WorldWideScience

Sample records for ambulatory care clinics

  1. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  2. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  3. German ambulatory care physicians' perspectives on clinical guidelines – a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Böcken Jan; Dieterle Wilfried E; Schnee Melanie; Kempkens Daniela; Butzlaff Martin; Rieger Monika A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background There has been little systematic research about the extent to which German physicians accept or reject the concept and practice of a) clinical practice guidelines (CPG) and b) evidence based medicine (EBM) The aim of this study was to investigate German office-based physicians' perspective on CPGs and EBM and their application in medical practice. Methods Structured national telephone survey of ambulatory care physicians, four thematic blocks with 21 questions (5 point Lik...

  4. The Role of Rural Health Clinics in Hospitalization Due to Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions: A Study in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanqing; Mueller, Keith J.; Chen, Li-Wu; Conway, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitalization due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) is often used as an indicator for measuring access to primary care. Rural health clinics (RHCs) provide basic primary care services for rural residents in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs). The relationship between RHCs and ACSCs is unclear. Purpose: The purpose…

  5. The Role of Ambulatory Care Pharmacists in an HIV Multidisciplinary Team within a Free and Bilingual Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Ann M. Fugit, Pharm.D., BCPS; Sallie D. Mayer, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, CDE; Radha S. Vanmali, Pharm.D., BCACP

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the role and integration of ambulatory care pharmacists in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) clinic within a free and bilingual clinic with regards to types of interventions made during the patient-pharmacist visit. Design: Retrospective, single-centered, chart review. Setting: Free, bilingual clinic in Richmond, VA. Participants: Thirty-two adult patients with diagnosed HIV receiving care in the clinic between June 30, 2010 and January 26, 2011. Main Outcome Measure: T...

  6. Characteristics of ambulatory care clinics and pharmacists in Veterans Affairs medical centers. IMPROVE investigators. Impact of Managed Pharmaceutical Care on Resource Utilization and Outcomes in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuwaidan, S; Malone, D C; Billups, S J; Carter, B L

    1998-01-01

    The type and extent of ambulatory care clinical pharmaceutical services in selected Veterans Affairs medical centers (VAMCs) were studied as part of a larger project. Questionnaires were sent to the 174 VAMCs to determine the extent of clinical pharmacy activity in ambulatory care clinics, characteristics of outpatient pharmacies and clinics, and characteristics of ambulatory care pharmacists in VAMCs and to identify sites for the IMPROVE (Impact of Managed Pharmaceutical Care on Resource Utilization and Outcomes in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers) project. Fifty VAMCs responded to the survey. There were 512 ambulatory care clinics within these VAMCs. There was some pharmacist coverage in 75% of the clinics. The highest pharmacist coverage was in walk-in refill, therapeutic drug monitoring, and anticoagulation clinics. Clinical pharmacists at 68% of the VAMCs had prescribing privileges in ambulatory care clinics. Clinical pharmacists managed 29.9% of the clinics. The types of clinics most commonly managed by pharmacists were therapeutic drug monitoring, anticoagulation, walk-in refill, and lipid clinics. Nurse practitioners or physician assistants also were providing primary care in 41% of the clinics. There were 242 ambulatory care clinical pharmacy specialists practicing in the 50 VAMCs. Of these, 41.3% had three years or less of ambulatory care experience. Most pharmacists were in the clinic five days per week. A Pharm.D. degree was the highest degree obtained for 76.9%. Ambulatory care pharmaceutical services are common in VAMCs and are being provided by numerous clinical pharmacists. PMID:9437478

  7. German ambulatory care physicians' perspectives on clinical guidelines – a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böcken Jan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been little systematic research about the extent to which German physicians accept or reject the concept and practice of a clinical practice guidelines (CPG and b evidence based medicine (EBM The aim of this study was to investigate German office-based physicians' perspective on CPGs and EBM and their application in medical practice. Methods Structured national telephone survey of ambulatory care physicians, four thematic blocks with 21 questions (5 point Likert scale. 511 office-based general practitioners and specialists. Main outcome measures were the application of Clinical Practice Guidelines in daily practice, preference for sources of guidelines and degree of knowledge and acceptance of EBM. In the data analysis Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for explorative analysis of correlations. The comparison of groups was performed by Student's t-test. Chi2 test was used to investigate distribution of two or more categorical variables. Results Of the total study population 55.3% of physicians reported already using guidelines in the treatment of patients. Physicians in group practices (GrP as well as general practitioners (GP agreed significantly more with the usefulness of guidelines as a basis for patient care than doctors in single practices (SP or specialists (S (Student's t-test mean GP 2.57, S 2.84, p Conclusion Despite a majority of physicians accepting and applying CPGs a large group remains that is critical and opposed to the utilization of CPGs in daily practice and to the concept of EBM in general. Doctors in single practice and specialists appear to be more critical than physicians in group practices and GPs. Future research is needed to evaluate the willingness to acquire necessary knowledge and skills for the promotion and routine application of CPGs.

  8. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermo JD

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic using point-of-care testing (POCT device versus venipuncture within ambulatory care clinics at our institution. Methods: All patients currently treated with warfarin therapy who were managed by clinical pharmacists for anticoagulation monitoring at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Family Medicine Center and University Diagnostic Center, were enrolled. Patients were asked to complete a satisfaction survey regarding their anticoagulation monitoring. In addition, data related to emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations and percent of time in the INR therapeutic range for 6 months pre- and post-implementation of POCT device was collected. This information was obtained through an electronic patient information database, Oacis. Results: A total of 145 patients were included in the data collection from the two clinics. The majority (41% of these patients were taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation. Satisfaction surveys were completed by 86 (59 % of patients. The surveys revealed that POCT device was preferred over venipuncture in 95% of patients. Reasons for the preference included more face-to-face interaction, less wait time, less pain, less blood needed, and quicker results. Of the 145 patients who were included in the objective data analysis, no significant differences were found in the number of hospitalizations, ED visits, or percent of time in the INR therapeutic range pre- and post- implementation of POCT device

  9. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  10. Clinical hypertension in Native American/span>s: a comparison of 1987 and 1992 rates from ambulatory care data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, K J; Preston, S; Rith-Najarian, S

    1996-01-01

    THE AUTHORS EXAMINED THE PREVALENCE of clinically diagnosed hypertension among all American Indian and Alaska Native outpatients served in Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities in fiscal year 1992, and compared these rates with a similar analysis done in 1987. In this report they provided data on that analysis as well as on the association between hypertension and diabetes. The 1992 overall estimated age-adjusted prevalence of clinically diagnosed hypertension in adults older than age 15 was 10.4%, compared with 10.9% in 1987, a small but significant decrease. Considerable variation exists in hypertension prevalence rates in American Indian communities as analyzed by IHS service area. This report represents an attempt to use ambulatory patient care data to demonstrate a means for ongoing surveillance of a chronic disease for the entire service population of the IHS. This comprehensive data set represents approximately 60% of the entire U.S. American Indian and Alaska Native population. Based on the ongoing nature of this ambulatory patient care data system, this model for hypertension surveillance permits a unique opportunity for longitudinal evaluation of quality improvement efforts for the American Indian and Alaska Native populations served by the IHS. PMID:8898769

  11. Evaluation of Ambulatory Care Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Simborg, Donald W.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Quinn E.

    1980-01-01

    The central purpose of an ambulatory care information system is to communicate information to the practitioner to facilitate clinical decision making. The clinical decision can be considered the dependent output variable in a process having the information system, the patient, clinician characteristics, and the environment as the independent input variables. Evaluation approaches using patient outcomes are problematic because of the indirect relationship between the information system and pat...

  12. Improving year-end transfers of care in academic ambulatory clinics: a survey of pediatric resident physician perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resident primary care continuity clinics, at the end of each academic year, continuity of care is disrupted when patients cared for by the graduating class are redistributed to other residents. Yet, despite the recent focus on the transfers of care between resident physicians in inpatient settings, there has been minimal attention given to patient care transfers in academic ambulatory clinics. We sought to elicit the views of pediatric residents regarding year-end patient handoffs in a pediatric resident continuity clinic.Methods: Residents assigned to a continuity clinic of a large pediatric residency program completed a questionnaire regarding year-end transfers of care.Results: Thirty-one questionnaires were completed out of a total 45 eligible residents (69% response. Eighty seven percent of residents strongly or somewhat agreed that it would be useful to receive a written sign-out for patients with complex medical or social issues, but only 35% felt it would be useful for patients with no significant issues. Residents more frequently reported having access to adequate information regarding their new patients’ medical summary (53% and care plan (47% than patients’ functional abilities (30%, social history (17%, or use of community resources (17%. When rating the importance of receiving adequate sign-out in each those domains, residents gave most importance to the medical summary (87% of residents indicating very or somewhat important and plan of care (84%. Residents gave less importance to receiving sign-out regarding their patients’ functional abilities (71% social history (58%, and community resources (58%. Residents indicated that lack of access to adequate patient information resulted in additional work (80%, delays or omissions in needed care (56%, and disruptions in continuity of care (58%.Conclusions: In a single-site study, residents perceive that they lack adequate information during year-end patient transfers

  13. Ambulatory Care Database

    OpenAIRE

    Misener, Terry R.

    1983-01-01

    A six month project was undertaken to collect outpatient encounter data (demographic, workload, and diagnoses) at a community medical treatment facility. To capture data, the 13,000 patients seen each month, the clerical staff and primary care providers all completed portions of a “mark sense” form. Study results, lessons learned, and a conceptual plan for a future outpatient information system are reviewed.

  14. Improving Clinical Workflow in Ambulatory Care: Implemented Recommendations in an Innovation Prototype for the Veteran’s Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Emily S.; Lowry, Svetlana Z.; Ramaiah, Mala; Gibbons, Michael C.; Brick, David; Calco, Robert; Matton, Greg; Miller, Anne; Makar, Ellen; Ferrer, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    NIST recommendations to improve workflow in ambulatory care using an EHR provide a first step in moving from a billing-centered perspective on how to maintain accurate, comprehensive, and up-to-date information about a group of patients to a clinician-centered perspective. These recommendations point the way towards a “patient visit management system,” which incorporates broader notions of supporting workload management, supporting flexible flow of patients and tasks, enabling accountable distributed work across members of the clinical team, and supporting dynamic tracking of steps in tasks that have longer time distributions. PMID:26290887

  15. Patient characteristics and clinical management of patients with shoulder pain in U.S. primary care settings: Secondary data analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansfield Richard J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although shoulder pain is a commonly encountered problem in primary care, there are few studies examining its presenting characteristics and clinical management in this setting. Methods We performed secondary data analysis of 692 office visits for shoulder pain collected through the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (Survey years 1993–2000. Information on demographic characteristics, history and place of injury, and clinical management (physician order of imaging, physiotherapy, and steroid intraarticular injection were examined. Results Shoulder pain was associated with an injury in one third (33.2% (230/692 of office visits in this population of US primary care physicians. Males, and younger adults (age ≤ 52 more often associated their shoulder pain with previous injury, but there were no racial differences in injury status. Injury-related shoulder pain was related to work in over one-fifth (21.3% (43/202 of visits. An x-ray was performed in 29.0% (164/566 of office visits, a finding that did not differ by gender, race, or by age status. Other imaging (CT scan, MRI, or ultrasound was infrequently performed (6.5%, 37/566. Physiotherapy was ordered in 23.9% (135/566 of visits for shoulder pain. Younger adults and patients with a history of injury more often had physiotherapy ordered, but there was no significant difference in the ordering of physiotherapy by gender or race. Examination of the use of intraarticular injection was not possible with this data set. Conclusion These data from the largest sample of patients with shoulder pain presenting to primary care settings offer insights into the presenting characteristics and clinical management of shoulder pain at the primary care level. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey is a useful resource for examining the clinical management of specific symptoms in U.S. primary care offices.

  16. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Fermo JD; Whitley HP; Thompson AM; Ragucci KR

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR) measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed an...

  17. Clinical Preventive Services for Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula W. Yoon, ScD, MPH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionClinical preventive services can detect diseases early, when they are most treatable, but these services may not be provided as recommended. Assessing the provision of services to patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD could help identify disparities and areas for improvement.MethodsWe used data on patient visits (n = 21,261 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2006, and classified patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, or diabetes as being at risk for CVD. We assessed differences in the provision of preventive services offered to patients who were and who were not at risk for CVD. Further, for those at risk, we compared the demographic characteristics of those who had and who had not been offered services.ResultsPatients at risk for CVD received significantly more preventive services compared with those not at risk. For patients at risk for CVD, aspirin therapy was more likely to be recommended to those aged 65 years or older than those aged 45 to 64 years and to men than women. Cholesterol screening was more likely for men and was less likely for patients with Medicare/Medicaid or no insurance than for patients who were insured. Rates of counseling for diet and nutrition, weight reduction, and exercise were low overall, but younger patients received these services more than older patients did.ConclusionPatients at risk for CVD are not all receiving the same level of preventive care, suggesting the need to clarify clinical practice guidelines and provide clinicians with education and support for more effective lifestyle counseling.

  18. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use...

  19. Ambulatory Medical Care Utilization Estimates for 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the caveats discussed in the ‘‘Methods’’ section. The relationship between characteristics of the patient’s ZIP Code and the choice of ambulatory care setting is shown in Table 5. For persons ...

  20. Use of antibiotics in ambulatory care patients and at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan-Mikić Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Optimal pharmacotherapy includes utilization of the right drug at the right time, right duration of therapy and adequate dosage. This study analyzed utilization of antimicrobial drugs at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad and in outpatients of the Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman. Material and methods Utilization of anti-infective agents was examined according to Anatomic-Therapeutic-Chemical Classification (group J. Drug utilization data were presented in Defined Daily Doses at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad in Defined Daily Doses per 100 bed-days, and in the Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman in Defined Daily Doses/1000 inhabitants per day. Results At the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad penicillins susceptible to beta-lactamase were established as most frequently used (39.33% namely: benzylpenicillin (32.18%, quinolone antibacterial agents ciprofloxacin (12.44% and cephalosporins, cephalexin (8.25%. In the Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman most frequently used were extended-spectrum penicillins (24.20% namely tetracyclines, doxycycline (18.98%, amoxicillin (18.27%, macrolides roxithromycin (17.56%. At the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad the decision on using antibiotics and establishing whether it was bacterial or virus infection in 92.13% cases was made on the basis of following analyses: throat and nasal swabs, urine culture, virus complement-binding reaction. In Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman it was done only in 18.46%. Conclusion Although treatment performed based on clinical picture and experience usually proves to be correct, antibiotic prescription policy should include antibiograms to provide optimal treatment and decrease the degree of resistance. Thus medicine would be

  1. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Bilcke

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies to (1 describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2 assess influential background characteristics, and (3 formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever, a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  2. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries. PMID:25032688

  3. Influenza-Like-Illness and Clinically Diagnosed Flu: Disease Burden, Costs and Quality of Life for Patients Seeking Ambulatory Care or No Professional Care at All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011–2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5–6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86–91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51–€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries. PMID:25032688

  4. Satisfaction With Medication Therapy Management Services at a University Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shiyun; Martin, Michelle T; Pierce, Andrea L; Zueger, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    A survey was issued to patients enrolled in the Medication Therapy Management Clinic (MTMC) at University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences (June 2011-January 2012) in order to assess satisfaction with pharmacy services provided by pharmacists. A 23-item survey was offered to 65 patients in the MTMC program before or after clinic visits. Since there is a paucity of data indicating the level of satisfaction with MTM services provided by pharmacists, this survey may contribute to the process of building a greater collaboration between the pharmacist and patient. Sixty-two of 65 patients completed the survey; satisfaction with MTMC pharmacists was demonstrated to be significantly positively correlated with overall satisfaction with the MTMC. Patient satisfaction is not significantly different according to age, gender, ethnicity, or number of disease states. Satisfaction with the pillbox service is not significantly different between younger and older patients. It was also noted that patients taking a greater number of medications had higher levels of satisfaction. Most patients indicated that they were satisfied with the MTMC pharmacists and services; further study linking patient satisfaction with MTM services to improved patient outcomes may allow our MTMC to serve as a model for other pharmacist-managed MTMCs serving similar patient populations. PMID:25312261

  5. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting. PMID:26938183

  6. Diagnostic Errors in Ambulatory Care: Dimensions and Preventive Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardeep; Weingart, Saul N.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on patient safety in ambulatory care, progress in understanding and reducing diagnostic errors in this setting lag behind many other safety concerns such as medication errors. To explore the extent and nature of diagnostic errors in ambulatory care, we identified five dimensions of ambulatory care from which errors may…

  7. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  8. Big Data and Ambulatory Care

    OpenAIRE

    Thorpe, Jane Hyatt; Gray, Elizabeth Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Big data is heralded as having the potential to revolutionize health care by making large amounts of data available to support care delivery, population health, and patient engagement. Critics argue that big data's transformative potential is inhibited by privacy requirements that restrict health information exchange. However, there are a variety of permissible activities involving use and disclosure of patient information that support care delivery and management. This article presents an ov...

  9. Use of extramural ambulatory care curricula in postgraduate medical training

    OpenAIRE

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S.; Satcher, D’Juanna; Turner, Teri L.; Sisson, Stephen D.; Fenick, Ada M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Extramural curricula developed for the purpose of sharing with other institutions have been designed to improve education on important topics in ambulatory care. We sought to assess the usage rates of these curricula among paediatric, internal medicine, and combined medicine-paediatrics residency programmes in the United States. Methods Surveys on aspects of trainee continuity clinic were sent to paediatric and medicine-paediatrics programme directors in 2012. Surveys contained a...

  10. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues. PMID:20050492

  11. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  12. Association between community health center and rural health clinic presence and county-level hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: an analysis across eight US states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laditka Sarah B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Federally qualified community health centers (CHCs and rural health clinics (RHCs are intended to provide access to care for vulnerable populations. While some research has explored the effects of CHCs on population health, little information exists regarding RHC effects. We sought to clarify the contribution that CHCs and RHCs may make to the accessibility of primary health care, as measured by county-level rates of hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS conditions. Methods We conducted an ecologic analysis of the relationship between facility presence and county-level hospitalization rates, using 2002 discharge data from eight states within the US (579 counties. Counties were categorized by facility availability: CHC(s only, RHC(s only, both (CHC and RHC, and neither. US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality definitions were used to identify ACS diagnoses. Discharge rates were based on the individual's county of residence and were obtained by dividing ACS hospitalizations by the relevant county population. We calculated ACS rates separately for children, working age adults, and older individuals, and for uninsured children and working age adults. To ensure stable rates, we excluded counties having fewer than 1,000 residents in the child or working age adult categories, or 500 residents among those 65 and older. Multivariate Poisson analysis was used to calculate adjusted rate ratios. Results Among working age adults, rate ratio (RR comparing ACS hospitalization rates for CHC-only counties to those of counties with neither facility was 0.86 (95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.78–0.95. Among older adults, the rate ratio for CHC-only counties compared to counties with neither facility was 0.84 (CI 0.81–0.87; for counties with both CHC and RHC present, the RR was 0.88 (CI 0.84–0.92. No CHC/RHC effects were found for children. No effects were found on estimated hospitalization rates among uninsured populations

  13. Colecistectomia videolaparoscópica ambulatorial Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Cruz Henriques

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Os autores apresentam sua experiência com 50 pacientes operados de colecistectomia videolaparoscópica em regime ambulatorial, no Hospital de Ensino da Faculdade de Medicina do ABC. MÉTODO: Quarenta e dois pacientes (84% eram do sexo feminino e oito (16% do masculino, a idade variou de 23 a 60 anos, com média de 41,5 anos. Foram submetidos ao procedimento pacientes com diagnóstico de colecistite crônica calculosa, que obedeciam aos seguintes critérios: inexistência de colecistite aguda, idade máxima de 60 anos, ausência de suspeita de coledocolitíase, avaliação clínica pré-operatória ASA I ou II, aprovação do paciente quanto ao método e período de internação empregados e presença de acompanhante. O posicionamento da equipe e a técnica utilizada foram os preconizados pela escola americana. RESULTADOS: O tempo cirúrgico variou de 50 minutos a 2 horas, com média de 1 hora e 25 minutos. A colangiografia intra-operatória foi realizada em 35 pacientes (70%, demonstrando coledocolitíase em um caso (2%, que necessitou conversão para cirurgia aberta. As complicações mais freqüentes no período pós-operatório imediato foram náuseas e vômitos em três casos (6%, seguidas de dor abdominal intensa em dois casos (4%. Foram tratados com antieméticos e analgésicos e tiveram a alta hospitalar adiada para o dia seguinte à operação. Quarenta e quatro pacientes (88% tiveram condições de alta no mesmo dia. O período de permanência hospitalar foi entre nove e 12 horas. O retorno ambulatorial era programado para o sétimo e trigésimo dias pós-operatório, não havendo necessidade de reinternação em nenhum caso. CONCLUSÕES: A colecistectomia videolaparoscópica ambulatorial é um procedimento seguro.BACKGROUND: The authors present their experience with 50 patients undergoing videolaparoscopic cholecystectomy in an ambulatory care setting at University Hospital, ABC Medical School. METHODS:Forty-two patients (84

  14. Impact of an Elective Course in Community and Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practices on Student Perception of Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kelli D; Maguire, Michelle; Bennett, Marialice S

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To determine the impact of an elective course on students' perception of opportunities and of their preparedness for patient care in community and ambulatory pharmacy settings. Design. Each course meeting included a lecture and discussion to introduce concepts and active-learning activities to apply concepts to patient care or practice development in a community or ambulatory pharmacy setting. Assessment. A survey was administered to students before and after the course. Descriptive statistics were used to assess student responses to survey questions, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze the improvement in student responses with an alpha level set at 0.05. Students felt more prepared to provide patient care, develop or improve a clinical service, and effectively communicate recommendations to other health care providers after course completion. Conclusion. This elective course equipped students with the skills necessary to increase their confidence in providing patient care services in community and ambulatory settings. PMID:27168617

  15. [Hospital Costs of Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, D

    2016-03-01

    Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSC) are defined as conditions that lead to a hospital admission of which the onset could have been prevented through a more easily accessible ambulatory sector or one that provides better quality care. They are used by health-care systems as a quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. The definition for ACSC varies internationally. Sets of conditions have been defined and evaluated already in various countries, e. g., USA, England, New Zealand and Canada, but not yet for Germany. Therefore this study aims to evaluate the hospital costs of ACSC in Germany using the National Health Service's set of ACSC. In order to calculate these costs a model has been set up for the time period between 2003 and 2010. It is based on G-DRG browsers issued by the German Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System as required by German law. Within these browsers all relevant DRG-ICD combinations have been extracted. The number of cases per combination was then multiplied by their corresponding cost weights and the average effective base rates. The results were then aggregated into their corresponding ICD groups and then into their respective conditions which lead to the costs per condition and the total costs. The total number of cases and total costs were then compared to another second source. These calculations resulted in 11.7 million cases, of which 10.7% were defined as ambulatory care-sensitive. Within the analysed time period the number of ambulatory care-sensitive cases increased by 6% in total and had a 0.9% CAGR. The corresponding costs amounted to a total of EUR 37.6B and to EUR 3.3B for ACSC. 60% of the costs were caused by three of the 19 ACSC. These results validate that it is worthwhile to further investigate this quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. PMID:25918929

  16. Ambulatory anesthetic care in pediatric tonsillectomy: challenges and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Corey Collins Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pediatric tonsillectomy is a common surgery around the world. Surgical indications are obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis. Despite the frequency of tonsillectomy in children, most aspects of perioperative care are supported by scant evidence. Recent guidelines provide important recommendations although clinician adherence or awareness of published guidance is variable and inconsistent. Current guidelines establish criteria for screening children for post-tonsillectomy observation, though most are based on low-grade evidence or consensus. Current recommendations for admission are: age <3 years; significant obstructive sleep apnea; obesity; and significant comorbid medical conditions. Recent reports have challenged each criterion and recommend admission criteria that are based on clinically relevant risks or observed clinical events such as adverse respiratory events in the immediate recovery period. Morbidity and mortality are low though serious complications occur regularly and may be amenable to improvements in postoperative monitoring, improved analgesic regimens, and parental education. Careful consideration of risks attributable to individual patients is vital to determine overall suitability for ambulatory discharge. Keywords: adverse airway events, complications, guidelines, mortality, OSA, pediatric anesthesia

  17. Caring for patients with chronic kidney disease: a joint opinion of the ambulatory care and the nephrology practice and research networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Alan J; Saseen, Joseph J; Dehart, Renee M; Dumo, Peter; Grabe, Darren W; Gilmartin, Cheryl; Hachey, David M; Hudson, Joanna Q; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Joy, Melanie S

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Appropriate care for patients with CKD must occur in the earliest stages, preferably before CKD progresses to more severe stages. Therefore, recognition and treatment of CKD and its associated complications must occur in primary care settings. Patients with CKD often have comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, creating specific considerations when treating these diseases. Also, these patients have CKD-related conditions, including anemia and renal osteodystrophy, that are not traditionally evaluated and monitored by the primary care practitioner. Collectively, many opportunities exist for pharmacists who practice in the primary care setting to improve the care of patients with CKD. PMID:15767229

  18. An overview of anesthetic procedures, tools, and techniques in ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messieha Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zakaria Messieha Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care (ASAC, also known as Same Day Surgery or Day Care in some countries, is the fastest growing segment of ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care. Over 50 million ambulatory surgical procedures are conducted annually comprising over 60% of all anesthesia care with an impressive track record of safety and efficiency. Advances in ambulatory anesthesia care have been due to newer generation of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics as well as airway management technology and techniques. Successful ambulatory anesthesia care relies on patient selection, adequate facilities, highly trained personnel and quality improvement policies and procedures. Favoring one anesthetic technique over the other should be patient and procedure-specific. Effective management of post-operative pain as well as nausea and vomiting are the final pieces in assuring success in ambulatory anesthesia care. Keywords: ambulatory anesthesia, out-patient anesthesia, Day-Care anesthesia

  19. Interdisciplinary Shared Governance in Ambulatory Care: One Health System's Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Sharon; Bacon, Cynthia Thornton

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of shared governance structures in acute care has illustrated the positive relationship between shared decision making and nurse empowerment and positive nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, about interdisciplinary shared governance, and even less is known about shared governance in ambulatory care. This article details one health system's experience with the implementation of an interdisciplinary shared governance structure in ambulatory care over a 4-year period. The authors report lessons learned, positive health system outcomes that resulted including improved communication, better preparedness for accreditation visits, improved assessment of fall risk, and a streamlined documentation system. Also discussed are mechanisms to enhance sustainability of the structure and discussion of future opportunities and challenges. PMID:27259130

  20. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  1. Quality assurance in the ambulatory care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, R D

    1989-01-01

    One of the most utilitarian developments in the field of quality assurance in health care has been the introduction of industrial concepts of quality management. These concepts, coupled with buyer demand for accountability, are bringing new perspectives to health care quality assurance. These perspectives provide a new view of quality assurance as a major responsibility and strategic opportunity for management; a competitive and marketable commodity; and a method of improving safety, effectiveness, and satisfaction with medical care. PMID:10313405

  2. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs. PMID:19265856

  3. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Drawz, Paul E; ABDALLA, MOHAMED; Rahman, Mahboob

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk...

  4. Analysis of Patient Service Time in Ambulatory Clinics: Patient Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Zerbe, Tony R.; Zerbe, Shirleen D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, analysis of patient service time (patient tracking) in ambulatory clinics has been performed manually. A case study of Eye and Ear Clinic in Pittsburgh, PA, revealed that this approach to patient data collection was prone to clerical error and did not satisfy the clinic's information-processing needs. Initial attempts at automation identified the features required of a successful computerized scheduling and patient tracking system.

  5. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  6. Application of three different sets of explicit criteria for assessing inappropriate prescribing in older patients: a nationwide prevalence study of ambulatory care visits in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chirn-Bin; Yang, Shu-yu; Lai, Hsiu-Yun; Wu, Ru-Shu; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, Hsiu-Ying; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Chan, Ding-Cheng (Derrick)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the national prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) prescribed in ambulatory care clinics in Taiwan according to three different sets of regional criteria and the correlates of PIM use. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This analysis included older patients who visited ambulatory care clinics in 2009 and represented half of the older population included on the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Participants We identified 1 1...

  7. Improving the quality of palliative care for ambulatory patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian; Aslaksen, Aslak

    2005-01-01

    PROBLEM: Most patients with advanced lung cancer currently receive much of their health care, including chemotherapy, as outpatients. Patients have to deal with the complex and time consuming logistics of ambulatory cancer care. At the same time, members of staff often waste considerable time and...... energy in organisational aspects of care that could be better used in direct interaction with patients. DESIGN: Quality improvement study using direct observation and run and flow charts, and focus group meetings with patients and families regarding perceptions of the clinic and with staff regarding...... satisfaction with working conditions. SETTING: Thoracic oncology outpatient clinic at a Norwegian university hospital where patients receive chemotherapy and complementary palliative care. KEY MEASURES FOR IMPROVEMENT: Waiting time and time wasted during consultations; calmer working situation at the clinic...

  8. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in making health care safe. That includes doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. Health care organizations ... embarrassed if you don't understand what your doctor, nurse or other health care professional tells you. • Don’ ...

  9. General practitioner's reported use of clinical guidelines for hypertension and ambulatory blood pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, E

    2012-03-01

    ABPM is an invaluable clinical tool, as it has been shown to improve blood pressure control in primary care. Many clinical guidelines for hypertension advocate ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. This study aims to quantify the use of clinical guidelines for hypertension and to explore the role of ABPM in Primary Care. A questionnaire survey was sent to GPs working in the West of Ireland. 88% (n=139) of GPs use clinical guidelines that recommend the use of ABPM. 82% (n=130) of GPs find use of clinic blood pressure monitoring insufficient for the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension. Despite good access to ABPM, GPs report lack of remuneration, 72% (n=116), cost 68% (n=108), and lack of time, 51% (n=83) as the main limiting factors to use of ABPM. GPs recognise the clinical value of ABPM, but this study identifies definite barriers to the use of ABPM in Primary Care.

  10. The Ambulatory Diagnostic and Treatment Center: A Unique Model for Educating Medical Trainees and Providing Expedited Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Richard A; Orlander, Jay D

    2016-05-01

    In this article, the authors reexamine the Ambulatory Diagnostic and Treatment Center (ADTC) model, which uniquely combines the education of trainees with the care of referred patients at one Veterans Affairs medical center. As an ambulatory clinic with an inpatient mind-set, the ADTC uses a series of closely spaced outpatient appointments that are longer than typical ambulatory visits, offering a VIP-level of evaluation with the patient-centered goal of expedited diagnosis and treatment. Faculty triage patients by weighing factors such as urgency, educational value, complexity, and instability of diseases in conjunction with the resources, availability, and appropriateness of other services within the medical center.The ADTC's unique focus on the education of trainees in comparison with other clinical rotations is evident in the ratio of learning to patient care. This intensive training environment expects postgraduate year 2 and 3 internal medicine residents and fourth-year medical students to read, reflect, and review literature daily. This mix of education and care delivery is ripe for reexploration in light of recent calls for curriculum reform amidst headlines exposing delays in veterans' access to care.A low-volume, high-intensity clinic like the ADTC can augment the clinical services provided by a busy primary care and subspecialty workforce without losing its emphasis on education. Other academic health centers can learn from this model and adapt its structure in settings where accountable care organizations and education meet. PMID:26839944

  11. What Ambulatory Care Managers Need to Know About Examination Room Utilization Measurement and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarich, Mark J; Rea, Ronald W; Lal, Tarun Mohan; Garcia, Angel L; Steffens, Fay L

    2016-01-01

    Demand for ambulatory care visits is projected to increase 22% between 2008 and 2025. Given this growth, ambulatory care managers need to proactively plan for efficient use of scarce resources (ie, space, equipment, and staff). One important component of ambulatory care space (the number of examination rooms) is dependent on multiple factors, including variation in demand, hours of operation, scheduling, and staff. The authors (1) outline common data collection methods, (2) highlight analysis and reporting considerations for examination room utilization, and (3) provide a strategic framework for short- and long-term decision making for facility design or renovation. PMID:27232683

  12. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, P. J.; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ...

  13. An assessment of 24-hour ambulatory EEG/ECG monitoring in a neurology clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Cull, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of 24-hour ambulatory EEG/ECG monitoring and routine EEG recording have been compared in a group of 62 patients attending a neurological clinic because of episodes of loss of consciousness. Overall, ambulatory EEG abnormalities were detected in 21 cases (34%) compared with 16 cases (26%) for routine EEG. Ambulatory EEG mainly improved the detection of generalised paroxysmal activity, but in some cases lateralised abnormalities were detected which were not present on the ro...

  14. Worksite Physical Activity Intervention for Ambulatory Clinic Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sharon; Farrington, Michele; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M; Clark, M Kathleen; Dawson, Cindy; Quinn, Geralyn J; Laffoon, Trudy; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviors, including physical activity (PA), of registered nurses (RNs) and medical assistants (MAs) are suboptimal but may improve with worksite programs. Using a repeated-measures crossover design, the authors explored if integrating a 6-month worksite non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) intervention, with and without personalized health coaching via text messaging into workflow could positively affect sedentary time, PA, and body composition of nursing staff without jeopardizing work productivity. Two ambulatory clinics were randomly assigned to an environmental NEAT intervention plus a mobile text message coaching for either the first 3 months (early texting group, n = 27) or the last 3 months (delayed texting group, n = 13), with baseline 3-month and 6-month measurements. Sedentary and PA levels, fat mass, and weight improved for both groups, significantly only for the early text group. Productivity did not decline for either group. This worksite intervention is feasible and may benefit nursing staff. PMID:27143144

  15. Strategies for reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Campbell, S.M.; Geissler, S.; Kunz, C.U.; Mahler, C.; Peters-Klimm, F.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are seen as potentially avoidable with optimal primary care. Little is known, however, about how primary care physicians rate these hospitalizations and whether and how they could be avoided. This study explores the complex c

  16. Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in Persons with an Intellectual Disability--Development of a Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Robert S.; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Brownell, Marni; Colantonio, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that the primary care provided for persons with an intellectual disability living in the community has been inadequate. Hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions are considered an indicator for access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of this research was to identify ACS…

  17. Defining Content for a Competency-based (CanMEDS) Postgraduate Curriculum in Ambulatory Care: a Delphi Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, René

    2012-01-01

    Background Ambulatory training in internal medicine has been noted to be dysfunctional and inadequate. In this study, we developed a set of competency-based outcomes specific to ambulatory care to guide the design, implementation and evaluation of instructional events to ensure that societal needs are addressed. Methods In 2007 a Delphi technique was used to reach consensus and define the priorities for competency-based training in ambulatory care for internal medicine residents. Four groups ...

