WorldWideScience

Sample records for american democracies rethinking

  1. Rethinking Regulatory Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Cuellar, Mariano-Florentino

    2004-01-01

    This Article presents a critique of democratic participation in the modern administrative state, and provides an affirmative proposal for reforming public participation in shaping regulatory policy. According to several different strands of thinking about law and democracy, the legitimacy of the administrative state depends on the claim that it provides opportunities for public engagement as well as a mechanism for expert decisionmaking. A typical rulemaking proceeding lets experts make tec...

  2. Rethinking Democracy: an Interview with Zygmunt Bauman

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente Ordóñez Roig; Vicent Sanz Rozalén

    2013-01-01

    Zygmunt Bauman, professor of Sociology at the University of Leeds and, since 1990, emeritus professor, has developed key concepts for the understanding of fundamental issues of today’s world, such as liquid modernity, time, space and disorder, individualism versus community, globalization and consumer’s culture, love and identity, etc. His analyses of the links between modernity, Holocaust, democracy and social politics were the principal subject of the following interview, which was condu...

  3. Democracy and environment: Rethinking our educational priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodlad, Stephen John

    Two groups of scholars have recently pined prominence. Both are concerned about what is taught in America's schools and how it is taught. One group is focused on the need to strengthen a democracy they see as weakening and under attack. A second is concerned about an impending ecological catastrophe. These two concerns are often regarded as separate, unrelated, even conflicting. This paper argues that democracy and environmental issues actually have much in common; that both are fundamentally concerned with relationships and both are threatened in similar ways, for similar reasons. Moreover, if fully and property understood, these two crises can be recognized as mere symptoms of a much deeper crisis of modern, industrialized cultures, which are defined as vast, paradigmatic "super-cultures" that share enough in common that they can be seen as unique in their own right. To address this cultural crisis will require deliberate, widespread intervention. This intervention should begin in our public schools: first, because a major purpose of public education is enculturation. Second, educators have moral and ethical obligations that suggest that such intervention is justified, perhaps even imperative. If public education is to play a proactive role in our cultural evolution, sweeping curricular and pedagogical reforms will be necessary. Cultural issues cannot be separated from other aspects of a curriculum, or set aside as a separate discipline. Therefore fundamental curricular and pedagogical changes will need to be made throughout the entire educational system. Democracy (how we interact with one another) and environment (how we interact with the world around us) ought to form the foundational priorities on which all such reforms rest. An undertaking of this magnitude will encounter a great many obstacles. Some of the most prominent of those obstacles are assessed and serve as broad indicators of certain key areas in which reform efforts might be initiated. Finally

  4. RETHINKING LIBERAL DEMOCRACY: PRELUDE TO TOTALITARIANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel David

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the long course of human evolution and political experimentation, liberal democracy, especially after the events of 1989, has come to be seen as the best political system. In fact, we seemed to have reached the only system compatible with liberty, after the dreadful experiences of Communist and Nazi totalitarianism, and its twin in the economic realm - capitalism. But is liberalism really conducive to freedom? I argue that evil – or totalitarianism – arises from the combination of both the Platonic and Augustinian views: ignorance of values and the pursuit of one’s egotistic desires. Evil has an essentially private nature. In this sense, totalitarianism may arise from a utilitarian culture that sees people – or some forms of knowledge – as worthless and disposable objects.

  5. Rethinking Democracy: an Interview with Zygmunt Bauman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Ordóñez Roig

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 91 503 UNIVERSIDAD JAUME I 4 1 593 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-TRAD JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} Zygmunt Bauman, professor of Sociology at the University of Leeds and, since 1990, emeritus professor, has developed key concepts for the understanding of fundamental issues of today’s world, such as liquid modernity, time, space and disorder, individualism versus community, globalization and consumer’s culture, love and identity, etc. His analyses of the links between modernity, Holocaust, democracy and social politics were the principal subject of the following interview, which was conducted by Vicente Ordóñez and Vicent Sanz on the occasion of Zygmunt Bauman’s recent visit to Spain. 

  6. How to Assess American Democracy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim Daghrir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a framework to evaluate the functioning of American democracy and to suggest, accordingly, suitable reforms. Reform, literally, means to form again, to reshape and restructure, sometimes to return to basic values that had been lost and sometimes to pursue newly emerging ones. It implies an improvement over the status quo in pursuit of some objective, and it is the question of goals and objectives that raise problems. This article’s main findings suggest that there are seven general values or criteria by which government and the political process – and therefore reform proposals – are to be evaluated. Governmental institutions and processes above all must be (1 effective, implying that its actions must be determined by a process of (2 reasoned and fair deliberation and judgment and that its operations should be (3 efficient. At the same time, government must be controlled and limited, leading to the criteria that apply to the citizenry: (4 responsiveness, (5 representativeness, (6 accountability and (7 participation. Any government that meets these criteria is very likely to be perceived as fair and legitimate by the governed, and is likely to be safe and protect liberties.

  7. Rethinking the Thinking on Democracy in Education: What Are Educators Thinking (and Doing About Democracy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zyngier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines perspectives and perceptions of democracy of pre- and in-service teachers as well as teacher-education academics in Australia in order to develop a robust and critical democratic education. Using data from an on-line survey the paper presents the quantitative analyses, and the qualitative responses of contrasting understandings of democracy, citizenship and the role of education in the promotion and development of an active and thick democracy the paper critiques the neo-liberal (thin democratic discourse of contemporary Australian academic research that suggests that the Civics and Citizenship Education project only requires some augmentation highlighting issues like sustainability and globalization while ignoring social justice issues. It begins by outlining the concepts of thick and thin democracy, and revisits the state of civics and citizenship education (CCE in Australia. It is argued that while the pre-service teachers in this study may have a more critical and thicker understanding of democracy that is mirrored in the views of their teacher-education professors, the practicing teachers, on the other hand, have largely adopted the mainstream neo-liberal discourse, presenting a tendency to view democracy in a very narrow or thin way that may impact on their classroom practice. The paper concludes with recommendations related to what a thick democracy might actually look like in school education.

  8. Rethinking Native American Language Revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    As many linguists continue to work with and analyze First Nations/Native American languages, the consensus opinion usually direly predicts the loss of daily use for almost all of the extant Indigenous languages. Tremendous efforts are being expended for renewing, revitalizing, and restoring these languages to everyday use. The model upon which…

  9. Three Traditions of Democracy in Relation to American Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The type of college or university one values most depends, at least in part, upon which of three distinct traditions of democracy in relation to American higher education one espouses. In this article, the author identifies three distinct traditions of democracy in relation to American higher education and suggests that the type of college or…

  10. Saving American democracy: the lessons of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author's experience of serving with a presidential commission investigating the Three Mile Island nuclear accident leads to an observation that the only way to save American democracy is to change the fundamental decision-making process, at the Federal level, so that it can come to grips with the enormous and complex issues that face this nation

  11. Re-Thinking Normative Democracy and the Political Economy of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Normative thinking around democracy often emphasizes the supremacy of electoral politics, underplaying the salience of education as a defining feature to produce a more meaningful, engaged, inclusive form of democracy. Critical pedagogy can be an extremely useful, illuminating and transformative means and process of deconstructing how democracy is…

  12. Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    2013-01-01

    Digital democracy debate often has had more to do with the potential role of technology in alternative, idealized visions of deliberative or participatory democracy than with representative democratic practice as we know it. Real-world democracies are distinguished less by informed debate or active...... democratic theorists and much of the digital avant-garde are more interested in alternative visions than in existing realities. The result is that we may have spent more time discussing what digital technologies might mean for forms of democracy that do not exist than what digital technologies mean...... for democracies that do exist and that in many places today—despite global enthusiasm for the label “democracy”—face serious problems of legitimacy, efficiency, and institutional integrity....

  13. Re-Thinking Dewey's Democracy: Shifting from a Process of Participation to an Institution of Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    Dewey's definition of democracy from "Democracy and Education" (1916) is analysed and rethought through a path exploring a shift from a conception of participation as a process to one of association as an institution. Contributions to this pathway among others come from political philosophy and educational philosophy. The rationale for…

  14. Contentious Engagement: Understanding Protest Participation in Latin American Democracies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Wallace Moseley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Why has protest participation seemingly exploded across much of Latin America in recent years? How do individual- and country-level characteristics interact to explain the rise of contentious politics in countries like Argentina, Brazil, and Venezuela? I contend that the recent wave of protests in Latin America is the result of trends in community engagement and institutional development across the region’s young democracies. Specifically, I argue that low-quality institutions in democratic regimes push an increasingly large number of civically active Latin Americans toward more radical modes of political participation, as governments’ abilities to deliver on citizens’ expectations fail to match the capacity for mobilization of active democrats. Drawing on cross-national surveys of Latin America, I test this argument, finding that an interactive relationship between community engagement and ineffective political institutions helps explain the recent spike in protest activity in certain cases and the vast differences in protest participation observed throughout the region.

  15. Nihilism and the Roots of Crisis in American Democracy: A Diagnosis of Cornel West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jeliński

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cornel West’s diagnosis of the crisis of the American democracy is the subject matter of this article. Analyzing the condition of the American democracy of the end of XX and the beginning of XXI centuries, C. West focused on the individual, existential character of the crisis. The diagnosed state had according to him much affect not only on political issues, but first and foremost on the spread of nihilism among American citizens. Nihilism – is understood in the C. West as senselessness of life and low self-esteem is the subject matter of this article.

  16. To Restore American Democracy: Political Education and the Modern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    At a time when democracy in America suffers from a profound sense of cynicism, lack of trust, and disengagement, especially among young adults, this book is a much needed antidote. Here are original essays by some of the most distinguished and insightful political thinkers of our time. No armchair observers, they have advised presidents, been…

  17. Debate on Bruce Bimber´s Book Information and American Democracy. Cambridge University Press, 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpf, David

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Not availablePresentation José Manuel Robles Abstract of Information and American Democracy. Cambridge University Press, 2003 Bruce Bimber From Regimes to Ecologies: Globalizing Bruce Bimber’s Model of Information and Politics Steven Livingston Internet, new forms of power and democracy José Luís Garcia Internet: A Technological Tool and Changes in Political Power Liu Gang Information and American Democracy in the era of web 2.0 Lorenzo Mosca What Comes Next?: Bimber’s Information Revolutions and Institutional Disruptions David Karpf Online Political Information and Online Political Participation José Manuel Robles Digital Media and Political Change: A Response to Garcia, Karpf, Livingston, Liu, Mosca, and Robles Bruce Bimber

  18. The Democratic Gap. Transcultural Confrontations of German Immigrants and the Promise of American Democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehring, F.

    2014-01-01

    Why has the promise of American democracy been so persuasive to immigrants despite prejudice regarding cultural inferiority, a history of slavery and genocide, violations of human rights, media manipulations, and imperial self-righteousness? How can we analyze, understand, and evaluate the response

  19. Contested visions of American democracy: citizenship, public housing, and the international arena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argersinger, Jo Ann E

    2010-01-01

    This essay reexamines the history of public housing and the controversy it generated from the Great Depression to the Cold War. By recasting that history in the global arena, it demonstrates that the debate over public housing versus homeownership was also a debate over the meaning of American citizenship and democracy, pointing up starkly divergent notions about what was and was not American. Through an examination of national conflicts and neglected local struggles, this article further shows that the fight over public housing was far more meaningful and volatile than traditionally assumed. Both critics and advocates of public housing drew from international experiences and imagery in positioning the home as a constitutive feature of citizenship in American democracy. Fears of Bolshevism, fascism, and communism served to internationalize issues of race, space, and housing and together shaped the decision of whether a decent home was an American right or privilege.

  20. 78 FR 18455 - Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-07171... Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2013 By the President of the... strengthen the bonds between the birthplace of democracy and the world's oldest republic. We recognize...

  1. 77 FR 18897 - Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-7640 Filed 3-27-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... of Greek and American Democracy, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation... the world's first democracy and kindled a philosophical tradition that would stand the test of...

  2. 76 FR 17329 - Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ....) [FR Doc. 2011-7502 Filed 3-28-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... of Greek and American Democracy, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation One hundred ninety years ago, Greece regained its independence and became a symbol of democracy...

  3. Atomic-powered democracy: Policy against politics in the quest for American nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation focuses on the relationship of American nuclear energy to democracy. It examines whether the nuclear policy processes have furthered the legitimacy-government accountability and citizen participation-which the democratic institutes are based. Nuclear policy and its institutions have placed severe limitations on democratic practices. Contravened democracy is seen most clearly in the decoupling of policy from politics. Decoupling refers to the weakening of institutional linkages between citizens and government, and to the erosion of the norms that ground liberal democracy. Decoupling is manifested in policy centralization, procedural biases, technical rationality, and the spatial displacement of conflict. Decoupling has normative implications: While federal accountability was limited and citizen participation was shackled, other major groups enjoyed privileged access to policy making. The decoupling of nuclear policy from politics arose within the context of US liberal-democratic capitalism. The federal government pursued its own goals of defense and world leadership. Yet, it was not structurally autonomous from the hegemony of the political-economic context. Economically, the Atomic Energy Act did not permit federal agencies to directly invest in power plant construction, and did not authorize them to commercially generate electricity. Private industry was structurally placed to domesticate the atom. Politically, the liberal-democratic system hampered an unquestioning pursuit of atomic energy. Federal institutions have been forced to heed some of the anti-nuclear concerns. The pervasive influence of the US political economy on nuclear policy has come to transgress democracy. Nuclear power's growth faltered during the 1970s. The political and economic constraints on federal actions have limited the means available to revive a becalmed nuclear industry; this has exerted strong pressure on federal institutions to decouple policy from participation

  4. Atomic-powered democracy: Policy against politics in the quest for American nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the relationship of American nuclear energy to democracy. It examines whether the nuclear policy processes have furthered the legitimacy-government accountability and citizen participation-which the democratic institutes are based. Nuclear policy and its institutions have placed severe limitations on democratic practices. Contravened democracy is seen most clearly in the decoupling of policy from politics. Decoupling refers to the weakening of institutional linkages between citizens and government, and to the erosion of the norms that ground liberal democracy. Decoupling is manifested in policy centralization, procedural biases, technical rationality, and the spatial displacement of conflict. Decoupling has normative implications: While federal accountability was limited and citizen participation was shackled, other major groups enjoyed privileged access to policy making. The decoupling of nuclear policy from politics arose within the context of US liberal-democratic capitalism. The federal government pursued its own goals of defense and world leadership. Yet, it was not structurally autonomous from the hegemony of the political-economic context. Economically, the Atomic Energy Act did not permit federal agencies to directly invest in power plant construction, and did not authorize them to commercially generate electricity. Private industry was structurally placed to domesticate the atom. Politically, the liberal-democratic system hampered an unquestioning pursuit of atomic energy. Federal institutions have been forced to heed some of the anti-nuclear concerns. The pervasive influence of the US political economy on nuclear policy has come to transgress democracy. Nuclear power's growth faltered during the 1970s. The political and economic constraints on federal actions have limited the means available to revive a becalmed nuclear industry; this has exerted strong pressure on federal institutions to decouple policy from

  5. Macedonia: Illiberal Democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Abazi

    2014-01-01

    The recent presidential and early parliamentary elections in Macedonia are only one illustration of the country’s long-term political condition: illiberal democracy. What is needed is a re-think of the instruments and the manner in which major international actors could and should foster constitutio

  6. Homegrown Democracy, Homegrown Democrats

    OpenAIRE

    Denzin, Norman K.

    2005-01-01

    Written on the eve of the 2004 American presidential election, this political narrative offers a critical reading of two models of democracy: Instant-Mix imperial democracy (bring to a boil, add oil, then bomb), criticized by Arundhati Roy, and Garrison Keillor’s Homegrown Democrat. Keillor’s pastoral view of democracy is anchored in LakeWobegon, his imaginary utopian community. His homegrown democracy is narrow, provincial, and White. The author concludes that he must look elsewhere for his ...

  7. Bolivia: A Gasified Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Assies

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In October 2003 a wave of popular protest  brought down the Sánchez de Lozada government  in Bolivia. The intention to export natural gas to  the United States and Mexico triggered the protests, but actually stood for widespread discontent  with the Sánchez de Lozada government, the  preceding governments and the economic policies  pursued since 1985. The events belie the opinion  of various students of the Latin American democratic transitions who held that Bolivian democracy  was on its way towards consolidation and suggest that the recent inquiries into the quality of Latin  American democracies may point a way ahead in  rethinking democracy in the region. Taking such  assessments as a reference, this article reviews the  ‘gas war’ and looks at the Bolivian political regime as it has functioned over the past decades. It  will be argued that the ‘pacted democracy’, that  until now sustained institutionality, and the economic model adopted in 1985 have excluded an  important part of the population, both in political terms and where poverty alleviation and equity is  concerned. Increasing popular protest has been  met with increasing repression, which gradually  turned Bolivia into a ‘democradura’, or a ‘gasified  democracy’ that relies on teargas and bullets to  uphold itself. At present the country finds itself at  a crossroads. It either may reinvent democracy or  become an institutionalized ‘democradura’. Resumen: Bolivia: una democracia gasificadaEn octubre de 2003 una ola de protesta popular  llevó a la caída del gobierno de Sánchez de Lozada en Bolivia. La intención de exportar gas natural a los Estados Unidos y México gatilló dichas  protestas, aunque en realidad reflejaron un descontento general con el gobierno Sánchez de  Lozada, los gobiernos anteriores y las políticas  económicas implementadas desde 1985. Los  sucesos desmienten la opinión de varios analistas  de las

  8. The Reconstruction of Community College Vocational Education: A Vision for Renewing American Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Clifford P.; Wolgemuth, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to explain how central points developed in Dewey's 1916 "Democracy and Education" provide the rationale needed to adopt institutional and policy recommendations made by Grubb and Lazerson in their 2004 book, "The Education Gospel: The Economic Power of Schooling". Method: The central…

  9. American Liberation Mythologies: Democracy and Domination in U.S. Visual Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    A myth of liberation saturates the cultural landscape of the United States, structuring the collective consciousness, guiding political action, and disguising the nation's patterns of domination. This study grew out of a concern over the United States' engagement in two wars with the stated aims of liberation and the spread of democracy. Anthropological theories of myth assert a reciprocal relationship between political action and creative expression; through myths we reflect upon culture, in...

  10. Mitigated Democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doomen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Militant democracy is an attempt to defend democracy against totalitarian parties that would use democratic procedures to rise to power. This article is focused on the consistency of the concept of 'militant democracy'. I argue that what militant democracy defends is not the democratic procedure its

  11. Deliberative Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Møller

    Deliberative democracy is the current Buzz-word in contemporary democratic thinking. However deliberative democracy is deeply rooted in the republican tradition of democracy.  Nevertheless these democratic roots are often forgotten when researchers "jump on the bandwagon". This paper will shows how...... deliberation appear within the writing of five important political thinkers within the republican tradition of democracy. Secondly it will investigate the rise of deliberative democracy and explain why the deliberative turn suddenly occurred. However, first a brief general account of deliberative democracy...... is presented in order to outline the focus of deliberative democracy....

  12. Rewriting American Democracy: Language and Cultural (Dis)locations in Esmeralda Santiago and Julia Alvarez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultermandl, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about how two American authors of Latin-Caribbean descent, Esmeralda Santiago and Julia Alvarez, inscribe their native language into the discourse of American literature, contributing to a more diverse picture of what American culture is. Thus Alvarez's and Santiago's texts not only renegotiate ethnic immigrant experiences of…

  13. The impact of 1989 on theoretical perceptions of democracy

    OpenAIRE

    BLOKKER, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The revolutions of 1989 have predominantly been understood as the confirmation of Western, liberal democracy as the ultimate model of the modern polity. Here, it is however argued that there is more to 1989 than the mere collapse of the communist world as the direct alternative to Western modernity. 1989 has had subtle implications for rethinking democracy. 1989 should not be understood as merely marking the triumph of Western liberal democracy, but instead, it can be shown that the events of...

  14. 重思可能性--朱迪斯·巴特勒激进民主理论研究%Rethinking Possibility:On Judith Butler’s Radical Democracy Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉珏

    2015-01-01

    美国学者朱迪斯�巴特勒以其惊世骇俗的性别理论闻名于世,但在她近年的研究中,围绕“主体是如何形成的”这个问题展开思考,由性别问题,转向了以身体理论为中心的生命政治学,并经由对社会现实问题的思考,渐渐走向了更为广阔的激进民主政治。通过对规范暴力的批评,她试图通过文化翻译来拓展民主的边界,运用激进民主政治策略为边缘群体寻找社会意义上的承认。%In recent years,Judith Butler,an American scholar,has become famous for her shocking study on gender.After that,she focused on the question about “how the body formed”,and turned her study to bio-politics centering on body.She gradually becomes interested in radical democracy.This article shows how Butler uses her radical democracy political strategies to find solutions to survival problems of marginal groups.Through her criticism of normative violence,Butler tries to expand the boundary of democracy by cultural translation,and fight for the social acknowledgment of marginal groups.

  15. The Consumption of Democracy. The Ritual Politics of the Meal:American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting (San Diego). Ritual Assembly and the Dynamics of Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Buch-Hansen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    "Ritual Assembly and the Dynamics of Democracy." Abstract:Based on five ethnographic case studies, this panel presents different ways in which ritual acts and performances reveal and mobilize cultural resources and initiate changes to establish new conditions for democratization processes. The focus is on forms of ritual practice in which creative responses to global crises are triggered by the dynamics of political and economic stratification. The aim is to show people entering ritual activi...

  16. Muslim American University Students' Perceptions of Islam and Democracy: Deconstructing the Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Sarah; Collet, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The aftermath of 9/11 and the current surge of revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East have caused Muslim Americans to be either demonized or forgotten altogether, despite the significance of their everyday navigation of both Islamic and democratic values and unique efforts toward identity construction. The neglect of the Muslim American…

  17. Social democracy after the crisis in Europe and the crisis of social democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Martell, Luke

    2013-01-01

    There is a crisis of social democracy in terms of the prevalence of its ideas, policies and institutions. There is also a crisis in Europe, which is economic, political and social. This article discusses where social democracy could be going in the context of these crises. It argues that social democracy could rediscover some of its historical tenets and approaches in response to the problems in Europe. At the same time it can rethink its approach on issues such as work and migration, seeking...

  18. Direct Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beramendi, Virginia; Ellis, Andrew; Kaufman, Bruno;

    While many books on direct democracy have a regional or national approach, or simply focus on one of the many mechanisms associated with direct democracy, this Handbook delves into a global comparison of direct democracy mechanisms, including referendums, citizens' initiatives, agenda initiatives...... included as a chapter in the Handbook are possible measures for best practices of implementation, designed for those who wish to tailor direct democracy instruments to their specific needs. In order to further complement the best practices, a variety of global case studies detail the practical uses...... of direct democracy mechanisms in specific contexts. These country case studies allow for in depth discussion of particular issues, including signature collection and voter participation, campaign financing, media coverage, national variations in the usage of direct democracy procedures and national lessons...

  19. 浅析美国民主制度与大众传媒的关系%On the Relation between American Democracy System and Mass Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱莉

    2012-01-01

    美国的民主是本大书,不同的人会有不同的解读,所得到的结论也不尽相同。但是,我们似乎还不能就此确定,它是一种飘忽不定或者虚幻的"观念共同体"。政治学家对美国民主的规范或实证研究是在两个前提下进行的:一是宪法设计的三权分立与制衡、联邦主义制度框架;二是民主的政治文化。从政治传播学的角度认识美国民主,将研究定位在"国家与社会关系"这个大背景之下是非常必要的,因为传媒既是社会的一部分也是政治的一部分。当我们对民主的社会起源了然于心的时候,传媒与民主的关系也就显山露水了。%American democracy is a big book,different people have different readings,the results are also different.But,it seems that we are not sure yet,it is a kind of erratic or unreal "concepts" community.Political scientists to American democracy specification or empirical research is in two premise:one is the constitution of the system of the separation and design check,a federal socialist system framework;another is democratic political culture.From the point of view of political communication understanding American democracy,will research orientation in "relationship between state and society" under the background is very necessary,because the media is a part of society is also part of the political.When our democratic society origin going on in the heart,the relationship between the media and democracy is laughing group inside.

  20. Democracy Squared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Sæbø, Øystein

    2005-01-01

    On-line political communities, such as the Norwegian site Demokratitorget (Democracy Square), are often designed according to a set of un-reflected assumptions about the political interests of their potential members. In political science, democracy is not taken as given in this way, but can...... be represented by different models which characterize different relationships between politicians and the citizens they represent. This paper uses quantitative and qualitative content analysis to analyze the communication mediated by the Democracy Square discussion forum in the first ten months of its life....... In the quantitative analysis, citizens’ and politicians’ contributions are analyzed against four different democracy models: Consumer, Demo-Elitist, Neo-Republican and Cyber-Democratic. Whereas politicians’ contributions mainly reflected the Demo-Elitist model, citizens’ contributions tended to reflect the Neo...

  1. Reframing Democracy -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Reframing Democracy – intersectional and transnational challenges This presentation will explore the theoretical and normative challenges to reframe feminist approaches to democracy from intersectional and transnational perspectives and present empirical findings from EU research projects...... and transnational levels and to reframe feminist approaches to gender equality and justice. The intersectional challenges to democracy include debates about gender, class and ethnicity/race; about participation/ representation and redistribution; about politics and economics. The transnational challenges include...... debates about intersections of democracy within the nation state with supra-national EU and global governance.       Birte Siim is political scientist and Professor in Gender Research in the Social Sciences, Dept. of Culture and Global Studies, Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. Her publications...

  2. Media and Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Media and Democracy addresses key topics and themes in relation to democratic theory, media and technology, comparative media studies, media and history, and the evolution of media research. For example: How does TV entertainment contribute to the democratic life of society? Why are Americans less informed about politics and international affairs than Europeans? How should new communications technology and globalisation change our understanding of the democratic role of the media? ...

  3. Democracy and the Moral Imperative to Philosophize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphrey, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available An important part of Cornelius Castoriadis’ exploration into the adventure of modernity involves his reflections on democracy. Indeed, in no less than three works [Figures of the Thinkable, Rising Tide of Insignificancy (The Big Sleep, and World in Fragments], Castoriadis devotes a part, entitled Polis, in which he discusses democracy and its relation to modernity by beginning with the Greeks. In World in Fragments, the section, "The Greek and the Modern Political Imaginary" clearly indicates the relation existing between the ancient Greeks and democracy in his mind. In my paper, I have considered Castoriadis’ reflections on democracy and the way in which he employs the Greeks in his attempt to rethink modern democracies. I shall argue that if we are to follow Castoriadis in embracing an authentic emancipation promised by but not delivered by modernity, we will have to look to his understanding of democracy as providing the way beyond both the cynicism of post-modernism and false hopes of neo-modernism.

  4. TOCQUEVILLE'S VIEW ON AMERICAN DEMOCRACY%托克维尔论美国的民主

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠继红

    2012-01-01

    Alexis de Tocqueville holds that the democracy in America not only caused by the identity equality and the sovereignty of the people,but also is based on the township spirit and the public sentiment influenced by the spirit of Christianity.%托克维尔认为,美国民主的实现,既离不开身份平等和人民主权这样的制度保障,更离不开在乡镇自治精神和基督教精神熏陶下的民情等深层根基。

  5. Protecting Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Galster, Kjeld Hald. Doctoral Student (History). Saxo Institute. May 2007. Protecting Democracy: Danish Defence Debate in Times of Change. Supervisor: Professor, Dr. Gunner Lind. Democratic debate on defence and democratic organisation of the forces are as central to the life of a democr......ABSTRACT Galster, Kjeld Hald. Doctoral Student (History). Saxo Institute. May 2007. Protecting Democracy: Danish Defence Debate in Times of Change. Supervisor: Professor, Dr. Gunner Lind. Democratic debate on defence and democratic organisation of the forces are as central to the life....... The dissertation addresses two essential problems of the correlation of democracy, the debate, and the current defence policy. Firstly, is democratic society capable of pursuing constantly a defence policy reflecting the classic, realist logic, or does this happen only sporadically, because the debate is being.......d.-studerende (historie). Saxo-Instituttet, maj 2007. Protecting Democracy: Danish Defence Debate in Times of Change. Vejleder: Professor, dr. phil. Gunner Lind. En forsvarsdebat hvilende på demokratisk debat og en demokratisk indretning af forsvaret er lige så selvfølgeligt for den demokratiske stat som forsvar i det...

  6. Media democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Pels, D.

    2008-01-01

    The present article compendiously presents the interlinked and abruptly developing processes of media democracy and political matters’ personalization. The writer expressly opts for these processes which can radically rejuvenate communication and trust among citizens and politicians and therefore reinforce, up to a certain extend, modern democracy’s function itself.

  7. Rethinking maps

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob; Dodge, Martin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we argue that cartography is profitably conceived as a processual, rather than representational, science. Building on recent analysis concerning the philosophical underpinnings of cartography we question the ontological security of maps, contending that it is productive to rethink cartography as ontogenetic in nature; that is maps emerge through practices and have no secure ontological status. Drawing on the concepts of transduction and technicity we contend that ...

  8. Bodily Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

      Sport has gained increasing importance for welfare society. In this process, however, the term of ‘sport' has become less and less clear. Larger parts of what nowadays is called ‘sport for all' are non-competitive and derived from traditions of gymnastics, dance, festivity, games, outdoor activ...... to a philosophy of practice as well as to a phenomenological understanding of ‘the people', of civil society and the ‘demos' of democracy - as folk in movement....

  9. Does democracy reduce corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Ivar Kolstad; Arne Wiig

    2011-01-01

    While democracy is commonly believed to reduce corruption, there are obvious endogeneity problems in measuring the impact of democracy on corruption. This paper addresses the endogeneity of democracy by exploiting the common observation that democracies seldom go to war against each other. We instrument for democracy using a dummy variable reflecting whether a country has been at war with a democracy in the period 1946-2009, while controlling for the extent to which countries have been at war...

  10. Toward a ""Paideia" of the Soul": Education to Enrich America's Multicultural Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Melissa Leigh; Grant, Carl A.

    2012-01-01

    What role might education play in the reinvigoration of a robust American democracy? We argue that common understandings of democracy, citizenship, and democratic education are too anemic to right the political inequalities and stagnancies that have deadened American democracy. Instead, we look to notions of "paideia" and an educated, enlightened…

  11. Power, Democracy--and Democracy in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ken

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses questions of workplace democracy, particularly in relation to school education. Following Luciano Canfora in treating democracy as "the rule of the many", it traces the post-1945 rise of workplace democracy, and its post-1979 decline. Analysing the constitution of contemporary schooling in England, the article concludes that…

  12. Blackboxing democracy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina; Markussen, Randi

    2011-01-01

    , 2011). The 2000 presidential election presidential in the US—where Bush was announced as a winner in spite of the flaws that were detected in the system—reminds us of the devastating consequences that these technologies may have on our democracy. E-voting technologies are imagined as having...... and decontextualized visions are familiar to us from the field of healthcare IT, where similar rhetoric is echoed regarding the implementation of Electronic Patient Records (EPRs). In both fields, we find that some of the visions are disputed (e.g., saving costs and increasing efficiency). The great difference...

  13. The Phenomenology of Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Human beings originate votes, and democracy constitutes decisions. This is the essence of democracy. A phenomenological analysis of the vote and of the decision reveals for us the inherent strength of democracy and its deficiencies. Alexis de Tocqueville pioneered this form of enquiry into democracy and produced positive results from it.…

  14. Democracy and Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Bruno S.

    2010-01-01

    Self-determination in politics has become the ideal everybody accepts. This paper argues that such contentment undermines the very idea of democracy. Democracy should be open to criticism and change. Two possible developments are considered: (a) More political power should be given to the citizens. Direct democracy is the appropriate form of democracy for the 21st century. (b) Many innovations are possible in democracy. The focus is on the potential role of random mechanisms to secure t...

  15. Daily Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Karin; Giro, Francesca; Graham, Todd;

    Although the ubiquity of social media points to everyday concerns, when it comes to analysing its use by politicians research typically focuses on the exceptional, namely election campaigns. While this provides insight into a highly visible and strategically mediated phase of the political process...... for bottom-up reciprocity between politicians and citizens engaging with social media. We dicuss our findings in light of ongoing debates about postmodern politics and the empowering potential of new media. We argue that social media practices may foster new (more personal, intimate) forms of connectivity......, it ignores the communicative mundaneness of daily democracy. This paper accordingly in- vestigates and compares the ways in which members of parliament (MPs) in three European countries – Italy, Sweden and United Kingdom – utilize Twit- ter during off-peak periods, focusing on the extent to which social...

  16. Rethinking "Turner v. Keefe": The Parallel Mobilization of African-American and White Teachers in Tampa, Florida, 1936-1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    In 1941, members of the local unit of the Florida State Teachers Association (FSTA) met in Tampa to plan a lawsuit against Hillsborough County's school board for paying African-American teachers less than white teachers. Hilda Turner, who taught history and economics at Tampa's historically black high school, agreed to serve as plaintiff; she was…

  17. Contemporary theories of democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is two-fold: first, to analyze several contemporary theories of democracy, and secondly, to propose a theoretical framework for further investigations based on analyzed theories. The following four theories will be analyzed: pluralism, social choice theory, deliberative democracy and participatory democracy.

  18. Schooling for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2011-01-01

    There is a widespread movement today to prepare all students for college, and it is promoted in the name of democracy. I argue here that such a move actually puts our democracy at risk by forcing students into programs that do not interest them and depriving them of courses at which they might succeed. We risk losing the vision of democracy that…

  19. Cosmopolitan Democracy: A Restatement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibugi, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Can democracy be expanded beyond borders? For many years, it was taken for granted that the norms and values of democracy could be applied within the boundaries of a state only. But over the last 20 years, it has been increasingly argued that democracy can also inform international organizations and global politics. This article recapitulates the…

  20. Democracy and Education (1894)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Francis W.

    2013-01-01

    True education is the presentation of the conditions necessary for the evolution of personality into freedom. Democracy is the only form of government under which the methods of freedom can be fostered. The great central principle of democracy is mutual responsibility. Democracy in its essence gives to each individual the liberty of becoming free;…

  1. Reclaiming Deep Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrienne Brant

    2010-01-01

    The dawn of the 20th century sparked a world-wide movement to apply democracy in schools, courts, and families. Democracy is a cooperative culture which emerged from vast lands of North America at a time when the European continent was locked in hierarchical rule. Democracy was advocated by visionary youth work pioneers who discovered a better…

  2. Democracy and Historical Writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, we try to clarify the relationship between democracy and historical writing. The strategy is first exploring the general relationship between democracy and historical awareness, and then, studying the relationship between democracy and historical writing itself to find out whether dem

  3. Democracy and Sense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    Democracy and sense questions practically all that happens in society today. Its aim is to raise a debate on the most urgent problems of economy, democracy, sustainable conduct and the framework for industry and business. A number of untraditional solutions are suggested, but without support...... to either rightwing or leftwing politics. In fact, one of the key points is that political parties have reduced democracy to one day of voting followed by four years of oligarchy. To regain a functioning democracy we must strengthen direct democracy and make the distance between population and government...

  4. Democracy and Sense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    Democracy and sense questions practically all that happens in society today. Its aim is to raise a debate on the most urgent problems of economy, democracy, sustainable conduct and the framework for industry and business. A number of untraditional solutions are suggested, but without support to...... either rightwing or leftwing politics. In fact, one of the key points is that political parties have reduced democracy to one day of voting followed by four years of oligarchy. To regain a functioning democracy we must strengthen direct democracy and make the distance between population and government...

  5. Philosophy of democracy and Principles of Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Chovancová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As the title of suggests the article deals with the problems of democracy, its philosophy and also dominant principles. The author reflects interpretation of democracy on the society with their different understand.             Democracy represents a form of government, a way of political life where these principles are put into practice.             Democracy and its separate principles are expressed in the ultimate legal rules in the democratic countries. Principle of participation as a democratic principle rests with the fact that citizens have right to participate in state administration either directly or via their elected representatives. This principle also ensures that citizens participating in state administration enjoy equal basic rights and liberties and also guarantees that no person can be excluded from participation in state administration or from access to elected or other posts.             Methodology: In the article I using method of analyze - I analyzing dominant problems of democracy-its principles in democratic countries. Another method is comparation- understanding democracy from historical aspect. And the end I also using method of synthesis-explanation democracy understand today.

  6. Mapping Deviant Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A number of countries have emerged as stable (though minimalist) democracies despite low levels of modernization, lack of democratic neighbouring countries and other factors consistently related to democratic stability in the literature. The study of these deviant democracies is a promising new...... research field but it is afflicted by a notable problem, viz. the lack of a consensus as to which countries are actually instances of deviant democracy. The present article attempts to solve this problem by carrying out a comprehensive mapping of deviant democracies. First, I review the existing literature...... to provide an overview of the cases most often identified as deviant democracies. Second, I use a large-N analysis to systematically map deviant democracies. The analysis includes 159 countries covering the time period 1993–2008. The analysis points to 12 cases that merits further attention, viz...

