WorldWideScience

Sample records for ambulatory-based standardized therapy

  1. Remote control improves quality of life in elderly pacemaker patients versus standard ambulatory-based follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoretto, Rosanna Irene; Facchin, Domenico; Ghidina, Marco; Proclemer, Alessandro; Gregori, Dario

    2017-08-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) improves shortly after pacemaker (PM) implantation. No studies have investigated the HRQoL trend for elderly patients with a remote device monitoring follow-up system. Using EuroQol-5D Questionnaire and the PM-specific Assessment of Quality of Life and Related Events Questionnaire, HRQoL was measured at baseline and then repeatedly during the 6 months following PM implantation in a cohort of 42 consecutive patients. Twenty-five patients were followed-up with standard outpatient visits, while 17 used a remote monitoring system. Aquarel scores were significantly higher in patients with remote device monitoring system regarding chest discomfort and arrhythmia subscales the first month after PM implant and remained stable until 6 months. Remote monitoring affected the rate of HRQoL improvement in the first 3 months after pacemaker implantation more than ambulatory follow-up. Remote device monitoring has a significant impact on HRQoL in pacemaker patients, increasing its levels up to 6 months after implant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  3. Combining Immunotherapy with Standard Glioblastoma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This clinical trial is testing standard therapy (surgery, radiation and temozolomide) plus immunotherapy with pembrolizumab with or without a cancer treatment vaccine for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, a common and deadly type of brain tumor.

  4. Proton-beam radiation therapy dosimetry standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Beams of protons have been used for radiation therapy applications for over 40 years. In the last decade the number of facilities treating patients and the total number of patients being treated has begun go grow rapidly. Due to the limited and experimental nature of the early programs, dosimetry protocols tended to be locally defined. With the publication of the AAPM Task Group 20 report open-quotes Protocol for Dosimetry of Heavy Charged Particlesclose quotes and the open-quotes European Code of Practice for Proton-Beam Dosimetryclose quotes the practice of determining dose in proton-beam therapy was somewhat unified. The ICRU has also recently commissioned a report on recommendations for proton-beam dosimetry. There have been three main methods of determining proton dose; the Faraday cup technique, the ionization chamber technique, and the calorimeter technique. For practical reasons the ionization chamber technique has become the most widely used. However, due to large errors in basic parameters (e.g., W-value) is also has a large uncertainty for absolute dose. It has been proposed that the development of water calorimeter absorbed dose standards would reduce the uncertainty in absolute proton dose as well as the relative dose between megavoltage X-ray beams and proton beams. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  5. Radiation therapy: model standards for determination of need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagasse, L.G.; Devins, T.B.

    1982-03-01

    Contents: Health planning process; Health care requirements (model for projecting need for megavoltage radiation therapy); Operational objectives (manpower, megavoltage therapy and treatment planning equipment, support services, management and evaluation of patient care, organization and administration); Compliance with other standards imposed by law; Financial feasibility and capability; Reasonableness of expenditures and costs; Relative merit; Environmental impact

  6. Standardization of 131I therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jianlin; Li Yuying; Gao Liuyan; Tang Xiuping; Hu Hongyong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish the normative and standard measures, to ensure medical safety and quality of care of the patients with Graves disease treated by 131 I therapy. Methods: Formulating and strictly implementing the medical organizational and technical measures of 131 I therapy for Graves disease and regular follow-up. Results: Receiving 131 I treatment of 104 patients, follow-up 6-36 months, no adverse events, the cure rate of 59.6%, the efficient rate is 99.9%. Conclusion: It is important guarantee for the medical quality and safety to standardize the 131 I therapy of Graves disease. (authors)

  7. [Deep brain stimulation in movement disorders: evidence and therapy standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpaley, Yaroslav; Skodda, Sabine

    2017-07-01

    The deep brain stimulation (DBS) in movement disorders is well established and in many aspects evidence-based procedure. The treatment indications are very heterogeneous and very specific in their course and therapy. The deep brain stimulation plays very important, but usually not the central role in this conditions. The success in the application of DBS is essentially associated with the correct, appropriate and timely indication of the therapy in the course of these diseases. Thanks to the good standardization of the DBS procedure and sufficient published data, the recommendations for indication, diagnosis and operative procedures can be generated. The following article attempts to summarize the most important decision-making criteria and current therapy standards in this fairly comprehensive subject and to present them in close proximity to practice. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Standard and Nonstandard Craniospinal Radiotherapy Using Helical TomoTherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, William; Brodeur, Marylene; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To show the advantages of planning and delivering craniospinal radiotherapy with helical TomoTherapy (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI) by presenting 4 cases treated at our institution. Methods and Materials: We first present a standard case of craniospinal irradiation in a patient with recurrent myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) and follow this with 2 cases requiring differential dosing to multiple target volumes. One of these, a patient with recurrent medulloblastoma, required a lower dose to be delivered to the posterior fossa because the patient had been previously irradiated to the full dose, and the other required concurrent boosts to leptomeningeal metastases as part of his treatment for newly diagnosed MPE. The final case presented is a patient with pronounced scoliosis who required spinal irradiation for recurrent MPE. Results: The four cases presented were planned and treated successfully with Helical Tomotherapy. Conclusions: Helical TomoTherapy delivers continuous arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy that gives high conformality and excellent dose homogeneity for the target volumes. Increased healthy tissue sparing is achieved at higher doses albeit at the expense of larger volumes of tissue receiving lower doses. Helical TomoTherapy allows for differential dosing of multiple targets, resulting in very elegant dose distributions. Daily megavoltage computed tomography imaging allows for precision of patient positioning, permitting a reduction in planning margins and increased healthy tissue sparing in comparison with standard techniques.

  9. Oxidative stress in organophosphate poisoning: role of standard antidotal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanova, Nela; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Herman, David; Dlabkova, Alzbeta; Jun, Daniel

    2018-08-01

    Despite the main mechanism of organophosphate (OP) toxicity through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) being well known over the years, some chronic adverse health effects indicate the involvement of additional pathways. Oxidative stress is among the most intensively studied. Overstimulation of cholinergic and glutamatergic nervous system is followed by intensified generation of reactive species and oxidative damage in many tissues. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in pathophysiology of OP poisoning and the influence of commonly used medical interventions on its levels are discussed. Current standardized therapy of OP intoxications comprises live-saving administration of the anticholinergic drug atropine accompanied by oxime AChE reactivator and diazepam. The capability of these antidotes to ameliorate OP-induced oxidative stress varies between both therapeutic groups and individual medications within the drug class. Regarding oxidative stress, atropine does not seem to have a significant effect on oxidative stress parameters in OP poisoning. In a case of AChE reactivators, pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties could be found. It is assumed that the ability of oximes to trigger oxidative stress is rather associated with their chemical structure than reactivation efficacy. The data indicating the potency of diazepam in preventing OP-induced oxidative stress are not available. Based on current knowledge on the mechanism of OP-mediated oxidative stress, alternative approaches (including antioxidants or multifunctional drugs) in therapy of OP poisoning are under consideration. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A standardized method for beam design in neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storr, G.J.: Harrington, B.V.

    1993-01-01

    A desirable end point for a given beam design for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) should be quantitative description of tumour control probability and normal tissue damage. Achieving this goal will ultimately rely on data from NCT human clinical trials. Traditional descriptions of beam designs have used a variety of assessment methods to quantify proposed or installed beam designs. These methods include measurement and calculation of open-quotes free fieldclose quotes parameters, such as neutron and gamma flux intensities and energy spectra, and figures-of-merit in tissue equivalent phantoms. The authors propose here a standardized method for beam design in NCT. This method would allow all proposed and existing NCT beam facilities to be compared equally. The traditional approach to determining a quantitative description of tumour control probability and normal tissue damage in NCT research may be described by the following path: Beam design → dosimetry → macroscopic effects → microscopic effects. Methods exist that allow neutron and gamma fluxes and energy dependence to be calculated and measured to good accuracy. By using this information and intermediate dosimetric quantities such as kerma factors for neutrons and gammas, macroscopic effect (absorbed dose) in geometries of tissue or tissue-equivalent materials can be calculated. After this stage, for NCT the data begins to become more sparse and in some areas ambiguous. Uncertainties in the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of some NCT dose components means that beam designs based on assumptions considered valid a few years ago may have to be reassessed. A standard method is therefore useful for comparing different NCT facilities

  11. STANDARDIZATION OF CUPPING THERAPY POINTS AND MECHANISM OF ACTION IN THE LIGHT OF SCIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Izharul Hasan

    2018-01-01

    Now a day’s cupping therapy is an established therapeutic modality among Indian system of medicine as well as worldwide. Inspite of that, standard operative procedure (SOPs) for cupping therapy is yet to develop. In this paper author comprises the possible indications of cupping therapy along with procedures, application points, safety concerns, historical perspective, surgical operative standards described in traditional system of medicine as well as in the light of science. Cupping may be d...

  12. Standard on microbiological management of fluids for hemodialysis and related therapies by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Hideki; Akiba, Takashi; Masakane, Ikuto; Tomo, Tadashi; Mineshima, Michio; Kawasaki, Tadayuki; Hirakata, Hideki; Akizawa, Tadao

    2009-04-01

    The Committee of Scientific Academy of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT) proposes a new standard on microbiological management of fluids for hemodialysis and related therapies. This standard is within the scope of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), which is currently under revision. This standard is to be applied to the central dialysis fluid delivery systems (CDDS), which are widely used in Japan. In this standard, microbiological qualities for dialysis water and dialysis fluids are clearly defined by endotoxin level and bacterial count. The qualities of dialysis fluids were classified into three levels: standard, ultrapure, and online prepared substitution fluid. In addition, the therapeutic application of each dialysis fluid is clarified. Since high-performance dialyzers are frequently used in Japan, the standard recommends that ultrapure dialysis fluid be used for all dialysis modalities at all dialysis facilities. It also recommends that the dialysis equipment safety management committee at each facility should validate the microbiological qualities of online prepared substitution fluid.

  13. Assessment of non-standard HIV antiretroviral therapy regimens at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-06

    Mar 6, 2016 ... Most patients were transitioned to standard regimens, ... In cases of first-line regimen treatment failure, ..... tute; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National. Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; National Insti-.

  14. [Development of legislation and standardization of acupuncture therapy in the United States of America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Dong; Hou, You-Juan; Meng, Fan-Hong; Chen, Shu-Juan; Wang, Yan-Yao; Jiang, Fan; Ding, Ming

    2012-06-01

    In the present article, the authors summarized the state of acupuncture therapy in the United States of America from 1) history and current state, 2) legislation and its contents, management system and introduction of health insurance system, and 3) standardization. Acupuncture therapy, as a complementary or alternative therapy, has been widely supported and approved by majority of states in the USA. The authors hold that due to differences between the oriental and western cultures and difficulties of Chinese medicine in quantitative and qualitative studies, the legislation on acupuncture therapy for approval of the American Parliament needs paying more efforts.

  15. Preclinical and clinical experience in vascular gene therapy: advantages over conservative/standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol, S; Huehns, T Y

    2001-04-01

    No systemic pharmacological treatment has been shown to convincingly reduce the incidence of restenosis after angioplasty or increase the formation of collaterals in ischemic tissue in patients. The lack of success of many pharmaceutical agents in reducing restenosis rates or in inducing angiogenesis post-angioplasty and following stent implantation has encouraged the development of new technological treatment approaches. Gene therapy is a novel strategy with the potential to prevent some of the sequelae after arterial injury, particularly cell proliferation, and to induce growth of new vessels or remodeling of pre-existing vessel branches, which may help patients with critical ischemia. Gene therapy strategies have the advantage of minimizing systemic side effects and may have a long-term effect as the encoded protein is released. Most clinical trials investigating gene therapy for vascular disease have been uncontrolled phase I and IIa trials. Gene therapy into vessels with the genes for growth factors has been demonstrated to be feasible and efficient. Local drug delivery devices have been used in combination with gene therapy in several trials to maximize safety and efficiency. Data from experimental animal work indicates that gene therapy may modify intimal hyperplasia after arterial injury, but there are few clinical trials on restenosis in patients. Preliminary clinical results show only limited success in altering restenosis rates. In vitro and experimental in vivo investigations into gene therapy for angiogenesis demonstrate increased formation of collaterals and functional improvement of limb ischemia. There is some evidence of increased collateral formation and clinical improvement in patients with critical limb ischemia. Results of placebo-controlled and double-blind trials of gene therapy for vascular disease are awaited.

  16. A Pilot Prospective Randomized Control Trial Comparing Exercises Using Videogame Therapy to Standard Physical Therapy: 6 Months Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid; Painting, Lynda; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Molitor, Fred; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available, interactive videogames that use body movements for interaction are used clinically in burn rehabilitation and have been shown to facilitate functional range of motion (ROM) but their efficacy with burn patients has not yet been proven. The purpose of this pilot randomized control study was to prospectively compare planar and functional ROM, compliance, pain, enjoyment, and exertion in pediatric burn patients receiving two types of rehabilitation therapy. Seventeen school-aged children with 31 affected limbs who demonstrated limited shoulder ROM from burn injury were randomized to receive exercises using either standard therapy ROM activities (ST) or interactive videogame therapy (VGT). Patients received 3 weeks of the designated therapy intervention twice daily. They were then given a corresponding home program of the same type of therapy to perform regularly for 6 months. Standard goniometry and three-dimensional motion analysis during functional tasks were used to assess ROM. Measures were taken at baseline, 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Pain was measured before and after each treatment session during the 3-week intervention. There was no difference in compliance, enjoyment, or exertion between the groups. Patients in both the ST and VGT groups showed significant improvement in shoulder flexion (P videogames were equally effective as traditional therapy for overall ROM gains and resulted in quicker recovery of motion with less pain experienced. Such videogames are a useful adjunct to therapy and should be considered as part of a holistic approach to rehabilitation within the hospital and at home after discharge in pediatric patients recovering from burn injury.

  17. A strategy to develop and implement Canadian standards for quality assurance in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    In Canada, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) regulates the limits of radiation exposure to the public and to workers in industry. In 1993, it discussed the fact that the safety of radiation therapy patients who receive medical exposures is not regulated [AE93]. The Group of Medical Advisors (GMA) to the AECB initiated a research contract to review quality assurance in Canadian radiation oncology centres and nuclear medicine departments. The review [MA95] revealed that the level of quality assurance in radiation therapy facilities varied across the country. As a result, the GMA undertook its own review of quality assurance in radiation therapy centres and made recommendations on how to achieve a uniform national system [MA98]. In response to the GMA report, the President of the AECB formed a Joint Working Group (JWG-11) to propose how Canadian Standards for Quality Assurance in Radiation Therapy could be developed and implemented. These national standards for quality assurance will serve as a common basis for establishing and evaluating quality assurance programs at individual radiation therapy centres. These standards should address the structure of quality assurance programs and quality assurance for radiation therapy equipment, personnel, and procedures. (author)

  18. Metabolic management of glioblastoma multiforme using standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servadei Franco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM has been difficult using standard therapy (radiation with temozolomide chemotherapy. The ketogenic diet is used commonly to treat refractory epilepsy in children and, when administered in restricted amounts, can also target energy metabolism in brain tumors. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with progressive memory loss, chronic headaches, nausea, and a right hemisphere multi-centric tumor seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Following incomplete surgical resection, the patient was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme expressing hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter. Methods Prior to initiation of the standard therapy, the patient conducted water-only therapeutic fasting and a restricted 4:1 (fat: carbohydrate + protein ketogenic diet that delivered about 600 kcal/day. The patient also received the restricted ketogenic diet concomitantly during the standard treatment period. The diet was supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Steroid medication (dexamethasone was removed during the course of the treatment. The patient was followed using MRI and positron emission tomography with fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET. Results After two months treatment, the patient's body weight was reduced by about 20% and no discernable brain tumor tissue was detected using either FDG-PET or MRI imaging. Biomarker changes showed reduced levels of blood glucose and elevated levels of urinary ketones. MRI evidence of tumor recurrence was found 10 weeks after suspension of strict diet therapy. Conclusion This is the first report of confirmed GBM treated with standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet. As rapid regression of GBM is rare in older patients following incomplete surgical resection and standard therapy alone, the response observed in this case could result in part from the action of the calorie restricted ketogenic diet. Further studies are needed

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of 7-Day Intensive and Standard Weekly Cognitive Therapy for PTSD and Emotion-Focused Supportive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Anke; Hackmann, Ann; Grey, Nick; Wild, Jennifer; Liness, Sheena; Albert, Idit; Deale, Alicia; Stott, Richard; Clark, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are usually delivered once or twice weekly over several months. It is unclear whether they can be successfully delivered over a shorter period of time. This clinical trial had two goals, (1) to investigate the acceptability and efficacy of a 7-day intensive version of cognitive therapy for PTSD, and (2) to investigate whether cognitive therapy has specific treatment effects by comparing intensive and standard weekly cognitive therapy with an equally credible alternative treatment. Method Patients with chronic PTSD (N=121) were randomly allocated to 7-day intensive or standard 3-month weekly cognitive therapy for PTSD, 3-month weekly emotion-focused supportive therapy, or a 14-week waitlist condition. Primary outcomes were PTSD symptoms and diagnosis as assessed by independent assessors and self-report. Secondary outcomes were disability, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Measures were taken at initial assessment, 6 weeks and 14 weeks (post-treatment/wait). For groups receiving treatment, measures were also taken at 3 weeks, and follow-ups at 27 and 40 weeks after randomization. All analyses were intent-to-treat. Results At post-treatment/wait assessment, 73%, 77%, 43%, 7% of the intensive cognitive therapy, standard cognitive therapy, supportive therapy, and waitlist groups, respectively, had recovered from PTSD. All treatments were well tolerated and were superior to waitlist on all outcome measures, with the exception of no difference between supportive therapy and waitlist on quality of life. For primary outcomes, disability and general anxiety, intensive and standard cognitive therapy were superior to supportive therapy. Intensive cognitive therapy achieved faster symptom reduction and comparable overall outcomes to standard cognitive therapy. Conclusions Cognitive therapy for PTSD delivered intensively over little more than a week is as effective as cognitive therapy delivered

  20. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  1. Fractionated Repetitive Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: A New Standard in Shock Wave Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kisch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. ESWT has proven clinical benefit in dermatology and plastic surgery. It promotes wound healing and improves tissue regeneration, connective tissue disorders, and inflammatory skin diseases. However, a single treatment session or long intervals between sessions may reduce the therapeutic effect. The present study investigated the effects of fractionated repetitive treatment in skin microcirculation. Methods. 32 rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received either fractionated repetitive high-energy ESWT every ten minutes or placebo shock wave treatment, applied to the dorsal lower leg. Microcirculatory effects were continuously assessed by combined laser Doppler imaging and photospectrometry. Results. In experimental group, cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation was increased 1 minute after the first application and until the end of the measuring period at 80 minutes after the second treatment (P<0.05. The third ESWT application boosted the effect to its highest extent. Cutaneous capillary blood flow showed a significant increase after the second application which was sustained for 20 minutes after the third application (P<0.05. Placebo group showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusions. Fractionated repetitive extracorporeal shock wave therapy (frESWT boosts and prolongs the effects on cutaneous hemodynamics. The results indicate that frESWT may provide greater benefits in the treatment of distinct soft tissue disorders compared with single-session ESWT.

  2. Comparison of Sequential Regimen and Standard Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Roshanaei

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Some studies have reported successful eradication rates using se-quential therapy but more recent studies performed in Asia did not find a similar benefit. Due to inconsistencies in the comparison of standard triple drugs therapy and sequential regimen, in the previous researches we decided to compare these treatments in Persian patients. Materials & Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial, performed in one hundred and forty patients suffering from dyspepsia with indication for H. pylori eradication between No-vember 2010 and March 2012.Patients were randomized in two equal groups. The patients in the first group (standard were treated by omeprazole capsule 20 mg BID, amoxicillin cap-sule 1 gr BID, clarithromycin tablet 500mg BID for 14 days; while the patients in the second group (sequential were treated by omeprazole capsule 20 mg for 10 days, amoxicillin cap-sule 1 gr BID for 5 days, then clarithromycin tablet 500 mg and tinidazole tablet 500 mg BID for other 5 days. 4-6 weeks after the treatment, we compared the eradication of H.pylori be-tween the two groups by urease breathe test with C14. Results: H. pylori infection was successfully cured in 57/70 (81.43% with a 10-day sequen-tial therapy, in 60/70 (85.75% with the standard fourteen-day triple therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We detected no significant differences between the 10-day sequential eradication therapy for H. pylori and 14-day standard triple treatment among the patients. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:184-193

  3. Will NOACs become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergene Oktay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the general population, with a prevalence of 1–3%, which increases with age, reaching 15% in elderly people. Prophylaxis of ischemic stroke with warfarin was the gold standard of medical management for many years. On the other hand heparin and warfarin was the main pharmacologic agents for the prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism. In the last 5 years warfarin is getting replaced by non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants at least partly. In this article it is attempted to foresee whether new oral anticoagulants will become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy.

  4. Development of job standards for clinical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Jae; Seo, Jung-Sook; Kim, Eun-Mi; Park, Mi-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hye; Ju, Dal-Lae; Wie, Gyung-Ah; Lee, Song-Mi; Cha, Jin-A; Sohn, Cheong-Min

    2015-04-01

    Dyslipidemia has significantly contributed to the increase of death and morbidity rates related to cardiovascular diseases. Clinical nutrition service provided by dietitians has been reported to have a positive effect on relief of medical symptoms or reducing the further medical costs. However, there is a lack of researches to identify key competencies and job standard for clinical dietitians to care patients with dyslipidemia. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the job components of clinical dietitian and develop the standard for professional practice to provide effective nutrition management for dyslipidemia patients. The current status of clinical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia patients in hospitals with 300 or more beds was studied. After duty tasks and task elements of nutrition care process for dyslipidemia clinical dietitians were developed by developing a curriculum (DACUM) analysis method. The developed job standards were pretested in order to evaluate job performance, difficulty, and job standards. As a result, the job standard included four jobs, 18 tasks, and 53 task elements, and specific job description includes 73 basic services and 26 recommended services. When clinical dietitians managing dyslipidemia patients performed their practice according to this job standard for 30 patients the job performance rate was 68.3%. Therefore, the job standards of clinical dietitians for clinical nutrition service for dyslipidemia patients proposed in this study can be effectively used by hospitals.

  5. Long-term safety profile of belimumab plus standard therapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Joan T; Ginzler, Ellen M; Wallace, Daniel J; McKay, James D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Aranow, Cynthia; Wellborne, Frank R; Burnette, Michael; Condemi, John; Zhong, Z John; Pineda, Lilia; Klein, Jerry; Freimuth, William W

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the safety profile of long-term belimumab therapy combined with standard therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in patients with active disease. Patients who were randomized to receive intravenous placebo or belimumab 1, 4, or 10 mg/kg, plus standard therapy, and completed the initial 52-week double-blind treatment period were then allowed to enter a 24-week open-label extension phase. During the extension period, patients in the belimumab group either received the same dose or were switched to 10 mg/kg and patients in the placebo group were switched to belimumab 10 mg/kg. Patients who achieved a satisfactory response during the 24-week extension period were allowed to participate in the long-term continuation study of monthly belimumab 10 mg/kg. Adverse events (AEs) and abnormal laboratory results were analyzed per 100 patient-years in 1-year intervals. Of the 364 patients who completed the 52-week double-blind treatment period, 345 entered the 24-week extension, and 296 continued treatment with belimumab in the long-term continuation study. Safety data through 4 years of belimumab exposure (1,165 cumulative patient-years) are reported. Incidence rates of AEs, severe/serious AEs, infusion reactions, infections, malignancies, grades 3/4 laboratory abnormalities, and discontinuations due to AEs were stable or declined during 4-year belimumab exposure. The most common AEs included arthralgia, upper respiratory tract infection, headache, fatigue, and nausea. Serious infusion reactions were rare: only 1 occurred during the 4-year followup period. Rates of serious infection decreased from 5.9/100 patient-years to 3.4/100 patient-years, and no specific type of infection predominated. Belimumab added to standard therapy was generally well-tolerated over the 4-year treatment period in patients with SLE, which suggests that belimumab can be administered long term with an acceptable safety profile. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Standard dose 131I therapy for hyperthyroidism caused by autonomously functioning thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fui, S.C.N.T.; Maisey, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with hyperthyroidism shown on scintigrams to have autonomously functioning thyroid nodules were treated with a standard dose of 15mCi of 131 I. Of thirty patients who have been followed up for at least 6 months to over 3 years, all but one patient were euthyroid after a single dose. Repeat scintigram and Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone test after therapy confirmed that twenty-five patients were cured of the disease. Only one patient developed hypothyroidism. This simplified dose regimen of radioiodine is effective in the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by autonomously functioning nodules and is not complicated by the high incidence of hyperthyroidism that is observed following radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease. (author)

  7. Compliance with technical standards for radiological protection at radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eduardo, Maria Bernadete de Paula; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy services provide essential therapeutic procedures for cancer, one of the main causes of population morbidity and mortality. Despite their importance in the health system and their potential risks due to the use of ionizing radiation, there are few studies on such services. We evaluated compliance with technical standards for radiological protection in radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Forty-nine services were studied in 2000 through interviews with technical staff. Typologies of performance profiles focusing on structure and process variables were constructed and services compared. Important differences were observed in the services' positions in the health care system, level of complexity, and geographic distribution, with better average performance in structural conditions but very inadequate performance in patient protection, indicating the need for more effective health surveillance. (author)

  8. Negative pressure wound therapy versus standard wound care on quality of life: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A H J; Mommers, E H H; Notter, J; de Vries Reilingh, T S; Wegdam, J A

    2016-03-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a widely accepted treatment modality for open or infected wounds. Premature ending of NPWT occasionally occurs due to negative effects on the quality of life (QoL), however, the actual impact on QoL is unknown. The aim of this review is to analyse the effect of NPWT versus standard wound care (SWC) on QoL when used for the treatment of open or infected wounds. A systematic literature search in a range of databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, Web of Science, Science Direct Freedom Collection, SwetsWise, PSYCArticles and Infrotrac Custom Journals) using the following search terms; 'standard wound care', 'wound dressing', 'dressing', 'treatment', OR 'negative pressure wound therapy [MESH]', OR 'vacuum assisted closure' AND 'quality of life [MESH]', 'patient-satisfaction', OR 'experiences' was performed. Methodological quality was assessed using the methodological index for non-randomised studies (MINORS) checklist. There were 42 studies identified, five matched the inclusion criteria: two randomised clinical trials (RCTs), one clinical comparative study, one exploratory prospective cohort study and one quasi experimental pilot study. Median MINORS-score was 75% (58%-96%). There were seven different questionnaires used to measure QoL or a subsidiary outcome. QoL in the NPWT group was lower in the first week, though no difference in QoL was observed thereafter. This systematic review observed that QoL improved at the end of therapy independent of which therapy was used. NPWT led to a lower QoL during the first week of treatment, possible due to aniexty, after which a similar or better QoL was reported when compared with SWC. It could be suggested that NPWT might be associated with increased anxiety. All authors of this publication have received no financial support or have personal interests conflicting with the objectivity of this manuscript.

  9. Adding chiropractic to standard medical therapy for nonspecific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Long, Cynthia R; Hondras, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Randomized controlled trial.Objective. To assess changes in pain levels and physical functioning in response to standard medical care (SMC) versus SMC plus chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) for the treatment of low back pain (LBP) among 18 to 35-year-old active-duty military...... physical functioning when compared with only standard care, for men and women between 18 and 35 years of age with acute LBP........ The primary outcome measures were changes in back-related pain on the numerical rating scale and physical functioning at 4 weeks on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and back pain functional scale (BPFS).Results. Mean Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores decreased in both groups during...

  10. Effects of mirror therapy through functional activites and motor standards in motor function of the upper limb after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, Candice Simões Pimenta de; Fernandes, Sabrina Gabrielle Gomes; Lopes, Johnnatas Mikael; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Cacho, Roberta de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy through functional activities and motor standards in upper limb function of chronic stroke subjects. Six patients with paresis of the arm within at least six months after stroke were randomly to a group of functional activities (GAF - n=3) and group of motor standards (GPM - n=3). Both groups performed 15 sessions of mirror therapy for 30 minutes, but the first one (GAF) were instructed to do the bilateral and symmetrical movements bas...

  11. A Standardized, Evidence-Based Massage Therapy Program for Decentralized Elite Paracyclists: Creating the Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann B; Trilk, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that para-athletes are injured more often than able-bodied athletes. The benefits of massage therapy for these disabled athletes are yet to be explored. This paper documents the process followed for creating a massage program for elite paracycling athletes with the goal to assess effects on recovery, rest, performance, and quality of life both on and off the bike. Massage therapists' private practices throughout the United States. A United States Paracycling team consisting of 9 elite athletes: 2 spinal cord injury, 2 lower limb amputation, 1 upper limb amputation, 1 transverse myelitis, 1 stroke, 1 traumatic brain injury, and 1 visually impaired. The process used to develop a massage therapy program for para-cyclists included meetings with athletes, coaching staff, team exercise physiologist, and sports massage therapists; peer-reviewed literature was also consulted to address specific health conditions of para-athletes. Team leadership and athletes identified needs for quicker recovery, better rest, and improved performance in elite paracyclists. This information was used to generate a conceptual model for massage protocols, and led to creation of the intake and exit questionnaires to assess patient health status and recovery. Forms also were created for a general health intake, therapist information, and a therapist's SOAAP notes. The conceptual model and questionnaires developed herein will help to operationalize an exploratory study investigating the feasibility of implementing a standardized massage therapy program for a decentralized elite paracycling team.

  12. The Future of Glioblastoma Therapy: Synergism of Standard of Care and Immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Mira A.; Kim, Jennifer E.; Ruzevick, Jacob; Li, Gordon; Lim, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The current standard of care for glioblastoma (GBM) is maximal surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). As the 5-year survival with GBM remains at a dismal <10%, novel therapies are needed. Immunotherapies such as the dendritic cell (DC) vaccine, heat shock protein vaccines, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) vaccines have shown encouraging results in clinical trials, and have demonstrated synergistic effects with conventional therapeutics resulting in ongoing phase III trials. Chemoradiation has been shown to have synergistic effects when used in combination with immunotherapy. Cytotoxic ionizing radiation is known to trigger pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and immune activation secondary to cell death, which can then be exploited by immunotherapies. The future of GBM therapeutics will involve finding the place for immunotherapy in the current treatment regimen with a focus on developing strategies. Here, we review current GBM therapy and the evidence for combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors, DC and peptide vaccines with the current standard of care

  13. The Future of Glioblastoma Therapy: Synergism of Standard of Care and Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Mira A.; Kim, Jennifer E.; Ruzevick, Jacob [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., Phipps Building Rm 123, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Li, Gordon [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 1201 Welch Rd., P309 MSLS, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lim, Michael, E-mail: mlim3@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., Phipps Building Rm 123, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-09-29

    The current standard of care for glioblastoma (GBM) is maximal surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). As the 5-year survival with GBM remains at a dismal <10%, novel therapies are needed. Immunotherapies such as the dendritic cell (DC) vaccine, heat shock protein vaccines, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) vaccines have shown encouraging results in clinical trials, and have demonstrated synergistic effects with conventional therapeutics resulting in ongoing phase III trials. Chemoradiation has been shown to have synergistic effects when used in combination with immunotherapy. Cytotoxic ionizing radiation is known to trigger pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and immune activation secondary to cell death, which can then be exploited by immunotherapies. The future of GBM therapeutics will involve finding the place for immunotherapy in the current treatment regimen with a focus on developing strategies. Here, we review current GBM therapy and the evidence for combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors, DC and peptide vaccines with the current standard of care.

  14. Simulated Prism Therapy in Virtual Reality produces larger after-effects than standard prism exposure in normal healthy subject - Implications for Neglect Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, Inge Linda

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality is an important area of exploration within computer-based cognitive rehabilitation of visual neglect. Virtual reality will allow for closer monitoring of patient behaviour during prism adaptation therapy and perhaps change the way we induce prismatic after......-effects. OBJECTIVE: This study compares the effect of two different prism simulation conditions in virtual reality to a standard exposure to prism goggles after one session of Prism Adaptation Therapy in healthy subjects. METHOD: 20 healthy subjects were subjected to one session of prism adaptation therapy under...... training for rehabilitation of hemi spatial attentional deficits such as visual neglect....

  15. Standard dose 131I therapy for toxic multinodular goiter in an endemic goiter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, E.; Castro, J.A.S.; Gross, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the standard 15 mCi dose of 131 I on the thyroid function of 25 patients from an endemic goiter region with toxic multinodular goiter of different sizes was determined. The patients were followed for 1 to 5 years and 7 months (mean: 2 years and 10 months). Eighteen patients were treated with the antithyroid drugs propylthiouracil or methimazole before 131 I and seven only received 131 I. All but three patients achieved euthyroidism after a single dose of 131 I. Two patients in the antithyroid treatment group became hypothyroid 2 months and 2 years after the isotope therapy, respectively. Pretreatment with antithyroid drugs did not significantly modify the effectiveness of 131 I treatment. This simplified dose regimen of 131 I was effective in the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by multinodular goiter in an endemic region, and the efficacy was independent of the size of the goiter. (author)

  16. Helicobacter pylori second-line rescue therapy with levofloxacin- and bismuth-containing quadruple therapy, after failure of standard triple or non-bismuth quadruple treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, J P; Romano, M; Gravina, A G; Solís-Muñoz, P; Bermejo, F; Molina-Infante, J; Castro-Fernández, M; Ortuño, J; Lucendo, A J; Herranz, M; Modolell, I; Del Castillo, F; Gómez, J; Barrio, J; Velayos, B; Gómez, B; Domínguez, J L; Miranda, A; Martorano, M; Algaba, A; Pabón, M; Angueira, T; Fernández-Salazar, L; Federico, A; Marín, A C; McNicholl, A G

    2015-04-01

    The most commonly used second-line Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens are bismuth-containing quadruple therapy and levofloxacin-containing triple therapy, both offering suboptimal results. Combining bismuth and levofloxacin may enhance the efficacy of rescue eradication regimens. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a second-line quadruple regimen containing levofloxacin and bismuth in patients whose previous H. pylori eradication treatment failed. This was a prospective multicenter study including patients in whom a standard triple therapy (PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin) or a non-bismuth quadruple therapy (PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin-metronidazole, either sequential or concomitant) had failed. Esomeprazole (40 mg b.d.), amoxicillin (1 g b.d.), levofloxacin (500 mg o.d.) and bismuth (240 mg b.d.) was prescribed for 14 days. Eradication was confirmed by (13) C-urea breath test. Compliance was determined through questioning and recovery of empty medication envelopes. Incidence of adverse effects was evaluated by questionnaires. 200 patients were included consecutively (mean age 47 years, 67% women, 13% ulcer). Previous failed therapy included: standard clarithromycin triple therapy (131 patients), sequential (32) and concomitant (37). A total of 96% took all medications correctly. Per-protocol and intention-to-treat eradication rates were 91.1% (95%CI = 87-95%) and 90% (95%CI = 86-94%). Cure rates were similar regardless of previous (failed) treatment or country of origin. Adverse effects were reported in 46% of patients, most commonly nausea (17%) and diarrhoea (16%); 3% were intense but none was serious. Fourteen-day bismuth- and levofloxacin-containing quadruple therapy is an effective (≥90% cure rate), simple and safe second-line strategy in patients whose previous standard triple or non-bismuth quadruple (sequential or concomitant) therapies have failed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy vs Enhanced Standard Care on Symptom Severity Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieleninik, Łucja; Geretsegger, Monika; Mössler, Karin; Assmus, Jörg; Thompson, Grace; Gattino, Gustavo; Elefant, Cochavit; Gottfried, Tali; Igliozzi, Roberta; Muratori, Filippo; Suvini, Ferdinando; Kim, Jinah; Crawford, Mike J.; Odell-Miller, Helen; Oldfield, Amelia; Casey, Órla; Finnemann, Johanna; Carpente, John; Park, A-La; Grossi, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Importance Music therapy may facilitate skills in areas affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), such as social interaction and communication. Objective To evaluate effects of improvisational music therapy on generalized social communication skills of children with ASD. Design, Setting, and Participants Assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial, conducted in 9 countries and enrolling children aged 4 to 7 years with ASD. Children were recruited from November 2011 to November 2015, with follow-up between January 2012 and November 2016. Interventions Enhanced standard care (n = 182) vs enhanced standard care plus improvisational music therapy (n = 182), allocated in a 1:1 ratio. Enhanced standard care consisted of usual care as locally available plus parent counseling to discuss parents’ concerns and provide information about ASD. In improvisational music therapy, trained music therapists sang or played music with each child, attuned and adapted to the child’s focus of attention, to help children develop affect sharing and joint attention. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was symptom severity over 5 months, based on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), social affect domain (range, 0-27; higher scores indicate greater severity; minimal clinically important difference, 1). Prespecified secondary outcomes included parent-rated social responsiveness. All outcomes were also assessed at 2 and 12 months. Results Among 364 participants randomized (mean age, 5.4 years; 83% boys), 314 (86%) completed the primary end point and 290 (80%) completed the last end point. Over 5 months, participants assigned to music therapy received a median of 19 music therapy, 3 parent counseling, and 36 other therapy sessions, compared with 3 parent counseling and 45 other therapy sessions for those assigned to enhanced standard care. From baseline to 5 months, mean ADOS social affect scores estimated by linear mixed-effects models decreased from 14

  18. Standard and Low-dose Hormone Therapy for Postmenopausal Women—Focus on the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Hui Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Menopause occurs naturally when the ovary ceases folliculogenesis, or artificially by surgical and/or medical ablation of the ovarian function. Menopause is a hypoestrogenic state, which may adversely affect estrogen target tissues, such as the brain, skeleton and skin, as well as the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems, with resultant frequency and severity of climacteric symptoms. The climacteric symptoms, however, vary significantly among women. For decades, hormone therapy (HT has been the mainstay and is considered the most effective for managing menopausal symptoms. The prolonged use of either single estrogen therapy or a combination therapy of estrogen and progestogen (EPT might be associated with a slightly increased risk of breast cancer and many resultant adverse events, such as coronary heart disease, stroke and venous thromboembolism. Perhaps because the clear benefits are limited to these end points of HT in treating menopausal women, the relatively significant adverse event profiles of these women may not be enough to trigger primary care physicians to be more aggressive than they have been to date in treating climacteric symptoms of postmenopausal women. However, severe climacteric symptoms really disturb the woman's life. Some epidemiologic studies have shown that the increased risk for breast cancer after 5 years of combined EPT is similar in magnitude to other lifestyle variables, such as 10-year delayed menopause, fewer pregnancies and reduced breastfeeding, postmenopausal obesity, excessive alcohol or cigarette use, and lack of regular exercise. Furthermore, elevated serum concentrations of either endogenous or exogenous (replaced by HT sex hormone in either pre- or postmenopausal women are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Finally, the increased breast cancer risk diminishes soon after discontinuing hormones, and largely disappears by 5 years after cessation. Taken together, low-dose conventional HT

  19. Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Older Glioblastoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvold, Nils D.; Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Aizer, Ayal A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Christianson, Laura W.; Horvath, Margaret C.; Dunn, Ian F.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Ligon, Keith L.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma have poor outcomes, and optimal treatment is controversial. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HRT) is frequently used but has not been compared to patients receiving standard fractionated radiation therapy (SRT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients ≥65 years of age who received radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma from 1994 to 2013. The distribution of clinical covariates across various radiation regimens was analyzed for possible selection bias. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of hypofractionated radiation (typically, 40 Gy/15 fractions) versus standard fractionation (typically, 60 Gy/30 fractions) in the setting of temozolomide was conducted using Cox regression and propensity score analysis. Results: Patients received SRT + TMZ (n=57), SRT (n=35), HRT + TMZ (n=34), or HRT (n=9). Patients receiving HRT were significantly older (median: 79 vs 69 years of age; P<.001) and had worse baseline performance status (P<.001) than those receiving SRT. On multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.10, P=.01), lower Karnofsky performance status (AHR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03; P=.01), multifocal disease (AHR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.23-3.61, P=.007), and radiation alone (vs SRT + TMZ; SRT: AHR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.06-2.79; P=.03; HRT: AHR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.44-10.60, P=.007) were associated with decreased overall survival. After propensity score adjustment, patients receiving HRT with TMZ had similar overall survival compared with those receiving SRT with TMZ (AHR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.50-2.4, P=.82). Conclusions: With no randomized data demonstrating equivalence between HRT and SRT in the setting of TMZ for glioblastoma, significant selection bias exists in the implementation of HRT. Controlling for this bias, we observed similar overall

  20. Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Older Glioblastoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvold, Nils D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tanguturi, Shyam K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Aizer, Ayal A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi [Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Christianson, Laura W.; Horvath, Margaret C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dunn, Ian F.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Claus, Elizabeth B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Chiocca, E. Antonio [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ligon, Keith L. [Department of Pathology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Alexander, Brian M., E-mail: bmalexander@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma have poor outcomes, and optimal treatment is controversial. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HRT) is frequently used but has not been compared to patients receiving standard fractionated radiation therapy (SRT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients ≥65 years of age who received radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma from 1994 to 2013. The distribution of clinical covariates across various radiation regimens was analyzed for possible selection bias. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of hypofractionated radiation (typically, 40 Gy/15 fractions) versus standard fractionation (typically, 60 Gy/30 fractions) in the setting of temozolomide was conducted using Cox regression and propensity score analysis. Results: Patients received SRT + TMZ (n=57), SRT (n=35), HRT + TMZ (n=34), or HRT (n=9). Patients receiving HRT were significantly older (median: 79 vs 69 years of age; P<.001) and had worse baseline performance status (P<.001) than those receiving SRT. On multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.10, P=.01), lower Karnofsky performance status (AHR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03; P=.01), multifocal disease (AHR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.23-3.61, P=.007), and radiation alone (vs SRT + TMZ; SRT: AHR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.06-2.79; P=.03; HRT: AHR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.44-10.60, P=.007) were associated with decreased overall survival. After propensity score adjustment, patients receiving HRT with TMZ had similar overall survival compared with those receiving SRT with TMZ (AHR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.50-2.4, P=.82). Conclusions: With no randomized data demonstrating equivalence between HRT and SRT in the setting of TMZ for glioblastoma, significant selection bias exists in the implementation of HRT. Controlling for this bias, we observed similar overall

  1. Maximal safe dose therapy of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Seok, Ju Won; Uh, Jae Sun

    2005-01-01

    In patients with recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma, residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy presents an awkward situation in terms of treatment decision making. Maximal safe dose (MSD) administration base on bone marrow radiation allows the delivery of a large amount I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue within the safety margin. We investigated the efficacy of MSD in differentiated thyroid cancers, which had persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy. Forty-six patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma who had non-responsible residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. The postoperative pathology consisted of 43 papillary carcinomas and 3 follicular carcinomas. MSD was calculated according the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center protocol using blood samples. MSDs were administered at intervals of at least 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole body scan (WBS) and serum thyroglobulin measurements. Mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq. Of the 46 patients, 6 (13.0%) showed complete remission, 15 (32.6%) partial response, 19 (41.3%) stable disease, and 6 (13.0%) disease progression. Thus, about a half of the patients showed complete or partial remission, and of these patients, 14 (67%) showed response after a single MSD administration and 6 (29%) showed response after the second dose of MSD administrations. Twenty-nine patients (63%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, and recovered spontaneously with the exception of one. MSD administration is an effective method even in the patients who failed to be treated by conventional fixed dose therapy. MSD therapy of I-131 can be considered in the patients who failed by fixed dose therapy

  2. Music therapy as an adjunct to standard treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder and co-morbid anxiety and depression: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiranibidabadi, Shahrzad; Mehryar, Amirhooshang

    2015-09-15

    Previous studies have highlighted the potential therapeutic benefits of music therapy as an adjunct to standard care, in a variety of psychiatric ailments including mood and anxiety disorders. However, the role of music in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have not been investigated to date. In a single-center, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial (NCT02314195) 30 patients with OCD were randomly assigned to standard treatment (pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavior therapy) plus 12 sessions of individual music therapy (n = 15) or standard treatment only (n = 15) for one month. Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form were administered baseline and after one month. Thirty patients completed the study. Music therapy resulted in a greater decrease in total obsessive score (post-intervention score: music therapy+standard treatment: 12.4 ± 1.9 vs standard treatment only: 15.1 ± 1.7, p Music therapy was significantly more effective in reducing anxiety (post-intervention score: music therapy + standard treatment: 16.9 ± 7.4 vs standard treatment only: 22.9 ± 4.6, p music therapy + standard treatment: 10.8 ± 3.8 vs standard treatment: 17.1 ± 3.7, p music therapy, as an adjunct to standard care, seems to be effective in reducing obsessions, as well as co-morbid anxiety and depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION AS A POSSIBLE STRATEGY FOR TREATING STANDARD THERAPY-RESISTANT ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Z. Gaidukova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have analyzed the literature dealing with studies of the efficiency and safety of stem cell transplantation (SCT in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS through the electronic resources Pubmed and Medline by using the keywords «bone marrow transplantation», «hematopoietic stem cell transplantation», «ankylosing spondylitis», «autoimmune diseases», and «sacroiliac joint biopsy». The paper describes four cases of SCT in AS patients, including transplantation that was carried out in one patient with lymphoma concurrent with AS, in two AS patients without blood cancers, and in one patient with AS concurrent with myeloid leukemia. Drug-free remission was achieved in 3 cases: lymphoma concurrent with AS (n=1, AS concurrent with myeloid leukemia (n=1, and AS without comorbidities (n=1. In addition to an improvement in the course of AS, there were also two cases with clinical presentations of AS after SCT. The given cases show that SCT can be basically used to induce drug-free remission in patients with severe forms of standard therapy-resistant AS. However, the introduction of SCT in clinical practice needs to adjust the technique to the specific features of AS patients. 

  4. Treatment planning using tailored and standard cylindrical light diffusers for photodynamic therapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendon, Augusto; Lilge, Lothar; Beck, J Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) has seen a rebirth, partially prompted by the development of photosensitizers with longer absorption wavelengths that enable the treatment of larger tissue volumes. Here, we study whether using diffusers with customizable longitudinal emission profiles, rather than conventional ones with flat emission profiles, improves our ability to conform the light dose to the prostate. We present a modified Cimmino linear feasibility algorithm to solve the treatment planning problem, which improves upon previous algorithms by (1) correctly minimizing the cost function that penalizes deviations from the prescribed light dose, and (2) regularizing the inverse problem. Based on this algorithm, treatment plans were obtained under a variety of light delivery scenarios using 5-15 standard or tailored diffusers. The sensitivity of the resulting light dose distributions to uncertainties in the optical properties, and the placement of diffusers was also studied. We find that tailored diffusers only marginally outperform conventional ones in terms of prostate coverage and rectal sparing. Furthermore, it is shown that small perturbations in optical properties can lead to large changes in the light dose distribution, but that those changes can be largely corrected with a simple light dose re-normalization. Finally, we find that prostate coverage is only minimally affected by small changes in diffuser placement. Our results suggest that prostate PDT is not likely to benefit from the use of tailored diffusers. Other locations with more complex geometries might see a better improvement

  5. Rapid course radiation therapy vs. more standard treatment: a randomized trial for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Tkocz, Heinz-Joachim; Abel, Ulrich; Scheib, Thomas; Walter, Karin; Nieder, Carsten; Schnabel, Klaus; Berberich, Werner; Kubale, Reinhard; Fuchs, Marcus

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In a prospective randomized trial we examined whether radiotherapy of painful bone metastases can be shortened using larger single doses without impairing effectivity. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with painful bone metastases having no prior surgical intervention or treatment with x-ray therapy and had a median follow-up of 12 months were analyzed. The primary tumor was located in the breast in 43%, in the lung in 24%, and in the prostate in 14%. The most frequent sites of metastases were the pelvis (31%), the vertebral column (30%), and the ribs (20%). Further percentages of sites were: lower extremity 11%, upper extremity 6%, and skull 2%. Fifty-one patients received a short course radiotherapy with a total dose of 20 Gy in 1 week (daily dose 4 Gy), and 49 patients received 30 Gy in 3 weeks (daily dose 2 Gy). Results: There were no significant differences in frequency, duration of pain relief, improvement of mobility, recalcification, frequency of pathologic fractures nor survival. There was a light trend favoring 30 Gy in frequency of pain relief and recalcification. Survival was mostly influenced by primary tumor site, Karnofsky performance status, and possibly by the response to radiotherapy (pain relief). Conclusions: Because of the very short life expectancy of patients with metastatic bone disease, we now use 20 Gy in 1 week as our standard to reduce hospital stay

  6. Rapid COJEC versus standard induction therapies for high-risk neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinemann, Frank; Tushabe, Doreen A; van Dalen, Elvira C; Berthold, Frank

    2015-05-19

    second malignancies. For endocrine complications and neurocognitive complications, a statistically significant difference in favor of the rapid COJEC arm was found; for all other late non-hematological toxicities no clear evidence of a difference between treatment groups was identified.Data on progression-free survival and health-related quality of life were not reported. We identified one randomized controlled trial that evaluated rapid COJEC versus standard induction therapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. No clear evidence of a difference in complete response, treatment-related mortality, overall survival, and event-free survival between the treatment alternatives was found. This could be the result of low power or too short a follow-up period. Results of both early and late toxicities were ambiguous. Information on progression-free survival and health-related quality of life were not available. This trial was performed in the 1990s. Since then, many changes in, for example, treatment and risk classification have occurred. Therefore, based on the currently available evidence, we are uncertain about the effects of rapid COJEC and standard induction therapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. More research is needed for a definitive conclusion.

  7. Quality control of secondary standards and calibration systems, therapy level, of National Laboratory of Metrology from Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecatti, E.R.; Freitas, L.C. de

    1992-01-01

    The results of quality control program of secondary standards, therapy level, and the calibration system of clinical dosemeters were analysed from 1984, when a change in the laboratory installation occurred and new standards were obtained. The national and the international intercomparisons were emphasised. The results for graphite wall chambers were compared, observing a maximum variation of about 0,6%. In the case of Delrin (TK01) wall chambers, the maximum variation was 1,7%. The results of post intercomparisons with thermoluminescent dosemeters have presented derivations lesser than 1%, securing the standards consistence at LNMRI with the international metrological system. (C.G.C.)