  18. The emerging primary care workforce: preliminary observations from the primary care team: learning from effective ambulatory practices project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladden, Maryjoan D; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Fishman, Nancy W; Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Parchman, Michael; Wagner, Edward H

    2013-12-01

    Many primary care practices are changing the roles played by the members of their health care teams. The purpose of this article is to describe some of these new roles, using the authors' preliminary observations from 25 site visits to high-performing primary care practices across the United States in 2012-2013. These sites visits, to practices using their workforce creatively, were part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded initiative, The Primary Care Team: Learning From Effective Ambulatory Practices.Examples of these new roles that the authors observed on their site visits include medical assistants reviewing patient records before visits to identify care gaps, ordering and administering immunizations using protocols, making outreach calls to patients, leading team huddles, and coaching patients to set self-management goals. The registered nurse role has evolved from an emphasis on triage to a focus on uncomplicated acute care, chronic care management, and hospital-to-home transitions. Behavioral health providers (licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, or licensed counselors) were colocated and integrated within practices and were readily available for immediate consults and brief interventions. Physicians have shifted from lone to shared responsibility for patient panels, with other team members empowered to provide significant portions of chronic and preventive care.An innovative team-based primary care workforce is emerging. Spreading and sustaining these changes will require training both health professionals and nonprofessionals in new ways. Without clinical experiences that model this new team-based care and role models who practice it, trainees will not be prepared to practice as a team. PMID:24128622

  19. Estado nutricional, clínico e padrão alimentar de pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids em assistência ambulatorial no município de São Paulo Nutritional and clinical status, and dietary patterns of people living with HIV/AIDS in ambulatory care in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Ferrari Rafael Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Atualmente, a abordagem nutricional desempenha papel essencial no tratamento de pessoas que vivem com HIV/aids, particularmente no caso de alterações metabólicas pelo uso da terapia antirretroviral (TARV que podem estar associadas ao maior risco de doenças cardiovasculares (DCV. OBJETIVO: Caracterizar o estado nutricional, clínico e a qualidade da dieta de pessoas que vivem com HIV/aids. METODOLOGIA: Trata-se de um estudo transversal envolvendo pessoas que vivem com HIV/aids em atendimento na rede de serviços especializados no município de São Paulo. Os usuários desta rede, em uso ou não de TARV, foram recrutados no período de dezembro de 2004 a maio de 2006, durante consultas de rotina. Foram coletados dados sociodemográficos, clínicos, bioquímicos, antropométricos e dietéticos. A qualidade da dieta foi avaliada segundo escores de padrão de consumo predominantemente "não protetor" e "protetor" para DCV. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi constituída por 238 pacientes em TARV e 76 sem TARV. A média dos níveis de colesterol total, triglicérides e glicemia foram maiores no grupo TARV (p INTRODUCTION: Nutrition currently plays a key role in the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA, especially in the case of metabolic alterations due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, which could be related to cardiovascular diseases (CD. OBJECTIVE: to describe the nutritional and clinical status, and the quality of diet of PLHA. METHODS: It is a cross-sectional study involving a network of ambulatory care facilities for PLHA in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Patients, in use of HAART or not, were selected from December 2004 to may 2006, through routine clinic visits. We collected: socio-demographic, clinical, biochemical, anthropometric measures and dietary data. Diet quality was evaluated according to a "protecting" or "non-protecting" pattern of consumption scores for CD. RESULTS: The sample had 238 patients on

  20. Evaluation of the Medical Care of Patients with Hypertension in an Emergency Department and in Ambulatory Hypertension Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nobre

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics of the patients receiving medical care in the Ambulatory of Hypertension of the Emergency Department, Division of Cardiology, and in the Emergency Unit of the Clinical Hospital of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School. METHODS: Using a protocol, we compared the care of the same hypertensive patients in on different occasions in the 2 different places. The characteristics of 62 patients, 29 men with a mean age of 57 years, were analyzed between January 1996 and December 1997. RESULTS: The care of these patients resulted in different medical treatment regardless of their clinical features and blood pressure levels. Thus, in the Emergency Unit, 97% presented with symptoms, and 64.5% received medication to rapidly reduce blood pressure. In 50% of the cases, nifedipine SL was the elected medication. Patients who applied to the Ambulatory of Hypertension presenting with similar features, or, in some cases, presenting with similar clinically higher levels of blood pressure, were not prescribed medication for a rapid reduction of blood pressure at any of the appointments. CONCLUSION: The therapeutic approach to patients with high blood pressure levels, symptomatic or asymptomatic, was dependent on the place of treatment. In the Emergency Unit, the conduct was, in the majority of cases, to decrease blood pressure immediately, whereas in the Ambulatory of Hypertension, the same levels of blood pressure, in the same individuals, resulted in therapeutic adjustment with nonpharmacological management. These results show the need to reconsider the concept of hypertensive crises and their therapeutical implications.

  1. Big data and ambulatory care: breaking down legal barriers to support effective use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Jane Hyatt; Gray, Elizabeth Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Big data is heralded as having the potential to revolutionize health care by making large amounts of data available to support care delivery, population health, and patient engagement. Critics argue that big data's transformative potential is inhibited by privacy requirements that restrict health information exchange. However, there are a variety of permissible activities involving use and disclosure of patient information that support care delivery and management. This article presents an overview of the legal framework governing health information, dispels misconceptions about privacy regulations, and highlights how ambulatory care providers in particular can maximize the utility of big data to improve care. PMID:25401945

  2. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients n...

  3. A real life clinical practice of neurologists in the ambulatory setting in Thailand: a pragmatic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannikar Kongbunkiat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurological disorders is high in developing countries. Real life data from neurologists as to how they practice in Thailand are limited in literature. Practices of neurologists in a university hospital clinical setting in Thailand were studied. A prospective study was performed at the ambulatory neurology clinic, Khon Kaen University Hospital, between 1 February and 31 October 2009. The following data were recorded: numbers of patients, characteristics of patients, consultation notes, and time spent for each patient. There were three neurologists, each of whom ran one afternoon clinic, once a week. There were 6137 visits during the 9 months, with an average of 681 visits per month. The total number of patients was 2834. The three most common diseases were cerebrovascular diseases (33%, epilepsy (16%, and movement disorders (non-Parkinson’s disease, 12%. Neurologists spent an average of 6.34 minutes per patient. In conclusion, neurologists in medical schools have limited time to take care of each patient. Several strategies are needed in medical education and neurology training to improve the quality of care.

  4. Hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and the role of primary care in Italian regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Rosano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract
    Background: Hospitalization may often be prevented by timely and effective outpatient care either by preventing the onset of an illness, controlling an acute illness or managing a chronic disease with an appropriate follow-up. The objective of the study is to examine the variability of hospital admissions within Italian regions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs, and their relationship with primary care supply.
    Methods: Hospital discharge data aggregated at a regional level collected in 2005 were analysed by type of ACS conditions. Main outcome measures were regional hospital admission rates for ACSCs. Negative binomial models were used to analyse the association with individual risk factors (age and gender and regional risk factors (propensity to hospitalisation and prevalence of specific conditions.
    Non-parametric correlation indexes between standardised hospital admission rates and quantitative measures of primary care services were calculated.
    Results: ACSC admissions accounted for 6.6% of total admissions, 35.7% were classified as acute conditions and 64.3% as chronic conditions. Admission rates for ACSCs varied widely across Italian regions with different patterns for chronic and acute conditions. Southern regions showed significantly higher rates for chronic conditions and North-eastern regions for acute conditions. We found a significant negative association between the provision of ambulatory specialist services and standardised hospitalization rates
    (SHR for ACS chronic conditions (r=-0.50; p=0.02 and an inverse correlation among SHR for ACS acute conditions and the rate of GPs per 1,000 residents, although the latter was not statistically significant.
    Conclusions: In Italy, about 480,000 inpatient hospital admissions in 2005 were attributable to ACSCs. Even
    adjusting for potential confounders

  5. The employee-safety and infection-control manual: guidelines for the ambulatory health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R

    1991-04-01

    The ambulatory health care center has an empirical need to maintain adequate policies and procedures designed to safeguard the health and physical safety of both clients and employees. Of particular concern is the health care worker's risk of injury or exposure to infection. This article discusses the development of a comprehensive employee-safety and infection-control manual. Such a manual can assist in the accreditation of an ambulatory health care center by a national accrediting organization, and can also serve as a risk-management tool. An example of a manual's table of contents, a specific policy/procedure, a waiver form regarding human immunodeficiency virus exposure, and a hepatitis B virus "vaccination status" form are provided. Additionally, two "quick-look" texts are presented as examples of fast reference guides for common safety practices and the treatment of the employee with a health-threatening exposure. PMID:1905791

  6. Ambulatory electroencephalogram in children: A prospective clinical audit of 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahin Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory electroencephalogram has been used for differentiating epileptic from nonepileptic events, recording seizure frequency and classification of seizure type. We studied 100 consecutive children prospectively aged 11 days to 16 years that were referred for an ambulatory electroencephalogram to a regional children′s hospital. Ambulatory electroencephalogram was clinically useful in contributing to a clinical diagnosis in 71% of children who were referred with a range of clinical questions. A diagnosis of epileptic disorder was confirmed by obtaining an ictal record in 26% and this included 11 children that had previously normal awake and or sleep electroencephalogram. We recommend making a telephone check of the current target event frequency and prioritising those with typical events on most days in order to improve the frequency of recording a typical attack.

  7. Pharmacist-patient relationship development in an ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, C J; Wiederholt, J B

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacist-patient relationship, conceptualizing its interpersonal constructs and dynamics using social exchange principles. The constructs of felt indebtedness (FI), collaborative willingness (CW), interpersonal relationship quality (IRQ), medication use beliefs (MUBs), and critical interpersonal incidents (CII) between pharmacist and patient were proposed, measured, and modeled. Patient responses were collected using interviews and mail surveys in 2 pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics. Higher IRQ levels predicted greater FI toward and CW with pharmacists (p pharmacists, and not their therapy, may lead to increased interpersonal exchange and patient collaboration in care. PMID:11550853

  8. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods: TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results: Pharmacists are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team and play a key role in providing care to patients as they move between health care settings or from a health care setting to home. Pharmacists can participate in many aspects of the inpatient, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy practice settings to implement and ensure optimal TOC processes. This article describes establishing the pharmacist’s TOC role and practicing within multiple health care settings. In these models, pharmacists focus on medication reconciliation, discharge counseling, and optimization of medications. Additionally, a checklist has been created to assist other pharmacists in developing the pharmacist’s TOC roles in a practice environment or incorporating more TOC elements in their practice setting. Conclusion: Optimizing the TOC process, reducing medication errors, and preventing adverse events are important focus areas in the current health care system, as emphasized by The Joint Commission and other health care organizations. Pharmacists have the unique opportunity and skillset to develop and participate in TOC processes that will enhance medication safety and improve patient care.

  9. A cluster randomized trial evaluating electronic prescribing in an ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Sherman

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors, adverse drug events and potential adverse drug events are common and serious in terms of the harms and costs that they impose on the health system and those who use it. Errors resulting in preventable adverse drug events have been shown to occur most often at the stages of ordering and administration. This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic trial of electronic prescribing to reduce prescription error. The trial was designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Design This study was designed as a 65-week, cluster randomized, parallel study. Methods The trial was conducted within ambulatory outpatient clinics in an academic tertiary care centre in Ontario, Canada. The electronic prescribing software for the study is a Canadian electronic prescribing software package which provides physician prescription entry with decision support at the point of care. Using a handheld computer (PDA the physician selects medications using an error minimising menu-based pick list from a comprehensive drug database, create specific prescription instructions and then transmit the prescription directly and electronically to a participating pharmacy via facsimile or to the physician's printer using local area wireless technology. The unit of allocation and randomization is by 'week', i.e. the system is "on" or "off" according to the randomization scheme and the unit of analysis is the prescription, with adjustment for clustering of patients within practitioners. Discussion This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized trial of point-of-care electronic prescribing, which was specifically designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00252395

  10. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    OpenAIRE

    Sen S.; Bowen JF; Ganetsky VS; Hadley D; Melody K; Otsuka S; Vanmali R; Thomas T

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC) models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods: TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results: Pharmacists are...

  11. Perceived Stress, Multimorbidity, and Risk for Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care-sensitive Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders; Vestergaard, Mogens; Davydow, Dimitry S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric disorders are associated with an increased risk for ambulatory care-sensitive condition (ACSC)-related hospitalizations, but it remains unknown whether this holds for individuals with nonsyndromic stress that is more prevalent in the general population. OBJECTIVES.......67) after fully adjusting for multimorbidity and socioeconomic factors. Individuals with above reference stress levels experienced 1703 excess ACSC-related hospitalizations (18% of all). A dose-response relationship was observed between perceived stress and the ACSC-related hospitalization rate regardless...

  12. Standardizing Assessment of Competences and Competencies of Oncology Nurses Working in Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Clara; Magnan, Morris A; Henderson, Denise; DeRose, Patricia; Carolin, Kathleen; Bepler, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A nursing quality consortium standardized nursing practice across 17 independently functioning ambulatory oncology sites. Programs were developed to validate both competences and competencies. One program assessed nine competences needed to develop systems of care to detect and treat treatment-related side effects. A second program was developed to assess competencies needed to prevent harm to oncology patients. This manuscript describes a successful approach to standardizing nursing practice across geographically distant academic and community sites. PMID:26985750

  13. Experts Foresee a Major Shift From Inpatient to Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beans, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    An American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation report predicts trends in health care delivery and financing, drug development and therapeutics, pharmaceutical marketplace, pharmacy workforce, and more. PMID:27069342

  14. AMBULATORY CARE - SENSITIVE CONDITIONS IN CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Araújo Figueiredo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:analyzethe extent to which the incidence rate of primary care sensitivehospitalizations in children under five years is influenced by the percentage of coverage of theprimary care.Methods:This was a cross-sectional ecological study that combines coverage ofprimary careand theambulatorycare-sensitiveconditionsin 2000 and 2010. We used data from theHospital Information System (HIS and the Information System of Primary Care (SIAB.Results:The data revealed that the increased coverage providedprimary carereductionrateofhospitalization diseases studied. In 2000 the reduction was greater for gastroenteritis (51% inchildren under 01 years and 30% in children 01-04 years in 2010 for respiratory diseases (51% inchildren under 01years and 33% in children aged 01-04 years.Conclusion:we found an association between the coverage ofprimary careand admission rates, however seem to affect othervariables, suggesting the need for further studies.

  15. Ambulatory anesthetic care in pediatric tonsillectomy: challenges and risks

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Corey

    2015-01-01

    Corey Collins Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pediatric tonsillectomy is a common surgery around the world. Surgical indications are obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis. Despite the frequency of tonsillectomy in children, most aspects of perioperative care are supported by scant evidence. Recent guidelines provide important recommendations although clinician adherence or awareness of published ...

  16. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe;

    2007-01-01

    (1993-March 2007), EMBASE (1980-February 2007), and Web of Science (1945-March 2007). Key words included medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease, outpatient, ambulatory care, primary health care, general practice, patient admission, hospitalization, observational study, retrospective.......5 per 1000 person-months. Cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and hypoglycemic agents together accounted for 86.5% of pADEs, and 77.2% of pADEs resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system, electrolyte/renal system, and gastrointestinal tract. Medication errors resulting in pADEs occurred in the...

  17. Hospitalisation Rates for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions for Persons with and without an Intellectual Disability--A Population Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, R.; Brownell, M.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.; Colantonio, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that persons with an intellectual disability (ID) face barriers to primary care; however, this has not been extensively studied at the population level. Rates of hospitalisation for ambulatory care sensitive conditions are used as an indicator of access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of the study was…

  18. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara Rehem

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. METHOD: the hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. RESULT: the sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. CONCLUSION: there are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  19. Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K C; Hale, D C; Von Boerum, D H; Reich, G C; Hamilton, L T; Matsen, J M

    1994-01-01

    A 4-month evaluation of ambulatory patients with a suspicion of a urinary tract infection was performed. Specific objectives included assessment of five urinary screening methods, reevaluation of the necessity of the phenylethyl alcohol plate (PEA), and cost-effectiveness of screening for low colony count bacteriuria. Urine samples were collected as midstream, clean-caught specimens. A total of 142 samples, 87 from 79 symptomatic patients and 55 negative controls, were evaluated. All urine specimens were cultured using a 0.01 mL loop and a 0.001 mL loop onto Columbia sheep blood agar, MacConkey agar, and PEA agar. Twenty-four specimens (17%) were sterile, 64 (45%) were contaminated, and 54 (38%) were infected. Five urine screening methods were performed. These tests and their associated sensitivity and specificity are as follows. The Chemstrip 9 (Behring, Inc., Somerville, NJ) for leukocyte esterase and nitrate, 67%, 98%; microscopic analysis on spun urine, 79%, 93%; methylene blue stain for pyuria, 60%, 99%; Gram stain for pyuria, 45%, 93%; Gram stain for bacteriuria, 65%, 75%; and the URISCREEN (Analytab Products, Plainview, NY), 92%, 89%. Inclusion of a PEA plate for isolation of gram-positive organisms provided no additional information. Routine culture of urine samples at 10(-2) mL increased the contamination rate by 19%. PMID:7506476

  20. Identifying consumer segments in health services markets: an application of conjoint and cluster analyses to the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrol, N V; Gagon, J P

    1983-01-01

    Because of increasing competition, it is becoming more important that health care providers pursue consumer-based market segmentation strategies. This paper presents a methodology for identifying and describing consumer segments in health service markets, and demonstrates the use of the methodology by presenting a study of consumer segments in the ambulatory care pharmacy market. PMID:10262855

  1. Comparing Team-Based and Mixed Active-Learning Methods in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Andrea S.; Guirguis, Alexander B.; George, Christa M.; Howard-Thompson, Amanda; Heidel, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess students' performance and perceptions of team-based and mixed active-learning methods in 2 ambulatory care elective courses, and to describe faculty members' perceptions of team-based learning. Methods Using the 2 teaching methods, students' grades were compared. Students' perceptions were assessed through 2 anonymous course evaluation instruments. Faculty members who taught courses using the team-based learning method were surveyed regarding their impressions of team-based learning. Results The ambulatory care course was offered to 64 students using team-based learning (n = 37) and mixed active learning (n = 27) formats. The mean quality points earned were 3.7 (team-based learning) and 3.3 (mixed active learning), p < 0.001. Course evaluations for both courses were favorable. All faculty members who used the team-based learning method reported that they would consider using team-based learning in another course. Conclusions Students were satisfied with both teaching methods; however, student grades were significantly higher in the team-based learning course. Faculty members recognized team-based learning as an effective teaching strategy for small-group active learning. PMID:21301594

  2. Comprehensive Ambulatory Medicine Training for Categorical Internal Medicine Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Bharel, Monica; Jain, Sharad; Hollander, Harry

    2003-01-01

    It is challenging to create an educational and satisfying experience in the outpatient setting. We developed a 3-year ambulatory curriculum that addresses the special needs of our categorical medicine residents with distinct learning objectives for each year of training and clinical experiences and didactic sessions to meet these goals. All PGY1 residents spend 1 month on a general medicine ambulatory care rotation. PGY2 residents spend 3 months on an ambulatory block focusing on 8 core medic...

  3. Addressing Pediatric Obesity in Ambulatory Care: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Carine M; Manders, Aaron J; Perdomo, Joanna E; Ireland, Kathy A; Barlow, Sarah E

    2016-06-01

    Since the "2007 summary report of child and adolescent overweight and obesity treatment" published by Barlow, many obesity intervention studies have been conducted in pediatric ambulatory care. Although several meta-analyses have been published in the interim, many studies were excluded because of the focus and criteria of these meta-analyses. Therefore, the primary goal of this article was to identify randomized case-control trials conducted in the primary care setting and to report on treatment approaches, challenges, and successes. We have developed four themes for our discussion and provide a brief summary of our findings. Finally, we identified major gaps and potential solutions and describe several urgent key action items. PMID:27048522

  4. Marketing strategy adjustments in the ambulatory care center industry: implications for community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J H

    1989-01-01

    Each stage of a product's life cycle requires marketing strategy modifications in response to changing demand levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in ambulatory care center (ACC) operational characteristics indicative of product, market, and distribution channel adjustments that could have a competitive impact upon community pharmacy practice. A questionnaire was mailed to a national sample of 325 ACC managers. Evidence of new product feature additions includes increased emphasis on continued care and increased prevalence of prescription drug dispensing. Expansion into new market segments and distribution channels was demonstrated by increased participation in HMO and employer relationships. The observed adjustments in ACC marketing strategies present obvious challenges as well as less obvious opportunities for community pharmacy practice. PMID:10295634

  5. Disparate estimates of hypertension control from ambulatory and clinic blood pressure measurements in hypertensive kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Velvie; Rahman, Mahboob; Lipkowitz, Michael; Toto, Robert; Miller, Edgar; Faulkner, Marquetta; Rostand, Stephen; Hiremath, Leena; Sika, Mohammed; Kendrick, Cynthia; Hu, Bo; Greene, Tom; Appel, Lawrence; Phillips, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring provides unique information about day-night patterns of blood pressure (BP). The objectives of this article were to describe ABP patterns in African Americans with hypertensive kidney disease, to examine the joint distribution of clinic BP and ABP, and to determine associations of hypertensive target organ damage with clinic BP and ABP. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the African American Study of Kidney Disease Cohort Study. Masked hypertension was defined by elevated daytime (>or= 135/85 mm Hg) or elevated nighttime (>or= 120/70 mm Hg) ABP in those with controlled clinic BP (disease, in large part because of increased nighttime BP. Whether lowering nighttime BP improves clinical outcomes is unknown but should be tested given the substantial burden of BP-related morbidity in this population. PMID:19047584

  6. Potential collaboration with the private sector for the provision of ambulatory care in the Mekong region, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Duc, Ha Anh; Sabin, Lora L; Cuong, Le Quang; Thien, Duong Duc; Feeley III, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the past two decades, health insurance in Vietnam has expanded nationwide. Concurrently, Vietnam’s private health sector has developed rapidly and become an increasingly integral part of the health system. To date, however, little is understood regarding the potential for expanding public-private partnerships to improve health care access and outcomes in Vietnam. Objective: To explore possibilities for public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the pr...

  7. Female genital mutilation management in the ambulatory clinic setting: a case study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Spencer; Kavanagh, Alex; Khavari, Rose

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old patient with obstructive voiding symptoms and apareunia in the setting of Type III female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is presented. The patient underwent ambulatory clinic defibulation to relieve her symptoms. FGM has been shown to have serious immediate complications and many chronic complications that greatly impact patients' lives. Several case series have been published describing center-specific experience with defibulation procedures for Type III FGM/C. Here, we present the treatment of a patient with Type III FGM/C in an ambulatory urology clinic in the United States. PMID:27333917

  8. Quality of Ambulatory Education from the Viewpoint of the Clinical Medical Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Niroumand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory education is an integral part of medical education. The present study was carried out to evaluate the quality of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of clinical medical students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the study sample included medical externs externs and interns of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences that were selected through census sampling technique in the academic year 2012-2013. The instrument for data collection was a researcher-made questionnaire with acceptable validity and reliability. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using descriptive statistics. Results: 65 (50% externs and 75 (65% interns participated in the study and 1588 questionnaires were completed via self-administered technique. The mean of the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was 22.6±5.2 and the mean for the clinics’ quality of physical environment was 19±5.13, indicating favorable and semi-favorable status, respectively. Qualitative evaluation of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of externs and interns showed a significant difference with more satisfaction from the part of the interns (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was favorable, but the physical condition of the clinics indicated a semi-favorable status.

  9. Application of Porter's generic strategies in ambulatory health care: a comparison of managerial perceptions in two Israeli sick funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgovicky, Refael; Goldberg, Avishay; Shvarts, Shifra; Bar Dayan, Yosefa; Onn, Erez; Levi, Yehezkel; BarDayan, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    A number of typologies have been developed in the strategic management literature to categorize strategies that an organization can pursue at the business level. Extensive research has established Porter's generic strategies of (1) cost leadership, (2) differentiation, (3) differentiation focus, (4) cost focus, and (5) stuck-in-the-middle as the dominant paradigm in the literature. The purpose of the current study was to research competitive strategies in the Israeli ambulatory health care system, by comparing managerial perceptions of present and ideal business strategies in two Israeli sick funds. We developed a unique research tool, which reliably examines the gap between the present and ideal status managerial views. We found a relation between the business strategy and performance measures, thus strengthening Porter's original theory about the nonviability of the stuck-in-the-middle strategy, and suggesting the applicability Porter's generic strategies to not-for-profit institutes in an ambulatory health care system. PMID:15773250

  10. Hotel-based ambulatory care for complex cancer patients: a review of the University College London Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sive, Jonathan; Ardeshna, Kirit M; Cheesman, Simon; le Grange, Franel; Morris, Stephen; Nicholas, Claire; Peggs, Karl; Statham, Paula; Goldstone, Anthony H

    2012-12-01

    Since 2005, University College London Hospital (UCLH) has operated a hotel-based Ambulatory Care Unit (ACU) for hematology and oncology patients requiring intensive chemotherapy regimens and hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Between January 2005 and 2011 there were 1443 patient episodes, totaling 9126 patient days, with increasing use over the 6-year period. These were predominantly for hematological malignancy (82%) and sarcoma (17%). Median length of stay was 5 days (range 1-42), varying according to treatment. Clinical review and treatment was provided in the ACU, with patients staying in a local hotel at the hospital's expense. Admission to the inpatient ward was arranged as required, and there was close liaison with the inpatient team to preempt emergency admissions. Of the 523 unscheduled admissions, 87% occurred during working hours. An ACU/hotel-based treatment model can be safely used for a wide variety of cancers and treatments, expanding hospital treatment capacity, and freeing up inpatient beds for those patients requiring them. PMID:22591143

  11. Associations Between the Continuity of Ambulatory Care of Adult Diabetes Patients in Korea and the Incidence of Macrovascular Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seo, Hyeyoung; Kim, Dongwoo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to identify association between the continuity of ambulatory care of diabetes patients in South Korea (hereafter Korea) and the incidence of macrovascular complications of diabetes, using claims data compiled by the National Health Insurance Services of Korea. Methods: This study was conducted retrospectively. The subjects of the study were 43 002 patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2007, who were over 30 years of age, and had insurance claim data from 2...

  12. Diagnostic thresholds for ambulatory blood pressure moving lower: a review based on a meta-analysis-clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Kikuya, M.; Thijs, L.; Li, Y.; Boggia, J.; Bjorklund-Bodegard, K.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Jeppesen, J.; Ibsen, H.; Staessen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    /75 mm Hg, 130/85 mm Hg, and 110/70 mm Hg, respectively, and those for ambulatory hypertension were 130/80 mm Hg, 140/85 mm Hg, and 120/70 mm Hg. However, in clinical practice, any diagnostic threshold for blood pressure needs to be assessed in the context of the patient's overall risk profile. The IDACO...

  13. Comparative evaluation of an ambulatory EEG platform vs. clinical gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gregory; Radhu, Natasha; Sun, Yinming; Tallevi, Kevin; Ritvo, Paul; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Grundlehner, Bernard; Penders, Julien; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) testing in clinical labs makes use of large amplifiers and complex software for data acquisition. While there are new ambulatory electroencephalogram (EEG) systems, few have been directly compared to a gold standard system. Here, an ultra-low power wireless EEG system designed by Imec is tested against the gold standard Neuroscan SynAmps2 EEG system, recording simultaneously from the same laboratory cap prepared with electrode gel. The data was analyzed using correlation analysis for both time domain and frequency domain data. The analysis indicated a high Pearson's correlation coefficient (mean=0.957, median=0.985) with high confidence (mean P=0.002) for 10-second sets of data transformed to the frequency domain. The time domain results had acceptable Pearson's coefficient (mean=0.580, median =0.706) with high confidence (mean P=0.008). PMID:24109914

  14. Evaluation of health care service quality in Poland with the use of SERVQUAL method at the specialist ambulatory health care center

    OpenAIRE

    Rosińczuk,Joanna; Manulik,Stanisław; Karniej,Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Stanisław Manulik,1 Joanna Rosińczuk,2 Piotr Karniej3 1Non-Public Health Care Institution, “Ambulatory of Cosmonauts” Ltd. Liability Company, 2Department of Nervous System Diseases, Faculty of Health Science, 3Department of Organization and Management, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Introduction: Service quality and customer satisfaction are very important components of competitive advantage in the health care sector. The SERVQUA...

  15. Improving patient experience in a pediatric ambulatory clinic: a mixed method appraisal of service delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soeteman M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Marijn Soeteman,1 Vera Peters,2 Jamiu O Busari1,3 1Department of Pediatrics, Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, 3Department of Educational Development and Research, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands Objective: In 2013, customer satisfaction surveys showed that patients were unhappy with the services provided at our ambulatory clinic. In response, we performed an appraisal of our services, which resulted in the development of a strategy to reduce waiting time and improve quality of service. Infrastructural changes to our clinic’s waiting room, consultation rooms, and back offices were performed, and schedules were redesigned to reduce wait time to 10 minutes and increase consultation time to 20 minutes. Our objective was to identify if this would improve 1 accessibility to caregivers and 2 quality of service and available amenities. Design: We conducted a multi-method survey using 1 a patient flow analysis to analyze the flow of service and understand the impact of our interventions on patient flow and 2 specially designed questionnaires to investigate patients’ perceptions of our wait time and how to improve our services. Results: The results showed that 79% of our respondents were called in to see a doctor within 20 minutes upon arrival. More patients (55% felt that 10–20 minutes was an acceptable wait time. We also observed a perceived increase in satisfaction with wait time (94%. Finally, a large number of patients (97% were satisfied with the quality of service and with the accessibility to caregivers (94%. Conclusion: The majority of our patients were satisfied with the accessibility to our ambulatory clinics and with the quality of services provided. The appraisal of our operational processes using a patient flow analysis also demonstrated how this strategy could effectively be applied to investigate and improve quality of

  16. The influence of distance on ambulatory care use, death, and readmission following a myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Piette, J. D.; Moos, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether patients admitted for treatment of a myocardial infarction (MI) who live farther from their source of care are less likely to be followed in an outpatient clinic, and whether patients who receive follow-up care are less likely to die or to have a subsequent acute care admission. DATA SOURCE: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) databases to identify a national sample of 4,637 MI patients discharged in 1992, their use of care, and vital status within the subsequent...

  17. Hospitalisations and costs relating to ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, A

    2012-03-08

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions for which the provision of timely and effective outpatient care can reduce the risks of hospitalisation by preventing, controlling or managing a chronic disease or condition. AIMS: The aims of this study were to report on ACSCs in Ireland, and to provide a baseline for future reference. METHODS: Using HIPE, via Health Atlas Ireland, inpatient discharges classified as ACSCs using definitions from the Victorian ACSC study were extracted for the years 2005-2008. Direct methods of standardisation allowed comparison of rates using the EU standard population as a comparison for national data, and national population as comparison for county data. Costs were estimated using diagnosis-related groups. RESULTS: The directly age-standardised discharge rate for ACSC-related discharges increased slightly, but non-significantly, from 15.40 per 1,000 population in 2005 to 15.75 per 1,000 population in 2008. The number of discharges increased (9.5%) from 63,619 in 2005 to 69,664 in 2008, with the estimated associated hospital costs increasing (31.5%) from 267.8 million in 2005 to 352.2 million in 2008. Across the country, there was considerable variation in the discharge rates for the Top-10 ACSCs for the years 2005-2008. Significantly lower rates of hospitalisation were observed in more urban areas including Cork, Dublin and Galway. The most common ACSC in 2008 was diabetes with complications (29.8%). CONCLUSIONS: The variation in rates observed indicates the scope of reducing hospitalisations and associated costs for ACSCs, across both adult\\'s and children\\'s services and particularly in relation to diabetes complications.

  18. Clinical Homeopathic Study in the Homeopathic Ambulatory at UNIRIO University Hospital, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Alves dos Santos Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 1966, the Gaffrée and Guinle University Hospital – GGUH was incorporated into the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro – UNIRIO. Since then the Homeopathy clinic has had it's service there. Since the creation of medical residency in Homeopathy in 2004, there has been a significant increase of treatment in the number of patients and also a significant increase in the inter-relationship with other specialists and hospital services. A wide variety of patients have been treated at the GGUH on a daily basis. Many patients have been examined and treated with homeopathy alone, while others were also examined in other specialties, making homeopathic treatment an adjunct to classical therapy and vice versa. Given the expressive number of medical consultations (around 2500/year, this outstanding result in our clinical and academic practice has created the relevance and need for the verification of the epidemiological profile of these patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to clearly show the population included in this hospital, which is considered to be a reference in the Brazilian Health System (SUS. Aims: To demonstrate the epidemiological and clinical homeopathic profile in the ambulatory of homeopathy at the Gaffrée and Guinle University Hospital (GGUH of the Federal University of the Staate of Rio de Janeiro - UNIRIO, Brazil. Methodology: Cross-sectional study of 140 medical records randomly selected from the ambulatory of homeopathy at GGUH. The sample represents 50% of the monthly average of the clinical service from January to October 2009. The medical records incorrectly completed for the data analysis were excluded. Microsoft Office Excel 2007 used to data collection and analysis. Results and Discussion: A total of 100 records were selected for analysis (71.4%. Average age: 50 years old, 69% being between 41 and 80 years old. Gender: 79% women and 21% men

  19. Potential collaboration with the private sector for the provision of ambulatory care in the Mekong region, Vietnam

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    Ha Anh Duc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past two decades, health insurance in Vietnam has expanded nationwide. Concurrently, Vietnam's private health sector has developed rapidly and become an increasingly integral part of the health system. To date, however, little is understood regarding the potential for expanding public-private partnerships to improve health care access and outcomes in Vietnam. Objective: To explore possibilities for public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in the Mekong region, Vietnam. Design: We employed a mixed methods research approach. Qualitative methods included focus group discussions with health officials and in-depth interviews with managers of private health facilities. Quantitative methods encompassed facility assessments, and exit surveys of clients at the same private facilities. Results: Discussions with health officials indicated generally favorable attitudes towards partnerships with private providers. Concerns were also voiced, regarding the over- and irrational use of antibiotics, and in terms of limited capacity for regulation, monitoring, and quality assurance. Private facility managers expressed a willingness to collaborate in the provision of ambulatory care, and private providers facilites were relatively well staffed and equipped. The client surveys indicated that 80% of clients first sought treatment at a private facility, even though most lived closer to a public provider. This choice was motivated mainly by perceptions of quality of care. Clients who reported seeking care at both a public and private facility were more satisfied with the latter. Conclusions: Public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in Vietnam has substantial potential for improving access to quality services. We recommend that such collaboration be explored by Vietnamese policy-makers. If implemented, we strongly urge attention to effectively managing such

  20. Brand Name and Generic Proton Pump Inhibitor Prescriptions in the United States: Insights from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2006–2010

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    Andrew J. Gawron

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI are one of the most commonly prescribed medication classes with similar efficacy between brand name and generic PPI formulations. Aims. We determined demographic, clinical, and practice characteristics associated with brand name PPI prescriptions at ambulatory care visits in the United States. Methods. Observational cross sectional analysis using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS of all adult (≥18 yrs of age ambulatory care visits from 2006 to 2010. PPI prescriptions were identified by using the drug entry code as brand name only or generic available formulations. Descriptive statistics were reported in terms of unweighted patient visits and proportions of encounters with brand name PPI prescriptions. Global chi-square tests were used to compare visits with brand name PPI prescriptions versus generic PPI prescriptions for each measure. Poisson regression was used to determine the incidence rate ratio (IRR for generic versus brand PPI prescribing. Results. A PPI was prescribed at 269.7 million adult ambulatory visits, based on 9,677 unweighted visits, of which 53% were brand name only prescriptions. In 2006, 76.0% of all PPI prescriptions had a brand name only formulation compared to 31.6% of PPI prescriptions in 2010. Visits by patients aged 25–44 years had the greatest proportion of brand name PPI formulations (57.9%. Academic medical centers and physician-owned practices had the greatest proportion of visits with brand name PPI prescriptions (58.9% and 55.6% of visits with a PPI prescription, resp.. There were no significant differences in terms of median income, patient insurance type, or metropolitan status when comparing the proportion of visits with brand name versus generic PPI prescriptions. Poisson regression results showed that practice ownership type was most strongly associated with the likelihood of receiving a brand name PPI over the entire study period. Compared to

  1. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Proper Robot-Assisted Gait Training Group in Non-ambulatory Subacute Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Hye Jin; Hwang, Seung Won; Pyo, Hannah; Yang, Sung Phil; Lim, Mun-Hee; Park, Gyu Lee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the clinical characteristics of proper robot-assisted gait training group using exoskeletal locomotor devices in non-ambulatory subacute stroke patients. Methods A total of 38 stroke patients were enrolled in a 4-week robotic training protocol (2 sessions/day, 5 times/week). All subjects were evaluated for their general characteristics, Functional Ambulatory Classification (FAC), Fugl-Meyer Scale (FMS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Modified Rankin Scale (MRS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) at 0, 2, and 4 weeks. Statistical analysis were performed to determine significant clinical characteristics for improvement of gait function after robot-assisted gait training. Results Paired t-test showed that all functional parameters except MMSE were improved significantly (probot-assisted gait training. Therefore, baseline BBS and duration of disease should be considered clinically for gaining walking ability in robot-assisted training group. PMID:27152266

  3. Modified computed tomography peritoneography: clinical utility in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present paper is to review the indications, results, clinical correlation and implications for management of a modified CT peritoneography (CTP) technique in the evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. Forty CTP in 33 patients were reviewed by two observers blinded to clinical history or outcome. The CTP technique included 100 mL non-ionic intraperitoneal contrast, 1 h of ambulation and prone positioning during the CT. No precontrast or delayed examinations were performed. A CAPD-related complication was diagnosed in 33 of 40 (82%) CTP . Twenty-nine CTP were performed for evaluation of suspected dialysate leaks. In this group there were 18 leaks, a total of seven umbilical hernias (five as isolated findings) and five normal studies. Nine of 18 (50%) leaks resolved with conservative management and six of nine patients (67%) of the remainder continued CAPD after appropriate surgery. Seven patients were evaluated for scrotal swelling (one bilateral), and there were five communicating hydroceles (all with inguinal fat herniation and all surgically confirmed) and three non-communicating hydroceles (none of which progressed). Umbilical hernias were present in nine of 33 patients (27%). No false positive or false negative studies were identified. The CTP technique described provides accurate diagnostic information in the management of common CAPD-related complications, particularly dialysate leak, genital swelling, abdominal wall hernias and peritoneal adhesions. Computed tomography peritoneography directs appropriate conservative or surgical management. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Female genital mutilation management in the ambulatory clinic setting: a case study and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Craven, Spencer; Kavanagh, Alex; Khavari, Rose

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old patient with obstructive voiding symptoms and apareunia in the setting of Type III female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is presented. The patient underwent ambulatory clinic defibulation to relieve her symptoms. FGM has been shown to have serious immediate complications and many chronic complications that greatly impact patients’ lives. Several case series have been published describing center-specific experience with defibulation procedures for Type III FGM/C. Here, we pre...