  7. Democracy and identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milović Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It might be that the crisis of democracy is crisis of thinking. Modern metaphysics affirms the monologue of the subject with respect to the problem of rationality, as well as in the social realm. It thus affirms liberal egoism. Such metaphysics structures modernity as a monologue. Thus the question arises: how to think the democracy within this monologue? Democracy appears to be a modern project impossible to achieve.

  8. Democracy in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Kusmayati, Anne

    1994-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited There is a wide-spread adherence to democracy as a form of government. Since the development of the concept, many countries have defined and practiced democracy after necessary modifications based on respective national interests and political culture. So did Indonesia after it gained independence from the Dutch colony. Soekamo was the first president of the country. He developed and practiced parliamentary democracy and later 'guided ...

  9. Globalization and democracy

    OpenAIRE

    DEEPAK NAYYAR

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe gathering momentum of globalization in the world economy has coincided with the spread of political democracy across countries. Economies have become global. But politics remains national. This essay explores the relationship between globalization and democracy, which is neither linear nor characterized by structural rigidities. It seeks to analyze how globalization might constrain degrees of freedom for nation states and space for democratic politics, and how political democracy ...

  10. Globalization and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEEPAK NAYYAR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe gathering momentum of globalization in the world economy has coincided with the spread of political democracy across countries. Economies have become global. But politics remains national. This essay explores the relationship between globalization and democracy, which is neither linear nor characterized by structural rigidities. It seeks to analyze how globalization might constrain degrees of freedom for nation states and space for democratic politics, and how political democracy within countries might exercise some checks and balances on markets and globalization. The essential argument is that the relationship between globalization and democracy is dialectical and does not conform to ideological caricatures.

  11. The Happy Gardener: on populism, democracy and specters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián A. Melo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present text aims to retake several aspects and debates concerning the relation between populism and democracy. We will expound the main ideas by authors such as Margaret Canovan, Benjamín Arditi and Sebastián Barros in order to rethink the bonds between both terms. We will try not to take populism and democracy as antithetical poles in communitary political associations, since we are interested in pointing out how the ideas of shadow and specter have been crucial in the thought of these authors. Along with this reflection we seek to revisit several discursive keys of the experience of first Peronism in twentieth-century Argentina, just to investigate the ways in which the logic of Peronist populism rethought democracy and set it as a central element of the identity that it claimed to embody. Thus, we think that may be interesting not just to think populism as a specter of democracy but also to think democracy as a specter of populism.

  12. Dewey's Participatory Educational Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Višnovský, Emil; Zolcer, Štefan

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Emil Višnovský and Štefan Zolcer outline John Dewey's contribution to democratic theory as presented in his 1916 classic "Democracy and Education." The authors begin with a review of the general context of Dewey's conception of democracy, and then focus on particular democratic ideas and concepts as presented in…

  13. Dr. Dampe - Doctor Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    2009-01-01

    On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings......On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings...

  14. Democracy and Security

    OpenAIRE

    Lever, Annabelle

    2009-01-01

    This talk is concerned with the role of democracy in preventing terrorism, identifying and apprehending terrorists, and in minimising and alleviating the damage created by terrorism. Specifically, it considers the role of democracy as a resource, not simply a limitation, on counter-terrorism.

  15. Derrida, Democracy and Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Mansfield

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Democracy is usually identified with openness, order and pluralism and thus peace. Yet, everywhere, from the political convulsions that bring it into being to the wars that aim to extend it, democracy is violent. Usually this violence is seen as accidental or forced upon democracy. The aim of this paper is to argue that the violence of democracy springs from its inextricable if denied relationship to revolution, the drive to re-found the political order properly and definitively. Through a reading of Derrida’s account of the relationship between violence and justice in Walter Benjamin, violence is identified as the unstable founding moment which democracy must both pass through in order to emerge and also endlessly recall in its drive to both expand and complete its mission.

  16. Preface - rethinking structural reform in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen J. Kay; Michael J. Chriszt

    2004-01-01

    The process of structural reform in Latin America has thus far been uneven, and various economic crises have raised doubts about reforms’ effectiveness and have caused public support for further reforms to wane. To promote and highlight research exploring structural reform’s impact on economic growth and income distribution in Latin America, the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) cosponsored the conference “Rethinking Structural Reform in Latin Ameri...

  17. Nuclear waste vs. democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States the storage and disposal of high-level nuclear waste is a highly contentious issue because under current plans the public is subjected to unaccepted, involuntary risks. The proposed federal policy includes the forced siting of a repository and interim storage facilities in Nevada, and the transport of waste across the entire nation through large cities and within 2 mile of over 50 million people. At its destination in Nevada, the residents would face coexistence with a facility housing highly radioactive wastes that remain dangerous for many thousands of years. Scientific predictions about the performance and safety of these facilities is highly uncertain and the people foresee possibly catastrophic threats to their health, safety and economic well-being for generations to come. The public sees this currently proposed plan as one that seeks to maximise the profits of the commercial nuclear industry through imposing risk and sacrifice to communities who reap no benefit. And there is no evidence that this plan is actually a solution to the problem. The American public has never had the opportunity to participate in the nuclear waste debate and government plans are presented to people as being necessary and inevitable. To allow democracy into the decisions could be costly to the nuclear industry and it might thwart the government program, but that is the nature of democracy. If the utilities are established to provide a public service, and the government is founded on the principle of public representation, then the nuclear waste debate must conform to those requirements. What we see in this case is a continuing change of rule and law to accommodate a corporate power and the subrogation of national principle. The result of this situation has been that the public exercises its only option - which is obstructing the federal plan. Because the odds are so heavily stacked in favour of government and industry and average citizens have so little access

  18. The "American Factor" and Spanish American Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Meyer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available El "factor de América" y la democracia en América Latina. Las contradicciones entre la "poderosa" ideología democrática de los Estados Unidos y la realidad de la política de su poder comenzó a influir en América Latina hace más de un siglo, pero durante la guerra fría cuando esta contradicción tuvo repercusión global. La larga lucha de las antiguas colonias españolas en América para construir democracias estables aun necesitan superar obstáculos históricos y principalmente políticos, sociales y culturales de carácter interno. La hegemonía de Estados Unidos en la región favorecía, e incluso frustraban los esfuerzos de América latina por crear modernos y democráticos sistemas políticos "responsables". Tras la guerra fría el "factor americano" ha tenido cada vez menos influencia en el desarrollo político de la región, e incluso se debe considerar como una de las razones por las que ha sido más difícil el proceso de modernización de la política en América Latina.

  19. Corruption, democracy and bureaucracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviral Kumar TIWARI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relationship of corruption with democracy and bureaucracy in the 82 countries in a panel framework. For the analysis we use rule of law, regulatory quality, control over corruption and secondary school enrollment ratio as control variables. We find that democracy, rule of law and control over corruption decreases the level of corruption. When we allowed for interaction effect among independent variables we find the evidence of strong interaction effect between all of the explanatory variables. We also find that, surprisingly, higher democracy and rule of law are positively associated with the level of corruption while higher bureaucracy negatively.

  20. Designing For Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Thomsen, Signe Mårbjerg;

    2014-01-01

    n this paper we focus on ‘patient-democracy’ and ‘shared decision-making’ seen from the perspective of design practice and design research. In the research on democracy in healthcare it is rarely questioned what forms of democracy underlies these concepts. We have examined three different theories...... there are already a number of approaches available which in one way or the other address the relationship between design, democracy and power. We provide an account of participatory design, adversarial design and design activism thereby pointing towards design’s potential for re-distributing power and authority...... in healthcare. Positioning ourselves within design activism, we have set up a series of disruptive design experiments at a Danish Hospital. The aim of these experiments is to make inquiries into the hospital’s own conception of democracy and to use design activism to re-negotiate the roles and rights...

  1. Future generations in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2015-01-01

    This paper asks whether the genuine representation of future generations brings any added value that could not be achieved by institutions or procedures installed to supplement and support ordinary representative democracy. On this background, it reviews some arguments for genuine representation...... of future generations within current democracy. It is concluded that what really matters in terms of the democratic ideal is to ensure an impartial deliberation which takes the interests of all affected parties sufficiently into account....

  2. After racial democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Sérgio Alfredo Guimarães; Renato Rezende

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I trace a scenario that is becoming increasingly actual and close to Brazilians. In that scenario racial inequalities coexist with a popular state regime in which Black NGOs participate in the implementation of multicultural policies and racial democracy ceases to be a hegemonic discourse. We have acquired consciousness of the limitations of our democracy, of the multicultural nature of our national formation, and of our invidious system of racial inequalities, but we are not...

  3. Democracy in the Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The focus of China's grassroots democracy building has shifted from the countryside to urban areas. In recent years, many Chinese cities, including Beijing, have been actively exploring ways to realize democracy at the grassroots level. What is the driving force behind this campaign? What challenges does it face presently? How can it achieve new breakthroughs in the future? With these questions in mind, Beijing Review spoke with Li Fan, Director of the World and China Institute, a non-governmental think ...

  4. Democracy, Credibility, and Clientelism

    OpenAIRE

    Keefer, Philip; Vlaicu, Razvan

    2008-01-01

    Despite having adopted the political institutions of established democracies, democratizing countries display a systematically different pattern of fiscal outcomes. This article attributes these differences to the low credibility of electoral promises in new democracies. We study a model of electoral competition where candidates have two costly means to make themselves credible: spending resources to communicate directly with voters and exploiting preexisting patron-client networks. The costs...

  5. China's e-democracy in information age

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yigong

    2012-01-01

    E-democracy is a new type of democracy in Information Age. At first, the paper discusses the definitions of democracy and e-democracy, and then the paper analyzes the advantages and problems of E-democracy in China. Finally the paper investigates the future of e-democracy in China.

  6. Taiwan’s Democracy: Towards a Liberal Democracy or Authoritarianism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafydd J. Fell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how Taiwan moved from being viewed as a model Asian democracy to one allegedly suffering from democratic reversal. The reasons for the declining domestic and international reputation of Taiwan’s democracy are discussed. Lastly, some key political challenges facing Taiwan’s democracy are outlined.

  7. The basic concept for the democracy ranking of the quality of democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, David F. J.

    2008-01-01

    "The following paper presents the basic concept for the Democracy Ranking of the Quality of Democracy and positions this approach in context of academic discourses about democracy and the quality of democracy. Key dimensions of democracy are freedom, equality and control. Quality-of-democracy models commonly emphasize a democracy understanding that is broader than earlier concepts of primarily electoral democracies. Different global democracy and democratization measurement initiatives (Freed...

  8. Ethnic Diversity, Democracy, and Corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Etienne B. Yehoue

    2007-01-01

    I study the link between ethnic diversity, democracy, and corruption. In a static model, I show that contrary to conventional wisdom, corruption might emerge as a negative externality of democracy. This occurs through ethnicity, which appears as a rent-extracting technology in a democratic society. Extending the model into a dynamic framework, I find that this technology of extraction operates only at the early stage of democracy. Its impact tends to phase out as democracy matures. In other w...

  9. Multilingualism and Education for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biseth, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    This essay attempts to show the importance of linguistic issues in education for democracy and the close relationship between democracy and multilingualism. Increasingly nation-states are having to adapt to linguistic diversity within their borders and to recognize that democracy requires the participation of all citizens, including those…

  10. Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How oil undermines democracy, and our ability to address the environmental crisis. This book is a French translation of 'Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil' originally published by Verso Edition (New York, US, ISBN 978-1781681169). Oil is a curse, it is often said, that condemns the countries producing it to an existence defined by war, corruption and enormous inequality. Carbon Democracy tells a more complex story, arguing that no nation escapes the political consequences of our collective dependence on oil. It shapes the body politic both in regions such as the Middle East, which rely upon revenues from oil production, and in the places that have the greatest demand for energy. Timothy Mitchell begins with the history of coal power to tell a radical new story about the rise of democracy. Coal was a source of energy so open to disruption that oligarchies in the West became vulnerable for the first time to mass demands for democracy. In the mid-twentieth century, however, the development of cheap and abundant energy from oil, most notably from the Middle East, offered a means to reduce this vulnerability to democratic pressures. The abundance of oil made it possible for the first time in history to reorganize political life around the management of something now called 'the economy' and the promise of its infinite growth. The politics of the West became dependent on an undemocratic Middle East. In the twenty-first century, the oil-based forms of modern democratic politics have become unsustainable. Foreign intervention and military rule are faltering in the Middle East, while governments everywhere appear incapable of addressing the crises that threaten to end the age of carbon democracy-the disappearance of cheap energy and the carbon-fuelled collapse of the ecological order. In making the production of energy the central force shaping the democratic age, Carbon Democracy rethinks the history of energy, the politics of nature, the theory of

  11. Political exile and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis RONIGER

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Political exile is a mechanism of institutional exclusion geared at revoking citizenship rights and removing individuals from full participation in the political and public arenas of a country. Due to its exclusionary character, the literature tends to assume a correlation between authoritarianism and exile, on the one hand, and democracy and asylum, on the other. This work challenges this view and discusses the more complex interactions between exile and democracy. Relying on qualitative case analysis of individual and massive exile and on a quantitative database of presidential exile in the nineteenth and twentieth century, it shows that also democracies generate exile and that also authoritarian countries have provided sites of exile and asylum for those fleeing from their home countries.

  12. Local Democracy in Myanmar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyed, Helene Maria; Harrisson, Annika Pohl; McCarthy, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is undergoing a comprehensive political transition. In April this year the first democratically elected government in six decades came into power under the leadership of NLD, the pro-democracy party headed by Aung San Suu Kyi. The largest peace conference in the country’s history was held....... However, often overlooked in this larger picture of transition is the state of local democracy, including village level governance and everyday state-citizen engagements. Political changes at this level are equally crucial for the wider democratization process. This roundtable summary discusses the 2016...... local elections of village tract and urban ward administrators and reflects on the future of local democracy and decentralization in Myanmar. Local administrators are the primary point of contact between the state and citizens. How they are elected and how they govern in the everyday are essential...

  13. Evangelical Religion and Evangelical Democracy: Lincoln’s Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldfield

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Evangelical religion and evangelical democracy reinforced each other in nineteenth-century America. The spread of evangelical Christianity and democracy across a continent justified the wars against Native Americans and Mexico, and provided the moral framework for the fight against slavery which many Americans came to see as incompatible with Protestant Christianity and democratic government. The problem with mixing religion and politics in this manner was that political issues became moral issues and, therefore, more difficult to deal with in the political process.

  14. Democracy, caring and competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig; Johannesson, Eva Marianne; Purola, Anna-Maija;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how Nordic Early Childhood Education and Care policies frame values education in preschools with a special focus on the values of democracy, caring and competence. The study is part of a larger Nordic project, Valueseducation in Nordic preschools: Basis of...... the study. Keywords related with democratic, caring and competence values were selected. The findings reveal different dimensions and meanings of the three value fields, such as democracy as being and/or becoming; care as fulfilment of basic needs and an ethical relationship; and competence values as...

  15. A path to democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Kai; Feng, Huiyun

    2008-01-01

    and conservative groups inside the communist regime will shape the process of China's democratization; (2) the hope of China's political future lies in continued economic development, a mature civil society, and the building of democratic political culture in society; and (3) the current intra-party democracy...

  16. Mindfulness, Democracy, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Andrea Marie; LaPrad, James G.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explain how mindfulness can enhance a democratic way of being, connecting practices of awareness, reflection, dialog, and action to democratic citizenship and social arrangements. We begin by sharing our understanding of democracy as a philosophy and a political system. We then provide a background for the concept of…

  17. More democracy through plebiscite?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has the opinion, a plebiscite means only a limited enlargement of democracy. The plebiscite should be formed out as a right of veto, which prohibits concrete political measures of the government or legal projects (Kalkar, Wackersdorf). The winning of time to continue the discussion is an advantage. Finally a general change of consciousness is possible. (CW)

  18. The Project of Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyssar, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Presents historical background about the path to universal suffrage and voting rights for all U.S. citizens. Addresses reasons citizens do not use their right to vote. Asserts the importance of democracy and discusses this ideal. Includes questions for discussion. (CMK)

  19. Democracy against the odds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    together enable political parties to reach compromises important for regime stability. The framework is used to get a better understanding of four deviant democracies in two time periods, viz. India and Costa Rica during the Cold War and Mongolia and Ghana during the post-Cold War era. The analysis...

  20. More democracy, less politics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Josje den Ridder; Paul Dekker

    2015-01-01

    Original Title: Meer democratie, minder politiek?   Concerns about the functioning and future of democracy in the Netherlands can have a variety of causes. One such is the attitude of the demos: there is an assumption that political dissatisfaction is growing and that democratic engagement is in de

  1. From David Walker to President Obama: Tropes of the Founding Fathers in African American Discourses of Democracy, or The Legacy of Ishmael

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J. West

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available More than a century after the Emancipation Proclamation, in a society that still others blackness, we continue to hold to the mythical humanizing power of literacy. In our own time this has been poignantly evinced in the public reception of the current President of the United States, Barack Obama. He has been internationally hailed for his written and oral eloquence, and many Americans expected that Obama’s evident intellectual prowess would reverse prevailing stereotypes of black inferiority. Obama’s rhetorical success is rooted in the longstanding literary practice of invoking the mythical founding fathers to validate text and subject. In this regard, David Walker’s Appeal (1829 represents the emergence of a long tradition of black voices invoking America’s most sacred patriarchs and their rhetoric of Americanness.

  2. Rethinking Leninism: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Levant

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This special section on ‘Rethinking Leninism’ emerges from sessions organized at the Society for Socialist Studies’ Annual Meetings, held at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in May 2009 at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The articles re-consider Lenin’s legacy, suggesting new ways of understanding his political thought and the implications for political strategies on the left today.

  3. Rethinking Leninism: Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Levant

    2009-01-01

    This special section on ‘Rethinking Leninism’ emerges from sessions organized at the Society for Socialist Studies’ Annual Meetings, held at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in May 2009 at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The articles re-consider Lenin’s legacy, suggesting new ways of understanding his political thought and the implications for political strategies on the left today.

  4. Dissident writings as political theory on civil society and democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Glasius

    2012-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of precisely how civil society and its relation to democracy were conceptualised by its East European and South American proponents in their pre-democratic contexts, through an examination of declarations, newspaper articles, samizdat essays, diaries, letters from pri

  5. Rethinking Project Management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per

    2012-01-01

    has lived a somewhat quiet life in Denmark, which leads to the purpose of this chapter, which is to set the stage for rethinking project management in Denmark. The chapter is based on an empirical study within the Danish project management community and beyond where we discuss this rethinking process....... The chapter argues for a rethinking process due to pervasiveness and complexity in the contemporary project environment where rethinking is needed in order to stay competitive. The suggested approach for the rethinking project management is a framing process where body of ideas is established......Projects are everywhere across different sectors, industries and countries. Project management is no longer a sub-discipline of engineering and other rather technical disciplines but is also used for many other purposes. Even though practice has changed dramatically over the years, the models...

  6. Democracy and Women's Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Safaei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available New research on broader determinants of health has culminated into the new paradigm of social determinants of health. The fundamental view that underlies this new paradigm is that socioeconomic and political contexts in which people live have significant bearing upon their health and well-being. Unlike a wealth of research on socioeconomic determinants, few studies have focused on the role of political factors. Some of these studies examine the role of political determinants on health through their mediation with the labour environments and systems of welfare state. A few others study the relationship between polity regimes and population health more directly.However, none of them have a focus on women's health.This study explores the interactions, both direct and indirect, between democracy and women's health. In doing so, it identifies some of the main health vulnerabilities for women and explains, through a conceptual model, how democracy and respect for human rights interacts with women's health.

  7. Science, expertise, and democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Justin; Elliott, Kevin C

    2012-06-01

    The combination of government's significant involvement in science, science's significant effects on the public, and public ignorance (of both politics and science) raise important challenges for reconciling scientific expertise with democratic governance. Nevertheless, there have recently been a variety of encouraging efforts to make scientific activity more responsive to social values and to develop citizens' capacity to engage in more effective democratic governance of science. This essay introduces a special issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, "Science, Expertise, and Democracy," consisting of five papers that developed from the inaugural Three Rivers Philosophy conference held at the University of South Carolina in April 2011. The pieces range from a general analysis of the in-principle compatibility of scientific expertise and democracy to much more concrete studies of the intersection between scientific practices and democratic values in areas such as weight-of-evidence analysis, climate science, and studies of locally undesirable land uses.

  8. Democracy and development in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolu Lawal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Democracy and development are global phenomena. Every country in the world aspires and claims to be democratic. This is because of the role of the latter in developmental process. This paper examined the linkage between democracy and development in Nigeria, using ethics as the yardstick for democratic adherence. The paper adopted content analysis approach to source its data and concluded that democracy is an ingredient of development. It must therefore be sustained to evolve and ensure sustainable development.

  9. RIGHTS, RULES, AND DEMOCRACY

    OpenAIRE

    Richard S. Kay, University of Connecticut-School of Law, Estados Unidos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Democracy require protection of certain fundamental rights, but can we expect courts to follow rules? There seems little escape from the proposition that substantive constitutional review by an unelected judiciary is a presumptive abridgement of democratic decision-making. Once we have accepted the proposition that there exist human rights that ought to be protected, this should hardly surprise us. No one thinks courts are perfect translators of the rules invoked before them on ever...

  10. Islam and Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Edgard Weber

    1998-01-01

    Edgard Weber raises the issue of the societal statute given to an individual in different cultures. Evidently, an historic change has occurred. To illustrate this, he puts forth the case of the Muslim-Arabic culture, which grants the individual in society a statute different from that of other Western, Judaic-Christian cultures. The author centralizes his study on the concept of democracy and shows the distinctiveness of the Islamic conceptions of State and of the individual when compared to ...

  11. Direct Democracy in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Rodin, Siniša

    2001-01-01

    Author discusses forms of direct democracy envisaged by the Croatian Constitution of 1990 which defined Croatia as semi-presidential republic, before constitutional ammendment of 1997. Article describes normative regulation of referenda and speculates about reasons for their absence. One of the main reasons seems to be specific institutional framework and political consensus existing among the Parliament, the Government and the President of the Republic which is of dynamic nature. Referendum,...

  12. Mexico: prospects for democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Norton, Yvonne D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyze why Mexico has failed to democratize and offer recommendations for U.S. policy towards Mexico. The thesis examines the impact of three casual variables on the level of democracy in Mexico: civilian control of the military, the fairness of Mexico's political party system, and U.S. foreign policy towards Mexico. NA U.S. Navy (U.S.N.) author

  13. Democratic Quality in Stable Democracies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijphart, Arend

    2011-02-01

    The major predecessor to Ringen's and my own efforts to measure democratic quality in terms of the purpose of democracy is Robert Dahl's seminal book Polyarchy (1971). Measuring the quality of democracy requires two prior judgments: (1) making sure that, in terms of institutional characteristics, a country is sufficiently democratic, and that, as a minimum, it has universal suffrage, and (2) that its democracy has been uninterrupted for a minimum number of years. To an important extent, higher democratic quality can be attributed to institutional characteristics of consensus democracy, especially proportional representation. PMID:21258634

  14. Study on the Output of American Democracy and the Security of Ideology in China from the Perspective of Soft Power%软实力视域下美国民主输出与我国意识形态安全研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李翠亭; 崔章; 李杨; 孟秋菊

    2016-01-01

    Though the United States regards liberal democracy as the source of its soft power, its practice of promoting democracy abroad has contributed to the decline of its soft power. America's motive behind exporting democracy is pursuing its national interests. Inconsistent standards make America's espousal of democratic principles appear both hypocritical and contradictory. The harm of America's exporting democracy has been made self-evident by the ongoing surge of refugees into Europe from the war-ravaged countries such as Iraq and Syria. Such a huge harm and the"halo"of the universalism of American democracy form the paradox of America's soft power. Exporting democracy is America's diplomatic strategy which is threatening the ideological security of the developing countries. College students are prone to the negative influence of Western ideology. Therefore, the ideological defense line must be strengthened in our colleges.%尽管美国视民主为其软实力的源泉,但美国向外推广民主的实践却导致了美国软实力的衰退。美国向世界输出民主的动机在于追求国家利益。“标准不一”暴露出美国对于民主原则的支持既虚伪又矛盾。从伊拉克、叙利亚等饱受战争蹂躏的国家涌入欧洲的难民大潮明证了美国民主输出的危害性。巨大的危害性和美式民主普世性的“光环”构成了软实力视域下美国民主输出的悖论。民主输出是美国的外交战略,威胁着发展中国家的意识形态安全。高校学生易受西方意识形态的负面影响,我国高校必须采取有效措施筑牢意识形态安全防线。

  15. Elementary Students' Metaphors for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to reveal elementary 8th grade students' opinions concerning democracy with the aid of metaphors. The students were asked to produce metaphors about the concept of democracy. 140 students from 3 public schools in Ankara (Turkey) participated in the research. 55% of the students were females and 45% were males. The…

  16. Community, Democracy, and Neighborhood News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Elizabeth Blanks

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on democracy, community, and journalism by examining the interplay between communication, democracy, and community at an inner-city neighborhood newspaper. Concludes that, through its focus on neighborhood culture, acknowledgment of conflict, and attempts to provide a forum for the neighborhood's self-definition, the…

  17. Music Education and Deliberative Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladh, Stephan; Heimonen, Marja

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the influence of democracy and law on music education in Sweden and Finland, and the potential for music education as training in democracy. The latter consideration can be instructive regardless of the nation, or its laws and paradigms of music education. The theoretical background is based on Jurgen Habermas'…

  18. Mathematics Education and Democracy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Ömer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Democracy is a most accepted form of government system and has a great importance for citizens by allowing them equal and active participation in common life. As its development and characteristics are important for all citizens of a country, each democratic country puts much emphasis on democracy education in its educational curricula. In recent…

  19. p-Brane Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    The ten or eleven dimensional origin of central charges in the N=4 or N=8 supersymmetry algebra in four dimensions is reviewed: while some have a standard Kaluza-Klein interpretation as momenta in compact dimensions, most arise from $p$-form charges in the higher-dimensional supersymmetry algebra that are carried by $p$-brane `solitons'. Although $p=1$ is singled out by superstring perturbation theory, U-duality of N=8 superstring compactifications implies a complete `$p$-brane democracy' of ...

  20. The atom and democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzing the relations established between public opinion and nuclear energy, it is considered that it will be impossible to develop the use of this type of energy without the approval of the citizens. This approval, which assumes that the definition of the energetic choices is not seized by 'technicians' whatever their authority, is a basic condition for democracy. It involves a huge informational and public education effort so that everyone is able to have an objective opinion on a type of energy which now rises more passioned than reasoned reactions

  1. Romanian Democracy, Theory and Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romulus Brâncoveanu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This is a comment on the type of democracy in Romania, as illiberal democracy. Given the Romanian democratization process, we can hope that, in the future, all populisms and politicization will cease, and a true liberal and constitutional democracy will be installed, which will not be a „Romanian democracy” as Paul Wolfowitz suggested to be exported in Iraq. The question is whether it is good or not to „export” such a political model. „Romanian democracy” could be an exporting model only as an alternative to dictatorship and under the assumption that it will be adjusted in time, under the external pressure.

  2. Power and democracy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Goul; Jørgensen, Torben Beck; Valgårda, Signild

    In 1997, the Danish Parliament decided to launch a power study, officially An Analysis of Democracy and Power in Denmark. A steering committee consisting of five independent researchers was assigned responsibility for the project. The Steering Committee has gathered the overall conclusions from...... the numerous projects under the Power Study, and this book is a short presentation of these conclusions.The main focus of the book is the state of democracy in Denmark at the dawn of the 21st century. How has democracy fared, has the development made things better or worse, and to which extent does...

  3. Rethinking Medicare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, T; Oberlander, J

    1998-01-01

    Many health policy analysts argue that demographic pressures, the inflationary nature of fee-for-service payment, and the uncontrollable nature of defined-benefit insurance make Medicare unsustainable in its current form. They assert that Medicare can remain fiscally viable in the next century only by embracing a voucher system and exposing beneficiaries to the economic consequences of their medical care decisions. We argue here, however, that Medicare need not rely on vouchers or on placing financial incentives on individual beneficiaries to control costs. Instead, we contend that Medicare can control expenditures the way most other industrial democracies do: through budgetary caps and centralized regulation of provider payments.

  4. Rethinking Journalism Again

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . But does rehashing such familiar rationales bring journalism studies forward? Does it contribute to ongoing discussions surrounding journalism’s viability going forth? For all their seeming self-evidence, this book considers what bearing these old platitudes have in the new digital era. It asks whether......It’s easy to make a rhetorical case for the value of journalism. Because, it is a necessary precondition for democracy; it speaks to the people and for the people; it informs citizens and enables them to make rational decisions; it functions as their watchdog on government and other powers that be...

  5. Democracy as Dictatorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Perez Soto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I propose a radical demystification of the perceived image of Augusto Pinochet Ugarte’s Chilean dictatorship as a period of uniform terror that suffocated all popular contestation. Based on the differentiation of repressive styles and the popular responses to them, I propose that this perceived image has been artificially constructed in order to hide the historical continuity between Pinochet’s dictatorship and the current democratic regime. I relate this historic reconstruction to a more general thesis: I argue that there is an essential continuity between both political periods ruled by the deep dictatorial character of so-called current democratic regimes. To conclude I highlight the dictatorial mechanisms of current democracies as well as the political tasks that would allow for a progressive opposition to these same mechanisms.

  6. Islam and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Weber

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Edgard Weber raises the issue of the societal statute given to an individual in different cultures. Evidently, an historic change has occurred. To illustrate this, he puts forth the case of the Muslim-Arabic culture, which grants the individual in society a statute different from that of other Western, Judaic-Christian cultures. The author centralizes his study on the concept of democracy and shows the distinctiveness of the Islamic conceptions of State and of the individual when compared to the West’s. Plainly, it would be erroneousto affirm the superiority of one system over the other. Rather, the issue is, before anything else, a matter of comprehending the function each system fulfills, of understanding how both may begin the next century in better conditions, and of seeing how these realizations may lead mankind towards a more universal dimension that banishes the demons of racism, exclusion, and war.

  7. Rethinking e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jørgen; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2006-01-01

    “Technology alone does not deliver educational success. It only becomes valuable in education if learners and teachers can do something useful with it” (E-Learning: The Partnership Challenge, 2001, p. 24). This quotation could be used as a bon mot for this chapter. Our main goal is to rethink e-learning...... by shifting the focus of attention from learning resources (learning objects) to learning activities, which also implies a refocusing of the pedagogical discussion of the learning process.Firstly, we try to identify why e-learning has not been able to deliver the educational results as expected five years ago....... Secondly, we discuss the relation between learning objectives, learning resources and learning activities in an attempt to develop a consistent theoretical framework for learning as an active collaborative process, which bears social and cultural relevance for the student. Finally, we specify our concept...

  8. Democracy is a historical urgency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synek, Miroslav

    2015-03-01

    Survival of humanity, on this planet, may depend, heavily, on coping with advancing technology of nuclear missiles. Let us consider critical alternatives of powerful governments: democracy, as an alternative to dictatorship. Democracy is based on free elections, as a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Democracy is a historical urgency, in the age of inter-continental nuclear missiles, computerized on a push-button, conceivably controllable by a very powerful, miscalculating and/or insane, dictator, capable of producing global nuclear holocaust, on our entire planet. Diplomacy, together with supporting activities, should be utilized, to help, in important steps, at this time, for achieving democracy in critical areas.

  9. Inventions and developments of democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    In traditional approaches to the history of political ideas, the history of democracy is uniformly studied concerning the point of departure, selection of canonical texts, etc. The paper introduces the Koselleckian conceptual history approach (Begriffsgeschichte) and the principle of a broader se...... selection of texts than in the traditional history of ideas to provide a fuller account of usages of the concept, thereby opening up for alternative conceptions of the inventions and development of democracy....

  10. Elites, power sources and democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Yetkin, Deniz

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is about elites in general, and the acquisition and maintenance of power in particular. The last concern of the thesis is democracy. For this reason, the classical elite theorists’ and the democratic elite theorists’ perceptions of the elite were critically analyzed. Moreover, power for becoming a part of the elites and power of the elites were discussed. In addition to these discussions, ideas of classical and democratic elite theorists about the possibility of democracy under el...

  11. Discussing the Prospects of European Democracy with Alexis de Tocqueville

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Eidukienė

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the concept of democracy proposed by Alexis de Tocqueville, a famous French historian and sociologist. Special attention is paid to the definition of democracy, the dialectics of freedom and equality as well as the issues of relationship between democracy and centralization of power, democracy and individualism, and democracy and the tyranny of the majority. Tocqueville‘s liberal theory is an excellent example of the political project of the early modern period; it was in step with or, in many cases, ahead of France‘s political evolution, thereby contributing to the formation of the intellectual climate of the later 20th century. More than that, Tocqueville‘s political thought remains relevant even today. He is valued as an innovator, who, as Zbigniew Brzezinski put it, „understood earlier and interpreted better than anyone the uniqueness of the American experiment... His judgements are to this day remarkably prescient and incisive“ (Brzezinski 2011. Consequently, Tocqueville‘s book Democracy in America is a text that is worth being reread. In each political period the readers of this text rediscover anew the meaning of the messages communicated by the author. This depends on the political consciousness, political culture and the „quality“ of the recipients, i.e. on their ability to process and adapt the received information to their times, their state, their specific situation or a specific subject. Tocqueville invites his readers to engage in communicative reading (i.e. dialogue and discussions, which is an important part of modern political communication and political practice. It is also one of the most important attributes of politics and a reliable instrument that makes it easier to form modern political theories and solve political problems. 

  12. Deweyan Democracy: The Epistemic Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jón Olafsson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available John Dewey famously argued that we should think of democracy as a “way of life”. What this consists in he described as participating according to capacity in public decisions and participating according to need or desire in forming values. He also characterized democracy as “a mode of associated living, of conjoint communicated experience” (Dewey 1966 p. 87; 1954 p. 147; 1957 p. 209. Such and other passages in Dewey’s works show that his conception of democracy is complex. He did not think of it simply as a way of decision-making, nor is democratic procedure of particular importance to him. Concepts such as “associated living” or “communicated experience” point to the social dimensions Dewey was particularly interested in. Dewey also repeatedly claims that democracy demands “social return” from every individual and that democracy enables everyone to develop “distinct capacities” (Dewey 1966, p. 122. A related claim emphasizes how, in a democracy, “all share in useful service and enjoy a worthy leisure” (Dewey 1966, p. 256.

  13. Quality of democracy in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. LEVINE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions of democracy in contemporary Venezuela lack a settled definition of the subject, how to study it, or indeed of what counts as «democracy» in the first place. The regime has been described as everything from participatory democracy, hybrid, mixed, and personalist to populist, illiberal, or no longer democratic but rather competitive authoritarian. The goal of this article is to measure the quality of democracy in Venezuela, within the terms of a procedural concept of democracy as detailed in our earlier work. Empirical measurement of the quality of democracy on five dimensions (electoral choice, participation, responsiveness, accountability, sovereignty reveals a low level overall and deep institutional weakness under a personalist leadership, with little change from 2005 to 2010. Future scenarios, after the 2012 presidential election result, include reinforcement of authoritarian trends, open militarization, liberalization and institutional strengthening, or long term volatility and polarized conflict. All scenarios are contingent on the health of President Chávez, who is a central unifying factor for his movement and regime

  14. Rethinking macroeconomic policies for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Nayyar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The global economic crisis has created an opportunity to rethink macroeconomics for development. Such rethinking is both necessary and desirable. It is essential to redefine macroeconomic objectives so that the emphasis is on fostering employment creation and supporting economic growth instead of the focus on price stability alone. It is just as important to rethink macroeconomic policies which cannot simply be used for the management of inflation and the elimination of macroeconomic imbalances, since fiscal and monetary policies are powerful and versatile instruments in the pursuit of development objectives. In doing so, it is essential to the overcome the constraints embedded in orthodox economic thinking and recognize the constraints implicit in the politics of ideology and interests.

  15. Exportação de democracia na política externa norte-americana no pós-Guerra-Fria: doutrinas e o uso da força Exporting of democracy in American foreign policy in the post-Cold War period: the doctrine and the use of force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena de Castro Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa os pilares da política externa americana no pós-guerra fria, mirando o lugar que ai ocupa democracia e sua relação com segurança. Busca-se mais especificamente as bases da doutrina da política externa que justificam a exportação de democracia pelo uso da força. Utilizou-se a análise de conteúdo quantitativa e qualitativa de 415 discursos dos Presidentes e Secretários de Estado entre 1989 e 2008.The article analyses the pillars of the American foreign policy in the post-cold war period, focusing on the importance democracy vis-à-vis security plays in it as well as their relationship. More specifically the work aims to define the bases of the doctrine of the foreign policy that justify exporting democracy by the use of force. It was used quantitative and qualitative content analysis of 414 speeches of the Presidents and Secretaries of States in the period 1989-2008.