  8. Effective therapy to reduce edema after total knee arthroplasty Multi-layer compression therapy or standard therapy with cool pack - a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Brigitta; Babendererde, Christine; Rohner-Spengler, Manuela; Müller, Urs W; Meichtry, André; Luomajoki, Hannu

    2018-02-01

    Background: After total knee arthroplasty (TKA) efficient control and reduction of postoperative edema is of great importance. Aim: The aim of this pilot study (EKNZ 2014 – 225 DRKS00006271) was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layer compression therapy (MLCT) to reduce edema in the early period after surgery compared to the standard treatment with Cool Pack. Methods: In this randomized controlled pilot trial, sixteen patients after TKA were randomized into an intervention group (IG) or a control group (CG). Circumferential measurements were used to assess edema. Secondary outcomes were range of motion (ROM), pain (numeric rating scale, NRS) and function as measured with the fast Self Paced Walking Test (fSPWT). Results: Clinically relevant differences in edema reduction between the two groups were found in the early postoperative period and at the six weeks follow up. Six days postoperatively the group time interaction (IE) in favor of the IG were −3.8 cm (95 % CI: −5.1; −2.4) when measured 10 cm proximal to the joint space and −2.7 cm (CI: −4.1; −1.3) when measured 5 cm proximally. We further observed differences in secondary outcomes in favor of the CG. Six days postoperatively the IE for knee flexion was –8.3 ° (CI: −22.0; 5.4) and for the fSPWT it was 12.8 seconds (CI: −16.4; 41.3). Six weeks postoperatively these differences diminished. Conclusions: The findings suggest that MLCT could be an alternative treatment to reduce postoperative edema in patients after total knee arthroplasty. Eventually possible negative effects on early knee flexion and function must be considered.

  9. MO-G-9A-01: Imaging Refresher for Standard of Care Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labby, Z [The University of Michigan Hospital ' Health Sys, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sensakovic, W [Florida Hospital, Orlando, FL (United States); Hipp, E [NYULMC Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Altman, M [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Imaging techniques and technology which were previously the domain of diagnostic medicine are becoming increasingly integrated and utilized in radiation therapy (RT) clinical practice. As such, there are a number of specific imaging topics that are highly applicable to modern radiation therapy physics. As imaging becomes more widely integrated into standard clinical radiation oncology practice, the impetus is on RT physicists to be informed and up-to-date on those imaging modalities relevant to the design and delivery of therapeutic radiation treatments. For example, knowing that, for a given situation, a fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image set is most likely what the physician would like to import and contour is helpful, but may not be sufficient to providing the best quality of care. Understanding the physics of how that pulse sequence works and why it is used could help assess its utility and determine if it is the optimal sequence for aiding in that specific clinical situation. It is thus important that clinical medical physicists be able to understand and explain the physics behind the imaging techniques used in all aspects of clinical radiation oncology practice. This session will provide the basic physics for a variety of imaging modalities for applications that are highly relevant to radiation oncology practice: computed tomography (CT) (including kV, MV, cone beam CT [CBCT], and 4DCT), positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging specific to brachytherapy (including ultrasound and some brachytherapy specific topics in MR). For each unique modality, the image formation process will be reviewed, trade-offs between image quality and other factors (e.g. imaging time or radiation dose) will be clarified, and typically used cases for each modality will be introduced. The current and near-future uses of these modalities and techniques in radiation oncology clinical practice will also be discussed. Learning

  10. Hypertonic saline (HTS versus standard (isotonic fluid therapy for traumatic brain injuries: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrit Lourens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI is one of the foremost causes of mortality secondary to trauma. Poorer outcomes are associated with secondary insults, after the initial brain injury occurred. The management goal of TBI is to prevent or minimise the effects of secondary brain injuries. The primary objective of this systematic review/meta-analysis was to assess the effects of Hypertonic Saline (HTS compared to Standard Fluid Therapy (SFT in the treatment and resuscitation of TBI patients. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE (from 1966, EBSCOhost, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Proquest Medical Library and EMBASE (from 1980 in May 2010 and updated searches in February 2011. Data were assessed and extracted by two independent authors. Risk ratios (RR with a 95% confidence interval (CI were used as the effect measure. The review included three RCTs (1184 participants of which two were of high to moderate quality (1005 participants. HTS was not found to be associated with a reduction in mortality (3 RCTs, 1184 participants, RR 0.91, 95%CI 0.76 to 1.09 and morbidity in TBI patients. No significant improvement in haemodynamical stability was found whereas insufficient data were available to indicate a reduction in the intracranial pressure (ICP. In the HTS group, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP (MD 3.83 mmHg, 95%CI 1.08 to 6.57 and serum sodium level (MD 8 mEq/L, 95%CI 7.47 to 8.53 were higher. Existing studies show no indication that HTS, in comparison to SFT, reduces mortality or morbidity after the occurrence of TBI. Against this backdrop, some uncertainties still exist in terms of the use of different concentrations and volumes of HTS, the timing of administration as well as the benefit in specific injury profiles. As a result, formulating conclusive recommendations is complex.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Bronchial Thermoplasty, Omalizumab, and Standard Therapy for Moderate-to-Severe Allergic Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Zafari

    Full Text Available Bronchial thermoplasty (BT is a recently developed treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. A few studies have suggested the clinical efficacy of this intervention. However, no study has evaluated the cost-effectiveness of BT compared to other alternative treatments for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma, which currently include omalizumab and standard therapy.To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of standard therapy, BT, and omalizumab for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in the USA.A probabilistic Markov model with weekly cycles was developed to reflect the course of asthma progression over a 5-year time horizon. The study population was adults with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma whose asthma remained uncontrolled despite using high-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS, with or without long-acting beta-agonists [LABA]. A perspective of the health-care system was adopted with asthma-related costs as well as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs and exacerbations as the outcomes.For standard therapy, BT, and omalizumab, the discounted 5-year costs and QALYs were $15,400 and 3.08, $28,100 and 3.24, and $117,000 and 3.26, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of BT versus standard therapy and omalizumab versus BT was $78,700/QALY and $3.86 million/QALY, respectively. At the willingness-to-pay (WTP of $50,000/QALY and $100,000/QALY, the probability of BT being cost-effective was 9%, and 67%, respectively. The corresponding expected value of perfect information (EVPI was $155 and $1,530 per individual at these thresholds. In sensitivity analyses, increasing the costs of BT from $14,900 to $30,000 increased its ICER relative to standard therapy to $178,000/QALY, and decreased the ICER of omalizumab relative to BT to $3.06 million/QALY. Reducing the costs of omalizumab by 25% decreased its ICER relative to BT by 29%.Based on the available evidence, our study suggests that there is more than 60% chance that BT becomes

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Bronchial Thermoplasty, Omalizumab, and Standard Therapy for Moderate-to-Severe Allergic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Zafar; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Marra, Carlo A; Chen, Wenjia; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2016-01-01

    Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a recently developed treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe asthma. A few studies have suggested the clinical efficacy of this intervention. However, no study has evaluated the cost-effectiveness of BT compared to other alternative treatments for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma, which currently include omalizumab and standard therapy. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of standard therapy, BT, and omalizumab for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in the USA. A probabilistic Markov model with weekly cycles was developed to reflect the course of asthma progression over a 5-year time horizon. The study population was adults with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma whose asthma remained uncontrolled despite using high-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS, with or without long-acting beta-agonists [LABA]). A perspective of the health-care system was adopted with asthma-related costs as well as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and exacerbations as the outcomes. For standard therapy, BT, and omalizumab, the discounted 5-year costs and QALYs were $15,400 and 3.08, $28,100 and 3.24, and $117,000 and 3.26, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of BT versus standard therapy and omalizumab versus BT was $78,700/QALY and $3.86 million/QALY, respectively. At the willingness-to-pay (WTP) of $50,000/QALY and $100,000/QALY, the probability of BT being cost-effective was 9%, and 67%, respectively. The corresponding expected value of perfect information (EVPI) was $155 and $1,530 per individual at these thresholds. In sensitivity analyses, increasing the costs of BT from $14,900 to $30,000 increased its ICER relative to standard therapy to $178,000/QALY, and decreased the ICER of omalizumab relative to BT to $3.06 million/QALY. Reducing the costs of omalizumab by 25% decreased its ICER relative to BT by 29%. Based on the available evidence, our study suggests that there is more than 60% chance that BT becomes cost

  13. Standardized programming to reduce the burden of inappropriate therapies in implantable cardioverter defibrillators - Single centre follow up results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Boles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current algorithms and device morphology templates have been proposed in current Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators (ICDs to minimize inappropriate therapies (ITS, but this has not been completely successful. Aim: Assess the impact of a deliberate strategy of using an atrial lead implant with standardized parameters; based on all current ICD discriminators and technologies, on the burden of ITS. Method: A retrospective single-centre analysis of 250 patients with either dual chamber (DR ICDs or biventricular ICDs (CRTDs over a (41.9 ± 27.3 month period was performed. The incidence of ITS on all ICD and CRTD patients was chronicled after the implementation of standardized programming. Results: 39 events of anti-tachycardial pacing (ATP and/or shocks were identified in 20 patients (8% incidence rate among patients. The total number of individual therapies was 120, of which 34% were inappropriate ATP, and 36% were inappropriate shocks. 11 patients of the 250 patients received ITS (4.4%. Of the 20 patients, four had ICDs for primary prevention and 16 for a secondary prevention. All the episodes in the primary indication group were inappropriate, while seven patients (43% of the secondary indication group experienced inappropriate therapies. Conclusions: The burden of ITS in the population of patients receiving ICDs was 4.4% in the presence of atrial leads. The proposed rationalized programming criteria seems an effective strategy to minimize the burden of inappropriate therapies and will require further validation. Keywords: Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICDs, Inappropriate therapies, Standardized programming

  14. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Standardizing Therapy Monitoring with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT Using the Example of Somatostatin Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Luboldt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to standardize therapy monitoring of hepatic metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs during the course of somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy (SRRT. In 21 consecutive patients with nonresectable hepatic metastases of GEP-NETs, chromogranin A (CgA and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT were compared before and after the last SRRT. On 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT, the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax of normal liver and hepatic metastases were calculated. In addition, the volumes of hepatic metastases (volume of interest [VOI] were measured using four cut-offs to separate normal liver tissue from metastases (SUVmax of the normal liver plus 10% [VOIliver+10%], 20% [VOIliver+20%], 30% [VOIliver+30%] and SUV = 10 [VOI10SUV]. The SUVmaxof the normal liver was below 10 (7.2 ± 1.3 in all patients and without significant changes. Overall therapy changes (Δ per patient (mean [95% CI] were statistically significant with p < .01 for ΔCgA = −43 (−69 to −17, ΔSUVmax = −22 (−29 to −14, and ΔVOI10SUV = −53 (−68 to −38% and significant with p < .05 for ΔVOIliver+10% = −29 (−55 to −3%, ΔVOIliver+20% = −32 (−62 to −2 and ΔVOIliver+30% = −37 (−66 to −8. Correlations were found only between ΔCgA and ΔVOI10SUV (r = .595; p < .01, ΔSUVmax and ΔVOI10SUV (0.629, p < .01, and SUVmax and ΔSUVmax (r = .446; p < .05. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT allows volumetric therapy monitoring via an SUV-based cut-off separating hepatic metastases from normal liver tissue (10 SUV recommended.

  15. Robotic-based carbon ion therapy and patient positioning in 6 degrees of freedom: setup accuracy of two standard immobilization devices used in carbon ion therapy and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Winter, Marcus; Kuhn, Sabine P; Debus, Jürgen; Nairz, Olaf; Münter, Marc W

    2012-03-29

    To investigate repositioning accuracy in particle radiotherapy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3 DOF) for two immobilization devices (Scotchcast masks vs thermoplastic head masks) currently in use at our institution for fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. Position verifications in patients treated with carbon ion therapy and IMRT for head and neck malignancies were evaluated. Most patients received combined treatment regimen (IMRT plus carbon ion boost), immobilization was achieved with either Scotchcast or thermoplastic head masks. Position corrections in robotic-based carbon ion therapy allowing 6 DOF were compared to IMRT allowing corrections in 3 DOF for two standard immobilization devices. In total, 838 set-up controls of 38 patients were analyzed. Robotic-based position correction including correction of rotations was well tolerated and without discomfort. Standard deviations of translational components were between 0.5 and 0.8 mm for Scotchcast and 0.7 and 1.3 mm for thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 1.2-1.4 mm and 1.0-1.1 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Mean overall displacement vectors were between 2.1 mm (Scotchcast) and 2.9 mm (thermoplastic masks) in 6 DOF and 3.9-3.0 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Displacement vectors were lower when correction in 6 DOF was allowed as opposed to 3 DOF only, which was maintained at the traditional action level of >3 mm for position correction in the pre-on-board imaging era. Setup accuracy for both systems was within the expected range. Smaller shifts were required when 6 DOF were available for correction as opposed to 3 DOF. Where highest possible positioning accuracy is required, frequent image guidance is mandatory to achieve best possible plan delivery and maintenance of sharp gradients and optimal normal tissue sparing inherent in carbon ion therapy.

  16. Bridge therapy or standard treatment for urgent surgery after coronary stent implantation: Analysis of 314 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Servi, Stefano; Morici, Nuccia; Boschetti, Enrico; Rossini, Roberta; Martina, Paola; Musumeci, Giuseppe; D'Urbano, Maurizio; Lazzari, Ludovico; La Vecchia, Carlo; Senni, Michele; Klugmann, Silvio; Savonitto, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Intravenous administration of a short acting glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor has been proposed as a bridge to surgery in patients on dual antiplatelet treatment, but data in comparison with other treatment options are not available. We conducted a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent un-deferrable, non-emergency surgery after coronary stenting. The bridge therapy was performed after discontinuation of the oral P2Y12 inhibitor by using i.v. tirofiban infusion. Net Adverse Clinical Events (NACE) was the primary outcome. We analyzed 314 consecutive patients: the bridge strategy was performed in 87 patients, whereas 227 were treated with other treatment options and represent the control group. Thirty-day NACE occurred in 8% of patients in the bridge group and in 22.5% in the control group (p Bridge therapy was associated with decreased 30-day NACE rate [Odds ratio (OR) 0.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13-0.39; p bridge group and 3 (1.3%) in the control group. Bridge therapy was associated with decreased events rates as compared to both patients with and without P2Y12 inhibitors discontinuation in the control group. After adjustment for the most relevant covariates, the favorable effect of the bridge therapy was not materially modified. In conclusion, perioperative bridge therapy using tirofiban was associated with reduced 30-day NACE rate, particularly when surgery was performed within 60 days after stent implantation.

  17. The Performance of Standardized Patients in Portraying Clinical Scenarios in Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Standardized patients (SPs) are frequently included in the clinical preparation of students in the health sciences. An acknowledged benefit of using SPs is the opportunity to provide a standardized method by which students can demonstrate and develop their competency. Relatively little is known, however, about the capacity of SPs to…

  18. Principles governing heart failure therapy re-examined relative to standard evidence-based medicine-driven guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lip-Bun; Chinnappa, Shanmugakumar; Tan, David K H; Hall, Alistair S

    2011-09-01

    Although all aspects of clinical work nowadays are modified by the pervading influence of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and multiplicative guidelines, not many clinicians realize that the underlying premise of EBM-driven guidelines is a particular strain of consequentialist ideology. Subservience to this ideology has transformed modern medical practice, but there is a real risk of distorting good medical practice, of belittling clinical judgement, of disempowering clinicians, and subjecting patients to skewed medical reality and treatment options. With so many heart failure (HF) guidelines issued by various august bodies, it is therefore timely to reappraise principles governing modern HF therapy with a fresh examination of the hierarchy of medical imperatives, the role of alternatives to consequentialism including deontological principles in HF therapy. In addition, other ideology worth re-examining, aside from EBM, are the principle of appropriate definition of HF underlying therapeutic goals and the principle of prioritizing objectives of HF therapy. Even within standard EBM, there are many questions to reconsider: about what types of evidence are admissible, different interpretations of available evidence, emphasizing patient-centered outcome measures instead of randomized controlled trials quantifiable therapeutic outcomes, how to prescribe drugs for prognostic versus symptomatic benefits, and how to deliver HF therapy based on pathophysiological features through mechanistic considerations and not just confined to randomized controlled trials or meta-analytical statistical imperatives. Through re-examination of these fundamental principles of HF therapy, it is hoped that clinicians will be empowered to manage HF patients more holistically and better deliver HF therapies in the best interest of each individual patient.

  19. An evaluation of the impact of introducing compassion focused therapy to a standard treatment programme for people with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Corinne; Gilbert, Paul; Read, Natalie; Goss, Ken

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the outcome of introducing Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) into a standard treatment programme for people with eating disorders. In particular, the aim was to evaluate the principle that CFT can be used with people with eating disorders and improve eating disorder symptomatology. Routinely collected questionnaire data were used to assess cognitive and behavioural aspects of eating disorders and social functioning/well being (n = 99). There were significant improvements on all questionnaire measures during the programme. An analysis by diagnosis found that people with bulimia nervosa improved significantly more than people with anorexia nervosa on most of the subscales. Also, in terms of clinical significance, 73% of those with bulimia nervosa were considered to have made clinically reliable and significant improvements at the end of treatment (compared with 21% of people with anorexia nervosa and 30% of people with atypical eating disorders). This study demonstrates the potential benefits of using CFT with people with eating disorders and highlights the need for further research on this new approach. CFT offers new ways to conceptualize and formulate some of the self-critical and shame-based difficulties associated with eating disorders. CFT offers a framework that can enable people with eating disorders to conceptualize their difficulties in different ways. CFT can be combined with standard therapies especially cognitive behavioural therapy. CFT can be especially useful in a group context where the relationships between members can become increasingly compassionate, validating, supportive and encouraging. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Compliance to Standard Equipment Requirements by Exercise Therapy/Fitness Outfits in The South-South Geopolitical Zone of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun S. Kubeyinje

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the compliance of exercise therapy/fitness outfits in the south-south geopolitical zone of Nigeria to standard equipment requirements. Descriptive survey design was adopted for the conduct of the study using a sample size of 51centres/managers purposively selected from a population of 102 managers of fitness outfits in the six states of the south-south geopolitical zone of Nigeria. A self- developed structured questionnaire and a facility checklist were used to collect the data. Data collected were analysed using frequency counts and percentages. The study revealed in this analysis that only treadmills (66.7%, bicycle ergometers (66.7%, dumbbells (84.3% and weight racks (57.0% met the benchmark minimum in more than 50% of the exercise therapy/fitness outfits surveyed in six states of the south-south geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Most of the equipment surveyed were functional with the highest non-functionality occurring in treadmill machines in 9.8% of the surveyed centres followed by sit-up benches (5.9% and bicycle ergometers (3.9%. In conclusion, it could be deduced from the results that there’s gross inadequacy of equipment and low level of compliance to established standard in the exercise therapy/fitness outfits evaluated in the south-south geopolitical zone of Nigeria.

  1. Psychometric Properties of a Standardized Observation Protocol to Quantify Pediatric Physical Therapy Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonderer, Patrizia; Ziegler, Schirin Akhbari; Oertle, Barbara Gressbach; Meichtry, Andre; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Purpose: Pediatric physical therapy (PPT) is characterized by heterogeneity. This blurs the evaluation of effective components of PPT. The Groningen Observation Protocol (GOP) was developed to quantify contents of PPT. This study assesses the reliability and completeness of the GOP. Methods: Sixty

  2. Effectiveness of a Standardized Equine-Assisted Therapy Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Marta; Loliva, Dafne; Cerino, Stefania; Chiarotti, Flavia; Venerosi, Aldina; Bramini, Maria; Nonnis, Enrico; Marcelli, Marco; Vinti, Claudia; De Santis, Chiara; Bisacco, Francesca; Fagerlie, Monica; Frascarelli, Massimo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effectiveness of an equine-assisted therapy (EAT) in improving adaptive and executive functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was examined (children attending EAT, n = 15, control group n = 13; inclusion criteria: IQ > 70). Therapeutic sessions consisted in structured activities involving horses and…

  3. Review of Real-Time 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy on Standard-Equipped Cancer Radiation Therapy Systems: Are We at the Tipping Point for the Era of Real-Time Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, Paul J; Nguyen, Doan Trang; O'Brien, Ricky; Zhang, Pengpeng; Happersett, Laura; Bertholet, Jenny; Poulsen, Per R

    2018-04-14

    To review real-time 3-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on standard-equipped cancer radiation therapy systems, focusing on clinically implemented solutions. Three groups in 3 continents have clinically implemented novel real-time 3D IGRT solutions on standard-equipped linear accelerators. These technologies encompass kilovoltage, combined megavoltage-kilovoltage, and combined kilovoltage-optical imaging. The cancer sites treated span pelvic and abdominal tumors for which respiratory motion is present. For each method the 3D-measured motion during treatment is reported. After treatment, dose reconstruction was used to assess the treatment quality in the presence of motion with and without real-time 3D IGRT. The geometric accuracy was quantified through phantom experiments. A literature search was conducted to identify additional real-time 3D IGRT methods that could be clinically implemented in the near future. The real-time 3D IGRT methods were successfully clinically implemented and have been used to treat more than 200 patients. Systematic target position shifts were observed using all 3 methods. Dose reconstruction demonstrated that the delivered dose is closer to the planned dose with real-time 3D IGRT than without real-time 3D IGRT. In addition, compromised target dose coverage and variable normal tissue doses were found without real-time 3D IGRT. The geometric accuracy results with real-time 3D IGRT had a mean error of real-time 3D IGRT methods using standard-equipped radiation therapy systems that could also be clinically implemented. Multiple clinical implementations of real-time 3D IGRT on standard-equipped cancer radiation therapy systems have been demonstrated. Many more approaches that could be implemented were identified. These solutions provide a pathway for the broader adoption of methods to make radiation therapy more accurate, impacting tumor and normal tissue dose, margins, and ultimately patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018

  4. Effect of a Standardized Protocol of Antibiotic Therapy on Surgical Site Infection after Laparoscopic Surgery for Complicated Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Chul; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Bong Hwa

    Although it is accepted that complicated appendicitis requires antibiotic therapy to prevent post-operative surgical infections, consensus protocols on the duration and regimens of treatment are not well established. This study aimed to compare the outcome of post-operative infectious complications in patients receiving old non-standardized and new standard antibiotic protocols, involving either 5 or 10 days of treatment, respectively. We enrolled 1,343 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis between January 2009 and December 2014. At the beginning of the new protocol, the patients were divided into two groups; 10 days of various antibiotic regimens (between January 2009 and June 2012, called the non-standardized protocol; n = 730) and five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole regimen (between July 2012 and December 2014; standardized protocol; n = 613). We compared the clinical outcomes, including surgical site infection (SSI) (superficial and deep organ/space infections) in the two groups. The standardized protocol group had a slightly shorter operative time (67 vs. 69 min), a shorter hospital stay (5 vs. 5.4 d), and lower medical cost (US$1,564 vs. US$1,654). Otherwise, there was no difference between the groups. No differences were found in the non-standardized and standard protocol groups with regard to the rate of superficial infection (10.3% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.488) or deep organ/space infection (2.3% vs. 2.1%; p = 0.797). In patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis, five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole did not lead to more SSIs, and it decreased the medical costs compared with non-standardized antibiotic regimens.

  5. 78 FR 43889 - Synergizing Efforts in Standards Development for Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... regenerative medicine products have generated a great deal of interest. These efforts include standards... is done to coordinate the various existing efforts. In the public workshop, FDA hopes to bring...

  6. Current status of epilepsy treatment and efficacy of standard phenobarbital therapy in rural areas of Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinbei; Luo, Nan; Wang, Zan; Lin, Weihong

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the current status of epilepsy treatment and the efficacy and adverse effects of phenobarbital therapy in rural areas of Northern China. A total of 2192 patients diagnosed with convulsive epilepsy were recruited from seven different rural regions in Jilin Province, China to investigate the current status of epilepsy treatment, and 1379 of them were enrolled in a standard phenobarbital therapy trial. Patients were selected according to strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, and medical records for all patients were collected and analyzed before the standard treatment was started. Patients were followed up monthly, and efficacy in 1218 patients was analyzed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. More patients had the initial seizure in juveniles than in adults, and 40.72% of the 2192 patients were not receiving any treatment before the treatment trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital increased and adverse effects decreased within the treatment period. Among the 349 patients who were followed up for 12 months from the beginning of the phenobarbital treatment, seizures were decreased by more than 75% in 71.3% of patients using a low-to-medium dose of phenobarbital. Major adverse effects of phenobarbital included mild exhaustion, drowsiness, dizziness and headache. Standardized long-term and regular administration of phenobarbital at a low-to-medium dose can be used as an effective, economic and safe treatment against epilepsy in rural areas.

  7. Twelve-month follow-up of virtual reality and standard exposure therapies for the fear of flying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov; Hodges, Larry; Anderson, Page L; Price, Larry; Smith, Samantha

    2002-04-01

    This study reports the 12-month follow-up from patients with the fear of flying who were treated in a controlled study and randomly assigned (n = 49) to virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy, standard exposure (SE) therapy, or to a wait-list control (WL). VRE and SE were equally superior to WL. At 12 months posttreatment, data were gathered on 24 of the 30 (80%) patients who were assigned to VRE or SE. Patients maintained their treatment gains, and 92% of VRE participants and 91% of SE participants had flown on a real airplane since the graduation flight. This is the 1st year-long follow-up of patients having been treated with VRE and indicates that short-term treatment can have lasting effects.

  8. Standards for gene therapy clinical trials based on pro-active risk assessment in a London NHS Teaching Hospital Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, K B; Wood, S; Shaw, R J

    2005-02-01

    Conducting gene therapy clinical trials with genetically modified organisms as the vectors presents unique safety and infection control issues. The area is governed by a range of legislation and guidelines, some unique to this field, as well as those pertinent to any area of clinical work. The relevant regulations covering gene therapy using genetically modified vectors are reviewed and illustrated with the approach taken by a large teaching hospital NHS Trust. Key elements were Trust-wide communication and involvement of staff in a pro-active approach to risk management, with specific emphasis on staff training and engagement, waste management, audit and record keeping. This process has led to the development of proposed standards for clinical trials involving genetically modified micro-organisms.

  9. Integrated cognitive remediation and standard rehabilitation therapy in patients of schizophrenia: persistence after 5years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Mariachiara; Spangaro, Marco; Bechi, Margherita; Baraldi, Maria Alice; Cocchi, Federica; Guglielmino, Carmelo; Bianchi, Laura; Mastromatteo, Antonella; Bosia, Marta; Cavallaro, Roberto

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive remediation, often used in combination with standard rehabilitation programs, represents the best available tool to treat cognitive impairments in patients with schizophrenia. However, there are still open questions about durability of effects and generalization of cognitive improvements to functional outcome. This study aims to investigate the persistence of both cognitive and functional effects of combined cognitive remediation plus standard rehabilitation interventions, 5years after completion of the intervention, also comparing different durations of the standard rehabilitation. Sixty patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and previously treated with a 6months intervention, consisting of standard rehabilitation plus 3-months of cognitive remediation, either followed by another year of standard rehabilitation or routine psychiatric treatment, were reassessed with neuropsychological and functional measures 5years after the intervention. Results show that cognitive abilities remained stable after 5years in both groups, while functional performance significantly decreased in patients treated with the 6months intervention only. Data thus suggest that cognitive effects persist even after 5years, while a longer standard rehabilitation following the cognitive remediation program may be needed to achieve a stable functional gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Breast Sentinel Lymph Node Coverage by Standard Radiation Therapy Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovitch, Rachel; Ballonoff, Ari; Newman, Francis M.S.; Finlayson, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Background: Biopsy of the breast sentinel lymph node (SLN) is now a standard staging procedure for early-stage invasive breast cancer. The anatomic location of the breast SLN and its relationship to standard radiation fields has not been described. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of radiotherapy treatment planning data sets was performed in patients with breast cancer who had undergone SLN biopsy, and those with a surgical clip at the SLN biopsy site were identified. The location of the clip was evaluated relative to vertebral body level on an anterior-posterior digitally reconstructed radiograph, treated whole-breast tangential radiation fields, and standard axillary fields in 106 data sets meeting these criteria. Results: The breast SLN varied in vertebral body level position, ranging from T2 to T7 but most commonly opposite T4. The SLN clip was located below the base of the clavicle in 90%, and hence would be excluded from standard axillary radiotherapy fields where the inferior border is placed at this level. The clip was within the irradiated whole-breast tangent fields in 78%, beneath the superior-posterior corner multileaf collimators in 12%, and outside the tangent field borders in 10%. Conclusions: Standard axillary fields do not encompass the lymph nodes at highest risk of containing tumor in breast cancer patients. Elimination of the superior-posterior corner MLCs from the tangent field design would result in inclusion of the breast SLN in 90% of patients treated with standard whole-breast irradiation

  11. Somato-Visceral Effects in the Treatment of Dysmenorrhea: Neuromuscular Manual Therapy and Standard Pharmacological Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barassi, Giovanni; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia; Porreca, Annamaria; Di Felice, Piera Attilia; Prosperi, Loris; Saggini, Raoul

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to verify whether neuromuscular therapy (NMT) or pharmacology therapy (PT) is more effective for reducing symptoms in women affected by primary dysmenorrhea and the effects associated with each treatment. A controlled, randomized, single-blind clinical trial within the framework of the chair of physical medicine and rehabilitation of the University "G. d'Annunzio" of Chieti-Pescara. The study was conducted on a sample of 60 women suffering from primary dysmenorrhea. Subjects were randomly divided in two groups (A and B). Group A was treated with NMT and group B with PT. Group B was given ibuprofen or naproxen because they are considered the best painkillers for this condition. Group A was treated with 8 neuromuscular manual lumbosacral and abdominal therapy sessions twice per week for 4 weeks. Results were analyzed at the beginning (T0) and end (T1) of the study with a menstrual distress questionnaire, brief pain inventory, and visual analogue scale. Twenty patients from Group A were selected for evaluation of their maintenance of the eventual improvement that was detected in T1 at follow-up (T2). Both therapies had significant short-term effects in reducing the perception and duration of pain. However, NMT appears to give more improvements in the duration of pain. NMT had a long-term effect on perception of pain because patients conserved the positive effects of treatment after 4 weeks. NMT also had a long-term effect on duration of pain because patients conserved benefits of treatment, but this improvement started to decrease after 4 weeks. In the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea, NMT represents a valid therapeutic alternative method to PT. NMT is free from potential adverse effects of analgesics, is noninvasive, and is easy to perform.

  12. Confluent diode laser coagulation: the gold standard of therapy for retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prepiaková, Zuzana; Tomcíková, Dana; Kostolná, Barbora; Gerinec, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The authors compare results of retinopathy of prematurity treatment with single-spot diode laser coagulation (DLC) versus confluent DLC. The final anatomical outcome and need for additional therapy, such as additional DLC, cryotherapy, scleral buckling, and intravitreal bevacizumab, were evaluated. A retrospective review of patients with threshold retinopathy of prematurity treated between January 2001 and October 2012 was conducted. Single-spot laser treatment or confluent laser treatment was applied anterior to the ridge extending to the ora serrata. In the first group (the single-spot group), a single-spot DLC was used between January 2001 and May 2008. The single-spot group included 338 patients (671 eyes) with retinopathy of prematurity. In the second group (the confluent group), confluent DLC was used in 326 patients (652 eyes) between June 2008 and October 2012. The authors compared the need for re-treatment to achieve regression of retinopathy of prematurity in both groups. The rate of progression, frequency of re-treatment, complications, and structural outcomes were evaluated. In the single-spot group, re-treatment only with DLC was necessary in 43 (6.4%) eyes, additional cryotherapy was performed in 22 (3.3%) eyes, and scleral buckling in 107 (15.9%) eyes. Altogether, additional therapy was used in 172 (25.6%) eyes. In the confluent group, re-treatment with DLC was used in 5 (0.8%) eyes, additional cryotherapy in 6 (0.9%) eyes, scleral buckling in 16 (2.5%) eyes, and intravitreal bevacizumab in 14 (2.1%) eyes. Altogether, additional therapy was used in 41 (6.3%) eyes. The confluent group showed a favorable anatomical outcome in 99.1% of the cases compared with 96.4% in the single-spot group. The results were statistically significant (P = .001.) The DLC method was significantly more effective than single-spot DLC in the treatment of retinopathy of prematurity. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Phd study of reliability and validity: One step closer to a standardized music therapy assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    The paper will present a phd study concerning reliability and validity of music therapy assessment model “Assessment of Parenting Competences” (APC) in the area of families with emotionally neglected children. This study had a multiple strategy design with a philosophical base of critical realism...... and pragmatism. The fixed design for this study was a between and within groups design in testing the APCs reliability and validity. The two different groups were parents with neglected children and parents with non-neglected children. The flexible design had a multiple case study strategy specifically...

  14. A Standardized Rat Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury for the Development of Tissue Engineering Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    appropriate sample size and dura- tion required to adequately characterize a treatment. Further compounding the need for a standard preclinical VML...al. In vivo tissue engineer- ing of functional skeletal muscle by freshly isolated satellite cells embedded in a photopolymerizable hydrogel. FASEB J

  15. Development of transfer standard devices for ensuring the accurate calibration of ultrasonic physical therapy machines in clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekkenberg, R T; Richards, A; Beissner, K; Zeqiri, B; Prout, G; Cantrall, Ch; Bezemer, R A; Koch, Ch; Hodnett, M

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapy ultrasound is widely applied to patients. However, many devices do not comply with the relevant standard stating that the actual power output shall be within ±20% of the device indication. Extreme cases have been reported: from delivering effectively no ultrasound or operating at maximum power at all powers indicated. This can potentially lead to patient injury as well as mistreatment. The present European (EC) project is an ongoing attempt to improve the quality of the treatment of patients being treated with ultrasonic physical-therapy. A Portable ultrasound Power Standard (PPS) is being developed and accurately calibrated. The PPS includes: Ultrasound transducers (including one exhibiting an unusual output) and a driver for the ultrasound transducers that has calibration and proficiency test functions. Also included with the PPS is a Cavitation Detector to determine the onset of cavitation occurring within the propagation medium. The PPS will be suitable for conducting in-the-field accreditation (proficiency testing and calibration). In order to be accredited it will be important to be able to show traceability of the calibration, the calibration process and qualification of testing staff. The clinical user will benefit from traceability because treatments will be performed more reliably

  16. Probiotics improve the efficacy of standard triple therapy in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau CSM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Christine S M Lau,1,2 Amanda Ward,2 Ronald S Chamberlain1–4 1Department of Surgery, Saint Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, NJ, USA; 2Saint George’s University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies; 3Department of Surgery, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ, USA; 4Department of Surgery, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA Introduction: Helicobacter pylori colonization is present in half of the world’s population and can lead to numerous gastrointestinal diseases if left untreated, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Although concurrent triple therapy remains the recommended treatment regimen for H. pylori eradication, its success rate and efficacy have been declining. Recent studies have shown that the addition of probiotics can significantly increase eradication rates by up to 50%. This meta-analysis examines the impact of probiotic supplementation on the efficacy of standard triple therapy in eradicating H. pylori. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar (time of inception to 2016 to identify all published randomized control trials (RCTs assessing the use of probiotics in addition to triple therapy for the treatment of H. pylori. Searches were conducted using the keywords “probiotics”, “triple therapy”, and “Helicobacter pylori”. RCTs comparing the use of probiotics and standard triple therapy with standard triple therapy alone for any duration in patients of any age diagnosed with H. pylori infection were included. H. pylori eradication rates (detected using urea breath test or stool antigen were analyzed as-per-protocol (APP and intention-to-treat (ITT. Results: A total of 30 RCTs involving 4,302 patients APP and 4,515 patients ITT were analyzed. The addition of probiotics significantly increased eradication rates by 12.2% (relative risk [RR] =1.122; 95% confidence

  17. Is there a standard for surgical therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma in healthy and cirrhotic liver? A comparison of eight guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, Giulia; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Porzsolt, Franz; Kremer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Liver resection (LR) and transplantation are the most reliable treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aim was to compare different guidelines regarding indication for resection and transplantation because of HCC with and without underlying cirrhosis. We compared the following guidelines published after 1 January 2010: American (American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)), Spanish (Sociedad Espanola de Oncologia Medica (SEOM)), European (European Association for the study of liver-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EASL-EORTC) and European Society for Medical Oncology-European Society of Digestive Oncology (ESMO-ESDO)), Asian (Asian Pacific Association for the Study of Liver (APASL)), Japanese (Japan Society of Hepatology (JSH)), Italian (Associazione Italiana Oncologia Medica (AIOM)) and German (S3) guidelines. All guidelines recommend resection as therapy of choice in healthy liver. Guidelines based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging system recommend resection for single HCCguidelines recommend LR for patients with Child-Pugh A/B with HCC without tumour size restriction; APASL guidelines in general exclude patients with Child-Pugh A from transplantation. In patients with Child-Pugh B, transplantation is the second-line therapy, if resection is not possible for patients within Milan criteria. German and Italian guidelines recommend transplantation for all patients within Milan criteria. Whereas resection is the standard therapy of HCC in healthy liver, a standard regarding the indication for LR and transplantation for HCC in cirrhotic liver does not exist, although nearly all guidelines claim to be evidence based. Surprisingly, despite European guidelines, Germany and Italy use their own national guidelines which partially differ from the European. Possible solutions of the problems are discussed.

  18. Technical standards for micro sensors in surgery and minimally invasive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuder; Dehm

    2004-04-01

    The development of medical applications is fuelled in the context of steadily growing needs and the requirement of lowering overall costs. Micro systems will have an extremely important impact on medical technology in the future. The great challenges for the wider use of micro structures in health applications are biocompatibility and mass production. Especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) need help to overcome these problems by free access to knowledge, the availability of standards and contacts to partners.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of omalizumab add-on to standard-of-care therapy in patients with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma in a Brazilian healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Cibele; Lopes da Silva, Nilceia; Kumar, Praveen; Pathak, Purnima; Ong, Siew Hwa

    2017-08-01

    Omalizumab add-on to standard-of-care therapy has proven to be efficacious in severe asthma patients for whom exacerbations cannot be controlled otherwise. Moreover, evidence from different healthcare settings suggests reduced healthcare resource utilization with omalizumab. Based on these findings, this study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the addition of omalizumab to standard-of-care therapy in patients with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma in a Brazilian healthcare setting. A previously published Markov model was adapted using Brazil-specific unit costs to compare the costs and outcomes of the addition of omalizumab to standard-of-care therapy vs standard-of-care therapy alone. Model inputs were largely based on the eXpeRience study. Costs and health outcomes were calculated for lifetime-years and were annually discounted at 5%. Both one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. An additional cost of R$280,400 for 5.20 additional quality-adjusted life-years was estimated with the addition of omalizumab to standard-of-care therapy, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of R$53,890. One-way sensitivity analysis indicated that discount rates, standard-of-care therapy exacerbation rates, and exacerbation-related mortality rates had the largest impact on incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Assumptions of lifetime treatment adherence and rate of future exacerbations, independent of previous events, might affect the findings. The lack of Brazilian patients in the eXpeRience study may affect the findings, although sample size and baseline characteristics suggest that the modeled population closely resembles Brazilian severe allergic asthma patients. Results indicate that omalizumab as an add-on therapy is more cost-effective than standard-of-care therapy alone for Brazilian patients with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma, based on the World Health Organization's cost-effectiveness threshold of up to 3-times the gross

  20. Neuropsychological Outcome of Children Treated for Standard Risk Medulloblastoma in the PNET4 European Randomized Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy and Maintenance Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Câmara-Costa, Hugo; Resch, Anika; Kieffer, Virginie; Lalande, Clémence; Poggi, Geraldina; Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Calaminus, Gabriele; Grill, Jacques; Doz, François; Rutkowski, Stefan; Massimino, Maura; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Dellatolas, Georges; Chevignard, Mathilde

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In the European HIT-SIOP PNET4 randomized controlled trial, children with standard risk medulloblastoma were allocated to hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT arm, including a partially focused boost) or standard radiation therapy (STRT arm), followed, in both arms, by maintenance chemotherapy. Event-free survival was similar in both arms. Previous work showed that the HFRT arm was associated with worse growth and better questionnaire-based executive function, especially in children <8 years of age at diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare performance-based cognitive outcomes between treatment arms. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological data were collected prospectively in 137 patients. Using the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, and Raven's Progressive Matrices, we estimated full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and, when available, verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), working memory index (WMI), and processing speed index (PSI). Results: Among the 137 participants (HFRT arm n=71, STRT arm n=66, 63.5% males), mean (±SD) ages at diagnosis and assessment respectively were 9.3 (±3.2) years of age (40.8% < 8 years of age at diagnosis) and 14.6 (±4.3) years of age. Mean (±SD) FSIQ was 88 (±19), and mean intergroup difference was 3.88 (95% confidence interval: −2.66 to 10.42, P=.24). No significant differences were found in children >8 years of age at diagnosis. In children <8 years of age at diagnosis, a marginally significant trend toward higher VIQ was found in those treated in the HFRT arm; a similar trend was found for PSI but not for PIQ, WMI, or FSIQ (mean intergroup differences were: 12.02 for VIQ [95% CI: 2.37-21.67; P=.02]; 3.77 for PIQ [95% CI: −5.19 to 12.74; P>.10]; 5.20 for WMI [95% CI: −2.07 to 12.47; P>.10]; 10.90 for PSI [95% CI: −1.54 to 23.36; P=.08]; and 5.28 for FSIQ [95% CI: −4.23 to 14.79; P>.10]). Conclusions: HFRT was associated with

  1. Neuropsychological Outcome of Children Treated for Standard Risk Medulloblastoma in the PNET4 European Randomized Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy and Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Câmara-Costa, Hugo, E-mail: hugocamaracosta@gmail.com [National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM U1178, Paris (France); Resch, Anika [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kieffer, Virginie [Saint Maurice Hospitals, Saint Maurice (France); Lalande, Clémence [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Poggi, Geraldina [Scientific Institute, IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini, Lecco (Italy); Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim [University of Southampton, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Paediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Grill, Jacques [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Paediatric Oncology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Dellatolas, Georges [National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM U1178, Paris (France); Chevignard, Mathilde [Rehabilitation Department for Children With Acquired Neurological Injury, Saint Maurice Hospitals, Saint Maurice, and Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Universités Paris, INSERM CNRS, Paris (France)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: In the European HIT-SIOP PNET4 randomized controlled trial, children with standard risk medulloblastoma were allocated to hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT arm, including a partially focused boost) or standard radiation therapy (STRT arm), followed, in both arms, by maintenance chemotherapy. Event-free survival was similar in both arms. Previous work showed that the HFRT arm was associated with worse growth and better questionnaire-based executive function, especially in children <8 years of age at diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare performance-based cognitive outcomes between treatment arms. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological data were collected prospectively in 137 patients. Using the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, and Raven's Progressive Matrices, we estimated full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and, when available, verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), working memory index (WMI), and processing speed index (PSI). Results: Among the 137 participants (HFRT arm n=71, STRT arm n=66, 63.5% males), mean (±SD) ages at diagnosis and assessment respectively were 9.3 (±3.2) years of age (40.8% < 8 years of age at diagnosis) and 14.6 (±4.3) years of age. Mean (±SD) FSIQ was 88 (±19), and mean intergroup difference was 3.88 (95% confidence interval: −2.66 to 10.42, P=.24). No significant differences were found in children >8 years of age at diagnosis. In children <8 years of age at diagnosis, a marginally significant trend toward higher VIQ was found in those treated in the HFRT arm; a similar trend was found for PSI but not for PIQ, WMI, or FSIQ (mean intergroup differences were: 12.02 for VIQ [95% CI: 2.37-21.67; P=.02]; 3.77 for PIQ [95% CI: −5.19 to 12.74; P>.10]; 5.20 for WMI [95% CI: −2.07 to 12.47; P>.10]; 10.90 for PSI [95% CI: −1.54 to 23.36; P=.08]; and 5.28 for FSIQ [95% CI: −4.23 to 14.79; P>.10]). Conclusions: HFRT was associated with

  2. Psychometric Properties of a Standardized Observation Protocol to Quantify Pediatric Physical Therapy Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderer, Patrizia; Akhbari Ziegler, Schirin; Gressbach Oertle, Barbara; Meichtry, André; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-07-01

    Pediatric physical therapy (PPT) is characterized by heterogeneity. This blurs the evaluation of effective components of PPT. The Groningen Observation Protocol (GOP) was developed to quantify contents of PPT. This study assesses the reliability and completeness of the GOP. Sixty infant PPT sessions were video-taped. Two random samples of 10 videos were used to determine interrater and intrarater reliability using interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) with 95% confidence intervals. Completeness of GOP 2.0 was based on 60 videos. Interrater reliability of quantifying PPT actions was excellent (ICC, 0.75-1.0) in 71% and sufficient to good (ICC, 0.4-0.74) in 24% of PPT actions. Intrarater reliability was excellent in 94% and sufficient to good in 6% of PPT actions. Completeness was good for greater than 90% of PPT actions. GOP 2.0 has good reliability and completeness. After appropriate training, it is a useful tool to quantify PPT for children with developmental disorders.

  3. Stereotactic radiation therapy: a second gold standard in the treatment of early-stage lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini B, Alejandro; Valdez C, Cristian; Sepulveda A, Veronica; Baeza L, Ricardo; Bustos, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Although in Chile this is not the case, the northern regions of the country show higher incidence and mortality rates than the other Chilean regions. In recent years screening guides for lung cancer with low-dose scanner have begun to be established, and most of the medical societies involved in this subject have already settled the selection criteria. At the same time new techniques of treatment for these patients have developed, with highly sophisticated radiotherapy such as SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) and SBART (Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy) that are revealing extremely encouraging results and augur significant changes in the coming years. In the present review we analyze the current work, their results, and the future of this treatment modality

  4. Effectiveness of a Standardized Equine-Assisted Therapy Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Marta; Loliva, Dafne; Cerino, Stefania; Chiarotti, Flavia; Venerosi, Aldina; Bramini, Maria; Nonnis, Enrico; Marcelli, Marco; Vinti, Claudia; De Santis, Chiara; Bisacco, Francesca; Fagerlie, Monica; Frascarelli, Massimo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effectiveness of an equine-assisted therapy (EAT) in improving adaptive and executive functioning in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was examined (children attending EAT, n = 15, control group n = 13; inclusion criteria: IQ > 70). Therapeutic sessions consisted in structured activities involving horses and included both work on the ground and riding. Results indicate an improvement in social functioning in the group attending EAT (compared to the control group) and a milder effect on motor abilities. Improved executive functioning was also observed (i.e. reduced planning time in a problem-solving task) at the end of the EAT program. Our findings provide further support for the use of animal-assisted intervention programs as complementary intervention strategies for children with ASD.

  5. [Relapse prevention program consisting of coping skills training, cue exposure treatment, and letter therapy for Japanese alcoholic men who relapsed after standard cognitive-behavioral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Akira; Matsushita, Sachio; Toyama, Tomomi; Nakayama, Hideki; Takimura, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Yoneda, Junichi; Maesato, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Higuchi, Susumu; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-04-01

    Coping skills training (CST) and cue exposure treatment (CET) have yielded favorable outcomes when used to treat alcoholics. We conducted 6-week inpatient programs that consisted of 9 CST group sessions (n = 117) during 2005-2009 and 9 CST group sessions plus 4 CET group sessions (n = 49) during 2009-2011 and subsequent 1-year letter therapy for Japanese alcoholic men who had relapsed and been readmitted after standard cognitive-behavioral inpatient therapy. When patients received a letter containing encouraging words every 2 weeks, they were asked to reread their CST and CET records and to respond to the letter by marking drinking days on a calendar and naming the skills on a list of the 9 CST themes and CET that were useful for maintaining abstinence during that 2-week period. The estimated percentages of achievement of 30 or fewer drinking days during the one year of letter therapy were 36.1 - 45.8%. 'Non-smoking', '2nd admission', and 'After age-limit job retirement' were significant factors in achieving good outcomes. The 'usefulness' responses for 'Increasing pleasant activities', 'CET', 'Anger management', ' Managing negative thinking', 'Problem solving', and ' Seemingly irrelevant decisions' as percentages of overall responses to the letters were significantly higher, in order of decreasing percentages, in the achiever group than in the non-achiever group, but the differences between the groups in ' Managing urges to drink', ' Drink refusal skills', ' Planning for emergencies', and ' Receiving criticism about drinking' were not significant. The odds ratios for achievement of 30 or fewer drinking days during the 1-year period increased significantly by 1.15 -1.31 fold per 10% increment in the 'usefulness' ratio for 'Increasing pleasant activities'. The difference in percentage achievement between the group treated by CST alone and the group treated by CST plus CET was not significant. In conclusion, some coping skills were more useful for relapse prevention

  6. SU-E-P-22: AAPM Task Group 263 Tackling Standardization of Nomenclature for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuszak, M; Feng, M [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moran, J [Univ Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Xiao, Y [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayo, C; Miller, R [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Bosch, W [Washington Univ, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Popple, R [Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Marks, L [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Molineu, A; Martel, M [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yock, T [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Severna Park, MD (United States); Brown, N [Baptist Medical Center, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Purdie, T [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yorke, E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Santanam, L [Washington University School of Medicine, St.louis, MO (United States); Gabriel, P [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Michalski, J [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is growing recognition of need for increased clarity and consistency in the nomenclatures used for body and organ structures, DVH metrics, toxicity, dose and volume units, etc. Standardization has multiple benefits; e.g. facilitating data collection for clinical trials, enabling the pooling of data between institutions, making transfers (i.e. hand-offs) between centers safer, and enabling vendors to define “default” settings. Towards this goal, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a task group (TG263) in July of 2014, operating under the Work Group on Clinical Trials to develop consensus statements. Guiding principles derived from the investigation and example nomenclatures will be presented for public feedback. Methods: We formed a multi-institutional and multi-vendor collaborative group of 39 physicists, physicians and others involved in clinical use and electronic transfer of information. Members include individuals from IROC, NRG, IHE-RO, DICOM WG-7, ASTRO and EORTC groups with overlapping interests to maximize the quality of the consensus and increase the likelihood of adoption. Surveys of group and NRG members were used to define current nomenclatures and requirements. Technical requirements of vendor systems and the proposed DICOM standards were examined. Results: There is a marked degree of inter and intra institutional variation in current approaches, resulting from inter-vendor differences in capabilities, clinic specific conceptualizations and inconsistencies. Using a consensus approach, the group defined optimal formats for the naming of targets and normal structures. A formal objective assessment of 13 existing clinically-used software packages show that all had capabilities to accommodate these recommended nomenclatures. Conclusions: A multi-stakeholder effort is making significant steps forward in developing a standard nomenclature that will work across platforms. Our current working list includes > 550

  7. Small laser spot versus standard laser spot photodynamic therapy for idiopathic choroidal neovascularization: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-xin; Tao, Yong

    2012-12-01

    Idiopathic choroidal neovascularization (ICNV) affects young patients and thus may have a significant impact on vision and life quality over a patient's lifespan. This study was designed to compare the visual outcome and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage after photodynamic therapy (PDT) with small laser spot and PDT with standard laser spot for idiopathic choroidal neovascularization (ICNV). This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty-two patients with ICNV were enrolled and randomly divided into a study group (small laser spot PDT, n = 27) and a control group (standard laser spot PDT, n = 25). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), optic coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) findings were the main measurements. The patients were followed up 1 week, 1, 3, 6, 9 months and 1 year after PDT. BCVA improvement was statistically significantly higher in the study group than the control group at 6-month ((25.53 ± 15.01) letters vs. (14.71 ± 11.66) letters, P = 0.025) and 9-month follow-ups ((27.53 ± 17.78) letters vs. (15.59 ± 12.21) letters, P = 0.039). At 3- and 6-month follow-ups, the quadrants of RPE damage between the two groups varied significantly (P laser spot PDT group than in the standard laser spot PDT group for ICNV.