  5. Development and Implementation of an Ambulatory Integrated Care Pathway for Major Depressive Disorder and Alcohol Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Saima; Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Aleem, Nadia; Hendershot, Christian S; Irving, Julie Anne; Kalvik, Anne; Lefebvre, Lisa; Le Foll, Bernard; Quilty, Lena; Voore, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Integrated care pathways (ICPs) provide an approach for delivering evidence-based treatment in a hospital setting. This column describes the development and pilot implementation in a clinical setting of an ICP for patients with concurrent major depressive disorder and alcohol dependence at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), an academic tertiary care hospital, in Toronto, Canada. The ICP methodology includes evidence reviews, knowledge translation, process reengineering, and change management. Pilot results indicate high patient satisfaction, evidence of symptom improvement, and excellent retention. PMID:26278235

  6. Ambulatory Phlebectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  7. Factors Associated with Hospitalisations for Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions among Persons with an Intellectual Disability--A Publicly Insured Population Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, R. S.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.; Brownell, M.; Colantonio, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hospitalisations for ambulatory care-sensitive (ACS) conditions are used as an indicator of access to, and the quality of, primary care. The objective was to identify factors associated with hospitalisations for ACS conditions among adults with an intellectual disability (ID) in the context of a publicly insured healthcare system.…

  8. Supply sensitive services in Swiss ambulatory care: An analysis of basic health insurance records for 2003-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Künzi Beat

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swiss ambulatory care is characterized by independent, and primarily practice-based, physicians, receiving fee for service reimbursement. This study analyses supply sensitive services using ambulatory care claims data from mandatory health insurance. A first research question was aimed at the hypothesis that physicians with large patient lists decrease their intensity of services and bill less per patient to health insurance, and vice versa: physicians with smaller patient lists compensate for the lack of patients with additional visits and services. A second research question relates to the fact that several cantons are allowing physicians to directly dispense drugs to patients ('self-dispensation' whereas other cantons restrict such direct sales to emergencies only. This second question was based on the assumption that patterns of rescheduling patients for consultations may differ across channels of dispensing prescription drugs and therefore the hypothesis of different consultation costs in this context was investigated. Methods Complete claims data paid for by mandatory health insurance of all Swiss physicians in own practices were analyzed for the years 2003-2007. Medical specialties were pooled into six main provider types in ambulatory care: primary care, pediatrics, gynecology & obstetrics, psychiatrists, invasive and non-invasive specialists. For each provider type, regression models at the physician level were used to analyze the relationship between the number of patients treated and the total sum of treatment cost reimbursed by mandatory health insurance. Results The results show non-proportional relationships between patient numbers and total sum of treatment cost for all provider types involved implying that treatment costs per patient increase with higher practice size. The related additional costs to the health system are substantial. Regions with self-dispensation had lowest treatment cost for primary care

  9. Unilateral renal agenesis: case review of ambulatory pediatric nephrology clinics in Cali

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    Consuelo Restrepo de Rovetto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unilateral renal agenesis is a frequent renal malformation with incidence of 1 per 1000 live born children. There are no statistics nor protocols to manage and follow-up these patients. Usually asymptomatic, it can be early detected by prenatal ultrasound, allowing opportune detection and adequate follow up. The goal is to describe main features found in children with renal agenesis at four ambulatory pediatric nephrology clinics in Cali, Colombia: Hospital Universitario del Valle (HUV, Club Noel Children’s hospital and the private practice of two pediatric nephrologists.Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive study in a series of cases with congenital renal agenesis diagnosed between January, 1995 and December 2007, of patients under 18 years of age and based on a review of clinical records.Results: 43 patients were found, 51.2% males, 88% from the department of Valle del Cauca. Prenatal diagnoses were conducted in only 21% of these patients; agenesis was right in 48.8% and left in 51.2%. In 46.5%, association with other pathologies was found: occult spinal bifida, congenital scoliosis, and Klippel-Feil sequence. Compensatory renal hypertrophy was reported in 39.5% of the patients, 42% had episodes of urinary tract infection, 31% vesicoureteral reflux and 10% proteinuria. Four male patients (9.3% developed renal failure. The average follow-up was 6.6 years.Conclusions: Prenatal diagnose was not very frequent in our set of cases. Urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux were common, increasing the risk of renal deterioration. Prolonged follow up is suggested, with unified protocols to prevent renal failure.

  10. Unilateral renal agenesis: case review of ambulatory pediatric nephrology clinics in Cali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Restrepo de Rovetto

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unilateral renal agenesis is a frequent renal malformation with incidence of 1 per 1000 live born children. There are no statistics nor protocols to manage and follow-up these patients. Usually asymptomatic, it can be early detected by prenatal ultrasound, allowing opportune detection and adequate follow up. The goal is to describe main features found in children with renal agenesis at four ambulatory pediatric nephrology clinics in Cali, Colombia: Hospital Universitario del Valle (HUV, Club Noel Children’s hospital and the private practice of two pediatric nephrologists. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive study in a series of cases with congenital renal agenesis diagnosed between January, 1995 and December 2007, of patients under 18 years of age and based on a review of clinical records. Results: 43 patients were found, 51.2% males, 88% from the department of Valle del Cauca. Prenatal diagnoses were conducted in only 21% of these patients; agenesis was right in 48.8% and left in 51.2%. In 46.5%, association with other pathologies was found: occult spinal bifida, congenital scoliosis, and Klippel-Feil sequence. Compensatory renal hypertrophy was reported in 39.5% of the patients, 42% had episodes of urinary tract infection, 31% vesicoureteral reflux and 10% proteinuria. Four male patients (9.3% developed renal failure. The average follow-up was 6.6 years. Conclusions: Prenatal diagnose was not very frequent in our set of cases. Urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux were common, increasing the risk of renal deterioration. Prolonged follow up is suggested, with unified protocols to prevent renal failure.

  11. From aviation to medicine: applying concepts of aviation safety to risk management in ambulatory care

    OpenAIRE

    Wilf-Miron, R; Lewenhoff, I; Benyamini, Z; Aviram, A

    2003-01-01

    

 The development of a medical risk management programme based on the aviation safety approach and its implementation in a large ambulatory healthcare organisation is described. The following key safety principles were applied: (1) errors inevitably occur and usually derive from faulty system design, not from negligence; (2) accident prevention should be an ongoing process based on open and full reporting; (3) major accidents are only the "tip of the iceberg" of processes that indicate possi...

  12. Coordinated multidisciplinary care for ambulatory Huntington's disease patients. Evaluation of 18 months of implementation

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    Veenhuizen Ruth B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A multidisciplinary outpatient department was set up in the northern part of the Netherlands because of a local lack of adequate treatment and care for Huntington's disease (HDpatients. Outreaching multidisciplinary care is a novel way to optimise functioning and quality of life of HD patients. The vast majority of patients want to stay home as long as possible. Huntington's disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder leading to complete disability and long term residence in a specialised institution. In this paper we outline this new type of treatment and give the results of 1.5 year, we also present the results of an inquiry on the appreciation of the working method. Methods In the first project half (1.5 yr 28 patients were seen as had been anticipated. The multidisciplinary team consisting of an institutional physician, a psychologist, a speech and language therapist, a social worker, an occupational therapist and a case manager, assesses the stage of the disease and formulates, coordinates and implements the individual care and treatment plan in the home situation. After 1.5 year a questionnaire on the appreciation of the department was sent to patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, the lay organisation and Dutch "experts in the field". Results For the 28 HD patients a total of 242 problems and actions were verbalised in the care plan, which was accepted by the majority of the patients. Especially informal caregivers, the lay organisation and the Dutch "experts in the field" were enthusiastic on the outreaching and multidisciplinary nature of the department. The verdict over the continuance of the clinic was positive and unanimous. Conclusions We concluded that coordinating outreaching multidisciplinary care from an outpatient clinic into the dwelling place of the patient is feasible and appreciated.

  13. Diagnosis of prostate cancer in patients with persistently elevated PSA and tumor-negative biopsy in ambulatory care. Performance of MR imaging in a multi-reader environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: False-negative results are obtained in approx. 20 % of prostate cancer (PCa) patients (pts) at initial systematic transrectal biopsy (Bx), in particular when digital rectal examination (DRE) or transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is negative. The aim of this study was to assess whether MR endorectal imaging of the prostate in a multi-reader ambulatory care setting may assist in patient selection for re-biopsy. Materials and Methods: 115 consecutive pts with persistent PSA elevation, negative Bx, DRE and TRUS were examined using T2w axial and coronal and T1w axial sequences for tumor diagnosis. MR images were prospectively read as tumor-suspicious or tumor-negative by the MR radiologist on duty. Additionally, a retrospective readout of a prostate MR expert and an abdominal imaging fellowship-trained radiologist was performed to evaluate the effect of the reader's experience on tumor detection. Imaging findings were compared to the results of the repeat Bx (61 pts) or the clinical course of at least two years. Results: For the prospective reading, the sensitivity of MRI was 83 %, the specificity was 69 %, the PPV was 33 % and the NPV was 96 %. ROC analysis revealed a significantly better performance of the prostate MR imaging expert compared to the abdominal imaging radiologist (area under ROC 0.88 vs. 0.66, p < 0.001). Based on the prospective reading, a pre-test probability for PCa of 17.4 % as in our study can be reduced to 5 % when obtaining a tumor-negative result in MRI. Conclusion: MR imaging in a multi-reader ambulatory care setting assists in patient selection for re-biopsy. Reducing the post-test probability for PCa to 5 % allows for further follow-up instead of re-biopsy in MR tumor-negative patients. Specific training and experience improve tumor detection in prostate MR imaging. (orig.)

  14. [Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions: validation study at a Hospital Information System (SIH) in the Federal District, Brazil, in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Danyelle Monteiro; Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes de; Rehem, Tânia Cristina Morais Santa Bárbara

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes hospitalizations due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions with a focus on infectious and parasitic diseases (IPDs) and validates the Hospital Information System, Brazilian Unified National Health System (SIH/SUS) for recording hospitalizations due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions in a hospital in the Federal District, Brazil, in 2012. The study estimates the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the SIH for recording hospitalizations due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, with the patient's medical file as the gold standard. There were 1,604 hospitalizations for hospitalizations due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (19.6%, 95%CI: 18.7-20.5), and the leading IPDs were renal and urinary tract infection, infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, and infectious gastroenteritis. IPDs were the leading cause of hospitalization in the 20 to 29-year age bracket and caused 28 deaths. Sensitivity was 70.1% (95%CI: 60.5-79.7), specificity 88.4% (95%CI: 85.6-91.2), PPV = 51.7% (95%CI: 42.7-60.7), and NPV = 94.3% (95%CI: 92.2-96.4). The findings for admissions due to ACSCs in this hospital were similar to those of other studies, featuring admissions for IPDs. The SIH/SUS database was more specific than sensitive. PMID:27027457

  15. Associations and Synergistic Effects for Psychological Distress and Chronic Back Pain on the Utilization of Different Levels of Ambulatory Health Care. A Cross-Sectional Study from Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; George, Aaron; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to assess the impact of chronic back pain and psychological distress on the utilization of primary and secondary levels of care in the ambulatory health care sector in Austria - a country without a gatekeeping system. Additionally, we aimed to determine if the joint effect of chronic back pain and psychological distress was higher than the impact of the sum of the two single conditions. The database used for this analysis was the Austrian Health Interview Survey, ...

  16. Internal Medicine Residents’ Perceptions of Team-Based Care and its Educational Value in the Continuity Clinic: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Soones, TN; O Brien, BC; Julian, KA

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Society of General Internal Medicine. BACKGROUND : In order to teach residents how to work in interprofessional teams, educators in graduate medical education are implementing team-based care models in resident continuity clinics. However, little is known about the impact of interprofessional teams on residents’ education in the ambulatory setting. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors affecting residents’ experience of team-based care within continuity clinics and the impact of these teams ...

  17. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic: Improving patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Bungard, Tammy J; Gardner, Leslie; Archer, Stephen L.; Hamilton, Peter; Ritchie, Bruce; Tymchak, Wayne; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation management services (AMSs) are widely used for anticoagulation management in many countries. Our AMS is a pharmacist-run ambulatory clinic with a physician advisory committee that manages patients referred with complicated anticoagulation histories. This paper assesses the adequacy of anticoagulation, rates of anticoagulant-related events and associated health care resource utilization for patients before and after referral to our AMS. Methods Consecutive patients r...

  18. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care. PMID:7787486

  19. Quality and correlates of medical record documentation in the ambulatory care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Steven R; Kleinman Kenneth P; Soto Carlos M

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Documentation in the medical record facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Few studies have assessed the quality of outpatient medical record documentation, and to the authors' knowledge, none has conclusively determined the correlates of chart documentation. We therefore undertook the present study to measure the rates of documentation of quality of care measures in an outpatient primary care practice setting that utilizes an electronic medical record. Metho...

  20. Income level and chronic ambulatory care sensitive conditions in adults: a multicity population-based study in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forastiere Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relationship between quality of primary health care and preventable hospitalizations has been described in the US, especially among the elderly. In Europe, there has been a recent increase in the evaluation of Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC as an indicator of health care quality, but evidence is still limited. The aim of this study was to determine whether income level is associated with higher hospitalization rates for ACSC in adults in a country with universal health care coverage. Methods From the hospital registries in four Italian cities (Turin, Milan, Bologna, Rome, we identified 9384 hospital admissions for six chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma among 20-64 year-olds in 2000. Case definition was based on the ICD-9-CM coding algorithm suggested by the Agency for Health Research and Quality - Prevention Quality Indicators. An area-based (census block income index was used for each individual. All hospitalization rates were directly standardised for gender and age using the Italian population. Poisson regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between income level (quintiles and hospitalization rates (RR, 95% CI separately for the selected conditions controlling for age, gender and city of residence. Results Overall, the ACSC age-standardized rate was 26.1 per 10.000 inhabitants. All conditions showed a statistically significant socioeconomic gradient, with low income people being more likely to be hospitalized than their well off counterparts. The association was particularly strong for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (level V low income vs. level I high income RR = 4.23 95%CI 3.37-5.31 and for congestive heart failure (RR = 3.78, 95% CI = 3.09-4.62. With the exception of asthma, males were more vulnerable to ACSC hospitalizations than females. The risks were higher among 45-64 year

  1. Ambulatory Diagnosis and Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Screening Questionnaires, Diagnostic Tests, and the Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, R Doug; Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; Antic, Nick A

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea has increased in prevalence in recent years and despite the expansion in sleep medicine services there is a significant unmet burden of disease. This burden presents a challenge to specialists and requires a reappraisal of service delivery, including a move toward lower-cost, simplified methods of diagnosis and treatment, an expansion of the sleep apnea workforce to include suitably trained and equipped primary care physicians and nurses, and the incorporation of chronic disease management principles that link patients to relevant community resources and empower them through new technologies to engage more fully in their own care. PMID:27542873

  2. Research on the effects of pharmacist-patient communication in institutions and ambulatory care sites, 1969-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, M

    1996-06-01

    Research on the effects of pharmacist-patient communication that appeared in the pharmacy literature between 1969 and 1994 is reviewed. The terms patients education and patient counseling were used in identifying relevant research. Many authors used these terms interchangeably; also, the terms counseling and consultation often were not clearly defined. Studies of pharmacists' history-taking in institutional settings and of other communication with patients in ambulatory care settings were examined by decade. The research questions, theories, methods, results, and limitations were analyzed. More than 30 studies examined the effect of pharmacists' communication on patient outcomes, primarily knowledge and medication compliance; generally, the results suggested that pharmacists' communication led to increased knowledge and compliance. A few researchers raised concerns about patients' knowledge as an indicator of effective communication by pharmacists, and in the 1980s a few suggested that better medication compliance could be associated with the time and attention given to patients rather than the informational content of the interaction. Little was reported about the communication theories or models on which the studies were based, and there was little indication in most studies that patients' ideas about their therapy were considered. Often, the numbers of patients and pharmacists were small, and the pharmacists may have had training or motivation exceeding that of the average practitioner. In studies of pharmacists' versus physicians' history-taking, the physicians were not well described; their involvement and their approach may not have been comparable to those of the pharmacists. Before 1990, a few researchers had examined outcomes such as pulmonary function and control of diabetes. In the 1990s, more researchers looked at outcomes such as medication-related problems and use of health care resources. The research indicated that pharmacists can increase patients

  3. Replacing Ambulatory Surgical Follow-Up Visits With Mobile App Home Monitoring: Modeling Cost-Effective Scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Kathleen A; Semple, John L; Coyte, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Women’s College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile ap...

  4. A force field evaluation tool for telephone service in ambulatory health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, V L; Steinberg, B

    1991-10-01

    The tool presented here is useful in analyzing the constraints and capabilities of a health care telephone service. It also provides a systematic method for assessing systems problems. As part of our analysis, we recommended that the manager implement the following steps. First, the manager determines whether the driving force on the unit is continuity of care by an individual provider or consistency of response. This focus directly affects how the unit's telephone service can be best organized (i.e., decentralized or centralized) and clarifies the factors most needed for success. For example, to function effectively and efficiently, a centralized phone service needs strong provider-endorsed protocols. Second, the manager should carefully examine neutral constraint factors to determine methods to transform these constraints into capabilities, such as planning for extra staff or office hours (or both) during influenza season. Planning for extra hours or staff depends largely on whether budget and resource planning is done in advance and whether value is placed on customer access and satisfaction during peak demand periods. The manager must next determine whether the service delivery format (centralized or decentralized) is consistent with the force field analysis findings. If the findings are not consistent, can the analysis present a compelling argument for using the opposite approach? Finally, the manager must create a plan of action for minimizing the constraints revealed and maximizing existing capabilities to achieve the overall goal of excellent phone service. The process of analysis and creating a plan of action is an excellent opportunity to involve staff, providers, and administrators in efforts to achieve better health care telephone service for all customers. PMID:10112997

  5. Quality and correlates of medical record documentation in the ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Steven R

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Documentation in the medical record facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Few studies have assessed the quality of outpatient medical record documentation, and to the authors' knowledge, none has conclusively determined the correlates of chart documentation. We therefore undertook the present study to measure the rates of documentation of quality of care measures in an outpatient primary care practice setting that utilizes an electronic medical record. Methods We reviewed electronic medical records from 834 patients receiving care from 167 physicians (117 internists and 50 pediatricians at 14 sites of a multi-specialty medical group in Massachusetts. We abstracted information for five measures of medical record documentation quality: smoking history, medications, drug allergies, compliance with screening guidelines, and immunizations. From other sources we determined physicians' specialty, gender, year of medical school graduation, and self-reported time spent teaching and in patient care. Results Among internists, unadjusted rates of documentation were 96.2% for immunizations, 91.6% for medications, 88% for compliance with screening guidelines, 61.6% for drug allergies, 37.8% for smoking history. Among pediatricians, rates were 100% for immunizations, 84.8% for medications, 90.8% for compliance with screening guidelines, 50.4% for drug allergies, and 20.4% for smoking history. While certain physician and patient characteristics correlated with some measures of documentation quality, documentation varied depending on the measure. For example, female internists were more likely than male internists to document smoking history (odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 – 2.83 but were less likely to document drug allergies (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35 – 0.75. Conclusions Medical record documentation varied depending on the measure, with room for improvement in most domains. A variety of

  6. Overview of hospitalizations by ambulatory care sensitive conditions in the municipality of Cotia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Laszlo Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the profile of Hospitalizations by Amulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (HACSC, in the Municipality of Cotia, from 2008 to 2012. Method ecological, exploratory, longitudinal study with a quantitative approach. Data on HACSC, by age group and sex, were obtained from the Department of the Unified Health System. For data analysis descriptive statistics were used. Results During the period, there were 46,676 admissions, excluding deliveries, 7,753 (16.61% by HACSC. The main causes were cerebrovascular diseases, 16.96%, heart failure, 15.50%, hypertension, 10.80% and infection of the kidney and urinary tract, 10.51%. Regarding gender, HACSC occurred predominantly in males. There was a greater number of HACSC at extreme age ranges, especially in the elderly. Conclusion Chronic diseases predominate among the leading causes of HACSC and there was no significant difference between sex.

  7. Health care retail clinics: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kaissi, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Amer Kaissi Department of Health Care Administration, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Retail clinics represent a major innovation with a radical value proposition in American health care: convenient locations and hours, walk-in care, short waiting times, and transparent pricing. Many organizations, groups, associations, and individual providers affect and are affected by retail clinics. The main winners from the retail clinic trend are insurance companies and third-party p...

  8. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2016 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  9. Nontraumatic dental condition-related visits to emergency departments on weekdays, weekends and night hours: findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okunseri C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Okunseri,1 Elaye Okunseri,1 Melissa Christine Fischer,1 Saba Noori Sadeghi,1 Qun Xiang,2 Aniko Szabo21Department of Clinical Services, School of Dentistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, USA; 2Division of Biostatistics, Institute of Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAObjective: To determine whether the rates of nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC-related emergency department (ED visits are higher during the typical working hours of dental offices and lower during night hours, as well as the associated factors.Methods: We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997 through 2007 using multivariate binary and polytomous logistic regression adjusted for survey design to determine the effect of predictors on specified outcome variables.Results: Overall, 4,726 observations representing 16.4 million NTDC-related ED visits were identified. Significant differences in rates of NTDC-related ED visits were observed with 40%–50% higher rates during non-working hours and 20% higher rates on weekends than the overall average rate of 170 visits per hour. Compared with 19–33 year olds, subjects <18 years old had significantly higher relative rates of NTDC-related ED visits during nonworking hours [relative rate ratio (RRR = 1.6 to 1.8], whereas those aged 73 and older had lower relative rates during nonworking hours (RRR = 0.4; overall P = 0.0005. Compared with those having private insurance, Medicaid and self-pay patients had significantly lower relative rates of NTDC visits during nonworking and night hours (RRR = 0.6 to 0.7, overall P < 0.0003. Patients with a dental reason for visit were overrepresented during the night hours (RRR = 1.3; overall P = 0.04.Conclusion: NTDC-related visits to ED occurred at a higher rate during non-working hours and on weekends and were significantly associated with age, patient-stated reason for visit and payer type.Keywords: dental

  10. Approach to fever assessment in ambulatory cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, M.K.; Walker-Dilks, C.; Atzema, C.; Morris, A.; Gupta, R.; Halligan, R.; Kouroukis, T.; McCann, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This guideline was prepared by the Fever Assessment Guideline Development Group, a group organized by the Program in Evidence-Based Care at the request of the Cancer Care Ontario Systemic Treatment Program. The mandate was to develop a standardized approach (in terms of definitions, information, and education) for the assessment of fever in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods The guideline development methods included a search for existing guidelines, literature searches in medline and embase for systematic reviews and primary studies, internal review by content and methodology experts, and external review by targeted experts and intended users. Results The search identified eight guidelines that had partial relevance to the topic of the present guideline and thirty-eight primary studies. The studies were mostly noncomparative prospective or retrospective studies. Few studies directly addressed the topic of fever except as one among many symptoms or adverse effects associated with chemotherapy. The recommendations concerning fever definition are supported mainly by other existing guidelines. No evidence was found that directly pertained to the assessment of fever before a diagnosis of febrile neutropenia was made. However, some studies evaluated approaches to symptom management that included fever among the symptoms. Few studies directly addressed information needs and resources for managing fever in cancer patients. Conclusions Fever in patients with cancer who are receiving systemic therapy is a common and potentially serious symptom that requires prompt assessment, but currently, evidence to inform best practices concerning when, where, and by whom that assessment is done is very limited.

  11. The Relative Impacts of Design Effects and Multiple Imputation on Variance Estimates: A Case Study with the 2008 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Taylor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey collects data on office-based physician care from a nationally representative, multistage sampling scheme where the ultimate unit of analysis is a patient-doctor encounter. Patient race, a commonly analyzed demographic, has been subject to a steadily increasing item nonresponse rate. In 1999, race was missing for 17 percent of cases; by 2008, that figure had risen to 33 percent. Over this entire period, single imputation has been the compensation method employed. Recent research at the National Center for Health Statistics evaluated multiply imputing race to better represent the missing-data uncertainty. Given item nonresponse rates of 30 percent or greater, we were surprised to find many estimates’ ratios of multiple-imputation to single-imputation estimated standard errors close to 1. A likely explanation is that the design effects attributable to the complex sample design largely outweigh any increase in variance attributable to missing-data uncertainty.

  12. Intervenção sobre tabagismo realizada por cardiologista em rotina ambulatorial Anti-smoking intervention performed by cardiologist during ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Scholz Issa

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a efetividade da intervenção sobre o tabagismo, realizada por médico cardiologista em rotina de ambulatório, utilizando a prescrição de adesivos de nicotina. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados, consecutivamente, 100 pacientes (50 homens e 50 mulheres, incluindo consulta médica, aplicação de escore para definição do grau de dependência à nicotina, determinação da concentração de monóxido de carbono expirado e peso corpóreo. Os adesivos foram utilizados entre 8 e 12 semanas, com redução progressiva da concentração até a suspensão (concentrações de 21, 14 e 7mg RESULTADOS: A taxa de abstinência um ano após o início do tratamento foi de 41%, confirmada pela concentração do monóxido de carbono. CONCLUSÃO: A intervenção sobre o tabagismo pode ser realizada em rotina de atendimento cardiológico com resultados satisfatórios. Os adesivos de nicotina são seguros, bem tolerados, e devem ser utilizados, mais freqüentemente, no auxílio aos fumantes, para deixarem de fumar.PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nicotine patches as a strategy to help patients quit smoking in the cardiovascular clinic. METHODS: The population studied was composed of 100 patients (50 women and 50 men. The strategy included medical consultation, Fangerstron escore application and prescription of nicotine patches. Nicotine patches were continuously used for 8 to 12 weeks, with progressive concentration reduction releasing 21, 14, and 7mg/day. RESULTS: The abstinence rate one year later was 41% confirmed by carbon monoxide exhaled air concentration. CONCLUSION: Nicotine patches are safe, and well tolerated and, for these reasons, should be more frenquently prescribed by cardiologists to help patients quit smoking.

  13. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  14. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  15. Ambulatory ST segment monitoring after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H

    1994-01-01

    as important reasons for the inconsistent findings. The precise role of ambulatory ST segment monitoring in clinical practice has yet to be established. Direct comparisons with exercise stress testing may not be appropriate for two reasons. Firstly, the main advantage of ambulatory monitoring may be...

  16. [Home hospice care at a clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, F; Osako, M; Shimoaraiso, Y; Sakamoto, T; Miyashita, T; Yamanouchi, H; Kadokura, K; Yoshida, K; Dozono, F; Mamitsuka, K; Dozono, H

    1999-12-01

    For the people who want to stay at home until their last day, the primary doctor and clinic where they were diagnosed will be the most reliable supports. We have been operating a 19 bed clinic since 1996. In these three years, we have established what we call a "combination palliative care system." A team composed of two doctors, 13 nurses, 3 care aids, a social worker, and a counselor provides home care services as well as outpatient and inpatient care. From April, 1998 to March, 1999, 59 patients died of cancer. Among them, 25 patients died at home. Their primary cancers were lung (7), colon (3), pancreatic (2), breast (2), ovarian (2), brain (1), stomach (1), hepatoma (1), neck (1) and others. First of all, sufficient consultation with patients and family makes this care successful. Through this, the patient can choose his style of care. The whole staff is involved in this care in turn, so that all of us become acquainted with each patient. Home care includes: 1) medical and nursing service available 24 hours a day, 2) activation of social resources for the support of the patient user, 3) constructive cooperation with relevant institutions, 4) relieving the patient's physical and mental suffering, 5) aroma therapy, oil massage, hair cuts and music therapy, and 6) support by volunteers. In this way, as a neighborhood clinic, the combination palliative care system is valuable. PMID:10630230

  17. Ambulatory and Community-Based Services

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Fred

    1999-01-01

    The shift in the site of service delivery from inpatient and institutional to ambulatory and community settings has been prompted by concerns over cost and the prospect for improving the quality of life. In response to these concerns, Medicare has implemented several demonstrations that emphasize ambulatory and community-based services. In this issue, articles are presented on four demonstrations, which focus on the extent to which coordinated care models reduce health care costs, and the cos...

  18. Clinical and microbiological evaluation of four culture methods for the diagnosis of peritonitis in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, P W; Crichton, E. P.; Mathias, R G; Werb, R

    1989-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to evaluate four culture methods for the diagnosis of bacterial peritonitis in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Peritonitis was present in 44 of 85 patient admissions (52%). The overall sensitivity of the culture methods in detecting peritonitis was 66%. The sensitivities of the individual methods were as follows: bag culture method, 61%; blood culture broth method, 51%; filter method, 54%; and plate method, 39%. Our broad definition of ...

  19. Processo de cuidar do idoso em Diálise Peritoneal Ambulatorial Contínua no domicílio Proceso de cuidar del anciano, que hace Diálisis Peritoneal Ambulatorial Contínua en el domicilio Home care for the elderly undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Favaro Ribeiro

    2009-12-01

    DPAC.Objectives: To describe the elders with end stage renal disease (ESRD undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD, their caregivers, and the care the caregivers provide to the elders. Methods: This was a qualitative study with 9 caregivers. Data were collected through oral history. Data analysis consisted of thematic content analysis. Results: The sample consisted of 5 male and 4 female elders and all them were dependent on caregivers to change the dialysis collection bag. The mean age of the participants was 70 years. Among the caregivers, 8 of them were female with a mean age of 41.5 years and they provided 8 hours of care to the elders daily. The main theme emerging from the content analysis was "home care for the elderly undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis." Conclusion: Caregivers need support for the development of knowledge and skills to deal with the elders' demand of care, particularly in regard to the management of CAPD.

  20. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

  1. The Effect of Mobile App Home Monitoring on Number of In-Person Visits Following Ambulatory Surgery: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Kathleen A; Coyte, Peter C.; Bhatia, R Sacha; Semple, John L

    2015-01-01

    Background Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, Canada, offers specialized ambulatory surgical procedures. Patients often travel great distances to undergo surgery. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have a low rate of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. However, regular follow-up is still considered important in the early postoperative phase. Increasingly, telemedicine is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care. Telemedicine data sug...

  2. Integrating wound care research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath M

    2007-10-01

    The process of integrating wound care research into clinical practice incorporates research methodology--i.e., the standardized practices, procedures, and rules by which research is performed--and an evidence-based approach. Using examples from the literature and clinician experience treating pressure ulcers in a 32-bed regional spinal cord injury unit in a tertiary referral center in Cleveland, Ohio, the authors describe this process and review the challenges faced by an interdisciplinary skin care team tasked with implementing evidence-based care. Additional considerations include determining the amount of current wound care that is evidence-based and whether wound prevention and care outcomes are improved through the use of evidence-based medicine. Five years after establishing the skin care team and implementing evidence-based care, improvements in care processes and short-term outcomes--specifically, pressure ulcer prevention and treatment protocols including documentation--have been realized. Studies to ascertain the effects of these changes on long-term outcomes are planned. PMID:17978411

  3. Communication Tools for End-of-Life Decision-Making in Ambulatory Care Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Han-Oh; Hanvey, Louise; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; You, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with serious illness, and their families, state that better communication and decision-making with healthcare providers is a high priority to improve the quality of end-of-life care. Numerous communication tools to assist patients, family members, and clinicians in end-of-life decision-making have been published, but their effectiveness remains unclear. Objectives To determine, amongst adults in ambulatory care settings, the effect of structured communication tools for end-of-life decision-making on completion of advance care planning. Methods We searched for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or non-randomized intervention studies in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, and the Cochrane Database of Randomized Controlled Trials from database inception until July 2014. Two reviewers independently screened articles for eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to evaluate the quality of evidence for each of the primary and secondary outcomes. Results Sixty-seven studies, including 46 RCTs, were found. The majority evaluated communication tools in older patients (age >50) with no specific medical condition, but many specifically evaluated populations with cancer, lung, heart, neurologic, or renal disease. Most studies compared the use of communication tools against usual care, but several compared the tools to less-intensive advance care planning tools. The use of structured communication tools increased: the frequency of advance care planning discussions/discussions about advance directives (RR 2.31, 95% CI 1.25–4.26, p = 0.007, low quality evidence) and the completion of advance directives (ADs) (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.43–2.59, p<0.001, low quality evidence); concordance between AD preferences and subsequent medical orders for use or non-use of life supporting treatment (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01–1.39, p = 0.028, very low quality evidence, 1

  4. Introducing Optometry Students to Clinical Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Eileen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the innovative content and structure of an introductory course on clinical patient care at the Illinois College of Optometry. Critiques its success based on student grades and feedback, concluding that it was successful in imparting skills of data analysis but had minimal impact on students' ability to empathize with patients. (EV)

  5. Patient attitudes and preferences regarding literacy screening in ambulatory cancer care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Garcia, Sofia F.; Hongyan Du; et al

    2010-01-01

    Elizabeth A Hahn1, Sofia F Garcia1, Hongyan Du2, David Cella11Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago; 2Center on Outcomes, Research and Education, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USAObjectives: To evaluate patient attitudes towards literacy screening, agreement between literacy tests, and associations between literacy, informed consent comprehension, and health-related quality of life (HRQL).Methods: Participants ...