  16. Property, Propriety and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Devenney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The redefinition of rights of equality and liberty by radical and deliberative democrats during the last decades of the 20th century resulted in the denial that a consideration of property is integral to political philosophy. Theorizing property as intrinsically political demands a return to Marx but on terms he may not have recognized. I outline a politics of property in this paper contending that there can be no universal justification for any regime of property. Property is by definition the institution of a wrong. The articulation of something as property establishes a border, determining what can be owned, how far ownership extends, where it is limited, as well as terms of use and terms of abuse. It establishes a set of property relations, and defines a vocabulary of the proper. Here sovereign state power is enlisted to enforce relations of property beneficial to some, but not all. A challenge to any political regime must of necessity put in to question both the forms of proper behaviour, and the regime of property. These are intrinsically related to each other. I conclude by arguing that democracy is always improper. Property, in all of its forms entails enclosure. Enclosure requires the drawing and the maintenance of boundaries of exclusion and inclusion. The sovereign determination of the proper, as well as of the exception to the proper defines trespass. Trespass is a form of democratic enactment when, and if, it destabilises enclosure.

  17. John Whitridge Williams' contribution to democracy abroad. (The fetus treated as a patient).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasicka, A

    1999-04-01

    The idealism of American pioneers was a driving force in the development of science, democracy, and sociology in the United States. It also served as a model for the development of new democracies abroad. The first American grafted democracy was established in Czechoslovakia in 1918, under Thomas Garrigue Masaryk as President. As a former professor of philosophy, at Charles University in Prague, he built the foundation of Czechoslovakian democracy on the historical principles of Jan Hus' search for the truth (1415), Jan Amos Komensky's use of Science and Humanism (1630), and on the values of American democracy as he conceived it from multiple visits to the United States and from the practical philosophy of his American wife. His major educational means was the use of science. He became a founder of political science. As president he recognized, that democracy, as a state form, does not educate people, they educate themselves through family, school, church, physician and life experience. In the last quarter of the nineteenth century, on the eve of the opening of John Hopkin's University Hospital, a young American scientist by the name John Whitridge Williams came to Prague, Vienna, and other Europeans cities for the purpose of studying scientific obstetrics. He believed in the power of the truth in the power of the truth equally as Masaryk did and used science uncompromisingly in his speciality. He became the founder of American scientific obstetrics. He was shy of political science and ethnic problems. There was no personal connection between Masaryk and Williams. In 1903, John Whitridge Williams published his review of European and American obstetrics: he abolished the craft of obstetrics and worked the science of physiology and pathology into the practice of obstetrics. For Czechoslovaks the political democracy coming out of America through Masaryk was attractive, but of particular interest was native and personal democracy of Americans as a way of life. John

  18. Rethinking language in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterponi, Laura; de Kirby, Kenton; Shankey, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we invite a rethinking of traditional perspectives of language in autism. We advocate a theoretical reappraisal that offers a corrective to the dominant and largely tacitly held view that language, in its essence, is a referential system and a reflection of the individual's cognition. Drawing on scholarship in Conversation Analysis and linguistic anthropology, we present a multidimensional view of language, showing how it also functions as interactional accomplishment, social action, and mode of experience. From such a multidimensional perspective, we revisit data presented by other researchers that include instances of prototypical features of autistic speech, giving them a somewhat different-at times complementary, at times alternative-interpretation. In doing so, we demonstrate that there is much at stake in the view of language that we as researchers bring to our analysis of autistic speech. Ultimately, we argue that adopting a multidimensional view of language has wide ranging implications, deepening our understanding of autism's core features and developmental trajectory. PMID:24916453

  19. What's Democracy Got to Do with Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    What's democracy got to do with teaching? To answer this question, the author recollects the personal experiences through which she came to understand the connections between democracy and teaching. Sustaining democracy requires its citizens--teachers, parents, and students, in the case of schooling--to fight for it intelligently. The way teachers…

  20. Democracy and Teacher Education: Setting Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jesse H.

    2009-01-01

    As John Dewey noted in his last book, each generation, in its turn, must assume responsibility as caretaker of democracy. He noted that one should never take democracy for granted. Everyone lives in an imperfect democracy, and teacher educators should play their part in protecting, nurturing, and advancing democratic ideals, rituals, values, and…

  1. Practicing Democracy in the NCLB Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Margaret H.

    2010-01-01

    The practice of teaching democracy in school is diminishing. The implementation of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has forced teachers to teach to the test, and has required some to follow scripted curriculum, leaving little time or incentive for teaching democracy. This study examines the importance of practicing democracy and identifies ways in…

  2. Satisfaction with democracy: do institutions matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Kees; Thomassen, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people in consensual democracies with a proportional electoral system are more satisfied with the functioning of democracy in their country than people in majoritarian democracies. We assess to what extent this relationship can be explained by people's perception of

  3. Deliberative Democracy and Adult Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcasson, Martin; Sprain, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Adult education programs should turn to the deliberative democracy movement in order to help their communities better address the "wicked problems" they face. The authors contend that due to the "wicked" nature of problems in the diverse democracies, communities must develop and sustain their capacity for deliberative democracy and collaborative…

  4. The Myth of Bourgeois Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvad, Andreas Christian Møller; Stahl, Rune Møller

    power under a legislative body, with regular elections and universal suffrage – was everywhere a result of the pressure of social movements from below against the aspirations of both conservatives and liberals. Second, we reread Marx on the Paris Commune to discover how Marx wanted to radicalize...... representative democracy - not abolish it. Third, we highlight how Leninists and liberals have unknowingly colluded to sustain the myth that parliamentary democracy is essentially liberal. Finally, turning our attention to the current neoliberal conjuncture, we argue that Badiou’s and Žižek’s notion...... of a structural complicity between capitalism and parliamentary democracy, while problematic even when applied to the Fordist epoch, is today becoming increasingly counterproductive for the Left. In a situation when popular control over states is gradually being eroded by emerging ‘authoritarian neoliberal...

  5. Does the Digital Age Require New Models of Democracy? – Lasswell’s Policy Scientist of Democracy vs. Liquid Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorius, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    This essay provides a debate about Lasswell’s policy scientist of democracy (PSOD, 1948) in comparison to the model of liquid democracy (21st century) based on the question if the digital age requires new models of democracy. The PSOD of Lasswell, a disciplinary persona, is in favour of an elitist approach to democracy including elite decision-making, as well as the values of wealth and power. Liquid democracy, on the other hand, emerged from the notion that the Internet provides a vast amoun...

  6. Rethinking Popular Culture and Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Elizabeth, Ed.; Sensoy, Ozlem, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Rethinking Popular Culture and Media" is a provocative collection of articles that begins with the idea that the "popular" in classrooms and in the everyday lives of teachers and students is fundamentally political. This anthology includes outstanding articles by elementary and secondary public school teachers, scholars, and activists who…

  7. E-democracy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Jens Villiam

    Already in the 1970's and -80's high hopes for democracy were connected with the rise of technologies like cableTV and digital telephones. This outburst of 'utopian energy' was greatly accelerated with the breakthrough of the Internet in the beginning/middle of the 1990's, and both politicians......, ITdevelopers and many academics depicted the new technologies as almost automatically leading to a new 'golden age of democracy' with increased political participation, better informed and resourceful citizens, better and more transparent political  ...

  8. The Western Way? Democracy and the Media Assistance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daire Higgins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available International media assistance took off during a time where the ideological extremes of USA vs. USSR were set to disappear. Following the Cold War, international relations focused on democracy building, and nurturing independent media was embraced as a key part of this strategy. Fukayama called it the ‘End of History’, the fact that all other ideologies had fallen and Western style democracy was set to become the one common ideology. The US and UK led the way in media assistance, with their liberal ideas of a free press, bolstered by free market capitalism. America was the superpower, and forged the way around the globe with its beacon of democracy. Under that guiding light they would bring truth, accuracy, freedom of expression and independent reporting to the countries which had so long lived under the shadow of communism, or authoritarian media systems. This is what propelled and justified American foreign policy, and their media assistance, for many years. Much work was thus carried out in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet satellites, but many now question the impact and legacy of these projects. When the US and UK spoke of media assistance they seemed to mean ‘free market’. These days, the ‘democracy promoters’ focus has turned more to Africa and the Middle East. The ideology is apparently the same: to help establish and support democracy with a stronger and more independent media. But with Western economies, and their media systems, in crisis, the relevance of this media assistance model is questioned. This essay looks at the history of media assistance and the ongoing debate on the impact of media assistance over the long term, its motives and the new balance of power appearing in international media development.

  9. A Tragedy of Democracy: Japanese Confinement in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Robinson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available

    The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Greg Robinson not only offers a bold new understanding of these events but also studies them within a larger time frame and from a transnational perspective. Drawing on newly discovered material, Robinson provides a backstory of confinement that reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights struggles, the long movement by former camp inmates for redress, and the continuing role of the camps as touchstones for nationwide commemoration and debate. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside events in wartime Hawaii, where fears of Japanese Americans justified Army dictatorship, suspension of the Constitution, and the imposition of military tribunals. He similarly reads the treatment of Japanese Americans against Canada's confinement of 22,000 citizens and residents of Japanese ancestry from British Columbia. A Tragedy of Democracy recounts the expulsion of almost 5,000 Japanese from Mexico's Pacific Coast and the poignant story of the Japanese Latin Americans who were kidnapped from their homes and interned in the United States. Approaching Japanese confinement as a continental and international phenomenon, Robinson offers a truly kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes.

  10. A Tragedy of Democracy: Japanese Confinement in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Robinson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Greg Robinson not only offers a bold new understanding of these events but also studies them within a larger time frame and from a transnational perspective. Drawing on newly discovered material, Robinson provides a backstory of confinement that reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights struggles, the long movement by former camp inmates for redress, and the continuing role of the camps as touchstones for nationwide commemoration and debate. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside events in wartime Hawaii, where fears of Japanese Americans justified Army dictatorship, suspension of the Constitution, and the imposition of military tribunals. He similarly reads the treatment of Japanese Americans against Canada's confinement of 22,000 citizens and residents of Japanese ancestry from British Columbia. A Tragedy of Democracy recounts the expulsion of almost 5,000 Japanese from Mexico's Pacific Coast and the poignant story of the Japanese Latin Americans who were kidnapped from their homes and interned in the United States. Approaching Japanese confinement as a continental and international phenomenon, Robinson offers a truly kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes.

  11. Flavor Democracy in Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sultansoy, S

    2007-01-01

    The flavor democracy hypothesis was introduced in seventies taking in mind three Standard Model (SM) families. Later, this idea was disfavored by the large value of the t-quark mass. In nineties the hypothesis was revisited assuming that extra SM families exist. According to flavor democracy the fourth SM family should exist and there are serious arguments disfavoring the fifth SM family. The fourth SM family quarks lead to essential enhancement of the Higgs boson production cross-section at hadron colliders and the Tevatron can discover the Higgs boson before the LHC, if it mass is between 140 and 200 GeV. Then, one can handle "massless" Dirac neutrinos without see-saw mechanism. Concerning BSM physics, flavor democracy leads to several consequences: tan(beta) approx.eq. 40 if there are three MSSM families; super-partner of the right-handed neutrino can be the LSP; relatively light E(6)-inspired isosinglet quark etc. Finally, flavor democracy may give opportunity to handle "massless" composite objects within...

  12. Designing the Future of Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichlmair, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Creating a simulation of Democracy and its future challenges is a fruitful exercise in design. This short paper describes a different use of a simulation that the traditional training via playing. Instead of playing, the creation of the simulation is at the center of attention....

  13. Popular democracy and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US has moved from representative democracy to popular democracy and public scrutiny is unrelenting. Any hope of success on their part in resolving the nuclear waste question hinges on their ability to condition themselves to operate in a popular democracy environment. Those opposed to the siting of high- and low-level waste repositories have already developed a set of recurring themes: (1) the siting criteria are fatally flawed; (2) the criteria are not adequate; (3) the process is driven by politics not science; (4) unrealistic deadlines lead to dangerous shortcuts; (5) transportation experience is lacking; (6) the scientific community does not really know how to dispose of the wastes. They must continue to tell the public that if science has brought us problems, then the answer can be only more knowledge - not less. Failure by their profession to recognize that popular democracy is a fact and that nuclear issues need to be addressed in humanistic terms raises the question of whether America is philosophically suited for the expanded use of nuclear power in the future - or for that matter for leadership in the world of tomorrow

  14. Flavor Democracy in Particle Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flavor democracy hypothesis (or, in other words, democratic mass matrix approach) was introduced in seventies taking in mind three Standard Model (SM) families. Later, this idea was disfavored by the large value of the t-quark mass. In nineties the hypothesis was revisited assuming that extra SM families exist. According to flavor democracy the fourth SM family should exist and there are serious arguments disfavoring the fifth SM family. The fourth SM family quarks lead to essential enhancement of the Higgs boson production cross-section at hadron colliders and the Tevatron can discover the Higgs boson before the LHC, if it mass is between 140 and 200 GeV. Then, one can handle 'massless' Dirac neutrinos without see-saw mechanism. Concerning BSM physics, flavor democracy leads to several consequences: tanβ ≅ mt/mb ≅ 40 if there are three MSSM families; super-partner of the right-handed neutrino can be the LSP; relatively light E(6)-inspired isosinglet quark etc. Finally, flavor democracy may give opportunity to handle ''massless'' composite objects within preonic models

  15. PUBLIC EQUALITY, DEMOCRACY AND JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mladenović

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the principle of public equality which, according to the view Thomas Christiano defends in his book The Constitution of Equality: Democratic Authority and Its Limits, is of central importance for social justice and democracy. Christiano also holds that the authority of democracy, and its limits, are grounded in this principle. Christiano’s democratic theory can be, broadly speaking, divided in two parts. The first part deals with the derivation and justification of the principle of public equality. The second part argues why and how the authority of democracy, and its limits, are based on this principle. This article will deal only with the first part of Christiano’s theory. While I believe that the second part is crucially important for Christiano’s democratic theory, I think that before examining the role of the principle of public equality, it is necessary to examine its nature. For that reason, this paper deals primarily with the nature of the principle of public equality as the requirement of social justice and the basis for the justification of democracy.

  16. Democracy, globalization and ethnic violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, D.J.; Jong-A-Pin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Bezemer, Dirk, and Jong-A-Pin, Richard Democracy, globalization and ethnic violence Do democratization and globalization processes combine to increase the incidence of violence in developing and emerging economies? The present paper examines this hypothesis by a study of internal violence in Sub-Sah

  17. Rethinking Resources and Hybridity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Allison J.; Seiler, Gale; Salter, Dana E.

    2011-01-01

    This review explores Alfred Schademan's "What does playing cards have to do with science? A resource-rich view of African American young men" by examining how he uses two key concepts--hybridity and resources--to propose an approach to science education that counters enduring deficit notions associated with this population. Our response to…

  18. Rethinking IT governance for SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Devos, Jan; Van Landeghem, Hendrik; Deschoolmeester, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to critically rethink the concepts and the theoretical foundations of IT governance in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Design/methodology/approach - The paper is based on multiple case studies. In total, eight cases of outsourced information system projects where failures occurred were selected. An outsourced information system failure (OISF) is suggested as a failure of governance of the IT in a SME environment. A structure for stating propo...

  19. Debating the Origins of Democracy: Overview of an Annotated Bibliography. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Bruce E.

    1996-01-01

    The idea that Native American confederacies practiced a form of democracy that influenced development of the U.S. Constitution has become established in general discourse. An anecdotal overview of a 550-item bibliography focuses on the idea's spread to unanticipated places, academic debates, and conservative critics' horror story of the outcomes…

  20. Brane-antibrane democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We suggest a duality-invariant formula for the entropy and temperature of nonextreme black holes in supersymmetric string theory. The entropy is given in terms of the duality-invariant parameter of the deviation from extremality and 56 SU(8) covariant central charges. It interpolates between the entropies of Schwarzschild solution and extremal solutions with various amount of unbroken supersymmetries, and therefore, serves for classification of black holes in supersymmetric string theories. We introduce the second auxiliary 56 via an E(7) symmetric constraint. The symmetric and antisymmetric combinations of these two multiplets are related via moduli to the corresponding two fundamental representations of E(7): brane and antibrane open-quote open-quote numbers.close-quote close-quote Using the CPT as well as C symmetry of the entropy formula and duality one can explain the mysterious simplicity of the nonextreme black hole area formula in terms of branes and antibranes. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Theories and core principles of Dutch democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Michels, Ank

    2007-01-01

    Democracies in Europe differ in what they see as being at the core of the democratic system. In some countries, citizen participation constitutes the fundamental tenet of democracy; in others, democracy is closely linked to pluralism and the protection of minorities. This paper tries to identify certain core principles of the Dutch democratic system that are reflected in the institutions and political culture that have to come to define the democratic system and are derived from the intellect...

  2. Taiwan’s Democracy: Towards a Liberal Democracy or Authoritarianism?

    OpenAIRE

    Dafydd Fell

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how Taiwan moved from being viewed as a model Asian democracy to one allegedly suffering from democratic reversal. The reasons for the declining domestic and international reputation of Taiwan’s democracy are discussed. Lastly, some key political challenges facing Taiwan’s democracy are outlined.

  3. The normative challenge of interaction: justice conflicts in democracy promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Poppe, Annika Elena; Wolff, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    In the global "North-West", liberal democracy is regarded as the universally valid model of political rule that is to be promoted globally via foreign and development policies. Democracy promotion, however, is frequently challenged by justice-related claims. Whereas external democracy promoters refer to democracy's universal value, those resisting democracy promotion point to the collective entitlement to a self-determined political evolution. "North-Western" governments see liberal democracy...

  4. Evolution of democracy in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Mukesh K.

    The emphasis of this thesis is to build an intuitive and robust GIS (Geographic Information systems) Tool which will give a survey on the evolution of democracy in European countries. The user can know about the evolution of the democratic histories of these countries by just clicking on them on the map. The information is provided in separate HTML pages which will give information about start of revolution, transition to democracy, current legislature, women's status in the country etc. There are two separate web pages for each country- one shows the detailed explanation on how democracy evolved in diff. countries and another page contains a timeline which holds key events of the evolution. The tool has been developed in JAVA. For the European map MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) is used. MOJO is developed by ESRI. The major features shown on the European map were designed using MOJO. MOJO made it easy to incorporate the statistical data with these features. The user interface, as well as the language was intentionally kept simple and easy to use, to broaden the potential audience. To keep the user engaged, key aspects are explained using HTML pages. The idea is that users can view the timeline to get a quick overview and can go through the other html page to learn about things in more detail.

  5. The Danish Agenda for Rethinking Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Grex, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the similarities and differences between the Danish Re-thinking Project Management initiative named Project Half Double (PHD) and the rethinking project man-agement (RPM) research stream. The paper furthermore discusses how PHD and RPM can inspire...... ideas and local implementations. Findings – RPM and PHD share a focus on value creation, social processes, learning and complexity while PHD also focuses on lean thinking, agile thinking, front-end loading and leadership, which are largely topics beyond the RPM research stream. Originality...... a foundation for further development of both rethinking project management and Project Half Double....

  6. Dewey versus "Dewey" on Democracy and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Piet

    2016-01-01

    In the literature on citizenship education, frequent references are made to Dewey. However, educationalists do not always interpret him correctly. To provide some counterbalance, I explain Dewey's views on education and democracy. I base this, not only on "Democracy and Education", but also on 17 articles that Dewey wrote after…

  7. Reaching beyond Democracy in Educational Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Educational policy analyses have tended toward either the impact of policies on student achievement or the furthering of progressive ideals, regularly theorized through concepts of democracy. In this theoretical essay, I suggest that democracy has become a vehicle for cauterized projects of individualized and contingent state status rather than…

  8. Education, Democracy and Poverty Reduction in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, Clive

    2002-01-01

    Authoritarian rule in Africa has exacerbated poverty levels in six ways. Achievement of greater democracy depends upon political culture and civil society in Africa becoming more democratic; education must play a part in teaching democratic values and behaviors. Examples show how education has not furthered democracy in Botswana, Zimbabwe, and…

  9. Mapping Anomalous Democracies During the Cold War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the Cold War, a number of countries established stable democracies despite low levels of modernization and a relative lack of democratic neighbour countries—factors otherwise consistently related to the endurance of democracy. Meanwhile, the Cold War superpowers often supported autocracies...

  10. Conceptions of "Nordic Democracy" and European Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Uffe

    of ‘tripartition of power' from the Age of the Enlightenment and spreading from the European centre to the Nordic periphery, as it were. On the other hand, democracy was reconsidered as a universal value in the form of ‘dialogue' (or deliberation) as a reaction to the Nazi compromising of democracy in the 1930s...

  11. American Studies in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Federmayer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of American Studies as an academic discipline at Hungarian colleges and universities is basically coterminous with the watershed years of 1989-1990 when the country made a radical shift from state socialism toward parliamentary democracy and a free economy. This political and economic about-face, which came hand in hand with the undermining of foundationalist certainties and the generation of new anxieties coincided, more or less, with the radical transformation that American St...

  12. Rethinking the Space for Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What happens to people’s sense of belonging when globalization meets with proclaimed regional identities resting heavily on conceptions of religion and ethnicity? Who are the actors stressing cultural heritage and authenticity as tools for self-understanding? In Rethinking the Space for Religion....... The case studies exemplify how public intellectuals and academics have taken active part in the construction of recent and traditional pasts. Instead of repeating the simplistic explanation as a “return of religion”, the authors of this volume focus on public platforms and agents, and their use of religion...

  13. Is There Muslim Exceptionalism in Democracy Research?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner

    Casual observation suggests a negative association between Islam and democratic rule, as very few Muslim countries can be considered democracies. Recent research has conrmed this observation by documenting that the negative association is robust to dierent democracy indices, different samples, and......, also, to alternative theories of the causes and correlates of democracy. This paper presents evidence against the notion of Muslim exceptionalism in democracy research. Thus, outside the European continent, territories that were governed earlier and more consistently by state organizations up...... and were therefore less likely to bring nascent legalistic and representative institutions to these territories. When we remove the autocratic legacy of early statehood and the influence of European settlement, there is nothing signicantly negative about the degree of democracy in Muslim-majority countries....

  14. The Non-Instrumental Value of Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2015-01-01

    A current debate in democratic theory concerns whether we can explain democratic legitimacy purely with reference to the intrinsic value of the public affirmation of equality, or whether we must invoke extra-democratic epistemic standards to do so. The freedom side of democracy is ignored or even...... rejected in this debate. But in order to understand the intrinsic value of democracy, we cannot ignore the relationship between freedom and democracy. Moreover, the freedom argument can better respond to the epistemic challenge to intrinsic accounts than can the equality argument. However, the freedom...... argument for democracy must be refined to avoid important objections to the idea that democracy can make citizens self-governing. The proposed freedom argument is based on notions of autonomy and freedom that have their root in the relational norm of not having another person as a master....

  15. Discursive ethics and political democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Cortina, Adela

    2010-01-01

    Discursive ethics or communicative ethics were born in the seventies fathered by K.O. Apel and J. Habermas, and today they are widely known; it is a current of such life and vigour that its very creators have engaged in lively polemics. This paper, starting from K.O. Apel' s texts, attempts to explore in what measure this discursive ethics provides philosophical foundations for political democracy and to determine the basic elements  necessary for the construction of a universal ethics.

  16. Flavor Democracy: On which basis?

    CERN Document Server

    Rador, T

    2003-01-01

    I argue that flavor democracy should not be considered as a "mere" assumption, but rather a fact that is inherent where there is hierarchy of quark masses. Briefly the crux of the argument is the ambiguity of defining a basis when one introduces a mass matrix. That is there is a degree of freedom of also defining a basis other than the weak eigenbasis with respect to which one can write down mass matrices. Since the ultimate aim is to diagonalize to the mass eigenbasis this is physically equivalent. But not necessarily so for the human eye.

  17. Lugu Community Showcases Grassroots Democracy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XIUHUA

    2007-01-01

    @@ Lying to the south of the western extension of the Chang'an Avenue, the artery of communication that runs through the breadth of central Beijing,Lugu area has come into the national limelight for pioneering a string of reforms aimed at promoting grassroots democracy in Chinese cities. Since the "Lugu Community" came into being in April 2004,some 6,000 visitors in 300 groups have come for a first hand knowledge of its experiences. Included are groups from 13foreign countries-the United States,Britain, Japan, France, Germany, the Republic of Korea, to cite just some.

  18. Liberty Challenge or Dangers of Liberal Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Eidukienė

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses dialectics of a modern democracy and liberalism through the new (from the quality point of view subsistence of liberty, the priority element of democracy, in liberal democracies. The significance of such discourse is determined by the existing social inequality and its conversion into political domain. Particular attention is paid to the social issue, which was treated by Max Weber already as the reason of death of the old, fanatic German “national liberalism”, since it has not managed to belong to the German environment. Even today, it still lies in the principles of life and reality of “young” democratic post­soviet states. Conversion of a social issue into political domain disorganises the society, and it is hardly capable to socialise its norms and values in order to be obligated with regard to civic goals. In other words, the social issue significantly adjusts the pace and direction of transformation of the society. Therefore, an immature “young” liberal democracy may become “less liberal” or no longer conform to the “strict” definition of liberal democracy. Referring to the above, we conclude that social composition should become the medium of political reconstruction for “young” democracies. This does not mean, however, the change of the genetic code of liberalism. This is a striving to vest it, as an ideology, additional powers for rationalisation of democracy by delivering to it the content and the meaning, which would answer the challenges and problems of the time. Liberalism should create a new, from the quality point of view, hierarchy of values and become a new context for both political thinking and democracy. This would render new impulses to economic and public politics, meanwhile developing new premises for a new, from the quality point of view, democracy that would help to consolidate the society for the becoming of liberal democracy.  

  19. Participatory and Dialogue Democracy in U.S. Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shiuli

    2009-01-01

    Teaching math to reflect values of democracy has to begin with some consideration of how democracy is conceptualized. A review of various theories of democracy conducted by Hagen (1992) provides everyone with a good starting point as it identifies three primary forms of democracy: competitive, participatory, and dialogue. In this essay, the author…

  20. Local Democracy in France: Improvements and Shilly-Shallying

    OpenAIRE

    Breuillard, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an up to date analysis of the French local government system and its potential for realisation of local democracy. It is structured into three sections in which the pros and cons, the improvements and shilly-shallying delineate local democracy in France. First, through the restricted French vision that participative democracy only supplements, not enriches representative democracy. Second, the structural and organisational crisis of representative local democracy will be ex...

  1. The emergence of Electronic Democracy as an auxiliary to representational democracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Electronic democracy as a system is defined, and the ways in which it may affect current systems of government is addressed. Electronic democracy`s achievements thus far in the United States at the community level are surveyed, and prospects for its expansion to state, national, and international systems are summarized. Central problems of electronic democracy are described, and its feasibility assessed (including safeguards against, and vulnerabilities to sabotage and abuse); the ways in which new and ongoing methods for information dissemination pose risks to current systems of government are discussed. One of electronic democracy`s underlying assumptions is challenged, namely that its direct, instant polling capability necessarily improves or refines governance. Further support is offered for the assertion that computer systems/networks should be used primarily to educate citizens and enhance awareness of issues, rather than as frameworks for direct decision making.

  2. The essential role of democracy in the Bush Doctrine: the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena de Castro Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Everyone knows that democracy played a role in the Bush Doctrine. What not everyone knows is that this role was essential for the doctrine to be put into operation under which the Iraq invasion was prepared and launched. We argue moreover that, even if aggressive, the Bush doctrine is compatible with the American Liberal Tradition. To demonstrate these arguments we analyze the links between democracy, security, and the US national interests as expressed in the pillars of the American foreign policy since the end of Cold War. The consequential belief of the Bush Administration on the positive effect of exporting democracy by the use of force to Afghanistan and Iraq to fight terrorism will be remarked. It will be shown, however, that in the first years of the Bush Administration, among the justifications for the military interventions in the two countries, security reasons prevailed over democratic concerns, although the latter was significantly present since the early hours after September 11. It was only when it became clear that WMDs did not exist in Iraq that the exporting of democracy as the ultimate weapon to fight terrorism grew remarkably and prevailed over security reasons to invade those rogue states. The paper uses quantitative and qualitative content analysis of the speeches of President Bush and his Secretaries of State and Defense.

  3. Democracy as a Way to Social Compromise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Zhen

    2006-01-01

    In modem society,democracy as a symbol of social civilization and progress is cherished.Any government or organization,whether truly democratic or not,will claim that it is democratic while its opponents are not.However,as a historical notion,democracy does not possess the quality of absoluteness.In my view,democracy,in its original meaning,should be understood as a way to social compromise,whose aim is to guarantee a relatively fair political life.

  4. Direct Democracy in Local Politics in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Elements of  direct democracy at the local level does exist in Denmark, but it is little known, because no formal rules regulate this aspect of political life, because results from popular initiatives and referendums are not recorded in official statistics, and because few systematic analyses have...... been published. This paper, accordingly, has an explorative nature and asks two basic questions: What is the current state of direct democracy at the local level in Denmark, and what are the prospects for a further development of direct democracy at the local level in Denmark? The paper is based...

  5. Postmaterialism and Democracy: What Does the Postmaterialist Value Shift Mean for Democracy?

    OpenAIRE

    Nickens, Bradley Harrison

    2004-01-01

    This thesis explores the possible impact of a postmaterialist value shift on the future of democracy in advanced industrial democratic countries. Research over the past few decades has questioned the responsiveness of representative democratic institutions in advanced industrial democracies to individual and communal needs in society. Radical democratic theorists have called for direct action, structural reform, and other social and political changes to make democracy â stron...

  6. Rethinking and Redesigning Teacher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltzersen, Johnny

    2003-01-01

    Teacher education and teachers are in most countries round the world under heavy criticism for not delivering what governments, many politicians and policy analysts and many sections of public life feel they should be delivering. And teacher education is at large on the defensive when confronted...... with this increasing criticism. In this presentation I will try to analyse this phenomenon and also try to sketch a preliminary strategy to cope with the criticism and introduce some basic principles that could be included in our search for rethinking and redesigning teacher education in the 21st century. I would like...... to emphasize that I only consider my contribution to day as a humble effort to address highly complex and complicated issues and further emphasize that everyone seriously engaged in education reform, educational change and teacher education have much to do before we can embark on coherent and well...

  7. Universal Democracy Instead of Anarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Branco, G C; Silva-Marcos, J I

    2013-01-01

    We propose for the flavour structure of both the quark and lepton sectors, the principle of Universal Democracy (UD), which reflects the presence of a $Z_3$ symmetry. In the quark sector, we emphasize the importance of UD for obtaining small mixing and flavour alignment, while in the lepton sector, large mixing, including the recently measured value of $U_{e3}$, is obtained in the UD framework through the seesaw mechanism. An interesting correlation between the values of $U_{e3}$ and $\\sin^2(\\theta_{23})$ is pointed out, with the prediction of $\\sin^2(\\theta_{23})\\approx 0.42$ in the region where $U_{e3}$ is in agreement with the DAYA-BAY experiment.

  8. Failure of market and democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author looks into the socio-economic question how economy and politics should be delimited against one another and which kinds of decisions should follow the logic of the decision systems ''economy'' respectively ''politics''. The paper examines decision procedures as to their efficacy, and the criticism of these methods leads to a determination of the relationship between market and democracy. The question whether economic control of environmental protection and political control of nuclear energy are appropriate is then investigated on the basis of the preceding insights. Our present practice of nuclear energy production being controlled by the government and environmental protection being left to the market is demonstrated to be inappropriate. Instead it would make sense to leave the supply of energy to the market and place environmental protection into the responsibility of the government. (orig./HSCH)

  9. The Future of Afghan Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Seward Smith

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The 2014 Afghan presidential and provincial council elections will have a critical effect on the future of Afghan democracy. At a minimum, they must be sufficiently credible to prevent severe division among elite political actors and ensure the survival of the current constitutional order. Yet there are growing expectations that the election might not merely be an elite pact between powerful figures from Afghanistan’s recent past, but more fully represent popular aspirations, particularly those of the growing urban and youth population. In order for this to happen, they must also be held in accordance with the legal rules that guide them, rather than be characterized by manipulation of these rules and government interference. Despite the problems of fraud in the 2009 election, where government figures and the electoral institutions themselves were partly responsible for the significant fraud that took place, there are a number of reasons to expect that the 2014 election will be an improvement on 2009, both in terms of participation and organization. If the elections held in Afghanistan since 2001 have diminished hopes for Afghan democracy, it is partly because an electoral formalism was introduced in Afghanistan before other elements crucial to a functioning democracy—the rule of law, political parties, institutionalized governance—really existed. The 2014 elections may reveal the boundaries of an emerging democratic space in which these features are beginning to emerge and, more importantly, where their value is increasingly recognized by Afghans. If, in every political transition, the future grapples with the past, the 2014 elections in Afghanistan may be a decisive arena of that struggle.

  10. Democracy as a social technology on schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    " democracy. The democratic influence in schools thus spans from "big" parliamentary democracy to small participatoruy democracy - a dichotomy schooll leadership must maneuvre within using democratic procedures and leadership as social technologies. This article argues that a positive coinnectiion exists......On a formal level, the influence og "big" parlamentary democracy is enhanced because parliamentary control in individual schools has become stronger; and the formal democratic influence of parents has been strengthned by their membership on school boards, the latter being an example of "small...... between strong leadership and having wello-functioning democratic processes in schools and the introduction of tests, quality reports and these approaches does not weaken democratic processes in schools. This connection is nonetheless changing the logics of the state, market, and the civil society vectors....

  11. Functional democracy and mass media: a critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Naribo Opuamie-Ngoa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper comprises two parts. The first part defines democracy and attempts an examination of the role of the media in a functional democracy. In an attempt to explain issues in the media and public opinion within the realm of democracy, the paper explores etymological origins of media, arguing that what the media ought to be differs from what is obtainable.
    Part two examines the media’s role in various African countries when they were under colonial rule and the continent’s push for self-rule, observing that post-colonial Africa witnessed a bifurcated partisan media.
    The paper, with specific reference to the role of the media in present day South Africa and Nigeria, concludes that, for the proper role of promoting a healthy culture of democracy in society, today’s news media needs to reflect society’s concerns and the media’s interest in democratic equity.

  12. Enhancing policy innovation by redesigning representative democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    . Two Danish case studies indicate that collaboration between politicians and relevant and affected stakeholders can promote policy innovation, but also that a redesign of representative democracy is needed in order to establish a productive combination of political leadership, competition...

  13. Castoriadis’ Concept of Institution and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahl Rendtorff, Jacob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article I discuss the relation between institution and democracy in Castoriadis’ philosophy. The paper proposes an outline of the development of Castoriadis’ political philosophy with focus on institutionalization, imagination and self-limitation of democratic institutions as central elements in Castoridis’ thought. We begin with a short introduction to the concept of institution and institutionalization. Then we discuss the elements of Castoridis’ critique of bureaucracy as a way to distinguish between totalitarian society and democracy. This is the basis for understanding the relation between the imaginary, freedom and autonomy as basic elements of democracy. Finally the paper discusses Castoridis’ new notion of democracy as a kind of self-limitation and creation of collective meaning as the basis for social legitimacy.

  14. On the Complementarity of Liberalism and Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Vanberg, Viktor J.

    2006-01-01

    The growth of the democratic welfare state has been accompanied by significant restrictions on individual liberty, raising doubts about the sustainability of the ideals of liberalism in democratic polities. The principal claim of this paper is that, adequately understood, liberalism and democracy represent complementary ideals. The argument in support of this claim is based on a distinction between three levels at which liberalism and democracy can be compared, namely the level of their ?inst...

  15. Cognitive aspect of education for democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Đurišić-Bojanović Mirosava

    2005-01-01

    Education for democracy is of particular importance for a society undergoing democratization. The paper investigates a cognitive aspect of education for democracy, and identifies psychological predispositions for the acceptance of plurality of ideas as a central indicator of democratic thinking. The acceptance of plurality is defined as the ability of an individual to consider different arguments in controversial topics, to accept the existence of different ideas in a discussion as well as di...

  16. Science is a gateway for democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaoua, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    The Arab Spring of 2011 has highlighted an unprecedent fact in the region: it was the young and educated population who established the spearheading of change, and led their countries to democracy. In this paper, we try to analyze how science has been a key factor in these moves, in Tunisia as well as in Egypt, and how it can help to anchor democracy in these countries. PMID:23813114

  17. Science is a gateway for democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaoua, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    The Arab Spring of 2011 has highlighted an unprecedent fact in the region: it was the young and educated population who established the spearheading of change, and led their countries to democracy. In this paper, we try to analyze how science has been a key factor in these moves, in Tunisia as well as in Egypt, and how it can help to anchor democracy in these countries.