  8. Omalizumab in Japanese children with severe allergic asthma uncontrolled with standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odajima, Hiroshi; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nagakura, Toshikazu; Fujisawa, Takao; Akasawa, Akira; Ito, Komei; Doi, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Katsunuma, Toshio; Kurihara, Kazuyuki; Kondo, Naomi; Sugai, Kazuko; Nambu, Mitsuhiko; Hoshioka, Akira; Yoshihara, Shigemi; Sato, Norio; Seko, Noriko; Nishima, Sankei

    2015-10-01

    Omalizumab has demonstrated clinical benefits in children with moderate to severe allergic asthma. However, no studies have been performed in Japanese asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy including free IgE suppression and safety of omalizumab in Japanese children with severe allergic asthma. The primary objective was to examine whether omalizumab decreases serum free IgE levels to less than 25 ng/ml (target level of suppression). Thirty-eight Japanese children (6-15 years) with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma despite inhaled corticosteroids (>200 μg/day fluticasone propionate or equivalent) and two or more controller therapies received add-on treatment with omalizumab in a 24-week, multicenter, uncontrolled, open-label study. The geometric mean serum free IgE level at 24 weeks was 15.6 ng/mL. Compared with baseline, total asthma symptom scores, daily activity scores and nocturnal sleep scores at 24 weeks were significantly improved. The rates of asthma exacerbation and hospitalization due to asthma were reduced by 69.2% and 78.2%, respectively (p omalizumab decreased free IgE levels to less than 25 ng/mL. Omalizumab improved asthma control and was well-tolerated, as well. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Standard versus rapid food reintroduction after exclusive enteral nutritional therapy in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiman, Abi; Mutalib, Mohamed; Moylan, Alexander; Morgan, Natalie; Crespi, Daniel; Furman, Mark; Kader, Ajmal

    2014-03-01

    In paediatric Crohn's disease (PCD), 6-8 weeks of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is effective in 60-80% cases. EEN is followed by gradual food reintroduction over variable (1-5 weeks) periods. Currently, there is no recommended duration or method for food reintroduction. The rationale for slow reintroduction is unclear and may be because of concerns about food intolerance or to maintain longer remission. The aims of this study were as follows: to compare relapse rates following standard and rapid reintroduction of food after EEN in PCD and to determine the duration of maintained remission in two groups of PCD patients. Two groups with PCD were compared: group A received standard food reintroduction over 5 weeks and group B received rapid reintroduction over 3 days. Data were collected over two consecutive time periods: group A (2005-2009) and group B (2009-2011). Only patients with a new diagnosis of PCD were included. Those with strictures and those on steroids or biologicals during EEN were excluded. The minimum duration of follow-up was 1 year. Group A included 20 patients and group B included 19 patients. In these groups, EEN led to clinical remission in 80% of the patients in group A and in 76% of the patients in group B. At 6 months, one-third of the patients from each group had developed relapse and a year after EEN, 50% of the patients in group A and 47% of the patients in group B developed relapse. Time to first relapse was 188 days (group A) and 136 days (group B). None of these results were statistically significant. In PCD, rapid food reintroduction following 6-week EEN is safe and equally effective as longer food reintroduction. We propose that a rapid food reintroduction schedule be recommended as the most tolerable approach for food reintroduction. Relapse rate and duration of remission are uninfluenced by the type of food reintroduction.

  10. Subdissociative intranasal ketamine plus standard pain therapy versus standard pain therapy in the treatment of paediatric sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crises in resource-limited settings: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James R; Sawe, Hendry Robert; Mfinanga, Juma A; Nshom, Ernest; Helm, Ethan; Moore, Charity G; Runyon, Michael S; Reynolds, Stacy L

    2017-07-10

    Pediatric sickle cell disease, highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, carries great morbidity and mortality risk. Limited resources and monitoring make management of acute vaso-occlusive crises challenging. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of subdissociative intranasal ketamine as a cheap, readily available and easily administered adjunct to standard pain therapy. We hypothesise that subdissociative, intranasal ketamine may significantly augment current approaches to pain management in resource-limited settings in a safe and cost-effective manner. This is a multicentred, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolling children 4-16 years of age with sickle cell disease and painful vaso-occlusive pain crises. Study sites include two sub-Saharan teaching and referral hospitals with acute intake areas. All patients receive standard analgesic therapy during evaluation. Patients randomised to the treatment arm receive 1 mg/kg intranasal ketamine at onset of therapy, while placebo arm participants receive volume-matched intranasal normal saline. All participants and clinical staff are blinded to the treatment allocation. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Primary endpoints are changes in self-report pain scales (Faces Pain Scale-Revised) at 30, 60 and 120 minutes and rates of adverse events. Secondary endpoints include hospital length of stay, total analgesia use and quality of life assessment 2-3 weeks postintervention. The research methods for this study have been approved by the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board Institutional Review Board (IRB2015-07), the Tanzanian National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR/HQ/R.8a/Vol. IX/2299), Muhimbili National Hospital IRB (MNH/IRB/I/2015/14) and the Tanzanian Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA0015/CTR/0015/9). Data reports will be provided to the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) periodically throughout the study as well as all reports of adverse events. All

  11. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography standardized uptake values in clinical practice and assessing response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Paul E; Fletcher, James W

    2010-12-01

    The use of standardized uptake values (SUVs) is now common place in clinical 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) position emission tomography-computed tomography oncology imaging and has a specific role in assessing patient response to cancer therapy. Ideally, the use of SUVs removes variability introduced by differences in patient size and the amount of injected FDG. However, in practice there are several sources of bias and variance that are introduced in the measurement of FDG uptake in tumors and also in the conversion of the image count data to SUVs. In this article the overall imaging process is reviewed and estimates of the magnitude of errors, where known, are given. Recommendations are provided for best practices in improving SUV accuracy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Damage control resuscitation using blood component therapy in standard doses has a limited effect on coagulopathy during trauma hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sirat; Davenport, Ross; Raza, Imran; Glasgow, Simon; De'Ath, Henry D; Johansson, Pär I; Curry, Nicola; Stanworth, Simon; Gaarder, Christine; Brohi, Karim

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effectiveness of blood component therapy in the correction of trauma-induced coagulopathy during hemorrhage. Severe hemorrhage remains a leading cause of mortality in trauma. Damage control resuscitation strategies target trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) with the early delivery of high-dose blood components such as fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet transfusions. However, the ability of these products to correct TIC during hemorrhage and resuscitation is unknown. This was an international prospective cohort study of bleeding trauma patients at three major trauma centers. A blood sample was drawn immediately on arrival and after 4, 8 and 12 packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. FFP, platelet and cryoprecipitate use was recorded during these intervals. Samples were analyzed for functional coagulation and procoagulant factor levels. One hundred six patients who received at least four PRBC units were included. Thirty-four patients (32 %) required a massive transfusion. On admission 40 % of patients were coagulopathic (ROTEM CA5 ≤ 35 mm). This increased to 58 % after four PRBCs and 81 % after eight PRBCs. On average all functional coagulation parameters and procoagulant factor concentrations deteriorated during hemorrhage. There was no clear benefit to high-dose FFP therapy in any parameter. Only combined high-dose FFP, cryoprecipitate and platelet therapy with a high total fibrinogen load appeared to produce a consistent improvement in coagulation. Damage control resuscitation with standard doses of blood components did not consistently correct trauma-induced coagulopathy during hemorrhage. There is an important opportunity to improve TIC management during damage control resuscitation.

  13. Investigation of standard care versus sham Reiki placebo versus actual Reiki therapy to enhance comfort and well-being in a chemotherapy infusion center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, Anita; Taylor-Ford, Rebecca L

    2011-05-01

    To determine whether provision of Reiki therapy during outpatient chemotherapy is associated with increased comfort and well-being. Double-blind, randomized clinical controlled trial. Outpatient chemotherapy center. 189 participants were randomized to actual Reiki, sham Reiki placebo, or standard care. Patients receiving chemotherapy were randomly placed into one of three groups. Patients received either standard care, a placebo, or an actual Reiki therapy treatment. A demographic tool and pre- and post-tests were given before and after chemotherapy infusion. Reiki therapy, sham Reiki placebo therapy, standard care, and self-reported levels of comfort and well-being pre- and postintervention. Although Reiki therapy was statistically significant in raising the comfort and well-being of patients post-therapy, the sham Reiki placebo also was statistically significant. Patients in the standard care group did not experience changes in comfort and well-being during their infusion session. The findings indicate that the presence of an RN providing one-on-one support during chemotherapy was influential in raising comfort and well-being levels, with or without an attempted healing energy field. An attempt by clinic nurses to provide more designated one-to-one presence and support for patients while receiving their chemotherapy infusions could increase patient comfort and well-being.

  14. Tumour cell dormancy as a contributor to the reduced survival of GBM patients who received standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Luqing; Yi, Li; Liu, Peidong; Abeysekera, Iruni Roshanie; Hai, Long; Li, Tao; Tao, Zhennan; Ma, Haiwen; Xie, Yang; Huang, Yubao; Yu, Shengping; Li, Jiabo; Yuan, Feng; Yang, Xuejun

    2018-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a fatal cancer with varying life expectancy, even for patients undergoing the same standard therapy. Identification of differentially expressed genes in GBM patients with different survival rates may benefit the development of effective therapeutic strategies. In the present study, key pathways and genes correlated with survival in GBM patients were screened with bioinformatic analysis. Included in the study were 136 eligible patients who had undertaken surgical resection of GBM followed by temozolomide (TMZ) chemoradiation and long-term therapy with TMZ. A total of 383 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to GBM survival were identified. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis as well as hub gene screening and module analysis were performed. As expected, angiogenesis and migration of GBM cells were closely correlated with a poor prognosis. Importantly, the results also indicated that cell dormancy was an essential contributor to the reduced survival of GBM patients. Given the lack of specific targeted genes and pathways known to be involved in tumour cell dormancy, we proposed enriched candidate genes related to the negative regulation of cell proliferation, signalling pathways regulating pluripotency of stem cells and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, and 3 hub genes (FTH1, GRM1 and DDIT3). Maintaining persistent cell dormancy or preventing tumour cells from entering dormancy during chemoradiation should be a promising therapeutic strategy.

  15. Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy vs Enhanced Standard Care on Symptom Severity Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: The TIME-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieleninik, Lucja; Geretsegger, Monika; Mössler, Karin; Assmus, Jörg; Thompson, Grace; Gattino, Gustavo; Elefant, Cochavit; Gottfried, Tali; Igliozzi, Roberta; Muratori, Filippo; Suvini, Ferdinando; Kim, Jinah; Crawford, Mike J; Odell-Miller, Helen; Oldfield, Amelia; Casey, Órla; Finnemann, Johanna; Carpente, John; Park, A-La; Grossi, Enzo; Gold, Christian

    2017-08-08

    Music therapy may facilitate skills in areas affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), such as social interaction and communication. To evaluate effects of improvisational music therapy on generalized social communication skills of children with ASD. Assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial, conducted in 9 countries and enrolling children aged 4 to 7 years with ASD. Children were recruited from November 2011 to November 2015, with follow-up between January 2012 and November 2016. Enhanced standard care (n = 182) vs enhanced standard care plus improvisational music therapy (n = 182), allocated in a 1:1 ratio. Enhanced standard care consisted of usual care as locally available plus parent counseling to discuss parents' concerns and provide information about ASD. In improvisational music therapy, trained music therapists sang or played music with each child, attuned and adapted to the child's focus of attention, to help children develop affect sharing and joint attention. The primary outcome was symptom severity over 5 months, based on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), social affect domain (range, 0-27; higher scores indicate greater severity; minimal clinically important difference, 1). Prespecified secondary outcomes included parent-rated social responsiveness. All outcomes were also assessed at 2 and 12 months. Among 364 participants randomized (mean age, 5.4 years; 83% boys), 314 (86%) completed the primary end point and 290 (80%) completed the last end point. Over 5 months, participants assigned to music therapy received a median of 19 music therapy, 3 parent counseling, and 36 other therapy sessions, compared with 3 parent counseling and 45 other therapy sessions for those assigned to enhanced standard care. From baseline to 5 months, mean ADOS social affect scores estimated by linear mixed-effects models decreased from 14.08 to 13.23 in the music therapy group and from 13.49 to 12.58 in the standard care group (mean difference, 0

  16. Development of departmental standard for traceability of measured activity for 131I therapy capsules used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    International Basic Safety Standards (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA) provide guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine indicating the maximum usual activity for various diagnostic tests in terms of activities of injected radioactive formulations. An accuracy of ± 10% in the activities of administered radio-pharmaceuticals is being recommended, for expected outcome in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures. It is recommended that the long-term stability of isotope calibrators used in nuclear medicine is to be checked periodically for their performance using a long-lived check source, such as 137 Cs, of suitable activity. In view of the un-availability of such a radioactive source, we tried to develop methods to maintain traceability of these instruments, for certifying measured activities for human use. Two re-entrant chambers ((HDR 1000 and Selectron Source Dosimetry System (SSDS)) with 125 I and 192 Ir calibration factors in the Department of Radiotherapy were used to measure Iodine-131 ( 131 I) therapy capsules to establish traceability to Mark V isotope calibrator of the Department of Nuclear Medicine. Special nylon jigs were fabricated to keep 131 I capsule holder in position. Measured activities in all the chambers showed good agreement. The accuracy of SSDS chamber in measuring 192 Ir activities in the last 5 years was within 0.5%, validating its role as departmental standard for measuring activity. The above method is adopted because mean energies of 131 I and 192 Ir are comparable. (author)

  17. Actual survey of dose evaluation method for standardization of radiation therapy techniques. With special reference to display method of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kozo; Yoshiura, Takao; Izumi, Takashi; Araki, Fujio; Takada, Takuo; Jingu, Kenichi.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of questionnaire survey for actual conditions of radiation therapy, which was conducted with the aim of establishing the standardization of radiation therapy techniques. Questionnaires were sent to 100 facilities in Japan, and 86 of these answered, consisting of 62 university hospitals, 2 national hospitals, 14 cancer centers, 4 prefectural or municipal hospitals, and 4 other hospitals. In addition to electron beam therapy, the following typical diseases for radiation therapy were selected as standard irradiation models: cancers of the larynx, esophagus, breast, and uterine cervix, and malignant lymphomas. According to these models, questionnaire results are analyzed in terms of the following four items: (1) irradiation procedures, (2) energy used for radiotherapy, (3) the depth for calculating target absorption doses, and (4) points for displaying target absorption doses. (N.K.)

  18. Can we improve cognitive-behavioral therapy for chronic back pain treatment engagement and adherence? A controlled trial of tailored versus standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Robert D; Burns, John W; Shulman, Marc; Jensen, Mark P; Nielson, Warren R; Czlapinski, Rebecca; Dallas, Mary I; Chatkoff, David; Sellinger, John; Heapy, Alicia; Rosenberger, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated whether tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy (TCBT) that incorporated preferences for learning specific cognitive and/or behavioral skills and used motivational enhancement strategies would improve treatment engagement and participation compared with standard CBT (SCBT). We hypothesized that participants receiving TCBT would show a lower dropout rate, attend more sessions, and report more frequent intersession pain coping skill practice than those receiving SCBT. We also hypothesized that indices of engagement and adherence would correlate with pre- to posttreatment changes in outcome factors. One hundred twenty-eight of 161 consenting persons with chronic back pain who completed baseline measures were allocated to either TCBT or SCBT using a modified randomization procedure. Participants completed daily ratings of pain coping skill practice and goal accomplishment during treatment, as well as measures of pain severity, disability, and other key outcomes at the end of treatment. No significant differences between treatment groups were noted on measures of treatment engagement or adherence. However, these factors were significantly related to some pre- to posttreatment improvements in outcomes, regardless of treatment condition. Participants in this study evidenced a high degree of participation and adherence, but treatment tailored to take into account participant preferences, and that employed motivational enhancement strategies, failed to increase treatment participation over and above SCBT for chronic back pain. Evidence that participation and adherence were associated with positive outcomes supports continued clinical and research efforts focusing on these therapeutic processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Response to standard interferon A2b and ribavirin combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C treatment naive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadoon, S.M.K.; Muhammad, I.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C is now well established with conventional interferon or pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin. Peginterferon Alfa and Ribavirin for 6 to 12 months is currently approved initial therapy, which is expensive. Response of our patients to standard Interferon-alpha-2b and ribavirin for 24 weeks have been studied. The objective of this study was to asses Sustained Viral Response (SVR) with standard Interferon A2b and Ribavirin combination treatment in chronic Hepatitis C patients. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital, Quetta from Jan 2006 to Jun 2007. One hundred and three patients, with 20-60 years of age suffering from chronic Hepatitis C were selected on the basis of raised ALT, positive anti-HCV antibodies, evidence of viraemia by quantitative PCR for HCV RNA and liver biopsy. All patients were started on same brand of Interferon alpha-2b, 3 MIU subcutaneously, thrice weekly and oral Ribavirin (1,000-1,200 mg/day) for 24 weeks. End treatment response (ETR) after completion of treatment and SVR six months after ETR were recorded. Results: The 103 patients, 85 males and 18 females with mean age of 21-48 years completed the treatment for 24 weeks. Mean ALT was 96.17 (SD +- 49.98). End treatment response (ETR) was 89.3% (p=0.032). Sustained Viral Response after 6 months of treatment was 86.4% (p=0.034). Conclusion: Standard Interferon and Ribavirin had excellent SVR. It is effective as well as economical treatment in Chronic Hepatitis C patients. (author)

  20. Development and operation of a quality assurance system for deviations from standard operating procedures in a clinical cell therapy laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, D; Kadidlo, D; Sumstad, D; McCullough, J

    2003-01-01

    Errors and accidents, or deviations from standard operating procedures, other policy, or regulations must be documented and reviewed, with corrective actions taken to assure quality performance in a cellular therapy laboratory. Though expectations and guidance for deviation management exist, a description of the framework for the development of such a program is lacking in the literature. Here we describe our deviation management program, which uses a Microsoft Access database and Microsoft Excel to analyze deviations and notable events, facilitating quality assurance (QA) functions and ongoing process improvement. Data is stored in a Microsoft Access database with an assignment to one of six deviation type categories. Deviation events are evaluated for potential impact on patient and product, and impact scores for each are determined using a 0- 4 grading scale. An immediate investigation occurs, and corrective actions are taken to prevent future similar events from taking place. Additionally, deviation data is collectively analyzed on a quarterly basis using Microsoft Excel, to identify recurring events or developing trends. Between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 over 2500 products were processed at our laboratory. During this time period, 335 deviations and notable events occurred, affecting 385 products and/or patients. Deviations within the 'technical error' category were most common (37%). Thirteen percent of deviations had a patient and/or a product impact score > or = 2, a score indicating, at a minimum, potentially affected patient outcome or moderate effect upon product quality. Real-time analysis and quarterly review of deviations using our deviation management program allows for identification and correction of deviations. Monitoring of deviation trends allows for process improvement and overall successful functioning of the QA program in the cell therapy laboratory. Our deviation management program could serve as a model for other laboratories in

  1. Mapping the route to medication therapy management documentation and billing standardization and interoperabilility within the health care system: meeting proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millonig, Marsha K

    2009-01-01

    To convene a diverse group of stakeholders to discuss medication therapy management (MTM) documentation and billing standardization and its interoperability within the health care system. More than 70 stakeholders from pharmacy, health information systems, insurers/payers, quality, and standard-setting organizations met on October 7-8, 2008, in Bethesda, MD. The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) organized the invitational conference to facilitate discussion on strategic directions for meeting current market need for MTM documentation and billing interoperability and future market needs for MTM integration into electronic health records (EHRs). APhA recently adopted policy that specifically addresses technology barriers and encourages the use and development of standardized systems for the documentation and billing of MTM services. Day 1 of the conference featured six foundational presentations on health information technology (HIT) trends, perspectives on MTM from the profession and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, health care quality and medication-related outcome measures, integrating MTM workflow in EHRs, and the current state of MTM operalization in practice. After hearing presentations on day 1 and having the opportunity to pose questions to each speaker, conference participants were divided into three breakout groups on day 2. Each group met three times for 60 minutes each and discussed five questions from the perspective of a patient, provider, or payer. Three facilitators met with each of the groups and led discussion from one perspective (i.e., patient, provider, payer). Participants then reconvened as a complete group to participate in a discussion on next steps. HIT is expected to assist in delivering safe, effective, efficient, coordinated care as health professionals strive to improve the quality of care and outcomes for individual patients. The pharmacy profession is actively contributing to quality patient care through MTM services

  2. EFFECTS OF RELIGIOUS VERSUS STANDARD COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY ON OPTIMISM IN PERSONS WITH MAJOR DEPRESSION AND CHRONIC MEDICAL ILLNESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Harold G; Pearce, Michelle J; Nelson, Bruce; Daher, Noha

    2015-11-01

    We compared the effectiveness of religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy (RCBT) versus standard CBT (SCBT) on increasing optimism in persons with major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic medical illness. Participants aged 18-85 were randomized to either RCBT (n = 65) or SCBT (n = 67) to receive ten 50-min sessions remotely (94% by telephone) over 12 weeks. Optimism was assessed at baseline, 12 and 24 weeks by the Life Orientation Test-Revised. Religiosity was assessed at baseline using a 29-item scale composed of religious importance, individual religious practices, intrinsic religiosity, and daily spiritual experiences. Mixed effects growth curve models were used to compare the effects of treatment group on trajectory of change in optimism. In the intention-to-treat analysis, both RCBT and SCBT increased optimism over time, although there was no significant difference between treatment groups (B = -0.75, SE = 0.57, t = -1.33, P = .185). Analyses in the highly religious and in the per protocol analysis indicated similar results. Higher baseline religiosity predicted an increase in optimism over time (B = 0.07, SE = 0.02, t = 4.12, P optimism predicted a faster decline in depressive symptoms over time (B = -0.61, SE = 0.10, t = -6.30, P optimism in persons with MDD and chronic medical illness. While baseline religiosity does not moderate this effect, religiosity predicts increases in optimism over time independent of treatment group. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Chevignard, Mathilde; Culliford, David; Dörr, Helmuth G.; Doz, François; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Massimino, Maura; Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora; Rutkowski, Stefan; Spoudeas, Helen A.; Calaminus, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life

  4. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Colin, E-mail: crk1@soton.ac.uk [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bull, Kim [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Chevignard, Mathilde [Hôpitaux de Saint Maurice, Saint Maurice (France); Neurophysiology, University of Pierre et Marie-Curie Paris 6, Paris (France); Culliford, David [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dörr, Helmuth G. [Kinder- und Jugendklinik der Universität Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Department of Pediatrics, The Sahlgren Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora [Hospital Universitario Cruces, Baracaldo-Vizcaya (Spain); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Spoudeas, Helen A. [Center for Pediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Pediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

  5. Quality of survival and growth in children and young adults in the PNET4 European controlled trial of hyperfractionated versus conventional radiation therapy for standard-risk medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Chevignard, Mathilde; Culliford, David; Dörr, Helmuth G; Doz, François; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Massimino, Maura; Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora; Rutkowski, Stefan; Spoudeas, Helen A; Calaminus, Gabriele

    2014-02-01

    To compare quality of survival in "standard-risk" medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Total skin electron therapy treatment verification: Monte Carlo simulation and beam characteristics of large non-standard electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavon, Ester Carrasco; Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco; Leal, Antonio; Capote, Roberto; Lagares, Juan Ignacio; Perucha, Maria; Arrans, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Total skin electron therapy (TSET) is a complex technique which requires non-standard measurements and dosimetric procedures. This paper investigates an essential first step towards TSET Monte Carlo (MC) verification. The non-standard 6 MeV 40 x 40 cm 2 electron beam at a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm as well as its horizontal projection behind a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) screen to SSD = 380 cm were evaluated. The EGS4 OMEGA-BEAM code package running on a Linux home made 47 PCs cluster was used for the MC simulations. Percentage depth-dose curves and profiles were calculated and measured experimentally for the 40 x 40 cm 2 field at both SSD = 100 cm and patient surface SSD = 380 cm. The output factor (OF) between the reference 40 x 40 cm 2 open field and its horizontal projection as TSET beam at SSD = 380 cm was also measured for comparison with MC results. The accuracy of the simulated beam was validated by the good agreement to within 2% between measured relative dose distributions, including the beam characteristic parameters (R 50 , R 80 , R 100 , R p , E 0 ) and the MC calculated results. The energy spectrum, fluence and angular distribution at different stages of the beam (at SSD = 100 cm, at SSD = 364.2 cm, behind the PMMA beam spoiler screen and at treatment surface SSD = 380 cm) were derived from MC simulations. Results showed a final decrease in mean energy of almost 56% from the exit window to the treatment surface. A broader angular distribution (FWHM of the angular distribution increased from 13deg at SSD 100 cm to more than 30deg at the treatment surface) was fully attributable to the PMMA beam spoiler screen. OF calculations and measurements agreed to less than 1%. The effect of changing the electron energy cut-off from 0.7 MeV to 0.521 MeV and air density fluctuations in the bunker which could affect the MC results were shown to have a negligible impact on the beam fluence distributions. Results proved the applicability of using MC

  7. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy (AHRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer: can we leave standard fractionation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, N Rodríguez; Sanz, X; Foro, P; Membrive, I; Reig, A; Ortiz, A; Jiménez, R; Algara, M

    2017-04-01

    To report interim results from a single-institution study conducted to assess accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy (AHRT) delivered with 3D conformal radiotherapy in two groups of patients with non-small cell lung cancer: (1) patients with early stage disease unable to tolerate surgery and ineligible for stereotactic body radiation therapy, and (2) patients with locally advanced disease unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy. A total of 83 patients (51 stage I-II, 32 stage III) were included. Radiotherapy targets included the primary tumor and positive mediastinal areas identified on the pre-treatment PET-CT. Mean age was 77.8 ± 7.8 years. ECOG performance status (PS) was ≥2 in 50.6 % of cases. Radiotherapy was delivered in daily fractions of 2.75 Gy to a total dose of 66 Gy (BED 10 84 Gy). Acute and late toxicities were evaluated according to NCI CTC criteria. At a median follow-up of 42 months, median overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were 23 and 36 months, respectively. On the multivariate analysis, PS [HR 4.14, p = 0.0001)], stage [HR 2.51, p = 0.005)], and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) [HR 1.04, p = 0.04)] were independent risk factors for OS. PS [HR 5.2, p = 0.0001)] and stage [HR 6.3, p = 0.0001)] were also associated with CSS. No cases of severe acute or late treatment-related toxicities were observed. OS and CSS rates in patients treated with AHRT for stage I-II and stage III NSCLC were good. Treatment was well tolerated with no grade three or higher treatment-related toxicity. PS, stage, and SUV max were predictive for OS and CSS.

  8. Achieving a Spiritual Therapy Standard for Drug Dependency in Malaysia, from an Islamic Perspective: Brief Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain; Hatim, Ahmad; Rashid, Rusdi; Ardakan, Abolfazl; Esmaeili Motlaq, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Religion is one of the protective factors that facilities positive outcomes by preventing individuals from engaging in addictive substance. A recent study has confirmed that religion inhibits drug addiction. The concept of psychospiritual therapy was to introduce drug addiction. Therefore, of the various methods of psychotherapy, the usage of Taqwa (piety) emerged as an applicable method of Islamic spiritual therapy. This study was conducted in Malaysia as a Muslim country and focuses on Islamic recommendations and its relation to spiritual therapy.

  9. Two-week, high-dose proton pump inhibitor, moxifloxacin triple Helicobacter pylori therapy after failure of standard triple or non-bismuth quadruple treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Javier P; Romano, Marco; Molina-Infante, Javier; Lucendo, Alfredo J; Medina, Enrique; Modolell, Inés; Rodríguez-Tellez, Manuel; Gomez, Blas; Barrio, Jesús; Perona, Monica; Ortuño, Juan; Ariño, Inés; Domínguez-Muñoz, Juan Enrique; Perez-Aisa, Ángeles; Bermejo, Fernando; Domínguez, Jose Luis; Almela, Pedro; Gomez-Camarero, Judith; Millastre, Judith; Martin-Noguerol, Elisa; Gravina, Antonietta G; Martorano, Marco; Miranda, Agnese; Federico, Alessandro; Fernandez-Bermejo, Miguel; Angueira, Teresa; Ferrer-Barcelo, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Marín, Alicia C; McNicholl, Adrián G

    2015-02-01

    Aim was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a moxifloxacin-containing second-line triple regimen in patients whose previous Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment failed. Prospective multicentre study including patients in whom a triple therapy or a non-bismuth-quadruple-therapy failed. Moxifloxacin (400mg qd), amoxicillin (1g bid), and esomeprazole (40 mg bid) were prescribed for 14 days. Eradication was confirmed by (13)C-urea-breath-test. Compliance was determined through questioning and recovery of empty medication envelopes. 250 patients were consecutively included (mean age 48 ± 15 years, 11% with ulcer). Previous (failed) therapy included: standard triple (n = 179), sequential (n = 27), and concomitant (n = 44); 97% of patients took all medications, 4 were lost to follow-up. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol eradication rates were 82.4% (95% CI, 77-87%) and 85.7% (95% CI, 81-90%). Cure rates were similar independently of diagnosis (ulcer, 77%; dyspepsia, 82%) and previous treatment (standard triple, 83%; sequential, 89%; concomitant, 77%). At multivariate analysis, only age was associated with eradication (OR = 0.957; 95% CI, 0.933-0.981). Adverse events were reported in 25.2% of patients: diarrhoea (9.6%), abdominal pain (9.6%), and nausea (9.2%). 14-day moxifloxacin-containing triple therapy is an effective and safe second-line strategy in patients whose previous standard triple therapy or non-bismuth quadruple (sequential or concomitant) therapy has failed, providing a simple alternative to bismuth quadruple regimen. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Review article: the effectiveness of standard triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori has not changed over the last decade, but it is not good enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, J P; Calvet, X

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND  A decrease in the Helicobacter pylori eradication rate after standard triple therapy has been suggested in recent years. AIM  To assess the efficacy of standard triple therapy in the eradication of H. pylori through an epidemiological analysis of all published Spanish trials. A secondary aim was to review the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance in Spain. METHODS  Articles on H. pylori eradication in Spain published in peer-reviewed journals were identified through MEDLINE searches. Studies that included a triple therapy consisting of any proton pump inhibitor with clarithromycin (500 mg b.d.) and amoxicillin (1 g b.d.) for up to 14 days were selected. Spanish studies evaluating the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance were also reviewed. Meta-analysis was performed using the generic inverse variance method. RESULTS The pooled eradication rates by year from Spanish studies evaluating the efficacy of the standard triple regimen revealed a relatively constant rate over the years. Overall, the analysis of the 32 studies (4727 patients) showed a mean H. pylori cure rate of 80% (95% CI = 77-82%) by intention-to-treat and 83% (81-86%) by per-protocol. When only peptic ulcer disease or 7-day regimens were considered, results were similar. Based on 13 studies (3293 patients), mean clarithromycin resistance rate was 8% (5-10%). CONCLUSION Although a decrease in the H. pylori eradication rate after triple therapy has been suggested in recent years, cure rates with this regimen did not change in Spain between 1997 and 2008. However, this by no means indicates that the efficacy of standard triple therapy in Spain is acceptable, as it has been calculated to be around only 80%. Therefore, it is evident that new strategies to improve first-line treatment are urgently needed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Oral rivaroxaban versus standard therapy for the treatment of symptomatic venous thromboembolism: a pooled analysis of the EINSTEIN-DVT and PE randomized studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Martin H; Lensing, Anthonie Wa; Bauersachs, Rupert; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Davidson, Bruce L; Decousus, Hervé; Raskob, Gary E; Berkowitz, Scott D; Wells, Philip S

    2013-09-20

    Standard treatment for venous thromboembolism (VTE) consists of a heparin combined with vitamin K antagonists. Direct oral anticoagulants have been investigated for acute and extended treatment of symptomatic VTE; their use could avoid parenteral treatment and/or laboratory monitoring of anticoagulant effects. A prespecified pooled analysis of the EINSTEIN-DVT and EINSTEIN-PE studies compared the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban (15 mg twice-daily for 21 days, followed by 20 mg once-daily) with standard-therapy (enoxaparin 1.0 mg/kg twice-daily and warfarin or acenocoumarol). Patients were treated for 3, 6, or 12 months and followed for suspected recurrent VTE and bleeding. The prespecified noninferiority margin was 1.75. A total of 8282 patients were enrolled; 4151 received rivaroxaban and 4131 received standard-therapy. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 86 (2.1%) rivaroxaban-treated patients compared with 95 (2.3%) standard-therapy-treated patients (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-1.19; pnoninferiority EINSTEIN-DVT: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00440193.

  12. 3D mathematical modeling of glioblastoma suggests that transdifferentiated vascular endothelial cells mediate resistance to current standard-of-care therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huaming; Romero-López, Mónica; Benitez, Lesly I.; Di, Kaijun; Frieboes, Hermann B.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.; Bota, Daniela A.; Lowengrub, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive brain tumor in human patients, is decidedly heterogeneous and highly vascularized. Glioma stem/initiating cells (GSC) are found to play a crucial role by increasing cancer aggressiveness and promoting resistance to therapy. Recently, crosstalk between GSC and vascular endothelial cells has been shown to significantly promote GSC self-renewal and tumor progression. Further, GSC also transdifferentiate into bona-fide vascular endothelial cells (GEC), which inherit mutations present in GSC and are resistant to traditional anti-angiogenic therapies. Here we use 3D mathematical modeling to investigate GBM progression and response to therapy. The model predicted that GSC drive invasive fingering and that GEC spontaneously form a network within the hypoxic core, consistent with published experimental findings. Standard-of-care treatments using DNA-targeted therapy (radiation/chemo) together with anti-angiogenic therapies, reduced GBM tumor size but increased invasiveness. Anti-GEC treatments blocked the GEC support of GSC and reduced tumor size but led to increased invasiveness. Anti-GSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduced tumor invasiveness and size, but were ultimately limited in reducing tumor size because GEC maintain GSC. Our study suggests that a combinatorial regimen targeting the vasculature, GSC, and GEC, using drugs already approved by the FDA, can reduce both tumor size and invasiveness and could lead to tumor eradication. PMID:28536277

  13. Development of the 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water (ND,W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Akifumi; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukahori, Mai; Sakata, Suoh

    2013-01-01

    A primary standard for the absorbed dose rate to water in a 60 Co gamma-ray field was established at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in fiscal year 2011. Then, a 60 Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water was developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL). The results of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organization (WHO) TLD SSDL audit demonstrated that there was good agreement between NIRS stated absorbed dose to water and IAEA measurements. The IAEA guide based on the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard was used to estimate the relative expanded uncertainty of the calibration factor for a therapy-level Farmer type ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water (N D,W ) with the new field. The uncertainty of N D,W was estimated to be 1.1% (k=2), which corresponds to approximately one third of the value determined in the existing air kerma field. The dissemination of traceability of the calibration factor determined in the new field is expected to diminish the uncertainty of dose delivered to patients significantly. (author)

  14. Towards the standardization of stem cell therapy studies for ischemic heart diseases: Bridging the gap between animal models and the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Ferreira-Martins, João; Ferreira, Rita; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Vitorino, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Today there is an increasing demand for heart transplantations for patients diagnosed with heart failure. Though, shortage of donors as well as the large number of ineligible patients hurdle such treatment option. This, in addition to the considerable number of transplant rejections, has driven the clinical research towards the field of regenerative medicine. Nonetheless, to date, several stem cell therapies tested in animal models fall by the wayside and when they meet the criteria to clinical trials, subjects often exhibit modest improvements. A main issue slowing down the admission of such therapies in the domain of human trials is the lack of protocol standardization between research groups, which hampers comparison between different approaches as well as the lack of thought regarding the clinical translation. In this sense, given the large amount of reports on stem cell therapy studies in animal models reported in the last 3years, we sought to evaluate their advantages and limitations towards the clinical setting and provide some suggestions for the forthcoming investigations. We expect, with this review, to start a new paradigm on regenerative medicine, by evoking the debate on how to plan novel stem cell therapy studies with animal models in order to achieve more consistent scientific production and accelerate the admission of stem cell therapies in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of pretreatment variables on the outcome of 131I therapy with a standardized dose of 150 Gray in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeilschifter, J.; Elser, H.; Haufe, S.; Ziegler, R.; Georgi, P.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: We examined the impact of several pretreatment variables on thyroid size and function in 61 patients with Graves' disease one year after a standardized [131[I treatment with 150 Gray. Methods: FT3, FT4, and TSH serum concentrations were determined before and 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months after therapy. Thyroid size was measured by ultrasound and scintigraphy before and one year after therapy. Results: One year after therapy, 30% of the patients had latent or manifest hyperthyroidism, 24% were euthyroid, and 46% had developed latent or manifest hypothyroidism. Age and initial thyroid volume were major predictors of posttherapeutical thyroid function. Thus, persistent hyperthyroidism was observed in 70% of the patients age 50 years and older with a thyroid size of more than 50 ml. With few exception, thyroid size markedly decreased after therapy. Initial thyroid size and age were also major predictors of posttherapeutical thyroid volume. Thyroid size normalized in all patients younger than 50 years of age, independent from initial thyroid size. Conclusion: Radioiodine treatment with 150 Gray causes a considerable decrease in thyroid size in most patients with Graves' disease. Age and initial thyroid volume are important determinants of thyroid function and size after therapy and should be considered in dose calculation. (orig.) [de

  16. Preliminary results of capecitabine metronomic chemotherapy in operable triple-negative breast cancer after standard adjuvant therapy - A singlearm phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawky, H.; Galal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy and toxicity of 1 year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Methods: Between June 2010 and February 2012, 19 women with pathologically proven operable TNBC, who had received standard adjuvant chemotherapy before were enrolled. Patients received 1 year of oral capecitabine metronomic therapy (650 mg/m2, twice every day), after standard adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy if indicated. The primary endpoints of this study were disease-free survival rates (DFS) and safety profile. Secondary end point was overall survival (OS). Results: The maximal follow-up was 46.6 months with a median of 30.1 months ±11.525 (95% CI; 28.5-33.5 months). The median DFS was 41.7 months ±2.7 (95% CI; 36.5-46.9). No one developed locoregional recurrence. The actuarial rate of DFS was 88.8% and 82.05% at 2 and 3 years, respectively. At the time of the analyses, no patients had died and the median OS was not reached. Treatment-related adverse events were manageable with only 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3/4 hand-foot syndrome and another 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3 diarrhea. No Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity was recorded. All patients received full doses of capecitabine throughout the study and dose reduction was not required in any of our patients. Conclusion: One year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy, is active and well-tolerated in TNBC patients previously treated with standard adjuvant chemotherapy.

  17. Preliminary results of capecitabine metronomic chemotherapy in operable triple-negative breast cancer after standard adjuvant therapy--a single-arm phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawky, Hanan; Galal, Samar

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy and toxicity of 1 year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Between June 2010 and February 2012, 19 women with pathologically proven operable TNBC, who had received standard adjuvant chemotherapy before were enrolled. Patients received 1 year of oral capecitabine metronomic therapy (650 mg/m2, twice every day), after standard adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy if indicated. The primary endpoints of this study were disease-free survival rates (DFS) and safety profile. Secondary end point was overall survival (OS). The maximal follow-up was 46.6 months with a median of 30.1 months±11.525 (95% CI; 28.5-33.5 months). The median DFS was 41.7 months±2.7 (95% CI; 36.5-46.9). No one developed locoregional recurrence. The actuarial rate of DFS was 88.8% and 82.05% at 2 and 3 years, respectively. At the time of the analyses, no patients had died and the median OS was not reached. Treatment-related adverse events were manageable with only 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3/4 hand-foot syndrome and another 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3 diarrhea. No Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity was recorded. All patients received full doses of capecitabine throughout the study and dose reduction was not required in any of our patients. One year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy, is active and well-tolerated in TNBC patients previously treated with standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Maximal safe dose of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-Jin; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kang, Won-Jun; Park, Do-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo; Cho, Bo-Youn; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2008-01-01

    The maximal safe dose (MSD) on the basis of bone marrow irradiation levels allows the delivery of a large amount of I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue. The efficacy of MSD therapy in differentiated metastatic thyroid cancers that persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy is investigated. Forty-seven differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients with non-responsive residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. Their postoperative pathologies were 43 papillary carcinomas and 4 follicular carcinomas. The MSD was calculated with the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center protocol using serial blood samples. The MSDs were administered at intervals of 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole-body scans and serum thyroglobulin measurements. The mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq (339.6±57.5 mCi). Of the 46 patients, 7 (14.9%) showed complete remission, 15 (31.9%) partial remission, 19 (40.4%) stable disease, and 6 (12.8%) disease progression. Of the patients who showed complete or partial remission, 15 (65%) showed response after the first MSD session and 6 (26%) showed response after the second session. Twenty-nine patients (62%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, but three did not recover to the baseline level. The maximal safe dose provides an effective means of treatment in patients who failed to respond adequately to conventional fixed dose therapy. I-131 MSD therapy can be considered in patients who fail fixed dose therapy. (author)

  19. Effectiveness of Standardized Physical Therapy Exercises for Patients With Difficulty Returning to Usual Activities After Decompression Surgery for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Falla, Deborah; Haahr, Jens Peder; Frich, Lars Henrik; Andrea, Linda Christie; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of exercise programs after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. For patients with difficulty returning to usual activities, special efforts may be needed to improve shoulder function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness at 3 and 12 months of a standardized physical therapy exercise intervention compared with usual care in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after subacromial decompression surgery. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted. The study was conducted in 6 public departments of orthopedic surgery, 2 departments of occupational medicine, and 2 physical therapy training centers in Central Denmark Region. One hundred twenty-six patients reporting difficulty returning to usual activities at the postoperative clinical follow-up 8 to 12 weeks after subacromial decompression surgery participated. A standardized exercise program consisting of physical therapist-supervised individual training sessions and home training was used. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Shoulder Score. Secondary outcome measures were the Constant Score and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. At 3 and 12 months, follow-up data were obtained for 92% and 83% of the patients, respectively. Intention-to-treat analyses suggested a between-group difference on the Oxford Shoulder Score favoring the exercise group at 3 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 2.0 (95% confidence interval=-0.5, 4.6), and at 12 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 5.8 (95% confidence interval=2.8, 8.9). Significantly larger improvements for the exercise group were observed for most secondary and supplementary outcome measures. The nature of the exercise intervention did not allow blinding of patients and care providers. The standardized physical therapy exercise intervention resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in shoulder pain and

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Photodynamic Therapy Alone and Combined with Standard Antifungal Therapy on Planktonic Cells and Biofilms of Fusarium spp. and Exophiala spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lujuan; Jiang, Shaojie; Sun, Yi; Deng, Meiqi; Wu, Qingzhi; Li, Ming; Zeng, Tongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Infections of Fusarium spp. and Exophiala spp. are often chronic, recalcitrant, resulting in significant morbidity, causing discomfort, disfigurement, social isolation. Systemic disseminations happen in compromised patients, which are often refractory to available antifungal therapies and thereby lead to death. The antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been demonstrated to effectively inactivate multiple pathogenic fungi and is considered as a promising alternative treatment for mycoses. In the present study, we applied methylene blue (8, 16, and 32 μg/ml) as a photosensitizing agent and light emitting diode (635 ± 10 nm, 12 and 24 J/cm(2)), and evaluated the effects of photodynamic inactivation on five strains of Fusarium spp. and five strains of Exophiala spp., as well as photodynamic effects on in vitro susceptibility to itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole and amphotericin B, both planktonic and biofilm forms. Photodynamic therapy was efficient in reducing the growth of all strains tested, exhibiting colony forming unit-reductions of up to 6.4 log10 and 5.6 log10 against planktonic cultures and biofilms, respectively. However, biofilms were less sensitive since the irradiation time was twice longer than that of planktonic cultures. Notably, the photodynamic effects against Fusarium strains with high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of ≥16, 4-8, 4-8, and 2-4 μg/ml for itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole and amphotericin B, respectively, were comparable or even superior to Exophiala spp., despite Exophiala spp. showed relatively better antifungal susceptibility profile. MIC ranges against planktonic cells of both species were up to 64 times lower after aPDT treatment. Biofilms of both species showed high sessile MIC50 (SMIC50) and SMIC80 of ≥16 μg/ml for all azoles tested and variable susceptibilities to amphotericin B, with SMIC ranging between 1 and 16 μg/ml. Biofilms subjected to aPDT exhibited a distinct reduction in

  1. Regression and statistical shape model based substitute CT generation for MRI alone external beam radiation therapy from standard clinical MRI sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Greer, Peter B.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Henault, David; Mitra, Jhimli; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Dowling, Jason A.

    2017-11-01

    In MR only radiation therapy planning, generation of the tissue specific HU map directly from the MRI would eliminate the need of CT image acquisition and may improve radiation therapy planning. The aim of this work is to generate and validate substitute CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2 weighted MR pelvic scans in prostate radiation therapy dose planning. A Siemens Skyra 3T MRI scanner with laser bridge, flat couch and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole pelvis MRI (1.6 mm 3D isotropic T2w SPACE sequence) was acquired. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Co-registered whole pelvis CT and T2w MRI pairs were used as training images. Advanced tissue specific non-linear regression models to predict HU for the fat, muscle, bladder and air were created from co-registered CT-MRI image pairs. On a test case T2w MRI, the bones and bladder were automatically segmented using a novel statistical shape and appearance model, while other soft tissues were separated using an Expectation-Maximization based clustering model. The CT bone in the training database that was most ‘similar’ to the segmented bone was then transformed with deformable registration to create the sCT component of the test case T2w MRI bone tissue. Predictions for the bone, air and soft tissue from the separate regression models were successively combined to generate a whole pelvis sCT. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same IMRT dose plan was found to be 0.3%+/-0.9% (mean  ±  standard deviation) for 39 patients. The 3D Gamma pass rate was 99.8+/-0.00 (2 mm/2%). The novel hybrid model is computationally efficient, generating an sCT in 20 min from standard T2w images for prostate cancer radiation therapy dose planning and DRR generation.

  2. Efficiency of Photodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Diffuse Facial Viral Warts in an Immunosuppressed Patient: Towards a Gold Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Caucanas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old man with a pulmonary transplant developed diffuse verrucae vulgares of the neck. After the failure of multiple cryotherapy treatments, 3 sessions of photodynamic therapy resulted in rapid therapeutic clinical success. This moderately painful and well-tolerated treatment is reproducible and can be very useful in treating papillomavirus infections in the immunosuppressed patient.

  3. Serelaxin in addition to standard therapy in acute heart failure : Rationale and design of the RELAX-AHF-2 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, John R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Pang, Peter S.; Greenberg, Barry H.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Felker, G. Michael; Davison, Beth A.; Cotter, Gad; Gimpelewicz, Claudio; Boer-Martins, Leandro; Wernsing, Margaret; Hua, Tsushung A.; Severin, Thomas; Metra, Marco

    Patients admitted for acute heart failure (AHF) experience high rates of in-hospital and post-discharge morbidity and mortality despite current therapies. Serelaxin is recombinant human relaxin-2, a hormone with vasodilatory and end-organ protective effects believed to play a central role in the

  4. Characterization and comparison of "Standard" and "Young" tumor infiltrating lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy at a Danish Translational Research Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in combination with IL-2 is an effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. Modified protocols of cell expansion may allow treatment of most enrolled patients and improve the efficacy of adoptively...

  5. Prospective observer and software-based assessment of magnetic resonance imaging quality in head and neck cancer: Should standard positioning and immobilization be required for radiation therapy applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yao; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Yang, Jinzhong; Colen, Rivka R; Frank, Steven J; Wang, Jihong; Wassal, Eslam Y; Wang, Wenjie; Kantor, Michael E; Balter, Peter A; Rosenthal, David I; Lai, Stephen Y; Hazle, John D; Fuller, Clifton D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a head and neck magnetic resonance simulation and immobilization protocol on reducing motion-induced artifacts and improving positional variance for radiation therapy applications. Two groups (group 1, 17 patients; group 2, 14 patients) of patients with head and neck cancer were included under a prospective, institutional review board-approved protocol and signed informed consent. A 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner was used for anatomic and dynamic contrast-enhanced acquisitions with standard diagnostic MRI setup for group 1 and radiation therapy immobilization devices for group 2 patients. The impact of magnetic resonance simulation/immobilization was evaluated qualitatively by 2 observers in terms of motion artifacts and positional reproducibility and quantitatively using 3-dimensional deformable registration to track intrascan maximum motion displacement of voxels inside 7 manually segmented regions of interest. The image quality of group 2 (29 examinations) was significantly better than that of group 1 (50 examinations) as rated by both observers in terms of motion minimization and imaging reproducibility (P quality of head and neck MRI in terms of motion-related artifacts and positional reproducibility was greatly improved by use of radiation therapy immobilization devices. Consequently, immobilization with external and intraoral fixation in MRI examinations is required for radiation therapy application. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy but not standard therapy is associated with resolution of erosion in the sacroiliac joints of patients with axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne J; Wichuk, Stephanie; Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena

    2014-01-01

    Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) MRI Sacroiliac Joint (SIJ) Structural Score (SSS) assesses a spectrum of structural lesions (erosion, fat metaplasia, backfill, ankylosis) and its potential to discriminate between therapies requires evaluation. METHODS: The SSS score assesses five consecutive coronal...... (ANOVA), discrimination was assessed using Guyatt's effect size, and treatment group differences were assessed using t-tests and the Mann-Whitney test. We identified baseline demographic and structural damage variables associated with change in SSS score by univariate analysis and analyzed the effect...... of treatment by multivariate stepwise regression adjusted for severity of baseline structural damage and demographic variables. RESULTS: A significant increase in mean SSS score for fat metaplasia (P = 0.017) and decrease in mean SSS score for erosion (P = 0.017) was noted in anti-TNFα treated patients...