  6. Characteristics of ambulatory anticoagulant adverse drug events: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckstrand Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high frequency with which adverse drug events (ADEs occur in outpatient settings, detailed information regarding these events remains limited. Anticoagulant drugs are associated with increased safety concerns and are commonly involved in outpatient ADEs. We therefore sought to evaluate ambulatory anticoagulation ADEs and the patient population in which they occurred within the Duke University Health System (Durham, NC, USA. Methods A retrospective chart review of ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs was conducted. An automated trigger surveillance system identified eligible events in ambulatory patients admitted with an International Normalized Ratio (INR >3 and administration of vitamin K. Event and patient characteristics were evaluated, and quality/process improvement strategies for ambulatory anticoagulation management are described. Results A total of 169 events in 167 patients were identified from December 1, 2006-June 30, 2008 and included in the study. A median supratherapeutic INR of 6.1 was noted, and roughly half of all events (52.1% were associated with a bleed. Nearly 74% of events resulted in a need for fresh frozen plasma; 64.8% of bleeds were classified as major. A total of 59.2% of events were at least partially responsible for hospital admission. Median patient age was 68 y (range 36-95 y with 24.9% initiating therapy within 3 months prior to the event. Of events with a prior documented patient visit (n = 157, 73.2% were seen at a Duke clinic or hospital within the previous month. Almost 80% of these patients had anticoagulation therapy addressed, but only 60.0% had a follow-up plan documented in the electronic note. Conclusions Ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs have significant patient and healthcare utilization consequences in the form of bleeding events and associated hospital admissions. Recommendations for improvement in anticoagulation management include use of information technology to assist

  7. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  8. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

  9. Atención médica ambulatoria en México: el costo para los usuarios Ambulatory medical care in Mexico: the cost for users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Arredondo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Analizar los resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud II (ENSA-II, en lo relativo a los costos del proceso de búsqueda y obtención de la atención médica ambulatoria en diferentes instituciones del sector público y privado. Material y métodos. La informacion se obtuvo a partir de los indicadores de costos de la atención médica que notificó la población de estudio de la ENSA-II. Los costos para el bolsillo del consumidor fueron la variable dependiente, y las independientes, la condición de aseguramiento y el ingreso económico. La significancia de los niveles de variación se identificó aplicando la prueba de Duncan. Resultados. Los costos en todo el país, en dólares estadunidenses, fueron: transporte, $ 2.20; consulta general, $ 7.90; medicamentos, $ 9.60, y estudios de diagnóstico, $13.6. El costo promedio total de la atención ambulatoria fue de $ 22.70. Los hallazgos empíricos permiten sugerir una nueva propuesta de análisis de los costos en salud, tanto directos como indirectos, en que incurren los consumidores de servicios de salud; dichos costos representan una carga importante en relación con el ingreso familiar, situación que se agudiza en el caso de la población no asegurada. Conclusiones. La incorporación de la perspectiva económica en el análisis de los problemas de los sistemas de salud, no debe limitarse a los costos de producción de servicios en que incurren los proveedores, sobre todo si lo que se busca es resolver los problemas de equidad y accesibilidad que actualmente caracterizan a la oferta de servicios médicos en México.Objective. To analyze the results of the National Health Survey (ENSA-II as to the costs generated by the search and obtainment of ambulatory medical attention in various intitutions of the private and public health sector. Material and methods. Information was raised from the health care cost indicators reported by the study population of the ENSA-II. The dependent

  10. ASSESSMENT OF COMPLIANCE TO TREATMENT AMONG AMBULATORY ASTHMATIC PATIENTS IN A SECONDARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    S. J. Showande et al.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the level of compliance using three different methods: pill count, self report and peak expiratory flow rate, in asthmatic patients attending a secondary health care facility. Self report (using a pre-tested structured questionnaire), peak expiratory flow rate and pill count were used to assess patient’s compliance and identify the factors which may be responsible for non compliance. Measurement of peak expiratory flow rate and the pill count were done at two different occ...

  11. Degree of Ambulatory Disability: Effects on Rural Siblings' Social Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Theresa Nowak; Ross-Reynolds, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with 22 mothers of children with ambulatory disability and 33 nondisabled siblings showed no differences in sibling's child care responsibilities, general home responsibilities, or independence related to severity of the ambulatory disability. A difference in the amount of social activity, reported by mothers, was not confirmed by…

  12. Ambulatory electrogastrography in patients with sclerodermia, delayed gastric emptying, dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Is there any clinical relevance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, M; Seidel, T; Sprott, H; Oelzner, P; Eitner, K; Bosseckert, H

    2001-07-01

    Background: Changes in electrogastrographic parameters are described in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, sclerodermia, dyspepsia, and delayed gastric emptying in static measurements. However, no information is available about changes in ambulatory measurements. The objective of this study was to find parameters that discriminate between these diseases using cutaneous 24-h-electrogastrography. Methods: Cutaneous 24-h electrogastrography (EGG) measurements were taken from 20 patients with dyspepsia, 10 patients with systemic sclerosis (sclerodermia, SSc), 7 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 7 patients with delayed gastric emptying, and 10 healthy volunteers. Measurements were made using a DIGITRAPPER EGG (Synectics Medical Inc., Stockholm, Sweden) and the accompanying computerized data analysis package (ElectroGastroGram Version 6.30, Gastrosoft Inc., Synectics Medical Inc., Stockholm, Sweden). Frequency and power were compared pre- and postprandially, as well as during the entire day of measurement. Results: The 24-h measurements in healthy volunteers revealed 45.00%+/-12.12% normal values (2.4-3.7 cpm), 30.10%+/-7.15% bradygastric values (3.7 cpm). There was no significant change in frequency between rest and motion, but there was a significant increase in power (P<0.05). There was significantly more bradygastria in patients with dyspepsia periprandially as well as after 24 h (P<0.01) than in healthy volunteers. The mean power of patients with dyspepsia was significantly higher than that of patients with IBS (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cutaneous 24-h-EGG may be used as an additional means of differentiating between dyspepsia and IBS. PMID:11395301

  13. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting. PMID:27025116

  14. Integrated care for diabetes: clinical, psychosocial, and economic evaluation. Diabetes Integrated Care Evaluation Team.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate integrated care for diabetes in clinical, psychosocial, and economic terms. DESIGN--Pragmatic randomised trial. SETTING--Hospital diabetic clinic and three general practice groups in Grampian. PATIENTS--274 adult diabetic patients attending a hospital clinic and registered with one of three general practices. INTERVENTION--Random allocation to conventional hospital clinic care or integrated care. Integrated care patients seen in general practice every three or four mon...

  15. Effect of Comorbid Depression on Outcomes in Diabetes and Its Relationship to Quality of Care and Patient Adherence: A Statewide Primary Care Ambulatory Research and Resources Consortium Study

    OpenAIRE

    Katerndahl, David; Calmbach, Walter L.; Becho, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether current depression was associated with poorer quality of care and poorer patient adherence to treatment regimens and whether current depression was associated with patient diabetes outcomes independent of its relationships to quality of care and patient adherence among patients with diabetes.

  16. Systematic care for caregivers of people with dementia in the ambulatory mental health service: designing a multicentre, cluster, randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adang Eddy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for people with dementia and their informal caregivers is a challenging aim in healthcare. There is an urgent need for cost-effective support programs that prevent informal caregivers of people with dementia from becoming overburdened, which might result in a delay or decrease of patient institutionalization. For this reason, we have developed the Systematic Care Program for Dementia (SCPD. The SCPD consists of an assessment of caregiver's sense of competence and suggestions on how to deal with competence deficiencies. The efficiency of the SCPD will be evaluated in our study. Methods and design In our ongoing, cluster, randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, the participants in six mental health services in four regions of the Netherlands have been randomized per service. Professionals of the ambulatory mental health services (psychologists and social psychiatric nurses have been randomly allocated to either the intervention group or the control group. The study population consists of community-dwelling people with dementia and their informal caregivers (patient-caregiver dyads coming into the health service. The dyads have been clustered to the professionals. The primary outcome measure is the patient's admission to a nursing home or home for the elderly at 12 months of follow-up. This measure is the most important variable for estimating cost differences between the intervention group and the control group. The secondary outcome measure is the quality of the patient's and caregiver's lives. Discussion A novelty in the SCPD is the pro-active and systematic approach. The focus on the caregiver's sense of competence is relevant to economical healthcare, since this sense of competence is an important determinant of delay of institutionalization of people with dementia. The SCPD might be able to facilitate this with a relatively small cost investment for caregivers' support, which could result in a major decrease in

  17. Ambulatory patient classifications and the regressive nature of medicare reform: is the reduction in outpatient health care reimbursement worth the price?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of the proposed Ambulatory Patient Classification (APC) system on reimbursement for hospital outpatient Medicare procedures at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Department of Radiation Oncology. Methods and Materials: Treatment and cost data for the MGH Department of Radiation Oncology for the fiscal year 1997 were analyzed. This represented 66,981 technical procedures and 41 CPT-4 codes. The cost of each procedure was calculated by allocating departmental costs to the relative value units (RVUs) for each procedure according to accepted accounting principles. Net reimbursement for each CPT-4 procedure was then calculated by subtracting its cost from the allowed 1998 Boston area Medicare reimbursement or from the proposed Boston area APC reimbursement. The impact of the proposed APC reimbursement system on changes in reimbursement per procedure and on volume-adjusted changes in overall net reimbursements per procedure was determined. Results: Although the overall effect of APCs on volume-adjusted net reimbursements for Medicare patients was projected to be budget-neutral, treatment planning revenues would have decreased by 514% and treatment delivery revenues would have increased by 151%. Net reimbursements for less complicated courses of treatment would have increased while those for treatment courses requiring more complicated or more frequent treatment planning would have decreased. Net reimbursements for a typical prostate interstitial implant and a three-treatment high-dose-rate intracavitary application would have decreased by 481% and 632%, respectively. Conclusion: The financial incentives designed into the proposed APC reimbursement structure could lead to compromises in currently accepted standards of care, and may make it increasingly difficult for academic institutions to continue to fulfill their missions of research and service to their communities. The ability of many smaller, low patient volume, high Medicare

  18. ASSESSMENT OF COMPLIANCE TO TREATMENT AMONG AMBULATORY ASTHMATIC PATIENTS IN A SECONDARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Showande et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the level of compliance using three different methods: pill count, self report and peak expiratory flow rate, in asthmatic patients attending a secondary health care facility. Self report (using a pre-tested structured questionnaire, peak expiratory flow rate and pill count were used to assess patient’s compliance and identify the factors which may be responsible for non compliance. Measurement of peak expiratory flow rate and the pill count were done at two different occasions. The data obtained was analysed using descriptive statistics. The study showed that the patients were prescribed a range of one to four drugs: 54% (3 drugs, 32% (2 drugs, 8% (4 drugs and 2% (1 drug. The levels of compliance were 86.57% for self report and 83.56% for pill count (p > 0.05. Reasons given for non compliance were: apparent wellness (33.31%, forgetfulness (26.67%, cost of drugs (6.67%, dysphagia (6.67%, presence of non-disturbing symptoms (6.67%, side effects (6.67%, ignorance/fear of addiction (6.67%, perceived lack of benefit from treatment (6.67%, and lethargy towards chronic medication (6.67%. However, there was a significant difference in the readings of the peak expiratory flow rate measured at two different occasions (p < 0.05. The study showed no significant difference in the methods used to assess the level of compliance. Non compliance can be overcome by proper education of patients on the importance of complying with the administration of medication and proper usage of metered dose devices.

  19. Effect of Intensive Salt-Restriction Education on Clinic, Home, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Levels in Treated Hypertensive Patients During a 3-Month Education Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahiro; Eguchi, Kazuo; Sato, Toshiko; Onoguchi, Atsuko; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-05-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that low-salt diet education by nutritionists would lower blood pressure (BP) levels in treated hypertensive patients. The amount of urinary salt excretion and clinic, home, and ambulatory BP values at baseline and at 3 months were measured in 95 patients with hypertension. After randomization to a nutritional education group (E group, n=51) or a control group (C group, n=44), the C group received conventional salt-restriction education and the E group received intensive nutritional education aimed at salt restriction to 6 g/d by nutritionists. From baseline to the end of the study, 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was significantly lowered in the E group compared with the C group (6.8±2.9 g/24 h vs 8.6±3.4 g/24 h, Pnutritionists was shown to be effective in lowering BP in treated hypertensive patients. PMID:26732187

  20. Overcoming Recruitment Challenges in Palliative Care Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Lodato, Jordan E.; Currow, David C; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2013-01-01

    Challenges to clinical trial recruitment in palliative care are significant but not insurmountable. Through their experience with designing and deploying a social-marketing based protocol, the authors show that a carefully crafted recruitment and retention protocol can be effective.

  1. Ten years of antibiotic consumption in ambulatory care: Trends in prescribing practice and antibiotic resistance in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apfalter Petra

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary aims of this study were (i to determine the quantity and pattern of antibiotic use in Austria between 1998 and 2007 and (ii to analyze antibiotic resistance rates in relation to antibiotic consumption in important clinical situations in order to provide data for empirical therapeutic regimens for key indications. Methods Consumption data and resistance data were obtained via the Austrian surveillance networks European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS and European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC. The EARSS collects data on isolates from blood and cerebrospinal fluid obtained predominantly in the hospital setting. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification and the Defined Daily Dose (DDD measurement units were assigned to the data. The number of DDDs and packages per 1,000 inhabitants (PID were used to calculate the level of antibiotic consumption. Antibiotic resistance was expressed in resistance rates, i.e., the percentage of resistant isolates compared to all isolates of one bacterial species. Results The overall antibiotic consumption measured in DIDs increased by 10% between 1998 and 2007, whereas PIDs decreased by 3%. The consumption of substances within the drug utilization 90% segment (measured in PID increased for ciprofloxacin (+118.9, clindamycin (+76.3, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (+61.9%, cefpodoxime (+31.6, azithromycin (+24.7; and decreased for erythromycin (-79.5%, trimethoprim (-56,1%, norfloxacin (-48.8%, doxycycline (-44.6, cefaclor (-35.1%, penicillin (-34.0%, amoxicillin (-22.5, minocycline (-21.9% and clarithromycin (-9.9%. Starting in 2001, an increase in the percentage of invasive E. coli isolates resistant to aminopenicillins (from 35% to 53%, fluoroquinolones (from 7% to 25.5% and third-generation cephalosporins (from 0% to 8.8% was observed. The percentage of nonsusceptible or intermediate penicillin-resistant pneumococcal isolates remained

  2. Improving patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care through quality control circle activities%开展品管圈活动提升门诊手术患者满意度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 白晓霞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of quality control circle (QCC) activities on patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care.Methods The operating room nursing staff formed a QCC,delved into problems affecting patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care,and formulated solutions to the problems through brainstorming.They put forward improvement schemes and put them into practice.Results Patient overall satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care increased from (6.80 ± 0.57) points before QCC activities to (7.41±0.44) points after the activities,with significant difference found in the scores (P<0.01).Nurses' consciousness in participating nursing management,and job satisfaction were enhanced,and staff's enthusiasm,creativity,and initiative were fully exercised.Conclusion QCC activities help improve quality of ambulatory surgical care and patient satisfaction.%目的 探讨品管圈活动用于提升门诊手术患者满意度的效果.方法 由手术室一线护理人员组成品管圈小组,通过脑力激荡,讨论分析门诊手术患者满意度不高的原因,制订相应的整改措施并组织实施.结果 门诊手术患者总体满意度由活动前(6.80±0.57)分提高到活动后的(7.41±0.44)分,效果显著(P<0.01);护理人员参与护理管理的意识和工作满足感增强,护理人员的积极性、创造性、主动性得到充分发挥.结论 品管圈活动的开展,有利于提高门诊手术服务质量、提升门诊手术患者满意度.

  3. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  4. Blood cultures in ambulatory outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laupland Kevin B

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood cultures are a gold standard specific test for diagnosing many infections. However, the low yield may limit their usefulness, particularly in low-risk populations. This study was conducted to assess the utility of blood cultures drawn from ambulatory outpatients. Methods Blood cultures drawn at community-based collection sites in the Calgary Health Region (population 1 million in 2001 and 2002 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed by linkages to acute care health care databases for utilization of acute care facilities within 2 weeks of blood culture draw. Results 3102 sets of cultures were drawn from 1732 ambulatory outpatients (annual rate = 89.4 per 100,000 population. Significant isolates were identified from 73 (2.4% sets of cultures from 51 patients, including Escherichia coli in 18 (35% and seven (14% each of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Compared to patients with negative cultures, those with positive cultures were older (mean 49.6 vs. 40.1 years, p Conclusion Blood cultures drawn in outpatient settings are uncommonly positive, but may define patients for increased intensity of therapy. Strategies to reduce utilization without excluding patients with positive cultures need to be developed for this patient population.

  5. Evaluation of health care service quality in Poland with the use of SERVQUAL method at the specialist ambulatory health care center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manulik, Stanisław; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Karniej, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Service quality and customer satisfaction are very important components of competitive advantage in the health care sector. The SERVQUAL method is widely used for assessing the quality expected by patients and the quality of actually provided services. Objectives The main purpose of this study was to determine if patients from state and private health care facilities differed in terms of their qualitative priorities and assessments of received services. Materials and methods The study included a total of 412 patients: 211 treated at a state facility and 201 treated at a private facility. Each of the respondents completed a 5-domain, 22-item SERVQUAL questionnaire. The actual quality of health care services in both types of facilities proved significantly lower than expected. Results All the patients gave the highest scores to the domains constituting the core aspects of health care services. The private facility respondents had the highest expectations with regard to equipment, and the state facility ones regarding contacts with the medical personnel. Conclusion Health care quality management should be oriented toward comprehensive optimization in all domains, rather than only within the domain identified as the qualitative priority for patients of a given facility.

  6. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi Nadeem; Mitchell Caroline; Magin Parker; McCowan Colin; Lasserson Daniel; Kadam Umesh; Hanratty Barbara; Del Mar Chris; Cleland Jennifer; Furler John; Rait Greta; Steel Nick; van Driel Mieke; Ward Alison

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some cou...

  7. Quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, WY; Lam, CLK; Lo, SV

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature regarding quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics with specific attention to the quality indicators for fall prevention, continence care, pulmonary rehabilitation, mental health, pharmaceutical care, and wound care services. Data sources Literature search from 1990 to 2010 including Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database, RAND (Research and Development) Corporation Health Database, the ACOVE (Assessing the Care of Vulnerab...

  8. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed. PMID:27487750

  9. Escuta psicanalítica de gestantes no contexto ambulatorial: uma experiência em grupos de fala = Psychoanalytic care of pregnant women in the context of an ambulatory: the experience of words group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilas Boas, Laís Macêdo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A gestação é um momento de mudanças significativas na vida da mulher, permeado por afetos, fantasias e expectativas em relação ao parto e ao bebê. A existência de um espaço de fala, no qual a futura mãe possa de algum modo elaborar tais conteúdos psíquicos, pode auxiliar tanto no processo de construção do lugar materno, como na preparação para o parto e para a interação com o bebê. O presente trabalho é uma proposta de reflexão a partir da experiência que se desenvolve no chamado Grupo de Palavras – espaço de fala e partilha de experiências de gestantes sobre questões relativas à gravidez, criado na sala de espera de um ambulatório – com objetivo de discutir nuances do processo psíquico envolvido na construção do ser mãe e a possibilidade de elaboração de tal processo por meio da fala, bem como os desafios do trabalho de escuta psicanalítica no contexto ambulatorial

  10. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Adams Jill C; Majeres Sharon; Batal Holly A; Scott David R; Dale Rita; Mehler Philip S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access hea...

  11. The DIAMOND initiative: implementing collaborative care for depression in 75 primary care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Leif I.; Crain, A. Lauren; Jaeckels, Nancy; Ohnsorg, Kris A.; Margolis, Karen L; Beck, Arne; Whitebird, Robin R.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Andrew H. Van de Ven

    2013-01-01

    Background The many randomized trials of the collaborative care model for improving depression in primary care have not described the implementation and maintenance of this model. This paper reports how and the degree to which collaborative care process changes were implemented and maintained for the 75 primary care clinics participating in the DIAMOND Initiative (Depression Improvement Across Minnesota–Offering a New Direction). Methods Each clinic was trained to implement seven components o...

  12. Pragmatic controlled clinical trials in primary care: the struggle between external and internal validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birtwhistle Richard

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlled clinical trials of health care interventions are either explanatory or pragmatic. Explanatory trials test whether an intervention is efficacious; that is, whether it can have a beneficial effect in an ideal situation. Pragmatic trials measure effectiveness; they measure the degree of beneficial effect in real clinical practice. In pragmatic trials, a balance between external validity (generalizability of the results and internal validity (reliability or accuracy of the results needs to be achieved. The explanatory trial seeks to maximize the internal validity by assuring rigorous control of all variables other than the intervention. The pragmatic trial seeks to maximize external validity to ensure that the results can be generalized. However the danger of pragmatic trials is that internal validity may be overly compromised in the effort to ensure generalizability. We are conducting two pragmatic randomized controlled trials on interventions in the management of hypertension in primary care. We describe the design of the trials and the steps taken to deal with the competing demands of external and internal validity. Discussion External validity is maximized by having few exclusion criteria and by allowing flexibility in the interpretation of the intervention and in management decisions. Internal validity is maximized by decreasing contamination bias through cluster randomization, and decreasing observer and assessment bias, in these non-blinded trials, through baseline data collection prior to randomization, automating the outcomes assessment with 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitors, and blinding the data analysis. Summary Clinical trials conducted in community practices present investigators with difficult methodological choices related to maintaining a balance between internal validity (reliability of the results and external validity (generalizability. The attempt to achieve methodological purity can

  13. 1892例腹股沟疝日间手术的临床疗效%Clinical efficacies of ambulatory surgery for inguinal hernia in 1892 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋应寒; 雷文章

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical efficacies of ambulatory surgery for inguinal hernia.Methods The clinical data of 1 892 patients with inguinal hernia who underwent ambulatory surgery at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from November 2009 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.Preoperative examinations including blood routine test, blood bio-chemistry checking, blood electrolytes, coagulation convention, pre-transfusion test, blood type, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram were applied to patients.Operation time was rescheduled after abnormal indexes were corrected for elective surgery.Preventive use of antibiotics was not needed.Preperitoneal space tension-free repair or Bassini method was adopted after local infiltration anesthesia.Anesthesia method, operation method, patching material, operation time, number of patients transferred to inpatient department and reasons and treatment expense were recorded.Ambulatory surgery center did satisfaction survey on patients at the discharge.Patients were followed up at postoperative month 1, 3, 6, 12 regularly by the doctor responsible for the surgery till July 2015, including occurrence of complications and chronic pain, recurred hernia, number of readmission and reasons.Measurement data with normal distribution were presented as x ± s.Results Among 1 892 patients, 1 889 patients underwent operation under local anesthesia and 3 patients were transferred to general anesthesia.There were 1 874 patients undergoing tension-free repair including 1 592 using the material of ultrapro hernia system (UHS) , 264 of ultrapro plug (UPP), 8 of prolene hernia system (PHS), 6 of Gore hernia patch, 4 of 3-dimensional plug (3DP), and 18 patients underwent Bassini without preoperative death.The operation time of 1 892 patients was (28 ± 12) minutes.Three patients were transferred to inpatient department for postoperative cut incision pain, ecchymoma, abdominal distention after satiation and discharged from hospital after

  14. Clinical research and medical care: towards effective and complete integration

    OpenAIRE

    Sacristán, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their close relationship, clinical research and medical care have become separated by clear boundaries. The purpose of clinical research is to generate generalizable knowledge useful for future patients, whereas medical care aims to promote the well-being of individual patients. The evolution towards patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research, and the gradual standardization of medicine are contributing to closer ties between clinical research and medical pract...

  15. Crianças/adolescentes em quimioterapia ambulatorial: implicações para a enfermagem Niños y adolescentes en quimioterapia ambulatoria: implicaciones para enfermería Children and adolecents in outpatient clinic chemotherapy: nursing implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cardeal da Costa

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A hospitalização era a indicação mais comum na assistência à criança com câncer, entretanto, um grande enfoque vem sendo dado à desospitalização, viabilizada através do seguimento ambulatorial e/ou assistência domiciliar (home care. O objetivo deste trabalho é analisar as dificuldades que os pais enfrentam no ambiente domiciliar, quando seus filhos são submetidos à quimioterapia ambulatorial. Para tanto, foi realizada uma entrevista semi-estruturada com os pais, nos meses de janeiro e fevereiro de 2000, na sala de quimioterapia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, da Universidade de São Paulo. Os resultados apontam as seguintes dificuldades: alteração no cotidiano familiar; comunicação ineficiente; alteração da auto-imagem e reação adversa à quimioterapia. Este trabalho possibilitou o acesso a informações de real interesse para assistência à criança/adolescente com câncer e sua família. A partir dos dados empíricos, elaborou-se uma cartilha de orientação para o cuidado domiciliar.La hospitalización todavía es indicación común en el niño con cáncer, aun así, un gran énfasis viene siendo dado a la deshospitalización, conseguida a través del seguimiento ambulatorio, de la quimioterapia ambulatoria, de los hospitales día y la atención domiciliaria (home care. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar cuales son las dificultades que las familias enfrentan en el ambiente domiciliario cuando sus niños y sus adolescentes son sometidos a la quimioterapia ambulatoria. El lugar de estudio fue la sala de quimioterapia del Hospital Clínicas de la Facultad de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto de la Universidad de São Paulo y la recolección de los datos empíricos fue realizada a partir de una entrevista semi-estructurada con la madre o el padre, en los meses de enero y febrero del 2000. Los resultados muestran las siguientes dificultades: alteración en el cotidiano familiar

  16. Home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: when? who?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Gülçin

    2013-12-01

    Blood pressure measurement in the diagnosis and management of hypertension, including the technique required for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring, will be reviewed in this article. Home and ambulatory measurements are widely used, both to confirm the diagnosis and to improve adherence to therapy. The major advantage of out-of-office blood pressure monitoring is that it provides a large number of blood pressure measurements away from the medical environment, which represents a more reliable assessment of actual blood pressure than office blood pressure. The advantage of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is its unique ability to measure nocturnal blood pressure. Although not fully validated in large-scale clinical trials, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring appears to correlate best with prognosis. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring provide somewhat different information on the subject's blood pressure status, and the two methods should thus be regarded as complementary, rather than competitive or alternative. PMID:25019016

  17. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday...... lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for...

  18. Ambulatory Healthcare Utilization in the United States: A System Dynamics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rafael; Behr, Joshua G.; Tulpule, Mandar

    2011-01-01

    Ambulatory health care needs within the United States are served by a wide range of hospitals, clinics, and private practices. The Emergency Department (ED) functions as an important point of supply for ambulatory healthcare services. Growth in our aging populations as well as changes stemming from broader healthcare reform are expected to continue trend in congestion and increasing demand for ED services. While congestion is, in part, a manifestation of unmatched demand, the state of the alignment between the demand for, and supply of, emergency department services affects quality of care and profitability. The central focus of this research is to provide an explanation of the salient factors at play within the dynamic demand-supply tensions within which ambulatory care is provided within an Emergency Department. A System Dynamics (SO) simulation model is used to capture the complexities among the intricate balance and conditional effects at play within the demand-supply emergency department environment. Conceptual clarification of the forces driving the elements within the system , quantifying these elements, and empirically capturing the interaction among these elements provides actionable knowledge for operational and strategic decision-making.

  19. Helping You Choose Quality Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health Care Behavioral Health Care Critical Access Hospitals Home Care (+ Pharmacy) Hospital Laboratory Nursing Care Center International Accreditation Accreditation Top Spots What ...

  20. Critical care clinical trials: getting off the roller coaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    Optimizing care in the ICU is an important goal. The heightened severity of illness in patients who are critically ill combined with the tremendous costs of critical care make the ICU an ideal target for improvement in outcomes and efficiency. Incorporation of evidence-based medicine into everyday practice is one method to optimize care; however, intensivists have struggled to define optimal practices because clinical trials in the ICU have yielded conflicting results. This article reviews examples where such conflicts have occurred and explores possible causes of these discrepant data as well as strategies to better use critical care clinical trials in the future. PMID:22948575

  1. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  2. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  3. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  4. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with better outcomes in diabetes care. Quality management was measured with newly developed questionnaires about organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, q...

  5. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The world population has become more globalised with increasing number of people residing in another country for work or other reasons. Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia. Methods Data were derived from the 2012 National Medical Care Survey (NMCS), a cross sectional survey of primary care enco...

  6. ClinicalKey: a point-of-care search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2013-01-01

    ClinicalKey is a new point-of-care resource for health care professionals. Through controlled vocabulary, ClinicalKey offers a cross section of resources on diseases and procedures, from journals to e-books and practice guidelines to patient education. A sample search was conducted to demonstrate the features of the database, and a comparison with similar tools is presented. PMID:23394422

  7. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Eskes, Anne M; Sumpio, Bauer E;

    2013-01-01

    . Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are universally acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects. To give high-level evidence the appreciation it deserves in wound care, we propose a step-by-step reporting standard for comprehensive and transparent reporting of RCTs in wound care...

  8. Does depression screening have an effect on the diagnosis and treatment of mood disorders in general medical settings?: an instrumental variable analysis of the national ambulatory medical care survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojtabai, Ramin

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the association of depression screening with the diagnoses of mood disorders and prescription of antidepressants in 73,712 visits to nonpsychiatrist physician offices drawn from the 2005-2007 U.S. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Physicians used depression screening selectively for patients whom they perceived as more likely to have a mood disorder. In bivariate probit analyses with instrumental variables, depression screening did not increase the prevalence of either mood disorder diagnoses or prescription of antidepressants. However, screening was associated with lower rates of antidepressants prescription without a diagnosis of a mood disorder. In visits in which antidepressants were prescribed, 47.4% of the screened visits compared with 16.3% of nonscreened visits had a mood disorder diagnosis. As currently practiced in medical settings, depression screening may help improve targeting and appropriate use of antidepressant medications. Wider use of depression screening may help curb the growing trend of off-label antidepressant prescriptions. PMID:21454246

  9. Electronic health records in outpatient clinics: Perspectives of third year medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Dobbie Alison E; Chumley Heidi S; Rouf Emran

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background United States academic medical centers are increasingly incorporating electronic health records (EHR) into teaching settings. We report third year medical students' attitudes towards clinical learning using the electronic health record in ambulatory primary care clinics. Methods In academic year 2005–06, 60 third year students were invited to complete a questionnaire after finishing the required Ambulatory Medicine/Family Medicine clerkship. The authors elicited themes for...

  10. Searching for more comprehensive health care records: development, application and assessment of a new tool to register outpatient consultations Buscando um registro mais integral do cuidado à saúde: desenvolvimento, aplicação e avaliação de um novo instrumento de registro da consulta ambulatorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Braunstein Bassan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The medical record is important for health care since it allows, through the analysis of data collected in several contacts between patients and health units, to appreciate and understand the disease and health care processes. This comprehension will be the more complete, the more the medical record accounts for the patient’s way of living, health-disease processes, investigations and therapeutic procedures, clinical evolution and possible difficulties to follow medical advice – that is, the way health care was/is delivered by different professionals in several sectors. In this sense, the service – and its record as well – must focus on the individual, the person as a whole, living and becoming ill, and not only on his diseases and morbidities. Based on this premise, this study aimed to develop, apply and assess a new tool for outpatient records at the Integral Ambulatory Care (AMI at Pedro Ernesto University.

    O prontuário médico constitui-se em um importante elemento no cuidado à saúde, na medida em que possibilita, por meio do levantamento das informações registradas nos diversos contatos dos indivíduos com as unidades de saúde, uma apreciação e compreensão de seu processo de adoecimento e de cuidado. Tal compreensão será tão mais completa quanto melhor o prontuário tiver registrado os elementos referentes ao seu modo de viver, ao seu processo de saúde-adoecimento, às investigações e condutas terapêuticas tomadas, à evolução clínica, bem como às eventuais dificuldades no atendimento, às orientações recebidas, o modo, enfim, como o cuidado foi ou está sendo prestado pelos diferentes profissionais responsáveis nos diversos setores de uma dada instituição. Para tal, o atendimento . e também o seu registro . deve ter como foco o indivíduo, a pessoa na sua totalidade do viver e adoecer, e não apenas as suas doenças ou o evoluir de suas morbidades. Tendo por foco o eixo acima, o objetivo deste

  11. 20. Integrating Cannabis Into Clinical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Mental Health, Alleviating Pain Cannabis is now available to patients as a medicine in 18 states and the District of Columbia. Unfortunately, due to the long-standing prohibition, most providers have little information regarding the medicinal use of this versatile botanical. The history of cannabis as medicine will be reviewed. This presentation will summarize the main components of the plant and their pharmacologic effects, highlighting the entour...

  12. Clinical research in primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasman, P A; Macpherson, L E; Haining, S A; Breckons, M

    2015-08-28

    Many commissioning bodies for research expect that researchers will actively involve the public and patients in their projects. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), for example, involves members of the public in reviewing funding applications and making recommendations about research funding. The NIHR's portfolio is currently operating in 97% of NHS Trusts and this now includes research sited in primary dental care. This paper presents some case studies of these and other projects which are designed specifically for patient benefit in dental services in the community. This means there is no necessity to translate the outcomes of such research from a university or hospital base to the general population as the projects are undertaken in dental practices that provide primary dental care to (predominantly) NHS patients. The relevance of the outcomes to dental care is, therefore, likely to be of direct interest and importance to commissioners of healthcare funding in the UK who have a duty to use evidence bases for commissioning decisions. PMID:26315174

  13. Memory Complaints Associated with Seeking Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pires

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as compared to the memory difficulties reported by subjects in the community. Assessment of subjective memory complaints was done with the subjective memory complaints scale (SMC. The mini-mental state examination was used for general cognitive evaluation and the geriatric depression scale for the assessment of depressive symptoms. Eight-hundred and seventy-one nondemented subjects older than 50 years were included. Participants in the clinical setting had a higher total SMC score (10.3±4.2 than those in the community (5.1±3.0. Item 3 of the SMC, Do you ever forget names of family members or friends? contributed significantly more to the variance of the total SMC score in the clinical sample (18% as compared to the community sample (11%. Forgetting names of family members or friends plays an important role in subjective memory complaints in the clinical setting. This symptom is possibly perceived as particularly worrisome and likely drives people to seek for clinical help.