  18. Democracy education in Turkish Education System

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Okutan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the reflection of legislation and practical samples of democracy education in school education of Turkish Education. Method of this study can be defined field study. For this purpose especially objectives, rules and  principles in legislation was examined then did observations in schools and try to find out how the practical applications reflected in democracy education in schools.  Results; although there are some expressions to carry out de...

  19. The Dogma of Democracy Gone Sour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Maxton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to political organisation the western world likes to claim the moral high ground. It touts the benefits of free and fair elections, as if the concept of democracy were a self-evident, eternal truth. For the US State Department, democracy has taken on near-religious significance. It has become a right, just as much as the right to life, liberty and happiness.If the US and many other western countries actually practised what they preached, they would at least be giving their sermons from solid turf. But because they continue to undermine the practice of democracy at home, their pulpits are not very high and the ground they stand on is increasingly squishy.In the nations with the loudest democracy trumpets, big businesses and rich individuals have corrupted the democratic process. They influence elections and laws to their advantage and suppress changes they don't like. At the same time, the poor have become increasingly disenfranchised, either because they are deliberately excluded from the voting process or because they no longer believe it has any value.This is not just a failure of democracy. It is also a failure of communication. Rather than achieving its goals, and promoting an idea with considerable merit, the West is undermining the cause. Democracy has become little more than an ideological weapon, and it is driving the doubters away.

  20. School of the Americas: At War With Democracy? Study Guide. Episode #804. America's Defense Monitor, Educational TV for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Sean L.

    This program examines the 50-year practice of the U.S. training of Latin American soldiers at the School of the Americas. Originally designed as a jungle warfare training center in the 1950s, the program evolved into a Cold War program to promote stability and democracy in Latin America. Human rights abuses have been charged against these elite…

  1. American Studies in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Luca

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available American Studies at the University of BucharestThe idea of teaching American Studies and founding a program in American Studies was first voiced in the long meetings of faculty and students held at the University of Bucharest soon after the collapse of the communist regime. The proposal was one of many that reflected the spirit of reform and hope for radical changes at the outset of Romania’s transition to democracy. The absence of institutional structures other than English departments and t...

  2. Democracy, Corruption and the Politics of Spirits in Contemporary Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubandt, Nils Ole

    Indonesia has been an electoral democracy for more than a decade, and yet the political landscape of the world’s third-largest democracy is as complex and enigmatic as ever. Indonesia is simultaneous a country that has achieved a successful transition to democracy and a flawed, illiberal, and pre...... with democracy and spirits in fact reflect a set of contradictions within democracy itself. The book will be of interest to academics in the fields of Asian Studies, anthropology and political science and relevant for the study of Indonesian politics and democracy in Asia and beyond....

  3. Democracy always comes first. Adolescents’ views on democracy and decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwelink, Hessel

    2014-01-01

    Research shows adolescents to be positively-oriented towards democracy, but little is known about their meanings of decision-making in both everyday situations and formal democracy. To gain insight into these aspects of adolescents’ democratic views we have interviewed 40 Dutch adolescents from seco

  4. Media and democracy in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    The Latin American media environment currently faces serious challenges which range from historical factors to regional political problems and gradual shifts in cultural attitudes. As Fox and Waisbord (2002, ix) have claimed, both local politics and media globalization have significantly shaped the development of the Latin American media in the 1990’s. Argentina for instance has seen a situation of limited competition and TV networks controlled by the state slowly give way to an international...

  5. US democracy promotion and energy security after 9/11

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhtar, Ali Reza

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to find out whether the US is also genuinely committed to promote democracy in those countries on which the US has oil dependency or does the US energy security interest eclipse its foreign policy principle of democracy promotion abroad after 9/11. The hypothesis of this research is that the US is less interested in promoting democracy in those countries on which the US has higher oil-dependency. Materialist theory of democracy promotion is us...

  6. Foreign Aided: Why Democratization Brings Growth When Democracy Does Not

    OpenAIRE

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner

    2015-01-01

    There is an unresolved puzzle in research on the economics of democracy: While there is consensus that democracy is not generally associated with higher rates of economic growth, a recent literature has found that democratization is followed by growth. Why should becoming a democracy bring growth if being one does not? This article shows that the positive growth effect of democratization is accounted for by a substantial and immediate influx of foreign aid into new democracies. The domestic r...

  7. Education for Deliberative Democracy: A Typology of Classroom Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The theory of deliberative democracy places public deliberations at the heart of democracy. In order to participate in democratic deliberations, citizens need certain skills, attitudes, and values. Within the field of education for deliberative democracy, it is assumed that these are learned through participation in democratic deliberation. Thus,…

  8. Promoting Local Democracy in Education: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintrom, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Scholars have recently explored the relationship between local democracy and education from two distinct perspectives. The first views local democracy as inherently good and offers suggestions for deepening the practice of democracy. The second perspective questions the merits of local democratic control of schools. Contributors to this…

  9. Landscape democracy, three sets of values, and the connoisseur method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arler, Finn; Mellqvist, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The European Landscape Convention has brought up the question of democracy in relation to landscape transformation, but without a clear definition of democracy. This paper conceptualises democracy in relation to three main sets of values related to self-determination, co-determination and respect...

  10. Technologies of democracy: experiments and demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Brice

    2011-12-01

    Technologies of democracy are instruments based on material apparatus, social practices and expert knowledge that organize the participation of various publics in the definition and treatment of public problems. Using three examples related to the engagement of publics in nanotechnology in France (a citizen conference, a series of public meetings, and an industrial design process), the paper argues that Science and Technology Studies provide useful tools and methods for the analysis of technologies of democracy. Operations of experiments and public demonstrations can be described, as well as controversies about technologies of democracy giving rise to counter-experiments and counter-demonstrations. The political value of the analysis of public engagement lies in the description of processes of stabilization of democratic orders and in the display of potential alternative political arrangements.

  11. How is an absolute democracy possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bednarek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last part of the Empire trilogy, Commonwealth, Negri and Hardt ask about the possibility of the self-governance of the multitude. When answering, they argue that absolute democracy, understood as the political articulation of the multitude that does not entail its unification (construction of the people is possible. As Negri states, this way of thinking about political articulation is rooted in the tradition of democratic materialism and constitutes the alternative to the dominant current of modern political philosophy that identifies political power with sovereignty. The multitude organizes itself politically by means of the constitutive power, identical with the ontological creativity or productivity of the multitude. To state the problem of political organization means to state the problem of class composition: political democracy is at the same time economic democracy.

  12. Kant, Freedom as Independence, and Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    While the influence of Kant’s practical philosophy on contemporary political theory has been profound, it has its source in Kant’s autonomy-based moral philosophy rather than in his freedom-based philosophy of Right. Kant scholars have increasingly turned their attention to Kant’s Rechtslehre......, but they have largely ignored its potential contribution to discussions of democracy. However, Kant’s approach to political philosophy can supply unique insights to the latter. His notion that freedom and the public legal order are co-constitutive can be developed into a freedom argument for constitutional...... democracy. This freedom argument goes beyond freedom as moral autonomy and a libertarian idea of freedom as non-interference to a notion of freedom as a form of standing constituted by the public legal order. The trouble with other attempts to connect freedom and democracy is that they have operated...

  13. High-stakes educational testing and democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the relation between high-stakes educational testing and democracy drawn from the experiences of 20th-century high-stakes educational testing practices in the Danish history of education. The article presents various concepts of democracy using leading propositions within...... the field of education. Then a sample of relevant historic case studies are examined in light of these definitions. Among other things, the article concludes that a combination of different evaluation technologies – some formative and some summative – might be the safest way to go from a democratic...

  14. Democracy at the end of the History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2013v12n2p289This article analyzes the loss of legitimacy that the economic crisis brought upon representative democracy and the consequences that can be drawn for the thesis of the end of History. The thesis we defend here is that the deterioration of the welfare state, as a result, under very specific conditions, of the capitalism in certain parts of the world, runs parallel with the delegative degradation of democracy.

  15. Örgütsel Demokrasi( Organizational Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar ERKAL COŞAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of democracy that is shaped by contemporary economic, political, social and cultural developments makes us re-consider organizational life. The number of studies on organizational democracy rises exponentially whereby contributions to and complexities for the organization are discussed. In this context, this study begins with a conceptualization of organizational democracy from modern business management perspective, which is followed by respectively; a discussion of previous research on organizational democracy, the causes behind the new departure towards organizational democracy, the contributions to organizations, the complexities and problems faced during practical implementation, and finally a literature review on the ways and means of ensuring organizational democracy. With this study, the following questions will be raised to scholarly discussion; is organizational democracy just an ideal emphasizing the human element and employee satisfaction, or is it a strategy that needs managerial attention for attainment of organizational goals in 21 st century?

  16. Freedom and the Non-Instrumental Value of Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    This paper is an intervention in two debates, one concerning the instrumental vs noninstrumental value of democracy, the other concerning the relationship between freedom and democracy. I reject the purely instrumental justification of democracy and defend the idea that democracy has...... noninstrumental value. I see the noninstrumental value of democracy in terms of freedom rather than the now more common reference to equality or fairness. The freedom argument can better show the noninstrumenal value of democracy and can better respond to some core objections to democratic noninstrumentalism than...... the equality argument. A main aim of this paper is to show that freedom and democracy are not merely instrumentally linked but, rather, intrinsically related. I argue this mainly via a critical engagement with Philip Pettit’s conception of freedom as nondomination. My defense of the noninstrumental value...

  17. Democracy and Governance Networks: Compatible or Not?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); C. Skelcher (Chris)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the relationship between representative democracy and governance networks at a theoretical level. It does so by offering four conjectures and their implications for theory and practice. The incompatibility conjectures rests on the primacy of politics and sees gove

  18. Free Press in a Constitutional Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucianek, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a lesson in which students will examine several views expressed by the founders to understand the context for including freedom of the press in the First Amendment. Students will be asked to think about the role that the news media and the need to be an informed citizen continue to play in our democracy. Students will…

  19. The Reaffirmation of Democracy in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Michael D.

    1977-01-01

    Views teacher militancy as part of an overall process of change in administrative processes and reaffirmed democratization of institutional involvement. Asserts that "democracy recognizes and uses individual excellence, but within the framework of broad-based representation and the individual participation of the citizenry." (Author/JM)

  20. Beating Social Democracy on Its Own Turf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    -right parties to flourish in contexts where welfare issues have a natural salience as in the case of universal welfare states. In contrast, Scandinavian universal welfare states ought to benefit social democracy when it comes to issue voting on welfare issues. It is argued in this article that centre...

  1. The Peculiar Status of "Democracy and Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boostrom, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The centennial of "Democracy and Education" invites those who study education and curriculum to reconsider this major work and its place in today's world. One of the most cited works in educational scholarship (and the most cited of Dewey's many works), the perspective it provides is not evident in US policy-making or in school practice.…

  2. Singularity and Community: Levinas and Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    This article explores and extends Levinas's ideas of singularity and community as multiplicity and argues that his identification of language and discourse as the means to create ethical communities provides tangible possibilities for rebuilding genuine democracy in a humane world. These ideas help us reimagine school and classroom as communities…

  3. Reinvigorating the role of science in democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Andrew A; Halpern, Michael; Shulman, Seth; Wexler, Celia; Phartiyal, Pallavi

    2013-01-01

    Private and political interests routinely conspire to sideline and misrepresent science and evidence in the public policy process. The Center for Science and Democracy, a new initiative at the Union of Concerned Scientists, endeavors to change this dynamic to strengthen the role of science in decision making.

  4. Democracy, Education and the Need for Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, Ingerid S.

    2016-01-01

    Even though the interrelationship between education and democratic politics is as old as democracy itself, it is seldom explicitly formulated in the literature. Most of the time, the political system is taken as a given, and education conceptualized as an instrument for stability and social integration. Many contemporary discussions about…

  5. Entropic «Virus» of Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Khmel, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the social and philosophical analysis of democracy as an element of holistic social being in contrast to its political and instrumental interpretation in politology research. Social entropy process and its effects were given special attention in this article.

  6. Forms and terminology of Direct Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

    It is apparent that some confusion exits both among researchers and political actors about the various forms of direct democracy. Various institutions such as IRI and IDEA, various countries such as Switzerland and California, and various authors such as Pier Vincenzo Uleri and David Altman present...

  7. On the Relevance of "Bildung" for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Walter

    2003-01-01

    The author argues that a continued analysis of the relationship between "Bildung" and democracy only makes sense when referring back to the "classic" intention of understanding "Bildung" as creative, critical and transformative processes which change the relationship of self and world in conjunction with a changing social and material environment.…

  8. Information, polarization and term length in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers term lengths in a representative democracy where the political issue divides the population on the left-right scale. Parties are ideologically different and better informed about the consequences of policies than voters are. A short term length makes the government more...

  9. Democracy and Governance in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Jachtenfuchs

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that internationalization undermines governance and democracy. This phenomenon has two dimensions. On the one hand, it is a real process which has to be understood. On the other hand, it constitutes a challenge for a number of concepts and theories in the social sciences as well as in law. These concepts and theories are often implicitly based on the idea of a sovereign nation-state. In consequence, it is difficult to conceptualize even the possibility of the transformation of the state as a result of internationalization. This general problematique is most strongly visible in the European Union which over time has developed into a political system of a new type. This system has enormous consequences on democracy and governance in its member states. The first part of the paper presents a view on the EU's political system which does not preclude the possibility of a fundamental transformation of governance and democracy in the EU by the choice of its basic concepts. The second part presents those features of the EU's political system which are most important for the future of democracy and governance. They are uneven Europeanization, permanent institutional change and new patterns of legitimation. The third part discusses two models of the European Union which might be the result of these processes. They represent two different mixtures of the institutionalization of governance and democracy. Both seem to be at least potentially stable forms of political organization but none of them can be reduced to the traditional forms of'state' and 'international organization'. The final part contains an assessment of the prospective development of the EU in the light of the central features of the EU and the system models discussed in the two previous section.

  10. Rethink! prototyping transdisciplinary concepts of prototyping

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Emilia; Stark, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the authors describe the findings derived from interaction and cooperation between scientific actors employing diverse practices. They reflect on distinct prototyping concepts and examine the transformation of development culture in their fusion to hybrid approaches and solutions. The products of tomorrow are going to be multifunctional, interactive systems – and already are to some degree today. Collaboration across multiple disciplines is the only way to grasp their complexity in design concepts. This underscores the importance of reconsidering the prototyping process for the development of these systems, particularly in transdisciplinary research teams. “Rethinking Prototyping – new hybrid concepts for prototyping” was a transdisciplinary project that took up this challenge. The aim of this programmatic rethinking was to come up with a general concept of prototyping by combining innovative prototyping concepts, which had been researched and developed in three sub-projects: “Hybrid P...

  11. The Danish Agenda for Rethinking Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Grex, Sara

    2016-01-01

    each other in research and practice. Design/methodology/approach – This is an empirical paper based on collaborative research between in-dustry and researchers. PHD has developed principles and practices driven by industry consisting of 10 leading stars and the impact, leadership and flow (ILF) method...... ideas and local implementations. Findings – RPM and PHD share a focus on value creation, social processes, learning and complexity while PHD also focuses on lean thinking, agile thinking, front-end loading and leadership, which are largely topics beyond the RPM research stream. Originality......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the similarities and differences between the Danish Re-thinking Project Management initiative named Project Half Double (PHD) and the rethinking project man-agement (RPM) research stream. The paper furthermore discusses how PHD and RPM can inspire...

  12. Rethinking Information Systems in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony

    2014-01-01

    This section of Information Polity consists of papers presented during the workshop “Rethinking Information Systems in the Public Sector: Bridging Academia and Public Service”. The workshop was held on 8 June 2014 in Tel Aviv, Israel, in conjunction with the European Conference on Information...... Systems (ECIS 2014), and it is part of the activities of the Special Interest Group for eGovernment (SIGeGov) of the Association for Information Systems (AIS)....

  13. Rethinking the Spatial Organization of Creative Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Vang, Jan

    2005-01-01

    This paper argues the need to rethink the dominant theory on the spatial organization of creative industries. According to this theory, creative industries tend to locate in the largest metropolitan areas as this location, it is argued, constitutes an arena allowing for accessing face-to-face based buzz on new industry trends and for utilizing the presence of a diverse portfolio of creative competencies. The locational choice reflects that creative industries are organized around inter-firm c...

  14. Flipping journals to open: Rethinking publishing infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Fecher, Benedikt; Wagner, Gert G.

    2015-01-01

    The resignation of the editorial board of an Elsevier-owned linguistics journal and its open access reorganization could get the ball rolling for other journals to follow suit. This case is a reminder that open access means more than just providing access to an article; it means rethinking the whole process of publishing. Open access also raises important questions about who owns the critical information infrastructure for online publishing.

  15. Paul Downes. Democracy, Revolution and Monarchism in Early American Literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Martin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available L’auteur, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto, part implicitement d’une évidence : pour l’ensemble hétérogène des colonies américaines rebelles, le lien à la Couronne est le seul commun dénominateur, et le trajet le plus court de Charleston à Boston passe par Londres…D’où, pour un tiers environ de la population — les Loyalistes— une fidèlité à la monarchie poussée parfois jusqu’à l’exil volontaire ; mais pour les Indépendantistes, nolentes volentes, des référence...

  16. Paul Downes. Democracy, Revolution and Monarchism in Early American Literature.

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Pierre Martin

    2006-01-01

    L’auteur, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto, part implicitement d’une évidence : pour l’ensemble hétérogène des colonies américaines rebelles, le lien à la Couronne est le seul commun dénominateur, et le trajet le plus court de Charleston à Boston passe par Londres…D’où, pour un tiers environ de la population — les Loyalistes— une fidèlité à la monarchie poussée parfois jusqu’à l’exil volontaire ; mais pour les Indépendantistes, nolentes volentes, des référence...

  17. Cidadania e democracia Citizenship and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria de Mesquita Benevides

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Discute-se a importância da implementação dos mecanismos de democracia direta previstos na Constituição de 1988. O referendo, o plebiscito e a iniciativa popular, como formas de participação política que complementem os mecanismos de democracia representativa, podem contribuir significativamente para a educação política dos cidadãos.The significance of putting into effect the procedures of direct democracy recognized by the Brazilian Constitution of 1988 is discussed. An important contribution to the political education of the citizens can be given by devices like the referendum, the plebiscite and the legislative initiative, provided they are seen as complements for representative democracy.

  18. Middle Class and Democracy in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Fierro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The consolidation of the middle class has been interpreted by modernization and postmodernization theories as a key factor for the functioning and stability of the democratic system. However, in Latin America the middle class has tended to be associated with two contradictory positions. On the one hand, it is emphasized that it plays a stabilizing and democratic role while, on the other hand, it is linked to supporting military coups. With the purpose of elucidate such a dilemma, the relationship that can be established between the socioeconomic status and the degree of support for democracy will be examined. In order to do this, an empirical analysis from Latinbarometer surveys databases will be conducted, covering seventeen countries in the region for the period from 1996 to 2011. It will be concluded that the middle class in Latin America does not have particularly more favorable attitudes toward democracy than other social segments.

  19. Popular Democracy and the European Union Polity

    OpenAIRE

    Mair, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Although we still celebrate the late twentieth-century ‘victory of democracy’, our understanding of what democracy entails in both theory and practice is increasingly subject to a variety of qualifying definitions, many of which now seem to devalue the role of elections and electoral accountability. This is also obviously seen in the politics of the European Union, where the efforts to displace conflict dimensions into arenas where democratic authority is lacking, as well as the efforts to de...

  20. Representative Democracy in Australian Local Government

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Hearfield; Brian Dollery

    2009-01-01

    In an assessment of representative democracy in Australian local government, this paper considers long-run changes in forms of political representation, methods of vote counting, franchise arrangements, numbers of local government bodies and elected representatives, as well as the thorny question of constitutional recognition. This discussion is set against the background of ongoing tensions between the drive for economic efficiency and the maintenance of political legitimacy, along with more...

  1. Democracy, Conflict and Development - Three Cases.

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Frances; Sullivan, Meghan

    1998-01-01

    This paper explores the connections between democracy, peace and development in three cases of recent history - Uganda, Kenya and Sri Lanka. It is shown that there are no simple and universal relationships. The experience of all three countries shows that democratic institutions are not sufficient to prevent conflict and can foment it in sharply divided societies. The case of Sri lanka suggests that redesigning democratic institutions in order to reduce conflict can fail to do so and may actu...

  2. Flavour democracy calls for the fourth generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is argued with the help of an illustrative mode, that the inter species hierarchy among the fermion masses and the quark mixing angles can be accommodated naturally in the standard model with (approximate) flavour democracy provided there are four families of sequential quark-leptons with all members of the fourth family having roughly equal masses. The special problem of light neutrino masses (if any) and possible solutions are also discussed. (author). 15 refs

  3. Flavour democracy calls for the fourth generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is argued with the help of an illustrative model, that the inter species hierarchy among the fermion masses and the quark mixing angles can be accommodated naturally in the standard model with (approximate) flavor democracy provided there are three exactly massless neutrinos and four families of sequential quark-leptons with all members of the fourth family having roughly equal masses. The special problem of light neutrino masses (if any) and possible solutions are also discussed. (author). 22 refs

  4. Flavour Democracy Calls for the Fourth Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, A

    1993-01-01

    It is argued with the help of an illustrative model, that the inter--species hierarchy among the fermion masses and the quark mixing angles can be accommodated naturally in the standard model with (approximate) flavor democracy provided there are four families of sequential quark--leptons with all members of the fourth family having roughly equal masses. The special problem of light neutrino masses (if any) and possible solutions are also discussed.

  5. Military Burden and the Democracy Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Rota, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Kantian thought had advanced the idea that wars and military expenditure should decrease as long as democracy widens across the World. Historical evidence seems to invalidate this wisdom because frequency of wars is ncreasing over time and a large amount of public resources is still being committed to military spending. This paper contributes to explain this point by considering the effect of polity regimes on the military spending during the period 1880-1938. Indeed, before World War ...

  6. Cognitive aspect of education for democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurišić-Bojanović Mirosava

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Education for democracy is of particular importance for a society undergoing democratization. The paper investigates a cognitive aspect of education for democracy, and identifies psychological predispositions for the acceptance of plurality of ideas as a central indicator of democratic thinking. The acceptance of plurality is defined as the ability of an individual to consider different arguments in controversial topics, to accept the existence of different ideas in a discussion as well as different explanations. This psychological phenomenon integrates certain cognitive affective and conative characteristics. The acceptance of plurality of ideas is a fundamental prerequisite for democratic communication, therefore a prerequisite for the creation of democratic climate in a society. The concept of cognitive style has been examined from the perspective of different research traditions in an attempt to identify a psychological profile of cognitive style, provisionally named pluralist profile, which would help an individual behave democratically. The paper also studies the connection between the manner of thinking, personality characteristics and cognitive style. It is the author’s conclusion that it is reasonable to assume that there are ways to encourage the development of pluralistic cognitive style by practicing the acceptance of different ideas through teaching process which would significantly improve the effectiveness of education for democracy.

  7. Transitional Democracy, Legitimacy and the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Kaplánová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the ongoing global crisis has triggered an issue how to set up a theoretical framework of global governance. The integration to a supranational level of governance has been a contemporary process of democratization in recent decades. To analyze the institutionalization of global governance means to recognize a normative idea of democracy. The theory of international relations demonstrates that there are four normative models of democracy at the supranational level of governance. In my opinion, a crucial difference of the institutionalization is a concept of legitimacy of global democratic regime. Because of a divided understanding of legitimacy at the transnational level of governance is difficult to find a consensus in which way should be a transnational democracy framed. A dual legitimacy in a supranational organization like the European Union also triggers a specific democratic deficit. My point of view corresponds with the division of transnational orders in normative way and its correspondence to legitimacy. Cla rifying the duality of legitimacy can help us not only to solve all globalizing problems but of course to decide in which way we want to make the supranational organizations work.

  8. 76 FR 34639 - Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Office of Food for Peace...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ...; ] AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Office..., Office of Food for Peace, Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance. BILLING CODE P...

  9. 75 FR 74678 - Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Office of Food for Peace Announcement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ...; ] AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Office..., Office of Food for Peace, Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance. BILLING CODE P...

  10. Towards a transformed library and information sector in South Africa: rethinking roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Davis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the current state of libraries in South Africa. It draws on the state’s role in the provision of library services since South Africa became a democracy in 1994. There seems to be a worrisome aspect that the place of public libraries within local and provincial governments is in a state of uncertainty. Hence the urgency with which the National Council for Library and Information Services (NCLIS is approaching the problem by having appointed a technical team to develop broad legislative and policy guidelines for the transformation of the library and information services (LIS sector. The focus of the paper is rather on an argument for a rethink of the role of libraries and librarians within the local and provincial context. It is the author’s contention that the services of a library should contribute towards the quality of life, that is, the library should play a role in education, the promotion of moral values, the eradication of illiteracy, the alleviation of poverty and assisting in the quest for knowledge and the promotion of democracy in society. The whole notion of democracy needs to be deconstructed. Certain objectives need to be set in order to attain this aim of the library, namely, the library should foster and provide certain facilities for the development of individuals and groups at all levels of education, for example, a study area and an activity room or auditorium; the library should be accessible to the user to fulfil his/her information needs, in the quickest possible time; the library should be a main centre for the promotion and appreciation of all arts so that cultural life can be enriched; the library should play a positive part in the encouragement of active usage of leisure and recreation time. This calls for a well informed and empowered library professional. Although the concept of library professional is used somewhat loosely here, library workers in general should not be excluded when library

  11. Rethinking the Business by Ensuring Marketing Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    PURCAREA, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    In full holiday rush marketers are turning their attention to start looking at how they can optimize their company’s marketing plans for the end of year holidays, considering the signal given by the midyear sales. There is a real need for rethinking the businesses in another way in the era of the “Nonstop Customer” by acting at the same pace as consumers act now and putting a greater emphasis on personalization and relevance. By providing valuable information, marketing can have a direct impa...

  12. Rethinking the economics of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper makes a case for rethinking the economics of climate change. It questions the way the problem was conventionally framed and solved through top-down international cooperation and carbon emission permits, taxes and pricing. The paper argues that the on-going industrial and energy transition reflects a paradigmatic shift as compared to neoclassical environmental economics that has framed climate policy since the Rio conference in 1992. On a normative basis, the paper maintains that a carbon tax should not follow a Pigovian rationale. To be feasible such a tax should be of a Marshallian nature, i.e. earmarked, and rather modest at the beginning. (author)

  13. Introduction: Rethinking Reference and Instruction with Tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Rebecca K; Meier, Carolyn; Moorefield-Lang, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to Rethinking Reference and Instruction with Tablets. This is a pre-print, made available prior to the full publication. The full publication (9 chapters, total) will be available for purchase by mid-November in the ALA Store: http://www.alastore.ala.org When Apple’s Steve Jobs introduced the first generation iPad in March 2010, library and information professionals immediately began imagining ways that the iPad, and the tablet devices that would quickly follow, could ...

  14. Schooling for Democracy: A Common School and a Common University? A Response to "Schooling for Democracy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reay, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This short paper is a response to Nel Noddings's article on schooling for democracy. Whilst agreeing with the basic premises of Noddings's argument, it questions the possibility of parity between academic and vocational tracks given the inequitable social and educational contexts the two types of learning would have to coexist within. Drawing on…

  15. The craddle of democracy. From absolute monarchy to parliamentary democracy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Uffe

    2009-01-01

    Starting in the 1830s and until 1915, three decisive changes were implemented that were crucial for the development of democracy in Denmark. Citizens obtained representation through a legislature, suffrage was expanded from just a small percentage of the population to practically speaking all...

  16. "Democracy and Education": Reconstruction of and through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James

    2016-01-01

    While focusing on "Democracy and Education," James Campbell attempts in this essay to offer a synthesis of the full range of John Dewey's educational thought. Campbell explores in particular Dewey's understanding of the relationship between democracy and education by considering both his ideas on the reconstruction of education and on…

  17. Dewey's Ethical Justification for Public Deliberation Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, John

    2013-01-01

    Interpretations of John Dewey's political theory grasp his respect for public deliberation, but typically overlook his ethical justification for democracy. Dewey gave two primary reasons why democracy is superior to other forms of government. First, a public educated in the tools of social intelligence can be more effective at managing their…

  18. Globalization, Democracy, and Social Movements: The Educational Potential of Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytten, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the contemporary value of John Dewey's conception of democracy to addressing the challenges of neoliberal globalization. I begin by describing his vision of democracy as a way of life that requires habits of experimentalism, pluralism, and hope. I then suggest that contemporary forms of mobilization, resistance, and…

  19. Democracy and Female Labor Force Participation: An Empirical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayanpourtehrani, Ghazal; Sylwester, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically examines associations between female labor force participation (FLFP) and democracy. Using a cross-country, time series (1980-2005) data set, we find evidence that FLFP is lower in democracies. One possible explanation is that dictators promote FLFP above what traditional norms would dictate and so a greater freedom to…

  20. On Democracy and Leadership: From Rhetoric to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiorgi, Yiasemina

    2011-01-01

    This paper resembles a personal narrative on leadership and democracy and outlines how an educational leader can conceptualize democratic leadership and take some steps towards transforming theory into practice. The concepts of democracy and democratic schools within the discourse of educational theory and research are briefly discussed. Based on…

  1. 21st-century liberal democracy and its contradictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bellini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This brief paper intends to highlight the contradictions in which liberal democracy struggles within the process of globalisation, influenced as it is by the new connecting technologies. In particular, the difficult relationship between liberalism and democracy is analysed in light of the latest communitarist theories and new trends that interpret them socially. 

  2. Banzhuren and Classrooming: Democracy in the Chinese Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacheng; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The issue of education and democracy has become more and more important in China. This paper firstly explains the theory of democracy in Chinese classrooms, and then focuses on the Chinese banzhuren who is responsible for classrooming, an important educational area equal to instruction. We illustrate how Chinese students achieve development…

  3. Foreign Aided: Why Democratization Brings Growth When Democracy Does Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner

    2015-01-01

    if being one does not? This article shows that a substantial and immediate influx of foreign aid into new democracies accounts for the positive growth effect of democratization. The domestic regime characteristics of neither democracy nor democratization therefore seems to bring growth. The...

  4. The Populist Conception of Democracy beyond Popular Sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepijn Corduwener

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With populist parties making electoral progress across the European continent, the question of what their electoral success means for contemporary democratic systems has gained increasing significance. This article investigates how two populist radical right parties, the Austrian FPÖ and the Dutch PVV, conceptualise democracy, based on a wide range of party documents released over recent decades. It builds upon recent academic consensus that the relationship between populism and democracy is best understood from a ‘minimalist’ perspective, seeing populism not as antagonistic to democracy, but as an ideology that conceptualises democracy primarily in terms of popular sovereignty. The article adds to the existing literature by demonstrating that we can extend this understanding of the populist conception of democracy in three aspects: the populist emphasis on state neutrality; a two-fold notion of equality; and the extension of the political sphere in society. Based upon these three issues, the article concludes by exploring how the populist conception of democracy relates to the most dominant form of democracy practised nowadays, liberal democracy, and to what extent it reflects changes in our democratic political culture.

  5. Flavour democracy and the lepton-quark hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass hierarchy of the leptons and quarks is interpreted as a consequence of a coherent state phenomenon ('flavour democracy'). It is emphasized that particular forms of the mass matrices can arise from the coherent state basis. The violations of the 'flavour democracy' turn out to be relatively large. Numerical examples are presented. (orig.)

  6. The Global Crisis and the Assault on Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juego, Bonn; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    The paper argues that the current global capitalist crisis entails an assault on democracy. Since crisis connotes danger and opportunity, the recent crisis appears to be a danger to democracy but an opportunity to its antithetical ideals. At the international level, multilateral institutions have...

  7. "A Liberation of Powers": Agency and Education for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyte, Harry C.; Finders, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    In this essay Harry Boyte and Margaret Finders argue that addressing the "shrinkage" of education and democracy requires acting politically to reclaim and augment Deweyan agency-focused concepts of democracy and education. Looking at agency from the vantage of civic studies, which advances a politics of agency--a citizen politics that is…

  8. Globalization, democracy, and child health in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, Anna; Lyttkens, Carl Hampus; Nilsson, Therese

    2015-07-01

    Good health is crucial for human and economic development. In particular poor health in childhood is of utmost concern since it causes irreversible damage and has implications later in life. Recent research suggests globalization is a strong force affecting adult and child health outcomes. Yet, there is much unexplained variation with respect to the globalization effect on child health, in particular in low- and middle-income countries. One factor that could explain such variation across countries is the quality of democracy. Using panel data for 70 developing countries between 1970 and 2009 this paper disentangles the relationship between globalization, democracy, and child health. Specifically the paper examines how globalization and a country's democratic status and historical experience with democracy, respectively, affect infant mortality. In line with previous research, results suggest that globalization reduces infant mortality and that the level of democracy in a country generally improves child health outcomes. Additionally, democracy matters for the size of the globalization effect on child health. If for example Côte d'Ivoire had been a democracy in the 2000-2009 period, this effect would translate into 1200 fewer infant deaths in an average year compared to the situation without democracy. We also find that nutrition is the most important mediator in the relationship. To conclude, globalization and democracy together associate with better child health in developing countries.

  9. The concept and institutions of education for democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Zoran M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper comprises three sections: (a the concepts and institutions of democracy, (b the concept of education for democracy, and (c the role of school in democratic education. The concept of 'open society' is critical to the strategy of education for democracy. In addition to general conditions for establishing and functioning of democracy, the author points to some of its basic institutions: structured social groups, political parties, leader elections. The concept of 'education' is considered from the standpoint of goals - social, national and individual. It is pointed to tolerance as a key concept of the theory of education for democracy. School, being the most prominent institution in the process of education for democracy, places student and development of his/he; democratic characteristics and capacities in the focus of its strategy. All elements of teaching: curriculum, methods teacher, student, textbook are in the function of the basic idea of democratic education - tolerance and crisscrossed influences (practicing of getting used to differences. Apart from the development and acquisition of thinking in concepts about democracy, education for democracy should encompass knowledge for life at state and social institutions, for private and public life, acquisition of national values, rational decision-making discussion. The framework of strategy in question is certainly exercising of tolerance and getting used to crisscrossed influences.

  10. The strategic value of design for e-democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.W. (Bert)

    2014-01-01

    The paper arguments that a design approach will be essential to the future of e-democracy and e-governance. This development is driven at the intersection of three fields: democracy, information technology and design. Developments in these fields will result in a new scale, new complexity and demand

  11. Democracy and Spiritual Awareness: Interconnections and Implications for Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Glenys J.; Woods, Philip A.

    2008-01-01

    This article sets out theorisations of developmental democracy and spiritual awareness formulated in previous work by the authors. These are used to explore collegial leadership in a case study Steiner school, with the aim of illuminating and illustrating the transformative demands of developmental democracy and its interconnection with spiritual…

  12. DEMOCRACY AND CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING: CONTINUITY, DEVELOPMENT, AND CHALLENGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bradley Lewis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the paper discusses the origins and meaning of democracy relative to the development of Christian political thought through the modern period; it is important here that democracy means something different in the ancient world than it does in the modern. The second part discusses the view of democracy proposed in the formative period of modern Catholic social doctrine in especially from the pontificate of Leo XIII to the Second Vatican Council. The third part analyzes the political thought of St. John Paul II which seems to be the apogee of Catholic thinking about democracy. The fourth part discusses some remaining tensions and problems related to democracy that are articulated partly also in John Paul II’s thought, but in a sharper way in the thought of Pope Benedict XVI and one quite prominent challenge to the Catholic view of democracy in the phenomenon of pluralism. One can see in this history that the Church has gradually come to appreciate democracy not simply as an acceptable form of government, one that is not intrinsically at odds with Christianity, but in a positive sense, as an opportunity for human beings to achieve a level of moral development not available in other regimes. But there remain challenges associated with democracy to government and social life consistent with the natural moral law and to Christian faith.

  13. Interculturality and Intercultural Education: A Challenge for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikman, Sheila

    1997-09-01

    The paper examines the debate taking place in Peru, and also more generally in South and Central American countries with large indigenous populations, on the nature of interculturality and intercultural education. It investigates concepts fundamental to interculturality such as democracy and equality and asks what they mean in the context of the Peruvian state, civil society and the indigenous movement. It questions whether an interculturality based in apolitical calls for dialogue and respect for cultural and linguistic plurality can meet the needs of indigenous peoples and their daily confrontations with oppressive and unequal intercultural relations. Taking Peru as an example, it investigates the possibilities for the development of an interculturality that is characterised by equality and participation and which enables indigenous peoples to have greater control over their lives. It then briefly examines the nature of the intercultural lives of the Harakmbut of SE Peruvian Amazon and a new indigenous intercultural education programme which the Harakmbut hope will help them address the inequalities and exploitation which they face.