  7. Caramiphen edisylate as Adjunct to Standard Therapy attenuates soman-induced Seizures and Cognitive Deficits in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-16

    705. Maren S. Pavlovian fear conditioning as a behavioral assay for hippocampus and amygdala function: cautions and caveats. Eur J Neurosci 2008;28... conditioning . Hear Res 2011;274:61–74. Weissman BA, Raveh L. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: the importance of anticholinergic drugs with...whichmay lead to neuropathological damage and behavioral deficits. Caramiphen edisylate is an anticholinergic drug with antiglutamatergic properties

  8. How does routinely delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for gambling disorder compare to "gold standard" clinical trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David P; Fairweather-Schmidt, A Kate; Harvey, Peter W; Battersby, Malcolm W

    2018-03-01

    Currently, it is unknown whether treatment outcomes derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for problem gamblers still hold when applied to patients seen in routine practice. Thus, data from an RCT of cognitive therapy versus exposure therapy for problem gambling versus patients of a gambling help service were compared. Assessments of problem gambling severity, psychosocial impairment, and alcohol use were undertaken at baseline and post-treatment and evaluated within a counterfactual framework. Findings showed that the contrast between routine CBT for pokies and horse betting had a significant effect, indicative of a 62% lower gambling urge score if routine CBT recipients had all been horse/track betters opposed to gambling with "pokies." However, the majority of contrasts indicated therapeutic outcomes achieved in routine CBT treatments were of equivalent robustness relative to RCT conditions. The present findings infer routine practice treatment outcomes are as efficacious as those generated in RCT contexts. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The consensus among Chinese interventional experts on the standard of interventional therapy for deep venous thrombosis of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Academic Group of Interventional Radiology, Radiology Branch of Chinese Medical Association

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce the indications and contraindications of catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, balloon angioplasty and stent implantation for deep venous thrombosis of lower extremity, and also aims to summarize and to illustrate the manipulating procedure, the points for attention, the perioperative complications and preventions in performing different kind of interventional technique. Great importance is attached to the interventional therapy for both acute and subacute deep venous thrombosis of lower extremity in order to effectively reduce the occurrence of post-thrombosis syndrome. (authors)

  10. 42 CFR Appendix E to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... technology; (b) Medical ethics and law; (c) Methods of patient care; (d) Medical terminology; (e) Human...; —Medical terminology; and —Mathematics. (c) Successful demonstration of the following competencies... cancer management centers or meeting demonstrably equivalent standards; (c) Medical schools; and (d...

  11. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor priming chemotherapy is more effective than standard chemotherapy as salvage therapy in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Bai, Ju; Wang, Jianli; Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Chen, Yinxia; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Yuandong; Yang, Yun

    2017-12-29

    To improve the complete remission (CR) rate of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and alleviate the severe side effects of double induction chemotherapy, we combined a standard regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming chemotherapy to compose a new double induction regimen for AML patients who failed to achieve CR after the first course. Ninety-seven patients with AML who did not achieve CR after the first course of standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Among them, 45 patients received G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy during days 20-22 of the first course of chemotherapy, serving as priming group, 52 patients were administered standard chemotherapy again, serving as control group. Between the two groups there were no differences in the French-American-British (FAB) classification, risk status, the first course of chemotherapy, blood cell count or blasts percentage of bone marrow before the second course. But the CR rate was significantly higher and the adverse effect was much lower in the priming group than the control group. Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that WBC level before the second course and the selection of the second chemotherapy regimen were two independent factors for long survival of patients. These results elucidate that standard chemotherapy followed by G-CSF priming new double induction chemotherapy is an effective method for AML patients to improve CR rate and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast cancer patients' satisfaction with individual therapy goals and treatment in a standardized integrative medicine consultancy service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Carolin C; Antoniadis, Sophia; Hackl, Janina; Langemann, Hanna; Schwitulla, Judith; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Theuser, Anna-Katharin

    2018-04-27

    Complementary medicine services are nowadays usually quite heterogeneous, and little information is available on standards for running an integrative medicine consultancy service. This study aimed to assess patients' satisfaction with a standardized treatment service on integrative medicine. Using a cross-sectional design, 75 breast cancer patients from the integrative medicine consultancy service at the University Breast Center for Franconia were evaluated between January 2016 and March 2017. At primary consultation, patients answered a standardized questionnaire on their medical history and treatment goals regarding integrative medicine. In a subsequent interview, patients evaluated their satisfaction with the treatment service and individual treatment goals. 72% of the patients (n = 54) reported high satisfaction with the overall approach of the treatment service. 76% of the patients (n = 57) were very satisfied or satisfied with their individual treatment plans. The most frequently reported goals were to slow tumor progression (n = 64, 85.3%), reducing the side effects of conventional cancer treatments (n = 60, 80%), and a desire to participate actively in the treatment of breast cancer (n = 64, 85.3%). Using a standardized procedure in integrative medicine allows a high quality level to be offered to patients. Overall, breast cancer patients report very high satisfaction with the integrative medicine consultancy service and state long-term treatment goals. Hence, long-term treatment with integrative medicine methods should be taken into consideration.

  13. Effects of adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and myocyte dysfunction in patients with acute decompensated heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Toyama, Takuji; Funada, Ryuichi; Takama, Noriaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Yuichi [Health Park Clinic, Department of Imaging, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, improves cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) in ischemic heart disease or chronic heart failure. However, its effects on CSNA and myocyte dysfunction in acute heart failure (AHF) remain unclear. We investigated the effects of adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy on CSNA and myocyte dysfunction in AHF. We selected 70 patients with mild to moderate nonischemic AHF who were treated with standard conventional therapy soon after admission. Thirty-five patients were assigned to additionally receive intravenous nicorandil (4-12 mg/h; group A), whereas the remaining patients continued their current drug regimen (group B). Delayed total defect score (TDS), delayed heart to mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, and washout rate (WR) were determined by {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy within 3 days of admission and 4 weeks later. High sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) level was also measured at the same time points. After treatment, MIBG scintigraphic parameters significantly improved in both groups. However, the extent of the changes in these parameters in group A significantly exceeded the extent of the changes in group B [TDS -11.3 ± 4.3 in group A vs -4.0 ± 6.0 in group B (p < 0.01); H/M ratio 0.31 ± 0.16 vs 0.14 ± 0.16 (p < 0.01); WR -13.8 ± 7.8 % vs -6.1 ± 8.9 % (p < 0.01)]. The hs-TnT level decreased significantly from 0.052 ± 0.043 to 0.041 ± 0.033 ng/ml (p < 0.05) in group A, but showed no significant change in group B. Moreover, in both groups, no relationships between the extent of changes in MIBG parameters and hs-TnT level were observed. Adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy provides additional benefits for CSNA and myocyte dysfunction over conventional therapy alone in AHF patients. Furthermore, the mechanisms of improvement in CSNA and myocyte dysfunction after nicorandil treatment in AHF patients were distinct. (orig.)

  14. Parents’ Perception of Stepped Care and Standard Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alison; Swaidan, Victoria R.; Torres, Angela Claudio; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Delivery systems other than in-office therapist-led treatments are needed to address treatment barriers such as accessibility, efficiency, costs, and parents wanting an active role in helping their child. To address these barriers, stepped care trauma focused-cognitive behavioral therapy (SC-TF-CBT) was developed as a parent-led, therapist-assisted therapy that occurs primarily at-home so that fewer in-office sessions are required. The current study examines caregivers’ perceptions of parent-led (SC-TF-CBT) and therapist-led (TF-CBT) treatment. Participants consisted of 52 parents/care-givers (25–68 years) of young trauma-exposed children (3–7 years) who were randomly assigned to SC-TF-CBT (n = 34) or to TF-CBT (n = 18). Data were collected at mid-and post-treatment via interviews inquiring about what participants liked, disliked, found most helpful, and found least helpful about the treatment. Results indicated that parents/caregivers favored relaxation skills, affect modulation and expression skills, the trauma narrative, and parenting skills across both conditions. The majority of parents/caregivers in SC-TF-CBT favored the at-home parent–child meetings and the workbook that guides the parent-led treatment, and there were suggestions for improving the workbook. Reported disliked and least helpful aspects of treatments were minimal across conditions, but themes that emerged that will need further exploration included the content and structure, and implementation difficulties for both conditions. Collectively, these results highlight the positive impact that a parent-led, therapist-assisted treatment could have in terms of providing caregivers with more tools to help their child after trauma and reduce barriers to treatment. PMID:26977133

  15. Parents' Perception of Stepped Care and Standard Care Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alison; Swaidan, Victoria R; Torres, Angela Claudio; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Delivery systems other than in-office therapist-led treatments are needed to address treatment barriers such as accessibility, efficiency, costs, and parents wanting an active role in helping their child. To address these barriers, stepped care trauma focused-cognitive behavioral therapy (SC-TF-CBT) was developed as a parent-led, therapist-assisted therapy that occurs primarily at-home so that fewer in-office sessions are required. The current study examines caregivers' perceptions of parent-led (SC-TF-CBT) and therapist-led (TF-CBT) treatment. Participants consisted of 52 parents/care-givers (25-68 years) of young trauma-exposed children (3-7 years) who were randomly assigned to SC-TF-CBT (n = 34) or to TF-CBT (n = 18). Data were collected at mid-and post-treatment via interviews inquiring about what participants liked, disliked, found most helpful, and found least helpful about the treatment. Results indicated that parents/caregivers favored relaxation skills, affect modulation and expression skills, the trauma narrative, and parenting skills across both conditions. The majority of parents/caregivers in SC-TF-CBT favored the at-home parent-child meetings and the workbook that guides the parent-led treatment, and there were suggestions for improving the workbook. Reported disliked and least helpful aspects of treatments were minimal across conditions, but themes that emerged that will need further exploration included the content and structure, and implementation difficulties for both conditions. Collectively, these results highlight the positive impact that a parent-led, therapist-assisted treatment could have in terms of providing caregivers with more tools to help their child after trauma and reduce barriers to treatment.

  16. In elderly patients with AML, which patients should be considered fit or unfit for standard induction therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan; Santini, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    A 75-year-old man visits his primary care physician for a routine checkup and a complete blood count reveals pancytopenia. BM examination confirms the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. No dysplastic features were noted and his karyotype results are pending. The patient has well-controlled hypertension and his last hospital admission was 20 years ago for repair of a rotator cuff injury. His Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status is 0/4 and he has no cognitive impairment. You believe the patient is fit for standard acute myeloid leukemia induction, but you are concerned because of his older age and you are considering less-intensive approaches.

  17. Estimation of the standardized risk difference and ratio in a competing risks framework: application to injection drug use and progression to AIDS after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephen R; Lau, Bryan; Eron, Joseph J; Brookhart, M Alan; Kitahata, Mari M; Martin, Jeffrey N; Mathews, William C; Mugavero, Michael J

    2015-02-15

    There are few published examples of absolute risk estimated from epidemiologic data subject to censoring and competing risks with adjustment for multiple confounders. We present an example estimating the effect of injection drug use on 6-year risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy between 1998 and 2012 in an 8-site US cohort study with death before AIDS as a competing risk. We estimate the risk standardized to the total study sample by combining inverse probability weights with the cumulative incidence function; estimates of precision are obtained by bootstrap. In 7,182 patients (83% male, 33% African American, median age of 38 years), we observed 6-year standardized AIDS risks of 16.75% among 1,143 injection drug users and 12.08% among 6,039 nonusers, yielding a standardized risk difference of 4.68 (95% confidence interval: 1.27, 8.08) and a standardized risk ratio of 1.39 (95% confidence interval: 1.12, 1.72). Results may be sensitive to the assumptions of exposure-version irrelevance, no measurement bias, and no unmeasured confounding. These limitations suggest that results be replicated with refined measurements of injection drug use. Nevertheless, estimating the standardized risk difference and ratio is straightforward, and injection drug use appears to increase the risk of AIDS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Evaluation of the Eclipse eMC algorithm for bolus electron conformal therapy using a standard verification dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Robert L; Sprunger, Conrad P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Popple, Richard A; Antolak, John A

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and calculation speed of electron dose distributions calculated by the Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). The recent com-mercial availability of bolus ECT technology requires further validation of the eMC dose calculation algorithm. eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to previously measured TLD-dose points throughout patient-based cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV (planning treatment volume) CT anatomy. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system, and electron dose distributions calculated using 1% and processors (Intel Xeon E5-2690, 2.9 GHz) on a framework agent server (FAS). In comparison, the eMC was significantly more accurate than the pencil beam algorithm (PBA). The eMC has comparable accuracy to the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) used for bolus ECT planning and has acceptably low dose calculation times. The eMC accuracy decreased when smoothing was used in high-gradient dose regions. The eMC accuracy was consistent with that previously reported for accuracy of the eMC electron dose algorithm and shows that the algorithm is suitable for clinical implementation of bolus ECT.

  19. Iliac Vein Interrogation Augments Venous Ulcer Healing in Patients Who Have Failed Standard Compression Therapy along with Pathological Venous Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Albeir Y; Broce, Mike; Yacoub, Michael; AbuRahma, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of venous ulcers is demanding for patients, as well as clinicians, and the investigation of underlying venous hypertension is the cornerstone of therapy. We propose that occult iliac vein stenosis should be ruled out by iliac vein interrogation (IVI) in patients with advanced venous stasis. We conducted a systematic retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients who presented with CEAP (clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathophysiological) 6 venous disease. All patients had great saphenous vein ablation, compressive treatment, wound care (including Unna boot compression), and perforator closure using ablation therapy. Iliac vein stenosis was defined as ≥50% stenosis in cross-sectional surface area on intravascular ultrasound. Primary outcomes include time of venous ulcer healing and/or measurable change in the Venous Clinical Severity Score. Twenty-two patients with CEAP 6 venous disease met the inclusion criteria (active ulcers >1.5 cm in diameter). The average age and body mass index were 62.2 ± 9.2 years and 41.7 ± 16.7, respectively. The majority were female (72.7%) with common comorbidities, such as hyperlipidemia (54.5%), hypertension (36.4%), and diabetes mellitus (27.3%). Twenty-nine ulcers with an average diameter of 3.4 ± 1.9 cm and a depth of 2.2 ± 0.5 mm were treated. The majority of the ulcers occurred on the left limb (n = 17, 58.6%). Average perforator venous reflux was 3.6 ± 0.8 sec, while common femoral reflux was 1.8 ± 1.6. The majority (n = 19, 64.5%) of the perforator veins were located at the base of the ulcer, while the remainder (n = 10, 34.5%) were within 2 cm from the base. Of the 13 patients who underwent IVI, 8 patients (61.5%) had stenosis >50% that was corrected with iliac vein angioplasty and stenting (IVAS). There was a strong trend toward shorter healing time in the IVI group (7.9 ± 9.5 weeks) than for patients in the no iliac vein interrogation (NIVI) group (20.2 ± 15

  20. Late acute humoral rejection in low-risk renal transplant recipients induced with an interleukin-2 receptor antagonist and maintained with standard therapy: preliminary communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J; Contreras, L; Zehnder, C; Pinto, V; Elberg, M; Araneda, S; Herzog, C; Calabran, L; Aguiló, J; Ferrario, M; Buckel, E; Fierro, J A

    2011-01-01

    Low-risk renal transplant recipients treated with standard immunosuppressive therapy including interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) antagonist show a low incidence of early rejection episodes but few reports have examined the incidence and severity of late rejection processes. This study evaluated retrospectively cellular and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) among 42 recipients selected because they showed low panel-reactive-antibodies, short cold ischemia time, no delayed graft function, and therapy including basiliximab (Simulect) induction. The mean observation time was 6.6 years. Sixty-seven percent of donors were deceased. Ten-year patient and death-censored graft survivals were 81% and 78%, respectively. Seven patients lost their kidneys due to nonimmunologic events. The seven recipients who experienced cellular rejection episodes during the first posttransplant year had them reversed with steroids. Five patients displayed late acute AMR causing functional deterioration in four cases including 1 graft loss. De novo sensitization occurred in 48% of recipients including patients without clinical rejection. In conclusion, long-term follow-up of kidney transplant recipients selected by a low immunologic risk showed a persistent risk of de novo sensitization evolving to acute AMR in 11% of cases. Although immunologic events were related to late immunosuppressive reduction, most graft losses were due to nonimmunologic factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Outcomes Among Children With Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma Treated With Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy: A Comparison of Disease Control and Overall Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia; Kim, Sungjin; Weyman, Elizabeth A; Thornton, Lauren T; Mazewski, Claire; MacDonald, Tobey; Ebb, David; MacDonald, Shannon M; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare long-term disease control and overall survival between children treated with proton and photon radiation therapy (RT) for standard-risk medulloblastoma. This multi-institution cohort study includes 88 children treated with chemotherapy and proton (n=45) or photon (n=43) RT between 2000 and 2009. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and patterns of failure were compared between the 2 cohorts. Median (range) age was 6 years old at diagnosis (3-21 years) for proton patients versus 8 years (3-19 years) for photon patients (P=.011). Cohorts were similar with respect to sex, histology, extent of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) RT dose, total RT dose, whether the RT boost was delivered to the posterior fossa (PF) or tumor bed (TB), time from surgery to RT start, or total duration of RT. RT consisted of a median (range) CSI dose of 23.4 Gy (18-27 Gy) and a boost of 30.6 Gy (27-37.8 Gy). Median follow-up time is 6.2 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1-6.6 years) for proton patients versus 7.0 years (95% CI: 5.8-8.9 years) for photon patients. There was no significant difference in RFS or OS between patients treated with proton versus photon RT; 6-year RFS was 78.8% versus 76.5% (P=.948) and 6-year OS was 82.0% versus 87.6%, respectively (P=.285). On multivariate analysis, there was a trend for longer RFS with females (P=.058) and higher CSI dose (P=.096) and for longer OS with females (P=.093). Patterns of failure were similar between the 2 cohorts (P=.908). Disease control with proton and photon radiation therapy appears equivalent for standard risk medulloblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. QUALITY OF LIFE AND COMPLIANCE TO THERAPY IN PATIENTS FOLLOWING SUCCESSFULTRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY, WHO WERE PRESCRIBED FLUVASTATIN EXTENDED RELEASE ADDED TO STANDARD THERAPY. PROTOCOL OF THE OPEN-LABEL OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Susekov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate quality of life changes and compliance to therapy in patients following successful transluminal angioplasty, who have indications for fluvastatin extended release in addition to standard treatment.Material and methods. This is a national observational multicenter study. An inclusion of 60 investigator centers is planned (out-patient medical centers, the total number of patients to be included is 600. Patients (men and women with coronary heart disease following successful transluminal coronary angioplasty, who were prescribed fluvastatinextended release (Lescol Forte, Novartis 80 mg once daily will be included in the observation. The following efficacy and safety parameters will be evaluated: quality of life assessed with SF-36 scale before and during treatment; compliance to therapy; adverse events and serious adverse events. Observation period is planned for 6 months. During this period patient is expected to make 4 visits to treating physician. According to the physician’s decision, observation period can be extended to 12 months.Present study status. The study is completed. 524 patients completed the observation, including 116 patients who were followed up for 12 months. There are 414 men (79% and 110 women (21% among patients enrolled into the study.

  3. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Sun, Jidi [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Richardson, Haylea [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Arm, Jameen [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Best, Leah [Department of Radiology, Hunter New England Health, New Lambton, New South Wales (Australia); Chandra, Shekhar S. [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Fripp, Jurgen [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Menk, Frederick W. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  4. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, Jason A.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Fripp, Jurgen; Menk, Frederick W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  5. Cost-effectiveness of computer-assisted training in cognitive-behavioral therapy as an adjunct to standard care for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Todd A; Ostrow, Cary D; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2010-08-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness, from clinic and patient perspectives, of a computer-based version of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT4CBT) as an addition to regular clinical practice for substance dependence. PARTICIPANTS, DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: This cost-effectiveness study is based on a randomized clinical trial in which 77 individuals seeking treatment for substance dependence at an outpatient community setting were randomly assigned to treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU plus biweekly access to computer-based training in CBT (TAU plus CBT4CBT). The primary patient outcome measure was the total number of drug-free specimens provided during treatment. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEACs) were used to determine the cost-effectiveness of TAU plus CBT4CBT relative to TAU alone. Results are presented from both the clinic and patient perspectives and are shown to be robust to (i) sensitivity analyses and (ii) a secondary objective patient outcome measure. The per patient cost of adding CBT4CBT to standard care was $39 ($27) from the clinic (patient) perspective. From the clinic (patient) perspective, TAU plus CBT4CBT is likely to be cost-effective when the threshold value to decision makers of an additional drug-free specimen is greater than approximately $21 ($15), and TAU alone is likely to be cost-effective when the threshold value is less than approximately $21 ($15). The ICERs for TAU plus CBT4CBT also compare favorably to ICERs reported elsewhere for other empirically validated therapies, including contingency management. TAU plus CBT4CBT appears to be a good value from both the clinic and patient perspectives. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Standard of Care Versus Metastases-directed Therapy for PET-detected Nodal Oligorecurrent Prostate Cancer Following Multimodality Treatment: A Multi-institutional Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuber, T; Jilg, C; Tennstedt, P; De Bruycker, A; Tilki, D; Decaestecker, K; Zilli, T; Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Wetterauer, U; Grosu, A L; Schultze-Seemann, W; Heinzer, H; Graefen, M; Morlacco, A; Karnes, R J; Ost, P

    2018-03-10

    Most prostate cancer (PCa) patients with a biochemical failure following primary multimodality treatment (surgery and postoperative radiotherapy) relapse in the nodes. To perform a matched-case analysis in men with lymph node recurrent PCa comparing standard of care (SOC) with metastasis-directed therapy (MDT). PCa patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression following multimodality treatment were included in this retrospective multi-institutional analysis. The SOC cohort (n=1816) received immediate or delayed androgen deprivation therapy administered at PSA progression. The MDT cohort (n=263) received either salvage lymph node dissection (n=166) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (n=97) at PSA progression to a positron emission tomography-detected nodal recurrence. The primary endpoint, cancer-specific survival (CSS), was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, Cox proportional hazards models, and propensity score-matched analyses. At a median follow-up of 70 (interquartile range: 48-98) mo, MDT was associated with an improved CSS on univariate (p=0.029) and multivariate analysis (hazard ratio: 0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.17-0.64) adjusted for the year of radical prostatectomy (RP), age at RP, PSA at RP, time from RP to PSA progression, Gleason score, surgical margin status, pT- and pN-stage. In total, 659 men were matched (3:1 ratio). The 5-yr CSS was 98.6% (95% CI: 94.3-99.6) and 95.7% (95% CI: 93.2-97.3) for MDT and SOC, respectively (p=0.005, log-rank). The main limitations of our study are its retrospective design and lack of standardization of systemic treatment in the SOC cohort. MDT for nodal oligorecurrent PCa improves CSS as compared with SOC. These retrospective data from a multi-institutional pooled analysis should be considered as hypothesis-generating and inform future randomized trials in this setting. Prostate cancer patients experiencing a lymph node recurrence might benefit from local treatments directed at

  7. Clinical Outcomes Among Children With Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma Treated With Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy: A Comparison of Disease Control and Overall Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, Bree R.; Esiashvili, Natia; Kim, Sungjin; Weyman, Elizabeth A.; Thornton, Lauren T.; Mazewski, Claire; MacDonald, Tobey; Ebb, David; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare long-term disease control and overall survival between children treated with proton and photon radiation therapy (RT) for standard-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: This multi-institution cohort study includes 88 children treated with chemotherapy and proton (n=45) or photon (n=43) RT between 2000 and 2009. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and patterns of failure were compared between the 2 cohorts. Results: Median (range) age was 6 years old at diagnosis (3-21 years) for proton patients versus 8 years (3-19 years) for photon patients (P=.011). Cohorts were similar with respect to sex, histology, extent of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) RT dose, total RT dose, whether the RT boost was delivered to the posterior fossa (PF) or tumor bed (TB), time from surgery to RT start, or total duration of RT. RT consisted of a median (range) CSI dose of 23.4 Gy (18-27 Gy) and a boost of 30.6 Gy (27-37.8 Gy). Median follow-up time is 6.2 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1-6.6 years) for proton patients versus 7.0 years (95% CI: 5.8-8.9 years) for photon patients. There was no significant difference in RFS or OS between patients treated with proton versus photon RT; 6-year RFS was 78.8% versus 76.5% (P=.948) and 6-year OS was 82.0% versus 87.6%, respectively (P=.285). On multivariate analysis, there was a trend for longer RFS with females (P=.058) and higher CSI dose (P=.096) and for longer OS with females (P=.093). Patterns of failure were similar between the 2 cohorts (P=.908). Conclusions: Disease control with proton and photon radiation therapy appears equivalent for standard risk medulloblastoma.

  8. QUALITY OF LIFE AND COMPLIANCE TO THERAPY IN PATIENTS FOLLOWING SUCCESSFUL TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY, WHO WERE PRESCRIBED LESCOL XL (FLUVASTATIN ADDED TO STANDARD THERAPY. RESULTS OF THE LESQOL OPEN-LABEL OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Susekov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life changes and compliance to therapy in patients following successful transluminal angioplasty, who were prescribed fluvastatin extended release in addition to standard treatment.Material and methods. This was a national prospective multicenter observational study. Patients with coronary heart disease following successful transluminal coronary angioplasty, who were prescribed fluvastatin extended release (Lescol Forte, Novartis 80 mg QD were included in the present observation. The following efficacy and safety parameters were evaluated: quality of life evaluated with SF-36 scale before and during treatment; hypolipidemic efficacy, compliance to therapy; adverse events and serious adverse events. Observation period was 6 months in all patients and 12 months in some patients at the discretion of the investigator.Results. 524 patients (79% men and 21% women completed the 6 months observation period and 116 patients were followed up for 12 months. Significant increase of all measures of SF-36 scales, physical and mental health was observed in 6 and 12 months of fluvastatin extended release treatment. Total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction was 30.5% and 54.9% respectively, p<0.01, in 6 months and 34.2% and 34.3% respectively in 12 months of treatment, p<0.01. High density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly increased by 22.5% in 12 months of treatment, p<0.01. There were very few adverse events and laboratory changes during the course of treatment.Conclusion. LESQOL study showed significant increase in quality of life and good hypolipidemic efficacy as well as good tolerability of fluvastatin extended release in patients after coronary angioplasty.

  9. Long-term results of pars plana vitrectomy as an anti-inflammatory therapy of pediatric intermediate uveitis resistant to standard medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsová, Denisa; Pochop, Pavel; Štěpánková, Jana; Dotřelová, Dagmar

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) as an anti-inflammatory therapy in pediatric recurrent intermediate uveitis. A retrospective study evaluated the long-term results of PPV indicated for intermediate uveitis with a mean observation period of 10.3 years (range 7-15.6 years) in 6 children (mean age 8 years, range 6-12 years). Pars plana vitrectomy was performed on 10 eyes in the standard manner and was initiated by vitreous sampling for laboratory examination. Data recorded were perioperative or postoperative vitrectomy complications, anatomic and functional results of PPV, and preoperative and postoperative best-corrected Snellen visual acuity. No perioperative or postoperative complications were observed. Bacteriologic, virologic, mycotic, and cytologic analysis of the vitreous was negative in all tested children. Five eyes were subsequently operated on for posterior subcapsular cataracts. An average preoperative visual acuity of 0.32 improved to an average postoperative visual acuity of 0.8. In the case of systemic immunosuppressive treatment failure in pediatric uveitis, particularly in eyes with cystoid macular edema, we recommend PPV relatively early.

  10. An immune-modulating diet increases the regulatory T cells and reduces T helper 1 inflammatory response in Leishmaniosis affected dogs treated with standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Laura; Annunziatella, Mariangela; Palatucci, Anna Teresa; Lanzilli, Sarah; Rubino, Valentina; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Centenaro, Sara; Guidetti, Gianandrea; Canello, Sergio; Terrazzano, Giuseppe

    2015-12-03

    Clinical appearance and evolution of Canine Leishmaniosis (CL) are the consequence of complex interactions between the parasite and the genetic and immunological backgrounds. We investigated the effect of an immune-modulating diet in CL. Dogs were treated with anti- Leishmania pharmacological therapy combined with standard diet (SD Group) or with the immune-modulating diet (IMMD Group). CD3+ CD4+ Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) and CD3+ CD4+ IFN-γ + T helper 1 (Th1) were analyzed by flow cytometry. All sick dogs showed low platelet number at diagnosis (T0). A platelet increase was observed after six months (T6) SD Group, with still remaining in the normal range at twelve months (T12). IMMD Group showed an increase in platelet number becoming similar to healthy dogs at T6 and T12. An increase of CD4/CD8 ratio was revealed in SD Group after three months (T3), while at T6 and at T12 the values resembled to T0. The increase in CD4/CD8 ratio at T3 was maintained at T6 and T12 in IMMD Group. A reduction in the percentage of Treg of all sick dogs was observed at T0. A recovery of Treg percentage was observed only at T3 in SD Group, while this effect disappeared at T6 and T12. In contrast, Treg percentage became similar to healthy animals in IMDD Group at T3, T6 and T12. Sick dogs showed an increase of Th1 cells at T0 as compared with healthy dogs. We observed the occurrence of a decrease of Th1 cells from T3 to T12 in SD Group, although a trend of increase was observed at T6 and T12. At variance, IMMD Group dogs showed a progressive decrease of Th1 cells, whose levels became similar to healthy controls at T6 and T12. The immune-modulating diet appears to regulate the immune response in CL during the standard pharmacological treatment. The presence of nutraceuticals in the diet correlates with the decrease of Th1 cells and with the increase of Treg in sick dogs. Therefore, the administration of the specific dietary supplement improved the clinical response to the

  11. Efficacy of standard therapies against Ureaplasma species and persistence among men with non-gonococcal urethritis enrolled in a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropour, Christine M; Manhart, Lisa E; Gillespie, Catherine W; Lowens, M Sylvan; Golden, Matthew R; Jensen, Nicole L; Kenny, George E; Totten, Patricia A

    2015-08-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum biovar 2 (UU-2), but not Ureaplasma parvum (UP), has been associated with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), but little is known about species-specific responses to standard therapies. We examined species-specific treatment outcomes and followed men with treatment failure for 9 weeks. From May 2007 to July 2011, men aged ≥16 attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Seattle, Washington, with NGU (urethral discharge or urethral symptoms plus ≥5 polymorphonuclear leucocytes /high-powered field) enrolled in a double-blind, randomised trial. Participants received active azithromycin (1 g) + placebo doxycycline or active doxycycline (100 mg twice a day ×7 days) + placebo azithromycin. Ureaplasma were detected in culture followed by species-specific PCR. Outcomes were assessed at 3, 6 and 9 weeks. At 3 weeks, men with persistent Ureaplasma detection received 'reverse therapy' (e.g., active doxycycline if they first received active azithromycin). At 6 weeks, persistently positive men received moxifloxacin (400 mg×7 days). Of 490 men, 107 (22%) and 60 (12%) were infected with UU-2 and UP, respectively, and returned at 3 weeks. Persistent detection was similar for UU-2-infected men initially treated with azithromycin or doxycycline (25% vs. 31%; p=0.53), but differed somewhat for men with UP (45% vs. 24%; p=0.11). At 6 weeks, 57% of UU-2-infected and 63% of UP-infected men who received both drugs had persistent detection. Failure after moxifloxacin occurred in 30% and 36%, respectively. Persistent detection of UU-2 or UP was not associated with signs/symptoms of NGU. Persistent detection after treatment with doxycycline, azithromycin and moxifloxacin was common for UU and UP, but not associated with persistent urethritis. NCT00358462. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Standardization of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound for the evaluation of antiangiogenic therapies: the French multicenter Support for Innovative and Expensive Techniques Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassau, Nathalie; Chapotot, Louis; Benatsou, Baya; Vilgrain, Valérie; Kind, Michèle; Lacroix, Joëlle; Cuinet, Marie; Taieb, Sophie; Aziza, Richard; Sarran, Antony; Labbe, Catherine; Gallix, Benoît; Lucidarme, Olivier; Ptak, Yvette; Rocher, Laurence; Caquot, Louis Michel; Chagnon, Sophie; Marion, Denis; Luciani, Alain; Uzan-Augui, Joëlle; Koscielny, Serge

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe the standardization and dissemination of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) for the evaluation of antiangiogenic treatments in solid tumors across 19 oncology centers in France and to define a quality score to account for the variability of the evaluation criteria used to collect DCE-US data. This prospective Soutien aux Techniques Innovantes Coûteuses (Support for Innovative and Expensive Techniques) DCE-US study included patients with metastatic breast cancer, melanoma, colon cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, renal cell carcinoma and patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma tumors treated with antiangiogenic therapy. The DCE-US method was made available across 19 oncology centers in France. Overall, 2339 DCE-US examinations were performed by 65 radiologists in 539 patients.One target site per patient was studied. Standardized DCE-US examinations were performed before treatment (day 0) and at days 7, 15, 30, and 60. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound data were transferred from the different sites to the main study center at the Institut Gustave-Roussy for analysis. Quantitative analyses were performed with a mathematical model to determine 7 DCE-US functional parameters using raw linear data. Radiologists had to evaluate 6 criteria that were potentially linked to the precision of the evaluation of these parameters: lesion size, target motion, loss of target, clear borders, total acquisition of wash-in, and vascular recognition imaging window adapted to the lesion size.Eighteen DCE-US examinations were randomly selected from the Soutien aux Techniques Innovantes Coûteuses (Support for Innovative and Expensive Techniques) database. Each examination was quantified twice by 8 engineers/radiologists trained to evaluate the perfusion parameters. The intraobserver variability was estimated on the basis of differences between examinations performed by the same radiologist. The mean coefficient of

  13. Supplementation of standard antibiotic therapy with oral probiotics for bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heczko, Piotr B; Tomusiak, Anna; Adamski, Paweł; Jakimiuk, Artur J; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena; Strus, Magdalena

    2015-12-03

    This multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to determine whether the use of oral probiotic preparation (prOVag®) containing three Lactobacillus strains together with standard metronidazole treatment and also targeted antibiotic treatment (following the failure of metronidazole therapy) could reduce the recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and aerobic vaginitis (AV). Patients at private gynaecological clinics in Poland with histories of recurrent BV/AV and current symptoms were randomly allocated to receive metronidazole and probiotic or placebo, and assessed monthly on visits II and III-V. The total number of study visits was 5-6 (I, II, II bis - if applicable, III, IV, V). One probiotic or placebo capsule was administered with metronidazole/targeted antibiotic twice daily for 10 days; during follow up, patients took one capsule daily for 10 days perimenstrually. Clinical examination and vaginal swabbing were performed at each visit. Primary outcomes were clinical or microbiological BV/AV recurrence and probiotic safety. Secondary outcomes were vaginal pH, Nugent score, and Lactobacillus counts in the vaginal microbiota. Safety analysis was performed in 578 (probiotic, n = 285; placebo, n = 293) 18-50-year-old women who were randomised. BV/AV was confirmed microbiologically in 241 (probiotic, n = 118; placebo, n = 123) participants, who continued the trial. Data from 154 (probiotic, n = 73; placebo, n = 81) participants who completed the study were analysed to determine the efficacy of prOVag. Additional analyses included 37 (probiotic, n = 22; placebo, n = 15) participants who received targeted antibiotics and probiotics or placebo. prOVag lengthened the time to clinical relapse of BV/AV symptoms up to 51 % (p vaginal pH and Nugent score, and increased vaginal Lactobacillus counts following standard treatment. This study demonstrated that oral probiotics lengthened remission in

  14. Impact of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy on the fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients: Comparison between an everolimus- and a standard tacrolimus-based regimen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Zaza

    Full Text Available The gut microbiome is the full set of microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract and is emerging as an important dynamic/fluid system that, if altered by environmental, dietetic or pharmacological factors, could considerably influence drug response. However, the immunosuppressive drug-induced modifications of this system are still poorly defined.We employed an innovative bioinformatics approach to assess differences in the whole-gut microbial metagenomic profile of 20 renal transplant recipients undergoing maintenance treatment with two different immunosuppressive protocols. Nine patients were treated with everolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (EVE+MMF group, and 11 patients were treated with a standard therapy with tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (TAC+MMF group.A statistical analysis of comparative high-throughput data demonstrated that although similar according to the degree of Shannon diversity (alpha diversity at the taxonomic level, three functional genes clearly discriminated EVE+MMF versus TAC+MMF (cutoff: log2 fold change≥1, FDR≤0.05. Flagellar motor switch protein (fliNY and type IV pilus assembly protein pilM (pilM were significantly enriched in TAC+MMF-treated patients, while macrolide transport system mrsA (msrA was more abundant in patients treated with EVE+MMF. Finally, PERMANOVA revealed that among the variables analyzed and included in our model, only the consumption of sugar significantly influenced beta diversity.Our study, although performed on a relatively small number of patients, showed, for the first time, specific immunosuppressive-related effects on fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients and it suggested that the analysis of the gut microbes community could represent a new tool to better understand the effects of drugs currently employed in organ transplantations. However, multicenter studies including healthy controls should be undertaken to better address this objective.

  15. Impact of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy on the fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients: Comparison between an everolimus- and a standard tacrolimus-based regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Felis, Giovanna; Granata, Simona; Torriani, Sandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiome is the full set of microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract and is emerging as an important dynamic/fluid system that, if altered by environmental, dietetic or pharmacological factors, could considerably influence drug response. However, the immunosuppressive drug-induced modifications of this system are still poorly defined. We employed an innovative bioinformatics approach to assess differences in the whole-gut microbial metagenomic profile of 20 renal transplant recipients undergoing maintenance treatment with two different immunosuppressive protocols. Nine patients were treated with everolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (EVE+MMF group), and 11 patients were treated with a standard therapy with tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (TAC+MMF group). A statistical analysis of comparative high-throughput data demonstrated that although similar according to the degree of Shannon diversity (alpha diversity) at the taxonomic level, three functional genes clearly discriminated EVE+MMF versus TAC+MMF (cutoff: log2 fold change≥1, FDR≤0.05). Flagellar motor switch protein (fliNY) and type IV pilus assembly protein pilM (pilM) were significantly enriched in TAC+MMF-treated patients, while macrolide transport system mrsA (msrA) was more abundant in patients treated with EVE+MMF. Finally, PERMANOVA revealed that among the variables analyzed and included in our model, only the consumption of sugar significantly influenced beta diversity. Our study, although performed on a relatively small number of patients, showed, for the first time, specific immunosuppressive-related effects on fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients and it suggested that the analysis of the gut microbes community could represent a new tool to better understand the effects of drugs currently employed in organ transplantations. However, multicenter studies including healthy controls should be undertaken to better address this objective.

  16. Impact of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy on the fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients: Comparison between an everolimus- and a standard tacrolimus-based regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Felis, Giovanna; Granata, Simona; Torriani, Sandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background The gut microbiome is the full set of microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract and is emerging as an important dynamic/fluid system that, if altered by environmental, dietetic or pharmacological factors, could considerably influence drug response. However, the immunosuppressive drug-induced modifications of this system are still poorly defined. Methods We employed an innovative bioinformatics approach to assess differences in the whole-gut microbial metagenomic profile of 20 renal transplant recipients undergoing maintenance treatment with two different immunosuppressive protocols. Nine patients were treated with everolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (EVE+MMF group), and 11 patients were treated with a standard therapy with tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (TAC+MMF group). Results A statistical analysis of comparative high-throughput data demonstrated that although similar according to the degree of Shannon diversity (alpha diversity) at the taxonomic level, three functional genes clearly discriminated EVE+MMF versus TAC+MMF (cutoff: log2 fold change≥1, FDR≤0.05). Flagellar motor switch protein (fliNY) and type IV pilus assembly protein pilM (pilM) were significantly enriched in TAC+MMF-treated patients, while macrolide transport system mrsA (msrA) was more abundant in patients treated with EVE+MMF. Finally, PERMANOVA revealed that among the variables analyzed and included in our model, only the consumption of sugar significantly influenced beta diversity. Conclusions Our study, although performed on a relatively small number of patients, showed, for the first time, specific immunosuppressive-related effects on fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients and it suggested that the analysis of the gut microbes community could represent a new tool to better understand the effects of drugs currently employed in organ transplantations. However, multicenter studies including healthy controls should be undertaken to better address this

  17. Efficacy of standard therapies against Ureaplasma species and persistence among men with non-gonococcal urethritis enrolled in a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropour, Christine M.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Gillespie, Catherine W.; Lowens, M. Sylvan; Golden, Matthew R.; Jensen, Nicole L.; Kenny, George E.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective U. urealyticum biovar 2 (UU-2) but not U. parvum (UP) has been associated with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), but little is known about species-specific responses to standard therapies. We examined species-specific treatment outcomes and followed men with treatment failure for 9 weeks. Methods From May 2007-July 2011, men aged ≥16 attending an STD clinic in Seattle, Washington with NGU (urethral discharge or urethral symptoms plus ≥5 PMNs/HPF) were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized trial. Participants received active azithromycin (1g) + placebo doxycycline or active doxycycline (100mg bid × 7d) + placebo azithromycin. Ureaplasmas were detected in culture followed by species-specific PCR. Outcomes were assessed at 3, 6, and 9 weeks. At 3 weeks, men with persistent Ureaplasmas received “reverse therapy” (e.g., active doxycycline if they first received active azithromycin). At 6 weeks, persistently-positive men received moxifloxacin (400mg × 7d). Results Of 490 men, 107 (22%) and 60 (12%) were infected with UU-2 and UP, respectively, and returned at 3 weeks. Persistent infection was similar for UU-2-infected men initially treated with azithromycin or doxycycline (25% vs. 31%, P=0.53), but differed somewhat for men with UP (45% vs. 24%; P=0.11). At 6 weeks, 57% of UU-2-infected and 63% of UP-infected men who received both drugs had persistent infection. Failure after moxifloxacin occurred in 30% and 36%, respectively. Persistent detection of UU-2 or UP was not associated with signs/symptoms of NGU. Conclusion Persistent infection after treatment with doxycycline, azithromycin, and moxifloxacin was common for UU and UP, but not associated with persistent urethritis. PMID:25616607

  18. Bowel sparing in pediatric cranio-spinal radiotherapy: a comparison of combined electron and photon and helical TomoTherapy techniques to a standard photon method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harron, Elizabeth; Lewis, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose to organs at risk (OARs) from different craniospinal radiotherapy treatment approaches available at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC), with a particular emphasis on sparing the bowel. Method: Treatment plans were produced for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient with inflammatory bowel disease using 3D conformal 6-MV photons (3DCP), combined 3D 6-MV photons and 18-MeV electrons (3DPE), and helical photon TomoTherapy (HT). The 3DPE plan was a modification of the standard 3DCP technique, using electrons to treat the spine inferior to the level of the diaphragm. The plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume data to OARs and the nontumor integral dose. Results: The 3DPE plan was found to give the lowest dose to the bowel and the lowest nontumor integral dose of the 3 techniques. However, the coverage of the spine planning target volume (PTV) was least homogeneous using this technique, with only 74.6% of the PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose. HT was able to achieve the best coverage of the PTVs (99.0% of the whole-brain PTV and 93.1% of the spine PTV received 95% of the prescribed dose), but delivered a significantly higher integral dose. HT was able to spare the heart, thyroid, and eyes better than the linac-based techniques, but other OARs received a higher dose. Conclusions: Use of electrons was the best method for reducing the dose to the bowel and the integral dose, at the expense of compromised spine PTV coverage. For some patients, HT may be a viable method of improving dose homogeneity and reducing selected OAR doses.

  19. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the safety, feasibility and activity of salvage therapy consisting of the mTOR inhibitor Temsirolimus added to standard therapy of Rituximab and DHAP for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell B-Cell lymphoma – the STORM trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Memmer, Marie Luise; Dreyling, Martin; Hess, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The current standard treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large cell B-Cell lymphoma (DLBCL) primarily consists of intensified salvage therapy and, if the disease is chemo-sensitive, high dose therapy followed with autologous stem cell transplantation. In the rituximab era however, this treatment approach has shown only limited benefit. In particular, patients relapsing after rituximab-containing primary treatment have an adverse prognosis, especially if this occurs within the first year after therapy or if the disease is primarily refractory. Therefore there is an ultimate need for improved salvage treatment approaches. The STORM study is a prospective, multicentre phase I/II study to evaluate the safety, feasibility and activity of salvage therapy consisting of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus added to the standard therapy rituximab and DHAP for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. The primary objective of the phase I of the trial is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of temsirolimus in combination with rituximab and DHAP. The secondary objective is to demonstrate that stem cells can be mobilized during this regimen in patients scheduled to proceed to high dose therapy. In phase II, the previously established maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus will be used. The primary objective is to evaluate the overall response rate (ORR) in patients with relapsed DLBCL. The secondary objective is to evaluate progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. The study will be accompanied by an analysis of lymphoma subtypes determined by gene expression analysis (GEP). The STORM trial evaluates the safety, feasibility and activity of salvage therapy consisting of the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus added to standard therapy of rituximab and DHAP for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. It also might identify predictive markers for this treatment modality. ClinicalTrials.gov http

  20. Imatinib in combination with hydroxyurea versus hydroxyurea alone as oral therapy in patients with progressive pretreated glioblastoma resistant to standard dose temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dresemann, G.; Weller, M.; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann Maria

    2010-01-01

    A randomized, multicenter, open-label, phase 3 study of patients with progressive, recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) for whom front-line therapy had failed was conducted. This study was designed to determine whether combination therapy with imatinib and hydroxyurea (HU) has superior antitumor...

  1. Comparing short to standard duration of antibiotic therapy for patients hospitalized with cellulitis (DANCE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranendonk, Duncan R.; Opmeer, Brent C.; Prins, Jan M.; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2014-01-01

    Recommended therapy duration for patients hospitalized with cellulitis is 10-14 days. Unnecessary use of antibiotics is one of the key factors driving resistance. Recent studies have shown that antibiotic therapy for cellulitis in outpatients can safely be shortened, despite residual inflammation.

  2. A randomized phase III study of accelerated hyperfractionation versus standard in patients with unresected brain metastases: a report of the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) 9104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Kevin J.; Scott, Charles; Greenberg, Harvey M.; Emami, Bahman; Seider, Michael; Vora, Nayana L.; Olson, Craig; Whitton, Anthony; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare 1-year survival and acute toxicity rates between an accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) radiotherapy (1.6 Gy b.i.d.) to a total dose of 54.4 Gy vs. an accelerated fractionation (AF) of 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions in patients with unresected brain metastasis. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) accrued 445 patients to a Phase III comparison of accelerated hyperfractionation vs. standard fractionation from 1991 through 1995. All patients had histologic proof of malignancy at the primary site. Brain metastasis were measurable by CT or MRI scan and all patients had a Karnofsky performance score (KPS) of at least 70 and a neurologic function classification of 1 or 2. For AH, 32 Gy in 20 fractions over 10 treatment days (1.6 Gy twice daily) was delivered to the whole brain. A boost of 22.4 Gy in 14 fractions was delivered to each lesion with a 2-cm margin. Results: The average age in both groups was 60 years; nearly two-thirds of all patients had lung primaries. Of the 429 eligible and analyzable patients, the median survival time was 4.5 months in both arms. The 1-year survival rate was 19% in the AF arm vs. 16% in the AH arm. No difference in median or 1-year survival was observed among patients with solitary metastasis between treatment arms. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classes have previously been identified and patients with a KPS of 70 or more, a controlled primary tumor, less than 65 years of age, and brain metastases only (RPA class I), had a 1-year survival of 35% in the AF arm vs. 25% in the AH arm (p = 0.95). In a multivariate model, only age, KPS, extent of metastatic disease (intracranial metastases only vs. intra- and extracranial metastases), and status of primary (controlled vs. uncontrolled) were statistically significant (at p < 0.05). Treatment assignment was not statistically significant. Overall Grade III or IV toxicity was equivalent in both arms, and one fatal toxicity at 44 days secondary

  3. Increased height standard deviation scores in response to growth hormone therapy to near-adult height in older children with delayed skeletal maturation: results from the ANSWER Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Judith L; Lee, Peter A; Gut, Robert; Germak, John

    2015-01-01

    A primary goal of recombinant human growth hormone therapy (GHT) in children is attaining normal adult height. In this study, children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) (including isolated idiopathic growth hormone deficiency [IGHD] and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency [MPHD]), idiopathic short stature (ISS), and Turner syndrome (TS) were evaluated for near-adult height (NAH) and percent achieving NAH within the normal range after approximately 4 years of GHT. Data from the American Norditropin® Web-Enabled Research (ANSWER) Program were analyzed for NAH from age at treatment start (ATS) (i.e., referral age as defined by age at enrollment in the study) to last clinic visit using one of the following two criteria: 1) age ≥18 years, or 2) if male: ≥16 years and height velocity (HV) standard deviation score (HSDS) ≤ -2, and either GHD (n = 201), ISS (n = 19), or TS (n = 41). The main outcome measures included HSDS and corrected HSDS (HSDS-target HSDS) in response to GH treatment, and correlation of ATS with NAH HSDS. Mean (± SD) chronological and bone ages at baseline were 14.0 ± 2.1 years and 11.7 ± 2.0 years, respectively, and mean GHT duration was 4.0 ± 1.6 years. Mean HSDS (baseline to NAH; GHD: -2.7 to -1.0; ISS: -2.8 to -1.4; TS: -3.0 to -1.8) and mean corrected HSDS (baseline to NAH; GHD: -2.1 to -0.3; ISS: -2.1 to -0.6; TS: -1.8 to -0.6) increased across diagnostic indications. Percentages of patients reaching near-adult HSDS > -2 were GHD: 87.6%; ISS: 78.9%; TS: 65.8%. Significant negative correlations were found between ATS and NAH HSDS when analyzed by sex. Despite a relatively advanced childhood age, the majority of GH-treated patients attained mean near-adult HSDS within the normal range (HSDS > -2). Negative correlations of ATS with near-adult HSDS indicate that an earlier age at treatment start would likely have resulted in greater adult height achieved in both male and female patients.