  14. Perfil de sujeitos de pesquisa clínica em um centro ambulatorial independente Profile of clinical research subjects in an independent outpatient center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gustavo Sampaio Lacativa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivos avaliar a qualidade de atendimento de um centro de pesquisa clínica e o entendimento do termo de consentimento informado (TCLE; determinar os motivos da participação e detalhar níveis socioeconômicos. Foi feito um estudo transversal em centro de pesquisa ambulatorial, através de questionário auto-explicativo. Dos cem questionários avaliados, todos os sujeitos de pesquisa consideraram o centro como ótimo (86% ou bom (9%. A quase totalidade foi bem informada do conteúdo do TCLE e o conhecimento do direito "confidencialidade", comum a todos os TCLEs, foi seis vezes maior que " acesso aos dados", que não faz parte. Os principais motivos para participarem foram para "saber mais sobre a sua saúde" (59% e para "beneficiar outras pessoas no futuro" (47%. A principal faixa de renda salarial dos participantes foi entre dois e cinco salários mínimos (48% e a maioria (66% concluiu pelo menos até a 4º série do ensino fundamental. A população possui o mesmo perfil econômico do Rio de Janeiro, nível de escolaridade suficiente para assinar e compreender o que está assinando, conhecendo não só a existência do TCLE, mas demonstrando conhecer seu conteúdo. O motivo principal para participação é para autobenefício e por atitude altruísta.This paper assesses the quality of assistance in a clinical trial outpatient center as well as the patients´understanding of the informed consent (IC; determine the reasons why they participate and detail socio-economic levels. A cross-sectional study was adopted in a clinical trial outpatient center using a self-explanatory questionnaire. All 100 respondents considered the assistance at the center excellent (86% or good (9%. Almost all of them were well informed about the content of the IC. Their knowledge about the right to "confidentiality", present in all ICs, was 6 times higher than their knowledge about their right to "access the results", generally not included

  15. Use of selected ambulatory dental services in Taiwan before and after global budgeting: a longitudinal study to identify trends in hospital and clinic-based services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chienhung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Taiwan government adopted National Health Insurance (NHI in 1995, providing universal health care to all citizens. It was financed by mandatory premium contributions made by employers, employees, and the government. Since then, the government has faced increasing challenges to control NHI expenditures. The aim of this study was to determine trends in the provision of dental services in Taiwan after the implementation of global budgeting in 1998 and to identify areas of possible concern. Methods This longitudinal before/after study was based on data from the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1996 to 2001. These data were subjected to logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to examine changes in delivery of specific services after global budgeting implementation. Utilization of hospital and clinic services was compared. Results Reimbursement for dental services increased significantly while the number of visits per patient remained steady in both hospitals and clinics. In hospitals, visits for root canal procedures, ionomer restoration, tooth extraction and tooth scaling increased significantly. In dental clinics, visits for amalgam restoration decreased significantly while those for ionomer restoration, tooth extraction, and tooth scaling increased significantly. After the adoption of global budgeting, expenditures for dental services increased dramatically while the number of visits per patient did not, indicating a possible shift in patients to hospital facilities that received additional National Health Insurance funding. Conclusions The identified trends indicate increased utilization of dental services and uneven distribution of care and dentists. These trends may be compromising the quality of dental care delivered in Taiwan.

  16. Memory complaints associated with seeking clinical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Pires; D. Silva; J. Maroco; S. Ginó; T. Mendes; B.A. Schmand; M. Guerreiro; A. de Mendonça

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as c

  17. Memory Complaints Associated with Seeking Clinical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Dina Silva; João Maroco; Sandra Ginó; Tiago Mendes; Schmand, Ben A; Manuela Guerreiro; Alexandre Mendonça; Carolina Pires

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as compared to the memory difficulties reported by subjects in the community. Assessment of subjective memory complaints was done with the subjective memory complaints scale (SMC). The mini-mental stat...

  18. Integrated and Gender-Affirming Transgender Clinical Care and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Sari L; Radix, Asa; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-08-15

    Transgender (trans) communities worldwide, particularly those on the trans feminine spectrum, are disproportionately burdened by HIV infection and at risk for HIV acquisition/transmission. Trans individuals represent an underserved, highly stigmatized, and under-resourced population not only in HIV prevention efforts but also in delivery of general primary medical and clinical care that is gender affirming. We offer a model of gender-affirmative integrated clinical care and community research to address and intervene on disparities in HIV infection for transgender people. We define trans terminology, briefly review the social epidemiology of HIV infection among trans individuals, highlight gender affirmation as a key social determinant of health, describe exemplar models of gender-affirmative clinical care in Boston MA, New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA, and offer suggested "best practices" for how to integrate clinical care and research for the field of HIV prevention. Holistic and culturally responsive HIV prevention interventions must be grounded in the lived realities the trans community faces to reduce disparities in HIV infection. HIV prevention interventions will be most effective if they use a structural approach and integrate primary concerns of transgender people (eg, gender-affirmative care and management of gender transition) alongside delivery of HIV-related services (eg, biobehavioral prevention, HIV testing, linkage to care, and treatment). PMID:27429189

  19. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care. PMID:18663640

  20. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskes, Anne M; Brölmann, Fleur E; Sumpio, Bauer E;

    2012-01-01

    The care for chronic and acute wounds is a substantial problem around the world. This has led to a plethora of products to accelerate healing. Unfortunately, the quality of studies evaluating the efficacy of such wound care products is frequently low. Randomized clinical trials are universally...... acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects, as they eliminate several sources of bias. We propose a framework for the design and conduct of future randomized clinical trials that will offer strong scientific evidence for the effectiveness of wound care interventions. While...... randomization is a necessary feature of a robust comparative study, it is not sufficient to ensure a study at low risk of bias. Randomized clinical trials should also ensure adequate allocation concealment and blinding of outcome assessors, apply intention-to-treat analysis, and use patient-oriented outcomes...

  1. Clinical knowledge management at the point of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong-Lieng Teng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the developing world, clinical knowledgemanagement in primary care has a long way to go.Clinical decision support systems, despite its promise torevolutionise healthcare, is slow in its implementationdue to the lack of financial investment in informationtechnology. Point-of-care resources, such ascomprehensive electronic textbooks delivered via theweb or mobile devices, have yet to be fully utilised bythe healthcare organisation or individual clinicians.Increasing amount of applicable knowledge of goodquality (e.g. clinical practice guidelines and otherpre-appraised resources are now available via theinternet. The policy makers and clinicians need tobe more informed about the potential benefits andlimitations of these new tools and resources and makethe necessary budgetary provision and learn how best toharness them for patient care.

  2. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  3. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D.I.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  4. Report a Complaint (about a Health Care Organization)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health Care Behavioral Health Care Critical Access Hospitals Home Care (+ Pharmacy) Hospital Laboratory Nursing Care Center International Accreditation Accreditation Top Spots What ...

  5. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nadeem

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment.

  6. Enfermagem em cirurgia ambulatorial de um hospital escola: clientela, procedimentos e necessidades biológicas e psicossociais Enfermería en cirugía ambulatoria en hospital escuela: clientela, procedimientos y necesidades biológicas y psicosociales Nursing care in ambulatory surgery at a teaching hospital: patients, procedures and biological and psychosocial needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Vegette Pinto

    2005-04-01

    local con o sin sedación. Como necesidades biológicas fueron identificadas: alteraciones en la tensión arterial, alteraciones electrocardiográficas, uso de medicamentos y alergias a los mismos, ayuno prolongado, náusea, vómito y dolor; como necesidades psicosociales: preocupación, miedo, ansiedad, incomodo por la espera para realizarse el procedimiento y dudas o desconocimiento respecto a los cuidados perioperatorios.This descriptive study aimed to characterize the profile of 167 subjects who were treated at the Ambulatory Surgical Center of a University Hospital in São Paulo State and procedures realized at the Ambulatory Surgical Center, as well as to identify the biological and psychosocial needs of these patients. Data were obtained through a semistructured interview and patients' files and were subject to descriptive analysis. The group was characterized by an equal number of individuals from both genders; average age was 51 years and socioeconomic levels were poor. The most common surgical and anesthetic procedures were ophthalmologic procedures and use of local anesthesia with or without sedation. The biological needs were: altered arterial pressure, electrocardiographic alterations, use of medication, allergy to medication, prolonged fasting, nausea, vomits and pain. The psychosocial needs were: worry, fear, anxiety, discomfort caused by waiting for the realization of procedures and doubts or lack of information concerning perioperative care.

  7. The enhancement of clinical competence through caring science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Malmberg, Rika; Hilli, Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    This theoretical research attempts to create a new basis for dialogue between two independent research fields that are connected by an inseparable link. The first, nursing science, is a body of professional knowledge, while the second, caring as an independent body of pure knowledge, conducts basic research with an aspiration towards applicability. This theoretical research uses the guidelines of the Buberian dialogue, which provides new meaning to the concept of clinical competence. The results emphasise the need to adopt abstract knowledge into the nursing field in order to improve the graduate's clinical capabilities. The combination of assessing clinical capability in a judgmental manner together with the dialogical humanistic approach of caring science may create a genuine platform and meeting event as a maturing process, which is intended to promote educational goals, which subsequently receive new meaning, that is, a different type of assessment. However, this assessment cannot be measured since a wide range of ethical moral aspects regarding both the student and the patient will have to be included. Nevertheless, this dialogue between nursing science and caring science can implement evidence on the basis of trust and can be used as a dialogical tool for evaluating clinical skills with the goal of empowering the educational field in nursing. Consequently, this clinical competence is called 'caring maturing means', and the goal is to convert the learning process into a meaningful event with the aim of improvement. PMID:24308907

  8. 预警干预护理在预防脑卒中卧床患者褥疮发病中的应用%Warning intervention in the prevention of stroke care in ambulatory patients bedsore incidence Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁琼

    2013-01-01

    目的:对脑卒中卧床患者实施预警干预护理,探讨和分析其预防患者发生褥疮的效果。方法:对我院此次收治的100例脑卒中卧床患者,根据Braden评分法来对患者发生褥疮的危险度进行预测。同时按照分值来进行分组,分为试验组和对照组,各为50例。对照组:对患者采用传统型的分级护理;试验组:对患者采用预警干预护理。结果:试验组:发生褥疮的患者为2例,占4.0%;其中I期1例,II期1例。对照组:发生褥疮的患者为7例,占14.0%;其中I期5例, II期2例。试验组患者发生褥疮的几率明显低于对照组,差异显著,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:在临床上,对脑卒中卧床患者采用Braden评分法进行预警干预护理,降低患者发生褥疮的几率,促进患者的康复,提高患者的生活质量。%Objective:Implementation of stroke warning intervention nursing bedridden patients to explore and analyze their preventive effect in patients with bedsores. Method:The admit ed in our hospital 100 cases of stroke bedridden patients, according to Braden score for patients to predict the risk of bedsores. Grouped according to both scores were divided into experimental and control groups, each of 50 cases. Control group: patients using traditional type of grading nursing; experimental group: nursing interventions for patients with early warning. Results:The experimental group:patients with pressure ulcers occur in 2 cases, accounting for 4.0%;including one case of stage I, II stage 1 case. Control group:patients with bedsores 7 cases, accounting for 14.0%;including five cases of stage I, II Phase 2 cases. Experimental group were significantly lower than the probability of occurrence of bedsores control group, the difference was significant, with statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusions: In clinical practice, ambulatory patients with stroke using the Braden score early warning

  9. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA. Patient satisfaction is a complex concept that is influenced by multiple factors. A patient's viewpoint and knowledge plays an influential role in patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgery. Medical optimization and psychological preparation of the patient plays a pivotal role in the success of ambulatory surgery. Postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting are the most important symptoms for the patient and can be addressed by multimodal drug regimens. Shared decision making, patient–provider relationship, communication, and continuity of care form the main pillars of patient satisfaction. Various psychometrically developed instruments are available to measure patient satisfaction, such as the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale and Evaluation du Vecu de I'Anesthesie Generale, but none have been developed specifically for ambulatory surgery. The ASA has made recommendations for data collection for patient satisfaction surveys and emphasized the importance of reporting the data to the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Future research is warranted to develop a validated tool to measure patient satisfaction in ambulatory surgery. Keywords: patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  10. Provider and Clinic Cultural Competence in a Primary Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cooper, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA. completed an on-line survey which includ...

  11. [Individualised care plan during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call Mañosa, S; Pujol Garcia, A; Chacón Jordan, E; Martí Hereu, L; Pérez Tejero, G; Gómez Simón, V; Estruga Asbert, A; Gallardo Herrera, L; Vaquer Araujo, S; de Haro López, C

    2016-01-01

    An individualised care plan is described for a woman diagnosed with pneumonia, intubated, and on invasive mechanical ventilation, who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A nursing care plan was designed based on Marjory Gordon functional patterns. The most important nursing diagnoses were prioritised, using a model of clinical reasoning model (Analysis of the current status) and NANDA taxonomy. A description is presented on, death anxiety, impaired gas exchange, decreased cardiac output, dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility, risk for disuse syndrome, infection risk, and bleeding risk. The principal objectives were: to reduce the fear of the family, achieve optimal respiratory and cardiovascular status, to maintain gastrointestinal function, to avoid immobility complications, and to reduce the risk of infection and bleeding. As regards activities performed: we gave family support; correct management of the mechanical ventilation airway, cardio-respiratory monitoring, skin and nutritional status; control of possible infections and bleeding (management of therapies, care of catheters…). A Likert's scale was used to evaluate the results, accomplishing all key performance indicators which were propose at the beginning. Individualised care plans with NNN taxonomy using the veno-venous ECMO have not been described. Other ECMO care plans have not used the same analysis model. This case can help nurses to take care of patients subjected to veno-venous ECMO treatment, although more cases are needed to standardise nursing care using NANDA taxonomy. PMID:27137415

  12. Priority Setting and Influential Factors on Acceptance of Pharmaceutical Recommendations in Collaborative Medication Reviews in an Ambulatory Care Setting – Analysis of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (WestGem-Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Olaf; Mennemann, Hugo; John, Carina; Lautenschläger, Marcus; Mertens-Keller, Damaris; Richling, Katharina; Waltering, Isabel; Hamacher, Stefanie; Felsch, Moritz; Herich, Lena; Czarnecki, Kathrin; Schaffert, Corinna; Jaehde, Ulrich; Köberlein-Neu, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication reviews are recognized services to increase quality of therapy and reduce medication risks. The selection of eligible patients with potential to receive a major benefit is based on assumptions rather than on factual data. Acceptance of interprofessional collaboration is crucial to increase the quality of medication therapy. Objective The research question was to identify and prioritize eligible patients for a medication review and to provide evidence-based criteria for patient selection. Acceptance of the prescribing general practitioner to implement pharmaceutical recommendations was measured and factors influencing physicians’ acceptance were explored to obtain an impression on the extent of collaboration in medication review in an ambulatory care setting. Methods Based on data of a cluster-randomized controlled study (WestGem-study), the correlation between patient parameters and the individual performance in a medication review was calculated in a multiple logistic regression model. Physician’s acceptance of the suggested intervention was assessed using feedback forms. Influential factors were analyzed. Results The number of drugs in use (p = 0.001), discrepancies between prescribed and used medicines (p = 0.014), the baseline Medication Appropriateness Index score (p0.05) and a low kidney function (p>0.05) do not predetermine the outcome. Longitudinal patient care with repeated reviews showed higher interprofessional acceptance and superior patient benefit. A total of 54.9% of the recommendations in a medication review on drug therapy were accepted for implementation. Conclusions The number of drugs in use and medication reconciliation could be a first rational step in patient selection for a medication review. Most elderly, multimorbid patients with polymedication experience a similar chance of receiving a benefit from a medication review. Longitudinal patient care should be preferred over confined medication reviews. The acceptance

  13. The Impact of Maternal Health Literacy on Structures, Interpersonal Processes and Outcomes of Ambulatory Care for Low-Income Latino Children

    OpenAIRE

    Fry-Bowers, Eileen Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Child health outcomes depend on a parent's ability to read, communicate, analyze, and use health information to participate in their child's care. Low maternal health literacy (HL) may disrupt access to pediatric health care, impede informed parent decision-making, and exacerbate pediatric health disparities. This dissertation explores relationships between maternal (HL), maternal self-efficacy (SE) in communication, interpersonal interactions with health care providers (HCPs), a...

  14. Functional assessment: bridge between family and rehabilitation medicine within an ambulatory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, G B; Granger, C V; Wineberg, D E

    1982-10-01

    This study describes development of a functional assessment instrument used to screen ambulatory care patients who have difficulty performing daily activities. Sample selection occurred in 2 stages. In the first stage, an interdisciplinary team used clinical selection criteria in order to screen patients into 2 groups: group 1, those likely to have functional limitations; and group 2, those not likely to have functional limitations. Using clinical selection criteria for a 3-week period in an ambulatory primary care setting, it was found that 20% of the outpatients seen fell into group 1. In the second stage, a randomly selected subsample of 194 persons was used, with 97 in group 1, and 97 in group 2. The Functional Assessment Screening Questionnaire (FASQ) was tested using this second sample. The FASQ was found to discriminate between the 2 groups, with those in group 1 having a significantly greater number of functional difficulties than those in group 2. An analysis was conducted to investigate which diagnostic problems were more likely to be associated with patients reporting functional limitations. Fourteen diagnostic patient problems found to be significantly more limiting than for the total sample were identified. The factor structure of the FASQ was examined and a format for clinically integrating the FASQ factors was offered. PMID:6215908

  15. [Clinical practice guidelines and primary care. SESPAS report 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza, Gerardo; Bañeres, Joaquim; Gracia, Francisco Javier

    2012-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are intended to serve as a bridge between the decision levels and the sources of knowledge, giving decision makers the best synthesis of scientific evidence and an analysis of context, to provide elements of judgement and to transfer scientific knowledge into clinical practice. However, the actual impact on health care is variable and effectiveness in changing medical practice, moderate. Qualitative and quantitative studies show that most primary care physicians consider that the guides are a valuable source of advice and training and a kind of improving the quality of healthcare. However, they underline its rigidity, the difficulty to apply to individual patients and that their main goal is to reduce healthcare costs. In Spain, there are several experiences as GuíaSalud in developing clinical practice guidelines aimed specifically at primary care. However, the proper implementation of a clinical practice guideline includes not only the quality and thoroughness of the evidence, but the credibility of professionals and organizations and other contextual factors such as characteristics of patients, providers and organizations or systems. An important step in future research is to develop a better theoretical understanding of organizational change that is required for management and professionals to give appropriate guidance to the implementation of the clinical practice guidelines. PMID:21993072

  16. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  17. 门诊可疑高血压患者诊室血压和ABP监测的比较%Comparison between Clinic Blood Pressure and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinically Suspected Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芦娜; 张仁汉

    2013-01-01

    目的:通过对门诊可疑高血压患者进行动态血压(ABP)监测以及门诊诊室血压(CBP)的比较,了解高血压病可靠的监测方法。方法:门诊就诊者CBP(SBP≥120mmHg或DBP≥80mmHg)224例分为高血压组(154例)和血压正常高值组(70例),对2组的CBP水平及ABP监测结果进行分析。结果:高血压组和血压正常高值组ABP监测SBP、DBP具有显著性差异(P<0.01)。CBP和ABP监测全天血压平均值具有密切相关(P<0.01)。结论:24小时ABP监测对于高血压早期阶段具有较高的敏感度,CBP和ABP监测全天血压平均值具有密切相关性。%Objective:To compare the ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and clinic blood pressure (CBP) in clinically suspected hypertension subject, and to explore the reliable monitoring method of hypertension. Methods:Outpatients CBP (SBP≥120mmHg or DBP≥80mmHg) 224 were divided into hypertension group (154 cases) and high-normal blood pressure group (70 cases), the two groups of CBP and ABP monitoring results were analyzed. Results:Hypertension and high-normal blood pressure group ABP monitoring SBP, DBP has significant difference(P<0.01). CBP and ABP monitoring throughout the day mean blood pressure is closely related(P<0.01). Conclusions:ABP monitoring have higher sensitivity for early stage hypertension. The average blood pressure of ABP was significant associated with CBP.

  18. Secondary uses of clinical data in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Sheila; Bates, David; Kmetik, Karen; Suzewits, Jeff; Bainbridge, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper, presented as a panel at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) Fall Symposium 2006, explores a number of secondary uses of primary care clinical data derived from point-of-care systems, and the issues arising from those uses. The authors (from the USA and the UK) describe, compare and contrast some secondary uses: pay-for-performance, public disclosure, clinical audit, health resource planning, and clinical system usage; in various environments: national health system, network of small family practice offices, and university teaching centres. In the UK, such data are now being used in pay-for-performance for GPs, and approximately 35% of their salary has been put at risk, which has resulted in close scrutiny. In the USA, pay-for-performance is at an earlier stage but is increasingly prevalent and continues to be hotly debated. Some of the issues that arise from these uses of clinical data - data quality including accuracy, comparability, perverse incentives, effect of secondary uses on care provision, and security and confidentiality among others - were discussed. Finally, options and opportunities for improving secondary uses of data in the light of the issues covered earlier were considered. PMID:18005563

  19. Secondary uses of clinical data in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Teasdale

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presented as a panel at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA Fall Symposium 2006, explores a number of secondary uses of primary care clinical data derived from point-of care systems, and the issues arising from those uses. The authors (from the USA and the UK describe, compare and contrast some secondary uses: pay-for-performance, public disclosure, clinical audit, health resource planning, and clinical system usage; in various environments: national health system, network of small family practice offices, and university teaching centres. In the UK, such data are now being used in pay-for-performance for GPs, and approximately 35% of their salary has been put at risk, which has resulted in close scrutiny. In the USA, pay-for-performance is at an earlier stage but is increasingly prevalent and continues to be hotly debated. Some of the issues that arise from these uses of clinical data _data quality including accuracy, comparability, perverse incentives, effect of secondary uses on care provision, and security and confidentiality among others _were discussed. Finally, options and opportunities for improving secondary uses of data in the light of the issues covered earlier were considered.

  20. Event detection using population-based health care databases in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Leif; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Tilsted, Hans Henrik; Mæng, Michael; Terkelsen, Christian; Thayssen, Per; Ravkilde, Jan; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Madsen, Morten; Lassen, Jens F

    2013-01-01

    To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials.......To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials....

  1. Determinants of patient satisfaction in ambulatory oncology: a cross sectional study based on the OUT-PATSAT35 questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thanh Vân France

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with satisfaction with care in cancer patients undergoing ambulatory treatment. We investigated associations between patients' baseline clinical and socio-demographic characteristics, as well as self-reported quality of life, and satisfaction with care. Methods Patients undergoing ambulatory chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 2 centres in France were invited, at the beginning of their treatment, to complete the OUT-PATSAT35, a 35 item and 13 scale questionnaire evaluating perception of doctors, nurses and aspects of care organisation. Additionally, for each patient, socio-demographic variables, clinical characteristics and self-reported quality of life using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire were recorded. Results Among 692 patients included between January 2005 and December 2006, only 6 were non-responders. By multivariate analysis, poor perceived global health strongly predicted dissatisfaction with care (p Conclusions A number of clinical of socio-demographic factors were significantly associated with different scales of the satisfaction questionnaire. However, the main determinant was the patient's global health status, underlining the importance of measuring and adjusting for self-perceived health status when evaluating satisfaction. Further analyses are currently ongoing to determine the responsiveness of the OUT-PATSAT35 questionnaire to changes over time.

  2. Awareness of the Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad Program and Education Regarding Pharmaceutical Advertising: A National Survey of Prescribers in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Boudewyns, Vanessa; Aikin, Kathryn J; Geisen, Emily; Betts, Kevin R; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad program educates health care professionals about false or misleading advertising and marketing and provides a pathway to report suspect materials. To assess familiarity with this program and the extent of training about pharmaceutical marketing, a sample of 2,008 health care professionals, weighted to be nationally representative, responded to an online survey. Approximately equal numbers of primary care physicians, specialists, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners answered questions concerning Bad Ad program awareness and its usefulness, as well as their likelihood of reporting false or misleading advertising, confidence in identifying such advertising, and training about pharmaceutical marketing. Results showed that fewer than a quarter reported any awareness of the Bad Ad program. Nonetheless, a substantial percentage (43%) thought it seemed useful and 50% reported being at least somewhat likely to report false or misleading advertising in the future. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants expressed more openness to the program and reported receiving more training about pharmaceutical marketing. Bad Ad program awareness is low, but opportunity exists to solicit assistance from health care professionals and to help health care professionals recognize false and misleading advertising. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants are perhaps the most likely contributors to the program. PMID:26176326

  3. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, William T; Zai, Adrian H; Grant, Richard W; Chueh, Henry C

    2008-01-01

    The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge-performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environment where disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their real-world effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT) tools for translating clinical information into clinical action. PMID:18534073

  4. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  5. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  6. Risk perception and clinical decision making in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aim to present new knowledge about different perspectives of health care professionals’ risk perceptions and clinical decision making. Furthermore, we intend to discuss differences between professional and personal risk perceptions and the impact on decisions in terms of both short...... considerations and the specific context. Most research has been focused on understanding of the concepts of risk. However healthcare professionals’ risk perception and personal attitudes also affect their clinical decision-making and risk communication. The differences between health care professionals’ personal...... and professional risk perception and attitudes and the subsequent impact on patients’ decision making have not previously been discussed. Content 1. Peder Halvorsen, MD, Professor, General Practice, Department of Community Medicine, The Arctic University of Norway: Making good decisions: Intuition or...

  7. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    OpenAIRE

    Jovana Rančić; Nemanja Rančić; Nemanja Majstorović; Vladimir Biočanin; Marko Milosavljević; Mihajlo Jakovljević

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was...

  8. Clinical review: Airway hygiene in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Jelic, Sanja; Cunningham, Jennifer A; Factor, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of airway secretion clearance, or airway hygiene, is important for the preservation of airway patency and the prevention of respiratory tract infection. Impaired airway clearance often prompts admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and can be a cause and/or contributor to acute respiratory failure. Physical methods to augment airway clearance are often used in the ICU but few are substantiated by clinical data. This review focuses on the impact of oral hygiene, tracheal suctio...

  9. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (PSSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938. PMID:27121727

  10. [Ambulatory surgery in France: practical and medicolegal considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodey, E; de la Brière, F

    2013-12-01

    In France, ambulatory anaesthesia and surgery seem to be well codified. Many recommendations have been published by the Health Authority and the professional associations: they are summarized in this review. However, numerous practical problems persist: for example, two situations specific to paediatric practice are problematic parental comprehension and application of the information provided and poor access to strong analgesics outside the hospital. Despite this, the paediatric population is an ideal target for ambulatory care because of its usual good health and quicker recovery after minor injury as proven by the small percentage of failure and readmission. PMID:24209990

  11. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  12. Chronic patient care at North West Province clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire van Deventer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic illnesses are a significant burden to the health services in South Africa. There is a specific national health plan whereby chronically ill patients who are acceptably controlled should be managed at clinic level. The perception has emerged that the management of primary care has not been optimal in the Southern District of the North West Province. This provided the motivation to initiate this research, namely consideration of chronic patient care at clinics in the North West Province of South Africa.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out at four randomly selected clinics covering four sub-districts in the Southern District (North West Province. This was done using charts and registers at the clinics. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18, and presenting with the following chronic illnesses: asthma/chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD, hypertension, diabetes and epilepsy. The major focus areas were the regular assessment of the patients, the level of control of the illness and the use of the Essential Drugs List and Standard Treatment Guidelines (EDL/STG.Results: In the cases of all the chronic illnesses it was found that regular assessments were poorly done, with asthma (peak flow measurements being the most poorly done. Control was generally less than 50% for all the illnesses, although the EDL was followed fairly well by the personnel at the clinics.Conclusion: In the light of the burden of chronic illness the results give cause for great concern about the quality of care for chronically ill patients, and reasons were sought for some of the poor results. A subsequent decision was taken to carry out comprehensive quality improvement projects on each of the illnesses over the following five years.

  13. Cuidando de idosos com Demência: um estudo a partir da prática ambulatorial de enfermagem Cuidando de ancianos con Demencia: pratica de enfermería en el ambulatorio Caring the elderly with Dementia: a study of the ambulatorial nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Ferreira Santana

    2005-02-01

    characteristics of sixteen elderly and their caregivers in attendence at the neurogeriatrical ambulatory of Rio de Janeiro during 2004; to identify nursing and care diagnosis used by caregivers, through EDG, MEEM, AIVDs and AVDs applied in nursing assessments. The quantitative descriptive method was employed, as a study of each case, obtaining the results: in the client- Disorientation, aggressiveness, skin drought, urinary incontinence, disturbance in the family relationship; In the caregivers- inefficient caregiver/ elderly communication, physical fatigue, lack of knowledge about care; accomplished types of care - feeding, medication and hygiene. In conclusion, educational nursing actions are necessary to improve the care quality to the elderly and their family.

  14. Kangaroo mother care for infantile colic: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Saeidi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Infantile colic has been defined as episodes of excessive and persistent crying without known medical cause. Kangaroo mother care is a new method for baby care with several advantages. A universally available and biologically sound method of care for all newborns, with three components: skin-to-skin contact, exclusive breastfeeding, support to the mother-infant dyad. This study designed for evaluating Kangaroo mother care on infantile colic.  "n"nMethods: This study was a randomized controlled trial. From 1th may 2008 to 1 may 2009 a total of 70 children, aged 3-12 weeks with persistent colic symptoms were studied. The children were referred to Sheikh clinic, Mashhad, Iran, because of excessive crying. Normal mother-infant pairs were recruited at 3 to 12 weeks of age after obtaining baseline for two days. Subjects divided randomly to kangaroo care or conventional care group and mothers in both groups filled diary for seven days. "n"nResults: In the beginning of the study, the infants in kangaroo care group had 3.5 hr/d crying and after the intervention, it decreased to 1.7 hr/d, the difference were significant (p<0.05. But there were no difference in feeding duration between

  15. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed. PMID:27382329

  16. Ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Is it safe and cost effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Athar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC is the most commonly performed minimal invasive surgery. However, practice of its use as an ambulatory surgery in our hospital settings is uncommon. Objective : To evaluate safety and cost effectiveness of LC as an ambulatory day care surgery. Study Design : Quasiexperimental. Setting : Department of surgery, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Materials and Methods : Patients with uncomplicated symptomatic gallstones were selected for Ambulatory LC. They were admitted electively on the same day and operated on in the morning hours and discharged after a check by the surgeon 6-8 hrs later. Results : Of fifty (n = 50 patients selected for ambulatory LC, 92% were discharged successfully after 6-8 hrs observation. No significant perioperative complications were noted. Unplanned admission and readmission rate was 8 and 2%, respectively. Cost saving for the daycare surgery was Rs. 6,200, Rs. 13,300, and Rs.22,800 per patient as compared to in patient general, semiprivate, and private ward package, respectively. Conclusion : Practice ambulatory LC is safe and cost-effective in selected patients with uncomplicated symptomatic gallstones.

  17. Clinical Predictors of Intensive Care Unit Admission for Asthmatic Children

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    Mohammad Hasan Kargar Maher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionChildren with severe asthma attack are a challenging group of patients who could be difficult to treat and leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Asthma attack severity is qualitatively estimated as mild, moderate and severe attacks and respiratory failure based on conditions such as respiration status, feeling of dyspnea, and the degree of unconsciousness. part of which are subjective rather than objective. We investigated clinical findings as predictors of severe attack and probable requirement for Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU admission.Materials and MethodsIn a cross sectional and analytical study 120 patients with asthma attack were enrolled from April 2010 to April 2014 (80 admitted in the ward and 40 in pediatric intensive care unit. Predictors of PICU admission were investigated regarding to initial heart rate(HR, respiratory rate (RR, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(SaO2 and PaCo2 and clinically evident cyanosis.ResultsInitial heart rate(p-value=0.02, respiratory rate (p-value=0.03, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(p-value=0.02 and PaCo2(p-value=0.03 and clinically evident cyanosis were significantly different in two groups(Ward admitted and PICU admittedConclusion There was a significant correlation between initial vital sign and blood gas analysis suggesting usefulness of these factors as predictors of severe asthma attack and subsequent clinical course.

  18. Shared care and implementation of a pediatric clinical pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfrits, Mette Sørensen; Thomsen, RW; Rubak, Jens Mørck; Høst, Arne; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck

    and children with uncontrolled asthma should be followed at the pediatrics department. Study 2) An increased overall proportion of children with well-controlled asthma. Study 3) Favorable changes in the use of asthma medication. Study 4) Self-reported higher quality of life among children with asthma...... either at a hospital specialist out-patient clinic at the pediatrics department at Viborg hospital or at one of 100 GPs in the Viborg area. At baseline the involved health care professionals participated in an introduction to the clinical pathway and treatment guide. Furthermore the clinical pathway and...... supported by Folkesundhed i Midten. We sincerely thank Lars G. Hansen (Head of Department of Pediatrics, Viborg Hospital) for his help and participation....

  19. Provider and clinic cultural competence in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K; Carson, Kathryn A; Cooper, Lisa A

    2008-03-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA completed an on-line survey which included items assessing provider and clinic cultural competence. Using simple linear regression, it was found that providers with attitudes reflecting greater cultural motivation to learn were more likely to work in clinics with a higher percent of nonwhite staff, and those offering cultural diversity training and culturally adapted patient education materials. More culturally appropriate provider behavior was associated with a higher percent of nonwhite staff in the clinic, and culturally adapted patient education materials. Enhancing provider and clinic cultural competence may be synergistic strategies for reducing healthcare disparities. PMID:18164114

  20. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation. PMID:26807853

  1. Ambulatory surgery for the patient with breast cancer: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Ern Yu; Pek, Chong Han; Tey,Boon Lim, John

    2016-01-01

    Chong Han Pek,1 John Tey,2 Ern Yu Tan1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is well accepted and is the standard of care at many tertiary centers. Rather than being hospitalized after surgery, patients are discharged on the day of surgery or within 23 hours. Such early discharge does not adversely affect patient outcomes and has the added benefit...

  2. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Jean; Shah, Ushma; Wong, David

    2015-01-01

    Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). Patient satisfaction is a complex concep...

  3. Hospitalization and ambulatory care in imported-malaria: evaluation of trends and impact on mortality. A prospective multicentric 14-year observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Casalino, Enrique; Etienne, Aurélie; Mentré, France; Houzé, Sandrine; ,

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization is usually recommended for imported malaria. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the evolution in clinical pathways while measuring their impact on mortality. Methods This is a 14-year prospective observational study divided into three periods. We evaluated for adult (≥15 years) and paediatric (

  4. Clinical Features Of Acute Febrile Thrombocytopaenia Among Patients Attending Primary Care Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Fah, Tong Seng; MMed, Noorazah Abdul Aziz; Liew, Chin Gek; Omar, Khairani

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Identifying clinical features that differentiate acute febrile thrombocytopaenia from acute febrile illness without thrombocytopaenia can help primary care physician to decide whether to order a full blood count (FBC). This is important because thrombocytopaenia in viral fever may signify more serious underlying aetiology like dengue infection.