  14. Democracia en movimiento | Democracy in motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel CALLE

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Los movimientos sociales son agentes de cambio social que concurren, junto con otros actores, en la construcción de nuestras gramáticas de democracia (valores, imaginarios, prácticas, instituciones. En los debates contemporáneos sobre democracia dentro del mundo más académico, vienen consolidándose dos grandes visiones en torno a la misma: democracia representativa y democracia participativa. En gran medida estas visiones desarrollan sus postulados dentro del marco liberal, siendo el papel asignado a la participación (como herramienta o como bien en sí una de las principales claves que divide a los y las analistas. Sucede que, al margen de los debates académicos y de la visualización de la política dentro del marco liberal, determinadas redes sociales vienen proponiendo, y en algunos casos ilustrando, formas de democracia radical como tercer elemento que sumar a las anteriores visiones de la democracia. Son los nuevos movimientos globales, más conocidos mediáticamente por su irrupción en la arena mediática a través de las llamadas “protestas antiglobalización”. En este artículo comenzamos sosteniendo la, tradicional ya desde los 70, vinculación entre movimientos sociales y propuestas de radicalizar la democracia. En segundo lugar, clarificamos los debates teóricos entre las diferentes formas de concebir la democracia, a saber, representativa, participativa y radical. Posteriormente, nos adentraremos en los discursos y prácticas aportados desde el mundo de los nuevos movimientos globales a este debate tan actual sobre democracia en el marco del asentamiento de una mundialización financiera y capitalista. In contemporay academic debates about democracy we see two main views: representative democracy and participatory democracy. Mostly, these views develop their postulates within the liberal framework, so participation (as a tool or as a good becomes a key factor dividing analysts. But beyond academic debates and the

  15. Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Kelle, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Schmitz, B., & Kelle, S. (2010, 1-6 February). Rethinking Game Based Learning: applying pedagogical standards to educational games. Presentation at JTEL Winter School 2010 on Advanced Learning Technologies, Innsbruck, Austria.

  16. Egalitarian Democracy between Elitism and Populism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cerovac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In his influential book Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy Jacques Ranciere builds a substantial critique of liberal regimes present in most Western countries. He finds them defective because: (1 they allow wealth and economic power of groups and individuals to influence public decision-making, making those with economic power an elite group; (2 they allow knowledge and expertise of groups and individuals to influence public decision-making, making those with epistemic power an elite group; (3 they allow and encourage social and economic conditions that make people inappropriate for decision-making on important issues, making those with certain characteristics thus acquired an inferior group. We focus on the Ranciere’s second objection by relying on Estlund’s epistemic proceduralis approach and claim that one does not have to embrace postmodernist idea of reducing reason to relations of power in order to present a substantial critique of our contemporary society. Furthermore, we argue that one does not have to base egalitarian democracy on postmodernist ideas that reject the truth-tracking potential of democratic procedures – egalitarian democracy is perfectly compatible with the idea of truth in politics. Key words: , , , , ,

  17. Dressing Uncivil Neighbor(hoods. Walt Whitman's Adhesive Democracy in “Calamus” and “Drum-Taps”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura López Peña

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes 19th-century US poet Walt Whitman’s vindication of “adhesiveness” as imperative to the formation of a social democracy which might heal the neighborly hatreds of a divided United States and bind the nation together at a time of violent fragmentation and Civil War. The article examines Whitman’s location of the possibility of politics and democracy at the interpersonal level, and connects the poet’s political project in his 1860 “Calamus” with that in the 1865 “Drum-Taps”, studying how Whitman’s belief in the uniting capacity of love between men remained constant even as he was witnessing the tragic consequences of a four-year Civil War which would widen even more the irreconcilable gulfs between different Americans.

  18. Politics and population health: Testing the impact of electoral democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Andrew C; Veenstra, Gerry

    2016-07-01

    This study addresses questions of whether and why electoral democracies have better health than other nations. After devising a replicable approach to missing data, we compare political, economic, and health-related data for 168 nations collected annually from 1960 through 2010. Regression models estimate that electoral democracies have 11 years of longer life expectancy on average and 62.5% lower rates of infant mortality. The association with life expectancy reduces markedly after controlling for GDP, while a combination of factors may explain the democratic advantage in infant health. Results suggest that income inequality associates independently with both health outcomes but does not mediate their associations with democracy. PMID:27183313

  19. The Problem of Citizens: E-Democracy for Actually Existing Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kreiss

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that many contemporary e-democracy projects, particularly in the United States, have at their heart a model of atomistic, independent, rational, and general-interest citizens. As such, these projects, variously grouped under the labels of e-governance, online deliberation, open government, and civic technology, often assume a broad shared consensus about collective definitions of “public problems” that both does not exist and sidesteps debates over what these problems are and what potential solutions can and should be. Drawing on recent theories of political parties, social identity, and cultural cognition, this article argues that e-democracy efforts need to account for the fact that the citizens practitioners appeal to see themselves by default as members of social groups, and that this has implications for politics and what Jasanoff calls “civic epistemology.” Presenting the case of attempting to change Republican opinions about climate change, I argue that e-democracy initiatives should seek to foster collaboration and deliberation within, not between, parties and among partisans. To do so, e-democratic reformers need to explicitly structure the collaborative and deliberative environment so there is a range of intra-party opinions and beliefs as part of the consultative and policy-making process.

  20. The Danish Agenda for Rethinking Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Grex, Sara

    2016-01-01

    implementations. Findings – RPM and PHD share a focus on value creation, social processes, learning and complexity while PHD also focusses on lean thinking, agile thinking, front-end loading and leadership, which are largely topics beyond the RPM research stream. Originality/value – The paper presents how...... and practice. Design/methodology/approach – This is an empirical paper based on collaborative research between industry and researchers. PHD has developed principles and practices driven by industry consisting of ten leading stars and the impact, leadership and flow (ILF) method. The ten leading stars and ILF......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the similarities and differences between the Danish rethinking project management (RPM) initiative named Project Half Double (PHD) and the RPM research stream. The paper furthermore discusses how PHD and RPM can inspire each other in research...

  1. Determinants of FDI: Does democracy matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Farazmand

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Having access to foreign investments allows a country to take advantage of opportunities to which they would otherwise not have access. Many factors interfere with the ability to attract investments in developing countries, but there is lack of consensus on which factors play an unambiguous role. Using different econometric techniques for a data sample of 5 developing countries and the period 1990 to 2012, this study identifies those factors that most explain the determinants of foreign direct investment. Based on results, democracy can positively affect investors’ decisions about where to locate capital. The findings also show that foreign direct investment as a share of GDP, is significantly associated with low corruption, inflation, high openness, literacy rate and infrastructure.

  2. The Crypto-democracy and the Trustworthy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambs, Sébastien; Ranellucci, Samuel; Tapp, Alain

    In the current architecture of the Internet, there is a strong asymmetry in terms of power between the entities that gather and process personal data (e.g., major Internet companies, telecom operators, cloud providers, ...) and the individuals from which this personal data is issued. In particular......, individuals have no choice but to blindly trust that these entities will respect their privacy and protect their personal data. In this position paper, we address this issue by proposing an utopian crypto-democracy model based on existing scientific achievements from the field of cryptography. More precisely...... with their personal data but rather their data is distributed among several institutions. Together these institutions form a virtual entity called the Trustworthy that is responsible for the storage of this data but which can also compute on it (provided first that all the institutions agree on this). Finally, we...

  3. Power, Democracy and Problem-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Stentoft, Diana; Dahms, Mona-Lisa

    2007-01-01

    and create an intercultural teaching and learning environment. One of the course sessions is titled ‘Education, Power and Democracy' and the contributions from participants to the discussion in the course forum have been an exciting inspiration for this paper. The first section of the paper......  Problem Based Learning (PBL) as an educational approach has been increasingly applied in educational settings around the world. Given that PBL - as well as any other educational approach - is rooted in a given cultural context and thus carries the ‘fingerprint' of the specific context......, an interesting question is: To which extent is PBL a universally applicable approach to teaching and learning, i.e. an approach which can be implemented successfully to all times and in all societies, independent of differences in social, cultural, political and economic contexts? With this question...

  4. Democracy, essential element of the electronic government

    CERN Document Server

    I, Bostan

    2010-01-01

    This paper emphasizes a determinant aim of identifying different approaches, as comparing to the education and democracy ways specific to e-government system. Introducing the information technology should offer the possibility by which reform processes of the government should become more efficient, transparent and much more public for the citizens; in this way, their ability of participating directly to government activities should prove the carrying out of a democratic and free frame. One of the essential issues of such phenomenon is that of proving that adopting the information and communication technology programs to government process or electronic government depends upon a series of external factors, such as the level of state's development, the cultural level, the frame of developing the structures of central and local public authority, criteria that differentiate the applicability of such system, to various countries. This difference is especially seen as comparing to the East states of European Union...

  5. Urban sprawl, smart growth, and deliberative democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B

    2010-10-01

    Urban sprawl is an increasingly common feature of the built environment in the United States and other industrialized nations. Although there is considerable evidence that urban sprawl has adverse affects on public health and the environment, policy frameworks designed to combat sprawl-such as smart growth-have proven to be controversial, making implementation difficult. Smart growth has generated considerable controversy because stakeholders affected by urban planning policies have conflicting interests and divergent moral and political viewpoints. In some of these situations, deliberative democracy-an approach to resolving controversial public-policy questions that emphasizes open, deliberative debate among the affected parties as an alternative to voting-would be a fair and effective way to resolve urban-planning issues.

  6. p-Democracy a Pervasive Majority Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Kyriacos A.

    Today, group decision making in our democratic society uses the non-ranked method. What we need is an improved method that allows decision makers to indicate not only their chosen alternative, but also their order of preference by which all alternatives will be placed. We classify this as a particular Social Choice Function, where choice is a group decision-making methodology in an ideal democratic society that gives the expression of the will of the majority. We use the Eigenvector Function to obtain individual priorities of preferences and Borda's Function to obtain the Ranking or otherwise, the Group Choice. Our conclusions give rise to new directions for pervasive democracy with an innovative degenerative quantum scale to allow even for strong to very strong preferences.

  7. Devolution, Democracy and Development in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornell, Agnes; D'Arcy, Michelle

    -buying, compromised primaries and allegations of vote-rigging in many gubernatorial elections. Improved development may be challenged by patronage and capacity constraints. Overall our findings suggest that devolution has achieved some of its goals, but that many challenges remain.......On March 4th, 2013, Kenyans voted for the first time under their new constitution, bringing in devolution. To what extent has devolution changed Kenyan politics? We assess the progress made in the first year and a half after the election in terms of the extent to which devolution has broken up...... the centralization of the state; strengthened national unity; enhanced local democracy; and improved development. Drawing on primary data from interviews and secondary sources we find that devolution has made some progress in each of these areas, but that a number of issues remain. Central government has worked...

  8. The neuropolitical habitus of resonant receptive democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romand Coles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I argue that the recent work on mirror neurons illuminates the character of our capacities for a politics of resonant receptivity in ways that both help us to comprehend the damages of our contemporary order and suggest indispensable alternative ethical–strategic registers and possible directions for organising a powerful movement towards radical democracy. In doing so, neuroscience simultaneously contributes to our understanding of the possibility and importance of a more durable (less fugitive radically democratic habitus. While the trope, ‘radically democratic habitus’, may seem oxymoronic in light of Bourdieu's extensive rendering of ‘habitus’, I suggest that research on mirror neurons discloses ways in which iterated practices and dispositional structures are crucial for democratic freedom.

  9. Ghana: an emerging oil-rich democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an indication of the main economic and social indicators of Ghana, and an overview of the historical evolution of Ghana towards democracy since its independence in 1960, a discussion of its advances and limitations in this respect as this country is starting oil production (support of investors, obstacles and difficulties related to institutional limits, decentralisation process, land tenure regime and tradition), the author discusses the possible consequences of this oil wind fall on the democratic dynamics, notably regarding the legal framework (issues of fragility of the institutional and legal systems). In a third part, the author discusses the capacity of the Ghanaian system to face the oil challenge while exorcising the generally occurring curse associated with oil resources

  10. Nuclear legacy. Democracy in a plutonium economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have already been a few hundred known incidents of nuclear smuggling, mostly of small quantities not close to weapons grade material - but one gram of plutonium is more than sufficient to cause significant harm and to pose a substantial threat. The potential for further thefts is growing as the world produces ever more quantities of plutonium, not only from the dismantling of nuclear weapons but also from the separation out of plutonium from spent uranium nuclear reactor fuel elements. Trying to prevent the theft of gram quantities of plutonium would require levels of protection and surveillance unacceptably high in a democratic society. It is unlikely, therefore, that democracy could survive in a plutonium economy

  11. Piracy, Property and the Crisis of Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fredriksson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A political battle is being waged over the use and control of culture and information. While media companies and copyright organisations argue for stricter intellectual property laws, a growing body of citizens challenge the contemporary IP-regime. This has seen a political mobilisation of piracy. Pirate parties see themselves as a digital civil rights movement, defending the public domain and the citizen’s right to privacy against copyright expansionism and increased surveillance. Since the first pirate party was formed in Sweden in 2006, similar parties have emerged across the world. This article draws on a study of the culture and ideology of copyright resistance, through interviews with pirate party representatives in Europe and North America. It focuses on challenges to democracy, and the distinction between public and private property and spaces, in the wake of the war on terror and the global financial crisis.

  12. American Nations, Latin States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Nelson Ahumada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The nation, as artifact of modernity, assumes particularities in America such as the colonization and genocide of original peoples which still weighs as a never ending comeback. Nevertheless, capital, with its overwhelming force, destroyed peoples, cultures, traditions and landscapes. Latin America faces the challenge of uniting beyond the necessities of capital, and beyond two languages, spanish and portuguese. All of which has full validity at present with the blocks UNASUR and ALBA. Ethnocentricity is postulated as the exclusive condition of all possible humanity and, as programme, racism without races; Latin American miscegenation, as the potential for unity and the strength of emancipation as a project. Our intellectuals, who constructed a unique and superlative literature, are the lighthouses in the development of a nationalism without races. Anthropology in debate with psychoanalysis can become a compass in rethinking our America.

  13. Sentimento de democracia Sentiment of democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubem Barboza Filho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo explora o papel que os valores, e um certo modo de vivê-los, pode ter para a consolidação da democracia no Brasil. Na primeira parte, mostra, com o auxílio de Charles Taylor, como a proposta de democracia deliberativa e procedimental de Habermas contempla as idéias de razão e interesse bem compreendidos, mas soterra a importância do ''sentimento bem compreendido'' - dos valores que a originaram historicamente. Na segunda parte, o artigo examina as grandes configurações expressivistas e não racionalistas de valores que conformaram a identidade brasileira - o barroco, o romantismo e o modernismo - e como esta tradição, e os valores que nela habitam, podem ser mobilizados para a nossa plena democratização e para a permanência dos próprios procedimentos democráticos.This article explores the role that values, and a way of experiencing them, may have to consolidate democracy in Brazil. The first part shows, with the assistance of Charles Taylor, how Habermas's procedural and deliberative democracy accounts for the ideas of reason and self-interest rightly understood, but not for the ''sentiment rightly understood'' - the values which have made it historically possible. The second part examines the great expressivist and non-rationalist configurations which have made up the Brazilian identity - Baroque, Romanticism and Modernism - and how this tradition, and the values which inhabit it, may be worked out for our full democratization and the keeping of the democratic proceduralism itself.

  14. Populism or the Fear of Democracy Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Rahel NIREL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Populism is for many observers unconceivable without a strong, direct relationship between a charismatic, anti-system-oriented leader and the citizens who feel or are neglected by the main leading political parties. Nevertheless, in populism, leadership is much overestimated. If we consider the extent of populism as a political phenomenon, correlated with the fact that populism is an appeal to direct democracy and that the populists may only protest but never govern – this point of view should be challenged. Populism, unlike liberalism, has no coherent system of distinct political ideas. But it should not be defined simply as any political movement which stirs up the masses by fostering the simplistic policies proposals. We might rather say that populism cannot be understood at the level of policies, as it is more of a special way of imagining politics. A populist leader who can promote a purely moral image of an elite directs the voters to a set of expectations. The voters who support the populist movements accept this fact, because they believe that the current elites actually fail to represent them. In fact, they are not against representative democracy as such, but they want the change of their representatives with persons whom they deem as the closest to the image of moral purity proposed by the populist leader. This characteristic of populism – i.e. people want only one thing and that only their elected representatives may satisfy this wish – evokes symmetry between populism and technocratic governing. Similarly, the technocrats also assume that there is only one correct solution for every social challenge and consequently a political debate is no longer necessary. But the democratic exercise involves the very opposite: political alternatives and varied solutions generated by different perspectives.

  15. "Democracy Will Not Fall from the Sky." A Comparative Study of Teacher Education Students' Perceptions of Democracy in Two Neo-Liberal Societies: Argentina and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyngier, David; Traverso, María Delia; Murriello, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares and contrasts pre-service teachers' (PSTs) beliefs about democracy in Argentina and Australia. While there are many important studies of how school students understand democracy and democratic participation, few have studied what teachers, and especially pre-service teachers, think about democracy. This paper uses a mixed…

  16. Freedom of expression: still a precondition for democracy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. McGonagle

    2015-01-01

    This conference report was written in the capacity of General Rapporteur for the Council of Europe Conference, 'Freedom of Expression: Still a Precondition for Democracy?', Strasbourg, 13-14 October 2015.

  17. PARTICIPATIVE DEMOCRACY – A PRECONDITION FOR SOCIAL ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Loghin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Social economy functions based on some principles, the decisionmaking process being one of the definitive processes. Because the question is whether some democratic decisions can be taken within organizations in the absence of a democracy culture at the level of society. In the same time, solidarity and social participation- basic conditions for promoting and developing social economy – remain a challenge for Romania, having in view their negative connotation givenby the association with the experiences during the communist period. Starting with the essence and the benefits of democracy, this article makes a review of social economy from the perspective of practice in the promotion and consolidation of democracy. The article looks into the importance of participative democracy as a precondition for the development of social economy in Romania.

  18. Party system institutionalization and government formation in new democracies

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Lee Michael

    2016-01-01

    Party systems provide the essential structure of the coalition bargaining environment. Stability in party systems ensures that there are regularities that can be observed in government formation, but most empirical research focuses on established democracies. In new democracies party systems are less institutionalized and interactions between parties are less predictable. This has significant implications for coalition formation. This paper presents the first study of coalition formation in n...

  19. DEMOCRACY IN POST-SOVIET KYRGYZSTAN AND TURKMENISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Kokaisl, Petr

    2008-01-01

    It was not difficult for some transition states to accept the uniform model of the Western-type democracy. Many post-socialist states (especially from Central Europe-Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary) had experience of a certain method of delegating power from the pre-socialistic period, which was similar to the new system. However, some countries, when accepting global democracy, may not have any adequate traditions to build on. It is not always easy, especially for these states, to leave thei...

  20. Working Paper 184 - Does Oil Wealth Affect Democracy in Africa?

    OpenAIRE

    John Anyanwu; Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effect of oil wealth on democracy is important. National democratic institutions provide a check on governmental power and thereby limit the potential of public officials to amass personal wealth and to carry out unpopular policies. Democracy promotion has thus been at the top of the US and West European foreign policy agenda since the end of the Cold War. Recently rising coups d’états attempts and oil discoveries in some African countries, high energy prices and the North A...

  1. Seeing Otherwise : Renegotiating Religion and Democracy as Questions for Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bergdahl, Lovisa

    2010-01-01

    Rooted in philosophy of education, the overall purpose of this dissertation is to renegotiate the relationship between education, religion, and democracy by placing the religious subject at the centre of this renegotiation. While education is the main focus, the study draws its energy from the fact that tensions around religious beliefs and practices seem to touch upon the very heart of liberal democracy. The study reads the tensions religious pluralism seems to be causing in contemporary edu...

  2. Direct and Representative Democracy - Supplementing, not Excluding Each Other

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

    2007-01-01

      This paper presents and discuses four main arguments for and against direct democracy, popular initiatives and referendums: (1) higher responsiveness versus lesser quality; (2) higher popular responsibility versus weaker representatives; (3) higher popular participation versus deeper conflicts......: and (4) more transparency and enlightened understanding versus less confidentiality. The arguments are discussed in relation to general political goals of good government such as legitimacy, efficiency and stability. The basic thesis of the paper is that direct and representative forms of democracy...

  3. Deliberative Democracy in China: A Sociology of Knowledge Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUOSHENG; TAN

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes from the perspective of the sociology of knowledge how the theory of deliberative democracy was introduced into China.This perspective means that the analysis of this article will not focus on the theory itself,but rather on the various strategies adopted in this process(the strategy of introducing deliberative democracy theory into China and the strategy of putting this theory into practice)and their effects.

  4. Crisis and Innovation of Liberal Democracy: Can Deliberation Be Institutionalised?

    OpenAIRE

    Offe, Claus

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores the possible contributions of deliberative procedures of political will formation to solving the problems encountered by liberal democracies today. To begin with, four functions of liberal democracy are distinguished: securing international peace, guaranteeing legal as well as political peace domestically, and producing good active citizens. The following part of the argument distinguishes four structural features characteristic of democratic regimes: stateness, rule of law...

  5. Socialism and Democracy : New Labour and the Constitution

    OpenAIRE

    Bevir, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests that one way to make sense of New Labour’s constitutional reforms is to show how they draw on concepts of democracy embedded in the British traditions of thought that have inspired New Labour.  In this view, the constitutional reforms draw on a representative concept of democracy that has been characteristic of the liberal and Fabian traditions that have long dominated British socialism. The paper contrasts the dominant liberal and Fabian traditions upon which New Labour h...

  6. Democracy, political participation and good governance in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dare E. Arowolo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of democracy in Nigeria over a decade ago has not yielded much needed good governance. This is because democracy is practiced in such a way that responsible and competent people are scared away. Scholars and keen observers have attempted at unraveling the factors militating against translating democracy into good governance. The paper revealed that democratisation in Nigeria is pervaded by electoral violence, manipulation of election results and political participation constraints. These identified challenges have made it impossible to attain consolidated democracy that can, in turn, facilitate good governance. Democracy is a catalyst for accountability, transparency and responsive government which brings about good governance. The paper insisted that governance collapse in Nigeria is reflexive of the perfunctory role of the political actors and it adopted elite theory to reinforce this argument. The paper adopted content analysis as a means of data gathering. It dwelt extensively on the synergy between democracy, political participation and good governance but queried the artificial gulf between them in Nigeria. It concluded by putting forth viable and pragmatic way forward.

  7. Rethinking a New Conceptual Relation Between Economic Justice, Democracy, and liberal system: An economic point of vue

    OpenAIRE

    Issaoui, Fakhri; El Montasser, Ghassen

    2013-01-01

    Liberals and libertarians believe that justice is deeply embodied in liberalism. The famous physiocratic maxim "let them do business, let people and goods move: the world works by itself" relegated to second place some virtues such as justice and equity by considering them as mechanical outputs produced by market mechanisms. The invisible hand of Adam Smith is so benevolent that it inherently purifies various actions of the market. However, reality does not often look forward to these conside...

  8. Rethinking a New Conceptual Relation Between Economic Justice, Democracy, and liberal system: An economic point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Issaoui, Fakhri; El Montasser, Ghassen

    2013-01-01

    Liberals and libertarians believe that justice is deeply embodied in liberalism. The famous physiocratic maxim "let them do business, let people and goods move: the world works by itself" relegated to second place some virtues such as justice and equity by considering them as mechanical outputs produced by market mechanisms. The invisible hand of Adam Smith is so benevolent that it inherently purifies various actions of the market. However, reality does not often look forward to these conside...

  9. Global Subalternity, Exteriority, and Independence Day: Rethinking Radical Democracy and Biopolitics. Notes on Laclau-Mouffe and Hardt- Negri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseba Gabilondo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the work of Laclau-Mouffe and Hardt-Negri, perhaps the most influential theorists of Postmarxism. The goal is to show that their work does not account for the exteriority of subalternity in globalization and, thus, they are not able to theorize globalization in its geopolitical dimension. The article shows that the work of these authors is still confined to and by the linguistic, epistemological framework of postestructuralism (Lacan, Deleuze, Foucault, and, as a result, remains defined and limited by the geopolitics of the (postimperialist European nation-state. The article discusses the film Independence Day to prove that the theoretical proposals of these authors have been already co-opted and deployed by global neoliberalism.

  10. Learning democracy in a Swedish gamers’ association: Representative democracy as experiential knowledge in a liquid civil society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Harding

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To explore the role of civil society organizations in learning democracy this articlecombines the concept of democracy as 'phronesis' with neo-institutional theory, as well as with Hannah Pitkin's concepts of representation. It presents a case study (based on qualitative research of how democracy is learned in SVEROK, a Swedish youth organization focusing on activities such as computer and role-playing games, activities often associated with informal organization. In SVEROK they are organized in an organization sharing many features with established Swedish organizations, including hierarchic formal representative democracy. The norm in SVEROK is a pragmatic organizational knowledge focusing on substantive and formal representation. Organized education plays only a limited role. Learning is typically informal and experience-based. An organization similar to earlier national organizations is createdby self-organized and self-governing associations in government-supported cooperation. The case study supports Theda Skocpol's argument that organizationalstructure is vital to democratic learning.

  11. Ethics in the liberal democracy from the perspective of liberalism egalitarian of John Rawls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Alexander Solórzano

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the study of ethics in liberal democracy from the analysis of the «most important moral philosopher of the last century», John Rawls, cataloged by his followers and neo-Kantian, is seen the thin line that crosses the threshold of democracy as a form of government and its purely procedimental, as human actions are reviewed framed in his critique of the dominant ethical currents in American culture of his time, to show their moral and political thought the idea of a well-ordered society «and peaceful society expansionist» lawful and respectful of Human Rights. Rawls comes from its main tenets solve the traditional conflict between equality and freedom democratic from the merely political not metaphysical.Received: 22/07/2013 / Accepted: 08/09/2013How to reference this articleSolórzano, G. A. (2014. La ética en la democracia liberal desde la perspectiva de liberalismo igualitario de John Rawls. Foro de Educación, 12(17, pp. 109-145. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/fde.2014.012.017.006

  12. Genetics and democracy-what is the issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Niclas; Hedlund, Maria; Lundin, Susanne; Mulinari, Shai; Kristoffersson, Ulf

    2013-04-01

    Current developments in genetics and genomics entail a number of changes and challenges for society as new knowledge and technology become common in the clinical setting and in society at large. The relationship between genetics and ethics has been much discussed during the last decade, while the relationship between genetics and the political arena-with terms such as rights, distribution, expertise, participation and democracy-has been less considered. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the connection between genetics and democracy. In order to do this, we delineate a notion of democracy that incorporates process as well as substance values. On the basis of this notion of democracy and on claims of democratisation in the science and technology literature, we argue for the importance of considering genetic issues in a democratic manner. Having established this connection between genetics and democracy, we discuss this relation in three different contexts where the relationship between genetics and democracy becomes truly salient: the role of expertise, science and public participation, and individual responsibility and distributive justice. As developments within genetics and genomics advance with great speed, the importance and use of genetic knowledge within society can be expected to grow. However, this expanding societal importance of genetics might ultimately involve, interact with, or even confront important aspects within democratic rule and democratic decision-making. Moreover, we argue that the societal importance of genetic development makes it crucial to consider not only decision-making processes, but also the policy outcomes of these processes. This argument supports our process and substance notion of democracy, which implies that public participation, as a process value, must be complemented with a focus on the effects of policy decisions on democratic values such as distributive justice.

  13. First hegemony, then democracy : On ideology and the media discourse on the coup against Hugo Chávez

    OpenAIRE

    Abalo, Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the media discourse on the 2002 coup d’état against the government of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela, with the aim of exploring how ideology in media discourse helps construct democracy in a Latin American political context. Critical discourse analysis is used to examine written pieces from Dagens Nyheter (Sweden), El País (Uruguay), and the New York Times (US). The study finds that the discourse on the overthrow and the events preceding it constructs the coup as a potential vic...

  14. Project for the new American Century?

    OpenAIRE

    Fahnøe, Sanne; Grip, Sune; Helqvist, Iben; Holton, Christina; Zidan, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Our concern is based on how the neoconservative think-tank "The Project for the New American Century" has combined their ideology from the two International Relations theories liberalism and realism. Our problem in the project is therefore on how they have combined these two theories, which we find troublesome. Their mission is democracy, which is liberalistic terminology, but their means to achieve this is realistic, by military interventions. In our project we are therefore questioning PNA...

  15. 5G: rethink mobile communications for 2020+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih-Lin, I; Han, Shuangfeng; Xu, Zhikun; Sun, Qi; Pan, Zhengang

    2016-03-01

    The 5G network is anticipated to meet the challenging requirements of mobile traffic in the 2020s, which are characterized by super high data rate, low latency, high mobility, high energy efficiency and high traffic density. This paper provides an overview of China Mobile's 5G vision and potential solutions. Three key characteristics of 5G are analysed, i.e. super fast, soft and green. The main 5G R&D themes are further elaborated, which include five fundamental rethinkings of the traditional design methodologies. The 5G network design considerations are also discussed, with cloud radio access network, ultra-dense network, software defined network and network function virtualization examined as key potential solutions towards a green and soft 5G network. The paradigm shift to user-centric network operation from the traditional cell-centric operation is also investigated, where the decoupled downlink and uplink, control and data, and adaptive multiple connections provide sufficient means to achieve a user-centric 5G network with 'no more cells'. The software defined air interface is investigated under a uniform framework and can adaptively adapt the parameters to well satisfy various requirements in different 5G scenarios. PMID:26809577

  16. Microbial dysbiosis: rethinking disease in marine ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhelen eEgan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With growing environmental pressures placed on our marine habitats there is concern that the prevalence and severity of diseases affecting marine organisms will increase. Yet relative to terrestrial systems, we know little about the underlying causes of many of these diseases. Moreover, factors such as saprophytic colonizers and a lack of baseline data on healthy individuals make it difficult to accurately assess the role of specific microbial pathogens in disease states. Emerging evidence in the field of medicine suggests that a growing number of human diseases result from a microbiome imbalance (or dysbiosis, questioning the traditional view of a singular pathogenic agent. Here we discuss the possibility that many diseases seen in marine systems are, similarly, the result of microbial dysbiosis and the rise of opportunistic or polymicrobial infections. Thus, understanding and managing disease in the future will require us to also rethink definitions of disease and pathogenesis for marine systems. We suggest that a targeted, multidisciplinary approach that addresses the questions of microbial symbiosis in both healthy and diseased states, and at that the level of the holobiont, will be key to progress in this area.

  17. Microbial Dysbiosis: Rethinking Disease in Marine Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Suhelen; Gardiner, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    With growing environmental pressures placed on our marine habitats there is concern that the prevalence and severity of diseases affecting marine organisms will increase. Yet relative to terrestrial systems, we know little about the underlying causes of many of these diseases. Moreover, factors such as saprophytic colonizers and a lack of baseline data on healthy individuals make it difficult to accurately assess the role of specific microbial pathogens in disease states. Emerging evidence in the field of medicine suggests that a growing number of human diseases result from a microbiome imbalance (or dysbiosis), questioning the traditional view of a singular pathogenic agent. Here we discuss the possibility that many diseases seen in marine systems are, similarly, the result of microbial dysbiosis and the rise of opportunistic or polymicrobial infections. Thus, understanding and managing disease in the future will require us to also rethink definitions of disease and pathogenesis for marine systems. We suggest that a targeted, multidisciplinary approach that addresses the questions of microbial symbiosis in both healthy and diseased states, and at that the level of the holobiont, will be key to progress in this area. PMID:27446031

  18. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  19. Science, democracy, and the right to research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark B; Guston, David H

    2009-09-01

    Debates over the politicization of science have led some to claim that scientists have or should have a "right to research." This article examines the political meaning and implications of the right to research with respect to different historical conceptions of rights. The more common "liberal" view sees rights as protections against social and political interference. The "republican" view, in contrast, conceives rights as claims to civic membership. Building on the republican view of rights, this article conceives the right to research as embedding science more firmly and explicitly within society, rather than sheltering science from society. From this perspective, all citizens should enjoy a general right to free inquiry, but this right to inquiry does not necessarily encompass all scientific research. Because rights are most reliably protected when embedded within democratic culture and institutions, claims for a right to research should be considered in light of how the research in question contributes to democracy. By putting both research and rights in a social context, this article shows that the claim for a right to research is best understood, not as a guarantee for public support of science, but as a way to initiate public deliberation and debate about which sorts of inquiry deserve public support.

  20. Nuclear energy and democracy in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since nuclear energy is a question of international moment, critical citizens are today orienting the attention of the Swiss public more and more towards the international problems presented by the fuel cycle: problems about which a small country like Switzerland can do nothing without international co-operation and information. The most important concerns from the standpoint of the information which Swiss citizens ought to receive and about which I should like to make a few proposals. These are the problem of ultimate disposal of the high-level radioactive waste produced in irradiated fuel reprocessing plants; and the problem of diversion of plutonium by criminals. In conclusion, the last points I have made show quite clearly that the problems raised by the relationship between nuclear energy and democracy in Switzerland are going to be, more and more, problems connected with security and international solidarity. Member States should put International Atomic Energy Agency in a position where it can discharge effectively its tasks of standardization and information related to all sensitive stages of the nuclear fuel cycle

  1. Religious pluralism, human rights and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio de Oliveira Ribeiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the results of a research on questions raised up by religious pluralism related to the promotion of human rights, and some aspects around the deepening of democracy. Methodologically, we first focused on the balance of some important questions for ecumenical theology of religions, because they raise new theological perspectives. Then, we highlighted (i some aspects of the contemporary tendency to privatize religious experiences, all of this as impediment to a good balance between religion and human rights. (ii We analyzed the relationship between ecumenical theology and human rights, in a dialogue with Boaventura de Souza Santo’s ‘counter-hegemonic globalization’ concept. In front of religious pluralism it is necessary to give special attention to the articulation between the capability of religious groups to dialogue and the challenges around the promotion of human rights. We also indicate that an ecumenical spirituality emerging from religious pluralism will have alterity as a central dimension, and this will have a direct impact in religious and social processes giving birth to utopian and democratic meaningful perspectives.

  2. Direct democracy and minority rights: same-sex marriage bans in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. A common critique of direct democracy posits that minority rights are endangered by citizen legislative institutions. By allowing citizens to directly create public policy, these institutions avoid the filtering mechanisms of representative democracy that provide a check on the power of the majority. Empirical research, however, has produced conflicting results that leave the question of direct democracy's effect on minority rights open to debate. This article seeks to empirically test this critique using a comparative, dynamic approach.Methods. I examine the diffusion of same-sex marriage bans in the United States using event-history analysis, comparing direct-democracy states to non-direct-democracy states.Results. The results show that direct-democracy states are significantly more likely than other states to adopt same-sex marriage bans.Conclusion. The findings support the majoritarian critique of direct democracy, suggesting that the rights of minority groups are at relatively higher risk under systems with direct democracy.

  3. 75 FR 51749 - Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance Office of Food for Peace Announcement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance Office of Food for Peace Announcement... and Technical Division, Office of Food for Peace, Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and...

  4. Is Polis the Answer? Hannah Arendt on Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bokiniec

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to reconsider Hannah Arendt’s most influential works from the point of view of her attitude towards democracy and analysis of the way it may contribute to the contemporary understanding and redefinition of the very notion of what democracy is.The paper begins with the reconstruction of Arendt’s anthropology in order to ground her political reflections. The next part discusses the basic characteristics of counsel democracy in forms of spontaneous, local organizations and associations in which every citizen could freely and equally participate, as they show through her analysis of revolutions. The last part deals with different and contradictory interpretations of Arendt’s attitude towards democracy and the question whether her proposition is a practical, revolutionary proposition or an idealist utopia. The interpretation of Arendt’s project emphasizing her democratic and reformative approach is defended. The conclusion states Hannah Arendt’s important contribution to the contemporary reflection on democracy in view of her recognition of the power of grassroots collective actions and their role in contemporary political sphere and the necessity of such formed at grass­roots and spontaneous level actions and associations as a unique safety valve for the society, as well as a counterbalance for mass society.  