  4. Consistent Reduction in Periprocedural Myocardial Infarction With Cangrelor as Assessed by Multiple Definitions: Findings From CHAMPION PHOENIX (Cangrelor Versus Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Matthew A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Stone, Gregg W; White, Harvey D; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Gibson, C Michael; Hamm, Christian W; Price, Matthew J; Leonardi, Sergio; Prats, Jayne; Deliargyris, Efthymios N; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Harrington, Robert A

    2016-09-06

    Cangrelor is an intravenous P2Y12 inhibitor approved to reduce periprocedural ischemic events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention not pretreated with a P2Y12 inhibitor. A total of 11 145 patients were randomized to cangrelor or clopidogrel in the CHAMPION PHOENIX trial (Cangrelor versus Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition). We explored the effects of cangrelor on myocardial infarction (MI) using different definitions and performed sensitivity analyses on the primary end point of the trial. A total of 462 patients (4.2%) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention had an MI as defined by the second universal definition. The majority of these MIs (n=433, 93.7%) were type 4a. Treatment with cangrelor reduced the incidence of MI at 48 hours (3.8% versus 4.7%; odds ratio [OR], 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.97; P=0.02). When the Society of Coronary Angiography and Intervention definition of periprocedural MI was applied to potential ischemic events, there were fewer total MIs (n=134); however, the effects of cangrelor on MI remained significant (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.46-0.92; P=0.01). Similar effects were seen in the evaluation of the effects of cangrelor on MIs with peak creatinine kinase-MB ≥10 times the upper limit of normal (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45-0.91) and those with peak creatinine kinase-MB ≥10 times the upper limit of normal, ischemic symptoms, or ECG changes (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). MIs defined by any of these definitions were associated with increased risk of death at 30 days. Treatment with cangrelor reduced the composite end point of death, MI (Society of Coronary Angiography and Intervention definition), ischemia-driven revascularization, or Academic Research Consortium definite stent thrombosis (1.4% versus 2.1%; OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.51-0.92). MI in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, regardless of definition, remains associated with increased risk of death

  5. Effectiveness of Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) versus standard occupational therapy for activity engagement and functioning among people with mental illness - a cluster RCT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Tjörnstrand, Carina; Sandlund, Mikael; Argentzell, Elisabeth

    2017-11-09

    Many with a mental illness have an impoverished everyday life with few meaningful activities and a sedentary lifestyle. The study aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of the 16-week Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) program, compared to care as usual (CAU), for people with mental illness in specialized and community-based psychiatric services. The main outcomes concerned different aspects of subjectively evaluated everyday activities, in terms of the engagement and satisfaction they bring, balance among activities, and activity level. Secondary outcomes pertained to various facets of well-being and functioning. It was hypothesized that those who received the BEL intervention would improve more than the comparison group regarding activity, well-being and functioning outcomes. BEL is a group and activity-based lifestyle intervention. CAU entailed active support, mainly standard occupational therapy. The BEL group included 133 participants and the CAU group 93. They completed self-report questionnaires targeting activity and well-being on three occasions - at baseline, after completed intervention (at 16 weeks) and at a six-month follow-up. A research assistant rated the participants' level of functioning and symptom severity on the same occasions. Non-parametric statistics were used since these instruments produced ordinal data. The BEL group improved more than the CAU group from baseline to 16 weeks on primary outcomes in terms of activity engagement (p life) more than the CAU group from baseline to the follow-up (p = 0.049). No differences were found at that time for activity balance, level of functioning and symptom severity. The BEL program was effective compared to CAU in terms of activity engagement. Their improvements were not, however, greater concerning other subjective perceptions, such as satisfaction with daily activities and self-rated health, and clustering effects lowered the dependability regarding findings of improvements on symptoms and

  6. Imatinib in combination with hydroxyurea versus hydroxyurea alone as oral therapy in patients with progressive pretreated glioblastoma resistant to standard dose temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dresemann, G.; Weller, M.; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann Maria

    2010-01-01

    A randomized, multicenter, open-label, phase 3 study of patients with progressive, recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) for whom front-line therapy had failed was conducted. This study was designed to determine whether combination therapy with imatinib and hydroxyurea (HU) has superior antitumor...... activity compared with HU monotherapy in the treatment of recurrent GBM. The target population consisted of patients with confirmed recurrent GBM and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2 who had completed previous treatment comprising surgical resection, irradiation therapy...

  7. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: The standard; Radiotherapie avec modulation d'intensite pour les cancers de la tete et du cou: le standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingon, P.; Crehange, G.; Chamois, J.; Khoury, C.; Truc, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Pr-Marion, 21079 Dijon cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Combined radical radiation therapy for head and neck carcinoma should be planned with intensity modulated beams to provide a rapid answer to patients' requirements in terms of quality of treatment. The most frequent late toxicity of radiation therapy is xerostomia, which may be prevented by using this technique able to significantly spare salivary glands irradiation. Selection of indications is a very important step. The objective of sparing salivary functions, strongly associated with optimization criteria of quality of life should be considered as a main objective in irradiation of head and neck tumours. The various possibilities offered by this technique allowing to boost a target volume included in prophylactically irradiated regions could offer the possibility to escalate the dose in selected patients. The feasibility of this process is currently validated in prospective studies. Finally, routine implementation of intensity modulated radiation therapy should be performed with strong and robust quality assurance procedures, ensuring that the expected benefit could be increased with the current developments by using rotational techniques. (authors)

  8. Implementation of clinical guidelines on physical therapy for patients with low back pain: randomized trial comparing patient outcomes after a standard and active implementation strategy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, Geertruida E; van Tulder, Maurits W; Hendriks, Erik J M; Koopmanschap, Marc a; Knol, Dirk L; Bouter, Lex M; Oostendorp, Rob a B

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: An active strategy was developed for the implementation of the clinical guidelines on physical therapy for patients with low back pain. The effect of this strategy on patients' physical functioning, coping strategy, and beliefs regarding their low back pain was studied.

  9. Impact of pretreatment variables on the outcome of {sup 131}I therapy with a standardized dose of 150 Gray in Graves` disease; Einfluss praetherapeutischer Variablen auf die Wirkung einer standardisierten {sup 131}J-Therapie mit 150 Gray beim Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeilschifter, J. [Heidelberg Univ., Radiologische Klinik (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Elser, H. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin I; Haufe, S. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin I; Ziegler, R. [Heidelberg Univ., Radiologische Klinik (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Georgi, P. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin I

    1997-04-01

    Aim: We examined the impact of several pretreatment variables on thyroid size and function in 61 patients with Graves` disease one year after a standardized [131]I treatment with 150 Gray. Methods: FT3, FT4, and TSH serum concentrations were determined before and 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months after therapy. Thyroid size was measured by ultrasound and scintigraphy before and one year after therapy. Results: One year after therapy, 30% of the patients had latent or manifest hyperthyroidism, 24% were euthyroid, and 46% had developed latent or manifest hypothyroidism. Age and initial thyroid volume were major predictors of posttherapeutical thyroid function. Thus, persistent hyperthyroidism was observed in 70% of the patients age 50 years and older with a thyroid size of more than 50 ml. With few exception, thyroid size markedly decreased after therapy. Initial thyroid size and age were also major predictors of posttherapeutical thyroid volume. Thyroid size normalized in all patients younger than 50 years of age, independent from initial thyroid size. Conclusion: Radioiodine treatment with 150 Gray causes a considerable decrease in thyroid size in most patients with Graves` disease. Age and initial thyroid volume are important determinants of thyroid function and size after therapy and should be considered in dose calculation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Bei 61 Patienten mit einem Morbus Basedow haben wir den Einfluss praetherapeutischer Variablen auf die Funktion und das Volumen der Schilddruese ein Jahr nach einer {sup 131}J-Therapie mit 150 Gray untersucht. Methoden: FT3, FT4, und TSH wurden vor Therapie und eineinhalb, 3, 6 und 12 Monate nach Therapie gemessen. Das Schilddruesenvolumen wurde vor Therapie und ein Jahr nach Therapie sonographisch und szintigraphisch bestimmt. Ergebnisse: Ein Jahr nach Therapie waren 30% der Patienten latent oder manifest hyperthyreot, 24% euthyreot, und 46% latent oder manifest hypothyreot. Lebensalter und Ausgangsvolumen der Schilddruese

  10. 10 Años innovando en el tratamiento de la infección tuberculosa latente: comparación entre pautas estándar y pautas cortas en tratamiento directamente observado 10 years of innovation in the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection: a comparison between standard and short course therapies in directly observed therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. López

    2011-06-01

    cortas 96 (23,41% pacientes, por los siguientes motivos (36 por abandono voluntario, 54 por reacciones adversas, 1 por libertad o traslado, 3 por causa desconocida, 1 por brote psicótico en enfermo psiquiátrico y 1 por hepatitis aguda no filiada. Se aprecian diferencias significativas en las tasas de finalización del TIT al comparar la pauta estándar 9H y las pautas cortas. Se observa una mayor probabilidad de finalización, estadísticamente significativa, con las pautas cortas: p: 0,006; Odds Ratio: 1.56 (LC95%: 1.14-2.12. Este diferencia en la finalización se debe a que la pauta 9H presenta un mayor número de abandonos voluntarios sin motivo aparente (p: 0.002; OR: 2.03 [1.30-3.15] y un mayor número de abandonos por conducción a otro centro o libertad (pObjectives: The main aim of the study is to compare the acceptance, adherence, tolerance and safety of short course therapies in comparison to a standard 9 month treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI in directly observed therapy (DOT and contrast this with previous results from a standard therapy in patient self-administered treatment. Materials and methods: Retrospective longitudinal study carried out at a medium sized prison. Period of inclusion covers 10 years, from January 2000 to December 2009. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC inclusion and exclusion criteria were used, as well as the ones included in the Program for Tuberculosis Prevention and Control in the Prison Environment. 4 LTBI therapies according to the preference of the patient and possible interactions with other treatments were utilised. Therapy I consisted of isoniazid (H in doses of 300 mg/day for 9 months (9H, therapy II with rifampicin for 2 months, twice a week, (2R2Z2 therapy III with rifampicin and isoniazid for 3 months (3RH and therapy IV with rifampicin for four months (4R. Treatment was administered under strict DOT conditions by nursing staff. Results: 902 patients were included, of which 810 accepted

  11. Monitoring Crohn's disease during anti-TNF-α therapy: validation of the magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) against a combined clinical reference standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prezzi, Davide; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Makanyanga, Jesica; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart Andrew; Vega, Roser

    2016-01-01

    To assess the ability of magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) to characterise Crohn's disease (CD) response to anti-TNF-α therapy. Thirty-six CD patients (median age 26 years, 20 males) commencing anti-TNF-α therapy with concomitant baseline MRI enterography (MRE) were identified retrospectively. Patients' clinical course was followed and correlated with subsequent MREs. Scan order was randomised and MEGS (a global activity score) was applied by two blinded radiologists. A physician's global assessment of the disease activity (remission, mild, moderate or severe) at the time of MRE was assigned. The cohort was divided into clinical responders and non-responders and MEGS compared according to activity status and treatment response. Interobserver agreement was assessed. Median MEGS decreased significantly between baseline and first follow-up in responders (28 versus 6, P < 0.001) but was unchanged in non-responders (26 versus 18, P = 0.28). The median MEGS was significantly lower in clinical remission (9) than in moderate (14) or severe (29) activity (P < 0.001). MEGS correlated significantly with clinical activity (r = 0.53; P < 0.001). Interobserver Bland-Altman limits of agreement (BA LoA) were -19.7 to 18.5. MEGS decreases significantly in clinical responders to anti-TNF-α therapy but not in non-responders, demonstrates good interobserver agreement and moderate correlation with clinical disease activity. (orig.)

  12. Revision of the Competency Standards for Occupational Therapy Driver Assessors: An overview of the evidence for the inclusion of cognitive and perceptual assessments within fitness-to-drive evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Sally M; Unsworth, Carolyn A

    2017-08-01

    Determination of fitness-to-drive after illness or injury is a complex process typically requiring a comprehensive driving assessment, including off-road and on-road assessment components. The competency standards for occupational therapy driver assessors (Victoria, Australia) define the requirements for performance of a comprehensive driving assessment, and we are currently revising these. Assessment of cognitive and perceptual skills forms an important part of the off-road assessment. The aim of this systematic review of systematic reviews (known as an overview) is to identify what evidence exists for including assessment of cognitive and perceptual skills within fitness-to-drive evaluations to inform revision of the competency standards. Five electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, OT Seeker) were systematically searched. Systematic review articles were appraised by two authors for eligibility. Methodological quality was independently assessed using the AMSTAR tool. Narrative analysis was conducted to summarise the content of eligible reviews. A total of 1228 results were retrieved. Fourteen reviews met the inclusion criteria. Reviews indicated that the components of cognition and perception most frequently identified as being predictive of fitness-to-drive were executive function (n = 13), processing speed (n = 12), visuospatial skills, attention, memory and mental flexibility (n = 11). Components less indicative were perception, concentration (n = 10), praxis (n = 9), language (n = 7) and neglect (n = 6). This overview of systematic reviews supports the inclusion of assessment of a range of cognitive and perceptual skills as key elements in a comprehensive driver assessment and therefore should be included in the revised competency standards for occupational therapy driver assessors. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  13. Outcomes of patients with chronic lung disease and severe aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement or standard therapy: insights from the PARTNER trial (placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Danny; Waksman, Ron; Barbash, Israel M; Kodali, Susheel K; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Xu, Ke; Minha, Sa'ar; Alu, Maria C; Szeto, Wilson Y; Thourani, Vinod H; Makkar, Raj; Kapadia, Samir; Satler, Lowell F; Webb, John G; Leon, Martin B; Pichard, Augusto D

    2014-01-28

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of chronic lung disease (CLD) on outcomes of severe aortic stenosis patients across all treatment modalities. Outcomes of patients with CLD undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have not been systematically examined. All patients who underwent TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve) trial, including the continued access registry (n = 2,553; 1,108 with CLD), were evaluated according to CLD clinical severity. Additionally, outcomes of CLD patients included in the randomization arms of the PARTNER trial were compared: Cohort A patients (high-risk operable) treated by either TAVR (n = 149) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR); (n = 138); and Cohort B patients (inoperable) treated by either TAVR (n = 72) or standard therapy only (n = 95). Among all TAVR-treated patients, at 1-year follow-up, patients with CLD had higher mortality than those without it (23.4% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.02). Baseline characteristics of CLD patients who underwent TAVR were similar to respective controls. In Cohort A, 2-year all-cause death rates were similar (TAVR 35.2% and SAVR 33.6%, p = 0.92), whereas in Cohort B, the death rate was lower after TAVR (52.0% vs. 69.6% after standard therapy only, p = 0.04). Independent predictors for mortality in CLD patients undergoing TAVR included poor mobility (6-min walk test CLD patients undergoing TAVR have worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR is better in these patients than standard therapy and is similar to SAVR. Although patients with CLD undergoing TAVR had worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR performed better in these patients than standard therapy and was similar to SAVR. However, CLD patients who were either poorly mobile or oxygen-dependent had poor outcomes. (THE PARTNER TRIAL: Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial; NCT00530894). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Effect of Standard vs Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: The NRG Oncology RTOG 0126 Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Jeff M; Moughan, Jennifer; Purdy, James; Bosch, Walter; Bruner, Deborah W; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Lau, Harold; Duclos, Marie; Parliament, Matthew; Morton, Gerard; Hamstra, Daniel; Seider, Michael; Lock, Michael I; Patel, Malti; Gay, Hiram; Vigneault, Eric; Winter, Kathryn; Sandler, Howard

    2018-03-15

    Optimizing radiation therapy techniques for localized prostate cancer can affect patient outcomes. Dose escalation improves biochemical control, but no prior trials were powered to detect overall survival (OS) differences. To determine whether radiation dose escalation to 79.2 Gy compared with 70.2 Gy would improve OS and other outcomes in prostate cancer. The NRG Oncology/RTOG 0126 randomized clinical trial randomized 1532 patients from 104 North American Radiation Therapy Oncology Group institutions March 2002 through August 2008. Men with stage cT1b to T2b, Gleason score 2 to 6, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 10 or greater and less than 20 or Gleason score of 7 and PSA less than 15 received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions or 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions. Time to OS measured from randomization to death due to any cause. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO)/Phoenix definitions were used for biochemical failure. Acute (≤90 days of treatment start) and late radiation therapy toxic effects (>90 days) were graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and the RTOG/European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme, respectively. With a median follow-up of 8.4 (range, 0.02-13.0) years in 1499 patients (median [range] age, 71 [33-87] years; 70% had PSA <10 ng/mL, 84% Gleason score of 7, 57% T1 disease), there was no difference in OS between the 751 men in the 79.2-Gy arm and the 748 men in the 70.2-Gy arm. The 8-year rates of OS were 76% with 79.2 Gy and 75% with 70.2 Gy (hazard ratio [HR], 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83-1.20; P = .98). The 8-year cumulative rates of distant metastases were 4% for the 79.2-Gy arm and 6% for the 70.2-Gy arm (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.42-1.01; P = .05). The ASTRO and Phoenix biochemical failure rates at 5 and 8 years were 31% and 20% with 79.2 Gy

  15. Comparison of Procalcitonin Guidance-Administered Antibiotics with Standard Guidelines on Antibiotic Therapy in Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections: A Retrospective Study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo; Wu, Gao; Wu, Shuxie; Wu, Hanbin

    2017-01-01

    To establish the efficacy of an algorithm based on the biomarker procalcitonin (PCT) to reduce antibiotic exposure in pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). The clinical data of 357 patients (standard group (n = 174) using SAS 9.1.3 software. The overall adverse effect rates were similar in both the PCT and standard groups: 42 (22.95%) and 51 (29.31%), respectively. The length of hospital stay was not significantly different between the PCT (9.96 ± 5.81 days) and standard groups (10.58 ± 4.24 days) (difference: -0.62%; 95% CI: -1.68 to 0.43). Antibiotic prescribing rates were significantly different in the PCT group compared to the standard group: 54.64% versus 83.91% (difference: -29.26%; 95% CI: -38.31, -20.22; p = 0.23). Mean duration of antibiotic exposure in the PCT group (3.98 ± 2.17 days) was lower than the standard groups (6.66 ± 5.59 days) (difference: -2.68%; 95% CI: -3.21 to -2.16). This study showed that PCT guidance of antibiotic treatment in children and adolescents with LRTI reduced the duration of antibiotic exposure and antibiotic prescribing rates, but did not affect the adverse effect rate and length of hospital stay. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the emergency department: a comparison with the standard fixed dose benzodiazepine regimen.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Eugene M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare symptom-triggered and standard benzodiazepine regimens for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in an emergency department clinical decision unit. The authors found that the symptom-triggered approach reduced cumulative benzodiazepine dose and length of stay.

  17. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macbeth Fergus R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus. VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN, a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. Methods/Design The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs, metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL, levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769

  18. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, Gareth O; Burns, Sarah; Noble, Simon I; Macbeth, Fergus R; Cohen, David; Maughan, Timothy S

    2009-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus). VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN), a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell) within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE) free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs), metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL), levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769

  19. Neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesler, Rudi

    1995-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy uses Xrays or electrons which have low LET (linear energy transfer); in contrast, particles such as neutrons with high LET have different radiobiological responses. In the late 1960s, clinical trials by Mary Catterall at the Hammersmith Hospital in London indicated that fast neutron radiation had clinical advantages for certain malignant tumours. Following these early clinical trials, several cyclotron facilities were built in the 1980s for fast neutron therapy, for example at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at UCLA. Most of these newer machines use extracted cyclotron proton beams in the range 42 to 66 MeV with beam intensities of 15 to 60 microamps. The proton beams are transported to dedicated therapy rooms, where neutrons are produced from beryllium targets. Second-generation clinical trials showed that accurate neutron beam delivery to the tumour site is more critical than for photon therapy. In order to achieve precise beam geometries, the extracted proton beams have to be transported through a gantry which can rotate around the patient and deliver beams from any angle; also the neutron beam outline (''field shape'') must be adjusted to extremely irregular shapes using a flexible collimation system. A therapy procedure has to be appropriately organized, with physicians, radiotherapists, nurses, medical physicists and other staff in attendance; other specialized equipment, such as CT or MRI scanners and radiation simulators must be made available. Neutron therapy is usually performed only in radiation oncology departments of major medical centres

  20. The efficacy and safety of standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua extract as maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinsoo; Chae, Jean; Lee, Sookyung; Kim, Kyungsuk; Eo, Wankyu; Kim, Sehyun; Choi, Woncheol; Cheon, Seong Ha

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy improves the survival of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but tumor progression is often inevitable. Strategies are needed to improve the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. Over recent years, there has been increasing interest in the role of maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy. We investigated the efficacy and safety of standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua Stokes extract (aRVS) as maintenance therapy in patients with non-progressive disease following first-line chemotherapy. We reviewed the medical records of 33 patients with advanced NSCLC, who started treatment with aRVS in a state of tumor regression or stable disease after completion of four or six cycles of induction chemotherapy at the Integrative Cancer Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong from June 2006 to April 2012. The primary objective of this study was progression-free survival (PFS) of aRVS as maintenance therapy. Secondary objectives included assessments of disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), and the safety of aRVS treatment. The median PFS was 5.2 months with a 6- and 12-month PFS rate of 40.6% and 12.9%, respectively. The DCR was 93.9% and the median OS was 34.8 months. The overall survival rates at 12, 24, and 36 months were 84.2%, 76.7% and 49.9%, respectively. We observed no hematologic toxicity, nephrotoxicity, or hepatotoxicity during aRVS treatment. In conclusion, maintenance therapy with aRVS for patients with advanced NSCLC is well-tolerated and offers encouraging improved PFS and OS compared with historical controls. Our data provide further evidence that aRVS may be used beyond disease progression in this clinical setting.

  1. Effects of standard and explicit cognitive bias modification and computer-administered cognitive-behaviour therapy on cognitive biases and social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Sirous; Mackintosh, Bundy; Illingworth, Jo; Gega, Lina; Langdon, Peter; Hoppitt, Laura

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the effects of a single session of Cognitive Bias Modification to induce positive Interpretative bias (CBM-I) using standard or explicit instructions and an analogue of computer-administered CBT (c-CBT) program on modifying cognitive biases and social anxiety. A sample of 76 volunteers with social anxiety attended a research site. At both pre- and post-test, participants completed two computer-administered tests of interpretative and attentional biases and a self-report measure of social anxiety. Participants in the training conditions completed a single session of either standard or explicit CBM-I positive training and a c-CBT program. Participants in the Control (no training) condition completed a CBM-I neutral task matched the active CBM-I intervention in format and duration but did not encourage positive disambiguation of socially ambiguous or threatening scenarios. Participants in both CBM-I programs (either standard or explicit instructions) and the c-CBT condition exhibited more positive interpretations of ambiguous social scenarios at post-test and one-week follow-up as compared to the Control condition. Moreover, the results showed that CBM-I and c-CBT, to some extent, changed negative attention biases in a positive direction. Furthermore, the results showed that both CBM-I training conditions and c-CBT reduced social anxiety symptoms at one-week follow-up. This study used a single session of CBM-I training, however multi-sessions intervention might result in more endurable positive CBM-I changes. A computerised single session of CBM-I and an analogue of c-CBT program reduced negative interpretative biases and social anxiety. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. A Prospective Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Incorporating a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Prostate Cancer: Long-term Outcomes Compared With Standard Image Guided IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, Michael H. [Midwestern University, Glendale, Arizona (United States); Schild, Steven E., E-mail: sschild@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Wong, William W.; Vora, Sujay A.; Keole, Sameer R.; Vargas, Carlos E.; Daniels, Thomas B.; Ezzell, Gary A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Nguyen, Ba D.; Roarke, Michael C. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: This report describes the long-term outcomes of a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), integrating a {sup 111}In capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan-directed simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients with T1N0M0 to T4N0M0 prostate cancer were enrolled, and their ProstaScint and pelvic computed tomography scans were coregistered for treatment planning. The entire prostate received 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions with IMRT, whereas regions of increased uptake on ProstaScint scans received 82 Gy as an SIB. Patients with intermediate- and high-risk disease also received 6 months and 12 months of adjuvant hormonal therapy, respectively. Results: The study enrolled 31 low-, 30 intermediate-, and 10 high-risk patients. The median follow-up was 120 months (range, 24-150 months). The 10-year biochemical control rates were 85% for the entire cohort and 84%, 84%, and 90% for patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease, respectively. The 10-year survival rate of the entire cohort was 69%. Pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL and boost volume of >10% of the prostate volume were significantly associated with poorer biochemical control and survival. The outcomes were compared with those of a cohort of 302 patients treated similarly but without the SIB and followed up for a median of 91 months (range, 6-138 months). The 5- and 10-year biochemical control rates were 86% and 61%, respectively, in patients without the SIB compared with 94% and 85%, respectively, in patients in this trial who received the SIB (P=.02). The cohort that received an SIB did not have increased toxicity. Conclusions: The described IMRT strategy, integrating multiple imaging modalities to administer 75.6 Gy to the entire prostate with a boost dose of 82 Gy, was feasible. The addition of the SIB was associated with greater biochemical control but not toxicity. Modern

  3. Do anti-malarials in Africa meet quality standards? The market penetration of non quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy in eight African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul N; Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-05-25

    Quality of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is important for ensuring malaria parasite clearance and protecting the efficacy of artemisinin-based therapies. The extent to which non quality-assured ACT (non-QAACT), or those not granted global regulatory approval, are available and used to treat malaria in endemic countries is poorly documented. This paper uses national and sub-national medicine outlet surveys conducted in eight study countries (Benin, Kinshasa and Kantanga [Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC], Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) between 2009 and 2015 to describe the non-QAACT market and to document trends in availability and distribution of non-QAACT in the public and private sector. In 2014/15, non-QAACT were most commonly available in Kinshasa (83%), followed by Katanga (53%), Nigeria (48%), Kenya (42%), and Uganda (33%). Non-QAACT accounted for 20% of the market share in the private sector in Kenya, followed by Benin and Uganda (19%), Nigeria (12%) and Zambia (8%); this figure was 27% in Katanga and 40% in Kinshasa. Public sector non-QAACT availability and distribution was much lower, with the exception of Zambia (availability, 85%; market share, 32%). Diverse generics and formulations were available, but non-QAACT were most commonly artemether-lumefantrine (AL) or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA PPQ), in tablet formulation, imported, and distributed in urban areas at either pharmacies or drug stores. The number of unique manufacturers supplying non-QAACT to each country ranged from 9 in Uganda to 92 in Nigeria. Addressing the availability and distribution of non-QAACT will require effective private sector engagement and evidence-based strategies to address provider and consumer demand for these products. Given the variation in non-QAACT markets observed across the eight study countries, active efforts to limit registration, importation and distribution of non-QAACT must be tailored to the country context

  4. A New Method for Treatment of Lymphedema of Limbs: Standardized Manual Massage with a New Device Linforoll in Conservative and Surgical Therapy Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Zaleska, Marzanna; Michelin, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    Edema fluid in lymphedematous limbs should be evacuated to sites where it can be absorbed. It should be moved either to the hypogastrium or arm/scapular regions along tissue channels or implanted silicon channels or through lymphovenous anastomoses. For that purpose, the manual lymphatic drainage of limb is an effective method. Standardization of manual massage applied force and timing becomes necessary. A device with known pressing area and continuously showing the applied force while moving it toward the root of the limb is needed. Moreover, force could be adjusted to the stiffness of the massaged tissues that varies at different levels of the limb. Results from such a device would be repeatable and reproducible by others. In this study we present data on tissue fluid hydromechanics obtained from 20 patients with obstructive limb lymphedema during massage with a massaging roller called Linforoll. Linforoll is composed of a hand piece with roller and pressure sensor connected wireless to the computer displaying the pressure curve of the applied force. Electron microscopy studies for checking eventual tissue changes were done. Linforoll provides the possibilities of: 1) regulating the applied force according to the hydromechanic conditions of the massaged tissues; 2) standardization of massage repeatable in the same patient; 3) decrease of limb volume; 4) evident increase in tissue elasticity; 5) application as a driving force for fluid flow along the surgically implanted tubing and vessels running to the lymphovenous shunts.

  5. A pilot cohort study of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of unresponsive thin endometrium resistant to standard therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, N; Kim, A; Michaeli, T; Lee, H-J; Shohat-Tal, A; Lazzaroni, E; Barad, D H

    2013-01-01

    Is thin endometrium unresponsive to standard treatments expandable by intrauterine perfusion with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)? This cohort study is supportive of the effectiveness of G-CSF in expanding chronically unresponsive endometria. In a previous small case series, we reported the successful off-label use of G-CSF in four consecutive patients, who had previously failed to expand their endometria beyond 6.9 mm with the use of standard treatments. In a prospective observational cohort pilot study over 18 months, we described 21 consecutive infertile women with endometria women had, based on age-specific FSH and anti-Müllerian hormone, an objective diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve and had failed 2.0 ± 2.1 prior IVF cycles elsewhere. With 5.2 ± 1.9 days between G-CSF perfusions and embryo transfers, endometrial thickness increased from 6.4 ± 1.4 to 9.3 ± 2.1 mm (P inventors on a number of awarded and still pending U.S. patents, none related to the materials presented here. N.G. is on the board of a medically related company, not in any way associated with the data presented here.

  6. Proton radiation therapy (prt) for pediatric optic pathway gliomas: comparison with 3d planned conventional photons and a standard photon technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, Martin; Hug, Eugen B.; Schaefer, Rosemary A.; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Miller, Daniel W.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Following adequate therapy, excellent long-term survival rates can be achieved for patients with optic pathway gliomas. Therefore, avoidance of treatment-related functional long-term sequelae is of utmost importance. Optimized sparing of normal tissue is of primary concern in the development of new treatment modalities. The present study compares proton radiation therapy (PRT) with a three-dimensional (3D)-planned multiport photon and a lateral beam photon technique for localized and extensive optic pathway tumors. Methods and Materials: Between February 1992 and November 1997, seven children with optic pathway gliomas underwent PRT. For this study, we computed proton, 3D photon, and lateral photon plans based on the same CT data sets, and using the same treatment planning software for all plans. Radiation exposure for normal tissue and discrete organs at risk was quantified based on dose-volume histograms. Results: Gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.9 cm 3 to 127.2 cm 3 . Conformity index (relation of encompassing isodose to GTV volume) was 2.3 for protons, 2.9 for 3D photons, and 7.3 for lateral photons. The relative increase of normal tissue (NT) encompassed at several isodose levels in relation to NT encompassed by the 95% proton isodose volume was computed. Relative NT volume of proton plan isodoses at the 95%, 90%, 80%, 50%, and 25% isodose level increased from 1 to 1.6, 2.8, 6.4, to a maximum of 13.3. Relative volumes for 3D photons were 1.6, 2.4, 3.8, 11.5, and 34.8. Lateral plan relative values were 6, 8.3, 11.5, 19.2, and 26.8. Analysis for small ( 3 ) and larger (> 80 cm 3 ) tumors showed that protons encompassed the smallest volumes of NT at all isodose levels. Comparable conformity and high-dose gradient were achieved for proton and 3D photon plans in small tumors. However, with increasing tumor volume and complexity, differences became larger. At the 50% isodose level, 3D photons were superior to lateral photons for small tumors; this

  7. Preoperative [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography standardized uptake value of neck lymph nodes may aid in selecting patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma for salvage therapy after relapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I. How; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Hsueh, Chuen; Lee, Li-Yu.; Lin, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2009-01-01

    Relapse of tumours in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is associated with a dismal outcome. In this prospective study, we sought to investigate the clinical significance of the preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the neck lymph nodes in selecting patients with OSCC for salvage therapy after relapse. Between 2002 and 2007, 108 patients with early relapse of OSCC (n=75) or late relapse of OSCC (n=33) were identified. Salvage therapy was performed in 47 patients. All patients underwent 2-deoxy-2[ 18 F]-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography during the 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed for 12 months or more after surgery or until death. The optimal cut-off value for the neck lymph node SUVmax (SUVnodal-max) was selected according to the 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rate. Independent risk factors were identified by Cox regression analysis. The mean follow-up for all patients was 20.3 months (41.1 months for surviving patients). In the early relapse group, several prognostic factors were identified in univariate and multivariate analyses, including a SUVnodal-max value of ≥4.2. A scoring system based on univariate analysis was formulated. Patients with a score of 0 had a better 5-year DSS than those with scores of 1 or higher (58% vs. 5%, p=0.0003). In patients with late relapse, a SUVnodal-max value of ≥4.2 had the highest prognostic value for predicting the 5-year DSS (45% vs. 0%, p=0.0005). Among patients with relapsed OSCC, the SUVnodal-max value may aid in selecting patients for salvage therapy. (orig.)

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Sensor-Augmented Pump Therapy with Low Glucose Suspend Versus Standard Insulin Pump Therapy in Two Different Patient Populations with Type 1 Diabetes in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, Stéphane; Smith-Palmer, Jayne; Valentine, William; Payet, Vincent; de Portu, Simona; Papo, Natalie; Cucherat, Michel; Hanaire, Helene

    2016-02-01

    Sensor-augmented pump therapy (SAP) provides a useful adjunct relative to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) alone. It can provide early warning of the onset of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia and has the functionality to suspend insulin delivery if sensor glucose levels fall below a predefined threshold. The aim was to assess the cost-effectiveness of SAP with low glucose suspend (LGS) versus CSII alone in type 1 diabetes. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using the CORE Diabetes Model, using published clinical input data. The analysis was performed in two cohorts: one with uncontrolled glycated hemoglobin at baseline and one at elevated risk for hypoglycemic events. The analysis was conducted from a healthcare payer perspective over a lifetime time horizon; future costs and clinical outcomes were discounted at 4% per annum. In patients with uncontrolled glycated hemoglobin at baseline, SAP + LGS resulted in improved discounted quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) versus CSII (10.55 quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs] vs. 9.36 QALYs) but higher mean lifetime direct costs (€84,972 vs. €49,171) resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €30,163 per QALY gained. In patients at elevated risk for hypoglycemia, the ICER was €22,005 per QALY gained for SAP + LGS versus CSII as lifetime costs were higher (€88,680 vs. €57,097), but QALE was also higher (18.46 QALYs vs. 18.30 QALYs). In France, projected improvements in outcomes with SAP + LGS versus CSII translated into an ICER generally considered as good value for money, particularly in patients who experience frequent and/or problematic hypoglycemic events.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF BIOFEEDBACK SESSIONS IN CLOSED LOOP OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND PACED BREATHING ON SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL DURING STANDARD DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. S. Belal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes of systolic blood pressure (SBP in biofeedback (BFB sessions with closed loop of paced breathing (PB and heart rate variability (HRV during standard drug therapy of arterial hypertension (AH was studied. 275 patients with 1-3 degree of AH (143 men and 132 women, mean age 58,55 ± 7,99 years was divided into two comparable groups: 1 - BFB (139 patients in investigated PB loop, 2 - control group (136 patients with BFB without PB. In both groups was performed 10 sessions of BFB. Changes of SBP depending on the stage and degree of AH, gender and age was assessed. BP was measured by the method of Korotkov’s with monometer Microlife BP AG1-20 in same conditions. Data were processed by parametric and nonparametric statistics. It is proved that the use of biofeedback in the loop of PB and HRV significantly (p < 0.01 exceeds in efficiency an isolated drug therapy in control of SBP at any stage and degree of AH in patients of both sexes in all age groups. Extent of the effect increases with the stage and degree of the disease and not related to the sex and age of the patient. Findings allow to recommend this technique in clinical practice.

  10. Survival, safety, and prognostic factors for outcome with Regorafenib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to standard therapies: results from a multicenter study (REBACCA) nested within a compassionate use program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenis, Antoine; Fouchardiere, Christelle de la; Paule, Bernard; Burtin, Pascal; Tougeron, David; Wallet, Jennifer; Dourthe, Louis-Marie; Etienne, Pierre-Luc; Mineur, Laurent; Clisant, Stéphanie; Phelip, Jean-Marc; Kramar, Andrew; Andre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Randomized trials have shown a survival benefit for regorafenib over placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that progressed after standard therapies. We evaluated survival and safety outcomes in patients treated with regorafenib in a real-life setting. REBECCA is a cohort study nested within a compassionate use program designed to evaluate survival, safety, and potential prognostic factors for outcome associated with regorafenib in patients with mCRC refractory to standard therapies. Treatment effects according to various patient and tumour characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models. Of 1178 patients in the compassionate use program, 654 were in the full analysis set. Median follow-up was 16.5 months. Median survival was 5.6 months. The 12-month survival rate was 22 %. Survival was independently and unfavourably affected by the following variables: poor performance status, short time from initial diagnosis of metastases to the start of regorafenib, low initial regorafenib dose, >3 metastatic sites, presence of liver metastases, and KRAS mutations. We identified prognostic groups of patients with low, intermediate, and high risk of death, with a median survival of 9.2, 5.2, and 2.5 months, respectively. Five-hundred-twenty-four patients (80 %) experienced at least one regorafenib-related adverse event, most commonly, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction, diarrhea, anorexia, arterial hypertension, and mucositis. The safety and efficacy profile of regorafenib in REBECCA are similar to those in randomized trials. Our prognostic model identified subgroups of mCRC patients who derived a minimal and maximum benefit from regorafenib. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02310477

  11. The cost and cost-effectiveness of expedited partner therapy compared with standard partner referral for the treatment of chlamydia or gonorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gift, Thomas L; Kissinger, Patricia; Mohammed, Hamish; Leichliter, Jami S; Hogben, Matthew; Golden, Matthew R

    2011-11-01

    Partner treatment is an important component of sexually transmitted disease control. Several randomized controlled trials have compared expedited partner treatment (EPT) to unassisted standard partner referral (SR). All of these trials found that EPT significantly increased partner treatment over SR, whereas some found that EPT significantly lowered reinfection rates in index patients. We collected cost data to assess the payer-specific, health care system, and societal-level cost of EPT and SR. We used data on partner treatment and index patient reinfection rates from 2 randomized controlled trials examining EPT and SR for patients diagnosed with chlamydia or gonorrhea. Additional elements were estimated or drawn from the literature. We used a Monte Carlo simulation to assess the impact on cost and effectiveness of varying several variables simultaneously, and calculated threshold values for selected variables at which EPT and SR costs per patient were equal. From a health care system or societal perspective, EPT was less costly and it treated more partners than SR. From the perspective of an individual payer, EPT was less costly than SR if ≥32% to 37% of male index patients' female partners or ≥29% of female index patients' male partners received care from the same payer. EPT has a lower cost from a societal or health care system perspective than SR and treats more partners. Individual payers may find EPT to be more costly than SR, depending on how many of their patients' partners receive care from the same payer.

  12. Standardized Index of Shape (SIS): a quantitative DCE-MRI parameter to discriminate responders by non-responders after neoadjuvant therapy in LARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Petrillo, Mario; Granata, Vincenza [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Radiology; Sansone, Mario [Naples Univ. ' ' Federico II' ' (Italy). Dept. of Biomedical, Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering; Avallone, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology; Delrio, Paolo [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Gastrointestinal surgical Oncology; Pecori, Biagio [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy; Tatangelo, Fabiana [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Diagnostic Pathology; Ciliberto, Gennaro [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the potential of DCE-MRI to discriminate responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). We investigated several shape parameters for the time-intensity curve (TIC) in order to identify the best combination of parameters between two linear parameter classifiers. Seventy-four consecutive patients with LARC were enrolled in a prospective study approved by our ethics committee. Each patient gave written informed consent. After surgery, pathological TNM and tumour regression grade (TRG) were estimated. DCE-MRI semi-quantitative analysis (sqMRI) was performed to identify the best parameter or parameter combination to discriminate responders from non-responders in response monitoring to CRT. Percentage changes of TIC shape descriptors from the baseline to the presurgical scan were assessed and correlated with TRG. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and linear classifier were applied. Forty-six patients (62.2 %) were classified as responders, while 28 subjects (37.8 %) were considered as non-responders. sqMRI reached a sensitivity of 93.5 % and a specificity of 82.1 % combining the percentage change in Maximum Signal Difference (ΔMSD) and Wash-out Slope (ΔWOS), the Standardized Index of Shape (SIS). SIS obtains the best result in discriminating responders from non-responders after CRT in LARC, with a cut-off value of -3.0 %. (orig.)

  13. Is the alpha-beta ratio of prostate cancer really low? A prospective, non-randomized trial comparing standard and hyperfractionated conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Italia, Corrado; Montanaro, Paolo; Lanceni, Angelo; Lattuada, Paola; Magnani, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio; Nahum, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objectives of the current study were to compare genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities as well as biochemical control (bRFS) in prostate cancer, utilizing conventional (2.0 Gy daily) (STD) or hyperfractionated (HFX) conformal irradiation (CRT). HFX (1.2 Gy BID) was chosen as a radiobiological method to try to reduce long term sequelae without compromising local control. Patients and methods: Three-hundred-and-seventy consecutive patients (pts) entered this prospective, non-randomized trial in the period January 1993-January 2003; 209 were treated with STD and 161 with HFX CRT. All were evaluable for acute toxicity analysis, 179 (STD) and 151 pts (HFX) being evaluable for late sequelae and bRFS analyses. Pt characteristics were not statistically different in the two groups. CRT consisted of a 4-field technique for prostate and/or pelvic nodes and a 5-field boost with rectal shielding. Median doses were 74 and 79.2 Gy for STD and HFX patients respectively, the latter dose being isoeffective for tumour control assuming α/β=10 (EQD 2 =73.9 Gy). Median follow-up was 29.4 months (25.2 mos for STD; 37.7 mos for HFX; P<0.01). The two regimens were compared in terms of acute and late GU and GI toxicities and 5-year bRFS by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Acute grade≥2 GU toxicity was higher in the STD group (48.6% versus 37.3% in HFX, P=0.03), while no significant difference was found for acute GI toxicity. Late grade≥2 GU and GI toxicities were lower in the HFX group (5-year actuarial rate: GU: 10.1% versus 20.3%, P=0.05; GI: 6.0% versus 10.6%, P=0.18). Five-year bRFS were 70% (±13.8%, 95% CI) and 82.6% (±7.2%) for STD and HFX, respectively (P=0.44); a trend favouring HFX was found in the subgroup of pts who did not receive hormonal therapy (5-year bRFS: 85.9%±12.4% versus 63.9%±23.8%, P=0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed only risk groups and age statistically related to bRFS but not fractionation

  14. Prospective evaluation of [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M.; Krause, Bernd J. [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kundt, Guenther [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Rostock (Germany); Retz, Margitta; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Thalgott, Mark [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [{sup 11}C] Choline uptake (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}), CT derived Houndsfield units (HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean}), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean,} and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} (early and late) and changes of PSA{sub early} and PSA{sub late} were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUV{sub max

  15. Prospective evaluation of [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M.; Krause, Bernd J.; Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus; Kundt, Guenther; Retz, Margitta; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Thalgott, Mark; Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens; Rummeny, Ernst J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [ 11 C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [ 11 C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [ 11 C] Choline uptake (SUV max , SUV mean ), CT derived Houndsfield units (HU max , HU mean ), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUV max , SUV mean , HU max , HU mean, and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUV max and SUV mean (early and late) and changes of PSA early and PSA late were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUV max and SUV mean was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUV max and SUV mean were statistically significantly higher in nPD (applying clinical

  16. Extra Physiotherapy in Critical Care (EPICC) Trial Protocol: a randomised controlled trial of intensive versus standard physical rehabilitation therapy in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kirsty; Wright, Stephen E; Watson, Gillian; Baker, Catherine; Stafford, Victoria; Wade, Clare; Chadwick, Thomas J; Mansfield, Leigh; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Shen, Jing; Deverill, Mark; Bonner, Stephen; Hugill, Keith; Howard, Philip; Henderson, Andrea; Roy, Alistair; Furneval, Julie; Baudouin, Simon V

    2015-05-25

    Patients discharged from Critical Care suffer from excessive longer term morbidity and mortality. Physical and mental health measures of quality of life show a marked and immediate fall after admission to Critical Care with some recovery over time. However, physical function is still significantly reduced at 6 months. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guideline on rehabilitation after critical illness, identified the need for high-quality randomised controlled trials to determine the most effective rehabilitation strategy for critically ill patients at risk of critical illness-associated physical morbidity. In response to this, we will conduct a randomised controlled trial, comparing physiotherapy aimed at early and intensive patient mobilisation with routine care. We hypothesise that this intervention will improve physical outcomes and the mental health and functional well-being of survivors of critical illness. 308 adult patients who have received more than 48 h of non-invasive or invasive ventilation in Critical Care will be recruited to a patient-randomised, parallel group, controlled trial, comparing two intensities of physiotherapy. Participants will be randomised to receive either standard or intensive physiotherapy for the duration of their Critical Care admission. Outcomes will be recorded on Critical Care discharge, at 3 and 6 months following initial recruitment to the study. The primary outcome measure is physical health at 6 months, as measured by the SF-36 Physical Component Summary. Secondary outcomes include assessment of mental health, activities of daily living, delirium and ventilator-free days. We will also include a health economic analysis. The trial has ethical approval from Newcastle and North Tyneside 2 Research Ethics Committee (11/NE/0206). There is a Trial Oversight Committee including an independent chair. The results of the study will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals and

  17. Novel 3D ultrasound image-based biomarkers based on a feature selection from a 2D standardized vessel wall thickness map: a tool for sensitive assessment of therapies for carotid atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Bernard; Bing, Li; Chow, Tommy W S, E-mail: bcychiu@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: bingli5@student.cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: eetchow@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-09-07

    With the advent of new therapies and management strategies for carotid atherosclerosis, there is a parallel need for measurement tools or biomarkers to evaluate the efficacy of these new strategies. 3D ultrasound has been shown to provide reproducible measurements of plaque area/volume and vessel wall volume. However, since carotid atherosclerosis is a focal disease that predominantly occurs at bifurcations, biomarkers based on local plaque change may be more sensitive than global volumetric measurements in demonstrating efficacy of new therapies. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop a biomarker that is based on the local distribution of vessel-wall-plus-plaque thickness change (VWT-Change) that has occurred during the course of a clinical study. To allow comparison between different treatment groups, the VWT-Change distribution of each subject must first be mapped to a standardized domain. In this study, we developed a technique to map the 3D VWT-Change distribution to a 2D standardized template. We then applied a feature selection technique to identify regions on the 2D standardized map on which subjects in different treatment groups exhibit greater difference in VWT-Change. The proposed algorithm was applied to analyse the VWT-Change of 20 subjects in a placebo-controlled study of the effect of atorvastatin (Lipitor). The average VWT-Change for each subject was computed (i) over all points in the 2D map and (ii) over feature points only. For the average computed over all points, 97 subjects per group would be required to detect an effect size of 25% that of atorvastatin in a six-month study. The sample size is reduced to 25 subjects if the average were computed over feature points only. The introduction of this sensitive quantification technique for carotid atherosclerosis progression/regression would allow many proof-of-principle studies to be performed before a more costly and longer study involving a larger population is held to confirm the treatment

  18. Novel 3D ultrasound image-based biomarkers based on a feature selection from a 2D standardized vessel wall thickness map: a tool for sensitive assessment of therapies for carotid atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Li Bing; Chow, Tommy W S

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of new therapies and management strategies for carotid atherosclerosis, there is a parallel need for measurement tools or biomarkers to evaluate the efficacy of these new strategies. 3D ultrasound has been shown to provide reproducible measurements of plaque area/volume and vessel wall volume. However, since carotid atherosclerosis is a focal disease that predominantly occurs at bifurcations, biomarkers based on local plaque change may be more sensitive than global volumetric measurements in demonstrating efficacy of new therapies. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop a biomarker that is based on the local distribution of vessel-wall-plus-plaque thickness change (VWT-Change) that has occurred during the course of a clinical study. To allow comparison between different treatment groups, the VWT-Change distribution of each subject must first be mapped to a standardized domain. In this study, we developed a technique to map the 3D VWT-Change distribution to a 2D standardized template. We then applied a feature selection technique to identify regions on the 2D standardized map on which subjects in different treatment groups exhibit greater difference in VWT-Change. The proposed algorithm was applied to analyse the VWT-Change of 20 subjects in a placebo-controlled study of the effect of atorvastatin (Lipitor). The average VWT-Change for each subject was computed (i) over all points in the 2D map and (ii) over feature points only. For the average computed over all points, 97 subjects per group would be required to detect an effect size of 25% that of atorvastatin in a six-month study. The sample size is reduced to 25 subjects if the average were computed over feature points only. The introduction of this sensitive quantification technique for carotid atherosclerosis progression/regression would allow many proof-of-principle studies to be performed before a more costly and longer study involving a larger population is held to confirm the treatment

  19. ['Gold standard', not 'golden standard'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    In medical literature, both 'gold standard' and 'golden standard' are employed to describe a reference test used for comparison with a novel method. The term 'gold standard' in its current sense in medical research was coined by Rudd in 1979, in reference to the monetary gold standard. In the same

  20. Decommissioning standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crofford, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    EPA has agreed to establish a series of environmental standards for the safe disposal of radioactive waste through participation in the Interagency Review Group on Nuclear Waste Management (IRG). One of the standards required under the IRG is the standard for decommissioning of radioactive contaminated sites, facilities, and materials. This standard is to be proposed by December 1980 and promulgated by December 1981. Several considerations are important in establishing these standards. This study includes discussions of some of these considerations and attempts to evaluate their relative importance. Items covered include: the form of the standards, timing for decommissioning, occupational radiation protection, costs and financial provisions. 4 refs

  1. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy

  2. Sample size requirements for separating out the effects of combination treatments: Randomised controlled trials of combination therapy vs. standard treatment compared to factorial designs for patients with tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrar Jeremy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In certain diseases clinical experts may judge that the intervention with the best prospects is the addition of two treatments to the standard of care. This can either be tested with a simple randomized trial of combination versus standard treatment or with a 2 × 2 factorial design. Methods We compared the two approaches using the design of a new trial in tuberculous meningitis as an example. In that trial the combination of 2 drugs added to standard treatment is assumed to reduce the hazard of death by 30% and the sample size of the combination trial to achieve 80% power is 750 patients. We calculated the power of corresponding factorial designs with one- to sixteen-fold the sample size of the combination trial depending on the contribution of each individual drug to the combination treatment effect and the strength of an interaction between the two. Results In the absence of an interaction, an eight-fold increase in sample size for the factorial design as compared to the combination trial is required to get 80% power to jointly detect effects of both drugs if the contribution of the less potent treatment to the total effect is at least 35%. An eight-fold sample size increase also provides a power of 76% to detect a qualitative interaction at the one-sided 10% significance level if the individual effects of both drugs are equal. Factorial designs with a lower sample size have a high chance to be underpowered, to show significance of only one drug even if both are equally effective, and to miss important interactions. Conclusions Pragmatic combination trials of multiple interventions versus standard therapy are valuable in diseases with a limited patient pool if all interventions test the same treatment concept, it is considered likely that either both or none of the individual interventions are effective, and only moderate drug interactions are suspected. An adequately powered 2 × 2 factorial design to detect effects of

  3. Sample size requirements for separating out the effects of combination treatments: randomised controlled trials of combination therapy vs. standard treatment compared to factorial designs for patients with tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Marcel; Heemskerk, Dorothee; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Caws, Maxine; Farrar, Jeremy; Day, Jeremy

    2011-02-02

    In certain diseases clinical experts may judge that the intervention with the best prospects is the addition of two treatments to the standard of care. This can either be tested with a simple randomized trial of combination versus standard treatment or with a 2 x 2 factorial design. We compared the two approaches using the design of a new trial in tuberculous meningitis as an example. In that trial the combination of 2 drugs added to standard treatment is assumed to reduce the hazard of death by 30% and the sample size of the combination trial to achieve 80% power is 750 patients. We calculated the power of corresponding factorial designs with one- to sixteen-fold the sample size of the combination trial depending on the contribution of each individual drug to the combination treatment effect and the strength of an interaction between the two. In the absence of an interaction, an eight-fold increase in sample size for the factorial design as compared to the combination trial is required to get 80% power to jointly detect effects of both drugs if the contribution of the less potent treatment to the total effect is at least 35%. An eight-fold sample size increase also provides a power of 76% to detect a qualitative interaction at the one-sided 10% significance level if the individual effects of both drugs are equal. Factorial designs with a lower sample size have a high chance to be underpowered, to show significance of only one drug even if both are equally effective, and to miss important interactions. Pragmatic combination trials of multiple interventions versus standard therapy are valuable in diseases with a limited patient pool if all interventions test the same treatment concept, it is considered likely that either both or none of the individual interventions are effective, and only moderate drug interactions are suspected. An adequately powered 2 x 2 factorial design to detect effects of individual drugs would require at least 8-fold the sample size of the

  4. [Music therapy and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a predominantly non-verbal psychotherapy based on music improvisation, embedded in a therapeutic relationship. This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression. We reviewed the literature on recent research into music therapy and depression, reporting on the methods used and the results achieved, and we assessed the current position of music therapy for depression in the context of evidence-based scientific research. A wide variety of research methods was used to investigate the effects of using music therapy as a psychotherapy. Most studies focused usually on the added value that music therapy brings to the standard form of psychiatric treatment, when administered with or without psychopharmacological support. Music therapy produced particularly significant and favourable results when used to treat patients with depression. Current research into music therapy and depression points to a significant and persistent reduction in patients' symptoms and to improvements in their quality of life. However, further research is needed with regard to the best methods of illustrating the effects of music therapy.