  5. [Certification of an ambulatory gastroenterologic service fulfilling ISO Law 9001--criteria and national guidelines of the Gastroenterologic Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, B

    2000-09-01

    The objectives of certification and accreditation are the deployment and examination of quality improvement measures in health care services. The quality management system of the ISO 9001 is created to install measures and tools leading to assured and improved quality in health care. Only some experiences with certification fulfilling ISO 9001 criteria exist in the German health care system. Evidence-based clinical guidelines can serve as references for the development of standards in quality measurement. Only little data exists on the implementation strategy of guidelines and evaluation, respectively. A pilot quality management system in consistence with ISO 9001 criteria was developed for ambulatory, gastroenterological services. National guidelines of the German Society of Gastroenterology and Metabolism and the recommendations of the German Association of Physicians for quality assurance of gastrointestinal endoscopy were included in the documentation and internal auditing. This pilot quality management system is suitable for the first steps in the introduction of quality management in ambulatory health care. This system shows validity for accreditation and certification of gastrointestinal health care units as well. PMID:11084717

  6. Impact of clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A critically ill patient is treated and reviewed by physicians from different specialties; hence, polypharmacy is a very common. This study was conducted to assess the impact and effectiveness of having a clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit (ICU. It also evaluates the clinical pharmacist interventions with a focus on optimizing the quality of pharmacotherapy and patient safety. Materials and Methods: The prospective, observational study was carried out in medical and surgical/trauma ICU over a period of 1 year. All detected drug-related problems and interventions were categorized based on the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe system. Results: During the study period, average monthly census of 1032 patients got treated in the ICUs. A total of 986 pharmaceutical interventions due to drug-related problems were documented, whereof medication errors accounted for 42.6% (n = 420, drug of choice problem 15.4% (n = 152, drug-drug interactions were 15.1% (n = 149, Y-site drug incompatibility was 13.7% (n = 135, drug dosing problems were 4.8% (n = 47, drug duplications reported were 4.6% (n = 45, and adverse drug reactions documented were 3.8% (n = 38. Drug dosing adjustment done by the clinical pharmacist included 140 (11.9% renal dose, 62 (5.2% hepatic dose, 17 (1.4% pediatric dose, and 104 (8.8% insulin dosing modifications. A total of 577 drug and poison information queries were answered by the clinical pharmacist. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist as a part of multidisciplinary team in our study was associated with a substantially lower rate of adverse drug event caused by medication errors, drug interactions, and drug incompatibilities.

  7. Nontraumatic dental condition-related visits to emergency departments on weekdays, weekends and night hours: findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care survey

    OpenAIRE

    Okunseri C; Okunseri E; Fischer MC; Sadeghi SN; Xiang Q; Szabo A

    2013-01-01

    Christopher Okunseri,1 Elaye Okunseri,1 Melissa Christine Fischer,1 Saba Noori Sadeghi,1 Qun Xiang,2 Aniko Szabo21Department of Clinical Services, School of Dentistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, USA; 2Division of Biostatistics, Institute of Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAObjective: To determine whether the rates of nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related emergency department (ED) visits are higher during the typical working hours of dental o...

  8. Bidirectional peritoneal transport of albumin in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to assess bidirectional peritoneal kinetics of albumin after simultaneous i.v. and i.p. injection of radioiodinated albumin tracers (125I-RISA and 131I-RISA) in eight clinically stable uraemic patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis...... mass at the end of the dialysis (54 +/- 19 mumol, P

  9. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families. PMID:24863582

  10. Missing Clinical Information in NHS hospital outpatient clinics: prevalence, causes and effects on patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthy Krishna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Britain over 39,000 reports were received by the National Patient Safety Agency relating to failures in documentation in 2007 and the UK Health Services Journal estimated in 2008 that over a million hospital outpatient visits each year might take place without the full record available. Despite these high numbers, the impact of missing clinical information has not been investigated for hospital outpatients in the UK. Studies in primary care in the USA have found 13.6% of patient consultations have missing clinical information, with this adversely affecting care in about half of cases, and in Australia 1.8% of medical errors were found to be due to the unavailability of clinical information. Our objectives were to assess the frequency, nature and potential impact on patient care of missing clinical information in NHS hospital outpatients and to assess the principal causes. This is the first study to present such figures for the UK and the first to look at how clinicians respond, including the associated impact on patient care. Methods Prospective descriptive study of missing information reported by surgeons, supplemented by interviews on the causes. Data were collected by surgeons in general, gastrointestinal, colorectal and vascular surgical clinics in three teaching hospitals across the UK for over a thousand outpatient appointments. Fifteen interviews were conducted with those involved in collating clinical information for these clinics. The study had ethics approval (Hammersmith and Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Research Ethics Committee, reference number (09/H0707/27. Participants involved in the interviews signed a consent form and were offered the opportunity to review and agree the transcript of their interview before analysis. No patients were involved in this research. Results In 15% of outpatient consultations key items of clinical information were missing. Of these patients, 32% experienced a delay or disruption

  11. Blood pressure variability in relation to outcome in the International Database of Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Thijs, Lutgarde; Richart, Tom;

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring provides information not only on the BP level but also on the diurnal changes in BP. In the present review, we summarized the main findings of the International Database on Ambulatory BP in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) with regard to risk.......1%. In conclusion, the IDACO observations support the concept that BP variability adds to risk stratification, but above all highlight that 24-h ambulatory BP level remains the main predictor to be considered in clinical practice....

  12. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of headache in the ambulatory care setting: a review of classic presentations and new considerations in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Natalie; Paauw, Douglas S

    2014-05-01

    Headaches represent the most common constellation of neurologic disorders and are a very common cause of morbidity, lost work time, and decreased quality of life among sufferers. In this article, the diagnostic features, workup, and treatment of common, nuanced, and difficult-to-diagnose headache conditions were addressed. The future will hold a number of changes, with respect to both the diagnosis and treatment of headache disorders. As the aging population continues to grow, primary care providers will need to become increasingly familiar with differentiating between benign primary and more serious secondary headache disorders and will need to be able to treat the headache disorders unique to the elderly. With respect to therapeutic options, the future for treatment of the various headache disorders is promising. With the rise in popularity of complementary medical practices, there is likely to be more research on the roles of acupuncture, herbal and alternative remedies, massage therapy, and mind-body techniques. Further, new research is suggesting that neurostimulation may be useful in certain chronic, intractable headache conditions. Finally, the pathophysiology of headache disorders is still poorly understood and there is great hope that better understanding of the underlying mechanics of headache might contribute to improved treatment modalities and better quality of life for patients. PMID:24758958

  14. Beta-blocker therapy in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction and chronic obstructive lung disease in an ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billups SJ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate beta blocker persistence six months after beta-blocker initiation or dose titration in heart failure (HF patients with COPD compared to those without COPD. Secondary objectives included comparison of beta-blocker dose achieved, changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and incidence of hospitalizations or emergency department (ED visits during follow-up.Methods: We conducted a matched, retrospective, cohort study including 86 patients with COPD plus concomitant HF (LVEF ≤40% and 137 patients with HF alone. All patients were followed in an outpatient HF clinic. Eligible patients had a documented LVEF ≤40% and were initiated or titrated on a beta-blocker in the HF clinic. Patients were matched based on LVEF (categorized as ≤ 20% or 21-40%, gender, and age (> or ≤70 years. The primary outcome was beta blocker persistence at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were dose achieved, LVEF, and incidence of hospitalizations or ED visits. Results: There were no differences between the COPD and non-COPD groups in beta-blocker persistence at six-month follow-up (94.2% vs. 93.4% respectively, adjusted p=0.842. The proportion of patients who achieved a daily metoprolol dose equivalent of at least 100 mg was similar between the groups (adjusted p=0.188. The percent of patients with at least one ED visit or hospitalization in the six-month post-titration period was substantial but similar between the groups (53.5% and 48.2% for COPD and non-COPD patients, respectively, adjusted p=0.169. Conclusion: Our results support the use of beta-blockers in the population of heart failure patients with COPD and without reactive airway disease.

  15. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities. PMID:23568381

  16. [Ethics in clinical practice and in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintor, S; Mennuni, G; Fontana, M; Nocchi, S; Giarrusso, P; Serio, A; Fraioli, A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical ethics is the identification, analysis and solution of moral problems that can arise during the care of a patient. Given that when dealing with ethical issues in health care some risks will be encountered (talking about ethics in general, or as a problem overlapped with others in this area, or by delegation to legislative determinations) in the text certain important aspects of the topic are examined. First of all ethics as human quality of the relationship between people for the common good, especially in health services where there are serious problems like the life and the health. It is also necessary a "humanizing relationship" between those who work in these services in order to achieve quality and efficiency in this business. It is important a proper training of health professionals, especially doctors, so that they can identify the real needs and means of intervention. It is also important that scientific research must respect fundamental ethical assumptions. In conclusion, ethics in health care is not a simple matter of "cookbook" rules, but involves the responsibility and consciousness of individual operators. PMID:26378763

  17. Considerations for Implementation of Cancer Molecular Diagnostics Into Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Physicians have provided personalized care with as much precision as possible for several centuries. However, increasingly sophisticated understanding of the human genome and of cancer biology has permitted identification of genetic and phenotypic distinctions that might permit development of new tumor biomarker tests for risk categorization, screening, differential diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and monitoring. Both commercial and academic laboratories are offering tests for single analytes, panels of tests of single analytes, multiparameter assays coalesced into a signature, and total genomic, transcriptomic, or proteomic analyses. However, the absence of a consistent regulatory environment has led to marketing of assays without proven analytic validity or clinical utility. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval or clearance does not necessarily imply that use of the test will improve patient outcomes, and FDA discretion to permit laboratory-developed tests results in unknown benefit, or harm, of others. In this regard, a "bad tumor marker is as bad as a bad drug." Caveat emptor is not a satisfactory approach to delivering high-quality care. Rather, adoption of tumor biomarker tests should be based on high levels of evidence generated in scientifically rigorous studies that demonstrate both analytical validity and clinical utility. Doing so will ensure that clinicians and patients are confident that a tumor biomarker test is likely to improve their outcomes. PMID:27249708

  18. Primary care satellite clinics and improved access to general and mental health services.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenheck, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between the implementation of community-based primary care clinics and improved access to general health care and/or mental health care, in both the general population and among people with disabling mental illness. STUDY SETTING: The 69 new community-based primary care clinics in underserved areas, established by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) between the last quarter of FY 1995 and the second quarter of FY 1998, including the 21 new clinics ...

  19. Seniors’ perspectives on care: a case study of the Alex Seniors health clinic, Calgary

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Marta; Rypien, Candace; Drummond, Neil; Harasym, Patricia; Nixon, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary care initiatives face an imperative to not only reduce barriers to care for their patients but also to uniquely accommodate the complex needs of at-risk patient populations. Patient-centered multidisciplinary care team models for primary care, like the Alex Seniors Clinic, are one approach for providing comprehensive care for marginalized seniors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore patient perspectives on the responsiveness of the Alex Seniors Clinic to th...

  20. Comparison of 5 health care professionals’ratings of the clinical significance of drug related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Christine; Hojsted, Jette; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel;

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients have medicines reviews conducted by different health care professionals in different settings. Introducing a clinical panel to drug related problems (DRPs) to evaluate their clinical significance is common practice. The clinical panel discuss the potential consequences and com...

  1. Determinants of Diabetes and Hypertension Control in Ambulatory Healthcare in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa M. Baynouna

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available bjectives: This study aims to study determinants for the control of diabetes and hypertension in Al Ain Ambulatory Healthcare patients. Method: This is a cross sectional observational study of patients attending ambulatory healthcare centers in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates in 2009. From a yearly audit evaluating the care of patients with diabetes and hypertension, the determinants for improved diabetes and hypertension outcomes were identified from a total of 512 patients and its association with glycemic and blood pressure control were studied. Results: From all variables studied, only the clinic where the patient was treated helped predict both improved blood sugar and blood pressure control. For patients with diabetes, poor control the year before (p<0.001, the number of chronic disease clinic visits (p=0.042 and triglyceride levels (p=0.007 predicted worse control of diabetes. A predictor of poor control of blood pressure (p<0.001 for patients with hypertension was poor control of blood pressure in the year before. Conclusion: In this population, the healthcare system and the team played major roles as determinants in the control of patient’s diabetes and blood pressure more than any of the other factors examined.

  2. [Attitudes toward estrogen replacement therapy. Study conducted on a sample population of women attending an ambulatory care center for the treatment of menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, G; Capri, O; Borrello, M; Galoppi, P

    1993-12-01

    Hormonal Replacement Therapy (HRT) is the most effective treatment of menopausal disturbances and has an established role in reducing the cardiovascular risk and in preventing the postmenopausal osteoporosis. Nevertheless several reports have evidenced that compliance with hormonal replacement therapy was not as good as expected, and that physician's and women's opinions can strongly influence the HRT choice, and the continuation of HRT use. The aim of this study was to assess the opinions and the expectations of menopausal women toward HRT. PATIENT AND METHODS. We utilized a questionnaire exploring social and affective conditions, and in particular women's opinions and experiences on menopause, hormonal therapy, the possibility of information, the reasons for accepting or refusing hormonal therapy. The questionnaires were administered to 226 menopausal clinic patients (Menopausal age: 2-10 years) in spontaneous menopause. RESULTS. 28% of the women were taking HRT at the time of the survey. Worries about menopause were reported by 27.4% of the group; this percentage was similar in both user and non-user groups. 70% received information on HRT from family doctors, and 63% from mass-media or conversations. 70% believes that the main problem of menopause is osteoporosis, and its prevention represents the most frequent aim that patients feel can be achieved by HRT. 67.5% of the group is afraid that long term treatment can be dangerous, however only 57% asked for detailed information to the doctor. To the question "Are you informed that HRT can reinduce menstrual bleeding?", 57.5% of the patients answered yes; 30% considered it to be a problem. CONCLUSIONS. Our study was carried out in a menopausal clinic and this can influence the answers of the respondents. Most women received some information on HRT, but their knowledge was only partial and did not eliminate the unrational fear of hormone therapy. Although long term use of HRT is to prevent CVD and menopausal

  3. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods: Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results: Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion: A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. Keywords: patient engagement, health outcomes, communication, provider effectiveness, patient incentive

  4. Impact of an oncology palliative care clinic on access to home care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Raymond W; Burman, Debika; Swami, Nadia; Kotler, Jennifer; Banerjee, Subrata; Ridley, Julia; Mak, Ernie; Bryson, John; Rodin, Gary; Le, Lisa W; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-08-01

    Home care (HC) is important for patients with cancer as performance status declines. Our study of 1224 patients at a Canadian cancer center examined the impact of an oncology palliative care clinic (OPCC) on HC referral. The HC referral frequency was calculated before and after the first OPCC consultation, in total and according to performance status (Palliative Performance Scale, PPS). Characteristics associated with HC referral were investigated. After the first OPCC consultation, there was an increase in HC referral from 39% (477 of 1224; 49% of those with PPS ≤60) to 69% (841 of 1224; 88% of those with PPS ≤60). Factors independently associated with HC referral were poor PPS (P < .001) and older age (P = .003). Thus OPCC involvement resulted in markedly increased HC referrals, particularly for older patients with poor performance status. PMID:22777408

  5. Following AACP Guidelines for Transitions in Care: The Transitional Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn I; Roberts, David; Martinez, Melissa; Fredrick, Megan; Hillner, Kiley; Luber, Philip

    2016-03-01

    The period of transition from hospital to community services is critical for individuals with serious mental illness. The American Association of Community Psychiatry developed guidelines for transitional services in behavioral health care. This column describes ways in which the Transitional Care Clinic (TCC) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio has implemented these guidelines. The TCC includes active outreach to hospitals and a Web-based referral system that allows hospital staff to make TCC appointments for patients for as soon as the day after discharge. The program includes a unique group intake process that allows rapid development of individualized plans while maximizing access to services and use of provider time. PMID:26567939

  6. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Rančić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was adopted. Sample size was 752 complete episodes of treatment in 250 patients, selected in 2012/2013 throughout several specialist state- and private-owned dental clinics in Serbia. All direct costs of dental care were taken into account and expressed in Euros (€.Results: Mean total costs of dental care were € 46 ± 156 per single dentist visit while total costs incurred by this population sample were € 34,424. Highest unit utilization of services belongs to conservative dentistry (31.9%, oral surgery (19.5% and radiology (17.4%, while the resource with the highest monetary value belongs to implantology € 828 ± 392, orthodontics € 706 ± 667 and prosthetics € 555 ± 244. The most frequently treated diagnosis was tooth decay (33.8% unit services provided, pulpitis (11.2% and impacted teeth (8.5%, while most expensive to treat were anomalies of tooth position (€ 648 ± 667, abnormalities of size and form of teeth (€ 508 ± 705 and loss of teeth due to accident, extraction or local periodontal disease (€ 336 ± 339.Conclusion: Although the range of dental costs currently falls behind EU average, Serbia’s emerging economy is likely to expand in the long run while market demand for dental services will grow. Due to threatened financial sustainability of current health insurance patterns in Western Balkans, getting acquainted with true size and structure of dental care costs could essentially support informed decision making in future

  7. Use of selected ambulatory dental services in Taiwan before and after global budgeting: a longitudinal study to identify trends in hospital and clinic-based services

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Chienhung; Chao Hailun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Taiwan government adopted National Health Insurance (NHI) in 1995, providing universal health care to all citizens. It was financed by mandatory premium contributions made by employers, employees, and the government. Since then, the government has faced increasing challenges to control NHI expenditures. The aim of this study was to determine trends in the provision of dental services in Taiwan after the implementation of global budgeting in 1998 and to identify areas o...

  8. [HOLDING OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ANESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE CLINICAL RESIDENCY IN STATE GRADUATES CERTIFICATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schegolev, A V; Andreenko, A A; Ershov, E N; Lahin, R E; Makarenko, E P

    2016-01-01

    The modern system of medical education requires objective methods to assess clinical competence of medical specialists. Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) during the final certification of graduates of clinical residency allows to evaluate the theoretical knowledge, manual skills. Enabling simulation scenarios in the program makes it possible to objectively evaluate the important non-technical skills of anesthesiologists, identify gaps in the system of training and modify it. The experience of the objective structured clinical examination as part of the state certification of graduates of clinical residency of the Department ofAnesthesiology and Intensive Care, Military MedicalAcademy after C M Kirov allows us to consider this technique in an objective way a comprehensive assessment of the competence of health professionals. Students confirmed its highly realistic, they have revealed the presence of emotional stress during the simulation sessions, the majority agreed that the simulation session increased the level of their readiness to address these situations in clinical practice. Staff of the department is planning to testing and introduction rating scales into a system of assessment, to improved exam program, increasing the number of clinical scenarios for simulation sessions. PMID:27192861

  9. A qualitative analysis of an electronic health record (EHR) implementation in an academic ambulatory setting

    OpenAIRE

    Kahyun Yoon-Flannery; Stephanie Zandieh; Gilad Kuperman; Daniel Langsam; Daniel Hyman; Rainu Kaushal

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine pre-implementation perspectives of institutional, practice and vendor leadership regarding best practice for implementation of two ambulatory electronic health records (EHRs) at an academic institution. Design Semi-structured interviews with ambulatory care network and information systems leadership, medical directors, practice managers and vendors before EHR implementation. Results were analysed using grounded theory with ATLAS.ti version 5.0. Measurements Quali...

  10. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabu-Bondoc S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 and 2 patients are rapidly fading into the past. To remain competitive and economically viable, the modern ambulatory surgery center needs to expand its practice to include patients with medical comorbidities. In an environment where production and economic pressures exist, maintaining safety and good outcomes in high-risk patients for ambulatory surgery can be arduous. Adding to the complexity of this challenge is the rapid evolution of the therapeutic approaches to a variety of medical issues. For example, there has been a significant increase in the number and types of insulin a diabetic patient might be prescribed in recent years. In the case of the patient with coronary artery disease, the variety of both drug and nondrug eluding stents or new antithrombotic agents has also increased the complexity of perioperative management. Complex patients need careful, timely, and team-based preoperative evaluation by an anesthesia provider who is knowledgeable of outpatient care. Optimizing comorbidities preoperatively is a crucial initial step in minimizing risk. This paper will examine a number of common medical issues and explore their impact on managing outpatient surgical procedures.Keywords: ambulatory surgery, medical comorbidities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, respiratory disease, obesity

  11. Health system support and health system strengthening: two key facilitators to the implementation of ambulatory tuberculosis treatment in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Stefan; Asadov, Damin Abdurakhimovich; Bründer, Andreas; Healy, Sean; Khamraev, Atadjan Karimovich; Sergeeva, Natalia; Tinnemann, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Uzbekistan inherited a hospital-based health system from the Soviet Union. We explore the health system-related challenges faced during the scale-up of ambulatory (outpatient) treatment for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Karakalpakstan in Uzbekistan. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants of the TB services, the ministries of health and finance, and their TB control partners. Structural challenges and resource needs were both discussed as obstacles to the expansion of ambulatory TB treatment. Respondents stated need for revising the financing mechanisms of the TB services to incentivize referral to ambulatory TB treatment. An increased workload and need for transportation in ambulatory TB care were also pointed out by respondents, given the quickly rising outpatient numbers but per capita financing of outpatient care. Policy makers showed strong interest in good practice examples for financing ambulatory-based management of TB in comparable contexts and in guidance for revising the financing of the TB services in a way that strengthens ambulatory TB treatment. To facilitate changing the model of care, TB control strategies emphasizing ambulatory care in hospital-oriented health systems should anticipate health system support and strengthening needs, and provide a plan of action to resolve both. Addressing both types of needs may require not only involving TB control and health financing actors, but also increasing knowledge about viable and tested financing mechanisms that incentivize the adoption of new models of care for TB. PMID:27406392

  12. Wearable technology as a booster of clinical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Stephan; Hannig, Andreas; Spreckelsen, Cord; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2014-03-01

    Wearable technology defines a new class of smart devices that are accessories or clothing equipped with computational power and sensors, like Google Glass. In this work, we propose a novel concept for supporting everyday clinical pathways with wearable technology. In contrast to most prior work, we are not focusing on the omnipresent screen to display patient information or images, but are trying to maintain existing workflows. To achieve this, our system supports clinical staff as a documenting observer, only intervening adequately if problems are detected. Using the example of medication preparation and administration, a task known to be prone to errors, we demonstrate the full potential of the new devices. Patient and medication identifier are captured with the built-in camera, and the information is send to a transaction server. The server communicates with the hospital information system to obtain patient records and medication information. The system then analyses the new medication for possible side-effects and interactions with already administered drugs. The result is sent to the device while encapsulating all sensitive information respecting data security and privacy. The user only sees a traffic light style encoded feedback to avoid distraction. The server can reduce documentation efforts and reports in real-time on possible problems during medication preparation or administration. In conclusion, we designed a secure system around three basic principles with many applications in everyday clinical work: (i) interaction and distraction is kept as low as possible; (ii) no patient data is displayed; and (iii) device is pure observer, not part of the workflow. By reducing errors and documentation burden, our approach has the capability to boost clinical care.

  13. Monitored anesthesia care (MAC sedation: clinical utility of fospropofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Harris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Eric A Harris, David A Lubarsky, Keith A CandiottiDepartment of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Management, and Pain Medicine, University of Miami/Miller School of MedicineAbstract: Fospropofol, a phosphorylated prodrug version of the popular induction agent propofol, is hydrolyzed in vivo to release active propofol, formaldehyde, and phosphate. Pharmacodynamic studies show fospropofol provides clinically useful sedation and EEG/bispectral index suppression while causing significantly less respiratory depression than propofol. Pain at the injection site, a common complaint with propofol, was not reported with fospropofol; the major patient complaint was transitory perianal itching during the drug’s administration. Although many clinicians believe fospropofol can safely be given by a registered nurse, the FDA mandated that fospropofol, like propofol, must be used only in the presence of a trained anesthesia provider.Keywords: fospropofol, propofol, monitored anesthesia care

  14. Clinical review: Airway hygiene in the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelic, Sanja; Cunningham, Jennifer A; Factor, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of airway secretion clearance, or airway hygiene, is important for the preservation of airway patency and the prevention of respiratory tract infection. Impaired airway clearance often prompts admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and can be a cause and/or contributor to acute respiratory failure. Physical methods to augment airway clearance are often used in the ICU but few are substantiated by clinical data. This review focuses on the impact of oral hygiene, tracheal suctioning, bronchoscopy, mucus-controlling agents, and kinetic therapy on the incidence of hospital-acquired respiratory infections, length of stay in the hospital and the ICU, and mortality in critically ill patients. Available data are distilled into recommendations for the maintenance of airway hygiene in ICU patients. PMID:18423061

  15. The Point-of-Care Laboratory in Clinical Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drancourt, Michel; Michel-Lepage, Audrey; Boyer, Sylvie; Raoult, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) laboratories that deliver rapid diagnoses of infectious diseases were invented to balance the centralization of core laboratories. POC laboratories operate 24 h a day and 7 days a week to provide diagnoses within 2 h, largely based on immunochromatography and real-time PCR tests. In our experience, these tests are conveniently combined into syndrome-based kits that facilitate sampling, including self-sampling and test operations, as POC laboratories can be operated by trained operators who are not necessarily biologists. POC laboratories are a way of easily providing clinical microbiology testing for populations distant from laboratories in developing and developed countries and on ships. Modern Internet connections enable support from core laboratories. The cost-effectiveness of POC laboratories has been established for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections in both developed and developing countries. PMID:27029593

  16. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients with...... validated method which in less time and with fewer patients than x-ray can discriminate between different therapies regarding structural damage progression, and which on top of this offers detailed assessment of upstream inflammatory drivers of damage. In routine clinical care, MRI can contribute to an...... benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor...

  17. [Ambulatory surgery. Patients and patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredland, T; Duesund, R

    1996-02-20

    This article reviews the concept of day surgery and shows how the treatment can be organized pre-, per- and post-operatively. It can be established in a hospital-integrated unit, a unit separate from the hospital, but connected with it, or a satellite ambulatory facility. Because the patient spends only a short time in hospital it is necessary to have structured preparations before admission, for the benefit of both patient and staff. It should be easy to identify patients suitable for day surgery from the waiting lists, and preparations should be directed at treatment by day surgery right from the start. Rules must be worked out for selecting patients, as well as guidelines for information to patients. It is also necessary to plan the operation programme, and to agree how nurses and doctors should take care of the patient during the different steps of treatment. PMID:8658453

  18. Acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crivaldo Gomes Cardoso Jr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a ubiquitous and serious disease. Regular exercise has been recommended as a strategy for the prevention and treatment of hypertension because of its effects in reducing clinical blood pressure; however, ambulatory blood pressure is a better predictor of target-organ damage than clinical blood pressure, and therefore studying the effects of exercise on ambulatory blood pressure is important as well. Moreover, different kinds of exercise might produce distinct effects that might differ between normotensive and hypertensive subjects. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on the acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. It has been conclusively shown that a single episode of aerobic exercise reduces ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Similarly, regular aerobic training also decreases ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals. In contrast, data on the effects of resistance exercise is both scarce and controversial. Nevertheless, studies suggest that resistance exercise might acutely decrease ambulatory blood pressure after exercise, and that this effect seems to be greater after low-intensity exercise and in patients receiving anti-hypertensive drugs. On the other hand, only two studies investigating resistance training in hypertensive patients have been conducted, and neither has demonstrated any hypotensive effect. Thus, based on current knowledge, aerobic training should be recommended to decrease ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, while resistance exercise could be prescribed as a complementary strategy.

  19. Taking care: practice and philosophy of communication in a critical care follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Anthony; Harris, Wendy; Howell, David

    2013-06-01

    Human consciousness is inextricable from communication. The conditions of communication in the clinical context are defined by the caring intention and the unequal relationship, which imply special responsibilities on the part of the clinician. The conventional hermeneutic model of communication proposes a close examination of the context of the other, and an objective effort to get close to their consciousness by interpretation of their expressions. The clinician is supposed to lay aside subjective factors but make use of her/his clinical knowledge and skills. At University College Hospital Critical Care follow-up clinic, the communicative task involves history taking; partly by questionnaire and partly by attention to the patient's agenda - assessing needs, providing information and facilitating access to further help. In recent years the provision of Critical Care has become ever more complex, both in terms of the sophisticated medical and nursing techniques it can offer to patients and in the range of conditions it can undertake to treat. This range and complexity is reflected in the variety of problems and consequences that may be encountered at follow-up. Communicative techniques should take account of the emotional vulnerability of patients emerging from severe illness. Attentive listening should identify special anxieties, and care with phraseology aims to avoid further distress. Issues of memory, depression and trauma may be expected, and the interview technique must be flexible enough to offer emotional containment if need be. The consultation should be therapeutic in its conduct but should not embark upon actual psychotherapy or seek to dismantle the patient's defences. Contemporary hermeneutic perspectives emphasise the contextual situatedness of the clinician's consciousness, and propose a model of communication as 'blending of horizons' rather than as objective interpretation. Systems theory contributes to an understanding of the influence on

  20. Integrating substance abuse care with community diabetes care: implications for research and clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghitza UE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Udi E Ghitza,1 Li-Tzy Wu,2 Betty Tai11Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cigarette smoking and alcohol use are prevalent among individuals with diabetes in the US, but little is known about screening and treatment for substance use disorders in the diabetic population. This commentary discusses the scope and clinical implications of the public health problem of coexisting substance use and diabetes, including suggestions for future research. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, and is associated with many severe health complications like cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney damage, and limb amputations. There are an estimated 24 million adults in the US with type 2 diabetes. Approximately 20% of adults aged 18 years or older with diabetes report current cigarette smoking. The prevalence of current alcohol use in the diabetic population is estimated to be around 50%–60% in epidemiological surveys and treatment-seeking populations. Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in a dose-dependent manner and is an independent modifiable risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic patients with an alcohol or other drug use disorder show a higher rate of adverse health outcomes. For example, these patients experience more frequent and severe health complications as well as an increased risk of hospitalization, and require longer hospital stays. They are also less likely to seek routine care for diabetes or adhere to diabetes treatment than those without an alcohol or other drug use disorder. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Mental Health Parity Act and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 provide opportunities for facilitating integration of

  1. Development of Ambulatory Quality Assurance Program Using Computerized Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Shrader, J.; Wright, C; Mieczkowski, L.; McDonald, S.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the computerization of the ambulatory teaching facility for our residency program, we have successfully utilized a comprehensive computerized medical records system to develop a specific quality assurance program. Our QA program includes allergy audits, health screening audits, drug utilization and recall audits, and nursing care plan audits. With a computerized QA program, specific question about individual patients as well as questions regarding our patient population are quickly...

  2. Challenges in Translating GWAS Results to Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeldt, Laura B; Schmidlen, Tara J; Gerry, Norman P; Christman, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing for Mendelian disorders is standard of care in many cases; however, it is less clear to what extent and in which situations clinical genetic testing may improve preventive efforts, diagnosis and/or prognosis of complex disease. One challenge is that much of the reported research relies on tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to act as proxies for assumed underlying functional variants that are not yet known. Here we use coronary artery disease and melanoma as case studies to evaluate how well reported genetic risk variants tag surrounding variants across population samples in the 1000 Genomes Project Phase 3 data. We performed a simulation study where we randomly assigned a "functional" variant and evaluated how often this simulated functional variant was correctly tagged in diverse population samples. Our results indicate a relatively large error rate when generalizing increased genetic risk of complex disease across diverse population samples, even when generalizing within geographic regions. Our results further highlight the importance of including diverse populations in genome-wide association studies. Future work focused on identifying functional variants will eliminate the need for tag SNPs; however, until functional variants are known, caution should be used in the interpretation of genetic risk for complex disease using tag SNPs. PMID:27527156

  3. Clinical characteristics and preventable acute care spending among a high cost inpatient population

    OpenAIRE

    Ronksley, Paul E.; Kobewka, Daniel M.; McKay, Jennifer A.; Rothwell, Deanna M.; Mulpuru, Sunita; Forster, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Background A small proportion of patients account for the majority of health care spending. The objectives of this study were to explore the clinical characteristics, patterns of health care use, and the proportion of acute care spending deemed potentially preventable among high cost inpatients within a Canadian acute-care hospital. Methods We identified all individuals within the Ottawa Hospital with one or more inpatient hospitalization between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011. Clinical cha...

  4. “Youth friendly” clinics: Considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care

    OpenAIRE

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Philbin, Morgan M.; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents’ unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how “youth friendly” clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Tria...

  5. Cirurgia ambulatorial em proctologia: análise retrospectiva de 437 casos Outpatient surgery for anorectal diseases: the experience of the Clinics Hospital of the Medical School, Botucatu, SP, Brazil, in 437 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Saad-Hossne

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O número de cirurgias ambulatoriais realizadas em hospitais, como em clínicas particulares, cresce a cada dia. Hoje, em alguns países, como a França, há predomínio das cirurgias ambulatoriais em relação às hospitalares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar retrospectivamente os pacientes operados no Serviço de Cirurgia Ambulatorial do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: Foram estudados retrospectivamente 437 casos clínicos de patologias orificiais, analisando a distribuição por faixa etária, por sexo, por patologias e as complicações pós-operatórias. RESULTADOS: Notou-se predomínio de pacientes com idade inferior a 45 anos (62,8%, prevalência do sexo feminino (56%, sendo a doença hemorroidária (45,1% a principal patologia e a dor e sangramento as complicações mais freqüentes (9,8% e 7,3%. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados satisfatórios observados demonstram a possibilidade de realização, em ambulatório, de diversos procedimentos simples em patologias anorretais freqüentes, a baixo custo e poucas complicações, sendo estas não superiores às observadas em cirurgia hospitalar.BACKGROUND: The number of outpatient surgical procedures performed in hospitals, as well as in private clinics, increases daily. In some countries, such as France, outpatient operations outnumber inpatient operations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate results obtained at the Surgical Outpatient Clinic of the Clinics Hospital of the Medical School, Botucatu, SP, Brazil. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study of 437 clinical cases of anorectal anomalies, analyzing the variables age bracket, gender, pathology, and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We observed predominance of patients younger than 45 (62.8% and of females (56%. The most common ailment was hemorrhoids (45.1% and the most frequent postoperative complications were pain (9.8% and bleeding (7.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that it is possible

  6. [Inpatient-ambulatory network of psychotherapy care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studt, Hans Henning

    2003-01-01

    The development and state of the art is presented for inpatient psychotherapy in neurotic and psychosomatic patients. The question is then posed whether time-tested inpatient psychotherapy can survive the introduction of "diagnosis-related groups" (DRG) with its threat of flat-rate case billing. Thus, the development of an "in- and outpatient network" has been considered as a possible alternative, in which hospitals and private practices combine intervals of inpatient and outpatient psychotherapy. PMID:14733063

  7. Antenatal care in practice: an exploratory study in antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessy Flora

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. Yet there are worrying gaps in knowledge of the quality of antenatal care provided in Tanzania. In particular, determinants of health workers' performance have not yet been fully understood. This paper uses ethnographic methods to document health workers' antenatal care practices with reference to the national Focused Antenatal Care guidelines and identifies factors influencing health workers' performance. Potential implications for improving antenatal care provision in Tanzania are discussed. Methods Combining different qualitative techniques, we studied health workers' antenatal care practices in four public antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania. A total of 36 antenatal care consultations were observed and compared with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Participant observation, informal discussions and in-depth interviews with the staff helped to identify and explain health workers' practices and contextual factors influencing antenatal care provision. Results The delivery of antenatal care services to pregnant women at the selected antenatal care clinics varied widely. Some services that are recommended by the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines were given to all women while other services were not delivered at all. Factors influencing health workers' practices were poor implementation of the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines, lack of trained staff and absenteeism, supply shortages and use of working tools that are not consistent with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Health workers react to difficult working conditions by developing informal practices as coping strategies or "street-level bureaucracy". Conclusions Efforts to improve antenatal care should address shortages of trained staff through expanding training opportunities, including health worker

  8. [Interdisciplinary care for a patient suffering from Diogenes syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggah-Alioua, Sabah; Berger, Jérôme; Cheseaux, Michel

    2014-06-25

    Interdisciplinarity is the combined care of a patient by two or more healthcare professionals. Taking into account the contribution of the different healthcare partners improves patient follow-up, quality of the care and use of resources. General practitioner (GP) becomes the pivot of a combined interdisciplinary ambulatory care allowing a prolonged staying at home and avoiding the multiplication of care offers. This paper, by the clinical description of a patient suffering from Diogenes Syndrome, allows a cross of the care between the GP, home nurse and pharmacist. It deals with follow-up questions, acceptance, objectives of treatment, communication between healthcare partners and "false notes" in the follow-up. PMID:25055477

  9. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Badley, Andrew D.; Kasten, Mary J.; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W.; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Stacey A Rizza

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and ...