  5. Democracy and human rights: a paradox for migration policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, L B

    1997-01-01

    This article seeks to 1) stimulate debate on the tension between democracy and human rights that arises from the fact that the organizational unit of modern democracy remains the state, which is incompatible with the quest for transnational human rights based on a transcendent human identity, and 2) explore this tension as it is revealed in migration policy in South Africa. The introduction of the article critiques the criticisms offered by contemporary writers as grounds for an overhaul of current migration policy. Next, the article presents an analysis of modern, state-based democracy and of the rise of international human rights, with a focus on the following trends: 1) development of the notion of citizenship resulting from a view of the state as the guarantor but not the progenitor of rights, 2) the growth of human rights traditions in industrialized democracies as judicial activism countered populist and nationalist inclinations of national legislatures, and 3) the growth of an international human rights juridical tradition. The article then highlights the issues raised within the migration policy debate in South Africa since 1994 and examines the 1997 Draft Green Paper on International Migration. It is concluded that, because South Africa fits the general pattern of a receiving state, an overly ambitious human rights approach to immigration will conflict with the exigencies of the new democracy as it builds institutional capacity. PMID:12294201

  6. Global Governance: Some concerns about authentic democracy addressed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Brock

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I take up a commonly voiced concern about the viability of global governance in general, and cosmopolitan democracy in particular, namely, whether genuine democracy can be achieved at the international level. Some (such as, Will Kymlicka argue that genuine democracy is only possible within nation-states, because authentic deliberation requires common nationality or identity, which generates the trust and solidarity necessary to sustain deliberation and democracy. Through analysis of the argument and consideration of the requirements of genuine democracy, we can see that these concerns can be addressed. I go on to suggest that the major challenge facing models of global governance is not one concerning lack of common identity, solidarity, or opportunities for authentic deliberation, rather, it lies elsewhere. We can assess global governance arrangements in terms of two main variables, which are sometimes in tension: effectiveness and accountability. We want systems of global governance to incorporate both considerations. Accountability can take the form of democratic procedures but alternative forms of accountability are also possible. Furthermore, a system of governance that both effectively attends to people’s interests and is suitably accountable can certainly claim to have adequate democratic credentials on the “Responsive Democracy” view I discuss. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1837317

  7. The Ways to Strengthen Democracy in 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shazia kiyani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the weaknesses of different democracies of the world in 21st century and suggests some solutions to them. Among the living democracies of the world all of them are not exemplary and among the mediocre ones too all of them are not too bad. Some of the countries are justifying with the splendid principle of democracy and leaving the examples of good governance, self reliance, supremacy of Law and Rule of Equality for the rest of the world. On the other hand some of the countries are still striving hard to establish or retrieve the democracy. We need an ideal of democracy which renders it possible to access to what degree a world government serving a sovereign world parliament could be democratic and independent in order to be prosperous and capable of standing on its own feet in the 21st century. A strong democratic system of government is the only way out for the self reliance and stability of the country. This paper is aimed to identify the problems faced by today’s democratic countries and their solution.

  8. Democracy and democratization in contemporary Muslim societies: A theoretical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahabuddin Ra’ees

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact of democracy and democratization on contemporary Muslim societies. The institutional and philosophical approaches to democracy and democratization are inseparable. The paper investigates the relationship between the philosophical dimension of Western democracy and the Muslim philosophy of life and concludes that the democratization of contemporary Muslim societies leads to serious and destabilizing ideological polarization and division of Muslim societies into supporters of secularism and political Islam. The Islamist-secularists relation radicalizes: (1 when the Islamists are prevented from capturing power through democratic institutions and (2 when the advanced Western democratic states cooperate with non-democratic secular elites of Muslim societies. The destabilizing role of democracy can be moderated if the Islamists are engaged in the democratic process, and the debate between the Islamists, the secularists and the West – based on the view that the West should conceive Islam as an alternative weltanschauung [worldview] – focuses on issues that are human properties, irrespective of religion, ethnicity or language. The institutional approach to democracy provides a common ground for cooperation and dialogue between the Islamists, the secularists and the West.

  9. Majority Tyranny or Minority Power? Impact of Direct Democracy on Same-Sex Relationship Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Doney, Jylisa Renea

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined the conditions under which direct democracy advanced versus impeded gay relationship rights. Many policy makers argue that direct democracy works to create a “tyranny of the majority” in which the majority impedes the rights of minority citizens. However, other researchers disagree and note that direct democracy contests advance gay rights as seen in Switzerland (Frey & Goette, 1998). I hypothesize that direct democracy advanced gay relationship rights legislation...

  10. The Role of Internet Political Communication in Development of Public Sphere and Electronic Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Visvaldis Valtenbergs

    2010-01-01

    The Role of Internet Political Communication in Development of Public Sphere and Electronic Democracy Visvaldis Valtenbergs Keywords: public sphere, internet, e-democracy, parties Central to this thesis are questions about internet’s potential in renewing informed and critical public opinion, and the adaptation of institutions of representative democracy to contemporary notions of public sphere, information consumption, communication and political participation patterns. ...

  11. The Democratic Transition. A study of the causality between income and the Gastil democracy index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin; Gundlach, Erich

    democracy index from Freedom House. First, the basic pattern of correlations reveals that a good deal of the short- to medium-run causality appears to be from democracy to income. Then a set of extreme biogeographic instruments is used to demonstrate that the long-run causality is from income to democracy...

  12. Rethinking reference for academic libraries innovative developments and future trends

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Rethinking Reference for Academic Libraries: Innovative Developments and Future Trends, containing five sections and fourteen chapters, reviews the current state of reference services in academic libraries with an emphasis on innovative developments and future trends. The main theme that runs through the book is the urgent need for inventive, imaginative, and responsive reference and research services.

  13. Emergent Interactions: Rethinking the Relationship between Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between teaching and learning is represented in contemporary higher education research which has looked at the correlations between students' approaches to learning and teachers' approaches to teaching. This article proposes a rethinking of this relationship, building on a critical realist perspective. Here, the teaching-learning…

  14. Living on Borrowed Time: Rethinking Temporality, Self, Nihilism, and Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappleye, Jeremy; Komatsu, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to contribute to recent attempts to rethink the deepest foundations of the field, this paper offers news ways of contemplating time, specifically its relations to self, nihilism, and schooling. We briefly review how some leading Western thinkers have contemplated time before detailing Japanese scholars who have offered divergent, original,…

  15. `I Am Not a Refugee': Rethinking Partition Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rahman; W. van Schendel

    2003-01-01

    In the wake of Partition - the break-up of British India in 1947 - millions of people moved across the new borders between Pakistan and India. Although much has been written about these 'Partition refugees,' a comprehensive picture remains elusive. This paper advocates a rethinking of the study of c

  16. Rethinking interdisciplinarity across the social sciences and neurosciences.

    OpenAIRE

    Callard, Felicity; Fitzgerald, Des

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a provocative account of interdisciplinary research across the neurosciences, social sciences and humanities. Setting itself against standard accounts of interdisciplinary 'integration,' and rooting itself in the authors' own experiences, the book establishes a radical agenda for collaboration across these disciplines. Rethinking Interdisciplinarity does not merely advocate interdisciplinary research, but attends to the hitherto tacit pragmatics, affects, power dynamics, and ...

  17. Intimate Distance: Rethinking the Unthought God in Christianity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kate, L. ten

    2008-01-01

    The work of the French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy shares with the thinkers of the ‘theological turn in phenomenology’ the programmatic desire to place the ‘theological’, in the broad sense of rethinking the religious traditions in our secular time, back on the agenda of critical thought. Like those

  18. Rethinking Themes for Teaching the Era of the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Norman L.; Rosenberg, Emily S.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that the "tried and true" strategies for teaching about the early Cold War years highlight the U.S. response to Soviet expansionism. Identifies four other focus themes: (1) debates over mass culture and youth culture; (2) gender and sexuality; (3) the civil rights era; and (4) rethinking the cold war itself. (CFR)

  19. The Method For Human Rights and Democracy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüştü YEŞİL

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Like in all other fields of education, it is also essential problem to select an appropriate method for human rights and democracy education. One of the most important factors influencing the method selection is the attribute of content. In this study, the methods which will be followed in human rights and the democracy education have been taken into consideration. Human rights and democracy are, first of all, two important concepts which address to the personality, culture and the mentality. Personality, culture and mentality, on the other hand, are shaped mostly by the environment and method that influence it. In order to train individuals who are respectful to the human rights and democratic members, it is necessary to create a democratic environment. Because individuals can acquire democratic value mostly through living and seeing.

  20. Delegated Democracy. The Siting of Swedish Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Hanna Sofia (Stockholm Univ., SCORE, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    This paper aims to characterise Swedish democracy in connection with the disposal of Swedish nuclear waste. To this end, an analysis is performed to discern which democratic ideals that can be found within the nuclear waste issue. The study analyses various actors' views on democracy and expertise as well as their definitions of the nuclear waste issue, and discusses this from the perspective of democracy theory. Which definitions that become influential has democratic implications. In addition, various actors' possible attempts to help or hinder other actors from gaining influence over the nuclear waste issue in the four municipalities are studied. In connection with the case studies the aim of the paper can be narrowed to comprise the following questions: Which democratic ideals can be found within SKB's siting process during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process during the site investigations? Which democratic ideals were influential during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process?

  1. Delegated Democracy. The Siting of Swedish Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to characterise Swedish democracy in connection with the disposal of Swedish nuclear waste. To this end, an analysis is performed to discern which democratic ideals that can be found within the nuclear waste issue. The study analyses various actors' views on democracy and expertise as well as their definitions of the nuclear waste issue, and discusses this from the perspective of democracy theory. Which definitions that become influential has democratic implications. In addition, various actors' possible attempts to help or hinder other actors from gaining influence over the nuclear waste issue in the four municipalities are studied. In connection with the case studies the aim of the paper can be narrowed to comprise the following questions: Which democratic ideals can be found within SKB's siting process during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process during the site investigations? Which democratic ideals were influential during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process?

  2. Delegated democracy. Siting selection for the Swedish nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study concerns the siting of the Swedish nuclear waste repository. Four cases are examined: the feasibility studies in Nykoeping and Tierp (cases 1 and 2), as well as three public consultation meetings with conservationist and environmental organisations, and two study visits to nuclear facilities in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar, which were held during what is called the site-investigation phase (cases 3 and 4). The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) began the search for a nuclear waste site in the 1970s. Since 1992 SKB has conducted feasibility studies in eight municipalities, including in the four municipalities mentioned above. At the present time more comprehensive site investigations are underway in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar, two municipalities that already host nuclear power plants as well as storages for nuclear waste. In addition to SKB and the municipalities involved in the site-selection process, politicians, opinion groups, concerned members of the public, and oversight bodies are important actors. The analysis of the cases employs the concepts of 'sub-politics', 'boundary work', and 'expertise', together with the four models of democracy 'representative democracy', participatory democracy', 'deliberative democracy', and 'technocracy'. The aim of the study is to describe the characteristics of Swedish democracy in relation to the disposal of Swedish nuclear waste. The main questions of the study are: Which democratic ideals can be found within SKB's siting process during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process during the site investigations? and Which democratic ideals were influential during the feasibility studies and in the consultation process? The study is based on qualitative methods, and the source materials consist of documents, interviews, and participant observations. In summary, the form of democracy that emerges in the four case studies can be described as delegated democracy. This means that a large

  3. The challenge from nationalism for European citizenship and democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    The paper reflects upon the democratic challenges posed by the growth of new forms of nationalism across Europe for civic, political and social citizenship exacerbated by the economic and financial crisis. Scholars have argued that we need to reframe citizenship a new multilayered conception...... of citizenship which extends from the local to the transnational level, because people are no longer connected primarily to the nation state but are simultaneously citizens in more than one political community. European scholarship has discussed the potential and barriers to develop EU citizenship, democracy...... and public sphere. The theoretical question is whether democracy and citizenship beyond the nation state is feasible. The analytical question is whether a European citizenship, democracy and public sphere is emerging within the EUs multilevel institutions and policy frame. The normative question is whether...

  4. Islam and Democracy: In Search of a Viable Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahtiar Effendy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Democracy is actually a concept that is understood and practiced heterogeneous. However, there are basic elements or "family resemblence" of democracy: the process of elite recruitment and freely through open competition, and the existence of the right to vote on the basis of universal suffrage. Are these two elements can not be accepted and practiced in Islamic countries? The problem is very dependent on how Islam is understood. During this time of political observers tend to define Islam as a monolithic religion. Huntington and Fukuyama, for example, the view that Islam is essentially incompatible with democracy. Islam is seen that seed saving practices threaten liberal.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v2i4.818

  5. Aggregate Democracyand Deliberative Democracy: An Inevitable Practical Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Marey

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper sets forth programmatically a series of conditions necessary for a deliberative theory of democracy to be able to account for the normative value of the two fundamental principles of democracy: human rights and popular sovereignty. The starting point is the question of whether aggregate conceptions are capable ofdesigning collective decision-making procedures in which those two principles are mutually entailed. The article emphasizes the importance for democratic procedures to include a reciprocal justification requirement that cannot be fully satisfied by aggregate or agonistic conceptions.

  6. [Sociology of health, social ecology and media democracy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Máté

    2012-05-27

    The correlation of the sociology of health, social ecology and media democracy is demonstrated in the study. In societies of today, the role of the media is unquestionable in disseminating information relating to health and the environment. According to Paragraph (1) of Article XXI of the Hungarian Constitution of 2011, everyone has the right to a healthy environment. An environmentalist media democracy may forward environmental justice, environmental education, and environmentalist economy, etc. All these are required in order to establish a society where the healthy environment is an objective value.

  7. [The regionalization of health: an opportunity for health democracy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saout, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Health democracy in France has consisted in recognizing individual and collective rights attributed to users of the health system and in making decision-making procedures in health more contradictory. However, this movement has encountered a number of obstacles and barriers since the adoption of the law of March 4, 2002. Seven years later, the recent Act of July 21, 2009, aims to renovate a more vigorous health democracy, including restoring regional conferences on health and governance with the autonomous powers that were conferred to them in the 2002 Act. However, nothing is yet secured; vigilance is essential and should remain high on the agenda.

  8. e-Democracy: The Political Culture of Tomorrow's Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilis, Triantafillou; Dimitris, Kalogeras

    The aim of this study is to investigate how Internet influences the political-social behavior of the members of the School Community. In order to do so we questioned students (tomorrow's citizens) and teachers of secondary schools and analyzed their understanding about e-democracy issues. The research is held by the department of Telecommunication Systems & Networks, Nafpaktos Branch of the Technological Educational Institute of Messolonghi with the participation of students and teachers from the Region of Western Greece. It was observed that Internet offers new possibilities for people's participation in the political process. The results show that students feel more confident against technology and Democracy in contrast to their teachers.

  9. A radical proposal for direct democracy in large societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN ASIMAKOPOULOS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is argued direct democracy is attainable but only in ways that connect to the experiences of daily life. By modifying existing institutions of governance it is pragmatically possible to achieve a society resembling distant utopias. One proposal is based on the argument that all electoral systems are inherently fraudulent under any regime. Rather, direct democracy alone can provide substantive equality. Therefore it is suggested legislative and judicial branches be filled by lottery while leaving the demos as the executive through internet voting modeled on the principle of state propositions.

  10. The Acción Nacional Party and Christian Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Hernández

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a chronology based on four stages that systematize the relationship between the PAN, since it's birth in 1939, and christian democracy, until today. The analysis focuses on the influence of organizational development, and the role of this party within the political system, in the redefinition of the PAN's strategy regarding the christian democratic movement. I argue that the phase I have described as of cooperation (second half of the seventies and eighties, was the key moment for both actors to establish formal links, based on the PAN's affiliation to christian democracy, and the establishment of a clear strategy of mutually beneficial partnerships.

  11. The Western Way: Democracy and the Media Assistance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Daire Higgins

    2015-01-01

    International media assistance took off during a time where the ideological extremes of USA vs. USSR were set to disappear. Following the Cold War, international relations focused on democracy building, and nurturing independent media was embraced as a key part of this strategy. Fukayama called it the ‘End of History’, the fact that all other ideologies had fallen and Western style democracy was set to become the one common ideology. The US and UK led the way in media assistance, with t...

  12. The US Occupation and Japan's New Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, Ruriko

    2007-01-01

    During the US Occupation of Japan (1945-1952), a victorious America attempted to reform Japanese education by replacing Japan's tradition system of values with one that promoted American democratic values. The United States had considered the source of Japan's militarism to lie in the selfless loyalty and love of country that many older Japanese…

  13. Democracy and Development: A Comparative Analysis of Nigeria and Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Olawale Bestoyin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nigeria and Malaysia share certain features in common. Both are plural societies; both experienced colonialism and both are federal and “democratic” states. However, unlike Nigeria, Malaysia has been able to tackle not only its cultural and religious differences, but also economic challenges. Within the past three decades, it has deepened its democracy and achieved a significant level of economic development via responsible political leadership as well as consistent economic planning hence, Malaysia is now one of the emerging economies in the world with a prospect of joining the league of developed nations in the nearest future. This is a great feat for the country that was far behind Nigeria in the 70s in terms of economic development. Using descriptive and historical approach as well as data from secondary sources such as text books, journal articles, newspapers, magazines and monographs, this paper, comparatively appraises the practice of democracy, and development efforts in both countries over the years. The aim is to unearth how Malaysia was able to strengthen its democracy and achieve economic transformation, whereas Nigeria has not. The paper concludes that the Malaysian experience is a clear testament that democracy and development can be achieved in plural societies like Nigeria, but only when public policies are informed by collective interest and driven by an unfailing political will.

  14. Education, Schooling, Derrida's Marx and Democracy: Some Fundamental Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peim, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Beginning with a reconsideration of what the school is and has been, this paper explores the idea of the school to come. Emphasizing the governmental role of education in modernity, I offer a line of thinking that calls into question the assumption of both the school and education as possible conduits for either democracy or social justice.…

  15. Libraries, Policy, and Politics in a Democracy: Four Historical Epochs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Paul T.; Gorham, Ursula; Sarin, Lindsay C.; Bertot, John Carlo

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the historical relationships between libraries, policy, and politics in the United States. Far too often, policy and political discussions related to libraries have little historical context. While libraries have long viewed themselves as a pillar of democracy by supporting informed, educated, and engaged citizenry, political…

  16. Democracy functions and optimal embeddings for approximation spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Garrigós, Gustavo; de Natividade, Maria

    2009-01-01

    We prove optimal embeddings for nonlinear approximation spaces in terms of weighted Lorentz sequence spaces, with the weights depending on the democracy functions of the basis. As applications we recover known embeddings for $N$-term wavelet approximation in Lebesgue, Orlicz, and Lorentz norms. We also study the "greedy classes" introduced by Gribonval and Nielsen.

  17. John Dewey's Democracy and Education: A British Tribute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Steve, Ed.; Coffield, Frank, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    In 1916 John Dewey published "Democracy and Education: An introduction to the philosophy of education". In this book some of today's foremost historians, philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists of education mark the anniversary of Dewey's work by reviewing and reflecting, from a British perspective, on Dewey's contribution to our…

  18. Attitude toward Democracy in Pakistan: Secondary School Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Yousuf, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Shafqat

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the public sector secondary school teachers' perceptions for development of democratic values and strategies to improve the democratic system and attitudes toward democracy. Sixty secondary school teachers were selected as a sample. The qualitative data in the form of interview responses were collected to explore…

  19. E-democracy a group decision and negotiation perspective

    CERN Document Server

    French, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Web-based interactions to support participation and deliberative democracy, called e-participation and e-democracy, are coming and coming fast. In some instances, the Internet is already permeating politics. However, it is far from clear if the processes involved in these interactions are meaningful and valid, and most of the research in the field has focused largely on the technologies to facilitate or automate the standard democratic instruments involved, such as e-voting or e-debating. This book, though, uses the point of view of the Group Decision and Negotiation approach to thoroughly discuss how web-based decision support tools can be used for public policy decision making. e-Democracy is structured into five main parts. The first part places democracy in context and reviews participatory instruments already in use in the physical world. The second part reviews methodologies that may be used to support groups in public policy decision making with a view on discussing how they may be used in the virtual ...

  20. Critical Thinking: Foundational for Digital Literacies and Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    This column addresses the importance of developing critical thinking to meet the demands of 21st-century literacies and participatory democracy. The author argues for a critical approach to digital literacies that explores the sociological nature of literacy practices. Students examine examples of new literacies and analyze how ideologies are…

  1. Managing Democracy in the Workplace for Sustainable Productivity in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikpo, Arikpo B.; Etor, Robert B.; Usang, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Democracy engenders freedom for all, human rights, participation based on equality, shared values, the rule of law, due process, good governance and transparency. In the workplace, it would include freedom of expression, association, participation, access to available information and the right of workers to understand what goes on where they work.…

  2. Living Democracy: How Constitution High School Molds Better Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasof, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Philadelphia's Constitution High School (CHS) is committed both to the theory of education for democracy, and to its practice, as reflected by a school constitution, student elections, town hall meetings, and active student participation in school government. As its name indicates, CHS is a theme-based high school that focuses on history,…

  3. Somaesthetics and Democracy: Dewey and Contemporary Body Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Perhaps no twentieth-century philosopher was as favorably inclined towards the role of aesthetic experience in building a democratic culture as was John Dewey, the preeminent public intellectual in America during the first half of the twentieth century. His vision of democracy necessitated a robust commitment not only to an open-ended process of…

  4. Leaders, Leadership and Democracy--Are They Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostak, John

    2016-01-01

    This article is taken from a talk given by John Schostak at the Co-Operative Head Office, Manchester on 25 September 2015. Question addressed in this paper include: (1) To what extent is leadership needed for a democratic life?; (2) What form of democratic organisation, if any, is compatible with leadership?; and (3) Is democracy undermined by…

  5. Classifying and explaining democracy in the Muslim world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohaizan Baharuddin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to classify and explain democracies in the 47 Muslim countries between the years 1998 and 2008 by using liberties and elections as independent variables. Specifically focusing on the context of the Muslim world, this study examines the performance of civil liberties and elections, variation of democracy practised the most, the elections, civil liberties and democratic transitions and patterns that followed. Based on the quantitative data primarily collected from Freedom House, this study demonstrates the following aggregate findings: first, the “not free not fair” elections, the “limited” civil liberties and the “Illiberal Partial Democracy” were the dominant feature of elections, civil liberties and democracy practised in the Muslim world; second, a total of 413 Muslim regimes out of 470 (47 regimes x 10 years remained the same as their democratic origin points, without any transitions to a better or worse level of democracy, throughout these 10 years; and third, a slow, yet steady positive transition of both elections and civil liberties occurred in the Muslim world with changes in the nature of elections becoming much more progressive compared to the civil liberties’ transitions.

  6. Economic Globalization, Industrialization and Deindustrialization in Affluent Democracies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, David; Denniston, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    This study reexamines the relationship between economic globalization and manufacturing employment in affluent democracies. After reviewing past research, including the well-supported Rowthorn model, we propose a differentiation-saturation model that theorizes that globalization has a curvilinear relationship with manufacturing employment. Using…

  7. Book review: islamic globalization: pilgrimage, capitalism, democracy and diplomacy

    OpenAIRE

    Housby, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This book examines an emerging pattern of Islamic globalization as a series of transformations in four interrelated areas – pilgrimage and religious travel, capitalism and Islamic finance, democracy and Islamic modernism, and diplomacy and great power politics. A valuable read for researchers and journalists, writes Elaine Housby, providing new insights into the rapidly growing ties between China and the Islamic world.

  8. The Urban Crisis and Pathways to a Multiracial Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivery, Curtis L.

    2013-01-01

    Realization of a multiracial democracy is challenged like never before by a new era of color-blind politics and postracial supposition, fueled in part by the election of our first black President in 2008, but contradicted by the chronic persistence of racial segregation and social inequality.

  9. Lebanese Young Citizens’ Attitudes toward Peace and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayrazad Kari Jabbour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lebanon is a small democratic country with a population of less than four million and a range of diversity; there are at least 18 different religious sects and 19 different political parties. The diversity among ethnic, religious and/or political groups has created conflicts that severely impact the Lebanese economy, environment, politics and most importance our young citizens. The aim of this investigation is to capture students’ awareness and attitudes toward the accountability and mechanisms of peace and democracy. Data for the study was obtained from extensive literature reviews and questionnaire surveys of 70 high school students. The investigation was conducted in the fall of the year 2013. The results of the study showed that most Lebanese young citizen view peace and democracy process associated with the end of violence and conflict behaviors; very small percent of respondents believe that bringing peace and democracy process should be answered by the people or by themselves. Results also indicate a lack of a sense of security among young citizen. This raises the urgent need to put into practice an effective peace education program that inspires and motivates young citizens to be involved in the peace and the democracy building process.

  10. Teaching for Democracy in Nigeria: A Paradigm Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enu, Donald Bette; Eba, Maxwell Borjor

    2014-01-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors addresses the complexities of the Nigerian Social Studies teaching context taking into cognizance the pervasive and lecture-based pedagogical process centered on rote learning and memorization. Democracy being a globally enthroned system of government can only endure when the citizens are actively involved by…

  11. Developing Curriculum for Democracy through International Partnerships. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamot, Gregory E.

    The fall of communism in eastern and central Europe inspired the call for curriculum development in citizenship education throughout the growing democratic world. Many programs between U.S. institutions and newly developing democracies continue to produce curricula for democratic citizenship suited to local needs. This digest discusses: (1)…

  12. World on Fire? Democracy, Globalization and Ethnic Violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, Dirk; Jong-A-Pin, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that democracy and globalization lead to ethnic hatred and violence in countries with a rich ethnic minority. We examine the thesis by Chua (2003) that democratization and globalization lead to ethnic violence in the presence of a market-dominant minority. We use different dat

  13. Sketches in Democracy: Notes from an Urban Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    "Sketches of Democracy" is a captivating book that chronicles the first year in the life of a new urban high school. Based on journal entries and educational literature, this book traces the author's challenging journey toward creating a democratic community of learners within a tangle of socio-economic and political issues. An experienced public…

  14. Understanding the role of nationalism in "new democracies".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić, D

    1999-06-01

    The transition from communism to democracy has raised numerous discussions regarding the nature of postcommunism in Eastern Europe. According to the author, the two main approaches used to explain the collapse of communism--one that claims that resurrected civil society triumphed over totalitarianism, and, the other that avers Eastern Europe's propensity for irrationalism and a political behaviour based on ethnic exclusion and hatred--overlook the unique nature of postcommunism. In order to properly grasp the nature of this phenomena, the author argues that one must first understand the intrinsic nature of Eastern Europe's transformation. To do this requires an analysis of the social structures that drive political change and identifying the social group that is the main bearer of transformation. The author believes that though her analysis focuses primarily on the case of former Yugoslavia, and Croatia in particular, the conclusions she draws from it are also valid for other East European countries: that the nation is regarded as the principal catalyst for political change and that nationalism is the main legitimizing principle of emerging states. This analysis rejects the common view according to which nationalism is casually discounted as an irrational political movement that is fundamentally hostile to democracy and freedom. Quite the contrary. Throughout Eastern Europe nationalism has had a positive role in bringing down communism and creating a space for democracy to take root. Still, tension exists between nationalism and the democracy it spawned. To understand this paradox requires an extensive sociological and historical study of the particular conditions within which a particular community defines the goals of nationalism and the specific content of its main undergirding concepts like nation and state. Identifying the circumstances within which nationalism begins to act as an obstacle to the establishment of full-fledge democracy is key to understanding

  15. Dutch Adolescents' Narratives about Democracy: "I Know What Democracy Means, but Not What It Means to Me"

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, I.; Goodson, I. F.; Veugelers, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, educational scholars have studied various aspects of adolescents' citizenship narratives. This paper reports on a qualitative study into the narratives about democracy of 27 adolescents from an urban area in the Netherlands. The aim of the study was to gain an insight into the type of democratic engagement that Dutch…

  16. An ‘Abductive’ Approach to Theorization of Militant Democracy: The Case of Post-authoritarian Democracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourne, Angela; Moroska-Bonkiewicz, Aleksandra

    (institutional, ideological or otherwise) of speakers articulating different positions. Our focus on discourse also permits an analysis of the role of ethical and normative issues in public debate, including the process of shaping conceptions of democracy, legitimacy, liberty and human rights in both countries...

  17. Rethinking Participation and Re-enacting Its Dilemmas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Birgit; Stephensen, Jan Løhmann

    2015-01-01

    Rethink project. Informed by theoretical distinctions between different forms of participation, and the diverse interests invested in participatory processes, we investigate how the young cultural entrepreneurs and the artistic administrators of Aarhus 2017 separately, in conjunction, and sometimes even......In 2012 the Danish city of Aarhus was appointed European Capital of Culture for 2017. The appointment was based on an ambitious programme that – under the headline Rethink – tried to set an agenda of societal transformation, mainly by seeking to increase the impact of art and culture, and to...... enhance civic participation at all levels of society. In this article we examine one of the first attempts of Aarhus 2017 to realize these grand ambitions: ‘The Playful Society’, a series of micro grants aimed at enabling young people to make their own art/culture projects and participate in the overall...

  18. Feet to the Fire: New Orleans Kids Rethink Their Devastated School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Jane; Burkes, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools is an organization of primarily middle school youth that formed after Hurricane Katrina destroyed most of the city's schools. This chapter describes Rethink's first six years of operation, which culminated in school system policy changes and an HBO documentary about the organization's groundbreaking work.

  19. FORMS OF DEMOCRACY IN EDUCATION: Open Access and Distance Education–Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Antonis LIONARAKIS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 4th International Conference in Open and Distance Learning - Forms of Democracy in Education: Open Access and Distance Education (ICODL 2007 had a special role to play this time: it was focused on the relationship between distance education and democratic principles which are connected and interrelated to eachother. These principles identify a new social role of distance education. Educational applications can be more flexible and effective when they follow some basic From the early beginning open universities and alternative forms of education have defined e democratic framework for educational systems. Their connection with the conventional educational system has influenced to a great extend new innovations in the system. With this approach we can realize that distance learning may become a bridge between these innovations and the initial ideals of democracy and human ICODL 2007 took place in Athens, Greece, from 23 to 25 of November 2007. There were 160 papers presented from 36 countries: Greece, Cyprus, Belgium, Spain, Iran,Canada, Turkey, South Africa, Italy, Palestine, France, Ireland, Japan, Nigeria,Bulgaria, USA, Austria, Finland, Pakistan, Great Britain, Ukraine, Egypt, Lithuania, Israel, India, Czech Republic, Brazil, Portugal, Botswana, Barbados–West Indies,The key–note speakers of ICODL 2007 were Professor Alan Tait, Pro-Vice-Chancellor, The Open University/UK, with the title ―What are Open Universities for?‖, Professor Michael Grahame Moore, the Pennsylvania State University and Editor of the American Journal of Distance Education with the title ―The scholarship of distance education: a review of the 40 years of growth and achievement‖ and Professor Paul Clark, Senior Research Fellow in the IET at the UK Open University with the title

  20. Concurso Network Reset: rethinking the Chicago Emerald Necklace

    OpenAIRE

    Torrecillas-Molina, Carmen; Cabrera-Manzano, David; Mart??nez-Hidalgo, Celia; Huertas-Fern??ndez, Miguel; Montalb??n-Navas, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Esta publicaci??n presenta la propuesta para el concurso???Network Reset: Rethinking the Chicago Emerald Necklace??? NUESTRA VISI??N Nuestra visi??n es crear una infraestructura maravillosa, vibrante y sociales a lo largo de la cadena con miles de lugares diferentes e intensos. El proyecto desarrolla una serie de intervenciones a lo largo del sistema de parques, especialmente en dos de norte a sur tiras interiores, dispositivos y eventos arquitect??nicos que fomenten nuevas conexion...

  1. Rethinking the city through memory and meaning of place

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    In the city the understanding of each location involves an approach to the processes and strategies of power behind socio-spatial dynamics associated with urban segregation and social exclusion. However, the intellectual weakness of the interpretations of the urban phenomenon requires rethinking the concepts and methodological tools to face the challenges of urban development in a context of economic instability, population aging and climate change. In this regard, various experts invite us t...

  2. Bourdieu in International Relations:Rethinking Key Concepts in IR

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This book rethinks the key concepts of International Relations by drawing on the work of Pierre Bourdieu.The last few years have seen a genuine wave of publications promoting sociology in international relations. Scholars have suggested that Bourdieu’s vocabulary can be applied to study security, diplomacy, migration and global environmental politics. Yet we still lack a systematic and accessible analysis of what Bourdieu-inspired IR might look like. This book provides the answer. It offers a...

  3. Rethinking the roots of terrorism: through the doors of perception

    OpenAIRE

    Franks, Jason

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the new terrorism debate and is intended to rethink the root causes of terrorism by examining alternative approaches, in part provided by conflict theory, to the predominant understanding of terrorism provided by what it identifies as orthodox terrorism theory. It presents a critical and discourse analysis approach to explaining and understanding the roots of terrorism and focuses initially on a description and explanation of the existence of orthodox terror...

  4. Mosques as American Institutions: Mosque Attendance, Religiosity and Integration into the Political System among American Muslims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Dana

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Religious institutions and places of worship have played a pivotal role in American Politics. What about the role of the mosque? Does the mosque, as an institution, in any sense play a different role than that of churches or synagogues in political participation? Some scholars have argued that Islam as a religion and a culture is incompatible with liberal, democratic American values; not only is Islam inconsistent with the West, but it poses a direct conflict.  This viewpoint has likewise been popularized in American and European media and by some government officials who have labeled Muslims as enemies of freedom and democracy. Through the examination of the Muslim American Public Opinion Survey (MAPOS, which has a large sample size of American Muslim respondents (N = 1410, we argue that the mosque emerges as an important indicator for Muslim social and political integration into American society. We demonstrate that not only are those Muslims who attend the mosque regularly more likely to identify as American Muslims rather than by national origin, they are also more likely to believe mosques encourage Muslims to integrate into U.S. society. Our analysis further exemplifies that mosque attendance and involvement, beyond creating a common identity among American Muslims, leads to more political participation in the U.S. In contrast to prevailing wisdom, we also find that more religiously devout Muslims are significantly more likely to support political participation. Based on our findings, we conclude that there is nothing inconsistent with the mosque and American democracy, and in fact, religiosity fosters support for American democratic values.

  5. Excerpt from Judah L. Magnes: An American Jewish Nonconformist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Kotzin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Kotzin’s Judah L. Magnes: An American Jewish Nonconformist offers a new view of Magnes, a prominent American rabbi and Zionist leader who emigrated to Palestine after World War I and became the first president of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Paradoxically, as Kotzin demonstrates, it was through his work in Jerusalem that Magnes most clearly sought to realize his American values. In the face of pressure from leaders of the Yishuv for a Jewish state, Magnes championed democracy, humanistic values, and Jewish–Arab binationalism.

  6. DEMOCRACY & NEW MEDIA: A REFLECTION ON THE APPARATUS AND ITS ROLE IN SUSTAINABLE DEMOCRACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Rao,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, the Internet has a possibility of opening a new era for public cyber-space democracy on a local, national, and global scale. Yet there are various views on Internet‟s democratic potential. As a result of internet‟ free nature, internet censorship is minimalised. Unlike content censorship, internet censorship is utilised to filter vulgar languages, videos and images. Recent protests in Hong Kong illustrated a good example of democratic society. China‟s government-scale censorship on Internet is significantly different from western part of the world. Whilst internet censorship in western countries is focused on hated posts, pornography, and coarse language or name calling, Chinese internet censorship is mainly aimed for replacing western internet environment to their own. As the world becomes more globalised, it is becoming more challenging for Chinese government to persuade the need of Internet censorship to the public. The question lies in how much control a government should have, if any at all, over the internet.

  7. Anti-discrimination Philosophy and the Decline of Post-capitalist Democracies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The author is trying to explain the contrasts existing between the expanding universe of anti-discrimination sanctions and the decline in legitimacy of democracy. The declining legitimacy affects both consolidated democracies, and newborn democracies. Inequality in the USA, but also at global level is illustrated with relevant statistics. The convergence between the crisis of democracy and the financial and economic global crisis is a major social and political threat. At the global level, after the Arab Spring, the third wave of democratization continued, while the quality of democracy substantially diminished. In the newborn Islamic democracies, discrimination against women, Christians, Jews, gay & lesbians, etc. continued, leading to arson, torture and killings.

  8. INTERVIEW OF THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE JOURNAL “COMPARATIVE POLITICS”, PROFESSOR ALEXEI D. VOSKRESSENSKI’S WITH ANDRANIK MIGRANYAN, DIRECTOR OF THE INSTITUTE FOR DEMOCRACY AND COOPERATION (N.Y., USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Migranian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Institute for democracy and cooperation is the first non-profit nonstate organization, set up to become a link between American think tanks and research centers, civil society institutions, universities and Russian intellectual and research centers and political and societal organizations. The IDC director Andranik Migranyan tells about the project of fundamental international research Democracy in the Russian mirror on the basis of the IDC and its significance for the world intellectual community and for Russia, about the project’s American comanager and co-editor Adam Przeworski, on the participants’ selection criteria. Project discussions were held in New York and in Moscow at MGIMO faculty of politics. A. Migranyan evaluates the results of work, the project workshops in Moscow and New York and makes tentative plans for joint follow-up research.

  9. Democracy and the Twin Challenges of Climate Denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change poses major challenges to the operation of "modern" political, economic and social systems, making visible assumptions and raising questions about how scientific information can and should operate in a modern globalized democracy. Alongside the serious threat to democracy posed by the phenomenon of "literal denial" (the e.g. so called skeptic challenges of scientific information for political reasons) is "implicatory denial" or the more pervasive and everyday problem of how and why people who believe climate change is occurring nevertheless manage to ignore it. Instead, disturbing information about climate change is normalized through a variety of everyday social practices from changing the subject, controlling exposure to information or the use of humor. The blatant and more readily identifiable processes of literal denial can work together with the less visible (and to date less studied) process of implicatory denial to hamper public response to climate change.