  5. Accounting standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellinga, B.; Mügge, D.

    2014-01-01

    The European and global regulation of accounting standards have witnessed remarkable changes over the past twenty years. In the early 1990s, EU accounting practices were fragmented along national lines and US accounting standards were the de facto global standards. Since 2005, all EU listed

  6. Standardization Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Specifications and Standards; Guide Specifications; CIDs; and NGSs . Learn. Perform. Succeed. STANDARDIZATION DOCUMENTS Federal Specifications Commercial...national or international standardization document developed by a private sector association, organization, or technical society that plans ...Maintain lessons learned • Examples: Guidance for application of a technology; Lists of options Learn. Perform. Succeed. DEFENSE HANDBOOK

  7. Standardized inidividual therapy: a contradiction in terms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Tine; Jakobsen, Turf Böcker

    2009-01-01

    This article explores a paradox that was identified during an ethnographic study of two Danish therapeutic residential institutions for children with emotional and behavioural problems. The key objective of these institutions is to provide specialized treatment for the individual child. However...

  8. Communications standards

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes, A V

    1986-01-01

    Communications Standards deals with the standardization of computer communication networks. This book examines the types of local area networks (LANs) that have been developed and looks at some of the relevant protocols in more detail. The work of Project 802 is briefly discussed, along with a protocol which has developed from one of the LAN standards and is now a de facto standard in one particular area, namely the Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP). Factors that affect the usage of networks, such as network management and security, are also considered. This book is divided into three se

  9. Effect of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy vs Standard Wound Management on 12-Month Disability Among Adults With Severe Open Fracture of the Lower Limb: The WOLLF Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew L; Achten, Juul; Bruce, Julie; Tutton, Elizabeth; Petrou, Stavros; Lamb, Sarah E; Parsons, Nick R

    2018-06-12

    Open fractures of the lower limb occur when a broken bone penetrates the skin. There can be major complications from these fractures, which can be life-changing. To assess the disability, rate of deep infection, and quality of life in patients with severe open fracture of the lower limb treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) vs standard wound management after the first surgical debridement of the wound. Multicenter randomized trial performed in the UK Major Trauma Network, recruiting 460 patients aged 16 years or older with a severe open fracture of the lower limb from July 2012 through December 2015. Final outcome data were collected through November 2016. Exclusions were presentation more than 72 hours after injury and inability to complete questionnaires. NPWT (n = 226) in which an open-cell solid foam or gauze was placed over the surface of the wound and connected to a suction pump, creating a partial vacuum over the dressing, vs standard dressings not involving application of negative pressure (n = 234). Disability Rating Index score (range, 0 [no disability] to 100 [completely disabled]) at 12 months was the primary outcome measure, with a minimal clinically important difference of 8 points. Secondary outcomes were complications including deep infection and quality of life (score ranged from 1 [best possible] to -0.59 [worst possible]; minimal clinically important difference, 0.08) collected at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Among 460 patients who were randomized (mean age, 45.3 years; 74% men), 88% (374/427) of available study participants completed the trial. There were no statistically significant differences in the patients' Disability Rating Index score at 12 months (mean score, 45.5 in the NPWT group vs 42.4 in the standard dressing group; mean difference, -3.9 [95% CI, -8.9 to 1.2]; P = .13), in the number of deep surgical site infections (16 [7.1%] in the NPWT group vs 19 [8.1%] in the standard dressing group; difference, 1.0% [95

  10. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  11. Randomized Phase III Trial to Test Accelerated Versus Standard Fractionation in Combination With Concurrent Cisplatin for Head and Neck Carcinomas in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0129 Trial: Long-Term Report of Efficacy and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, K. Kian; Weber, Randal S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Soulieres, Denis; Kim, Harold; Silverman, Craig; Raben, Adam; Galloway, Thomas J.; Fortin, André; Gore, Elizabeth; Westra, William H.; Chung, Christine H.; Jordan, Richard C.; Gillison, Maura L.; List, Marcie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We tested the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus accelerated fractionation with a concomitant boost (AFX-C) versus standard fractionation (SFX) in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma (LA-HNC). Patients and Methods Patients had stage III to IV carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx. Radiation therapy schedules were 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks (SFX) or 72 Gy in 42 fractions over 6 weeks (AFX-C). Cisplatin doses were 100 mg/m2 once every 3 weeks for two (AFX-C) or three (SFX) cycles. Toxicities were scored by using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by using the one-sided log-rank test. Locoregional failure (LRF) and distant metastasis (DM) rates were estimated by using the cumulative incidence method and Gray's test. Results In all, 721 of 743 patients were analyzable (361, SFX; 360, AFX-C). At a median follow-up of 7.9 years (range, 0.3 to 10.1 years) for 355 surviving patients, no differences were observed in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.18; P = .37; 8-year survival, 48% v 48%), PFS (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.24; P = .52; 8-year estimate, 42% v 41%), LRF (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.38; P = .78; 8-year estimate, 37% v 39%), or DM (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.24; P = .16; 8-year estimate, 15% v 13%). For oropharyngeal cancer, p16-positive patients had better OS than p16-negative patients (HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.42; P < .001; 8-year survival, 70.9% v 30.2%). There were no statistically significant differences in the grade 3 to 5 acute or late toxicities between the two arms and p-16 status. Conclusion When combined with cisplatin, AFX-C neither improved outcome nor increased late toxicity in patients with LA-HNC. Long-term high survival

  12. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  13. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided by a psychologist, ...

  14. Training Standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation

  15. Effluent standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisler, G C [Pennsylvania State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    At the conference there was a considerable interest in research reactor standards and effluent standards in particular. On the program, this is demonstrated by the panel discussion on effluents, the paper on argon 41 measured by Sims, and the summary paper by Ringle, et al. on the activities of ANS research reactor standards committee (ANS-15). As a result, a meeting was organized to discuss the proposed ANS standard on research reactor effluents (15.9). This was held on Tuesday evening, was attended by members of the ANS-15 committee who were present at the conference, participants in the panel discussion on the subject, and others interested. Out of this meeting came a number of excellent suggestions for changes which will increase the utility of the standard, and a strong recommendation that the effluent standard (15.9) be combined with the effluent monitoring standard. It is expected that these suggestions and recommendations will be incorporated and a revised draft issued for comment early this summer. (author)

  16. Nuclear standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtner, N.; Becker, K.; Bashir, M.

    1981-01-01

    This compilation of all nuclear standards available to the authors by mid 1980 represents the third, carefully revised edition of a catalogue which was first published in 1975 as EUR 5362. In this third edition several changes have been made. The title has been condensed. The information has again been carefully up-dated, covering all changes regarding status, withdrawal of old standards, new projects, amendments, revisions, splitting of standards into several parts, combination of several standards into one, etc., as available to the authors by mid 1980. The speed with which information travels varies and requires in many cases rather tedious and cumbersome inquiries. Also, the classification scheme has been revised with the goal of better adjustment to changing situations and priorities. Whenever it turned out to be difficult to attribute a standard to a single subject category, multiple listings in all relevant categories have been made. As in previous editions, within the subcategories the standards are arranged by organization (in Categorie 2.1 by country) alphabetically and in ascending numerical order. It covers all relevant areas of power reactors, the fuel cycle, radiation protection, etc., from the basic laws and governmental regulations, regulatory guides, etc., all the way to voluntary industrial standards and codes of pratice. (orig./HP)

  17. MATE standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, R. E.

    1982-11-01

    The MATE (Modular Automatic Test Equipment) program was developed to combat the proliferation of unique, expensive ATE within the Air Force. MATE incorporates a standard management approach and a standard architecture designed to implement a cradle-to-grave approach to the acquisition of ATE and to significantly reduce the life cycle cost of weapons systems support. These standards are detailed in the MATE Guides. The MATE Guides assist both the Air Force and Industry in implementing the MATE concept, and provide the necessary tools and guidance required for successful acquisition of ATE. The guides also provide the necessary specifications for industry to build MATE-qualifiable equipment. The MATE architecture provides standards for all key interfaces of an ATE system. The MATE approach to the acquisition and management of ATE has been jointly endorsed by the commanders of Air Force Systems Command and Air Force Logistics Command as the way of doing business in the future.

  18. Red light photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis using 37 J/cm2 : Fractionated irradiation with 12.3 mW/cm2 after 30 minutes incubation time compared to standard continuous irradiation with 75 mW/cm2 after 3 hours incubation time using a mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Baert, Gregory; Devos, Laura; Thecua, Elise; Vicentini, Claire; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2017-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for dermatological conditions. Although, the standard PDT protocol for the treatment of actinic keratoses in Europe has shown to be effective, treatment-associated pain is often observed in patients. Different modifications to this protocol attempted to decrease pain have been investigated. The decrease in fluence rate seems to be a promising solution. Moreover, it has been suggested that light fractionation significantly increases the efficacy of PDT. Based on a flexible light-emitting textile, the FLEXITHERALIGHT device specifically provides a fractionated illumination at a fluence rate more than six times lower than that of the standard protocol. In a recently completed clinical trial of PDT for the treatment of actinic keratosis, the non-inferiority of a protocol involving illumination with the FLEXITHERALIGHT device after a short incubation time and referred to as the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol has been assessed compared to the standard protocol. In this paper, we propose a comparison of the two above mentioned 635 nm red light protocols with 37 J/cm 2 in the PDT treatment of actinic keratosis: the standard protocol and the FLEXITHERALIGHT one through a mathematical modeling. This mathematical modeling, which slightly differs from the one we have already published, enables the local damage induced by the therapy to be estimated. The comparison performed in terms of the local damage induced by the therapy demonstrates that the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol with lower fluence rate, light fractionation and shorter incubation time is somewhat less efficient than the standard protocol. Nevertheless, from the clinical trial results, the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol results in non-inferior response rates compared to the standard protocol. This finding raises the question of whether the PDT local damage achieved by the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol (respectively, the standard protocol

  19. Bicalutamide as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: first analysis of the early prostate cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, William A; Wirth, Manfred P; McLeod, David G

    2002-01-01

    We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer.......We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  20. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  1. Local rhBMP-12 on an Absorbable Collagen Sponge as an Adjuvant Therapy for Rotator Cuff Repair - A Phase 1, Randomized, Standard of Care Control, Multicenter Study: Safety and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Stefan; Ide, Junji; Van Noort, Arthur; Mochizuki, Yu; Ochi, Hiroshi; Marraffino, Shannon; Sridharan, Sudhakar; Rudicel, Sally; Itoi, Eiji

    2015-08-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-12 (rhBMP-12) has been shown to induce tendon and ligament formation in rats and to improve tendon healing; however, the safety and feasibility of implanting rhBMP-12/absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) in humans are not known. To investigate the safety and feasibility of rhBMP-12 on an ACS as an adjuvant therapy in open rotator cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. This study consisted of 20 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Patients were randomized either to standard of care (SOC) treatment (open rotator cuff repair) or to receive 0.015 mg/mL rhBMP-12/ACS and SOC treatment during their open rotator cuff repair (rhBMP-12/ACS group) at a rate of 1/4 SOC/rhBMP-12/ACS. The feasibility of implanting the product and the safety of the product were evaluated during the 1-year follow-up period. The evaluation involved up to 10 postoperative visits, which included physical examinations, radiographs, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans with an emphasis on heterotopic ossification (HO), pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, laboratory evaluations, and local and systemic adverse events at specified time points. Small amounts of HO were seen on follow-up CT scans in 10 of 16 patients in the rhBMP-12/ACS group and in 2 of 3 patients in the SOC group. HO did not increase at 26 weeks and was not associated with any adverse events or unsatisfactory clinical outcomes. Pharmacokinetics demonstrated that circulating levels of rhBMP-12 were not detectable after administration. Five of 16 patients showed a postoperative immunogenic response but did not show any correlating adverse events. Complete healing of the rotator cuff was observed in 14 of 16 patients; 2 of 16 imaging results could not be analyzed because of artifacts in the rhBMP-12 group on MRI scans. In the SOC group, 1 of 4 patients showed a retear at 12 weeks after surgery. The use of rhBMP-12/ACS has been shown

  2. Real-Time 3D Image Guidance Using a Standard LINAC: Measured Motion, Accuracy, and Precision of the First Prospective Clinical Trial of Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring-Guided Gating for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keall, Paul J; Ng, Jin Aun; Juneja, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    for prostate cancer radiation therapy. In this paper we report on the measured motion accuracy and precision using real-time KIM-guided gating. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Imaging and motion information from the first 200 fractions from 6 patient prostate cancer radiation therapy volumetric modulated arc therapy...... treatments were analyzed. A 3-mm/5-second action threshold was used to trigger a gating event where the beam is paused and the couch position adjusted to realign the prostate to the treatment isocenter. To quantify the in vivo accuracy and precision, KIM was compared with simultaneously acquired k...

  3. Relevant Standards

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    .86: Ethernet over LAPS. Standard in China and India. G.7041: Generic Framing Procedure (GFP). Supports Ethernet as well as other data formats (e.g., Fibre Channel); Protocol of ... IEEE 802.3x for flow control of incoming Ethernet data ...

  4. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...

  5. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...

  6. Standard Fortran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    Because of its vast software investment in Fortran programs, the nuclear community has an inherent interest in the evolution of Fortran. This paper reviews the impact of the new Fortran 77 standard and discusses the projected changes which can be expected in the future

  7. Premise for Standardized Sepsis Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remick, Daniel G; Ayala, Alfred; Chaudry, Irshad; Coopersmith, Craig M; Deutschman, Clifford; Hellman, Judith; Moldawer, Lyle; Osuchowski, Marcin

    2018-06-05

    Sepsis morbidity and mortality exacts a toll on patients and contributes significantly to healthcare costs. Preclinical models of sepsis have been used to study disease pathogenesis and test new therapies, but divergent outcomes have been observed with the same treatment even when using the same sepsis model. Other disorders such as diabetes, cancer, malaria, obesity and cardiovascular diseases have used standardized, preclinical models that allow laboratories to compare results. Standardized models accelerate the pace of research and such models have been used to test new therapies or changes in treatment guidelines. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandated that investigators increase data reproducibility and the rigor of scientific experiments and has also issued research funding announcements about the development and refinement of standardized models. Our premise is that refinement and standardization of preclinical sepsis models may accelerate the development and testing of potential therapeutics for human sepsis, as has been the case with preclinical models for other disorders. As a first step towards creating standardized models, we suggest 1) standardizing the technical standards of the widely used cecal ligation and puncture model and 2) creating a list of appropriate organ injury and immune dysfunction parameters. Standardized sepsis models could enhance reproducibility and allow comparison of results between laboratories and may accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of sepsis.

  8. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  9. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  10. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  12. Bulimic Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Field, Tory; Fierro, Karen; Henteleff, Tanja; Mueller, Cynthia; Yando, Regina; Shaw, Seana; Burman, Iris

    1998-01-01

    Female bulimic inpatients (N=24) were randomly assigned to massage therapy or standard treatment group. Massaged patients showed immediate reductions in anxiety and depression; additional improvements were noted by the last day of therapy. Massage therapy is shown to be effective as an adjunct treatment for bulimia. (Author/EMK)

  13. A randomised comparison of bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150 mg versus placebo as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care for early non-metastatic prostate cancer. First report from the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group Study No. 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tammela, T L J; Vaage, S

    2002-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg ('Casodex'(1)) as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with early (T1b-T4, any N, M0) prostate cancer....

  14. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  15. Prolonged Intermittent Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrees, Fahad; Li, Tingting; Vijayan, Anitha

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT) is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to continuous renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. There are significant practice variations in the provision of PIRRT across institutions, with respect to prescription, technology, and delivery of therapy. Clinical trials have generally demonstrated that PIRRT is non-inferior to continuous renal replacement therapy regarding patient outcomes. PIRRT offers cost-effective renal replacement therapy along with other advantages such as early patient mobilization and decreased nursing time. However, due to lack of standardization of the procedure, PIRRT still poses significant challenges, especially pertaining to appropriate drug dosing. Future guidelines and clinical trials should work toward developing consensus definitions for PIRRT and ensure optimal delivery of therapy. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene therapy of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wei; Tan Jian

    2007-01-01

    Normally, differentiated thyroid carcinoma(DTC) is a disease of good prognosis, but about 30% of the tumors are dedifferentiate, which are inaccessible to standard therapeutic procedures such as 'operation, 131 I therapy and thyroid hormone'. Both internal and abroad experts are researching a new therapy of dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma--gene therapy. Many of them utilize methods of it, but follow different strategies: (1) transduction of the thyroid sodium/iodide transporter gene to make tissues that do not accumulate iodide treatable by 131 I therapy; (2) strengthening of the anti-tumor immune response; (3) suicide gene therapy; (4) depression the generation of tumor cells; (5) gene therapy of anti- vascularization. (authors)

  17. Feasibility and efficacy of an isocaloric high-protein vs. standard diet on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luger, M; Holstein, B; Schindler, K

    2013-01-01

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks.......To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks....

  18. Alternative medicine: an update on cupping therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Li, M-Y; Liu, P-D; Guo, Y; Chen, Z-L

    2015-07-01

    To know the research progress of cupping therapy all over the world, the authors analyze the research of cupping therapy in recent 5 years. It indicates that cupping therapy can be applied to extensive curable disease, but has poor clinical evidence. Some improvements in the mechanism research of cupping therapy have been made, but it needs further research. The adverse events of cupping therapy attract attention. The standardization of cupping therapy has emerged. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A randomised, double-masked phase III/IV study of the efficacy and safety of Avastin® (Bevacizumab intravitreal injections compared to standard therapy in subjects with choroidal neovascularisation secondary to age-related macular degeneration: clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunce Catey

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD has been transformed by the introduction of agents delivered by intravitreal injection which block the action of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (anti-VEGF agents. One such agent in widespread use is bevacizumab which was initially developed for use in oncology. Most of the evidence supporting the use of bevacizumab for nAMD has come from interventional case series and this clinical trial was initiated because of the increasing and widespread use of this agent in the treatment of nAMD (an off-label indication despite a lack of definitive unbiased safety and efficacy data. Methods and design The Avastin® (bevacizumab for choroidal neovascularisation (ABC trial is a double-masked randomised controlled trial comparing intravitreal bevacizumab injections to standard therapy in the treatment of nAMD. Patients are randomised to intravitreal bevacizumab or standard therapy available at the time of trial initiation (verteporfin photodynamic therapy, intravitreal pegaptanib or sham treatment. Ranibizumab treatment was not included in the control arm as it had not been licensed for use at the start of recruitment for this trial. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients gaining ≥ 15 letters of visual acuity at 1 year and secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients with stable vision and mean visual acuity change. Discussion The ABC Trial is the first double-masked randomised control trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab in the treatment of nAMD. This trial fully recruited in November 2007 and results should be available in early 2009. Important design issues for this clinical trial include (a defining the control group (b use of gain in vision as primary efficacy end-point and (c use of pro re nata treatment using intravitreal bevacizumab rather than continuous therapy. Trial registration Current controlled

  20. Dosimetric comparison of standard bi-dimensional radiotherapy, mono-isocentric three-dimensional and arc-therapy for a bilateral breast cancer case with ganglionary attack; Comparaison dosimetrique pour un cas de cancer du sein bilateral avec atteinte ganglionnaire de la radiotherapie bidimensionnelle standard, la radiotherapie tridimensionnelle mono-isocentrique et l'arctherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, A. [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France); Bodez, V.; Alric, K.; Chastel, D.; Mege, A. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Avignon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a study which aimed at determining the optimal radiotherapy technique for a patient operated from a bilateral breast cancer with ganglionary attack and peculiar thoracic conformation. A dosimetric study has been performed. Target volumes and lung and heart coverages have been compared for three techniques: bi-dimensional and three-dimensional radiotherapy, and arc-therapy. It appears that arc-therapy would allow a dosimetric and therapeutic duration gain without improving the target volume coverage while increasing doses delivered to organs at risk. Short communication

  1. Virtual reality exposure therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rothbaum, BO; Hodges, L; Kooper, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been proposed that virtual reality (VR) exposure may be an alternative to standard in vivo exposure. Virtual reality integrates real-time computer graphics, body tracking devices, visual displays, and other sensory input devices to immerse a participant in a computer- generated virtual environment. Virtual reality exposure is potentially an efficient and cost-effective treatment of anxiety disorders. VR exposure therapy reduced the fear of heights in the first control...

  2. Horticultural therapy for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Bo, Li; Sampson, Stephanie; Roberts, Samantha; Zhang, Guoyou; Wu, Weiping

    2014-05-19

    Horticultural therapy is defined as the process of utilising fruits, vegetables, flowers and plants facilitated by a trained therapist or healthcare provider, to achieve specific treatment goals or to simply improve a person's well-being. It can be used for therapy or rehabilitation programs for cognitive, physical, social, emotional, and recreational benefits, thus improving the person's body, mind and spirit. Between 5% to 15% of people with schizophrenia continue to experience symptoms in spite of medication, and may also develop undesirable adverse effects, horticultural therapy may be of value for these people. To evaluate the effects of horticultural therapy for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses compared with standard care or other additional psychosocial interventions. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (Janurary 2013) and supplemented this by contacting relevant study authors, and manually searching reference lists. We included one randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing horticultural therapy plus standard care with standard care alone for people with schizophrenia. We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data. For continuous outcomes, we calculated a mean difference (MD) and for binary outcomes we calculated risk ratio (RR), both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assessed risk of bias and created a 'Summary of findings' table using the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. We included one single blind study (total n = 24). The overall risk of bias in the study was considered to be unclear although the randomisation was adequate. It compared a package of horticultural therapy which consisted of one hour per day of horticultural activity plus standard care with standard care alone over two weeks (10 consecutive days) with no long-term follow-up. Only two people were lost to follow-up in the study, both in the horticultural therapy group (1 RCT

  3. Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma requires a qualified clinical, radiological, and pathohistological diagnosis and, in particular, an optimal therapy by an experienced team of oncological specialists. Important prognostic factors are the presence of hematogenous metastases at diagnosis, the initial tumor volume, the response to chemotherapy, and adequate local therapy. Presently, cure rates of more than 60% can be achieved for localized Ewing's sarcoma by combination of local therapy and chemotherapy. The four-drug combination VACA (vincristin, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin) can be considered as cytostatic gold standard. More aggressive regimens (VAIA, EVAIA, autologous bone marrow transplant) may be beneficial in subgroups and are under investigation. Concerning local therapy adequate radiotherapy plays a major role and achieves the same survival rates as radical surgery, comparable patient selection provided. Several factors have impact on radiotherapeutic results, especially total dose (45 Gy large volume, 55 Gy to the primary tumor), target volume (safety margin at least 2 cm according to the pretreatment volume, at least 5 cm in proximal and distal extension of long bones), timing of radiotherapy (as early as possible) and quality of treatment. Radiotherapy as sole local treatment is indicated in inoperable lesions (spine, sacrum, skull) and in small, good-responding tumors. High-risk patients should receive combined radiotherapeutic-surgical treatment, preferably as pre-operative irradiation. The value of hyperfractionation is not yet proven despite theoretical advantages. (orig.) [de

  4. The Dynamics of Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsson, Nils; Rasche, Andreas; Seidl, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper suggests that when the phenomenon of standards and standardization is examined from the perspective of organization studies, three aspects stand out: the standardization of organizations, standardization by organizations and standardization as (a form of) organization. Following a comp...

  5. Switch to maraviroc with darunavir/r, both QD, in patients with suppressed HIV-1 was well tolerated but virologically inferior to standard antiretroviral therapy: 48-week results of a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rossetti

    Full Text Available Primary study outcome was absence of treatment failure (virological failure, VF, or treatment interruption per protocol at week 48.Patients on 3-drug ART with stable HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL and CCR5-tropic virus were randomized 1:1 to maraviroc with darunavir/ritonavir qd (study arm or continue current ART (continuation arm.In June 2015, 115 patients were evaluable for the primary outcome (56 study, 59 continuation arm. The study was discontinued due to excess of VF in the study arm (7 cases, 12.5%, vs 0 in the continuation arm, p = 0.005. The proportion free of treatment failure was 73.2% in the study and 59.3% in the continuation arm. Two participants in the study and 10 in the continuation arm discontinued therapy due to adverse events (p = 0.030. At VF, no emergent drug resistance was detected. Co-receptor tropism switched to non-R5 in one patient. Patients with VF reported lower adherence and had lower plasma drug levels. Femoral bone mineral density was significantly improved in the study arm.Switching to maraviroc with darunavir/ritonavir qd in virologically suppressed patients was associated with improved tolerability but was virologically inferior to 3-drug therapy.

  6. Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  7. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  8. Manual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hakgüder, Aral; Kokino, Siranuş

    2002-01-01

    Manual therapy has been used in the treatment of pain and dysfunction of spinal and peripheral joints for more than a hundred years. Manual medicine includes manipulation, mobilization, and postisometric relaxation techniques. The aim of manual therapy is to enhance restricted movement caused by blockage of joints keeping postural balance, restore function and maintain optimal body mechanics. Anatomic, biomechanical, and neurophysiological evaluations of the leucomotor system is essential for...

  9. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  10. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; Sohns, Jan M.; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M.; Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph A. von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T. 240 patients who underwent a [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to <2, 0.5 to <1, >0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study. (orig.)

  11. Adaptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Robert A; Silva, Ariosto S; Gillies, Robert J; Frieden, B Roy

    2009-06-01

    A number of successful systemic therapies are available for treatment of disseminated cancers. However, tumor response is often transient, and therapy frequently fails due to emergence of resistant populations. The latter reflects the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment as well as the evolutionary capacity of cancer phenotypes to adapt to therapeutic perturbations. Although cancers are highly dynamic systems, cancer therapy is typically administered according to a fixed, linear protocol. Here we examine an adaptive therapeutic approach that evolves in response to the temporal and spatial variability of tumor microenvironment and cellular phenotype as well as therapy-induced perturbations. Initial mathematical models find that when resistant phenotypes arise in the untreated tumor, they are typically present in small numbers because they are less fit than the sensitive population. This reflects the "cost" of phenotypic resistance such as additional substrate and energy used to up-regulate xenobiotic metabolism, and therefore not available for proliferation, or the growth inhibitory nature of environments (i.e., ischemia or hypoxia) that confer resistance on phenotypically sensitive cells. Thus, in the Darwinian environment of a cancer, the fitter chemosensitive cells will ordinarily proliferate at the expense of the less fit chemoresistant cells. The models show that, if resistant populations are present before administration of therapy, treatments designed to kill maximum numbers of cancer cells remove this inhibitory effect and actually promote more rapid growth of the resistant populations. We present an alternative approach in which treatment is continuously modulated to achieve a fixed tumor population. The goal of adaptive therapy is to enforce a stable tumor burden by permitting a significant population of chemosensitive cells to survive so that they, in turn, suppress proliferation of the less fit but chemoresistant

  12. Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ri-Hui; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    This chapter first summarizes the therapy of addiction disorder, and elaborates on the progress of medication. First, the difference between dependency and addiction are introduced. The basic principles of the therapy of substance and non-substance addiction are then put forward. It is also pointed out in this chapter that with the progress of the study, the goal of addiction disorder therapy is expected to transfer from reducing the relapse and harm of the addiction to completely eliminating and recovering from it. This chapter also introduces the progress of psychological addiction elimination technology, especially the "Unconditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm and Conditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm" and PITDH technology. Finally it is pointed out that in addiction disorder therapy, comprehensive intervention has become a trend. With regard to the medication for addiction disorders, this chapter also includes the progress and deficiencies of substance and non-substance addiction. In terms of addiction disorder rehabilitation, the foundation of substance addiction is medication which is, however, limited for non-substance addiction. The key to the rehabilitation of addiction disorder is psycho-behavioral therapy, which is especially effective in eliminating craving.

  13. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols......, was that participants gained a new understanding about their personal life. In addition, some participants were able to continue to use art therapy experiences as selfdevelopmental tools after the research study terminated. Jung’s description of the interactive relationship between the two living parts of the psyche...

  14. Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  15. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  16. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The new insights and controversies concerning the radiobiological properties of malignant melanoma and how these relate to new clinical approaches are reviewed. The recent clinical experience with large individual fraction sizes is analyzed. The treatment of malignant melanoma in certain specialized sites is also described. An attempt is made to place in perspective the usefulness of radiation therapy in the treatment of this complex disease. Finally, certain new applications for radiation therapy both alone and in combustion with other treatment modalities are proposed that may ultimately prove appropriate for clinical trials

  17. The standardized creation of a lumbar spine vertebral compression fracture in a sheep osteoporosis model induced by ovariectomy, corticosteroid therapy and calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschler, Anica; Röpenack, Paula; Herlyn, Philipp K E; Roesner, Jan; Pille, Kristin; Büsing, Kirsten; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2015-10-01

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are one of the most common injuries in the aging population presenting with an annual incidence of 1.4 million new cases in Europe. Current treatment strategies focus on cement-associated solutions (kyphoplasty/vertebroplasty techniques). Specific cement-associated problems as leakage, embolism and the adjacent fracture disease are reported adding to open questions like general fracture healing properties of the osteoporotic spine. In order to analyze those queries animal models are of great interest; however, both technical difficulties in the induction of experimental osteoporosis in animal as well as the lack of a standardized fracture model impede current and future in vivo studies. This study introduces a standardized animal model of an osteoporotic VCF type A3.1 that may enable further in-depth analysis of the afore mentioned topics. Twenty-four 5-year-old female Merino sheep (mean body weight: 67 kg; range 57-79) were ovariectomized (OP1) and underwent 5.5 months of weekly corticosteroid injections (dexamethasone and dexamethasone-sodium-phosphate), adding to a calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet. Osteoporosis induction was documented by pQCT and micro-CT BMD (bone mineral density) as well as 3D histomorphometric analysis postoperatively of the sheep distal radius and spine. Non osteoporotic sheep served as controls. Induction of a VCF of the second lumbar vertebra was performed via a mini-lumbotomy surgical approach with a standardized manual compression mode (OP2). PQCT analysis revealed osteoporosis of the distal radius with significantly reduced BMD values (0.19 g/cm(3), range 0.13-0.22 vs. 0.27 g/cm(3), range 0.23-0.32). Micro-CT documented significant lowering of BMD values for the second lumbar vertebrae (0.11 g/cm(3), range 0.10-0.12) in comparison to the control group (0.14 g/cm(3), range 0.12-0.17). An incomplete burst fracture type A3.1 was achieved in all cases and resulted in a significant decrease

  18. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  19. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Jinguu, Ken-ichi

    1982-01-01

    Of the cases of lung cancer in which radiation therapy was given between 1961 and November 1981, 399 cases for which histological type was confirmed, and irradiated as follows were reviewed. The cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma irradiated with more than 5,000 rad or more, those of undifferentiated carcinoma irradiated with 3,000 rad or more, and those irradiated pre- and post-operatively with 3,000 rad or more. The actual 5 year survival rate for stages I, II, III and IV were 29.6, 9.3, 7.5 and 1.9% respectively, and the survival rate tended to be better for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma at stages I, II and III, but not different at stage IV. There was no difference between large cell, small cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Irradiation with 200 rad every other day or 150 rad daily was better than that with 200 rad, and daily irradiation with 150 rad was used since 1976. The therapy of stage III small cell carcinoma at the age of up to 80 years was improved with the combination of anticancer agents, maintenance therapy and immunotherapy, but these combined therapies were not significantly effective for the cancers with other histological types or at other stages. Although there was no significant difference in statistics for resectable cases, clinically, the results were experienced to be better after resection, and surgery was done in combination as much as possible. (Kaihara, S.)

  20. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  1. Shock therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Erin

    2016-02-03

    Therapies administered by mental health nurses, aimed at "curing" gay people of their sexual preference were still in common use in the UK in the 1960s and early 1970s. Some nurses tried to avoid participating in these practices, but many believed that they were helping their patients, as a new book reveals.

  2. Comparison of cardiac output optimization with an automated closed-loop goal-directed fluid therapy versus non standardized manual fluid administration during elective abdominal surgery: first prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilot, Marc; Bellon, Amandine; Gueugnon, Marine; Laplace, Marie-Christine; Baffeleuf, Bruno; Hacquard, Pauline; Barthomeuf, Felicie; Parent, Camille; Tran, Thomas; Soubirou, Jean-Luc; Robinson, Philip; Bouvet, Lionel; Vassal, Olivia; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Piriou, Vincent

    2018-01-27

    An intraoperative automated closed-loop system for goal-directed fluid therapy has been successfully tested in silico, in vivo and in a clinical case-control matching. This trial compared intraoperative cardiac output (CO) in patients managed with this closed-loop system versus usual practice in an academic medical center. The closed-loop system was connected to a CO monitoring system and delivered automated colloid fluid boluses. Moderate to high-risk abdominal surgical patients were randomized either to the closed-loop or the manual group. Intraoperative final CO was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were intraoperative overall mean cardiac index (CI), increase from initial to final CI, intraoperative fluid volume and postoperative outcomes. From January 2014 to November 2015, 46 patients were randomized. There was a lower initial CI (2.06 vs. 2.51 l min -1 m -2 , p = 0.042) in the closed-loop compared to the control group. No difference in final CO and in overall mean intraoperative CI was observed between groups. A significant relative increase from initial to final CI values was observed in the closed-loop but not the control group (+ 28.6%, p = 0.006 vs. + 1.2%, p = 0.843). No difference was found for intraoperative fluid management and postoperative outcomes between groups. There was no significant impact on the primary study endpoint, but this was found in a context of unexpected lower initial CI in the closed-loop group.Trial registry number ID-RCB/EudraCT: 2013-A00770-45. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01950845, date of registration: 17 September 2013.

  3. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  4. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. Objectives: What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? Methods: A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. Results: In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two, six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the

  5. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  6. Instant standard concept for data standards development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Erwin Johan Albert; Kulcsor, Istvan Zsolt; Roes, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the current results of an ongoing research about a new data standards development concept. The concept is called Instant Standard referring to the pressure that is generated by shrinking the length of the standardization process. Based on this concept it is estimated that the

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R G; Wiens, A N

    1975-10-01

    Recent research on the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on memory is critically reviewed. Despite some inconsistent findings, unilateral nondominant ECT appears to affect verbal memory less than bilateral ECT. Adequate research on multiple monitored ECT is lacking. With few exceptions, the research methodologies for assessing memory have been inadequate. Many studies have confounded learning with retention, and only very recently has long term memory been adequately studied. Standardized assessment procedures for short term and long term memory are needed, in addition to more sophisticated assessment of memory processes, the duration of memory loss, and qualitative aspects of memories.

  8. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individual, couples, family, and group therapy formats. Art therapy is an effective treatment for people experiencing developmental, medical, educational, and social or psychological impairment. Individuals who benefit from art therapy include ...

  9. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  10. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  11. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  12. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  13. Particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics

  14. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive......Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...

  15. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  16. Radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Jr, J F; Deliso, H B

    1993-12-31

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ({sup 131}I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  17. Malaysian NDT standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazali Mohd Zin

    2001-01-01

    In order to become a developed country, Malaysia needs to develop her own national standards. It has been projected that by the year 2020, Malaysia requires about 8,000 standards (Department of Standard Malaysia). Currently more than 2,000 Malaysian Standards have been gazette by the government which considerably too low before tire year 2020. NDT standards have been identified by the standard working group as one of the areas to promote our national standards. In this paper the author describes the steps taken to establish the Malaysian very own NDT standards. The project starts with the establishment of radiographic standards. (Author)

  18. Calibration of working standard ionization chambers and dose standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elmahoud, A. A. B.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements were performed for the calibration of two working standard ionization chambers in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory of Sudan. 600 cc cylindrical former type and 1800 cc cylindrical radical radiation protection level ionization chambers were calibrated against 1000 cc spherical reference standard ionization chamber. The chamber were calibrated at X-ray narrow spectrum series with beam energies ranged from (33-116 KeV) in addition to 1''3''7''Cs beam with 662 KeV energy. The chambers 0.6 cc and 0.3 cc therapy level ionization were used for dose standardization and beam output calibrations of cobalt-60 radiotherapy machine located at the National Cancer Institute, University of Gazira. Concerning beam output measurements for 6''0''Co radiotherapy machine, dosimetric measurements were performed in accordance with the relevant per IAEA dosimetry protocols TRS-277 and TRS-398. The kinetic energy released per unit mass in air (air kerma) were obtained by multiplying the corrected electrometer reading (nC/min) by the calibration factors (Gy/n C) of the chambers from given in the calibration certificate. The uncertainty of measurements of air kerma were calculated for the all ionization chambers (combined uncertainty) the calibration factors of these ionization chambers then were calculated by comparing the reading of air kerma of secondary standard ionization chambers to than from radical and farmer chambers. The result of calibration working standard ionization chambers showed different calibration factors ranged from 0.99 to 1.52 for different radiation energies and these differences were due to chambers response and specification. The absorbed dose to to water calculated for therapy ionization chamber using two code of practice TRS-277 and TRS-398 as beam output for 6''0''Co radiotherapy machine and it can be used as a reference for future beam output calibration in radiotherapy dosimetry. The measurement of absorbed dose to water showed that the

  19. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Physical Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Physical Therapy Print en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) ...

  20. The International Standards Organisation offshore structures standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, R.O.

    1994-01-01

    The International Standards Organisation has initiated a program to develop a suite of ISO Codes and Standards for the Oil Industry. The Offshore Structures Standard is one of seven topics being addressed. The scope of the standard will encompass fixed steel and concrete structures, floating structures, Arctic structures and the site specific assessment of mobile drilling and accommodation units. The standard will use as base documents the existing recommended practices and standards most frequently used for each type of structure, and will develop them to incorporate best published and recognized practice and knowledge where it provides a significant improvement on the base document. Work on the Code has commenced under the direction of an internationally constituted sub-committee comprising representatives from most of the countries with a substantial offshore oil and gas industry. This paper outlines the background to the code and the format, content and work program

  1. Massage therapy and exercise therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Rezaie, Solmaz; Goharpey, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    The primary aim was to investigate the comparative effects of massage therapy and exercise therapy on patients with multiple sclerosis. The secondary aim was to investigate whether combination of both massage and exercise has an additive effect. Randomized controlled pilot trial with repeated measurements and blinded assessments. Local Multiple Sclerosis Society. A total of 48 patients with multiple sclerosis were randomly assigned to four equal subgroups labelled as massage therapy, exercise therapy, combined massage-exercise therapy and control group. The treatment group received 15 sessions of supervised intervention for five weeks. The massage therapy group received a standard Swedish massage. The exercise therapy group was given a combined set of strength, stretch, endurance and balance exercises. Patients in the massage-exercise therapy received a combined set of massage and exercise treatments. Patients in the control group were asked to continue their standard medical care. Pain, fatigue, spasticity, balance, gait and quality of life were assessed before and after intervention. Massage therapy resulted in significantly larger improvement in pain reduction (mean change 2.75 points, P = 0.001), dynamic balance (mean change, 3.69 seconds, P = 0.009) and walking speed (mean change, 7.84 seconds, P = 0.007) than exercise therapy. Patients involved in the combined massage-exercise therapy showed significantly larger improvement in pain reduction than those in the exercise therapy (mean change, 1.67 points, P = 0.001). Massage therapy could be more effective than exercise therapy. Moreover, the combination of massage and exercise therapy may be a little more effective than exercise therapy alone.

  2. Standard Industry Fare Level

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Standard Industry Fare Level was establish after airline deregulation to serve as the standard against which a statutory zone of operating expense reasonableness was...

  3. Standard Reference Tables -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Standard Reference Tables (SRT) provide consistent reference data for the various applications that support Flight Standards Service (AFS) business processes and...

  4. Chemotherapy and molecular target therapy combined with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been established as standard treatment approach for locally advanced head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer and so on through randomized clinical trials. However, radiation-related morbidity such as acute toxicity also increased as treatment intensity has increased. In underlining mechanism for enhancement of normal tissue reaction in chemo-radiation therapy, chemotherapy enhanced radiosensitivity of normal tissues in addition to cancer cells. Molecular target-based drugs combined with radiation therapy have been expected as promising approach that makes it possible to achieve cancer-specific enhancement of radiosensitivity, and clinical trials using combined modalities have been performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In order to obtain maximum radiotherapeutic gain, a detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the interaction between radiation and Molecular target-based drugs is indispensable. Among molecular target-based drugs, inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its signal transduction pathways have been vigorously investigated, and mechanisms regarding the radiosensitizing effect have been getting clear. In addition, the results of randomized clinical trials demonstrated that radiation therapy combined with cetuximab resulted in improvement of overall and disease-specific survival rate compared with radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. In this review, clinical usefulness of chemo-radiation therapy and potential molecular targets for potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing are summarized. (author)

  5. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  6. Quadruple H therapy for vasospasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple H therapy has been enthusiastically used to increase cerebral blood flow in cases of vasospasm. Nevertheless, the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood is lowered with this treatment. This side effect can theoretically be partially corrected using hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO which appears to be the missing ring in the above therapeutic regimen. We conducted a review of of the available evidence regarding the beneficial effects of HBO in preventing postoperative ischemic complications due to vasospasm after surgery on ruptured cerebral aneurysms and the rationale for including HBO into the standards of care of these difficult patients.

  7. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  8. A Standardized Light-Emitting Diode Device for Photoimmunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Esther; Warram, Jason M.; Hartmans, Elmire; Bremer, Peter J.; Bijl, Ben; Crane, Lucia M. A.; Nagengast, Wouter B.; Rosenthal, Eben L.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    Antibody-based photodynamic therapy-photoimmunotherapy (PIT)-is an ideal modality to improve cancer treatment because of its selective and tumor-specific mode of therapy. Because the use of PIT for cancer treatment is continuing to be described, there is great need to characterize a standardized

  9. Standards for holdup measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Holdup measurement, needed for material balance, depend intensively on standards and on interpretation of the calibration procedure. More than other measurements, the calibration procedure using the standard becomes part of the standard. Standards practical for field use and calibration techniques have been developed. While accuracy in holdup measurements is comparatively poor, avoidance of bias is a necessary goal

  10. Creating standards: Creating illusions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Mai Skjøtt

    written standards may open up for the creation of illusions. These are created when written standards' content is not in accordance with the perception standard adopters and standard users have of the specific practice phenomenon's content. This general theoretical argument is exemplified by the specific...

  11. Collaboration Between Multistakeholder Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Maclean, Camilla

    Public interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has resulted in a wide variety of multistakeholder CSR standards in which companies can choose to participate. While such standards reflect collaborative governance arrangements between public and private actors, the market for corporate...... responsibility is unlikely to support a great variety of partly competing and overlapping standards. Increased collaboration between these standards would enhance both their impact and their adoption by firms. This report examines the nature, benefits, and shortcomings of existing multistakeholder standards...

  12. Photodynamic therapy in endodontics: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alessandra Cesar; De Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; Steier, Liviu; Weber, João Batista Blessmann

    2015-03-01

    Recently, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated promising results about the use of photodynamic therapy during root canal system disinfection. However, there is no consensus on a standard protocol for its incorporation during root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize the results of research on photodynamic therapy in endodontics published in peer-reviewed journals. A review of pertinent literature was conducted using the PubMed database, and data obtained were categorized into sections in terms of relevant topics. Studies conducted in recent years highlighted the antimicrobial potential of photodynamic therapy in endodontics. However, most of these studies were not able to confirm a significant improvement in root canal disinfection for photodynamic therapy as a substitute for current disinfection methods. Its indication as an excellent adjunct to conventional endodontic therapy is well documented, however. Data suggest the need for protocol adjustments or new photosensitizer formulations to enhance photodynamic therapy predictability in endodontics.

  13. Radiation therapy for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, G.V.; Semikoz, N.G.; Bashejev, V.Kh.; Borota, O.V.; Bondarenko, M.V.; Kiyashko, O.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on modern tendencies of radiation therapy application to treatment of operable rectal cancer. Many randomized control studies compared the efficacy of combination of radiation therapy (pre-operative or post-operative) and surgery versus surgery only demonstrating various results. Meta-analysis of the data on efficacy of combination of radiation therapy and standard surgery revealed 22 randomized control studies (14 with pre-operative radiation therapy and 8 with post-operative radiation therapy) with total number of 8507 patients (Colorectal Cancer Collaborative Group, 2000). The use of combination treatment reduced the number of isolated locoregional relapses both with pre-operative (22.5 - 12.5 %; p < 0.00001) and post-operative radiation therapy (25.8 - 16.7 %; p - 0.00001). The influence on total survival was not significant (62 % vs. 63 %; p - 0.06).

  14. The Financial Therapy Association: A Brief History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Britt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this brief review is to provide a historical context for the conceptualization, development, and launch of the Financial Therapy Association (FTA. The FTA membership base consists of practicing financial planners, financial counselors, psychologists, marriage and family therapists, social workers, financial coaches, psychotherapists, and researchers from these and other disciplines. From the outset, the Association’s purpose has encompassed five goals:To promote a vision of financial therapy, which is the study of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, relational, economic, and integrative aspects of financial health.To provide a forum for researchers, practitioners, the media, and policy makers to share research and practice methods and models of financial therapy.To promote methods of training for those involved in financial therapy.To inform policy and practice management standards as these relate to financial therapy.To stimulate and disseminate clinical, experimental, and survey research on financial therapy.

  15. Current standard treatment for pediatric glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Yamashita, Yoji; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we selected three representative disorders among pediatric gliomas and reviewed standard treatments for these diseases. The formation of this rare disease is involved with BRAF mutation as well as cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma. Radical resection is not recommended as initial therapy due to high morbidity. Despite its good tumor control, radiotherapy is not a standard therapy due to neuroendocrine and neurocognitive dysfunction. Several papers have reported the effectiveness of platinum-based chemotherapy, which is a useful for induction therapy. Recent progress in molecular analyses has suggested that some markers might be used for staging ependymoma. While total resection is considered to be strongly correlated with patients' survival, the majority of recurrence occurs in the primary site. Despite many clinical trials, chemotherapeutic agents were not found to be effective for this disease. Since whole brain radiation cannot prevent dissemination, local radiation is recommended for adjuvant therapy. The prognosis of this disease is still dismal, and median survival time is within 1 year. Although clinical trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy prior to, concomitantly with, or after radiotherapy, an effective regimen has not yet been established. Therefore, only conventional local radiotherapy is the standard regimen for this disease. A new therapeutic approach, such as convection-enhanced drug delivery, would be required for improved outcomes in patients with this disease. (author)

  16. Standardisation in standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    The following observations are offered by one who has served on national and international standards-writing committees and standards review committees. Service on working groups consists of either updating previous standards or developing new standards. The process of writing either type of document proceeds along similar lines. The first order of business is to recognise the need for developing or updating a standard and to identify the potential user community. It is also necessary to ensure that there is a required number of members willing to do the writing. A justification is required as to why a new standard should be developed, and this is written as a new work item proposal or a project initiation notification system form. This document must be filed officially and approved, and a search is then undertaken to ensure that the proposed new standard will not duplicate a standard that has already been published or is underway in another standards organisation. (author)

  17. Nuclear standardization development study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jianjun

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear industry is the important part of national security and national economic development is key area of national new energy supported by government. nuclear standardization is the important force for nuclear industry development, is the fundamental guarantee of nuclear safe production, is the valuable means of China's nuclear industry technology to the world market. Now nuclear standardization faces to the new development opportunity, nuclear standardization should implement strategy in standard system building, foreign standard research, company standard building, and talented people building to meet the requirement of nuclear industry development. (author)

  18. The Biosulin equivalence in standard therapy (BEST) study − a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -label, non-randomised, interventional, observational study in subjects using Biosulin ... Methods. Subjects in this interventional, observational, multicentre, open-label, prospective study were switched from their existing human premix insulin ...

  19. Effectiveness of sequential v. standard triple therapy for treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer.[4] Children are infected with H. pylori at a much younger age in developing ... a recent meta-analysis that included over 53 000 patients showed that the eradication rate .... The child's parents/guardians were questioned ..... human infection, drug resistance, and alternative approaches to treatment. Ann Trop Med ...