  10. Clinical nursing care for transgender patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    Transgender people often face barriers in their pursuit of receiving sensitive and informed health care, and many avoid preventive care and care for life threatening conditions because of those obstacles. This article focuses on cancer care of the transgender patient, as well as ways that nurses and other providers can help to create a transgender-sensitive healthcare environment. PMID:26000586

  11. The Use of Computers for Clinical Care: A Case Series of Advanced U.S. Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, David F.; Bates, David W.; James, Brent C.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe advanced clinical information systems in the context in which they have been implemented and are being used. Design: Case series of five U.S. hospitals, including inpatient, ambulatory and emergency units. Descriptive study with data collected from interviews, observations, and document analysis. Measurements: The use of computerized results, notes, orders, and event monitors and the type of decision support; data capture mechanisms and data form; impact on clinician satisfaction and clinical processes and outcomes; and the organizational factors associated with successful implementation. Results: All sites have implemented a wide range of clinical information systems with extensive decision support. The systems had been well accepted by clinicians and have improved clinical processes. Successful implementation required leadership and long-term commitment, a focus on improving clinical processes, and gaining clinician involvement and maintaining productivity. Conclusion: Despite differences in approach there are many similarities between sites in the clinical information systems in use and the factors important to successful implementation. The experience of these sites may provide a valuable guide for others who are yet to start, or are just beginning, the implementation of clinical information systems. PMID:12509360

  12. Lactotripeptides effect on office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure stress response, pulse wave velocity and cardiac output in patients with high-normal blood pressure or first-degree hypertension: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Rosticci, Martina; Gerocarni, Beatrice; Bacchelli, Stefano; Veronesi, Maddalena; Strocchi, Enrico; Borghi, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Contrasting data partially support a certain antihypertensive efficacy of lactotripeptides (LTPs) derived from enzymatic treatment of casein hydrolysate. Our aim was to evaluate this effect on a large number of hemodynamic parameters. We conducted a prospective double-blind randomized clinical trial, which included 52 patients affected by high-normal blood pressure (BP) or first-degree hypertension. We investigated the effect of a 6-week treatment with the LTPs isoleucine-proline-proline and valine-proline-proline at 3 mg per day, assumed to be functional food, on office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) values, stress-induced BP increase and cardiac output-related parameters. In the LTP-treated subjects, we observed a significant reduction in office systolic BP (SBP; -5±8 mm Hg, P=0.013) and a significant improvement in pulse wave velocity (PWV; -0.66±0.81 m s(-1), P=0.001; an instrumental biomarker of vascular rigidity). No effect on 24-h ABPM parameters and BP reaction to stress was observed from treatment with the combined LTPs. LTPs, but not placebo, were associated with a mild but significant change in the stroke volume (SV), SV index (markers of cardiac flow), the acceleration index (ACI) and velocity index (VI) (markers of cardiac contractility). No effect was observed on parameters related to fluid dynamics or vascular resistance. LTPs positively influenced the office SBP, PWV, SV, SV index, ACI and VI in patients with high-normal BP or first-degree hypertension. PMID:21753776

  13. Ambulatory monitoring in the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Corral-Peñafiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a highly prevalent disorder associated with complications such as arterial hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The resources allocated for OSA are insufficient and OSA is a significant public health problem. Portable recording devices have been developed for the detection of OSA syndrome and have proved capable of providing an equivalent diagnosis to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG, at least in patients with a high pre-test probability of OSA syndrome. PSG becomes important in patients who have symptoms and certain comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or stroke, as well as in patients with a clinical history suggesting a different sleep disorder. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most effective treatment in OSA. Ambulatory monitoring of the therapeutic modalities has been evaluated to enhance the care process and reduce costs compared to the conventional approach, without sacrificing efficiency. This review evaluates the role of portable monitoring devices in the diagnostic process of OSA and the search for alternative strategies based on ambulatory management protocols.

  14. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemie Getahun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data.

  15. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  16. A Pharmacist-Led Point-of-Care INR Clinic: Optimizing Care in a Family Health Team Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Rossiter; Gursharan Soor; Deanna Telner; Babak Aliarzadeh; Jennifer Lake

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Monitoring patients' international normalized ratio (INR) within a family medicine setting can be challenging. Novel methods of doing this effectively and in a timely manner are important for patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led point-of-care (POC) INR clinic. Methods. At a community-based academic Family Health Team in Toronto, Canada, charts of patients with atrial fibrillation managed by a pharmacist with usual care (bloodt...

  17. Assessment of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic within a primary care physicians office

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley MJ; Pacitti R; Warning W

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess value-added service of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic to quantify respiratory disease abnormalities within a primary care physicians officeMethods: This retrospective, cohort study was an analysis of physician referred patients who attended our spirometry clinic during 2008-2010 due to pulmonary symptoms or disease. After spirometry testing, data was collected retrospectively to include patient demographics, spirometry results, and pulmonary pharmaceu...

  18. Predictors of antibiotic prescription in respiratory tract infections by ambulatory care practitioners Predictores de la prescripción de antibióticos en infecciones del tracto respiratorio por médicos de atención ambulatoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireya Aznar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in viral respiratory infections (common cold, acute rhinosinusitis and acute bronchitis promotes the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. Studies have found that antibiotics are prescribed for 50-70% of respiratory tract infections, despite the fact that most of them have a viral etiology. The objective of the study was to determine predictors of antibiotic use in acute respiratory infections. It was conducted as a cross-sectional study on physicians' practices for antibiotic use. The subjects were internists and otolaryngologists of adult patients in an ambulatory setting in Buenos Aires. The instrument was a questionnaire with 20 clinical vignettes that included relevant variables for making decisions regarding antibiotic use in acute respiratory infections. The vignettes were constructed with a fractional factorial design with nine clinical variables. The absolute and relative weight of each clinical variable that predicted antibiotic use were calculated for each individual practitioner using multiple linear regression. The predictors with the greatest absolute weight in the decision to prescribe antibiotics were nasal discharge and cough (24% and 21% of total weight. The correlation between predictors and individual physician answers was high (r² = 0.73. The mean probability and the rate of antibiotic prescription were both about 50%. Predictors of antibiotic use for acute respiratory infections among ambulatory physicians in this sample differ from internationally accepted guidelines. The likelihood of prescribing antibiotics for these illnesses is high. Wider implementation of management guidelines for acute respiratory infections could improve cost effective antibiotic use and decrease the development of antibiotic resistance.El uso excesivo de antibióticos promueve la aparición y diseminación de bacterias resistentes. Se ha encontrado una tasa de prescripción de antibióticos en infecciones

  19. Ambulatory oral surgery: 1-year experience with 11 680 patients from Zagreb district, Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Jokić, Dražen; Macan, Darko; Perić, Berislav; Tadić, Marinka; Biočić, Josip; Đanić, Petar; Brajdić, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Aim To examine the types and frequencies of oral surgery diagnoses and ambulatory oral surgical treatments during one year period at the Department of Oral Surgery, University Hospital Dubrava in Zagreb, Croatia. Methods Sociodemographic and clinical data on 11 680 ambulatory patients, treated between January 1 and of December 31, 2011 were retrieved from the hospital database using a specific protocol. The obtained data were subsequently analyzed in order to assess th...

  20. The palliative care clinical nurse consultant: an essential link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Margaret; Chapman, Ysanne

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the role of acute hospital palliative care nurse consultants and makes recommendations about future directions for the role development of this role. While the palliative care nurse consultant role is accepted in the acute setting there is little evidence or literature about what contributes to the success of this role. A three-phase study was undertaken to describe the role of palliative care nurse consultants in acute hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The first phase of the three-phase study, involving in-depth qualitative interviews with the palliative care nurse consultants, is reported in this article. Using open-ended semi-structured questions, 10 palliative care nurse consultants were interviewed using open-ended questions about aspects of their role and the interviews were thematically analysed. Four main themes were identified that clarified the role; being the internal link; being the lynch pin; being responsive and being challenged. The palliative care nurse consultants were the first point of introduction to palliative care and thus they saw a significant role in introducing the concept of palliative care to those requiring palliative care, their families and others. They are an important link between the settings of care required by people accessing palliative care-acute, in-patient palliative care and community care. The palliative care nurse consultants saw themselves in leadership positions that in some ways defy boundaries, because of the inherent complexity and diversity of the role. The palliative care nurse consultants' role appears to be pivotal in providing expert advice to staff and people requiring palliative care, and connecting palliative care services both within the hospital and to external services. PMID:19112925

  1. An ultrasound-guided fascia iliaca catheter technique does not impair ambulatory ability within a clinical pathway for total hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudumbai, Seshadri C.; Kim, T. Edward; Howard, Steven K.; Giori, Nicholas J.; Woolson, Steven; Ganaway, Toni; Kou, Alex; King, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Both neuraxial and peripheral regional analgesic techniques offer postoperative analgesia for total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients. While no single technique is preferred, quadriceps muscle weakness from peripheral nerve blocks may impede rehabilitation. We designed this study to compare postoperative ambulation outcome in THA patients who were treated with a new ultrasound-guided fascia iliaca catheter (FIC) technique or intrathecal morphine (ITM). Methods We reviewed the electronic health records of a sequential series of primary unilateral THA patients who were part of a standardized clinical pathway; apart from differences in regional analgesic technique, all other aspects of the pathway were the same. Our primary outcome was total ambulation distance (meters) combined for postoperative days 1 and 2. Secondary outcomes included daily opioid consumption (morphine milligram equivalents) and analgesic-related side effects. We examined the association between the primary outcome and analgesic technique by performing crude and adjusted ordinary least-squares linear regression. A P value guided FIC technique offers similar analgesia with fewer side effects when compared with ITM.

  2. Usual Care as the Control Group in Clinical Trials of Nonpharmacologic Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, B Taylor; Schoenfeld, David

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the pros and cons of including usual care as a control arm in clinical trials of nonpharmacologic interventions. Usual care is a term used to describe the full spectrum of patient care practices in which clinicians have the opportunity (which is not necessarily seized) to individualize care. The decision to use usual care as the control arm should be based on the nature of the research question and the uniformity of usual-care practices. The use of a usual-care arm in a two-arm tri...

  3. The Inverse Care Law: Clinical Primary Care Encounters in Deprived and Affluent Areas of Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Mercer, Stewart W.; Watt, Graham C M

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE The inverse care law states that the availability of good medical care tends to vary inversely with the need for it in the population served, but there is little research on how the inverse care law actually operates.

  4. Adolescents with Special Needs: Clinical Challenges in Reproductive Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Elisabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents with special needs have unique reproductive health care needs related to their physical and cognitive issues. This review discusses some of the most common concerns that are encountered in clinical practice, as the clinician will partner with the adolescent and her family to guide her through the pubertal transition and to help navigate the risks and rights of reproduction. Families often seek anticipatory guidance before menarche on menstrual hygiene, abuse risk and sexuality and can be reassured that most teens with special needs do very well with menstruation. The clinician needs to evaluate the teenager's reproductive knowledge as well her risk for abuse and coercion and her ability to consent to sexual activity, if she requests contraception. Menstrual management is mostly based on the impact of the menstrual cycles on the teenager's life and activities. The adolescents may have a decreased ability to tolerate menses or pain, or experience changes in seizure pattern or altered mood. Hormonal treatment is often used to assist with menstrual hygiene, cyclical mood changes or dysmenorrhea. The goal of treatment can be complete amenorrhea, alleviate pain or regulate and decrease menstrual flow. The unique risks and benefits of hormonal treatment for this special population are highlighted. PMID:26542013

  5. Profile of a Liver Transplant Follow-Up Clinic in a Nontransplant Canadian Urban Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Bazylewski, R; Rosser, BG; Cohen, A; Kaita, KDE; Minuk, GY

    1997-01-01

    Care of the growing number of liver transplant recipients will increasingly fall on the referring centres. Thus, there is a need to define more clearly the demographic, clinical and laboratory profiles of liver transplant recipients, particularly in the setting of a centre where a liver transplantation program does not exist. The present study documented these features in 37 patients attending an adult ambulatory care clinic in an urban, nonliver transplant centre. Mean ± SD age of the study ...

  6. Pharmacy intervention at an intensive care rehabilitation clinic

    OpenAIRE

    MacTavish, P.; McPeake, J.; Devine, H.; Kinsella, J; Daniel, M; Fenlon, C.; Quasim, T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: During an intensive care stay, patients often have their chronic medications withheld for a variety of reasons and new drugs commenced [1]. As patients are often under the care of a number of different medical teams during their admission there is potential for these changes to be inadvertently continued [2]. Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment (InS:PIRE) is a five week rehabilitation programme for patients and their care...

  7. Fulfilling an Unmet Need: Roles for Clinical Pharmacists in Preconception Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro Mager, Natalie A

    2016-02-01

    Preconception care refers to a set of interventions that identify and address biomedical, behavioral, and social risks to a woman's health that may negatively impact a future pregnancy. A great need for preconception care currently exists in the United States, and women's attitudes about discussions with health care providers about healthy and safe pregnancies are positive. Clinical pharmacists are well positioned to work with other health care and public health professionals to ensure that all women of childbearing potential have access to preconception care. As part of the collaborative health care team, clinical pharmacists can directly provide services or support and referrals to other members of the health care team or to community resources through clinical-community linkages. Specifically, clinical pharmacists can provide education, counseling, and/or services to women to address family planning, medication and disease state management, immunizations, screenings, health promotion, and substance use. Clinical pharmacists can also impact preconception care through drug information services, advocacy, and research. Preconception care services can be incorporated into daily pharmacy practice, and there are potential means for reimbursement. Multiple roles exist for clinical pharmacists to fulfill unmet needs in preconception care. PMID:26846305

  8. Determinants of patient satisfaction in ambulatory oncology: a cross sectional study based on the OUT-PATSAT35 questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with satisfaction with care in cancer patients undergoing ambulatory treatment. We investigated associations between patients' baseline clinical and socio-demographic characteristics, as well as self-reported quality of life, and satisfaction with care. Patients undergoing ambulatory chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 2 centres in France were invited, at the beginning of their treatment, to complete the OUT-PATSAT35, a 35 item and 13 scale questionnaire evaluating perception of doctors, nurses and aspects of care organisation. Additionally, for each patient, socio-demographic variables, clinical characteristics and self-reported quality of life using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire were recorded. Among 692 patients included between January 2005 and December 2006, only 6 were non-responders. By multivariate analysis, poor perceived global health strongly predicted dissatisfaction with care (p < 0.0001). Patients treated by radiotherapy (vs patients treated by chemotherapy) reported lower levels of satisfaction with doctors' technical and interpersonal skills, information provided by caregivers, and waiting times. Patients with primary head and neck cancer (vs other localisations), and those living alone were less satisfied with information provided by doctors, and younger patients (< 55 years) were less satisfied with doctors' availability. A number of clinical of socio-demographic factors were significantly associated with different scales of the satisfaction questionnaire. However, the main determinant was the patient's global health status, underlining the importance of measuring and adjusting for self-perceived health status when evaluating satisfaction. Further analyses are currently ongoing to determine the responsiveness of the OUT-PATSAT35 questionnaire to changes over time

  9. Ambulatory pressure monitoring in the assessment of antihypertensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, A J; Conway, J; Somers, V K; Isea, J E; Sleight, P

    1989-06-01

    A low-cost, ambulatory blood-pressure monitor has been calibrated and validated against a random zero sphygmomanometer. The repeatability of ambulatory pressure recordings after a placebo month in 44 mild to moderate untreated hypertensives was assessed. Systolic blood pressure showed a mean difference over 1 month of 2.0 mmHg, with a standard deviation of differences of 9.3 mmHg. The diastolic blood pressure mean difference was 0.1 mmHg (SD = 6.3 mmHg). This variability was much less than for clinic readings (SD = 17.3 mmHg) or for single home pressure readings (SD = 19.7 mmHg). Using ambulatory monitoring to detect a drop in pressure of 8/5 mmHg with a power of 0.9, the number of subjects needed in a parallel group trial is reduced from 360 to 68, and in a crossover study from 88 to 16 subjects. The usefulness of ambulatory pressure monitoring is demonstrated in a placebo-controlled comparison of atenolol, nifedipine retard, or their combination in random order. Eleven subjects, 21-60 years, with initial average blood pressures of 166.5/104.7 mmHg, showed a reduction in pressure with atenolol 50 mg a day of 15.1/10.0 mmHg, with nifedipine retard 20 mg b.i.d. of 21.0/11.6 mmHg, and with atenolol 50 mg and nifedipine retard 20 mg once a day of 26.2/16.8 mmHg. Ambulatory monitoring of pressure improved the accuracy of the trial and demonstrated a reduction in the alerting response with atenolol. PMID:2487802

  10. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, Lori J; van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequent...

  11. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  12. 77 FR 50548 - Agency Information Collection: (PACT Clinical Innovation Study: Engaging Caregivers in the Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: (PACT Clinical Innovation Study: Engaging Caregivers in the Care of... No. 2900--New (VA Form 10-0537). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: PACT Clinical Innovation Study... social services. The information will help VA develop and test a care management intervention that...

  13. PO02 - Clinical profile of children admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit due to acute clinical deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Aagaard, Hanne; Olesen, Hanne Vebert;

    2016-01-01

    Theme: Intensive care Background: There has been an increased number of critically ill patients admitted to paediatric departments. Only a few studies have described the various causes of unplanned admission to paediatric intensive care units (PICU) due to clinical deterioration. However, an...... critical ill children in paediatric wards....

  14. Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) Outpatient Clinical Information System Implemented in a Faculty General Medicine Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, Steven; Clark, Anthony S.; Clayton, Paul D.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a clinical information system for hospital-based ambulatory care implemented in the context of the institution's IAIMS Phase III effort. Key features of this application are physician data entry to maintain summary clinical profiles that include medication lists, problem lists, and preventive care, and integration with other components of the Clinical Information System at the levels of the database, the user interface, and data sharing. A goal of this application is to provide co...

  15. Emergency Training, Education And Perceived Clinical Skills For Tsunami Care Among Nurses In Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Cut Husna; Urai Hatthakit; Aranya Chaowalit

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nurses are a part of health care provider who has responsibility to respond to disaster. The nurses ought to have sufficient knowledge and skills in caring for patients in disasters such as in a tsunami. Clinical skills of nurses effectively help the nurses in handling the tsunami emergency response.Objectives: To describe the levels of perceived clinical skills for tsunami care in acute response phase (6 months) after tsunami struck, and to examine the relationship between emerge...

  16. What are the effective ways to translate clinical leadership into health care quality improvement?

    OpenAIRE

    McSherry, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert McSherry,1 Paddy Pearce2 1School of Health and Social Care, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, 2PKP Consulting, Yarm, United Kingdom Abstract: The presence and/or absence of effective leaders in health care can have a stark consequence on the quality and outcomes of care. The delivery of safe, quality, compassionate health care is dependent on having effective clinical leaders at the frontline. In light of the Kirkup and Francis reports, this article explores some ways of translat...

  17. Brote por Pseudomonas aeruginosa, en el área de atención ambulatoria de heridas quirúrgicas, en pacientes posmastectomizadas Outbreak of postmastectomy wound infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ambulatory surgical care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vilar-Compte

    2003-10-01

    by a ciprofloxacin and gentamycin-resistant P. aeruginosa. The causative Pseudomonas was isolated from a nurse's nostrils and non-sterile gauzes left by her on the Mayo table at the Breast Tumor ambulatory clinic. None of the closed packages was positive to Pseudomonas. On April 14, 2000, the nurse was transferred to another ward and strict infection control practices were established. After this date, 4 additional cases were diagnosed. Radiation therapy was the only risk factor for infection (Or=5.1, 95% cI 1.1-28.4. CONCLUSIONS: This outbreak was probably caused by a common source initially, and later disseminated by cross-infection among patients. The poor compliance with infection control practices during wound cleaning and drainage led to implementing a series of specific preventive interventions.

  18. Clinical and regulatory protocols for the management of impaired vision in the public health care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva Paula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the procedures used in developing Clinical and Regulatory Protocols for primary care teams to use in the management of the most common scenarios of impaired vision in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1.333 referral forms from all primary care practitioners was performed in Ribeirão Preto city, during a 30-day period. The major ophthalmic diagnostic categories were evaluated from those referrals forms. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols development process was held afterwards and involved scientific cooperation between a university and the health care system, in the form of workshops attended by primary care practitioners and regulatory system team members composed of health care administrators, ophthalmologists, and professors of ophthalmology and social medicine. RESULTS: The management of impaired vision was chosen as the theme, since it accounted for 43.6% of the ophthalmology-related referrals from primary care providers of Ribeirão Preto. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols developed involve distinctive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can be performed at the primary care level and in different health care settings. The most relevant clinical and regulatory interventions were expressed as algorithms in order to facilitate the use of the Clinical and Regulatory Protocols by health care practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: These Clinical and Regulatory Protocols could represent a useful tool for health systems with universal access, as well as for health care networks based on primary care and for regulatory system teams. Implementation of these Clinical and Regulatory Protocols can minimize the disparity between the needs of patients with impaired vision and the treatment modalities offered, resulting in a more cooperative health care network.

  19. Clinical microbiology in the intensive care unit: Strategic and operational characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya S; Mondal A.

    2010-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs). The application of the principles and the practice of Clinical Microbiology for ICU patients can significantly improve clinical outcome. The present article is aimed at summarising the strategic and operational characteristics of this unique field where medical microbiology attempts to venture into the domain of direct clinical care of critically ill patients. The close and strategic ...

  20. Effectiveness of dementia follow-up care by memory clinics or general practitioners: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of post-diagnosis dementia treatment and coordination of care by memory clinics compared with general practitioners. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine memory clinics and 159 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Participants 175 patients with a new diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers. Interventions Usual care provided by memory clinic or general practitioner. Main out...

  1. Clinical data integration model : core interoperability ontology for research using primary care data

    OpenAIRE

    Ethier, J.-F.; Curcin, V; Barton, A.; Bastiaens, H.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Introduction: This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Managing Interoperability and Complexity in Health Systems". Background: Primary care data is the single richest source of routine health care data. However its use, both in research and clinical work, often requires data from multiple clinical sites, clinical trials databases and registries. Data integration and interoperability are therefore of utmost importance. Objectives: TRANSFoRm's...

  2. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Gayle, Krystal A.T.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K.; Shelly R. McFarlane; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A.; Boyne, Michael S.; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates ...

  3. Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Following Ambulatory Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Chanu; Huang, Susan S.; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Kaganov, Rebecca; Bruce, Christina; Lankiewicz, Julie; Platt, Richard; Yokoe, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed 4045 ambulatory surgery patients for surgical site infection (SSI) using claims-based triggers for medical chart review. Of 98 patients flagged by codes suggestive of SSI, 35 had confirmed SSIs. SSI rates ranged from 0 to 3.2% for common procedures. Claims may be useful for SSI surveillance following ambulatory surgery.

  4. What are the effective ways to translate clinical leadership into health care quality improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McSherry R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert McSherry,1 Paddy Pearce2 1School of Health and Social Care, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, 2PKP Consulting, Yarm, United Kingdom Abstract: The presence and/or absence of effective leaders in health care can have a stark consequence on the quality and outcomes of care. The delivery of safe, quality, compassionate health care is dependent on having effective clinical leaders at the frontline. In light of the Kirkup and Francis reports, this article explores some ways of translating clinical leadership into health care quality improvement. This is achieved by exploring what is clinical leadership and why and how this is important to health care quality improvement, clinical leadership, and a duty of candor, along with the importance clinical leadership plays in the provision of quality care improvement and outcomes. Clinical leaders are not predefined roles but emerge from the complex clinical setting by gaining an acquired expertise and from how they then internalize this to develop and facilitate sound relationships within a team. Clinical leaders are effective in facilitating innovation and change through improvement. This is achieved by recognizing, influencing, and empowering individuals through effective communication in order to share and learn from and with each other in practice. The challenge for health care organizations in regard to creating organizational cultures where a duty of candor exists is not to reinvent the wheel by turning something that is simple into something complex, which can become confusing to health care workers, patients, and the public. By focusing on the clinical leader's role and responsibilities we would argue they play a crucial and pivotal role in influencing, facilitating, supporting, and monitoring that this duty of candor happens in practice. This may be possible by highlighting where and how the duty of candor can be aligned within existing clinical governance frameworks. Keywords: governance

  5. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT IN LITHUANIAN HEALTH CARE INSTITUTIONS: OPINION ANALYSIS OF PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Augustinas Rotomskis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – to investigate the state of clinical psychological assessment in the Lithuanian health care system: 1) what kind of tests are used in clinical practice and what are clinicians opinions about them; 2) what kind of psychological functions are assessed in clinical practice and what is the opinion of clinicians about the assessment of these psychological functions; 3) what kind of issues are the most pressing in clinical assessment. Design/methodology/approach – 101 clinical psychol...

  6. Impact of video-ambulatory electroencephalography on the medical management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredonia, Francesco; Lawley, Andrew; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-06-15

    Video-ambulatory electroencephalography (video-AEEG) is increasingly being used in secondary care centres for the diagnostic work-up of new cases with suspected epilepsy and for the review of known cases with active seizures despite medical treatment. We reviewed how the outcome of video-AEEG influenced the medical management of patients who underwent this investigation at a neurophysiology department within a secondary care centre. Out of a total of 171 consecutive video-AEEG studies performed over a period of two years, 111 could be included in our retrospective analysis, based on availability and completeness of relevant clinical information pre- and post-investigation. In our sample, 55.9% of patients had typical clinical events captured on video-AEEG and diagnostic yield was higher in patients with a previously established diagnosis of epilepsy (n=62; diagnostic yield 62.9%). A total of 27 patients (24.3%) had changes in medical treatment following video-AEEG, most frequently antiepileptic drug introduction/increase when epileptic seizures were captured. This proportion was similar between patients with or without a previously established diagnosis of epilepsy. Our findings in a real-life setting confirm the usefulness of video-AEEG in influencing the clinical attitude towards complex patients with suspected or longstanding history of epilepsy. PMID:27206892

  7. Rationale, design, and implementation protocol of an electronic health record integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR randomized trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnivesky Juan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical prediction rules (CPRs represent well-validated but underutilized evidence-based medicine tools at the point-of-care. To date, an inability to integrate these rules into an electronic health record (EHR has been a major limitation and we are not aware of a study demonstrating the use of CPR's in an ambulatory EHR setting. The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR trial integrates two CPR's in an EHR and assesses both the usability and the effect on evidence-based practice in the primary care setting. Methods A multi-disciplinary design team was assembled to develop a prototype iCPR for validated streptococcal pharyngitis and bacterial pneumonia CPRs. The iCPR tool was built as an active Clinical Decision Support (CDS tool that can be triggered by user action during typical workflow. Using the EHR CDS toolkit, the iCPR risk score calculator was linked to tailored ordered sets, documentation, and patient instructions. The team subsequently conducted two levels of 'real world' usability testing with eight providers per group. Usability data were used to refine and create a production tool. Participating primary care providers (n = 149 were randomized and intervention providers were trained in the use of the new iCPR tool. Rates of iCPR tool triggering in the intervention and control (simulated groups are monitored and subsequent use of the various components of the iCPR tool among intervention encounters is also tracked. The primary outcome is the difference in antibiotic prescribing rates (strep and pneumonia iCPR's encounters and chest x-rays (pneumonia iCPR only between intervention and control providers. Discussion Using iterative usability testing and development paired with provider training, the iCPR CDS tool leverages user-centered design principles to overcome pervasive underutilization of EBM and support evidence-based practice at the point-of-care. The ongoing trial will determine if this collaborative

  8. Medication-related problem type and appearance rate in ambulatory hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drayer Debra K

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodialysis (HD patients are at risk for medication-related problems (MRP. The MRP number, type, and appearance rate over time in ambulatory HD patients has not been investigated. Methods Randomly selected HD patients were enrolled to receive monthly pharmaceutical care visits. At each visit, MRP were identified through review of the patient chart, electronic medical record, patient interview, and communications with other healthcare disciplines. All MRP were categorized by type and medication class. MRP appearance rate was determined as the number of MRP identified per month/number of months in study. The number of MRP per patient-drug exposures were determined using: {[(number of patients × (mean number of medications]/(number of months of study} /number of MRP identified. Results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation or percentages. Results Patients were 62.6 ± 15.9 years old, had 6.4 ± 2.0 comorbid conditions, were taking 12.5 ± 4.2 medications, and 15.7 ± 7.2 doses per day at baseline. Medication-dosing problems (33.5%, adverse drug reactions (20.7%, and an indication that was not currently being treated (13.5% were the most common MRP. 5,373 medication orders were reviewed and a MRP was identified every 15.2 medication exposures. Overall MRP appearance rate was 0.68 ± 0.46 per patient per month. Conclusion MRP continue to occur at a high rate in ambulatory HD patients. Healthcare providers taking care of HD patients should be aware of this problem and efforts to avoid or resolve MRP should be undertaken at all HD clinics.

  9. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  10. Exemplary Care and Learning Sites: A Model for Achieving Continual Improvement in Care and Learning in the Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, Greg; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Stevenson, Katherine M.; Shalaby, Marc; Beard, Albertine S.; Thörne, Karin E.; Coleman, Mary T.; Baum, Karyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Current models of health care quality improvement do not explicitly describe the role of health professions education. The authors propose the Exemplary Care and Learning Site (ECLS) model as an approach to achieving continual improvement in care and learning in the clinical setting. Approach From 2008–2012, an iterative, interactive process was used to develop the ECLS model and its core elements—patients and families informing process changes; trainees engaging both in care and the improvement of care; leaders knowing, valuing, and practicing improvement; data transforming into useful information; and health professionals competently engaging both in care improvement and teaching about care improvement. In 2012–2013, a three-part feasibility test of the model, including a site self-assessment, an independent review of each site’s ratings, and implementation case stories, was conducted at six clinical teaching sites (in the United States and Sweden). Outcomes Site leaders reported the ECLS model provided a systematic approach toward improving patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. Most sites found it challenging to incorporate the patients and families element. The trainee element was strong at four sites. The leadership and data elements were self-assessed as the most fully developed. The health professionals element exhibited the greatest variability across sites. Next Steps The next test of the model should be prospective, linked to clinical and educa tional outcomes, to evaluate whether it helps care delivery teams, educators, and patients and families take action to achieve better patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. PMID:26760058

  11. Systematic review of studies of quality of clinical care in general practice in the UK, Australia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Seddon, M; Marshall, M.; Campbell, S; Roland, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—Little is known about the quality of clinical care provided outside the hospital sector, despite the increasingly important role of clinical generalists working in primary care. In this study we aimed to summarise published evaluations of the quality of clinical care provided in general practice in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand.

  12. The utility of a health risk assessment in providing care for a rural free clinic population

    OpenAIRE

    Scariati, Paula D; Williams, Cyndy

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Free clinics are an important part of our country's health safety net, serving a working poor uninsured population. With limited resources and heavily dependent upon volunteer health care providers, these clinics have historically focused on stopgap, band-aid solutions to the population's health problems. Embracing a new paradigm, free clinics are now prioritizing resources for disease prevention and health promotion. Methods We initiated a Healthy Friday Clinic project in...

  13. Clinical audit, a valuable tool to improve quality of care: General methodology and applications in nephrology

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Pasquale; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation and improvement of quality of care provided to the patients are of crucial importance in the daily clinical practice and in the health policy planning and financing. Different tools have been developed, including incident analysis, health technology assessment and clinical audit. The clinical audit consist of measuring a clinical outcome or a process, against well-defined standards set on the principles of evidence-based medicine in order to identify the changes needed to improve t...

  14. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs. PMID:25532924

  15. Criteria for clinical audit of women friendly care and providers' perception in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Broek Nynke

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two dimensions of quality of maternity care, namely quality of health outcomes and quality as perceived by clients. The feasibility of using clinical audit to assess and improve the quality of maternity care as perceived by women was studied in Malawi. Objective We sought to (a establish standards for women friendly care and (b explore attitudinal barriers which could impede the proper implementation of clinical audit. Methods We used evidence from Malawi national guidelines and World Health Organisation manuals to establish local standards for women friendly care in three districts. We equally conducted a survey of health care providers to explore their attitudes towards criterion based audit. Results The standards addressed different aspects of care given to women in maternity units, namely (i reception, (ii attitudes towards women, (iii respect for culture, (iv respect for women, (v waiting time, (vi enabling environment, (vii provision of information, (viii individualised care, (ix provision of skilled attendance at birth and emergency obstetric care, (x confidentiality, and (xi proper management of patient information. The health providers in Malawi generally held a favourable attitude towards clinical audit: 100.0% (54/54 agreed that criterion based audit will improve the quality of care and 92.6% believed that clinical audit is a good educational tool. However, there are concerns that criterion based audit would create a feeling of blame among providers (35.2%, and that manager would use clinical audit to identify and punish providers who fail to meet standards (27.8%. Conclusion Developing standards of maternity care that are acceptable to, and valued by, women requires consideration of both the research evidence and cultural values. Clinical audit is acceptable to health professionals in Malawi although there are concerns about its negative implications to the providers.

  16. Introduction to integrative primary care: the health-oriented clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Luke; Rakel, Dave; Rindfleisch, J Adam; Mallory, Jill

    2010-03-01

    Integrative medicine is healing-oriented medicine that accounts for the whole person (body, mind, and spirit), including all aspects of lifestyle. Integrative medicine emphasizes the therapeutic relationship and makes use of all appropriate therapies, both conventional and alternative. This article describes ways to bring the integrative perspective into primary care practice. Several approaches are described, including some that are routinely used in the authors' practice. Changes in practice philosophy that can (1) help inform primary care redesign, (2) facilitate the creation of patient-centered medical homes, (3) strengthen provider-patient relationships, and (4) enhance patient satisfaction are also provided. PMID:20188994

  17. Self-reported health care seeking behavior in rural Ethiopia: Evidence from clinical vignettes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2011, Ethiopia rapidly expanded its health-care infrastructure recording an 18-fold increase in the number of health posts and a 7-fold increase in the number of health centers. However, annual per capita outpatient utilization has increased only marginally. The extent to which individuals forego necessary health care, especially why and who foregoes care are issues that have received little attention in the context of low-income countries. This paper uses five clinical vigne...