  10. Enhancing citizen engagement in cancer screening through deliberative democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychetnik, Lucie; Carter, Stacy M; Abelson, Julia; Thornton, Hazel; Barratt, Alexandra; Entwistle, Vikki A; Mackenzie, Geraldine; Salkeld, Glenn; Glasziou, Paul

    2013-03-20

    Cancer screening is widely practiced and participation is promoted by various social, technical, and commercial drivers, but there are growing concerns about the emerging harms, risks, and costs of cancer screening. Deliberative democracy methods engage citizens in dialogue on substantial and complex problems: especially when evidence and values are important and people need time to understand and consider the relevant issues. Information derived from such deliberations can provide important guidance to cancer screening policies: citizens' values are made explicit, revealing what really matters to people and why. Policy makers can see what informed, rather than uninformed, citizens would decide on the provision of services and information on cancer screening. Caveats can be elicited to guide changes to existing policies and practices. Policies that take account of citizens' opinions through a deliberative democracy process can be considered more legitimate, justifiable, and feasible than those that don't.

  11. 'Decipio': examining Virchow in the context of modern 'democracy'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, R Gregory; McKee, Martin

    2012-04-01

    More than 100 years ago Rudolf Virchow advocated for enhanced democracy and socioeconomic reforms in order that the state could empower people to achieve better health. With reference to these now famous assertions this article traces the promises and pit-falls of democracy from ancient Greece to neo-liberal economies, to ascertain if the democratic state is indeed the ideal mechanism for promoting public health. In the end we conclude that contemporary western political systems are not rooted in the interest of the people, but are rather deceptive forces of branding designed to promote underlining agendas. This 'decipractic' (decipo = to deceive) system of politics demands a vigilant analysis and response from those in the health and academic communities to ensure that governments can be a mechanism for positive change in the public's interest.

  12. Cosmic Neutrino Flavor Democracy and Unitarity Violation at Neutrino Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2008-01-01

    Provided ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrinos are produced from the decays of charged pions arising from proton-proton and (or) proton-gamma collisions, their flavor ratios at a neutrino telescope will be \\phi^T_e : \\phi^T_\\mu : \\phi^T_\\tau \\approx 1 : 1 : 1. We show that the exact flavor democracy can occur if the unitary neutrino mixing matrix satisfies either \\theta_13 = 0 and \\theta_{23} = \\pi/4 (CP invariance) or \\delta= \\pm \\pi/2 and \\theta_{23} = \\pi/4 (CP violation) in the standard parametrization. Allowing for slight deviations from either condition, we calculate the corresponding neutrino flavor distribution at neutrino telescopes. If the neutrino mixing matrix is non-unitary, as expected in a class of seesaw models with TeV-scale Majorana neutrinos, we demonstrate that the effect of unitarity violation on the flavor democracy of cosmic neutrinos at neutrino telescopes can be as large as several percent.

  13. From grand narratives of democracy to small expectations of participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christopher; Witschge, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    This chapter critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism’s function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public...... distinctions based on structures of participation and different levels of engagement. This article argues that the focus in digital journalism is not so much on citizen engagement but rather audience or user interaction; instead of participation through news, the focus is on participation in news. This demands...... the storytelling and distribution of citizen journalism within public discourse (integrative structural participation). Furthermore, commercial interests tend to dominate the shaping of digital affordances, which can lead to individualistic rather than collective conceptualisations. This article concludes...

  14. Trust, social capital and democracy: a complex joint for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ganga Contreras

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lately, it has been seen progress in Latin America, mainly from an economic perspective. Currently, it has been conducted research aimed at sustaining the growth, but focused on the country's development, which can be converted into social capital. Democracy becomes a key factor on this challenge and thus confidence in individuals and institutions. In this sense, the central purpose of this paper is to analyze the most relevant aspects of trust, social capital and its impact on democracy and development. To achieve these objectives, it is primarily used secondary sources of information, which involved review of articles addressing this issue. The conclusion is that a society that aspires the development should coordinate institutions to solve the society’s problems and demands, so that society responds with appropriate confidence levels.

  15. Macroeconomic policies and economic democracy in neoliberal Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this paper is to investigate some of the forms of conduct of macroeconomic policies related to a substantive concept of democracy, characterized by popular participation - direct or through representatives - in decisions that unevenly affect the material well-being of the entire Brazilian population. Special attention is given to decisions about the country's public indebtedness in the years following the launching of the RealPlan. Empirical evidences show a limited democracy, revealed by the material inequality, which in turn reproduces political inequality and restricts real freedom. This is combined with the selective bureaucratic insulation of economic policy decisions, and the parliament's failure to deal with the macroeconomic agenda. The latter is thus left to the control of the executive branch's economic apparatus, which on one hand submits itself to substantial political influence from finance and, on the other hand, restricts popular participation in decisions on both fiscal and monetary policies.

  16. SWELA, Ethnicity, and Democracy in Cameroon’s Patrimonial State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orock, Rogers Tabe Egbe

    2014-01-01

    empowerment and accountability. This article draws from a recent anthropological theoretical position on democracy as a work of cultural construction as well as on ethnographic material on an ethno-regional elite organization in Southwestern Cameroon called SWELA to provide an alternative reading...... of effective political participation, deliberation (voice), and political accountability. Taking the case of Cameroon, I argue that in complete reversal of the situation under the one-party state, the historical shift from the one-party state to multiparty politics in 1990 and vernacularization of democracy...... in Cameroon along a cultural politics of ethnic identities have provided political spaces to the elite that were previously inexistent. I explore how South-West political elites successfully articulate personalized and collective interests on the state through various ethno-regional modes of political action...

  17. Globalization and democracy: international immigration and limits of national citizenship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helcio Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although democracy has become an endlessly widespread idea around the world in recent decades, is also verified in specialized literature and opinion research that the democratic regime is in crisis. This apparently paradoxical process stems from the fact that the new democracies that emerged at the end of the twentieth century are challenged by two important factors: economic globalization and increasing social complexity. With the decline of the nation- state brought by the restructuring of capitalism at a global scale, political and legal mechanisms of economic intervention, income distribution, national development and protection of the citizens’ rights, undergo a radical weakening. On the other hand, globalization intensifies and facilitates population displacement and international migration.

  18. Energy, environment and sustainable development - tough decisions for a democracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossin, A.D.

    1994-12-31

    Electricity is recognized to be essential to attaining even minimum modem levels of human welfare in any country. However, where electricity is available, the public shows little concern about where it comes from or what it takes to make sure supply continues to be adequate. In the next century, the world will have to face the difficult decision about the long-term use of plutonium as fuel, and deal with its implications for nonproliferation. What the United States does on this issue will affect all nations, and particularly those around the Pacific Basin. How do responsible leaders set rational priorities in a democracy, when every issue has its vocal advocates and the news media can reach every household? If democracies are to avoid the downside risks of energy shortages, leadership will have to emerge that has the courage to tell the people the truth. That means providing scientific facts and explanations in terms that people can understand.

  19. Has the Deliberative Model of Democracy an epistemic value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto García

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Deliberative democracy is a normative ideal of democracy. This model is a proposal for the regeneration of the legitimacy of our institutions, but also a mechanism for decision making. It is based on two different dimensions: a procedural dimension where the model demands the inclusion and an equal capacity to influence the final decision of all those affected (Cohen, 1989; Bohman, 1996; Habermas, 1992 ... and a substantive dimension where the political decisions are made through a collective procedure of argumentation and public discussion. If these conditions are recognized, the decisions will be more rational and better decisions. This paper has two aims. First I will present the key elements of this epistemic conception of political legitimacy. Second I will show the challenges it faces. On a one hand, the counterfactual of many of its postulates and on the other, the obvious problems of bias consensualist of this model.

  20. Political leaders: the paradox of freedom and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Teles

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that political leadership still makes a difference. However, research seems unable to offer the proper tools to provide further and relevant understanding on the theme, particularly when we consider liberal democracy’s current trends, namely its egalitarian ethos and the personalization of politics. One of its key features, even in controlled democracies, with strong checks and counterweight systems in place, is the dominance of assertive leaders, to whom voters look-up to when deciding which party to vote for. Therefore, a dispassionate assessment of political leadership is needed in order to adjust our analysis. This article aims to identify the specific nature and distinctiveness of contemporary political leadership, arguing that the neglect of this issue by mainstream democratic theory is a consequence of an egalitarian bias that considers political leadership as in conflict with the ethos of democracy.

  1. A re-examination of the relation between democracy and international trade: The case of Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Balding, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and policy makers believe that democracy will bring prosperity through integration into the global economy via increased international trade. This study tests two theories as to why democracies might trade more. First, political freedom may be correlated with economic freedom, thus prompting higher levels of economic activity, thereby driving states to trade more. Second, democracy implies higher quality governance either through institutions or policy-making procedures. I utilize a ...

  2. Democracy and Sense : alternatives to financial crises and political small-talk

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2015-01-01

    Democracy and sense questions practically all that happens in society today. Its aim is to raise a debate on the most urgent problems of economy, democracy, sustainable conduct and the framework for industry and business. A number of untraditional solutions are suggested, but without support to either rightwing or leftwing politics. In fact, one of the key points is that political parties have reduced democracy to one day of voting followed by four years of oligarchy. To regain a functioning ...

  3. Democracy and administrative policy: Contrasting elements of NPM and post-NPM

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Tom; Lægreid, Per

    2009-01-01

    This paper was presented at the EGPA Annual Conference «The Public Service: Public Service Delivery in the Information Age», Study Group VI: Governance of Public Sector Organizations, Malta, 2.–5.9.2009 This paper put together an analytical platform for discussing and analyzing administrative reforms in terms of democracy. First, we present the fundamental positions of democratic theory represented by output-democracy and input-democracy. These two positions are used to clas...

  4. The role of voluntarism in stimulating organization democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This thesis represents a body of work developed over 10 years in the areas of management learning, organizational politics, and change and organization democracy. It focuses on the role of hierarchy in balancing the need for strategic coherence with the ever burgeoning plurality of organizational life. In recent years, there has been a variety of academic discourses that have illuminated this debate. Often coming from different epistemological traditions, each makes a helpful contribution to ...

  5. Media capture in a democracy : the role of wealth concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Corneo, Giacomo

    2005-01-01

    Since objective news coverage is vital to democracy, captured media can seriously distort collective decisions. The current paper develops a voting model where citizens are uncertain about the welfare effects induced by alternative policy options and derive information about those effects from the mass media. The media might however secretly collude with interest groups in order to influence the public opinion. In the case of voting over the level of a productivity-enhancing public bad, it is...

  6. Disruption and empowerment. Embedding citizens at the heart of democracy.

    OpenAIRE

    Andy Williamson

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a changing landscape of society and politics. Firstly it briefly situates current practices and methods of democratic engagement and representation within a recent historical framework. It then describes mediating factors relating to democracy, the media and civil society and contextualises these within the broader neoliberal shift from citizen to consumer. The paper then identifies some key transformational agendas in the modus operandi of citizen to government exchange ...

  7. PARTICIPATIVE DEMOCRACY – A PRECONDITION FOR SOCIAL ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    Dina Loghin

    2012-01-01

    Social economy functions based on some principles, the decisionmaking process being one of the definitive processes. Because the question is whether some democratic decisions can be taken within organizations in the absence of a democracy culture at the level of society. In the same time, solidarity and social participation- basic conditions for promoting and developing social economy – remain a challenge for Romania, having in view their negative connotation givenby the association with the ...

  8. The Political Dimension of Global Education: Global Governance and Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Bettina Lösch

    2011-01-01

    "Political and economic global transformation processes are encompassing the field of political education. The subject matter of political education, namely the political, has itself undergone a radical transformation. The changes have had a particular effect on democratic structures and opportunities for participation in the political process. Focusing on a conception of critical education for democracy, this article will highlight the democratic deficits of the globalisation process, and sh...

  9. [Democracy in healthcare and user participation: a long story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Chantal

    2015-10-01

    Since 1945, many legislative and regulatory texts have contributed to protecting patients' rights. This long road, alongside the development of patients' associations, has led to the rise of healthcare democracy. These rights need to take their place in everyday practice and enable citizen-patients to be seen as partners in constructing their healthcare and treatment pathway. The alliance is a necessity for this--now we need to bring it to life! PMID:26455617

  10. Towards a New Consensus: Democracy and Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    United Nations Development Programme, UNDP

    2001-01-01

    The report focuses on the interrelationships between human development, democracy and economic progress in Indonesia, in the wake of the East Asian financial crisis. The Report asks: How can Indonesia achieve steady progress in all indicators of human development as it restructures its economy, refashions its governance institutions, and devolves decision-making to regions and localities? The answer, the Report argues, lies in building a new social consensus for Indonesia that renews a shared...

  11. A Viable Alternative: the Scandinavian Model of "Social Democracy"

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbi, Michela

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing how far the Scandinavian model of "social democracy", which is assumed to be the Swedish model, still represents a viable alternative for the development of other industrial relations systems. The Scandinavian model, characterised by labour market peace and centralised bargaining, is based on two main pillars: "active labour market" and "solidaristic wage" policies. Its "golden age" lasted more than forty years targeting full employment, therefore here it is argu...

  12. The proscription of parties and the problem of 'miltant democracy'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourne, Angela

    2011-01-01

    banned. The party bans in Spain highlight weaknesses in leading theoretical accounts of proscription and democratic responses to extremism, weaknesses that are symptomatic of broader problems with the paradigmatic concept of ‘militant democracy’. More specifically, closer examination of the Spanish case...... illustrates an error of classification in Fox and Nolte’s (2000) distinction between ‘tolerant’ and ‘intolerant’ democracies, but also suggests a strategy for responding to a more fundamental problem of internal inconsistency in their model....

  13. Dilemmas of Direct Democracy: The European Union from Comparative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mendez, Fernando; Mendez, Mario; Triga, Vasiliki

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades Europe?s political landscape has been marked by a notable rise in the use of mechanisms of direct democracy such as the referendum and the citizens? initiative. Our focus in this article is on the national referendums that are directly connected to the European Union (EU) integration process. These types of referendums are increasingly recognised by the scholarly community as the source of institutional instability across the wider EU polity. To explain the nature of this em...

  14. American Indian Geographies of Identity and Power: At the Crossroads of Indigena and Mestizaje.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Sandy Marie Anglas

    2000-01-01

    Asserts that critical pedagogy fails to consider indigenous perspectives and calls for critical theorists to reexamine epistemological foundations. Urges American Indian scholars to bring their perspectives into this dialogue in order to redefine identity, democracy, and social justice. (Contains 65 references.) (SK)

  15. The Freedom Schools, the Civil Rights Movement, and Refocusing the Goals of American Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Jon N.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the history of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools to illustrate how integrating the Civil Rights Movement into the social studies curriculum refocuses the aims of American education on participatory democracy. Teaching the Civil Rights Movement and employing the teaching strategies used in the Freedom Schools leads to the…

  16. Democracia e justiça Democracy and justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro de Vita

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Examinam-se as relações entre democracia e justiça na teoria política contemporânea. Após evidenciar as insuficiências da vertente competitiva da democracia com respeito a esse tópico, argumenta-se que necessitamos recorrer a uma concepção "epistêmica" de democracia deliberativa, para a qual há um padrão independente de legitimidade política com base no qual os resultados de procedimentos deliberativos devem ser avaliados. Os limites dessa concepção epistêmica, sobretudo no que se refere ao lugar que nela deve ser reservado à competição e ao conflito políticos, são discutidos.The relations between democracy and justice in contemporary political theory are examined. The shortcomings of the competitive tradition of democracy on this score are brought out, and it is argued that we need an "epistemic" conception of deliberative democracy, according to which an independent criterion of political legitimacy should be employed in evaluating the outcomes of deliberative procedures. The limits of such an epistemic conception, particularly with reference to political conflict and competition, are discussed.

  17. The dynamics of democracy, development and cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaiser, Viktoria; Ranganathan, Shyam; Mann, Richard P; Sumpter, David J T

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades many countries have experienced rapid changes in their economies, their democratic institutions and the values of their citizens. Comprehensive data measuring these changes across very different countries has recently become openly available. Between country similarities suggest common underlying dynamics in how countries develop in terms of economy, democracy and cultural values. We apply a novel Bayesian dynamical systems approach to identify the model which best captures the complex, mainly non-linear dynamics that underlie these changes. We show that the level of Human Development Index (HDI) in a country drives first democracy and then higher emancipation of citizens. This change occurs once the countries pass a certain threshold in HDI. The data also suggests that there is a limit to the growth of wealth, set by higher emancipation. Having reached a high level of democracy and emancipation, societies tend towards equilibrium that does not support further economic growth. Our findings give strong empirical evidence against a popular political science theory, known as the Human Development Sequence. Contrary to this theory, we find that implementation of human-rights and democratisation precede increases in emancipative values.

  18. Community Engagement for Big Epidemiology: Deliberative Democracy as a Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah E. McWhirter

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Public trust is critical in any project requiring significant public support, both in monetary terms and to encourage participation. The research community has widely recognized the centrality of public trust, garnered through community consultation, to the success of large-scale epidemiology. This paper examines the potential utility of the deliberative democracy methodology within the public health research setting. A deliberative democracy event was undertaken in Tasmania, Australia, as part of a wider program of community consultation regarding the potential development of a Tasmanian Biobank. Twenty-five Tasmanians of diverse backgrounds participated in two weekends of deliberation; involving elements of information gathering; discussion; identification of issues and formation of group resolutions. Participants demonstrated strong support for a Tasmanian Biobank and their deliberations resulted in specific proposals in relation to consent; privacy; return of results; governance; funding; and, commercialization and benefit sharing. They exhibited a high degree of satisfaction with the event, and confidence in the outcomes. Deliberative democracy methodology is a useful tool for community engagement that addresses some of the limitations of traditional consultation methods.

  19. Do democracies promote peace in the lights of democratic peace theory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Balcı

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that democracy and peace are inextricably linked, that democracy leads to and causes peace, and that peace cannot be achieved in the absence of democracy. It is an obvious but important starting-point to remember that democracy and peace are not timeless but historical social concepts. Indeed, war itself is a historical product as the negation of peace. Democracy is accepted as the only way for the peaceful world according to the Democratic Peace Theory, but to understand the democratic peace theory, it will be better to ask the question, “What is democracy”? Democratic peace theory’s main argument is that democracies do not fight each other, but “what kind democracies”? In this paper some important points of democracy and the democratic peace theory will be pointed out. This paper gives a perspective of the relationship of democracy and peace, and clarifies the question of “does democracy really promote peace”?

  20. Discrimination at Work: Comparing European, French, and American Law

    OpenAIRE

    Mercat-Bruns, Marie

    2016-01-01

    How do the United States and France differ in laws and attitudes concerning discrimination at work? Franco-American scholar Marie Mercat-Bruns interviews prominent legal scholars to demonstrate how these two post-industrial democracies have adopted divergent strategies. Whereas employers in the United States and France rarely discriminate openly, deep systemic discrimination exists in both countries, each with a unique history of dealing with difference. Powerful and incisive, the book examin...

  1. American Religion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田甜

    2008-01-01

    It is said that American religion,as a great part of American culture,plays an important role in American culture. It is hoped that some ideas can be obtained from this research paper,which focuses on analyzing the great impact is produced to American culture by American religion. Finally, this essay gives two useful standpoints to English learners:Understunding American religion will help understand the American history, culture and American people,and help you to communic.ate with them better. Understanding American religion will help you understand English better.

  2. From grand narratives of democracy to small expectations of participation : Audiences, citizenship, and interactive tools in digital journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Chris; Witschge, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    This article critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism's function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public representativ

  3. Rethinking learning networks collaborative possibilities for a Deleuzian century

    CERN Document Server

    Kamp, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    In the face of today's complex policy challenges, various forms of 'joining-up' - networking, collaborating, partnering - have become key responses. However, institutions often fail to take advantage of the full benefits that joining-up offers. In this book, the author draws on ethnographic research into learning networks in post compulsory education and training in the state of Victoria, Australia, to explore why this might be the case and presents an argument for rethinking how joining-up works in practice. Throughout the book, Deleuzian concepts are engaged to forge a 'little complicating m

  4. Scientific Argumentation and Deliberative Democracy: An Incompatible Mix in School Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran, Sibel; Kaya, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    The article investigates how deliberative democracy is related to argumentation in school science. We use examples of political models of deliberative democracy to synthesize implications for argumentation in science teaching and learning. Some key questions guided our approach: How does democratic deliberation work and how does it relate to…

  5. The Paramount Importance of Experience and Situations in Dewey's "Democracy and Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, David Hildebrand connects "Democracy and Education" to Dewey's wider corpus. Hildebrand argues that "Democracy and Education's" central objective is to offer a practical and philosophical answer to the question, What is needed to live a meaningful life, and how can education contribute? He argues, further, that…

  6. 75 FR 4526 - Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Office of Food for Peace...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Office of Food for Peace; Announcement... Manager, Policy and Technical Division, Office of Food for Peace, Bureau for Democracy, Conflict...

  7. The Public Library, Democracy and Rancière's Poetics of Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzar, Timothy Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper applies the thought of Jacques Rancière to the concept of democracy as it is traditionally understood in library studies literature. Methods: The paper reviews a cross-section of instances of the link between democracy and the public library in library studies literature. It offers a close textual analysis of Michael…

  8. Charter Schools as Nation Builders: Democracy Prep and Civic Education. Policy Brief 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautzenheiser, Daniel; Kelly, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    This policy brief is the first in a series of in-depth case studies exploring how top-performing charter schools have incorporated civic learning in their school curriculum and school culture. This paper introduces Democracy Prep, a network of seven public charter schools with a civic mission at its core. Democracy Prep's founder and…

  9. What Future Teachers Believe about Democracy and Why It Is Important

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyngier, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses pre-service education student perceptions and perspectives related to education for democracy in Australia. Using a critical pedagogical framework datum from an online survey, it presents both quantitative and qualitative responses of contrasting understandings of democracy. It begins by outlining the concepts of thick and thin…

  10. Fighting for Social Democracy: R.H. Tawney and Educational Reconstruction in the Second World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Hsiao-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    R.H. Tawney (1880-1962), a leading English economic historian and prominent socialist, was vigorously involved in educational reconstruction during the Second World War. For Tawney, the war was a war for social democracy. His ideals of social democracy formed a basis for his case for Public (independent) School reform and free secondary education…

  11. Democracy Lessons in Market-Oriented Schools: The Case of Swedish Upper Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Based on recent ethnographic research, this article explores young people's opportunities of formal and informal democracy learning and expressions of such learning in the highly market-influenced Swedish upper secondary education. With its ambitious democracy-fostering goals and far-reaching marketisation, Swedish education constitutes an…

  12. The Pitfalls of a "Democracy Promotion" Project for Women of Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kassem, Nadeen

    2008-01-01

    "Democracy promotion" as part of a larger project of 'reconstruction' is hailed in mainstream academia and in policy circles as an essential component of rebuilding the state and civil society in post-conflict situations. Here "democracy promotion" refers exclusively to the promotion of political representation and participation, not to the…

  13. On Collapse and the Next U.S. Democracy: Elements of Applied Systemic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Greg

    2015-01-01

    While concern has been growing in recent years about the structural precursors to economic collapse in the United States, and a parallel decline in democracy, few have asked: (1) what moral and cultural foundations might be necessary as building blocks to launch a democratic renewal and (2) whether a different and "deep" democracy might…

  14. Visions Unite through the Concept of Democracy: The School and the Popular Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Lotta; Bergstedt, Bosse

    2015-01-01

    With a point of departure in the concept of democracy, this article aims to show how Swedish Popular Adult Education influenced the content of the established school system in Sweden. The Popular Adult Education and established school systems are studied through their relation to democracy, based on curricula, as well as on visionary and political…

  15. People's High Schools in Scandinavia: A Contribution to Democracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutas, Agneta

    2013-01-01

    In times of global influence, compulsory education in the Nordic countries has promoted democracy as choice since the 1990s, as enhancing an individual good. Supporting education for democracy is a matter that concerns the world and society on the topic of "what shall he do? Shall he act for this or that end?". This indicates that…

  16. Gender difference in support for democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa: Do social institutions matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konte, M.

    2014-01-01

    Little investigation has been made to explain why women are less likely than are men to support democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa. This gender difference in politics has been found in numerous studies and may hinder the much needed legitimation of democracy in this region. This paper addresses the que

  17. Against Fundamentalism, for Democracy: Towards a Pedagogy of Tolerance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badley, Graham

    2005-01-01

    Fundamentalism and democracy are presented as opposing forces in a world in conflict. Fundamentalism is described both as a threat to democracy itself and also to supposedly democratic institutions such as the university. First, fundamentalism is defined in its various guises: Christian, Islamic and economic. Each of these forms is pernicious in…

  18. The Politics of Difference and Multicultural Feminism: Reconceptualizing Education for Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Leslie Rebecca

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how a theoretical framework that includes a politics of difference and multicultural feminism may help reconceptualize democracy in general and education for democracy specifically. Indicates how universality has failed in practice, posits "equivalent rights" instead of "equal rights," and discusses instructional strategies to…

  19. "Poppies are democracy!" A critical geopolitics of opium eradication and reintroduction in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evered, Kyle T

    2011-01-01

    Historical scholarship in traditional geopolitics often relied on documents authored by states and by other influential actors. Although much work in the subfield of critical geopolitics thus far has addressed imbalances constructed in official, academic, and popular media due to a privileging of such narratives, priority might also be given to unearthing and bringing to light alternative geopolitical perspectives from otherwise marginalized populations. Utilizing the early-1970s case of the United States' first “war on drugs,” this article examines the geopolitics of opium-poppy eradication and its consequences within Turkey. Employing not only archival and secondary sources but also oral histories from now-retired poppy farmers, this study examines the diffusion of U.S. antinarcotics policies into the Anatolian countryside and the enduring impressions that the United States and Turkish government created. In doing so, this research gives voice to those farmers targeted by eradication policies and speaks more broadly to matters of narcotics control, sentiments of anti-Americanism, and notions of democracy in Turkey and the region, past and present. PMID:22164875

  20. MILITARY COMPETITION BETWEEN FRIENDS? HEGEMONIC DEVELOPMENT AND MILITARY SPENDING AMONG EIGHT WESTERN DEMOCRACIES, 1920-1938

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Eloranta

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the complicated phenomenon of military spending among a sample of eight Western democracies in the interwar period by analyzing especially the possibility of economic and/or military competition between the Western Great Powers and the ensuing impacts on the smaller states included here. The hegemonic paradigm suggested by e.g. Paul Kennedy predicts that the economic leader in a system will increasingly invest on maintaining security; thus eventually bringing economic growth to a halt. The military spending patterns respective of economic growth at first seem to suggest that not only the totalitarian states, as is the traditional view, but also the UK and France stepped in to fill the void created by the lack of American leadership. However, the military expenditures of these nations were too low to warrant the conclusion that they had any impact on their respective economic performance. This result is also verified here by employing Granger non-causality tests between the military spending and economic growth variables. Moreover, regression analysis on the military spending variables for the UK and France points towards competition on the level. The smaller states, respectively, seemed to follow the UK and France fairly closely in their military spending decisions.

  1. Entertaining Democracy in the Era of Neo-Liberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Curran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available James Curran’s article “Entertaining democracy in the Era of Neo-liberalism” is an essay written from the 13th SBPJor Conference Meeting in Campo Grande in 2015; a conference in which he was the opening speaker. The article was approved for publication in the BJR at the end of 2015, but we have decided to publish it in a special edition of Journalism and Democracy as it deals precisely with this issue. Curran begins the article by questioning the current state of democracy as it pertains to the decline of the nation state and the emergence of transnational institutions of deliberation which he calls “multilevel governance” but “is not matched by the development of a multilevel sense of citizenship”. As almost a prelude to the Brexit, Curran draws attention to the fact that the English do not consider themselves European despite being a part of the European Union. He tied this nationalist ideal not only to the British, but to other country populations in general. In a world dominated by transnational corporations and the presence and constancy of national media “supporting a national identity” he predicted that “Attempts at new institutional building are out of step with media development”. His analysis highlights several problems that are weakening modern democracy like “the increasing centralization of power by political leaders” and the “increasingly unrepresentative nature of the political class  rendering them in some countries almost a ‘separate caste’”. Reading Curran’s text allows us to reflect on the situation in Brazil. At first, it is pessimistic and places meanings that we have lobbied for outside of our borders: “Governments are less able to govern; political power is becoming more centralized; and the unelected influence of big business is becoming greater”. The media also has a hand in contributing towards a “growing sense of disconnection from politics”, making reference to politics as

  2. Dementia and representative democracy: Exploring challenges and implications for democratic citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnicksen, Jared

    2016-05-01

    Despite growing recognition of the rights of people with dementia for full citizenship, issues related to democracy, whether from theoretical or practical perspectives, remain neglected. Especially since discourses on dementia have expanded to this rights-based approach, it is imperative to begin to examine the meanings and practices of democracy within a context of dementia. Accordingly, the purpose of this article is to assess implications of dementia in the context of democracy. Rather than surveying the variety of democratic concepts, it will focus the analytical framework on representative democracy and then outline several challenges to and for representative democracy and citizens with dementia. The intention is to begin to identify paths for ensuring representation, inclusion and participation for those who have dementia.

  3. Dementia and representative democracy: Exploring challenges and implications for democratic citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnicksen, Jared

    2016-05-01

    Despite growing recognition of the rights of people with dementia for full citizenship, issues related to democracy, whether from theoretical or practical perspectives, remain neglected. Especially since discourses on dementia have expanded to this rights-based approach, it is imperative to begin to examine the meanings and practices of democracy within a context of dementia. Accordingly, the purpose of this article is to assess implications of dementia in the context of democracy. Rather than surveying the variety of democratic concepts, it will focus the analytical framework on representative democracy and then outline several challenges to and for representative democracy and citizens with dementia. The intention is to begin to identify paths for ensuring representation, inclusion and participation for those who have dementia. PMID:27170585

  4. The young Marx on constituent power and “true democracy.”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flohr, Mikkel

    Marx and Marxism is commonly charged with having neglected politics and the development of a theory of politics. However, this presumption ignores Marx’s unfinished and unpublished 1843 Critique of Hegel’s Doctrine of State, where he engaged political theory at length – an engagement, which...... propelled him towards his subsequent critique of political economy. It is the aim of the proposed paper to reconstruct and reinterpret his argument focusing in particular on his conceptualization of constituent power and “true democracy.” In the 1843 Critique Marx argues that democracy is the foundation...... the conflicts of civil society. Marx therefore concludes that all these political forms are democracies in contradiction with themselves. Marx proceeds to suggest that it is possible to overcome these contradictions and develop an adequate political form of democracy, which he describes as “true democracy...

  5. Co-Integration Analysis of Economic Development and Democracy: The Case of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan Uysal

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between economic growth and democracy is a contentious issue in the literature of comparative politics and political economy. Empirical studies have reached various conclusions, depending upon the sample, data and model utilized. Furthermore there are deviations between certain countries in terms of the relationship between economic growth and democracy. Thus, country specific models have critical importance to shed light on these deviations between those different countries. In this study, we construct a co-integration model of the Turkish economy to examine the relationship between economic growth and democracy. From its very foundation, Turkey has experienced economic and political crises. However, few empirical studies have investigated the relationship between these two traits. Using co-integration analysis for the period 1955 to 2006, we seek to identify the relationship between economic growth and democracy. Our empirical results suggest that there is a long run equilibrium between economic grow th and democracy in Turkey.

  6. Parliamentary democracy and pluralist society; Parlamentarische Demokratie und pluralistische Gesellschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Horst

    2010-10-15

    The Federal Republic of Germany is a democracy: The people expresses its political will in general, direct, free, equal and secret elections, in this way appointing its representatives at federal, state and local levels. The persons elected assemble in parliaments, deciding mainly on laws (legislative). Majorities are opposed to minorities in this process, the former constituting and supporting a government while the latter, as the opposition, exercise parliamentary control over the former. The political structure of a parliamentary democracy is matched by society, which continuously forms its political opinions and is able also to express them. In addition, the media exercise both political control and the function of forming public opinion. These personal and societal freedoms of action and expression are effective in a pluralist society not bound by one standard opinion and able to re-form itself continuously. The rights set out in the Basic Law and the structures in place constitute a balanced framework for political and societal reality. In what way this framework is filled depends decisively on political culture in general and on the political style of personal contact in individual cases. The past few months, and their debate about operating life extensions for the nuclear power plants in Germany, can be judged in the light of both the constitutional structure of a parliamentary democracy and the political style and political culture in our pluralist society. Intellectual objectivity has never harmed a society, while a loss of political culture can quickly lead to instabilities and political decisions with negative consequences for the future. (Constitutional) law alone is not always able to direct this development in a positive sense. (orig.)

  7. Rethinking "relevance": South African psychology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wahbie

    2013-02-01

    This article examines the phenomenon known as the "relevance debate" in South African psychology. It begins with a historical overview of the contours of the discipline in that country before describing the controversy's international dimensions, namely, the revolutionary politics of 1960s higher education and the subsequent emergence of cognate versions of the debate in American, European, and "Third World" psychology. The article then details how South Africa's "relevance" project enjoyed a special affinity with an assortment of ethnic-cultural, national, and continental myths and metaphors, all of which served the interests of the political formations of the day. It discusses how, in present-day South Africa, the intelligentsia has become an important catalyst for the so-called African Renaissance, which seeks to provide "relevant" solutions for the regeneration of African society. However, the global hegemony of what began in the 1970s as a "second academic revolution," aided by the lifting of the academic boycott of South Africa, has blunted the once critical edge of "relevance" discourse. A new mode of knowledge production now holds sway, the outcome of a dramatic reformulation of the capitalist manifesto in which the values of the "May 68" generation have been hijacked by a managerialist rationality. In light of the capitalization of the knowledge-production enterprise, it is concluded that the idiom of "relevance" has outlived its usefulness. PMID:23421936

  8. Perspectives on human development theory in democracy promotion: A comparison of democracy promotion programmes in Egypt through the lenses of classical and revised modernisation theory

    OpenAIRE

    Moen Dyrnes, I.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that the concept of socio-economic development needs to be redefined for the purpose of effective democracy promotion. By including aspects from human development theory, advocates of revised modernisation theory state that mass values in a society shift towards a preferance for democracy as higher levels socio-economic development provide existential security. This implies that a democratic culture shapes its institutions and not the other way around. If donor countries are...

  9. Introduction to "Rethinking Business History in Modern China"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-hsin Yeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this special issue of Cross-Currents, the contributing authors look at how business linked China and the world from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, and how Chinese and foreign companies interacted with one another, as well as with political power, long before today. Some authors concentrate on material connections, including shipping, banking, the building of railroads, the spread of the motion picture industry, international treaties, and the formation of knowledge, while others investigate the role of business culture and how entrepreneurship and networks of trust crossed borders. Both of these aspects are set against the backdrop of simultaneous Chinese state-building efforts that became evident in the state creation of a national market and the formation of political borders. All of the authors collected here draw on case studies of individual entrepreneurs or companies, just as they draw on the new historical and theoretical scholarship summarized above to fill out the picture of China’s economic development within global processes. As the contributions to this issue demonstrate, rethinking Chinese business history also forces us to rethink Chinese urban history more generally... The new pictures of business practice presented here entail a remapping of the spatial dynamics of such activities and thereby a new understanding of the making of urban China...

  10. Reflections on the Tenth Anniversary of Mathematics and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Arthur Steen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two independent reflections by early proponents of quantitative literacy connect today's numeracy initiative with its origin in concern about school tests, its impact on students today, and the challenges of democracy. Even as interest in QL grows in many places, evidence of need also grows. Moreover, well-meaning programs with other goals—especially at the K-12 level—often channel education in directions that fail to advance numeracy. Examples show that both students and teachers are enthusiastic when offered QL opportunities, but that individual beliefs and public decisions often belie the goals of QL.

  11. Participatory Publics - Examples from Higher Education in Fragile Democracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Pär-Ola

    This paper presents two cases of local communities, defined by being constituted by students in higher education in polities that have a relatively short tradition of democracy. The first case is a college in Bhutan. The second example is a Madrasa in Bangladesh, a privately run institution...... with theological profile, and at the centre of attention due to national social unrest. The examples are provided as a base for thinking on how social media can be redesigned to support local democratic activity. The paper concludes by proposing some aspects of the local communities that are intriguing...

  12. [The concept of racial democracy in Brazilian intellectual history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to reconstruct the history of the term "racial democracy" in Brazilian sociological literature. This term, usually associated with the idea of "myth", is used in many studies of race relations without little definition or clarity. This article retraces its origins, in particular by showing that the concept is not the invention of Gilberto Freyre. It then examines the evolution of its use with particular emphasis on Unesco's research in the 1950s and the texts of Florestan Fernandes in the 1960s.