  20. Therapy of the burnout syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczak, Dieter; Wastian, Monika; Schneider, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence, diagnostics and therapy of the burnout syndrome are increasingly discussed in the public. The unclear definition and diagnostics of the burnout syndrome are scientifically criticized. There are several therapies with unclear evidence for the treatment of burnout in existence. The health technology assessment (HTA) report deals with the question of usage and efficacy of different burnout therapies. For the years 2006 to 2011, a systematic literature research was done in 31 electronic databases (e.g. EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO). Important inclusion criteria are burnout, therapeutic intervention and treatment outcome. 17 studies meet the inclusion criteria and are regarded for the HTA report. The studies are very heterogeneous (sample size, type of intervention, measuring method, level of evidence). Due to their study design (e.g. four reviews, eight randomized controlled trials) the studies have a comparable high evidence: three times 1A, five times 1B, one time 2A, two times 2B and six times 4. 13 of the 17 studies are dealing with the efficacy of psychotherapy and psychosocial interventions for the reduction of burnout (partly in combination with other techniques). Cognitive behaviour therapy leads to the improvement of emotional exhaustion in the majority of the studies. The evidence is inconsistent for the efficacy of stress management and music therapy. Two studies regarding the efficacy of Qigong therapy do not deliver a distinct result. One study proves the efficacy of roots of Rhodiola rosea (evidence level 1B). Physical therapy is only in one study separately examined and does not show a better result than standard therapy. Despite the number of studies with high evidence the results for the efficacy of burnout therapies are preliminary and do have only limited reach. The authors of the studies complain about the low number of skilled studies for the therapy of burnout. Furthermore, they point to the insufficient evaluation of the therapy

  1. Some considerations about standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewez, Ph L; Fanjas, Y R [C.E.R.C.A., Romans (France)

    1985-07-01

    Complete standardization of research reactor fuel is not possible. However the transition from HEU to LEU should be an opportunity for a double effort towards standardization and optimization in order to reduce cost. (author)

  2. BTS statistical standards manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), like other federal statistical agencies, establishes professional standards to guide the methods and procedures for the collection, processing, storage, and presentation of statistical data. Standards an...

  3. Dental Assisting Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the dental assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  4. Some considerations about standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewez, Ph.L.; Fanjas, Y.R.

    1985-01-01

    Complete standardization of research reactor fuel is not possible. However the transition from HEU to LEU should be an opportunity for a double effort towards standardization and optimization in order to reduce cost. (author)

  5. The Distance Standard Deviation

    OpenAIRE

    Edelmann, Dominic; Richards, Donald; Vogel, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The distance standard deviation, which arises in distance correlation analysis of multivariate data, is studied as a measure of spread. New representations for the distance standard deviation are obtained in terms of Gini's mean difference and in terms of the moments of spacings of order statistics. Inequalities for the distance variance are derived, proving that the distance standard deviation is bounded above by the classical standard deviation and by Gini's mean difference. Further, it is ...

  6. Making standards work

    OpenAIRE

    Stigzelius, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Social and environmental standards can function as tools for companies that want to improve their conduct in social and environmental areas in the supply chain. However, relatively little attention has been given to how the adoption of social and environmental standards may influence the actual business practices in the supply chain. The overall aim of this thesis is to examine the institutional context surrounding the adoption of social and environmental standards and how these standards inf...

  7. Standards, the users perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nason, W.D.

    1993-01-01

    The term standard has little meaning until put into the proper context. What is being standardized? What are the standard conditions to be applied? The list of questions that arise goes on and on. In this presentation, answers to these questions are considered in the interest of providing a basic understanding of what might be useful to the electrical power industry in the way of standards and what the limitations on application of them would be as well. 16 figs

  8. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Physical Therapy Physical therapy may be an important component of treating ... everyday tasks, Since dystonia is a neurological disorder, physical therapy does not treat the dystonia directly but ...

  9. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  10. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  11. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  12. Radiological Control Technician: Standardized technician Qualification Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The Qualification Standard states and defines the knowledge and skill requirements necessary for successful completion of the Radiological Control Technician Training Program. The standard is divided into three phases: Phase I concerns RCT Academic training. There are 13 lessons associated with the core academics program and 19 lessons associated with the site academics program. The staff member should sign the appropriate blocks upon successful completion of the examination for that lesson or group of lessons. In addition, facility specific lesson plans may be added to meet the knowledge requirements in the Job Performance Measures (JPM) of the practical program. Phase II concerns RCT core/site practical (JPMs) training. There are thirteen generic tasks associated with the core practical program. Both the trainer/evaluator and student should sign the appropriate block upon successful completion of the JPM. In addition, facility specific tasks may be added or generic tasks deleted based on the results of the facility job evaluation. Phase III concerns the oral examination board successful completion of the oral examination board is documented by the signature of the chairperson of the board. Upon completion of all of the standardized technician qualification requirements, final qualification is verified by the student and the manager of the Radiological Control Department and acknowledged by signatures on the qualification standard. The completed Qualification Standard shall be maintained as an official training record

  13. Quality of semantic standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Erwin Johan Albert

    2012-01-01

    Little scientific literature addresses the issue of quality of semantic standards, albeit a problem with high economic and social impact. Our problem survey, including 34 semantic Standard Setting Organizations (SSOs), gives evidence that quality of standards can be improved, but for improvement a

  14. Automotive Technology Skill Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Tom; Asay, Don; Evans, Richard; Barbie, Bill; Herdener, John; Teague, Todd; Allen, Scott; Benshoof, James

    2009-01-01

    The standards in this document are for Automotive Technology programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school automotive program. Minimally, the student will complete a three-year program to achieve all standards. Although these exit-level standards are designed…

  15. Advances in inmune therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvalheim, G.

    2004-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies either alone or combined with isotopes as radio immuno conjugates has proven to be very efficient treatment for cancers such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas or breast cancer. Cellular based immunotherapy treatment modalities are also currently in use. Allogeneic T lymphocytes infused during haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTSC) mediate graft-versus-tumour effects, but also initiate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which remains the primary complications of allogeneic HTSC. The current clinical need for GVHD prophylaxis, which at a minimum involves single agents immune suppression generally limits the success of allogeneic HTSC immunotherapy to patients with indolent or chemotherapy sensitive malignancy. Therefore the use of allogeneic HTSC as a cancer therapy still needs to augment the anti-tumour effects and improve GVHD control. During the presentation several ongoing studies addressing these questions will be discussed. Since 1996 more than 500 patients have been recruited into >30 clinical trials with dendritic cell vaccines. Most clinical trials used different protocols with variations in D C generation, Dc maturation stage, D C-Ag loading, route of administration, vaccination intervals and vaccination frequency. The overall response rate is 20%(0- >50%) with occasional complete or partial regressions, prolonged stable disease, but no cure. Little or no toxicity has been observed which might suggest that the vaccines do not work as efficient as expected. As will be discussed the reason for these modest clinical effects observed can be many. Therefore, careful study design and use of standardized clinical and immunological criteria are needed. Recently, we have started a process for production of TILs, antigen specific T cells. During our DC vaccine programs tumour specific T-cell clones have been developed and such T-cells might also be useful as therapy in the vaccinated patients. The principal of such therapy and the

  16. [Physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, pulmonary rehabilitation program is widely considered one of the most effective and evidence-based treatment for not only chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but many clinical situations including neuro-muscular disease, post-operative status and weaning period from the ventilator, etc. The essential components of a pulmonary rehabilitation program are team assessment, patient training, psycho-social intervention, exercise, and follow-up. In 2003, Japanese medical societies (J. Thoracic Society, J. Pul. Rehabilitation Society and J. Physiotherapist Society) made a new guideline for pulmonary rehabilitation, especially how to aproach the execise training. As for the duration after surgical operation, airway cleaning is the important technique to prevent post-operative complications including pneumonia. Postural dranage technique is well known for such condition, at the same time, several instruments (flutter vulve, positive expiratory mask, high frequecy oscillation, etc) were also used for the patient to expectrate airway mucus easier. Lung transplantation is a new method of treatment for the critically-ill patients with chronic respiratoy failure. Several techniques of physical therapy are must be needed before and after lung transplantation to prevent both pulmonary infection and osteoporosis.

  17. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  18. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  19. A Comparison of Aphasia Therapy Outcomes before and after a Very Early Rehabilitation Programme Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godecke, Erin; Ciccone, Natalie A.; Granger, Andrew S.; Rai, Tapan; West, Deborah; Cream, Angela; Cartwright, Jade; Hankey, Graeme J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Very early aphasia rehabilitation studies have shown mixed results. Differences in therapy intensity and therapy type contribute significantly to the equivocal results. Aims: To compare a standardized, prescribed very early aphasia therapy regimen with a historical usual care control group at therapy completion (4-5 weeks post-stroke)…

  20. Optimal therapy in Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goker-Alpan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozlem Goker-AlpanLysosomal Diseases Research and Treatment Unit, Center for Clinical Trials, O&O Alpan LLC, Springfield, VA, USAAbstract: Gaucher disease (GD, the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, presents with a wide range of symptoms of varying severity, and primarily affects the skeletal, hematologic and nervous systems. To date, the standard of care has included enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase. Although imiglucerase is highly effective in reversing the visceral and hematologic manifestations, skeletal disease is slow to respond, pulmonary involvement is relatively resistant, and the CNS involvement is not impacted. Because of the recent manufacturing and processing problems, the research and development of alternative therapeutics has become more pressing. The divergent phenotypes and the heterogeneity involving different organ systems implicates the involvement of several pathological processes that include enzyme deficiency, substrate accumulation, protein misfolding, and macrophage activation, that differ in each patient with GD. Thus, the therapy should be tailored individually in order to target multiple pathways that interplay in GD.Keywords: glucocerebrosidase, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, protein misfolding and chaperone therapy, macrophage

  1. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF CONDYLOMATA ACUMINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Galkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliably established a causal role of human papillomavirus in the formation of condylomata acuminate. In 10% of people with the human papilloma virus develops condylomata acuminate, which can be transformed into malignant tumors. The most common treatment of condylomata acuminate is a conservative treatment, namely, the local chemical or physical destruction of the lesions and immunotherapy. With the ineffectiveness of conservative treatment resort to surgical excision. At the same time the traditional methods of treatment condylomata acuminate associated with high rates of recurrence. Moreover, these treatments are often associated with significant risk of bleeding, ulceration and scarring. The emergence of new methods of diagnosis and treatment of condylomata acuminate – fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy has opened up new opportunities to improve the treatment of this pathology. Topical administration of photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy is more convenient and less phototoxic and broaden the range of clinical applications of this technology in the medical dermatology. An increasing amount of evidence that photodynamic therapy with topical application of the photosensitizer is highly effective in the treatment of a variety of benign skin diseases, including condylomata acuminataca, for which traditional methods are ineffective treatment. However, many parameters of photodynamic therapy of this disease has not yet been optimized. It is necessary to conduct large-scale clinical studies on the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy of condylomata acuminatain order to standardize the treatment parameters.

  2. Individual Music Therapy for Agitation in Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been...... methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. Method: In a crossover trial, 42 participants...... with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Results: Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at −6...

  3. Calibration of Flick standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalmann, Ruedi; Spiller, Jürg; Küng, Alain; Jusko, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Flick standards or magnification standards are widely used for an efficient and functional calibration of the sensitivity of form measuring instruments. The results of a recent measurement comparison have shown to be partially unsatisfactory and revealed problems related to the calibration of these standards. In this paper the influence factors for the calibration of Flick standards using roundness measurement instruments are discussed in detail, in particular the bandwidth of the measurement chain, residual form errors of the device under test, profile distortions due to the diameter of the probing element and questions related to the definition of the measurand. The different contributions are estimated using simulations and are experimentally verified. Also alternative methods to calibrate Flick standards are investigated. Finally the practical limitations of Flick standard calibration are shown and the usability of Flick standards both to calibrate the sensitivity of roundness instruments and to check the filter function of such instruments is analysed. (paper)

  4. Music therapy CD creation for initial pediatric radiation therapy: a mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Philippa; O'Callaghan, Clare; Wheeler, Greg; Grocke, Denise

    2010-01-01

    A mixed methods research design was used to investigate the effects of a music therapy CD (MTCD) creation intervention on pediatric oncology patients' distress and coping during their first radiation therapy treatment. The music therapy method involved children creating a music CD using interactive computer-based music software, which was "remixed" by the music therapist-researcher to extend the musical material. Eleven pediatric radiation therapy outpatients aged 6 to 13 years were randomly assigned to either an experimental group, in which they could create a music CD prior to their initial treatment to listen to during radiation therapy, or to a standard care group. Quantitative and qualitative analyses generated multiple perceptions from the pediatric patients, parents, radiation therapy staff, and music therapist-researcher. Ratings of distress during initial radiation therapy treatment were low for all children. The comparison between the two groups found that 67% of the children in the standard care group used social withdrawal as a coping strategy, compared to 0% of the children in the music therapy group; this trend approached significance (p = 0.076). MTCD creation was a fun, engaging, and developmentally appropriate intervention for pediatric patients, which offered a positive experience and aided their use of effective coping strategies to meet the demands of their initial radiation therapy treatment.

  5. Requirements of quality standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture traces the development of nuclear standards, codes, and Federal regulations on quality assurance (QA) for nuclear power plants and associated facilities. The technical evolution of the last twelve years, especially in the area of nuclear technology, led to different activities and regulatory initiatives, and the present result is: several nations have their own homemade standards. The lecture discusses the former and especially current activities in standard development, and gives a description of the requirements of QA-standards used in USA and Europe, especially Western Germany. Furthermore the lecture attempts to give a comparison and an evaluation of the international quality standards from the author's viewpoint. Finally the lecture presents an outlook for the future international implications of QA-standards. There is an urgent need within the nuclear industry for simplification and standardization of QA-standards. The relationship between the various standards, and the applicability of the standards need clarification and a better transparancy. To point out these problems is the purpose of the lecture. (orig.) [de

  6. Autoimmune liver disease and therapy in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Homan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the liver. In childhood, autoimmune liver disorders include autoimmune hepatitis type I and II, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, Coombs-positive giant cell hepatitis, and de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation. Autoimmune liver disease has a more aggressive course in children, especially autoimmune hepatitis type II. Standard therapy is a combination of corticosteroids and azathioprine. Around 80 % of children with autoimmune liver disease show a rapid response to combination therapy. The non-responders are treated with more potent drugs, otherwise autoimmune disease progresses to cirrhosis of the liver and the child needs liver transplantation as rescue therapy.

  7. Second-Line Therapy for Advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jared M; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer have non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subtype and have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Improvements in both first-line and subsequent therapies are allowing longer survival and enhanced quality of life for these patients. The median overall survival observed in many second-line trials is approximately 9 months, and many patients receive further therapy after second-line therapy. The cytotoxic agents pemetrexed and docetaxel and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib and gefitinib are standard second-line therapies. For patients with EGFR mutation, a TKI is the favored second-line therapy if not already used in first-line therapy. For patients without the EGFR mutation, TKIs are an option, but many oncologists favor cytotoxic therapy. The inhibitor of the EML4/ALK fusion protein, crizotinib, has recently become a standard second-line treatment for patients with the gene rearrangement and has promise for patients with the ROS1 rearrangement.

  8. Beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1993-01-01

    The standard model of particle physics is highly successful, although it is obviously not a complete or final theory. In this presentation the author argues that the structure of the standard model gives some quite concrete, compelling hints regarding what lies beyond. Essentially, this presentation is a record of the author's own judgement of what the central clues for physics beyond the standard model are, and also it is an attempt at some pedagogy. 14 refs., 6 figs

  9. Standard Model processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, M.L.; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Alekhin, S.; Badger, S.; Bauer, C.W.; Becher, T.; Bertone, V.; Bonvini, M.; Boselli, S.; Bothmann, E.; Boughezal, R.; Cacciari, M.; Carloni Calame, C.M.; Caola, F.; Campbell, J.M.; Carrazza, S.; Chiesa, M.; Cieri, L.; Cimaglia, F.; Febres Cordero, F.; Ferrarese, P.; D'Enterria, D.; Ferrera, G.; Garcia i Tormo, X.; Garzelli, M.V.; Germann, E.; Hirschi, V.; Han, T.; Ita, H.; Jäger, B.; Kallweit, S.; Karlberg, A.; Kuttimalai, S.; Krauss, F.; Larkoski, A.J.; Lindert, J.; Luisoni, G.; Maierhöfer, P.; Mattelaer, O.; Martinez, H.; Moch, S.; Montagna, G.; Moretti, M.; Nason, P.; Nicrosini, O.; Oleari, C.; Pagani, D.; Papaefstathiou, A.; Petriello, F.; Piccinini, F.; Pierini, M.; Pierog, T.; Pozzorini, S.; Re, E.; Robens, T.; Rojo, J.; Ruiz, R.; Sakurai, K.; Salam, G.P.; Salfelder, L.; Schönherr, M.; Schulze, M.; Schumann, S.; Selvaggi, M.; Shivaji, A.; Siodmok, A.; Skands, P.; Torrielli, P.; Tramontano, F.; Tsinikos, I.; Tweedie, B.; Vicini, A.; Westhoff, S.; Zaro, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-06-22

    This report summarises the properties of Standard Model processes at the 100 TeV pp collider. We document the production rates and typical distributions for a number of benchmark Standard Model processes, and discuss new dynamical phenomena arising at the highest energies available at this collider. We discuss the intrinsic physics interest in the measurement of these Standard Model processes, as well as their role as backgrounds for New Physics searches.

  10. International Construction Measurement Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The International Construction Measurement Standard Coalition (the Coalition) was formed on 17 June 2015 after meeting at the International Monetary Fund in Washington DC, USA. The Coalition, comprising the organisations listed below at the date of publication, aims to bring about consistency in construction cost reporting standards internationally. This is achieved by the creation and adoption of this ICMS, an agreed international standard for the structuring and presentation of cost reports...

  11. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  12. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  13. [Physical therapy for scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanovic, Marguerite Guillot

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy consists notably of hand or mechanical massages, pressure therapy using various fabrics or splints, cryotherapy, laser therapy, etc. It forms part of the range of therapies used to treat pathological scars, including medical and surgical treatment. While the results are often satisfactory for hypertrophic scars, they remain uncertain for major keloids.

  14. Standard NIM instrumentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    NIM is a standard modular instrumentation system that is in wide use throughout the world. As the NIM system developed and accommodations were made to a dynamic instrumentation field and a rapidly advancing technology, additions, revisions and clarifications were made. These were incorporated into the standard in the form of addenda and errata. This standard is a revision of the NIM document, AEC Report TID-20893 (Rev. 4) dated July 1974. It includes all the addenda and errata items that were previously issued as well as numerous additional items to make the standard current with modern technology and manufacturing practice

  15. Towards common technical standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmat, H.; Suardi, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, PETRONAS launched its Total Quality Management (TQM) program. In the same year the decision was taken by the PETRONAS Management to introduce common technical standards group wide. These standards apply to the design, construction, operation and maintenance of all PETRONAS installations in the upstream, downstream and petrochemical sectors. The introduction of common company standards is seen as part of an overall technical management system, which is an integral part of Total Quality Management. The Engineering and Safety Unit in the PETRONAS Central Office in Kuala Lumpur has been charged with the task of putting in place a set of technical standards throughout PETRONAS and its operating units

  16. The Standard Model course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    Suggested Readings: Aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics/A Pich, arXiv:hep-ph/0001118. - The Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions/A Pich, arXiv:hep-ph/0502010. - The Standard Model of Particle Physics/A Pich The Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics will be described. A detailed discussion of the particle content, structure and symmetries of the theory will be given, together with an overview of the most important experimental facts which have established this theoretical framework as the Standard Theory of particle interactions.

  17. Flight Standards Automation System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — FAVSIS supports Flight Standards Service (AFS) by maintaining their information on entities such as air carriers, air agencies, designated airmen, and check airmen....

  18. Dance movement therapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkou, Vicky; Meekums, Bonnie

    2017-02-03

    Dementia is a collective name for different degenerative brain syndromes which, according to Alzheimer's Disease International, affects approximately 35.6 million people worldwide. The latest NICE guideline for dementia highlights the value of diverse treatment options for the different stages and symptoms of dementia including non-pharmacological treatments. Relevant literature also argues for the value of interventions that acknowledge the complexity of the condition and address the person as a whole, including their physical, emotional, social and cognitive processes. At the same time, there is growing literature that highlights the capacity of the arts and embodied practices to address this complexity. Dance movement therapy is an embodied psychological intervention that can address complexity and thus, may be useful for people with dementia, but its effectiveness remains unclear. To assess the effects of dance movement therapy on behavioural, social, cognitive and emotional symptoms of people with dementia in comparison to no treatment, standard care or any other treatment. Also, to compare different forms of dance movement therapy (e.g. Laban-based dance movement therapy, Chacian dance movement therapy or Authentic Movement). Searches took place up to March 2016 through ALOIS, Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement's Specialized Register, which covers CENTRAL, a number of major healthcare databases and trial registers, and grey literature sources. We checked bibliographies of relevant studies and reviews, and contacted professional associations, educational programmes and experts from around the world. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language, including cross-over design and cluster-RCTs for inclusion. Studies considered had to include people with dementia, in any age group and in any setting, with interventions delivered by a dance movement therapy practitioner who (i) had received formal training (ii) was a dance movement

  19. Radiation therapy following targeted therapy in oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Faure, Marjorie; Rybikowski, Stanislas; Dermeche, Slimane; Tyran, Marguerite; Calderon, Benoit; Thomassin, Jeanne; Walz, Jochen; Salem, Naji

    2015-11-01

    Up to 40% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with initially localized disease eventually develop metastasis following nephrectomy. The current standard of care for metastatic RCC (mRCC) is targeted therapy. However, complete response remains rare. A state of oligometastatic disease may exist, in which metastases are present in a limited number of locations; such cases may benefit from metastasis-directed local therapy, based on the evidence supporting resection of limited-volume metastases, allowing for improved disease control. We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of response of RCC metastases, in patients treated with targeted therapies followed by radiation therapy (RT) of residual metastatic lesions in Paoli-Calmettes Institute (Marseille, France). We analyzed disease response rates, response to sequential strategy, relapse at the irradiated locations and disease evolution. The median follow-up was 34.1 months (range, 19.2-54.5 months). No progression at the irradiated sites was observed. A total of 5 patients had stable disease at the irradiated locations at the last follow-up; 3 remained in complete remission at the assessment, and 2 were stable. Excellent local response and clinical benefit may be achieved without added toxicity. In conclusion, sequential therapeutic strategies with RT following systemic treatment using sunitinib appear to be highly effective in patients with progressive mRCC and prompt the conduction of further confirmatory trials.

  20. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  1. Position paper on standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The ''NPOC Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Plants'' creates a framework within which new standardized nuclear plants may be built. The Strategic Plan is an expression of the nuclear energy industry's serious intent to create the necessary conditions for new plant construction and operation. One of the key elements of the Strategic Plan is a comprehensive industry commitment to standardization: through design certification, combined license, first-of-a-kind engineering, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. The NPOC plan proposes four stages of standardization in advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). The first stage is established by the ALWR Utility Requirements Document which specifies owner/operator requirements at a functional level covering all elements of plant design and construction, and many aspects of operations and maintenance. The second stage of standardization is that achieved in the NRC design certification. This certification level includes requirements, design criteria and bases, functional descriptions and performance requirements for systems to assure plant safety. The third stage of standardization, commercial standardization, carries the design to a level of completion beyond that required for design certification to enable the industry to achieve potential increases in efficiency and economy. The final stage of standardization is enhanced standardization beyond design. A standardized approach is being developed in construction practices, operating, maintenance training, and procurement practices. This comprehensive standardization program enables the NRC to proceed with design certification with the confidence that standardization beyond the regulations will be achieved. This confidence should answer the question of design detail required for design certification, and demonstrate that the NRC should require no further regulatory review beyond that required by 10 CFR Part 52

  2. 77 FR 43542 - Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413-Cost Accounting Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... rule that revised Cost Accounting Standard (CAS) 412, ``Composition and Measurement of Pension Cost... Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413--Cost Accounting Standards Pension Harmonization Rule AGENCY: Cost Accounting Standards Board, Office of Federal Procurement Policy, Office of...

  3. State Skill Standards: Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  4. State Skill Standards: Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Frederick; Reed, Loretta; Jensen, Capra; Robison, Gary; Taylor, Susan; Pavesich, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide skill standards for all content areas in career and technical education. The standards in this document are for photography programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program.…

  5. How many standards?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maegaard, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Discussions of standardisation and standard languages has a long history in linguistics. Tore Kristiansen has contributed to these discussions in various ways, and in this chapter I will focus on his claim that young Danes operate with two standards, one for the media and one for the school...

  6. Environmental radiation standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    This document contains an outline of an oral presentation on environmental radiation standards presented to the American Nuclear Societies' Topical Conference on Population Exposure from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The paper contains several definitions, a summary of current radiation exposure limits; and numerous proposed changes to current standards. 7 figs

  7. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Standards Consortium (GSC), an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality...

  8. Weston Standard battery

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a Weston AOIP standard battery with its calibration certificate (1956). Inside, the glassware forms an "H". Its name comes from the British physicist Edward Weston. A standard is the materialization of a given quantity whose value is known with great accuracy.

  9. Surface soil contamination standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothe, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to define surface soil contamination limits for radioactive materials below which posting, restrictions and environmental controls are not necessary in order to protect personnel and the environment. The standards can also be used to determine if solid waste or other material is contaminated relative to disposal requirements. The derivation of the standards is given

  10. Standard classification: Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a draft standard classification of physics. The conception is based on the physics part of the systematic catalogue of the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek and on the classification given in standard textbooks. The ICSU-AB classification now used worldwide by physics information services was not taken into account. (BJ) [de

  11. Governing through standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Katja

    This abstract adresses the ways in which new education standards have become integral to new modes of education governance. The paper explores the role of standards for accelerating the shift from national to transnational governance in higher education. Drawing on the case of higher education...

  12. Environmental radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richings, L.D.G.; Morley, F.; Kelley, G.N.

    1978-04-01

    The principles involved in the setting of radiological protection standards are reviewed, and the differences in procedures used by various countries in implementing them are outlined. Standards are taken here to mean the specific numerical limits relating to radiation doses to people or to amounts of radioactive material released into the environment. (author)

  13. Standards and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengler, Cynthia J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the professional development that has taken place in conjunction with Ohio adopting the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards. The professional development (PD) has changed over time to include not only training on the new standards and lesson plans but training on the concepts defined in the…

  14. Evaluating Living Standard Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birčiaková Naďa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of selected available indicators of living standards, divided into three groups, namely economic, environmental, and social. We have selected six countries of the European Union for analysis: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, France, and Great Britain. The aim of this paper is to evaluate indicators measuring living standards and suggest the most important factors which should be included in the final measurement. We have tried to determine what factors influence each indicator and what factors affect living standards. We have chosen regression analysis as our main method. From the study of factors, we can deduce their impact on living standards, and thus the value of indicators of living standards. Indicators with a high degree of reliability include the following factors: size and density of population, health care and spending on education. Emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere also have a certain lower degree of reliability.

  15. [Dance/movement therapy in oncological rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Elana G; Helmes, Almut; Weis, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Dance/movement therapy may be defined as a psychosocial and body-oriented art therapy, which uses dance for the expression of emotional and cognitive issues. Dance/movement therapy is an important intervention for cancer patients to enhance coping strategies. There are only few studies investigating dance therapy with cancer patients. The present study investigates effects of dance/movement therapy (n = 115) in the setting of inpatient rehabilitation based on a pre-post design with a control group as well as a follow-up 3 months later. Standardized questionnaires measuring quality of life, anxiety and depression, and self-concept (EORTC QLQ-C30, HADS, FSKN) were used. In addition, at the end of the inpatient rehabilitation program subjective expectations of the dance/movement therapy and the patients' subjective evaluation of the benefits of the intervention were measured by a new developed questionnaire. As process factors of dance/movement therapy, expression of emotions, enhancement of self-esteem, development of the personality, vitality, getting inner balance, and getting in touch with the body have been identified. In terms of quality of life and psychological well-being, the results showed significant improvements with medium to large effect sizes. Even though those effects may not be attributed to the intervention alone, the analysis of the data and the patients' subjective statements help to reveal therapeutic factors and process characteristics of dance/movement therapy within inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Imaging after vascular gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    Targets for cardiovascular gene therapy currently include limiting restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stent placement, inhibiting vein bypass graft intimal hyperplasia/stenosis, therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiac and lower-limb ischemia, and prevention of thrombus formation. While catheter angiography is still standard method to follow-up vascular gene transfer, other modern imaging techniques, especially intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging provide complementary information about the therapeutic effect of vascular gene transfer in humans. Although molecular imaging of therapeutic gene expression in the vasculatures is still in its technical development phase, it has already offered basic medical science an extremely useful in vivo evaluation tool for non- or minimally invasive imaging of vascular gene therapy

  17. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  18. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  19. A case of standardization?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Morten Hulvej; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2016-01-01

    the ones envisioned by the makers of standards. In 2012, the Danish National Health Authorities introduced a set of health promotion guidelines that were meant to guide the decision making and priority setting of Denmark's 98 local governments. The guidelines provided recommendations for health promotion...... and standardization. It remains an open question whether or not the guidelines lead to more standardized policies and interventions, but we suggest that the guidelines promote a risk factor-oriented approach as the dominant frame for knowledge, reasoning, decision making and priority setting in health promotion. We...

  20. The Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Christine

    1994-01-01

    The initial evidence from Fermilab for the long awaited sixth ('top') quark puts another rivet in the already firm structure of today's Standard Model of physics. Analysis of the Fermilab CDF data gives a top mass of 174 GeV with an error of ten per cent either way. This falls within the mass band predicted by the sum total of world Standard Model data and underlines our understanding of physics in terms of six quarks and six leptons. In this specially commissioned overview, physics writer Christine Sutton explains the Standard Model

  1. Wireless installation standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hwang Bin

    2007-12-01

    This is divided six parts which are radio regulation law on securing of radio resource, use of radio resource, protection of radio resource, radio regulation enforcement ordinance with securing, distribution and assignment of radio regulation, radio regulation enforcement regulation on utility of radio resource and technical qualification examination, a wireless installation regulation of technique standard and safety facility standard, radio regulation such as certification regulation of information communicative machines and regulation of radio station on compliance of signal security, radio equipment in radio station, standard frequency station and emergency communication.

  2. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  3. International radiofrequency standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lincoln, J.

    2001-01-01

    Of the various radiofrequency standards in use around the world, many are based on or similar to the Guidelines published by ICNIRP (The International Commission on Non-ionising Radiation Protection). This organisation is a working group operating in co-operation with the Environmental Health division of the World Health Organisation (WHO). This paper presents a very brief overview of current international standards, beginning with a summary of the salient points of the ICNIRP Guidelines. It should be remembered that these are guidelines only and do not exist as a separate standard. Copyright (2001) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  4. Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    Targeted therapies have become standard therapies for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A phase III trial of carboplatin and paclitaxel with and without bevacizumab in patients with advanced NSCLC with non-squamous histology demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in efficacy. In patients with NSCLC with an activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (defined as exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R point mutation), phase III trials of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) compared to platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated superior efficacy in the first-line setting. In patients with NSCLC with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements, phase III trials of crizotinib have demonstrated superior efficacy compared to platinum-pemetrexed in the first-line setting and standard chemotherapy in the second-line setting. A second-generation ALK inhibitor, ceritinib, is available for patients who have progressed after or were intolerant of crizotinib. Crizotinib has also demonstrated activity on patients with ROS1 rearrangements, and BRAF inhibitors (dabrafenib, vemurafenib) have demonstrated activity in patients with NSCLC with BRAF V600E mutation. The oncogenic mutations that are susceptible to targeted therapy are mainly found in non-squamous NSCLC. The development of targeted therapy in patients with squamous NSCLC has been more challenging due to the genomic complexity observed in the squamous histology and the low prevalence of EGFR, ALK, and ROS1 molecular alterations. A phase III trial of cisplatin and gemcitabine with and without necitumumab in patients with advanced NSCLC with squamous histology demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival.

  5. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  6. Is there a role for thrombolytic therapy in venous thromboembolism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanson, B. J.; Büller, H.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretically, thrombolytic therapy would appear to offer benefits over standard heparin therapy in the treatment of venous thromboembolism based on the more rapid resolution of thrombus. In this paper, the results of clinical trials performed with thrombolytic agents in the initial treatment of

  7. Radioactivity of peat mud used in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpińska, Maria; Mnich, Krystian; Kapała, Jacek; Bielawska, Agnieszka; Kulesza, Grzegorz; Mnich, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the contents of natural and artificial isotopes in peat mud and to estimate the radiation dose absorbed via skin in patients during standard peat mud treatment. The analysis included 37 samples collected from 8 spas in Poland. The measurements of isotope concentration activity were conducted with the use of gamma spectrometry methods. The skin dose in a standard peat mud bath therapy is approximately 300 nSv. The effective dose of such therapy is considered to be 22 nSv. The doses absorbed during peat mud therapy are 5 orders of magnitude lower than effective annual dose absorbed from the natural radiation background by a statistical Pole (3.5 mSv). Neither therapeutic nor harmful effect is probable in case of such a small dose of ionising radiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1990-04-01

    The unresolved issues of the standard model are reviewed, with emphasis on the gauge hierarchy problem. A possible mechanism for generating a hierarchy in the context of superstring theory is described. 24 refs

  9. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  10. FDA Recognized Consensus Standards

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database consists of those national and international standards recognized by FDA which manufacturers can declare conformity to and is part of the information...

  11. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  12. 3G Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saugstrup, Dan; Henten, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – The main purpose of this paper is to analyze which standard/technology will win the 3G mobile markets. In addition, two sub topics are examined. First, which kind of victory will it be – will one technological solution be all-dominating or is co-existence more likely? Second, which....... Originality/value – The paper is based on the understanding that a vast array of different factors in a complex dynamic environment goes into the determination of the outcome of such standardization games. However, the battle between 3G standards has already reached a level, where relatively certain...... predictions can be made. And, the paper contributes with a methodologically based discussion concerning the outcome of the battle between 3G standards....

  13. State Air Quality Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollution Engineering, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This article presents in tabular form the air quality standards for sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, photochemicals, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. (CS)

  14. SOFG: Standards requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerganov, T.; Grigorov, S.; Kozhukharov, V.; Brashkova, N.

    2005-01-01

    It is well-known that Solid Oxide Fuel Cells will have industrial application in the nearest future. In this context, the problem of SOFC materials and SOFC systems standardization is of high level of priority. In the present study the attention is focused on the methods for physical and chemical characterization of the materials for SOFC components fabrication and about requirements on single SOFC cells tests. The status of the CEN, ISO, ASTM (ANSI, ASSN) and JIS class of standards has been verified. Standards regarding the test methods for physical-chemical characterization of vitreous materials (as sealing SOFC component), ceramic materials (as electrodes and electrolyte components, including alternative materials used) and metallic materials (interconnect components) are subject of overview. It is established that electrical, mechanical, surface and interfacial phenomena, chemical durability and thermal corrosion behaviour are the key areas for standardization of the materials for SOFC components

  15. AKRO: Standard Prices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard prices are generated for cost recovery programs in the Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) halibut and sablefish, BSAI Rationalized crab, and Central Gulf of...

  16. Crew Transportation Operations Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Edward J.; Pearson, Don J. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Crew Transportation Operations Standards contains descriptions of ground and flight operations processes and specifications and the criteria which will be used to evaluate the acceptability of Commercial Providers' proposed processes and specifications.

  17. Nuclear radiation gauge standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    A hydrophobic standard for calibrating nuclear radiation moisture gauges is described, comprising a body of superposed interleaved thin layers of a moderating material containing hydrogen in the molecular structure thereof and of a substantially non-moderating material

  18. Ozone Standard Reference Photometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Standard Reference Photometer (SRP) Program began in the early 1980s as collaboration between NIST and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to design,...

  19. Beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleitez, V.

    1994-01-01

    The search for physics laws beyond the standard model is discussed in a general way, and also some topics on supersymmetry theories. An approach is made on recent possibilities rise in the leptonic sector. Finally, models with SU(3) c X SU(2) L X U(1) Y symmetry are considered as alternatives for the extensions of the elementary particles standard model. 36 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  20. Testing the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, H.; Marciano, W.; Williams, H.H.

    1982-01-01

    We summarize here the results of the standard model group which has studied the ways in which different facilities may be used to test in detail what we now call the standard model, that is SU/sub c/(3) x SU(2) x U(1). The topics considered are: W +- , Z 0 mass, width; sin 2 theta/sub W/ and neutral current couplings; W + W - , Wγ; Higgs; QCD; toponium and naked quarks; glueballs; mixing angles; and heavy ions

  1. The Gold Standard Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Tim; Rasmussen, Mette; Ghith, Nermin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates.......To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates....

  2. Food Safety & Standards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ An increasing number of people have realized that food safety is an important issue for public health. It not only concerns public health and safety, but also has direct influence on national economic progress and social development. The development and implementation of food safety standards play a vital role in protecting public health, as well as in standardizing and facilitating the sound development of food production and business.

  3. Islam, Standards, and Technoscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    Halal (literally, "permissible" or "lawful") production, trade, and standards have become essential to state-regulated Islam and to companies in contemporary Malaysia and Singapore, giving these two countries a special position in the rapidly expanding global market for halal products......, this book provides an exploration of the role of halal production, trade, and standards. Fischer explains how the global markets for halal comprise divergent zones in which Islam, markets, regulatory institutions, and technoscience interact and diverge. Focusing on the "bigger institutional picture...

  4. Standard software for CAMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkszus, F.R.

    1978-01-01

    The NIM Committee (National Instrumentation Methods Committee) of the U.S. Department of Energy and the ESONE Committee of European Laboratories have jointly specified standard software for use with CAMAC. Three general approaches were followed: the definition of a language called IML for use in CAMAC systems, the definition of a standard set of subroutine calls, and real-time extensions to the BASIC language. This paper summarizes the results of these efforts. 1 table

  5. Standards update -- 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    What a year this has been! Not since 1986, when SGML was being finished, has there been so much activity in the SGML world. In ISO, there are new standards being completed and old ones (some of which are not really all that old) being revised. As you`ll be hearing, there is lots of SGML activity in the applications world--particularly on the Internet--and that`s causing other kinds of standards activity. WG8 divides its work into five ``Rapporteur Groups`` (or ``RGs``) for DSSSL, Font Description and Interchange, SGML, SPDL, and Hypermedia Languages. Since interest is in DSSSL, SGML, and Hypermedia Languages, the author only mentions that the other groups have been active, too. The Fronts group has been doing amendments to its standards, ISO/IEC 9541 and ISO/IEC 10036. The Fronts groups has been active in providing support for ISO/IEC 10646, the massive character coding standard that has drawn a lot of attention in the SGML world. The SPDL group has at long last finished its standard, the Standard Page Description Language (ISO/IEC 10180) and is about to publish it. More detailed discussions are given for activity in SGML, DSSSL, and Hypermedia Languages.

  6. ISO radiation sterilization standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Byron J.; Hansen, Joyce M.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the current status of the ISO radiation sterilization standards. The ISO standards are voluntary standards which detail both the validation and routine control of the sterilization process. ISO 11137 was approved in 1994 and published in 1995. When reviewing the standard you will note that less than 20% of the standard is devoted to requirements and the remainder is guidance on how to comply with the requirements. Future standards developments in radiation sterilization are being focused on providing additional guidance. The guidance that is currently provided in informative annexes of ISO 11137 includes: device/packaging materials, dose setting methods, and dosimeters and dose measurement, currently, there are four Technical Reports being developed to provide additional guidance: 1. AAMI Draft TIR, 'Radiation Sterilization Material Qualification' 2. ISO TR 13409-1996, 'Sterilization of health care products - Radiation sterilization - Substantiation of 25 kGy as a sterilization dose for small or infrequent production batches' 3. ISO Draft TR, 'Sterilization of health care products - Radiation sterilization Selection of a sterilization dose for a single production batch' 4. ISO Draft TR, 'Sterilization of health care products - Radiation sterilization-Product Families, Plans for Sampling and Frequency of Dose Audits'

  7. Technical standards in nuclear area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimberg, M.

    1978-01-01

    The technical standardization in nuclear area is discussed. Also, the competence of CNEN in standardization pursuit is analysed. Moreover, the process of working up of technical standards is explained; in addition, some kinds of technical standards are discussed. (author) [pt

  8. Photodynamic therapy of intraocular cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravier, N.; Duvournau, Y.; Querec, M.A.; Pechereau, A.; Patrice, T.

    1992-01-01

    The most common intraocular tumors are choroidal malignant melanomas (70%) and retinoblastomas (13%). Each time that visual acuity is preserved, various conservative treatments are considered relative to the potential risk of metastatic disease during enucleation. In addition to standard techniques, photodynamic therapy is a potentially attractive new approach limited in its effects to the area of the treated tumor. The purpose of this preclinical study is to determine a reference dose-effect for single laser doses and to study effects of fractionation of the laser dose. (author). 9 refs., 1 tab

  9. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients...... of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more...... effective in treating depression and reducing relapse than standard cognitive behavioural therapy. METHOD/DESIGN: This study is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial comparing the effectiveness of group-based rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy with the effectiveness...

  10. Current therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Obukhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD is to correct dopamine deficiency in the nigrostriatal system. Levodopa preparations and dopamine receptor agonists (DRAs that are prescribed with regards to patient age and disease severity are mainly used now. Notwithstanding the fact that levodopa preparations are the gold standard of therapy, their long-term use gives rise to complications as motor fluctuations and drug-induced dyskinesias. The currently available DRAs are the drugs of choice for the therapy of early-stage PD as they are as effective as levodopa preparations. In extensive-stage PD, DRAs are used to enhance the therapy and correction of developed motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. Pramipexole is one of the most commonly used representatives of non-ergoline DRAs. The paper analyzes the efficacy of the medication used as both monotherapy and part of combined therapy, its effect on tremor and depression in PD. A novel extended-release formulation of pramipexole is considered separately. Both immediate- and extended-release pramipexole formulations contain the same active ingredient and have the same dopamine-receptor interaction profile, but differ in the tablet release rate of the active ingredient. The advantages of the novel formulation are its more steady-state plasma concentration and 24-hour action, which ensures continuous dopaminergic stimulation ofpostsynaptic receptors to prevent and treat already developed motor complications. The once-daily extended-release formulation of the drug makes its treatment regimen easier and patient compliance higher.

  11. Nonablative 1550-nm fractional laser therapy versus triple topical therapy for the treatment of melasma: A randomized controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Marije W.; Wind, Bas S.; Beek, Johan F.; van der Veen, J. P. Wietze; Nieuweboer-Krobotová, Ludmila; Bos, Jan D.; Wolkerstorfer, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Various treatments are currently available for melasma. However, results are often disappointing. We sought to assess the efficacy and safety of nonablative 1550-nm fractional laser therapy and compare results with those obtained with triple topical therapy (the gold standard). Twenty female

  12. Adlerian Marriage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon; Dinkmeyer, Don, Sr.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the assumptions, processes, and techniques used in Alderian marriage therapy. Describes purpose of therapy as assessing current beliefs and behaviors while educating the couple in new procedures that can help the couple establish new goals. (Author/ABL)

  13. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  14. Complementary Pancreatitis Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medication, and improve quality of life.1,2 Massage Therapy Massage therapy involves touch and different techniques of stroking ... of the body or be a full-body massage. Massage can be performed through one’s clothing or ...

  15. Cesar-therapie tijdelijk effectiever dan standaardbehandeling door de huisarts bij patiënten met chronische aspecifieke lage rugklachten : gerandomiseerd, gecontroleerd en geblindeerd onderzoek met 1 jaar follow-up [Cesar therapy is temporarily more effective than a standard treatment from the general practitioner in patients with chronic aspecific lower back pain; randomized, controlled and blinded study with a I year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrandt, V.H.; Proper, K.I.; Berg, R. van den; Douwes, M.; Heuvel, S.G. van den; Buuren, S. van

    2000-01-01

    Doel van dit onderzoek was het vaststellen van korte- en langetermijneffecten van Cesar-therapie op zelfgerapporteerd herstel en op houdingsverandering bij patiënten met chronische aspecifieke lage rugklachten. Patiënten met chronische aspecifieke lage rugklachten werden, nadat 'informed consent'

  16. The Environmental Impact on Occupational Therapy Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubik-Peplaski, Camille Louise; Howell, Dana; Hunter, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the environment influenced the intervention choices occupational therapists made for patients recovering from a stroke in an inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Three occupational therapists were observed providing intervention for six patients over a 16-month period. Treatment spaces included a therapy gym, gym with kitchen combination, and a home-like space. Furniture was added to the therapy gym to be more home-like midway through the study. Observations included therapist selection of treatment location and interventions, and observational data of the environment and interactions among therapists and patients. This study found that inpatient rehabilitation environments did influence interventions. The occupational therapists provided therapy in the standard therapy gym environment most often, whether it was enhanced to be more home-like or not, and predominately used preparatory methods.

  17. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL...... and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have...... there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition...

  18. DOE technical standards list. Department of Energy standards index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards. This TSL provides listing of current DOE technical standards, non-Government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other Government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and canceled DOE technical standards. Information on new DOE technical standards projects, technical standards released for coordination, recently published DOE technical standards, and activities of non-Government standards bodies that may be of interest to DOE is published monthly in Standards Actions.

  19. [Play therapy in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Katharina; Grothues, Dirk; Leitzmann, Michael; Gruber, Hans; Melter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The following article presents an overview of current research studies on play therapy in the hospital. It highlights individual diagnoses for which play therapy has shown reasonable success. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of the scientific debate on play therapy for sick children in order to allow conclusions regarding the indications for which play therapy is or might be useful.

  20. Tumor therapy and pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joss, R.; Brunner, K.W.

    1982-01-01

    Many successfully treated tumour patients are children and juveniles. This raises questions as to the effects of tumour therapy on reproductiveness and offspring. The possible extent of damage to the male and female gonads caused by surgical, chemical, and radiological tumour therapy is investigated. Also, the problem of tumour therapy or women developing neoplasms during pregnancy. Pregnancies after successful tumour therapy are quite frequent today. Experience so far suggests that the rate of congenital deformities is not significantly increased. (orig.) [de

  1. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  2. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  3. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, P; Keller, J; Lankisch, P G

    2001-04-01

    Malabsorption due to severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is one of the most important late features of chronic pancreatitis. Generally, steatorrhea is more severe and occurs several years prior to malabsorption of other nutrients because synthesis and secretion of lipase are impaired more rapidly, its intraluminal survival is shorter, and the lack of pancreatic lipase activity is not compensated for by nonpancreatic mechanisms. Patients suffer not only from nutritional deficiencies but also from increased nutrient delivery to distal intestinal sites, causing symptoms by profound alteration of upper gastrointestinal secretory and motor functions. Adequate nutrient absorption requires delivery of sufficient enzymatic activity into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meal nutrients. The following recommendations are based on modern therapeutic concepts: 25,000 to 40,000 units of lipase per meal using pH-sensitive pancreatin microspheres, with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in case of treatment failure. Still, in most patients, lipid digestion cannot be completely normalized by current standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment.

  4. Viewpoint: Personalizing Statin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo Keidar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD, associated with vascular atherosclerosis, is the major cause of death in Western societies. Current risk estimation tools, such as Framingham Risk Score (FRS, based on evaluation of multiple standard risk factors, are limited in assessment of individual risk. The majority (about 70% of the general population is classified as low FRS where the individual risk for CVD is often underestimated but, on the other hand, cholesterol lowering with statin is often excessively administered. Adverse effects of statin therapy, such as muscle pain, affect a large proportion of the treated patients and have a significant influence on their quality of life. Coronary artery calcification (CAC, as assessed by computed tomography, carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT, and especially presence of plaques as assessed by B-mode ultrasound are directly correlated with increased risk for cardiovascular events and provide accurate and relevant information for individual risk assessment. Absence of vascular pathology as assessed by these imaging methods has a very high negative predictive value and therefore could be used as a method to reduce significantly the number of subjects who, in our opinion, would not benefit from statins and only suffer from their side-effects. In summary, we suggest that in very-low-risk subjects, with the exception of subjects with low FRS with a family history of coronary artery disease (CAD at young age, if vascular imaging shows no CAC or normal CIMT without plaques, statin treatment need not be administered.

  5. DOE technical standards list: Department of Energy standards index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standards list (TSL) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards (EH-31) on the basis of currently available technical information. Periodic updates of this TSL will be issued as additional information is received on standardization documents being issued, adopted, or canceled by DOE. This document was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards. This TSL provides listings of current DOE technical standards, non-Government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other standards-related documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and canceled DOE technical standards. Information on new DOE technical standards projects, technical standards released for coordination, recently published DOE technical standards, and activities of non-Government standards bodies that may be of interest to DOE is published monthly in Standards Actions.

  6. Play Therapy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  7. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...