  13. The Dilemma of Democracy: Collusion and the State of Exception

    OpenAIRE

    Mark McGovern

    2011-01-01

    In what sense might the authoritarian practices and suspension of legal norms as means to combat the supposed threat of “terrorism,” within and by contemporary western democratic states, be understood as a problem of and not for democracy? That question lies at the heart of this article. It will be explored through the theoretical frame offered in the work of Giorgio Agamben on the state of exception and the example of British state collusion in non-state violence in the North of Ireland. The...

  14. Intersection democracy for winding branes and stabilization of extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Rador, Tonguc

    2005-01-01

    We show that, in the context of pure Einstein gravity, a democratic principle for intersection possibilities of branes winding around extra dimensions in a given partitioning yield stabilization, while what the observed space follows is matter-like dust evolution . Here democracy is used in the sense that, in a given decimation of extra dimensions, all possible wrappings and hence all possible intersections are allowed. Generally, the necessary and sufficient condition for this is that the dimensionality $m$ of the observed space dimensions obey $3\\leqm \\le N$ where $N$ is the decimation order of the extra dimensions.

  15. The Symmetry behind Extended Flavour Democracy and Large Leptonic Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Marcos, Joaquim I

    2002-01-01

    We show that there is a minimal discrete symmetry which leads to the extended flavour democracy scenario constraining the Dirac neutrino, the charged lepton and the Majorana neutrino mass term ($M_R$) to be all proportional to the democratic matrix, with all elements equal. In particular, this discrete symmetry forbids other large contributions to $M_R$, such as a term proportional to the unit matrix, which would normally be allowed by a $S_{3L}\\times S_{3R}$ permutation symmetry. This feature is crucial in order to obtain large leptonic mixing, without violating 't Hooft's, naturalness principle.

  16. Intersection democracy for winding branes and stabilization of extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that, in the context of pure Einstein gravity, a democratic principle for intersection possibilities of branes winding around extra dimensions in a given partitioning yield stabilization, while what the observed space follows is matter-like dust evolution. Here democracy is used in the sense that, in a given decimation of extra dimensions, all possible wrappings and hence all possible intersections are allowed. Generally, the necessary and sufficient condition for this is that the dimensionality m of the observed space dimensions obey 3==3, where N is the decimation order of the extra dimensions

  17. Flavor Democracy in Standard Models at High Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetic, G.; Kim, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is possible that the standard model (SM) is replaced around some transition energy $\\E_{tr}$ by a new, possibly Higgsless, ``flavor gauge theory'' such that the Yukawa (running) parameters of SM at $E \\sim \\E_{tr}$ show up an (approximate) flavor democracy (FD). We investigate the latter possibility by studying the renormalization group equations for the Yukawa couplings of SM with one and two Higgs doublets, by evolving them from given physical values at low energies ($E \\simeq 1 GeV$) to...

  18. Social Actors, Political Representation and Democracy in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henio Millán Valenzuela

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Low representativeness and modernity explain electoral abstention as well as the level of support Mexicans give to democracy. I argue that both raise two conflicts. The first one is the most important and reflects a generalized, but differentiated, claim on the part of citizens for better representation. The second one points to disagreements regarding the Mexican modernization process. Therefore, behind the struggle for representation in Mexico lies the demand for more openness from the State in order for these conflicts to be expressed. These arguments are supported by a quantitative analysis comprising logistic equations and a survey conducted fifteen days after the federal election of 2006.

  19. An Embarrassment of Spirits: Spirits, Hauntology and Democracy in Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubandt, Nils Ole

    2014-01-01

    combined his vocational interest in spirits and anti-corruption and sent a thousand spirits to Jakarta to protect the supporters of the Indonesian president at an anti-corruption rally. The introduction of spirits into the increasingly ‘occult’ Indonesian politics of 2009 was as apt as it was embarrassing...... irruption of spirits into Indonesian politics reflected not only a haunting within Indonesian politics and Indonesian Islam but also a haunting of the spirit of global democracy. Embarrassment, the paper posits, provides a useful methodological entry point into the ethnographic study of politics and its...

  20. Dissent, Criticism, and Transformative Political Action in Deliberative Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2009-01-01

    of these purposes and show some of the shortcomings of deliberative theory that ignores them. However, the ideal speech situation fails to supply anything like a strategy for political action under conditions hostile to deliberation. I seek to fill this void by arguing for a limited consequentialism, according......Many discussions of deliberative democracy ignore or misunderstand the purposes of the ideal speech situation in Habermas' theory. These purposes are to show the possibility of dissent in actual communication and of supplying a normative standard of social criticism. I elaborate the significance...

  1. Through Liquid Democracy to Sustainable Non-Bureaucratic Government

    OpenAIRE

    Alois Paulin

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the concept of Self-Service Government (ss-Gov) as presented earlier and explore how the principles of Liquid Democracy (LD) can be applied in ss-Gov for collaborative decision making. We provide a thorough insight into the history of LD and summarize its recent developments. By combining ss-Gov and LD, we develop the concept of Sustainable, Non-Bureaucratic Government (SNBG) as a novel, blank-slate approach to government of eligibilities within- and towards governmental systems....

  2. Rethinking Political Economy: Change and Continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen R. Meehan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Editorial note This contribution, written by three leading North American representatives of political economy of communication, was published in a complex and conflict-laden context, when this research tradition (again had to provide a solid grounding for its continuing existence and relevance. Attacks on the approach have emerged both from within—i.e., the academia—as well as the wider social context, as it was widely claimed that critical political economy has become an irrelevant and insignificant approach for understanding society. With the victorious march of liberalism and capitalism, the key historical questions have supposedly already been answered. This contribution and its defensive stance—throughout the text, authors offer reasons why political economy should remain important, when everyone is dismissing it, and provide an overview of its key characteristics—must therefore also be read as an answer to these pressures that were neither completely new nor did they emerge for the first time, but were perhaps fiercest during this period. In the era marked by the deep crisis of capitalism and all time-high awareness of the immense growth of inequality, some arguments provided by authors might seem less important today, especially as the postmodern thought has by now been largely discredited. But ideas and arguments that political economy had to confront then remain similar throughout the history of social thought and often reemerge in different shapes and forms, while political economy of communication remains a marginalized approach that needs to continuously reaffirm its position as an indispensable research tradition.

  3. The Decline of Social Education and the Rise of Instrumentalism in North American Adult Education (1947-1970)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Andre P.

    2012-01-01

    In 1947 the Truman Commission on Higher Education accentuated the importance of adult education in its report entitled "Higher Education for American Democracy". In 1970 a new US "Handbook of Adult Education" signifying the move to a more professionalised field of study and practice was published. The intervening years encapsulate a time of…

  4. Deliberative Democracy and Precautionary Public Reasoning : Exploratory Thoughts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Fuji-Johnson

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Because public policy is legally binding and, perhaps more pointedly, can have pervasive social and environmental consequences for the autonomy of persons, it should be justifiable to those it could so affect. What is much more controversial, and what constitutes the basic intuitive claim of this exploratory paper, is that certain public policies should be morally justifiable to both existing and future persons. My concern is with policies in such areas as energy, climate change control, nuclear waste management, natural resources management, and genomics research and commercialization, which can no doubt improve our lives and our descendant’s lives, but which can also result in tremendous adverse effects for centuries to come. In this short paper, I suggest that the ideal of deliberative democracy provides a way of morally justifying such policies to both existing and future generations. If we take seriously the requirements of this ideal, we may have to modify our public reasoning so that it includes reasons that are generally acceptable among contemporaries as well as reasons that would be acceptable to posterity. The suggestion I make in this paper is thatintegral to the ideal of deliberative democracy in the transgenerational contextis a future-oriented and precautionary public reasoning.

  5. Disruption and empowerment. Embedding citizens at the heart of democracy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Williamson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a changing landscape of society and politics. Firstly it briefly situates current practices and methods of democratic engagement and representation within a recent historical framework. It then describes mediating factors relating to democracy, the media and civil society and contextualises these within the broader neoliberal shift from citizen to consumer. The paper then identifies some key transformational agendas in the modus operandi of citizen to government exchange that hint at a return to more civic-focused responsibility, the emergence of issues-based politics and discusses the transformative role that digital media can play in this. All of this pre-supposes that citizens have both the ability and opportunity to engage in democratic practices so, finally, the paper describes a transformative model for citizen-driven, issues-based democracy that might connect with the systems of power in a more effective and democratic way by harnessing digital media and by building on local skills, knowledge, ideas and partnerships.

  6. Energy, environment and sustainable development - tough decisions for a democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricity is recognized to be essential to attaining even minimum modern levels of human welfare in any country. However, where electricity is available, the public shows little concern about where it comes from or what it takes to make sure supply continues to be adequate. In the next century, the world will have to face the difficult decision about the long-term use of plutonium as fuel, and deal with its implications for nonproliferation. What the United States does on this issue will affect all nations, and particularly those around the Pacific Basin. How do responsible leaders set rational priorities in a democracy, when every issue has its vocal advocates and the news media can reach every household? If democracies are to avoid the down side risks of energy shortages, leadership will have to emerge that has the courage to tell the people the truth, by providing scientific facts and explanations in terms that people can understand. The issues discussed in this paper illustrate how policies are being decided by populism and not by leaders on the basics of scientific evidence. 2 refs

  7. Critical thinking, politics on a large scale and media democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio IBÁÑEZ-MARTÍN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The first approximation to the social current reality offers us numerous motives for the worry. The spectacle of violence and of immorality can scare us easily. But more worrying still it is to verify that the horizon of conviviality, peace and wellbeing that Europe had been developing from the Treaty of Rome of 1957 has compromised itself seriously for the economic crisis. Today we are before an assault to the democratic politics, which is qualified, on the part of the media democracy, as an exhausted system, which is required to be changed into a new and great politics, a politics on a large scale. The article analyses the concept of a politics on a large scale, primarily attending to Nietzsche, and noting its union with the great philosophy and the great education. The study of the texts of Nietzsche leads us to the conclusion of how in them we often find an interesting analysis of the problems and a misguided proposal for solutions. We cannot think to suggest solutions to all the problems, but we outline various proposals about changes of political activity, that reasonably are defended from the media democracy. In conclusion, we point out that a politics on a large scale requires statesmen, able to suggest modes of life in common that can structure a long-term coexistence.

  8. Democracy and Environmental Integration in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Maria

    This dissertation presents an evaluation of the democratic qualities of decision-making processes for large transport infrastructure projects in two Scandinavian countries: Denmark and Sweden. The study uncovers criteria from aggregative and deliberative theories of democracy to create a qualitat......This dissertation presents an evaluation of the democratic qualities of decision-making processes for large transport infrastructure projects in two Scandinavian countries: Denmark and Sweden. The study uncovers criteria from aggregative and deliberative theories of democracy to create...... concerns into those decisions. Four central normative areas define the framework created for this evaluation: a) fulfilment of procedural obligations during the process; b) development of public debate; c) influence achieved or attempted during the decision-making process; d) existence and reproduction......-sponsored large infrastructure decisions. In three of the four evaluations (Uddevalla, Øresund/Denmark, Øresund/Sweden), evidences of a democratic deficit were apparent. To the Danish evaluators the core of the deficit was related to the lack of ‘government’s fulfilment of procedural obligations’, to the Swedish...

  9. Tocqueville revisited. The meaning of American prosperity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, C

    2001-01-01

    Why is business so admired in the United States and so often denigrated in Europe? How has America created 30 million new jobs in the last 20 years while the European Union, with a bigger population, only managed 5 million? What is feeding America's apparently inexhaustible appetite for growth and its recent dramatic improvements in productivity? In 1831, French philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville came to America to examine its prison system and returned with a vision of democracy so profound it has become part of our cultural heritage. More than a century and a half later, renowned British business philosopher Charles Handy retraces Tocqueville's intellectual journey, this time focusing not on democracy but on capitalism. The result is an eye-opening look at some of the fundamental assumptions underpinning business in America today. It is America's optimism that Handy finds most striking, the unquestioned belief that tomorrow can--and should--be made better than today. He contrasts this with the Spaniards when they came to the New World: No haya novedades, those Spaniards would say, "Let nothing new arise." The energy engendered by American optimism, coupled with the Puritan belief in work and in the nobility of earned wealth (as opposed to Europe's furtive attitude toward its nobility's inherited wealth) lies, in Handy's view, at the heart of America's success. Will American capitalism, born as it was from a property-owning democracy, now adapt to a dematerialized world, where property is intellectual rather than physical? Handy draws no absolute conclusions, but rather lays out the challenges that must be overcome for tomorrow to indeed continue to be better than today in this still-young country. PMID:11189463

  10. Cultural democracy: the way forward for primary care of hard to reach New Zealanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finau, Sitaleki A; Finau, Eseta

    2007-09-01

    The use of cultural democracy, the freedom to practice one's culture without fear, as a framework for primary care service provision is essential for improved health service in a multi cultural society like New Zealand. It is an effective approach to attaining health equity for all. Many successful health ventures are ethnic specific and have gone past cultural competency to the practice of cultural democracy. That is, the services are freely taking on the realities of clients without and malice from those of other ethnicities. In New Zealand the scientific health service to improve the health of a multi cultural society are available but there is a need to improve access and utilization by hard to reach New Zealanders. This paper discusses cultural democracy and provide example of how successful health ventures that had embraced cultural democracy were implemented. It suggests that cultural democracy will provide the intellectual impetus and robust philosophy for moving from equality to equity in health service access and utilization. This paper would provide a way forward to improved primary care utilization, efficiency, effectiveness and equitable access especially for the hard to reach populations. use the realities of Pacificans in New Zealand illustrate the use of cultural democracy, and thus equity to address the "inverse care law" of New Zealand. The desire is for primary care providers to take cognizance and use cultural democracy and equity as the basis for the design and practice of primary health care for the hard to reach New Zealanders.

  11. Promises and democracy limits: political discussions on Jacques Derrida’s thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Penchaszadeh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The central theme of this reflection on democracy is the problem of identity and difference in the context of a recognition of the absence of an ultimate foundation of the social and political. An emphasis on the impossibility of aggregation is central to the development of a new way of left-thinking that is more reflective about the paradoxical role that democracy plays in the current world. To address the range of problems that cut across the definition of democracy, this article will examine how two references in post-foundational contemporary political theory understand the thinking of Jacques Derrida, namely: Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe.

  12. Rethinking cities in the post-carbon society. Research notebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document compiles the different syntheses of the research projects which were used to prepare the synthesis report 'Rethinking cities in the post-carbon society', published in March 2014 by the French Agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe). It allows to browse more precisely the experience of six French cities (Lille, Mulhouse, Tours, Fontainebleau, Plaine Commune et Grenoble) and to go deeper into the governance stakes. This publication also brings together some unpublished sectoral studies about life styles and consumption habits, energy inequalities and poverty, housing etc. Different levels of reading of the document are possible, in order to make it accessible to all readers and to involve all citizens in the post-carbon city culture

  13. Sustainable Refugee Migration: A Rethink towards a Positive Capability Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Husban

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge facing many countries around the world is how to sustainably address the issues of increased numbers of refugee migrants. The refugee migrant “issue” is often heavily political as a high density of migrants in local areas impacts communities (e.g., disrupting local employment, service and culture. Different migrants come with different “baggage” and needs which can be a significant draw on the hosting communities’ resources. This paper argues that sustainable long-term solutions to refugee migrants will require a rethink to the existing dominant models of containment and charity. The paper draws upon insights from a study of a large refugee camp in Jordan over a three-and-a-half-year period, and historical cases of refugee migration. The paper presents a sustainable model that develops long-term capability for the various stakeholder groups.

  14. On Rethinking Our Classrooms: A Critical Pedagogy View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Samacá Bohórquez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper, as its title suggests, introduces some reflections on the importance critical pedagogy as well as awareness-raising practices have in education today, especially in language teacher preparation programs, and how they provide a new opportunity for pre-service teachers to re-think their pedagogical experiences for social transformation. Critical pedagogy (CP as a philosophy of life helps teachers achieve a better understanding of what teaching really entails and raising awareness fosters reflection regarding our practices in educational settings, starting in the language classroom, exploring on the one hand, what pre-service teachers think and perceive about teaching and learning in the context they are involved in, and on the other hand, how those perceptions might influence their educational practices.

  15. Rethinking the Postgraduate Teaching Program and Examinations in Today's India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Georgi; George, Tarun K

    2015-07-01

    Postgraduate medical education has undergone drastic changes in the developed and developing countries on par with advancements in technology. The Indian examination system which we imbibed from the British requires a rethinking and restructuring to keep pace with the changing trends shown by the Federation of the Royal Colleges of UK. In this manuscript we look at the strengths and weaknesses of different examination systems. We suggest changes in the theory examination which should be objectively based rather than the outdated essay and short notes. We discuss positive and proactive changes to reform our clinical examination system to enable a just and fair assessment of the candidate in a strictly time bound fashion. PMID:26731837

  16. Media and Glocal Change - Rethinking Communication for Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is about exploring both the potential and the limits of communication - of using communication both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of development and social change, improving, everyday lives, and empowering people to influence their own lives and those of their fellow...... community members. The essence is communication. The dilemma is that communication will not solve every problem, although it can contribute in some ways to problemsolving - we just need to get better at knowing how. The discipline of communication for development is currently at a crossroad......, and the approaches taken over the last few decades require serious rethinking. Technologies are evolving, societies are changing, globalization is impacting on everything - and communication for development is evolving and changing, too: as a tool as an approach and as a scientific sub-discipline of communication...

  17. Climate Change after the International : Rethinking Security, Territory and Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What does a politics after the international mean? Many strands of contemporary scholarship converge on the image of the international as obsolete, but strongly diverge on the contours of the kinds of politics that are superseding it. The modern state has been pivotal to the meaning of security, territory and authority - concepts central to the idea of the international - but they do not necessarily have to be tied to the state. This thesis offers a critique of International Relations theory combined with a study of climate change. A departure in 'process philosophy' facilitate a rethinking of security, territory and authority as activities rather than things, as verbs rather than nouns. The author shows that a multiplicity of practices of securitization, territorialization, and authorization are visible in the climate issue. The book goes beyond, and reflects upon, the traditional study of 'International Environmental Politics' as a particular subfield of International Relations

  18. Climate Change after the International : Rethinking Security, Territory and Authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stripple, Johannes

    2005-07-01

    What does a politics after the international mean? Many strands of contemporary scholarship converge on the image of the international as obsolete, but strongly diverge on the contours of the kinds of politics that are superseding it. The modern state has been pivotal to the meaning of security, territory and authority - concepts central to the idea of the international - but they do not necessarily have to be tied to the state. This thesis offers a critique of International Relations theory combined with a study of climate change. A departure in 'process philosophy' facilitate a rethinking of security, territory and authority as activities rather than things, as verbs rather than nouns. The author shows that a multiplicity of practices of securitization, territorialization, and authorization are visible in the climate issue. The book goes beyond, and reflects upon, the traditional study of 'International Environmental Politics' as a particular subfield of International Relations.

  19. PREFFIXATION: COMPOUNDING OR DERIVATION? RETHINKING AND OLD CONTROVERSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Gonçalves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we rethink an old controversy involving the preffixation in Portuguese: if this process aligns the suffixation and, therefore, differs from the compounding, or is affiliated to the compounding, distinguishing itself from suffixation. In the paper, we show that the preffixation is not uniform and, therefore, is far from being considered globally compounding or derivation. We believe, following Nunes (2009: 291, “that the individuality of the prefixes forces us to consider this process heterogeneous and we believe the different behavior of each prefix allows the classification of the process as derivation or compounding”. This vagueness indicates that a categorization based on prototypes is more appropriate for the description of word formation in Portuguese.

  20. Democracy, individual rights and the regulation of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, J

    2009-09-01

    Whether the US Constitution guarantees a right to conduct scientific research is a question that has never been squarely addressed by the United States Supreme Court. Similarly, the extent to which the First Amendment protects the right to communicate the results of scientific research is an issue about which there is scant judicial authority. This article suggests that a crucial guidepost for exploring both these uncharted areas of constitutional law should be whether restrictions on scientific research or communication truly implicate fundamental individual rights or instead primarily concern issues of general social welfare-issues that in a democracy are properly decided by the representative branches of government or their delegates, not by the judiciary.

  1. The Consumption of Democracy. The Ritual Politics of the Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    "Ritual Assembly and the Dynamics of Democracy." Abstract: Based on five ethnographic case studies, this panel presents different ways in which ritual acts and performances reveal and mobilize cultural resources and initiate changes to establish new conditions for democratization processes...... and demonstrate continuously renegotiate social identities. In this capacity, they ritually transform democratic processes that constitute the working of society. The argument put forward in this panel is that rituals significantly impact democratic processes both reshaping society and providing the grounds...... societies. Based on five ethnographic case studies from China, Denmark, India, Norway, and Turkey, different ways are analysed in which ritual acts and performances reveal and mobilize cultural resources and initiate changes to establish new conditions for democratization processes. The case studies...

  2. Democracy, individual rights and the regulation of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, J

    2009-09-01

    Whether the US Constitution guarantees a right to conduct scientific research is a question that has never been squarely addressed by the United States Supreme Court. Similarly, the extent to which the First Amendment protects the right to communicate the results of scientific research is an issue about which there is scant judicial authority. This article suggests that a crucial guidepost for exploring both these uncharted areas of constitutional law should be whether restrictions on scientific research or communication truly implicate fundamental individual rights or instead primarily concern issues of general social welfare-issues that in a democracy are properly decided by the representative branches of government or their delegates, not by the judiciary. PMID:19526326

  3. Cycles of Protest and the Consolidation of Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Della Porta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of democratization paths have been addressed within literature on democratic consolidation as well as on revolution. These approaches have however never been linked with social movement theory that, I argue in this article, can provide new lenses to explain how movements’ characteristics at the time of transition might have an impact on the quality of ensuing democracy. As the same time, looking at effects of social movements in terms of democratization can help broadening social movement studies, that have rarely addressed this type of effects. I am in particular interested in linking reflections (and empirical evidence on effects of social movements to the typology on paths towards democratization that I have developed in other works. Looking especially at Central Eastern Europe post-1989, I single out the different characteristics of contentious politics in countries that underwent, respectively, eventful democratization, participated pacts and troubled democratization. Protest event analysis as constituted the empirical basis for the analysis

  4. Contribution of Feminism to the Evolution of Deliberative Democracy Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Boboc Cojocaru

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Two types of feminist approaches bring their contribution in the debate on deliberativedemocracy. The first type, which highlights women’s greater capacity to provide care, change and expandesthe deliberation by providing images and models of practice from the experience of women. In this view,women's socialization and role in childrearing, among other causes, makes them especially concerned totransform "I" into "we" and to seek solutions to conflict that accommodate diverse and often suppresseddesires. In our society women are usually brought up to identify their own good with that of others,especially their children and husbands. More than men, women build their identities through relationshipswith friends. Feminist critiques of deliberative democracy have focused on the abstraction, impartiality andrationality of mainstream accounts of deliberation. Feminist writers propose this capacity for broader selfdefinitionas a model for democratic politics.

  5. Onwards! Reinforcing Democracy for the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Serageldin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Universal suffrage has been the primary goal of democratic evolution. Despite elections and other measures taken to ensure democratic rights, some desired outcomes such as equality and transparency are not being met. The current mode of our democratic system is archaic in addressing the world’s multifaceted global crises. So, there’s a dire need to incorporate new elements of democratic governance to address the issue. Humanity now lives in a transition period, so the path may not be easy. But the scientific and technological revolution underway is rapidly changing the mindsets of people and helping them exercise their rights. The article thus focuses on how democracy serves as the best system to ensure human rights and provide for a better society and also, how current models of democratic governance which matured in the last century can be improved in the 21st century, which is instrumental for meeting the challenges humanity confronts today. – Editor

  6. Democracy and the Internet: Access, Engagement and Deliberation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Gerodimos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The internet has the capacity to facilitate the creation of new forms of civic engagement, but the realisation of these opportunities requires institutional and cultural reinforcement. The democratic character of e-citizenship and the equal distribution of online resources to the public require the fulfilment of four conditions: access, engagement (incorporating education, motivation and trust, meaningful deliberation and a link between civic input and public policy output. Furthermore, the gap between the main features of cyberspace and the inherent prerequisites of democracy, such as a finite space and a set of rules, create tensions that need to be negotiated politically. Although the empirical evidence available includes some encouraging signs regarding the future use of the internet for civic engagement, the existing limitations and obstacles mean that the new media will complement, rather than replace, the old media as a democratic public sphere.

  7. The Impact of Terrorism on Democracy in Northern Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Schmidt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrorist activities by the IRA for a politically united Ireland were one of the most sustained and prolonged campaigns in Northern Ireland, unparalleled in Western Europe since the World War II. Under the pressure of violence, the British government engaged in a process that delivered new constitutional arrangements combined with major legislative reforms, giving terrorist-related politicians access to the governance of Northern Ireland and control over its destiny. This article will discuss the project Mobilizing Opposition Networks to Nationalistic European Terrorism (MONNET, which analyzed the progressive undermining of democracy and human rights by terrorism in Northern Ireland with the view of developing a message to mobilize the European public against terrorism in all its forms. This article will also mention the recommendations made to the European Commission through the MONNET programme.

  8. Education, ethics and democracy: philosophical considerations around citizenship building up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Orlando Vargas Montañez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at showing the analysis of society from a philosophical perspective and the contributions of the Illustration around education, ethics and politics. Taking into account hermeneutics and history, it pretends to highlight the individual’s autonomous learning and the critical pedagogy as means to abolish an authoritarian system in order to give way to an emancipating pedagogy. Besides, philosophical considerations such as education, ethics and democracy are remarked in order to reflect on education as a determining stuff of the individual’s development because it is focused on educating upstanding human beings for the social and political life, able to build up a fair society framed by principles like freedom, security and justice.

  9. La democracia subyugada: El hiperpresidencialismo venezolano Venezuelan's Hiperpresidentialism: Democracy Suhjugated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAEL PENFOLD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El estado de la democracia en Venezuela combina prácticas electorales débilmente institucionalizadas aunque relativamente libres y limpias pero con claros rasgos autoritarios: la falta de autonomía de los poderes Judicial y Legislativo frente a un Ejecutivo con atribuciones extraordinarias; el desarrollo de complejas dinámicas de centralización del poder hacia la figura del Presidente; el acceso irrestricto a los recursos petroleros por parte del gobierno federal; la ausencia de una prensa imparcial e independiente y la pérdida de transparencia en el gobierno, entre otros. Las anormalidades constitucionales en el referéndum de 2009 (que permite el surgimiento del único sistema presidencial en la región con reelección ilimitada sugieren además que incluso la democracia electoral está siendo socavada.The state of democracy in Venezuela combines relatively fair, free, and electoral procedures but with distinct authoritarian features: the lack of autonomy in the Judicial and Legislative powers vis-à-vis an Executive with extraordinary attributions; the development of complex dynamics of centralization of power by the President; the free access to oil revenues by the federal government; the absence of an independent and impartial press and the loss of transparency in the government, among others. Moreover, the abnormalities in the 2009 referendum (that has allowed the emergence of the only presidential system in the region without term limits suggest that even electoral democracy is being undermined in the country.

  10. Consensus Building: the Democracy which Works Properly in Complex Society

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    Lawrence Susskind

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available “Quality of life and governance are more and more related. The Consensus Building method is the “other” democracy, the one which works in complex societies. This approach has old roots, but its current success born in the last years due to two phenomenon’s; the great crisis in traditional governance in particular in western societies from 70’s until nowadays, and the inadequate local answers to this problems. On one hand some governments try to solve it with more restrict places of power, that take decisions on their own, on the other hand or they try to solve it with naïve participation, open new moments of decision without specific methods, thinking that differences could be solve with “good will” and  voting. (From the introduction“Confronto Creativo; dal diritto alla parola al diritto di essere ascoltati” Lawrence Susskind- Marianella Sclavi 2011On September 2011 Lawrence Susskind came to Italy in order to presents his book “Confronto Creativo, dal diritto di parola al diritto di essere ascoltati”, wrote with Marianella Sclavi. This book has been published in more than 20 countries, from China, to Japan. The authors underline the idea that globalization is, in certain way, helping the born of a different governance, which makes democracy and new ways of participation been closer than in the past. This interview tries to answer some questions of participatory urban planning in Italy nowadays. As for example; can consensus building help to deal with complex cities nowadays? Who should promote consensus building approach: governments, citizens, private entrepreneurships? Which are the obstacles, and the methodologies to solve them? Once urban planners finish their work, who implement the projects? What are the new languages that urban planning should find in order to create local processes?

  11. The Political Dimension of Global Education: Global Governance and Democracy

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    Bettina Lösch

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available "Political and economic global transformation processes are encompassing the field of political education. The subject matter of political education, namely the political, has itself undergone a radical transformation. The changes have had a particular effect on democratic structures and opportunities for participation in the political process. Focusing on a conception of critical education for democracy, this article will highlight the democratic deficits of the globalisation process, and shed light on political-theoretical conceptions of global governance. As opposed to the paradigmatic reorientation of political education into democratic and (European citizenship education, which has taken place in Germany, the case will be put forward for political education for global democracy which goes beyond Eurocentric thinking and the concept of the nation state. Global political education involves a broad conception of politics and incorporates the new democratisation processes as well as the accompanying expanded forms of participation.Die globalen Transformationsprozesse von Politik und Ökonomie erfassen auch die politischen Bildungsprozesse. Der Gegenstand der politischen Bildung: das Politische ist einem radikalen Wandel unterzogen. Die Veränderungen wirken sich insbesondere auf die demokratischen Strukturen und Partizipationsmöglichkeiten aus. Im Fokus einer Konzeption kritischer Demokratiebildung werden in diesem Artikel die Demokratiedefizite des Globalisierungsprozesses sowie der politiktheoretischen Konzeptionen einer Global Governance beleuchtet. In Kontrast zur paradigmatischen Neuausrichtung politischer Bildung in Deutschland als Demokratie-Pädagogik und european citizenship education wird in diesem Beitrag für eine globale Perspektive politischer Bildung plädiert, die über ein nationalstaatliches und eurozentristisches Denken hinausweist. Eine globale politische Bildung legt einen weiten Begriff von Politik an und greift die

  12. The role of the Courts sustaining democracy: An approach from transitional regimes

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    Vicente F. Benítez R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the political factors that enable or prevent the consolidation of an effective judicial review in transitional democracies such as the Colombian and the Venezuelan ones. These democracies, in turn, are likely to be victims of abusive constitutionalism attempts by powerful executives, which is a phenomenon typical of young democracies. This paper analyzes key cases of successful and unsuccessful experiences in Central Europe, Asia and Latin America in order to identify what kind of factors allow or hinder a Tribunal’s effective judicial review in new democracies. I argue that factors as judicial independence, separation of powers, Courts’ reputation, and judicial deference to other branches, are key elements to determine whether a Tribunal will be a successful institution.

  13. Democracy To Come in Derridean Philosophy: Between Sovereignty and Unconditionality”

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Balcarce

    2015-01-01

    This  article  aims  to  perform  a  reading  of  the  Derridean notion of “democracy to come”. Taking this notion as a starting point, the author makes a deep reading of the problems of democracy with regard to its foundation and concept. Our hypothesis is that “democracy to come” allows Derrida to put democracy -as a resistance to any totalizing closure in the name of the common and the same- into an abyss. At the same time, we’ll interpret this notion considering its links with sovereignty...

  14. Workplace Democracy: A Review of Literature and Implications for Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim

    2007-01-01

    A review of workplace democracy revealed that both practice and research need updating. The results are discussed in terms of history, theory, research and practice. Implications for human resource development research and practice are also included. (Contains 2 tables.)

  15. The Idea of Freedom in Radical and Deliberative Models of Democracy

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    Wojciech Ufel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the idea of freedom brought by I. Berlin we can derive to classical models of democracy: liberal and republican. Reflection on postmodern theories of democracy – radically plural and deliberative – points that they do not strongly differ from the traditional ones, but rather give them new challenges. Radical democracy of Ch. Mouffe and E. Laclau praising pluralism and negative freedom is a deconstruction of a liberal model, while deliberative project of J. Habermas, praising community and negative freedom, remains in a republican tradition. In the end of the article the author also presents the understanding of the educative role of society and tradition in both classical and postmodern models of democracy.

  16. Designing For Democracy: Using Design Activism to Re-negotiate the Roles and Rights for Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Mårbjerg Thomsen, Signe;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we focus on ‘patient-democracy’ and ‘shared decision-making’ seen from the perspective of design practice and design research. In the research on democracy in healthcare it is rarely questioned what forms of democracy underlies these concepts. We have examined three different theories...... there are already a number of approaches available which in one way or the other address the relationship between design, democracy and power. We provide an account of participatory design, adversarial design and design activism thereby pointing towards design’s potential for re-distributing power and authority...... in healthcare. Positioning ourselves within design activism, we have set up a series of disruptive design experiments at a Danish Hospital. The aim of these experiments is to make inquiries into the hospital’s own conception of democracy and to use design activism to re-negotiate the roles and rights...

  17. Democracy and environment as references for quadruple and quintuple helix innovation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayannis, Elias G.; Campbell, David F. J.; Orr, Barron J.

    2015-04-01

    The perspective of democracy and the ecological context define key references for knowledge production and innovation in innovation systems. Particularly under conditions of environmental change where enhancing the potential for adaptation is critical, this requires a closer look at ecological responsibility and sensitivity in the different innovation models and governance regimes. The "Quintuple Helix" innovation model is an approach that stresses the necessary socio-ecological transition of society and economy by adding an environment helix to an innovation system already made up of three (university-industry-government) or four (civil society relations) helices in a way that supports adaptation by incorporating global warming as both a challenge to and a driver of innovation. There is the proposition that knowledge production and innovation co-evolve with democracy (Carayannis and Campbell, 2014). In the Triple Helix model (Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff, 2000) the existence of a democracy does not appear to be necessary for knowledge production and innovation. However, the Quadruple Helix (Carayannis and Campbell, 2009, 2010 and 2014) is defined and represented by additional key attributes and components: "media-based and culture-based public", "civil society" and "arts, artistic research and arts-based innovation" (Bast, Carayannis and Campbell, 2015). Implications of this are that the fourth helix in the Quadruple Helix innovation systems brings in and represents the perspective of "dimension of democracy" or the "context of democracy" for knowledge in general and knowledge production and innovation in more particular. Within theories of democracy there is a competition between narrow and broader concepts of democracy (Campbell, 2013). This is particularly true when democracy is to be understood to transcend more substantially the narrow understanding of being primarily based on or being primarily rooted in government institutions (within a Triple Helix

  18. A PDS Narrative: Fostering Renewal, Democracy, and Social Justice in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Karen; Urban, Elizabeth; Middleton, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    This article chronicles the inception, growth, and continued impact of a Professional Development School partnership based on teaching practices that acculturate preservice and practicing teachers into teaching for participation in a democracy.

  19. A Narrative Approach to Both Teaching and Learning About Democracy with Young Children: A Theoretical Exploration

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    maila dinia husni rahim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As adults, we often believe that children are only interested with games and children’s ‘stuff’. However research has shown that children do indeed show a greater interest in the world around them, including about politics, elections, and democracy. If we need to teach children about democracy, what are the best methods of teaching democracy to young children? Narrative is considered as an effective medium to convey messages to children and discuss hard subjects. This paper is a theoretical exploration that looks at the narrative approach to teaching and learning about democracy with young children. The researchers has used a literature review to look at why narratives should be used, what narratives should be used and how to use narratives.

  20. Data Democracy and Decision Making: Enhancing the Use and Value of Geospatial Data and Scientific Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Data democracy is a concept that has great relevance to the use and value of geospatial data and scientific information. Data democracy describes a world in which data and information are widely and broadly accessible, understandable, and useable. The concept operationalizes the public good nature of scientific information and provides a framework for increasing benefits from its use. Data democracy encompasses efforts to increase accessibility to geospatial data and to expand participation in its collection, analysis, and application. These two pillars are analogous to demand and supply relationships. Improved accessibility, or demand, includes increased knowledge about geospatial data and low barriers to retrieval and use. Expanded participation, or supply, encompasses a broader community involved in developing geospatial data and scientific information. This pillar of data democracy is characterized by methods such as citizen science or crowd sourcing.A framework is developed for advancing the use of data democracy. This includes efforts to assess the societal benefits (economic and social) of scientific information. This knowledge is critical to continued monitoring of the effectiveness of data democracy implementation and of potential impact on the use and value of scientific information. The framework also includes an assessment of opportunities for advancing data democracy both on the supply and demand sides. These opportunities include relatively inexpensive efforts to reduce barriers to use as well as the identification of situations in which participation can be expanded in scientific efforts to enhance the breadth of involvement as well as expanding participation to non-traditional communities. This framework provides an initial perspective on ways to expand the "scientific community" of data users and providers. It also describes a way forward for enhancing the societal benefits from geospatial data and scientific information. As a result, data