  8. Combining Voice Therapy and Physical Therapy: A Novel Approach to Treating Muscle Tension Dysphonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jennifer; Tomlinson, Carey; Stevens, Kristin; Kotagal, Kiran; Fornadley, Judith; Jacobson, Barbara; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Francis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the role of a specialized physical therapy program for muscle tension dysphonia patients as an adjunct to standard of care voice therapy. Study Design Retrospective Cohort Study Methods Adult MTD patients seen between 2007 and 2012 were identified from the clinical database. They were prescribed voice therapy and, if concomitant neck pain, adjunctive physical therapy. In a pragmatic observational cohort design, patients underwent one of four potential treatment approaches: voice therapy alone (VT), voice therapy and physical therapy (VT+PT), physical therapy alone (PT), or incomplete/no treatment. Voice handicap outcomes were compared between treatment approaches. Results Of 153 patients meeting criteria (Median age 48 years, 68% female, and 30% had fibromyalgia, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, depression, and/or anxiety), there was a similar distribution of patients with moderate or severe pre-treatment VHI scores across treatment groups (VT 45.5%, VT+PT 43.8%, PT 50%, no treatment 59.1%; p=0.45). Patients treated with VT alone had significantly greater median improvement in VHI than those not treated: 10-point vs. 2-point (p=0.02). Interestingly, median VHI improvement in patients with baseline moderate-severe VHI scores was no different between VT (10), VT+PT (8) and PT alone (10; p=0.99). Conclusions Findings show voice therapy to be an effective approach to treating MTD. Importantly, other treatment modalities incorporating physical therapy had a similar, albeit not significant, improvement in VHI. This preliminary study suggests that physical therapy techniques may have a role in the treatment of a subset of MTD patients. Larger, comparative studies are needed to better characterize the role of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26012419

  9. The Use of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in Music Therapy: A Sequential Explanatory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalek, Carolyn M; McKinney, Cathy H

    2015-01-01

    There are published examples of how dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and music therapy are effectively being used as separate therapies in the treatment of individuals with a variety of mental health disorders. However, research examining DBT-informed music therapy is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine whether music therapists working in mental health settings are implementing components of DBT in their work, and if so, how and why; and if not, why not and what is their level of interest in such work. We used a sequential explanatory mixed-methods research design implemented in two phases. Phase 1 was a quantitative survey of board-certified music therapists (n=260). Due to a low survey response rate (18%), and to enhance the validity of the findings, Phase 2, an embedded qualitative procedure in the form of interviews with clinicians experienced in the DBT approach, was added to the study. Both survey and interviews inquired about DBT training, use of DBT-informed music therapy, music therapy experiences used to address DBT skills, and experiences of implementing DBT-informed music therapy. Respondents indicating they implement DBT-informed music therapy (38.3%) are using components and adaptations of the standard DBT protocol. Advantages of implementing DBT-informed music therapy were identified, and more than half of the respondents who do not implement DBT in their music therapy practice also perceived this work as at least somewhat important. Disadvantages were also identified and support the need for further research. Components of DBT are used in music therapy and are valued, but there is a lack of empirical evidence to inform, refine, and guide practice. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño PhD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare X-linked disease caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase that leads to the accumulation of abnormal glycolipid. Untreated patients develop potentially lethal complications by age 30 to 50 years. Enzyme replacement therapy is the current standard of therapy for Fabry disease. Two formulations of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (agalsidase are available in most markets: agalsidase-α and agalsidase-β, allowing a choice of therapy. However, the US Food and Drug Administration rejected the application for commercialization of agalsidase-α. The main difference between the 2 enzymes is the dose. The label dose for agalsidase-α is 0.2 mg/kg/2 weeks, while the dose for agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks. Recent evidence suggests a dose-dependent effect of enzyme replacement therapy and agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks, which has been shown to reduce the occurrence of hard end points (severe renal and cardiac events, stroke, and death. In addition, patients with Fabry disease who have developed tissue injury should receive coadjuvant tissue protective therapy, together with enzyme replacement therapy, to limit nonspecific progression of the tissue injury. It is likely that in the near future, additional oral drugs become available to treat Fabry disease, such as chaperones or substrate reduction therapy.

  11. Results of radiation therapy in periarthritis humeroscapularis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.; Schlichting, G.; Galalae, R.; Kimmig, B.; Koltze, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: radiation therapy is applied in painful degenerative shoulder diseases. Aim of this work was to evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to symptomatic improvement in periarthritis humeroscapularis. Methods: ninety-four patients with periarthritis humeroscapularis were treated in two institutions. Mean age was 68 years, sex distribution were 32 men and 62 women. In 58 cases the right side was affected, left in 36 cases. At single doses of 0,75 Gy once a week a total dose of 6 Gy was applied The treatment effect was evaluated by the standardized von Pannewitz-score at the end of the treatment up to 6 months thereafter. Results: the treatment results of all the 94 patients were documentated at the end of therapy. Seventy-one patients were followed at least for further 4 months. Radiogenic side-effects were not noticed. The symptoms of 54 patients (57.4%) were improved or vanished, in 40 cases the symptoms were not significantly affected (42.6%). Four months after therapy 42 of 71 patients were improved (59.2%), 29 unchanged (40.8%). The treatment effect occured typically up to 2 months after therapy, there were no age-related differences. Also in recurrent radiation therapies the symptoms improved, in 80 percent after one preceding therapy, however only in 31.2 percent after multiple prior radiotherapies. (orig.)

  12. GISB: Efficiency through standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, B.

    1995-01-01

    For those who participated in the numerous day-long development sessions held in the dim, stale basement auditorium of the Department of Energy, the ida that the Gas Industry standards Board (GISB) would be producing standards anytime soon seemed a distant dream. However, the hazy vision of just over a year ago has now become a reality. As summer turns to fall and young gas schedulers throughout this country dream of the gridiron, GISB will have already issued a model electronic-trading partner agreement and 12 standards for capacity-release transactions, as well as three standards for nomination-related transactions. Under the steady hand of Executive directors Rae McQuade and a board of director that looks like a Who's Who of the gas industry, GISB has developed into a organization that will directly influence how gas is purchased, transported, and accounted and paid for in the 21st century. The paper describes the background of the organization, standards that have been released, and issues still to be addressed

  13. Sports eyewear protective standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Eye injuries sustained during sport comprise up to 20 per cent of all injuries to the eye serious enough for medical attention to be sought. The prevalence of eye injuries in sport is not easily assessed due to lack of authoritative participation rates, so most studies report total numbers in a time period. The evidence on the proportion of all ocular injuries that are from sport is reviewed. The relative frequencies in different sports are compared in a qualitative manner and the sports with greater numbers of ocular injuries are detailed. In common with occupational injuries to the eye, most sports eye injuries are considered preventable. The hierarchy of action for occupational risk is detailed and adapted to use in a sports scenario. All the available international, regional and national standards on sports eye protection are detailed and their provisions compared. The major function of the standards is to provide adequate protection against the hazard of the sport concerned. These are detailed and compared as a function of energy transfer. Eye protection must not introduce additional or secondary hazards (for instance, fracturing into sharp fragments on impact) and not introduce features that would deter the wearing of eye protection (for instance, restricting field of view to impede playing the sport). The provisions of the standards intended to limit secondary hazards are detailed and compared. The need for future work in standards writing and the activities of the International Standardization Organization in sports eye protection are detailed. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  14. IAEA Safety Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-09-01

    The IAEA Safety Standards Series comprises publications of a regulatory nature covering nuclear safety, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, the transport of radioactive material, the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and management systems. These publications are issued under the terms of Article III of the IAEA’s Statute, which authorizes the IAEA to establish “standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property”. Safety standards are categorized into: • Safety Fundamentals, stating the basic objective, concepts and principles of safety; • Safety Requirements, establishing the requirements that must be fulfilled to ensure safety; and • Safety Guides, recommending measures for complying with these requirements for safety. For numbering purposes, the IAEA Safety Standards Series is subdivided into General Safety Requirements and General Safety Guides (GSR and GSG), which are applicable to all types of facilities and activities, and Specific Safety Requirements and Specific Safety Guides (SSR and SSG), which are for application in particular thematic areas. This booklet lists all current IAEA Safety Standards, including those forthcoming

  15. Code, standard and specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Radiography also same as the other technique, it need standard. This standard was used widely and method of used it also regular. With that, radiography testing only practical based on regulations as mentioned and documented. These regulation or guideline documented in code, standard and specifications. In Malaysia, level one and basic radiographer can do radiography work based on instruction give by level two or three radiographer. This instruction was produced based on guideline that mention in document. Level two must follow the specifications mentioned in standard when write the instruction. From this scenario, it makes clearly that this radiography work is a type of work that everything must follow the rule. For the code, the radiography follow the code of American Society for Mechanical Engineer (ASME) and the only code that have in Malaysia for this time is rule that published by Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) known as Practical code for radiation Protection in Industrial radiography. With the existence of this code, all the radiography must follow the rule or standard regulated automatically.

  16. Standardization of depression measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Inka; Löwe, Bernd; Bjørner, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide a standardized metric for the assessment of depression severity to enable comparability among results of established depression measures. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A common metric for 11 depression questionnaires was developed applying item response theory (IRT) methods. Data...... of 33,844 adults were used for secondary analysis including routine assessments of 23,817 in- and outpatients with mental and/or medical conditions (46% with depressive disorders) and a general population sample of 10,027 randomly selected participants from three representative German household surveys....... RESULTS: A standardized metric for depression severity was defined by 143 items, and scores were normed to a general population mean of 50 (standard deviation = 10) for easy interpretability. It covers the entire range of depression severity assessed by established instruments. The metric allows...

  17. Standards and quality

    CERN Document Server

    El-Tawil, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    The book brings together a number of subjects of prime importance for any practicing engineer and, students of engineering. The book explains the concepts and functions of voluntary standards, mandatory technical regulations, conformity assessment (testing and measurement of products), certification, quality and quality management systems as well as other management systems such as environmental, social responsibility and food safety management systems.The book also gives a comprehensive description of the role of metrology systems that underpin conformity assessment. A description is given of typical national systems of standards, quality and metrology and how they relate directly or through regional structures to international systems. The book also covers the relation between standards and trade and explains the context and stipulations of the Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

  18. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  19. Music Therapy for Seniors

    OpenAIRE

    SLUNEČKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the use of music therapy in the lives of seniors. The target of this thesis is to map the possibilities of using music therapy ways with seniors and to recommend a suitable music therapy resources on the basis of the research and evaluation of obtained dates. The theoretical part describes the term "the music therapy", e.g. concept, definition, types and forms, the development of music therapy, the history, methods and techniques. This age group is defined in t...

  20. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.

    1987-01-01

    The standard model of particle interactions is a complete and relatively simple theoretical framework which describes all the observed fundamental forces. It consists of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and of the electro-weak theory of Glashow, Salam and Weinberg. The former is the theory of colored quarks and gluons, which underlies the observed phenomena of strong interactions, the latter leads to a unified description of electromagnetism and of weak interactions. The inclusion of the classical Einstein theory of gravity completes the set of established basic knowledge. The standard model is in agreement with essentially all of the experimental information which is very rich by now. The recent discovery of the charged and neutral intermediate vector bosons of weak interactions at the expected masses has closed a really important chapter of particle physics. Never before the prediction of new particles was so neat and quantitatively precise. Yet the experimental proof of the standard model is not completed. For example, the hints of experimental evidence for the top quark at a mass ∼ 40 GeV have not yet been firmly established. The Higgs sector of the theory has not been tested at all. Beyond the realm of pure QED, even remaining within the electro-weak sector, the level of quantitative precision in testing the standard model does not exceed 5% or so. Furthermore, the standard model does not look as the ultimate theory. To a closer inspection a large class of fundamental questions emerges and one finds that a host of crucial problems are left open by the standard model

  2. Conference: STANDARD MODEL @ LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    HCØ institute Universitetsparken 5 DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø Denmark Room: Auditorium 2 STANDARD MODEL @ LHC Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center 10-13 April 2012 This four day meeting will bring together both experimental and theoretical aspects of Standard Model phenomenology at the LHC. The very latest results from the LHC experiments will be under discussion. Topics covered will be split into the following categories:     * QCD (Hard,Soft & PDFs)     * Vector Boson production     * Higgs searches     * Top Quark Physics     * Flavour physics

  3. The Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Cliff; Moore, Guy

    2012-04-01

    List of illustrations; List of tables; Preface; Acknowledgments; Part I. Theoretical Framework: 1. Field theory review; 2. The standard model: general features; 3. Cross sections and lifetimes; Part II. Applications: Leptons: 4. Elementary boson decays; 5. Leptonic weak interactions: decays; 6. Leptonic weak interactions: collisions; 7. Effective Lagrangians; Part III. Applications: Hadrons: 8. Hadrons and QCD; 9. Hadronic interactions; Part IV. Beyond the Standard Model: 10. Neutrino masses; 11. Open questions, proposed solutions; Appendix A. Experimental values for the parameters; Appendix B. Symmetries and group theory review; Appendix C. Lorentz group and the Dirac algebra; Appendix D. ξ-gauge Feynman rules; Appendix E. Metric convention conversion table; Select bibliography; Index.

  4. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes

  5. [Conservative therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolenski, U C; Best, N; Bocker, B

    2008-03-01

    Cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint reflect the problem that great force is transmitted and balanced out over a relatively small surface area. As a pathophysiological factor, cartilage-bone contusions play a significant role in the development of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint. Physiotherapeutic procedures belong to the standard procedures of conservative therapy. The use and selection of the type of therapy is based on empirical considerations and experience and investigations on effectiveness of particular therapies are relatively rare. At present a symptom-oriented therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint seems to be the most sensible approach. It can be assumed that it makes sense that the symptomatic treatment of cartilage defects or initial stages of arthritis also includes the subsequent symptoms of pain, irritated condition and limited function. This leads to starting points for physiotherapy with respect to pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, avoidance of pressure points, improvement of diffusion and pressure release. In addition to the differential physiotherapeutic findings, the determination of a curative, preventive or rehabilitative procedure is especially important. In physical therapy special importance is placed on a scheduled serial application corresponding to the findings, employing the necessary methods, such as physiotherapy, sport therapy, medical mechanics, manual therapy, massage, electrotherapy and warmth therapy. From this the findings-related therapy is proposed as a practical therapy concept: locomotive apparatus pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, improvement of diffusion and decongestion therapy. Therapy options have been selected base on the current literature and are summarised in tabular form. The art of symptomatic therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint does not lie in the multitude of sometimes speculative procedures, but in the targeted selection

  6. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  7. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  8. Aroma therapy and medfly SIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelly, Todd E., E-mail: todd.e.shelly@aphis.usda.go [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA-APHIS), HI (United States). Animal and Plant Health Inspection

    2006-07-01

    A summary of the main findings of the research program on the biological competence of mass-reared, sterile males of the Mediterranean fruit fly (med fly), Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) and the development and implementation of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against this pest is presented. The potential application of aroma therapy to improve the mating success of sterile med fly males is studied. The report assumes a loosely chronological framework as it documents progression along two experimental scales: the number of males simultaneously exposed to ginger root oil, starting with small groups of 25 males and ending with rooms with nearly 200 million males; the experimental arena used to test the effects of aroma therapy, progressing from standard field-cages to large field enclosures to the open field. In addition, brief comments are offered regarding the potential negative effects of GRO exposure, the mechanisms underlying GRO-mediated improvement in male mating success, and the financial costs of GRO aroma therapy. (MAC)

  9. Aroma therapy and medfly SIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelly, Todd E.

    2006-01-01

    A summary of the main findings of the research program on the biological competence of mass-reared, sterile males of the Mediterranean fruit fly (med fly), Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) and the development and implementation of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against this pest is presented. The potential application of aroma therapy to improve the mating success of sterile med fly males is studied. The report assumes a loosely chronological framework as it documents progression along two experimental scales: the number of males simultaneously exposed to ginger root oil, starting with small groups of 25 males and ending with rooms with nearly 200 million males; the experimental arena used to test the effects of aroma therapy, progressing from standard field-cages to large field enclosures to the open field. In addition, brief comments are offered regarding the potential negative effects of GRO exposure, the mechanisms underlying GRO-mediated improvement in male mating success, and the financial costs of GRO aroma therapy. (MAC)

  10. Low Impact Development Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftin, Samuel R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-02

    The goal of the LID Standards is to provide guidance on the planning, design, construction and maintenance of green infrastructure (GI) features at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The success of LID at LANL is dependent on maintaining a consistent approach to achieve effective application, operation, and maintenance of these storm water control features.

  11. Standards and producers' liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmer, F.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the liability of producers and the diligence required, which has to come up to technical standards and the latest state of technology. The consequences of this requirement with regard to claims for damages are outlined and proposals for reforms are pointed out. (HSCH) [de

  12. GASB Achieves Standardization, Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, George E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1984 the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, created to solidify accounting principles for government entities, enumerated Generally Accepted Accounting Principles endorsed by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the National Council on Governmental Accounting. These principles have recently been approved for school…

  13. Standard hakkab tootma Mercedesele

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    AS Standard sõlmis ühe maailma suurema autotootjaga DaimlerChrysler AG koostöölepingu, mille kohaselt hakkab ettevõte tootma ning müüma kontori- ja teenindussaalide mööblit kontserni kuuluva Mercedes-Benzi Euroopa diileritele

  14. Elevating standards, improving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Richard

    2014-08-01

    In our latest 'technical guidance' article, Richard Clarke, sales and marketing director at one of the UK's leading lift and escalator specialists, Schindler, examines some of the key issues surrounding the specification, maintenance, and operation of lifts in hospitals to help ensure the highest standards of safety and reliability.

  15. International Financial Reporting Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam

    2011-01-01

    The advance of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) across the globe has accelerated over the last few years. This is placing increasing demands on educators to respond to these changes by an increased focus on IFRS in the curricula of accounting students. This paper reviews a range...

  16. Standard Model festival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-10-15

    The 'Standard Model' of modern particle physics, with the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) theory of inter-quark forces superimposed on the unified electroweak picture, is still unchallenged, but it is not the end of physics. This was the message at the big International Symposium on Lepton and Photon Interactions at High Energies, held in Hamburg from 27-31 July.

  17. Beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuypers, F.

    1997-05-01

    These lecture notes are intended as a pedagogical introduction to several popular extensions of the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions. The topics include the Higgs sector, the left-right symmetric model, grand unification and supersymmetry. Phenomenological consequences and search procedures are emphasized. (author) figs., tabs., 18 refs

  18. Standardized terminology in electronic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallas, R.

    1985-01-01

    The correct definitions of the most usual terms on standardization and homologation are given. Then the factors concerning the safety of electrical equipments are reviewed, as they are considered in most of the present legislations. Last, the state of homologations in Spain and Europe is included. (author)

  19. Standard Model festival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The 'Standard Model' of modern particle physics, with the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) theory of inter-quark forces superimposed on the unified electroweak picture, is still unchallenged, but it is not the end of physics. This was the message at the big International Symposium on Lepton and Photon Interactions at High Energies, held in Hamburg from 27-31 July

  20. Beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    The necessity for new physics beyond the Standard Model will be motivated. Theoretical problems will be exposed and possible solutions will be described. The goal is to present the exciting new physics ideas that will be tested in the near future. Supersymmetry, grand unification, extra dimensions and string theory will be presented.

  1. Standardization of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  2. Mixed RIA standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talan, P.; Mucha, J.; Krizan, J.

    1986-01-01

    For the radioimmunoassay of digoxin, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, 17β-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone and α 1 -fetoprotein a mixed standard was prepared of these substances in a gamma globulin solution at a concentration of 0.8 to 1.4 wt.% in an aqueous buffer at pH within the range of 6 - 9. The standard contains digoxin at a concentration of 10 -4 to 10 nmol/l, 17β-estradiol at 10 -4 to 2 nmol/l, progesteron at 10 -4 to 100 nmol/l, testosterone at 1o -4 to 21 nmol/l, and α 1 -fetoprotein at 10 -4 to 10 nmol/l with at least two of these substances having concentrations higher than 10 -3 nmol/l. Examples are given of the preparation of the mixed standard with different concentrations of the components. The use of the standard has the following advantages: it is labor saving, reduces the risk of failure in the manufacture of RIA kits, eliminates mistakes in the selection of kits for the determination of different substances and allows a more economical use of material. (E.S.)

  3. Nationwide Standards Eyed Anew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    With the federal No Child Left Behind Act underscoring the wide variation in what states demand of their students, people on both sides of the political aisle are again making the case for national standards, curricula, and tests. It wasn't so long ago--during the Clinton and George H.W. Bush administrations--that similar proposals went down in…

  4. Individualized therapies in colorectal cancer: KRAS as a marker for response to EGFR-targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kuiyuan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individualized therapies that are tailored to a patient's genetic composition will be of tremendous value for treatment of cancer. Recently, Kirsten ras (KRAS status has emerged as a predictor of response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeted therapies. In this article, we will discuss targeted therapies for colorectal cancers (CRC based on EGFR signaling pathway and review published data about the potential usefulness of KRAS as a biological marker for response to these therapies. Results from relevant studies published since 2005 and unpublished results presented at national meetings were retrieved and summarized. These studies reflected response (or lack of response to EGFR-targeted therapies in patients with metastatic CRC as a function of KRAS status. It has become clear that patients with colorectal cancer whose tumor has an activating mutation in KRAS do not respond to monoclonal antibody therapies targeting EGFR. It should now become a standard practice that any patients being considered for EGFR targeted therapies have their tumors tested for KRAS status and only those with wild-type KRAS being offered such therapies.

  5. 42 CFR 413.106 - Reasonable cost of physical and other therapy services furnished under arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of therapy, to therapists working full time in an employment relationship. (2) Fringe benefit and... geographical area in which the services are furnished and a standard travel allowance. (3) If therapy services... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reasonable cost of physical and other therapy...

  6. 78 FR 24750 - Scientific Information Request Therapies for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ...) approaches. b. External Beam Radiotherapy, including standard therapy and therapies designed to decrease..., learning curve)? Key Question 4 How do tumor characteristics (e.g., Gleason score, tumor volume, screen-detected vs. clinically detected tumors, and PSA levels) affect the outcomes of these therapies overall and...

  7. Effects of Vibration Therapy in Pediatric Immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Arika L; Hendrix, Thomas J; Woody, Jacque L

    2016-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial of 100 children (52 boys, 48 girls) ages 2 months to 7 years was conducted to evaluate the effect of vibration therapy without cold analgesia on pain. A convenience sample was recruited at two sites: a publicly funded, free immunization clinic and a private group pediatric practice. Participants were randomly assigned to receive vibration therapy via a specialized vibrating device or standard care. All children regardless of intervention group were allowed to be distracted and soothed by the parent. Pain was evaluated using the FLACC score, which two nurses assessed at three points in time: prior to, during, and after the injection(s). Data were analyzed using a two-independent samples-paired t-test. Results show that vibration therapy had no effect on pain scores in the younger age groups studied (2 months ≤ 1 year, > 1 year ≤ 4 years). In the oldest age group (> 4 to 7 years of age), a heightened pain reading was found in the period from preinjection to post-injection periods (p = 0.045). These results indicate that the addition of vibration therapy (without cold analgesia) to standard soothing techniques is no more effective in reducing immunization pain than standard soothing techniques alone, and thus, is not indicated for use with immunization pain. Recommendations include further evaluation of interventions.

  8. Photodynamic therapy in treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, O F; Rabinovich, I M; Guseva, A V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elaborate the rationale for the application of photodynamic therapy in complex treatment of patient with severe oral lichen planus. Complex clinical and laboratory examination and treatment was performed in 54 patients divided on 3 groups. Diagnosis of oral lichen planus was based on clinical, histological and immunohistochemical features. Group 1 received standard treatment, in the second group photodynamic therapy was conducted in addition to conventional treatment, patients in the third group received only photodynamic therapy. The study results proved photodynamic therapy to be useful tool in complex treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

  9. DOE standard: Radiological control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  10. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  11. DOE standard: Radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ''Occupational Radiation Protection''. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835

  12. Seminar on standards, standardization, quality control and interlaboratory test programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Bievre, P. [Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, Geel (Belgium)

    1978-12-15

    The author gives a resume on the proper use of standards and standardization of measurement procedures. Results of measurements obtained on the same instrument and on the same series of standards of different isotopic compositions are displayed.

  13. Comparative effectiveness of Tai Chi versus physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. Objective: To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy f...

  14. Department of Energy Standards Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This TSL, intended for use in selecting and using DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards, provides listing of current and inactive DOE technical standards, non-Government standards adopted by DOE, other Government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and cancelled DOE technical standards.

  15. DOE technical standards list: Department of Energy standards index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This technical standards list (TSL) was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of US DOE technical standards and other government and non-government standards. This TSL provides listings of current DOE technical standards, non-government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and cancelled DOE technical standards. Standards are indexed by type in the appendices to this document. Definitions of and general guidance for the use of standards are also provided.

  16. Pelvic floor physical therapy in urogynecologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarinos, Rhonda K

    2003-08-01

    Physical therapists are uniquely qualified to treat pelvic floor dysfunction with conservative management techniques. Techniques associated with incontinence and support functions of the pelvic floor include bladder training and pelvic floor rehabilitation: pelvic floor exercises, biofeedback therapy, and pelvic floor electrical stimulation. Pain associated with mechanical pelvic floor dysfunction can be treated by physical therapists utilizing various manual techniques and modalities. Research documents that conservative management is effective in treating many conditions associated with pelvic floor dysfunction. Research should be conducted to determine if addressing diastasis recti and contracture of the pelvic floor musculature should be a component of the standard physical therapy protocol.

  17. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  18. Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lene

    2004-07-01

    based on one of these three models could be constructed regarding all but one of the studied disorders. The single exception was depression, where reliable relationships between patient characteristics, drug classes and outcome of therapy remain to be defined. Conclusion Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy can, with presumably rare exceptions, be developed for any disorder, using standard Internet programming methods.

  19. Therapy of the burnout syndrome [Therapie des Burnout-Syndroms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczak, Dieter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] The prevalence, diagnostics and therapy of the burnout syndrome are increasingly discussed in the public. The unclear definition and diagnics of the burnout syndrome are scientifically criticized. There are several therapies with unclear evidence for the treatment of burnout in existence.The health technology assessment (HTA report deals with the question of usage and efficacy of different burnout therapies.For the years 2006 to 2011, a systematic literature research was done in 31 electronic databases (e.g. EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO. Important inclusion criteria are burnout, therapeutic intervention and treatment outcome.17 studies meet the inclusion criteria and are regarded for the HTA report. The studies are very heterogeneous (sample size, type of intervention, measuring method, level of evidence. Due to their study design (e.g. four reviews, eight randomized controlled trials the studies have a comparable high evidence: three times 1A, five times 1B, one time 2A, two times 2B and six times 4. 13 of the 17 studies are dealing with the efficacy of psychotherapy and psychosocial interventions for the reduction of burnout (partly in combination with other techniques. Cognitive behaviour therapy leads to the improvement of emotional exhaustion in the majority of the studies. The evidence is inconsistent for the efficacy of stress management and music therapy. Two studies regarding the efficacy of Qigong therapy do not deliver a distinct result. One study proves the efficacy of roots of Rhodiola rosea (evidence level 1B. Physical therapy is only in one study separately examined and does not show a better result than standard therapy.Despite the number of studies with high evidence the results for the efficacy of burnout therapies are preliminary and do have only limited reach. The authors of the studies complain about the low number of skilled studies for the therapy of burnout. Furthermore, they point to the insufficient evaluation of

  20. Kinetic therapy improves oxygenation in critically ill pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Theresa Ryan; Lin, Richard; Francis, Barbara A; Hales, Roberta L; Colborn, Shawn; Napoli, Linda A; Helfaer, Mark A

    2005-07-01

    To compare changes in oxygenation after manual turning and percussion (standard therapy) and after automated rotation and percussion (kinetic therapy). Randomized crossover trial. General and cardiac pediatric intensive care units. Intubated and mechanically ventilated pediatric patients who had an arterial catheter and no contraindications to using a PediDyne bed. Patients were placed on a PediDyne bed (Kinetic Concepts) and received 18 hrs blocks of standard and kinetic therapy in an order determined by randomization. Arterial blood gases were measured every 2 hrs during each phase of therapy. Oxygenation index and arterial-alveolar oxygen tension difference [P(A-a)O(2)] were calculated. Indexes calculated at baseline and after each 18-hr phase of therapy were analyzed. Fifty patients were enrolled. Data from 15 patients were either not collected or not used due to reasons that included violation of protocol and inability to tolerate the therapies in the study. Indexes of oxygenation were not normally distributed and were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank testing. Both therapies led to improvements in oxygenation, but only those from kinetic therapy achieved statistical significance. In patients receiving kinetic therapy first, median oxygenation index decreased from 7.4 to 6.19 (p = .015). The median P(A-a)O(2) decreased from 165.2 to 126.4 (p = .023). There were continued improvements in oxygenation after the subsequent period of standard therapy, with the median oxygenation index decreasing to 5.52 and median P(A-a)O(2) decreasing to 116.0, but these changes were not significant (p = .365 and .121, respectively). When standard therapy was first, the median oxygenation index decreased from 8.83 to 8.71 and the median P(a-a)o(2) decreased from 195.4 to 186.6. Neither change was significant. Median oxygenation index after the subsequent period of kinetic therapy was significantly lower (7.91, p = .044) and median P(A-a)O(2) trended lower (143.4, p = .077

  1. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leakage from 'open to air' system or breakage of glass bottle (with associated risk to ... and an air-leak detection system. It is connected to a ... need to add water. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard therapy – a randomised controlled trial. CHARL COOPER, M.B. CH.B. TIMOTHY HARDCASTLE ...

  2. Standarder for god undervisning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens; Christiansen, Frederik V; Troelsen, Rie

    foretages på baggrund af forskningsresultater, og ansattes engagement i undervisning vil ofte være på bekostning af forskningsindsatsen – og dermed på bekostning af vedkommendes akademiske karriere. Dette roundtable vil diskutere hvorvidt indførelsen af standarder for god undervisning kan være en del af en...... indsats, som både kan øge kvaliteten i de videregående uddannelser og øge undervisningens status. En sådan standard kan formuleres på mange måder, som har indflydelse på såvel anvendelighed som på selve forståelsen af hvad god undervisning er. Den udviklede model kan opfattes som et dialogredskab...

  3. Beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    These lectures constitute a short course in ''Beyond the Standard Model'' for students of experimental particle physics. The author discusses the general ideas which guide the construction of models of physics beyond the Standard model. The central principle, the one which most directly motivates the search for new physics, is the search for the mechanism of the spontaneous symmetry breaking observed in the theory of weak interactions. To illustrate models of weak-interaction symmetry breaking, the author gives a detailed discussion of the idea of supersymmetry and that of new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale. He discusses experiments that will probe the details of these models at future pp and e + e - colliders

  4. Beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    These lectures constitute a short course in ``Beyond the Standard Model`` for students of experimental particle physics. The author discusses the general ideas which guide the construction of models of physics beyond the Standard model. The central principle, the one which most directly motivates the search for new physics, is the search for the mechanism of the spontaneous symmetry breaking observed in the theory of weak interactions. To illustrate models of weak-interaction symmetry breaking, the author gives a detailed discussion of the idea of supersymmetry and that of new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale. He discusses experiments that will probe the details of these models at future pp and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders.

  5. Beyond standard quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1995-09-01

    Despite the many empirical successes of QCD, there are a number of intriguing experimental anomalies that have been observed in heavy flavor hadroproduction, in measurements of azimuthal correlations in deep inelastic processes, and in measurements of spin correlations in hadronic reactions. Such phenomena point to color coherence and multiparton correlations in the hadron wavefunctions and physics beyond standard leading twist factorization. Two new high precision tests of QCD and the Standard Model are discussed: classical polarized photoabsorption sum rules, which are sensitive to anomalous couplings and composite structure, and commensurate scale relations, which relate physical observables to each other without scale or scheme ambiguity. The relationship of anomalous couplings to composite structure is also discussed

  6. Testing the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Riles, K

    1998-01-01

    The Large Electron Project (LEP) accelerator near Geneva, more than any other instrument, has rigorously tested the predictions of the Standard Model of elementary particles. LEP measurements have probed the theory from many different directions and, so far, the Standard Model has prevailed. The rigour of these tests has allowed LEP physicists to determine unequivocally the number of fundamental 'generations' of elementary particles. These tests also allowed physicists to ascertain the mass of the top quark in advance of its discovery. Recent increases in the accelerator's energy allow new measurements to be undertaken, measurements that may uncover directly or indirectly the long-sought Higgs particle, believed to impart mass to all other particles.

  7. Efficacy of Turmeric as Adjuvant Therapy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maithili Karpaga Selvi, N.; Sridhar, M. G.; Swaminathan, R. P.; Sripradha, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that there is a significant interplay of insulin resistance, oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, and inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study was undertaken to investigate the effect of turmeric as an adjuvant to anti-diabetic therapy. Sixty diabetic subjects on metformin therapy were recruited and randomized into two groups (30 each). Group I received standard metformin treatment while group II was on standard metformin therapy with turmeric (2 g) supplements for 4 ...

  8. [Therapy of intermediate uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doycheva, D; Deuter, C; Zierhut, M

    2014-12-01

    Intermediate uveitis is a form of intraocular inflammation in which the vitreous body is the major site of inflammation. Intermediate uveitis is primarily treated medicinally and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy. When recurrence of uveitis or side effects occur during corticosteroid therapy an immunosuppressive treatment is required. Cyclosporine A is the only immunosuppressive agent that is approved for therapy of uveitis in Germany; however, other immunosuppressive drugs have also been shown to be effective and well-tolerated in patients with intermediate uveitis. In severe therapy-refractory cases when conventional immunosuppressive therapy has failed, biologics can be used. In patients with unilateral uveitis or when the systemic therapy is contraindicated because of side effects, an intravitreal steroid treatment can be carried out. In certain cases a vitrectomy may be used.

  9. Fertility and cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life

  10. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  11. DOE standard: Firearms safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    Information in this document is applicable to all DOE facilities, elements, and contractors engaged in work that requires the use of firearms as provided by law or contract. The standard in this document provides principles and practices for implementing a safe and effective firearms safety program for protective forces and for non-security use of firearms. This document describes acceptable interpretations and methods for meeting Order requirements

  12. Beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.G.

    1995-01-01

    The attempts to develop models beyond the Standard Model are briefly reviewed paying particular regard to the mechanisms responsible for symmetry breaking and mass generation. A comparison is made of the theoretical expectations with recent precision measurements for theories with composite Higgs and for supersymmetric theories with elementary Higgs boson(s). The implications of a heavy top quark and the origin of the light quark and lepton masses and mixing angles are considered within these frameworks. ((orig.))

  13. New standard environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriola, Luca; Luciani, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    The ISO 14001:2004 standard, like ISO 9001:2000 on quality management, transcends the preventive approach (based on a rigid and more or less adequate process-management model still mainly inspired by traditional production methods) and introduces in its stead a highly flexible approach applicable to any socio-economic activity. It is structured by processes rather than system elements, and is based on the quest for efficacy and ongoing improvement [it

  14. Standard Model physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Altarelli, Guido

    1999-01-01

    Introduction structure of gauge theories. The QEDand QCD examples. Chiral theories. The electroweak theory. Spontaneous symmetry breaking. The Higgs mechanism Gauge boson and fermion masses. Yukawa coupling. Charges current couplings. The Cabibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and CP violation. Neutral current couplings. The Glasow-Iliopoulos-Maiani mechanism. Gauge boson and Higgs coupling. Radiative corrections and loops. Cancellation of the chiral anomaly. Limits on the Higgs comparaison. Problems of the Standard Model. Outlook.

  15. Standard model and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    1984-09-01

    The SU(3)/sub c/ circle crossSU(2)/sub L/circle crossU(1)/sub Y/ gauge theory of ineractions among quarks and leptons is briefly described, and some recent notable successes of the theory are mentioned. Some shortcomings in our ability to apply the theory are noted, and the incompleteness of the standard model is exhibited. Experimental hints that Nature may be richer in structure than the minimal theory are discussed. 23 references

  16. DOE standard: Firearms safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Information in this document is applicable to all DOE facilities, elements, and contractors engaged in work that requires the use of firearms as provided by law or contract. The standard in this document provides principles and practices for implementing a safe and effective firearms safety program for protective forces and for non-security use of firearms. This document describes acceptable interpretations and methods for meeting Order requirements.

  17. Natural matrix standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1976-01-01

    Environmental radiochemistry needs, for use in analytical intercomparision and as standard reference materials, very large homogeneous samples of a variety of matrices, each naturally contaminated by a variety of longer-lived radionuclides, at several different ranges of concentrations. The reasons for this need are discussed, and the minimum assortment of matrices of radionuclides, and of concentrations is established. Sources of suitable materials are suggested, and the international approach to meeting this need is emphasized

  18. Non_standard Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    . Using parametric design tools and computer controlled production facilities Copenhagens Centre for IT and Architecture undertook a practice based research into performance based non-standard element design and mass customization techniques. In close cooperation with wood construction software......, but the integration of traditional wood craft techniques. The extensive use of self adjusting, load bearing wood-wood joints contributed to ease in production and assembly of a performance based architecture....

  19. Natural matrix standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental radiochemistry needs, for use in analytical inter-comparison and as standard reference materials, very large homogeneous samples of a variety of longer-lived radionuclides, at several different ranges of concentrations. The reasons for this need are discussed, and the minimum assortment of matrices, of radionuclides, and of concentrations is established. Sources of suitable materials are suggested, and the international approach to meeting this need is emphasized. (author)

  20. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy versus Cognitive Therapy for the Treatment of Comorbid Eating Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarascio, Adrienne S.; Forman, Evan M.; Herbert, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that although eating pathology is prevalent in college populations, both CBT and non-CBT-based therapies achieve only limited effectiveness. The current study examined several questions related to the treatment of eating pathology within the context of a larger randomized controlled trial that compared standard CBT…

  1. Radionuclide therapy of endocrine-related cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.

    2014-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the established radionuclide therapies for endocrine-related cancer that already have market authorization or are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Radioiodine therapy is still the gold standard for differentiated iodine-avid thyroid cancer. In patients with bone and lung metastases (near) total remission is seen in approximately 50 % and the 15-year survival rate for these patients is approximately 90 %. In contrast to the USA, meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy has market approval in Europe. According to the current literature, in the setting of advanced stage neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, radiological remission can be achieved in > 30 % and symptom control in almost 80 % of the treated patients. Somatostatin receptor targeted radionuclide therapies (e.g. with DOTATATE or DOTATOC) demonstrated promising results in phase 2 trials, reporting progression-free survival in the range of 24-36 months. A first phase 3 pivotal trial for intestinal carcinoids is currently recruiting and another trial for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is planned. Radiopharmaceuticals based on glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) or minigastrins are in the early evaluation stage for application in the treatment of insulinomas and medullary thyroid cancer. In general, radiopharmaceutical therapy belongs to the group of so-called theranostics which means that therapy is tailored for individual patients based on molecular imaging diagnostics to stratify target positive or target negative tumor phenotypes. (orig.) [de

  2. Autologous proliferative therapies in recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetschke, Elisa; Rudolf, Margit; Lohmann, Christoph H; Stärke, Christian

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the clinical effects of autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) injections and low-level laser application as therapy options for chronic lateral epicondylitis. A total of 52 patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis were evaluated in this study; 26 of these patients received three ACP injections and the control group, with 26 patients, received 12 laser applications, with standardized physical therapy for all patients afterward. Control examinations took place before treatment, after 2 and 6 mos, and in the 1 yr final follow-up. The control examination included the visual analog scale for pain and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome measure scores. The analysis at final follow-up after 1 yr showed that both treatment options resulted in successful therapy outcome for the patients. In total, 63.5 % were successfully treated. Successful treatment was defined as more than 30% improvement in the visual analog score and more than 10.2 points in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score. Both groups showed a significant improvement in time response. This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of autologous proliferative therapies in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. The data show that laser application and ACP therapy lead to a clinical improvement in epicondylopathia. Especially the new treatment with ACP can be highlighted as an alternative and as an easy-to-apply therapy option for clinical practice.

  3. Induction immunosuppressive therapies in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Martin, Spencer T; Roberts, Keri L; Grafals, Monica

    2011-02-01

    Induction immunosuppressive therapies for patients undergoing renal transplantation are reviewed. The goal of induction therapy is to prevent acute rejection during the early posttransplantation period by providing a high degree of immunosuppression at the time of transplantation. Induction therapy is often considered essential to optimize outcomes, particularly in patients at high risk for poor short-term outcomes. All of the induction immunosuppressive agents currently used are biological agents and are either monoclonal (muromonab-CD3, daclizumab, basiliximab, alemtuzumab) or polyclonal (antithymocyte globulin [equine] or antithymocyte globulin [rabbit]) antibodies. Although antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) is not labeled for induction therapy, it is used for this purpose more than any other agent. Basiliximab is not considered as potent an immunosuppressive agent but has a much more favorable adverse-effect profile compared with antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) and is most commonly used in patients at low risk for acute rejection. Rituximab is being studied for use as induction therapy but to date has not demonstrated any significant benefits over placebo. While head-to-head data are available comparing most induction agents, the final decision on the most appropriate induction therapy for a transplant recipient is highly dependent on preexisting medical conditions, donor characteristics, and the maintenance immunosuppressive regimen to be used. No standard induction immunosuppressive regimen exists for patients undergoing renal transplantation. Antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) is the most commonly used agent, whereas basiliximab appears safer. The choice of regimen depends on the preferences of clinicians and institutions.

  4. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  5. Standard biological parts knowledgebase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Galdzicki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We have created the Knowledgebase of Standard Biological Parts (SBPkb as a publically accessible Semantic Web resource for synthetic biology (sbolstandard.org. The SBPkb allows researchers to query and retrieve standard biological parts for research and use in synthetic biology. Its initial version includes all of the information about parts stored in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (partsregistry.org. SBPkb transforms this information so that it is computable, using our semantic framework for synthetic biology parts. This framework, known as SBOL-semantic, was built as part of the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL, a project of the Synthetic Biology Data Exchange Group. SBOL-semantic represents commonly used synthetic biology entities, and its purpose is to improve the distribution and exchange of descriptions of biological parts. In this paper, we describe the data, our methods for transformation to SBPkb, and finally, we demonstrate the value of our knowledgebase with a set of sample queries. We use RDF technology and SPARQL queries to retrieve candidate "promoter" parts that are known to be both negatively and positively regulated. This method provides new web based data access to perform searches for parts that are not currently possible.

  6. Standard Biological Parts Knowledgebase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdzicki, Michal; Rodriguez, Cesar; Chandran, Deepak; Sauro, Herbert M.; Gennari, John H.

    2011-01-01

    We have created the Knowledgebase of Standard Biological Parts (SBPkb) as a publically accessible Semantic Web resource for synthetic biology (sbolstandard.org). The SBPkb allows researchers to query and retrieve standard biological parts for research and use in synthetic biology. Its initial version includes all of the information about parts stored in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (partsregistry.org). SBPkb transforms this information so that it is computable, using our semantic framework for synthetic biology parts. This framework, known as SBOL-semantic, was built as part of the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL), a project of the Synthetic Biology Data Exchange Group. SBOL-semantic represents commonly used synthetic biology entities, and its purpose is to improve the distribution and exchange of descriptions of biological parts. In this paper, we describe the data, our methods for transformation to SBPkb, and finally, we demonstrate the value of our knowledgebase with a set of sample queries. We use RDF technology and SPARQL queries to retrieve candidate “promoter” parts that are known to be both negatively and positively regulated. This method provides new web based data access to perform searches for parts that are not currently possible. PMID:21390321

  7. Standard biological parts knowledgebase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdzicki, Michal; Rodriguez, Cesar; Chandran, Deepak; Sauro, Herbert M; Gennari, John H

    2011-02-24

    We have created the Knowledgebase of Standard Biological Parts (SBPkb) as a publically accessible Semantic Web resource for synthetic biology (sbolstandard.org). The SBPkb allows researchers to query and retrieve standard biological parts for research and use in synthetic biology. Its initial version includes all of the information about parts stored in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (partsregistry.org). SBPkb transforms this information so that it is computable, using our semantic framework for synthetic biology parts. This framework, known as SBOL-semantic, was built as part of the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL), a project of the Synthetic Biology Data Exchange Group. SBOL-semantic represents commonly used synthetic biology entities, and its purpose is to improve the distribution and exchange of descriptions of biological parts. In this paper, we describe the data, our methods for transformation to SBPkb, and finally, we demonstrate the value of our knowledgebase with a set of sample queries. We use RDF technology and SPARQL queries to retrieve candidate "promoter" parts that are known to be both negatively and positively regulated. This method provides new web based data access to perform searches for parts that are not currently possible.

  8. Emission- and product standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, P. de

    1988-01-01

    This report makes part of a series of eight reports which have been drawn up in behalf of the dutch Policy Notition Radiation Standards (BNS). In this report the results are presented of an inventarization of the use of radioactive materials and ionizing-radiation emitting apparates in the Netherlands. Ch. 2 deals with the varous applications of radioactive materials in the Netherlands. Herein also the numbers and the various locations by application, and the amounts and character of the radioactive materials used, come under discussion. Besides, the various waste currents are considered separately. The use of ionizing-radiation emitting apparates is treated in ch. 3. In ch. 4 the differences and agreements of the various applications, concentrating on the emission and product standards to be drawn up, are entered further. Also on the base of these considerations, a number of starting points are formulated with regard to the way in which emission and product standards may be drawn up. Ch. 7 deals with the conclusions and indicates the most important hiates. (H.W.). 25 refs.; 5 figs.; 25 tabs

  9. US Topo Product Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Michael J.; Davis, Larry R.; Fishburn, Kristin A.; Lestinsky, Helmut; Moore, Laurence R.

    2011-01-01

    This document defines a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) digital topographic map. This map series, named “US Topo,” is modeled on what is referred to as the standard USGS 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) topographic map series that was created during the period from 1947 to approximately 1992. The US Topo map product has the same extent, scale, and general layout as the older standard topographic maps. However, unlike the previous maps, US Topo maps are published using Adobe Systems Inc. Portable Document Format (PDF) with a geospatial extension that is called Georeferenced PDF (GeoPDF), patented by TerraGo Technologies. In addition, the US Topo map products incorporate an orthorectified image along with data that was included in the standard 7.5-minute topographic maps. US Topo maps are intended to serve conventional map users by providing Geographic Information System (GIS) information in symbolized form in the customary topographic map layout. The maps are not intended for GIS analysis applications.

  10. The IAEA safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karbassioun, Ahmad

    1995-01-01

    During the development of the NUSS standards, wide consultation was carried out with all the Member States to obtain a consensus and the programme was supervised by a Senior Advisory Group consisting of senior safety experts from 13 countries. This group of senior regulators later became what is now known as the Nuclear Safety Standards Advisory Group (NUSSAG) and comprises of senior regulatory experts from 16 countries. The standards that were developed comprise of four types of documents: safety fundamentals; codes of practice; safety guides; and safety practices. The safety fundamentals set out the basic objectives, concepts and principles for nuclear safety in nuclear power plants. The codes of practice, are of a legislative nature, and establish the general objectives that must be fulfilled to ensure adequate nuclear power plant safety. They cover five areas: governmental organization; siting, design, operation and quality assurance. The safety guides, administrative in character, recommend procedures and acceptable technical solutions to implement the codes and guides by presenting further details gained from Member States, on the application and interpretation of individual concepts in the NUSS codes and guides. In total in the NUSS series there is currently one Fundamentals document, five Codes of Practice and fifty-six Safety Guides

  11. Implementing PAT with Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Laakshmana Sabari; Doolla, Suryanarayana; Khaparde, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Perform Achieve Trade (PAT) is a market-based incentive mechanism to promote energy efficiency. The purpose of this work is to address the challenges inherent to inconsistent representation of business processes, and interoperability issues in PAT like cap-and-trade mechanisms especially when scaled. Studies by various agencies have highlighted that as the mechanism evolves including more industrial sectors and industries in its ambit, implementation will become more challenging. This paper analyses the major needs of PAT (namely tracking, monitoring, auditing & verifying energy-saving reports, and providing technical support & guidance to stakeholders); and how the aforesaid reasons affect them. Though current technologies can handle these challenges to an extent, standardization activities for implementation have been scanty for PAT and this work attempts to evolve them. The inconsistent modification of business processes, rules, and procedures across stakeholders, and interoperability among heterogeneous systems are addressed. This paper proposes the adoption of specifically two standards into PAT, namely Business Process Model and Notation for maintaining consistency in business process modelling, and Common Information Model (IEC 61970, 61968, 62325 combined) for information exchange. Detailed architecture and organization of these adoptions are reported. The work can be used by PAT implementing agencies, stakeholders, and standardization bodies.

  12. ISO radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.; West, N.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief description of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and its Technical Committee (TC) 85 ''Nuclear Energy'', the work of its Sub-Committee (SC) 2 ''Radiation Protection'' is described in some detail. Several international standards on subjects closely related to radiation protection have already been published, for example ISO-361 (Basic radiation protection symbol), ISO-1757 (Photographic dosimeters), ISO-1758 and 1759 (Direct and indirect-reading pocket exposure meters), ISO-2889 (Sampling of airborne radioactive materials), ISO-4037 (X and gamma reference radiations for calibration) and ISO-4071 (Testing of exposure meters and dosimeters). TC 85/SC 2 has currently eight active Working Groups (WG) dealing with 14 standards projects, mostly in advanced stages, in such fields as neutron and beta reference radiations, and X and gamma radiations of high and low dose-rates and high energies for calibration purposes, reference radiations for surface contamination apparatus, ejection systems for gamma radiography apparatus, industrial and laboratory irradiators, lead shielding units, protective clothing, thermoluminescence dosemeters, radioelement gauges, and surface contamination and decontamination. (author)

  13. Genetically Guided Statin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    number of new statin prescriptions, and (4) patient reported quality of life, physical activity, perceptions regarding statin therapy , and pain as...outcomes known to be prevented by statin therapy , we examined hospitalizations for three diagnoses: acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and...cholesterol. However, the ultimate goal of statin therapy is to decrease incidence of CAD, acute myocardial infarction and perhaps stroke. However, there is a

  14. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  15. American Physical Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do APTA represents more than 100,000 members: physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students of physical therapy. Other Popular Resources: - Member Directory - Annual Reports ...

  16. Is Bicarbonate Therapy Useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    Despite concerns about the negative effects of metabolic acidosis, there is minimal evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration is an effective treatment. In addition, sodium bicarbonate therapy is associated with many adverse effects, including paradoxic intracellular acidosis, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypernatremia, and hyperosmolality. Definitive recommendations regarding bicarbonate therapy are challenging as there is little high-quality evidence available. In most clinical scenarios of metabolic acidosis, treatment efforts should focus on resolution of the underlying cause, and sodium bicarbonate therapy should be used with caution, if at all. An exception to this is kidney disease, wherein sodium bicarbonate therapy may have a valuable role. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Ninan, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to radically change the way cancer is diagnosed, imaged, and treated. The holistic approach to cancer involves noninvasive procedures that emphasize restoring the health of human energy fields. Presenting a wealth of information and research about the most potent cancer healing therapies, this forward-thinking book explores how nanomedicine, holistic medicine, and other cancer therapies play important roles in treatment of this disease. Topics include nanobiotechnology for antibacterial therapy and diagnosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer, antioxidants and combinatorial therapies, and optical and mechanical investigations of nanostructures for biomolecular detection.

  18. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  19. Biological therapies for spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Vincenzo; Atteno, Mariangela; Spanò, Angelo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Peluso, Rosario

    2014-06-01

    Biological therapies and new imaging techniques have changed the therapeutic and diagnostic approach to spondyloarthritis. In patients with axial spondyloarthritis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor treatment is currently the only effective therapy in patients for whom conventional therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has failed. TNFα inhibitor treatment is more effective in preventing articular damage in peripheral joints than in axial ones. It is important to treat patients at an early stage of disease to reduce disease progression; moreover it is necessary to identify causes of therapy inefficacy in preventing joint damage in the axial subset.

  20. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...