  18. Clinical profile of hospital acquired pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital, South India

    OpenAIRE

    Vasuki V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospital acquired infections continue to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. Hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) results in a significant increase in the cost of care of hospitalized patients. Its development prolongs a patient's stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Accurate information concerning the clinical profile of HAP is lacking in South India. This study was conducted prospectively to evaluate the clinical profile of HAP in ICU pat...

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines as Instruments for Sound Health Care Priority Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Patrick R; Norheim, Ole F

    2015-11-01

    This editorial discusses the potential role that physician-authored clinical practice guidelines could play in health care priority setting decisions in the United States. We briefly review the challenges associated with increasingly obligate health care priority setting in the United States and discuss accountability for these decisions. We then propose a potential role for clinical practice guidelines in addressing these challenges, while considering the ethical foundations of such a proposal. PMID:26342516

  20. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT IN LITHUANIAN HEALTH CARE INSTITUTIONS: OPINION ANALYSIS OF PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustinas Rotomskis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – to investigate the state of clinical psychological assessment in the Lithuanian health care system: 1 what kind of tests are used in clinical practice and what are clinicians opinions about them; 2 what kind of psychological functions are assessed in clinical practice and what is the opinion of clinicians about the assessment of these psychological functions; 3 what kind of issues are the most pressing in clinical assessment. Design/methodology/approach – 101 clinical psychologists, who work in Lithuanian health care institutions, completed a questionnaire about their opinion on clinical psychological assessment. Findings – Attention, memory, executive functions, intelligence and emotions are the most important and frequently assessed psychological functions in clinical practice. Neuropsychogical assessment of attention, memory, executive functions, are viewed as the most problematic fields of assessment. The adaptation, standartization and revision of the various neuropsychological tests is suggested. The most pressing issues in clinical practice are: 1 the assessment of specific psychological functions (neuropsychological and psychosocial functioning; 2 the assessment of specific disorders (schizophrenia spectrum disorders and autism spectrum disorders; 3 the asessment of specific stages of development (children and teenagers. Research limitations/implications – 32 percent of health care institutions (30 out of 95 identified institutions, which provide mental health care, did not participate in the study. The majority of these institutions are from the provinces. Practical implications – psychological assessment plays a key role in the practice of a clinical psychologist. This study investigated and pinpointed the most pressing issues and needs of psychologists in clinical practice. According to the study results, recommendations ascertaining to the adaptation and revision of tests and preparation of clinical psychologists

  1. Opening the Black Box of Clinical Collaboration in Integrated Care Models for Frail, Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Stampa, Matthieu; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard; Novella, Jean-Luc; Lechowski, Laurent; Ankri, Joel; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to understand better the clinical collaboration process among primary care physicians (PCPs), case managers (CMs), and geriatricians in integrated models of care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of 35 PCPs, 7 CMs, and 4 geriatricians was selected in…

  2. Preliminary Validation of a Screening Tool for Adolescent Panic Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Alexander H.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a brief screening tool for adolescent panic disorder (PD) in a primary care setting. A total of 165 participants (ages 12-17 years) seen in two pediatric primary care clinics completed the Autonomic Nervous System Questionnaire (ANS; Stein et al. in Psychosomatic Med 61:359-364, 40). A subset of those screening…

  3. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, J R

    1995-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part article, in the December 1994 issue of the journal, the author discussed the manufacturing theories of Peter Drucker in terms of their applicability for the health care field. He concluded that Drucker's four principles and practices of manufacturing--statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach--do have application to the health care system. Clinical guidelines, a variation on the Drucker theory, are a specific example of the manufacturing process in health. The performance to date of some guidelines and their implications for the health care reform debate are discussed in Part II of the article. PMID:10139603

  4. Health-care technology assessment: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantler, Cyril

    2004-01-01

    Health technology assessment needs to relate to contemporary questions which concern public health-care systems: how to keep people healthy, how to focus on the needs of those with chronic disabilities and integrate care between the hospital and the community, how to encourage and audit effective teamwork, and how to establish a consensus about what is effective and affordable. Clinicians have an ethical responsibility to practice efficiently and economically, for profligacy in the care of one patient may mean that another is treated inadequately. For similar reasons, clinicians need to play a full role in the management of services. Advice from health technology assessment is vital and needs to be accurate, relevant, timely, clear, and accessible. As well as being concerned about what works, we need also to eliminate from practice what does not. Regular audit and appraisal of practice against the evidence base should be useful in this respect. Alternative approaches to management, such as the provision of care as opposed to aggressive treatments, need to be evaluated, and health technology assessment needs to consider how services are delivered, not just specific treatments. PMID:15176183

  5. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases.Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level.Method: A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility.Results: There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes.Conclusions: A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  6. Treatment goals for ambulatory blood pressure and plasma lipids after stroke are often not reached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Kofoed, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In Danish health care, secondary prevention after stroke is currently handled mainly by general practitioners using office blood pressure (OBP) assessment of hypertension. The aim of this study was to compare the OBP approach to 24-hour assessment by ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring...

  7. Cost Effectiveness of Facility-Based Care, Home-Based Care and Mobile Clinics for Provision of Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Babigumira, Joseph B; Sethi, Ajay K.; Smyth, Kathleen A.; Singer, Mendel E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders in HIV/AIDS care currently use different programmes for provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. It is not known which of these represents the best value for money. Objective: To compare the cost effectiveness of home-based care (HBC), facility-based care (FBC) and mobile clinic care (MCC) for provision of ART in Uganda. Methods: Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using decision and Markov modeling of adult AIDS patients in WHO Clinical ...

  8. Day surgery for gynaecological laparoscopy: Clinical results from an RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudex, Claire; Sørensen, Jan; Clausen, Ingo

    2006-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial compared the clinical outcome from inpatient and ambulatory laparoscopy for benign gynaecological conditions. While 658 consecutive patients were considered for inclusion into the study, data from 26 inpatients and 40 ambulatory cases were analysed. Inpatient surg...

  9. Good clinical practice guidelines for care home residents with diabetes: an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A J

    2011-07-01

    A Task and Finish Group of Diabetes UK was convened over 14 months to undertake a systematic review of the original 1999 British Diabetic Association guidance on care home diabetes, incorporate new research findings and produce a set of recommendations that are evidenced-based, practical and implementable within UK care home settings. The anticipation of Diabetes UK is that these guidelines will represent a national policy of good clinical practice for diabetes care within care homes. This executive summary demonstrates how the full guidelines should provide a framework of assessment of the quality of diabetes care within care homes, for use by regulatory bodies who have responsibility for this provision of diabetes care. This document is primarily based on recommendations for adults living within British care home environments and its focus, by virtue of the nature and characteristics of residents, is on older adults. Improvements in diabetes care within residential and nursing homes are likely to follow a sustained commitment by health and social care professionals to ensure that the well-being of residents with diabetes is paramount, that high-quality policies of diabetes care are implemented and monitored and effective diabetes education is a mandatory and integral part of care home staff training. PMID:21672001

  10. Cirurgia ambulatorial em proctologia: análise retrospectiva de 437 casos Outpatient surgery for anorectal diseases: the experience of the Clinics Hospital of the Medical School, Botucatu, SP, Brazil, in 437 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Rogério Saad-Hossne; Renê Gamberini Prado; Alexandre Bakonyi-Neto

    2005-01-01

    RACIONAL: O número de cirurgias ambulatoriais realizadas em hospitais, como em clínicas particulares, cresce a cada dia. Hoje, em alguns países, como a França, há predomínio das cirurgias ambulatoriais em relação às hospitalares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar retrospectivamente os pacientes operados no Serviço de Cirurgia Ambulatorial do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: Foram estudados retrospectivamente 437 casos clínicos de patologias orificiais, anal...

  11. Care delivery value chains for ophthalmic clinics in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Bühlmann Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Perceived patient value is often not aligned with the emerging expenses for health care services. In other words, the costs are often supposed as rising faster than the actual value for the patients. This fact is causing major concerns to governments, health plans, and individuals. Attempts to solve the problem have habitually been on the operational effectiveness side: increasing patient volume, minimizing costs, rationing, or closing hospitals, usually resulting in a zero-sum game. Only few...

  12. Cultural Competence in Elderly Care within the Clinical Practice Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Dhadda, Sukdeep

    2014-01-01

    i Abstract  Aims: This study sought to assess the knowledge, skills, attitudes and practice of nurses towards the issue of culture, in order to assess their level of cultural competence (CC) and its impact upon healthcare provision within the speciality of elderly care.  Background: The UK continues to be an increasingly diverse and ageing population; hence, it is important that healthcare professionals become aware of the needs of older ethnic minority patients. CC is one approach...

  13. Outcome research in palliative care: could it represent a new dimension of clinical research or clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassinari, Davide; Maltoni, Marco; Sartori, Sergio; Fantini, Manuela; Poggi, Barbara; Ravaioli, Alberto

    2005-03-01

    Outcome research is a new dimension of clinical research, and all fields of clinical medicine are involved in this kind of analysis. Overall survival and quality of life are the main outcomes identified in clinical oncology. The former must be the main outcome whenever possible; the latter has to be the main outcome when an improvement of overall survival cannot be expected. It follows that quality of life is the main outcome of palliative care, in which the patient instead of the disease represents the target of the clinical approach. In our critical paper, we review the meaning of clinical outcomes in palliative care, classifying the outcomes as main and surrogate outcomes, and the results of the trials as indexes of activity and efficacy of a treatment. We also review the main randomized clinical trials on the treatment of cancer cachexia, trying to define the role of the treatments in cachexia-related symptom control and quality of life improvement. Strictly related to outcome analysis is the dimension of pharmacoeconomic evaluation. The models of the different designs of pharmacoeconomic analysis are revisited in an attempt to conjugate the pharmacoeconomic evaluation with the particular dimension of palliative care. PMID:15580363

  14. Serving transgender people: clinical care considerations and service delivery models in transgender health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Kevan; Knudson, Gail; Khan, Sharful Islam; Bonierbale, Mireille; Watanyusakul, Suporn; Baral, Stefan

    2016-07-23

    The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) standards of care for transsexual, transgender, and gender non-conforming people (version 7) represent international normative standards for clinical care for these populations. Standards for optimal individual clinical care are consistent around the world, although the implementation of services for transgender populations will depend on health system infrastructure and sociocultural contexts. Some clinical services for transgender people, including gender-affirming surgery, are best delivered in the context of more specialised facilities; however, the majority of health-care needs can be delivered by a primary care practitioner. Across high-income and low-income settings alike, there often remains a dearth of educational programming for health-care professionals in transgender health, although the best evidence supports introducing modules on transgender health early during clinical education of clinicians and allied health professionals. While these challenges remain, we review the increasing evidence and examples of the defined roles of the mental health professional in transgender health-care decisions, effective models of health service provision, and available surgical interventions for transgender people. PMID:27323926

  15. Clinical Approach to Nonresponsive Pneumonia in Adults Diagnosed by a Primary Care Clinician: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiley B. Vander Wyst

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is commonly diagnosed in the primary care setting. Management of nonresponsive pneumonia (NRP, i.e. failure to respond to CAP treatment, is not clearly understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial work-up and treatment of CAP in the ambulatory primary care setting and to determine relative proportion of, diagnostic approach to and treatment of NRP. Methods: We retrospectively studied adult patients diagnosed with CAP within our large, integrated health care system from October 2006 through July 2013. Cases were defined as patients with CAP who worsened after 4 days, or did not improve within 10 days, of antibiotic treatment. Controls were CAP patients who did not meet case definition. Mann-Whitney and t-tests were used to analyze continuous variables. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to analyze categorical variables. Significant variables were used to construct a multivariable logistic regression model. Results: Of 250 total patients studied, there were 85 cases and 165 controls. The case population was significantly older (59 ± 16 vs. 53 ± 19 years, P = 0.02. Multivariable logistic regression revealed former smoker (P < 0.01, initial presentation to urgent care (P = 0.02 and myalgia (P = 0.003 as predictors of NRP. Chest X-rays were more commonly ordered for cases at initial visit (80% vs. 68%, P = 0.06. Overall, 24% of patients had additional testing at the initial visit (39% of cases vs. 16% of controls, P < 0.001. Additionally, a higher proportion of cases underwent antibiotic change at their first (62% vs. 15%, P < 0.001 or second (47% vs. 5%, P < 0.001 follow-up visit. Conclusions: Patients with NRP tended to be former smokers, report myalgia and/or present to urgent care. The majority of providers conducted chest X-rays, but no further pneumonia testing, at the initial visit. Further study is needed to determine if this strategy leads to delayed etiologic

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement: opportunities in the patient protection and affordable care act to reduce cancer care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Beverly; Polite, Blase N; Halpern, Michael T; Stranne, Steven K; Winer, Eric P; Wollins, Dana S; Newman, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Patients in specific vulnerable population groups suffer disproportionately from cancer. The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of cancer. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides both opportunities and challenges for addressing cancer care disparities and access to care. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates for policies that ensure access to cancer care for the underserved. Such policies include insurance reform and the reduction of economic barriers to quality health care. Building on ASCO's prior statement on disparities in cancer care (2009), this article summarizes elements of the health care law that are relevant to cancer disparities and provides recommendations for addressing major provisions in the law. It outlines specific strategies to address insurance reform, access to care, quality of care, prevention and wellness, research on health care disparities, and diversity in the health care workforce. ASCO is committed to leading efforts toward the improvement of cancer care among the most vulnerable patients. PMID:21810680

  17. A cross-national comparison of the quality of clinical care using vignettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, John W; Liu, Anli

    2007-09-01

    In studies comparing clinical practice to evidence-based standards, researchers have found that quality of care is inconsistently provided to different segments of the population in both developing and developed countries. To test the hypothesis that quality of care varies widely within different countries, we conducted a prospectively designed evaluation of quality for three common clinical conditions: diarrhoea, tuberculosis and prenatal care. Five countries participated in the study: China, the Philippines, Mexico, El Salvador and India. Within each country, physicians were randomly selected from tertiary care hospitals, district level hospitals, and public and private outpatient clinics. A total of 488 previously validated case vignettes were administered to 300 participating physicians. Vignettes were scored according to evidence and expert based quality criteria. We used a random effects model to estimate the associations between quality scores by case, physician characteristics, study site, and country. We found that average quality of care was low (61.0%), but there exists a wide variation in overall quality (30-93%). While there was little difference in average quality scores between countries (60.2 to 62.6%), variation within countries was broad. The wide variation was consistent across facility type, medical condition and domain of care. We also found that younger, female, tertiary care and specialist physicians performed better than their counterparts. We conclude that some physicians provide exceptional care even in the setting of limited resources. Furthermore, poor quality can be addressed by health policy planners by directing remediation toward the lowest performers. PMID:17660225

  18. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  19. Clinical intuition in mental health care: A discussion and focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteman, C.L.M.; Spaanjaars, N.L.; Aarts, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical intuition in mental health care has been written off as a mysterious kind of ability to ‘see through’ clients, something that clinicians who favour evidence-based practice should have nothing to do with. We propose another understanding of clinical intuition. Similar to other types of profe

  20. Clinical Curriculum Reform and Advanced Care Training at the New England College of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how the New England College of Optometry has expanded clinical education so graduates are equipped to handle new and advanced clinical and patient-care responsibilities and meet the changing standards of professional entry-level competency. The reform process, third- and fourth-year curriculum components, rotations, and plans for…

  1. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  2. Adherence to Measuring What Matters Measures Using Point-of-Care Data Collection Across Diverse Clinical Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal, AH; Bull, J; Ritchie, CS; Kutner, JS; Hanson, LC; Friedman, F; Jr, TDH; Grp, AAHPMRCW

    2016-01-01

    Measuring What Matters (MWM) for palliative care has prioritized data collection efforts for evaluating quality in clinical practice. How these measures can be implemented across diverse clinical settings using point-of-care data collection on quality is unknown.To evaluate the implementation of MWM measures by exploring documentation of quality measure adherence across six diverse clinical settings inherent to palliative care practice.We deployed a point-of-care quality data collection syste...

  3. A Pharmacist-Led Point-of-Care INR Clinic: Optimizing Care in a Family Health Team Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Jennifer; Soor, Gursharan; Telner, Deanna; Aliarzadeh, Babak; Lake, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Monitoring patients' international normalized ratio (INR) within a family medicine setting can be challenging. Novel methods of doing this effectively and in a timely manner are important for patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led point-of-care (POC) INR clinic. Methods. At a community-based academic Family Health Team in Toronto, Canada, charts of patients with atrial fibrillation managed by a pharmacist with usual care (bloodtesting at lab and pharmacist follow up of INR by phone) from February 2008 to April 2008 were compared with charts of patients attending a weekly POC INR clinic from February 2010 to April 2010. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was measured for both groups. Results. 119 patient charts were reviewed and 114 had TTR calculated. After excluding patients with planned inconsistent Coumadin use (20), such as initiating Coumadin treatment or stopping for a surgical procedure, the mean TTR increased from 64.41% to 77.09% with the implementation of the POC clinic. This was a statistically significant difference of 12.68% (CI: 1.18, 24.18; P = 0.03). Conclusion. A pharmacist-led POC-INR clinic improves control of anticoagulation therapy in patients receiving warfarin and should be considered for implementation in other family medicine settings. PMID:24455250

  4. Implementation of a drug therapy monitoring clinic in a primary-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchick, J K

    2000-12-15

    The development and implementation of a drug therapy monitoring clinic in the primary-care clinics of a military hospital are described. To improve patient care and decrease costs associated with treating chronic diseases, in August 1995 the pharmacy department established a drug therapy monitoring clinic. The clinic was responsible for initiating and monitoring treatment plans for patients with chronic diseases, implementing clinical guidelines, providing educational programs, collecting and analyzing outcome data, and handling requests for medication extensions. Treatment followed existing national standards and Department of Defense guidelines modified for the institution. The clinic began with one clinical pharmacy specialist, and within a year it added another clinical pharmacist and a technician. The clinic first obtained patients via consultations from providers in primary care; this was soon extended to all departments. In addition, the pharmacist was available to see walk-in patients needing medication extensions. Later, referrals came for inpatients and patients seen in the emergency room for asthma or diabetes mellitus, as well as for inpatients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. For fiscal year 1999, the clinic saw 104 (+/- 44.3) patients per month seeking medication extensions. It also handled 24,873 clinical interventions that year, resulting in projected annual savings of $1,085,560. Chart review indicated that compliance with national standards improved dramatically for patients with diabetes mellitus or asthma followed by pharmacists compared with physician monitoring during the same period and before the clinic began. The wait time for reviewing laboratory results and for patients receiving anticoagulation therapy was eliminated, and doses were changed immediately, if needed. A comprehensive pharmacist-managed drug therapy monitoring clinic for outpatients with chronic diseases can result in positive patient outcomes and more cost

  5. [Clinical consensus statement on the care of the child with a tracheostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrestarazu, Paula; Varón, Juan; Rodríguez, Aldana; Ton, Valeria; Vila, Fernando; Cipriani, Silvina; Moncada, Karina; Antonioli, Cintia P; Timoni, María A; Altina, Martha E; Nociti, Yamila B; Silva, Mariana L; Del Valle Rodríguez, Liliana; Rivas, Esteban; Boailchuk, Ivanna; Nieto, Mary E; Botto, Hugo A

    2016-02-01

    The care of the child with a tracheostomy deserves special attention because of the potential devastating airway compromise and because of the need of competent care by caregivers and professionals. The recommendations on tracheostomy care published are few and approaches are inconsistent among different institutions. This clinical consensus statement aims to improve care for children with tracheostomies. A literature search was conducted, reviewed and revised by this group of experts, who concurred with these statements, based on the best evidence available and taking into account the local context. PMID:26914079

  6. Self-care practices developed by pregnant women in a prenatal outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Riul da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this descriptive, cross-sectional, quantitative study was to examine self-care practices developed by pregnant women in a prenatal outpatient clinic. Ninety-nine pregnant women participated. The survey was conducted in a public outpatient clinic in Minas Gerais. A questionnaire was administered. The responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results indicated greater self-care in relation to consumption of toxic substances (alcohol and drugs, hygiene, rest and nutrition. Others, such as physical exercise, wearing sunscreen and breast care were not deemed as priorities by the participants. Most reported receiving self-care guidance from health professionals, especially physicians and nurses. Defining the nature of the theme could contribute to the reorganization of health services, in order to provide better strategies for delivering quality care to pregnant women, especially the development of educational practices. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i4.21779.

  7. Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone Past ... healthy people to help," says Melanie Modlin about clinical trials. "We have a role to play in helping ...

  8. Using Digital Crumbs from an Electronic Health Record to identify, study and improve health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, James E; Feldman, Henry; Reti, Shane; Markson, Larry; Lu, Xiaoning; Davis, Roger B; Safran, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach, the Digital Crumb Investigator, for using data collected as a byproduct of Electonic Health Record (EHR) use to help define care teams and care processes. We are developing tools and methods to utilize these routinely collected data to visualize and quantify care networks across acute care and ambulatory settings We have chosen a clinical care domain where clinicians use EHRs in their offices, on the maternity wards and in the neonatal intensive care units as a test paradigm for this technology. The tools and methods we deliver should readily translate to other health care settings that collect behind-the-scenes electronic metadata such as audit trails. We believe that by applying the methods of social networking to define clinical relationships around a patient's care we will enable new areas of research into the usage of EHRs to promote patient safety and other improvements in care. PMID:22195103

  9. Multi-professional audit supports clinical governance in projecting and implementing a new stroke care area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute stroke have better outcomes in terms of survival or regaining independence if they receive organized inpatient care in a specific setting (Stroke Unit, SU where a coordinated multidisciplinary team can ensure the best level of care. The clinical governance of an SU requires a systematic monitoring of diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic processes through a structured audit. The entire project and set up of a new SU in Bentivoglio, Italy, were based on a model that focused on multidisciplinary teamwork and clinical governance. An audit based on the Benjamin audit cycle followed every step of the set up of the new SU. Markers from national and international guidelines and from the Italian Regional Audit, together with a specific database were used. The audit showed a high level of care and a significant improvement in the majority of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic parameters. Only a few markers (i.e. waiting times for ultrasound tomography and prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy required specific projects in order to improve the results. Our experience confirmed that a structured audit can support clinical governance of an SU by monitoring clinical processes and quality of care. Such an audit involves the whole professional team and shows the effects of any single actions. It also helps integration and co-operation among staff. Furthermore, a structured audit is a useful instrument for professional accountability for both qualitative and quantitative aspects of care.

  10. PROPOSAL OF A CLINICAL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Cavalcante FRANCO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Upper gastrointestinal bleeding implies significant clinical and economic repercussions. The correct establishment of the latest therapies for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. The use of clinical pathways for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with shorter hospital stay and lower hospital costs. Objective - The primary objective is the development of a clinical care pathway for the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to be used in tertiary hospital. Methods - It was conducted an extensive literature review on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, contained in the primary and secondary information sources. Results - The result is a clinical care pathway for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with evidence of recent bleeding, diagnosed by melena or hematemesis in the last 12 hours, who are admitted in the emergency rooms and intensive care units of tertiary hospitals. In this compact and understandable pathway, it is well demonstrated the management since the admission, with definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, passing through the initial clinical treatment, posterior guidance for endoscopic therapy, and referral to rescue therapies in cases of persistent or rebleeding. It was also included the care that must be taken before hospital discharge for all patients who recover from an episode of bleeding. Conclusion - The introduction of a clinical care pathway for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may contribute to standardization of medical practices, decrease in waiting time for medications and services, length of hospital stay and costs.

  11. A collaborative clinical and population-based curriculum for medical students to address primary care needs of the homeless in New York City shelters : Teaching homeless healthcare to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin; Naderi, Ramesh; Gaughran, Margaret; Sckell, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    Background Millions of Americans experience homelessness annually. Medical providers do not receive adequate training in primary care of the homeless.Methods Starting in 2012, a comprehensive curriculum was offered to medical students during their family medicine or ambulatory clerkship, covering clinical, social and advocacy, population-based, and policy aspects. Students were taught to: elicit specific social history, explore health expectations, and assess barriers to healthcare; evaluate clinical conditions specific to the homeless and develop plans for care tailored toward patients' medical and social needs; collaborate with shelter staff and community organizations to improve disease management and engage in advocacy efforts. A mixed methods design was used to evaluate students' knowledge, attitudes, and skills including pre- and post-curriculum surveys, debriefing sessions, and observed clinical skills.Results The mean age of the students (n = 30) was 26.5 years; 55 % were female. The overall scores improved significantly in knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy domains using paired t‑test (p relationship and collaboration with community organizations were key elements. PMID:27277430

  12. Anti-Nuclear Antibodies in Daily Clinical Practice: Prevalence in Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Y. Avery

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD, patients are screened for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA. ANA, as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF, have a poor specificity. This hampers interpretation of positive results in clinical settings with low pretest probability of SARD. We hypothesized that the utility of positive ANA IIF results increases from primary to tertiary care. We retrospectively determined ANA, anti-ENA, and anti-dsDNA antibody prevalence in patient cohorts from primary (n=1453, secondary (n=1621, and tertiary (n=1168 care settings. Results reveal that from primary care to tertiary care, ANA prevalence increases (6.2, 10.8, and 16.0%, resp.. Moreover, in primary care low titres (70% versus 51% and 52% in secondary and tertiary care, resp. are more frequent and anti-ENA/dsDNA reactivities are less prevalent (21% versus 39% in secondary care. Typically, in tertiary care the prevalence of anti-ENA/dsDNA reactivities (21% is lower than expected. From this descriptive study we conclude that positive ANA IIF results are more prone to false interpretation in clinical settings with low pretest probabilities for SARD, as in primary care. Whether alternative approaches, that is, immunoadsorption of anti-DFS70 antibodies or implementation of anti-ENA screen assays, perform better, needs to be determined.

  13. Screening for Harsh Punishment in a Pediatric Primary Care Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelman, Susan; Dubowitz, Howard; Lane, Wendy; Prescott, Leslie; Meyer, Walter; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Kim, Jeongeun

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine: (1) the prevalence of harsh punishment among parents in a pediatric clinic, and (2) the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and stability of a brief screening measure. Methods: A subset of families involved in a study of child maltreatment prevention were recruited for this study. Two items in a parent screening…

  14. Clinical care of adult Turner syndrome--new aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Hjerrild, Britta E;

    2012-01-01

    TS female enters adulthood it is less clear who should be the primary care giver. Morbidity and mortality is increased, especially due to the risk of dissection of the aorta and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as the risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, thyroid disease and...... treatment for increasing height, are becoming well founded. Osteoporosis, diabetes, both type 1 and 2, hypothyroidism, obesity and a host of other endocrine diseases and conditions are seen more frequently in TS. Prevention, intervention and proper treatment is only just being recognized. Hypertension is...

  15. Experience of clinical pharmaceutical care carried out in pediatric respiratory department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xiao-ming; JIAN Ling-yan; ZHAO Li-mei

    2008-01-01

    Objective To discuss the role of clinical pharmacists in providing pharmaceutical care in pediatric respiratory department. Methods Supply pharmaceutical information, participate in clinical rounds, provide the rationalization proposal, help doctors to formulate correctly dose regimen, enhance medication efficiency; establish medicine record for the patient, record the drugs which were used, provide pharmaceutical care for the patient such as disease propaganda, medicine-use education, medicine consultation and so on. Results Promote rational administration, enhance the security of medical practice, the clinical pharmacists' work obtains the doctors' approval; improve the medication compliance, reduce patients' economy and spiritual burden, and obtain the patients' trust. Conclusions The pharmaeeutical care carried out in pediatric respiratory department can help reduce the incidence of medication errors, cut down the medication cost, shorten the time of patients to be hospitalized, raise the medication efficieney, and promote the doctor-patient relationship harmoniously. In a word the clinical pharmacists are indispensable.

  16. Implementing and sustaining transformational change in health care: lessons learnt about clinical process redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Katherine M; Bennett, Denise M; Ben-Tovim, David I; Boyages, Steven C; Lyons, Nigel J; O'Connell, Tony J

    2008-03-17

    *Clinical process redesign has enabled significant improvements in the delivery of health care services in emergency departments and elective surgery programs in New South Wales and at Flinders Medical Centre in South Australia, with tangible benefits for patients and staff. *The principles used in clinical process redesign are not new; they have been applied in other industries with significant gains for many years, but have only recently been introduced into health care systems. *Through experience with clinical process redesign, we have learnt much about the factors critical to the success of implementing and sustaining this process in the health care setting. *The key elements for success are leadership by senior executives, clinical leadership, team-based problem solving, a focus on the patient journey, access to data, ambitious targets, strong performance management, and a process for maintaining improvement. PMID:18341474

  17. Integrating HIV care and treatment into primary healthcare: Are clinics equipped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talitha Crowley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The demand for HIV care and treatment services is increasing rapidly and strategies to sustain long-term care should be employed. The decentralisation and integration of HIV care and treatment services into primary healthcare (PHC is vitally important in order to ensure optimal access to life-saving antiretroviral therapy and ongoing chronic care. Conversely, the PHC system is fraught with the current burden of disease. Setting: The study was conducted in PHC clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, Kwa-Zulu Natal.Aim: The objectives of the study were to assess whether PHC clinics were equipped to deliver integrated HIV services and to evaluate the availability of resources as well as support systems for HIV care and treatment in PHC clinics.Methods: A quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken in 20 randomly-selected, eligible clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. An evaluation instrument was completed through observations and review of the clinic data records. Criteria were based on the World Health Organization’s guide to indicators for antiretroviral programmes as well as South African HIV standards for PHC facilities.Results: None of the clinics were equipped adequately. Clinics with a higher patient load had poorer scores, whilst clinics providing antiretroviral therapy were better equipped in terms of human resources and infrastructure.Conclusion: HIV services are an essential part of primary healthcare and clinics need to be equipped adequately in order to render this service. It is unlikely that the over-burdened health system would be able to cope with an increased number of patients on antiretroviral therapy in the long term, whilst maintaining quality of services, without support being given to PHC clinics.

  18. Does the presence of a pharmacist in primary care clinics improve diabetes medication adherence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocarnik Beverly Mielke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs are an essential element of therapy for the management of type 2 diabetes, OHA adherence is often suboptimal. Pharmacists are increasingly being integrated into primary care as part of the move towards a patient-centered medical home and may have a positive influence on medication use. We examined whether the presence of pharmacists in primary care clinics was associated with higher OHA adherence. Methods This retrospective cohort study analyzed 280,603 diabetes patients in 196 primary care clinics within the Veterans Affairs healthcare system. Pharmacists presence, number of pharmacist full-time equivalents (FTEs, and the degree to which pharmacy services are perceived as a bottleneck in each clinic were obtained from the 2007 VA Clinical Practice Organizational Survey—Primary Care Director Module. Patient-level adherence to OHAs using medication possession ratios (MPRs were constructed using refill data from administrative pharmacy databases after adjusting for patient characteristics. Clinic-level OHA adherence was measured as the proportion of patients with MPR >= 80%. We analyzed associations between pharmacy measures and clinic-level adherence using linear regression. Results We found no significant association between pharmacist presence and clinic-level OHA adherence. However, adherence was lower in clinics where pharmacy services were perceived as a bottleneck. Conclusions Pharmacist presence, regardless of the amount of FTE, was not associated with OHA medication adherence in primary care clinics. The exact role of pharmacists in clinics needs closer examination in order to determine how to most effectively use these resources to improve patient-centered outcomes including medication adherence.

  19. Clinical accompaniment: the critical care nursing students’ experiences in a private hospital

    OpenAIRE

    N. Tsele; Marie Muller

    2000-01-01

    The quality of clinical accompaniment of the student enrolled for the post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General) is an important dimension of the educational/learning programme. The clinical accompanist/mentor is responsible for ensuring the student’s compliance with the clinical outcomes of the programme in accordance with the requirements laid down by the Nursing Education Institution and the South African Nursing Council. The purpose of this...

  20. Traditional Chinese Medicine in Cancer Care: A Review of Controlled Clinical Studies Published in Chinese

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xun; Yang, Guoyan; Li, Xinxue; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Jingli; Chang, Jiu; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Guo, Yu; Xu, Yue; Liu, Jianping; Bensoussan, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been widely applied for cancer care in China. There have been a large number of controlled clinical studies published in Chinese literature, yet no systematic searching and analysis has been done. This study summarizes the current evidence of controlled clinical studies of TCM for cancer. Methods We searched all the controlled clinical studies of TCM therapies for all kinds of cancers published in Chinese in four main Chinese electronic databa...

  1. PSYCHIATRIC CLINICAL PLACEMENT UPON NURSING STUDENTS PERCEIVED KNOWLEDGE IN CARING FOR MENTALLY ILL

    OpenAIRE

    Herry Prasetyo

    2012-01-01

    Background: The implementation of a psychiatric clinical placement has been an integral component in Indonesia Nursing Academies. Purpose: The research was to investigate how nursing students’ perceived knowledge in caring for mentally ill patients as a result of their psychiatric clinical placement. Method: A descriptive survey design commonly called non-experimental design was used in this research. Students, who had completed two weeks in a psychiatric clinical placement as a component of ...

  2. An approach to measure compliance to clinical guidelines in psychiatric care

    OpenAIRE

    Brommels Mats; Wistedt Anna; Forsner Tord; Forsell Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to measure six months compliance to Swedish clinical guidelines in psychiatric care after an active supported implementation process, using structured measures derived from the guidelines. Methods In this observational study four psychiatric clinics each participated in active implementation of the clinical guidelines for the assessment and treatment of depression and guidelines for assessment and treatment of patients with suicidal behaviours dev...

  3. Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

    2014-05-01

    The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

  4. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M.; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81–87) PMID:26348355

  5. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Peter M; Bauer, Amy M; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C

    2016-04-01

    Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81-87). PMID:26348355

  6. The effect of nursing management development program on clinical competency in coronary care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Vaezi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are the main members in nursing cares and nursing managers can improve their clinical competency by applying better leadership skills. This study carried out to determine the effect of nursing management program on clinical competency of nurses in a coronary care unit (CCU.Methods: A quasi-experimental study was carried out in two educational hospitals in Yazd- Iran. These hospitals were allocated randomly in case and control hospitals. 25 matched nurses were selected by convenience sampling from both case and control hospitals. The clinical competency of nurses was measured by related questioners consisted of two dimensions caring and care management behaviors by self-evaluation and head nurse evaluation in case and control groups. Then, the intervention was implemented in four stages including nurse's development, managers' development, adaptation and supervision period during four months in the case group. After intervention, clinical competency of nurses was measured in both groups.Results: The results showed that before intervention more than 80% of nurses in two groups was in the moderate clinical competency level and they were proficient based on Benner's skill acquisition model. After intervention, nurses' clinical competency improved to higher level in case group but it didn't change in control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Creating necessary modifications in nursing environments through the management development program by head nurses may improve nurses' clinical competency.

  7. A CLINICAL STUDY OF VAULT PROLAPSE IN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to assess clinical parameters of patients with vault prolapse and its results of surgery. A prospective study of 11 patients with vault prolapse seen from October 2009 to July 2011 with 2 years of follow-up. Clinical parameter like age, parity, symptoms, POP-Q staging, type of previous hysterectomy and interval of onset of symptoms for prolapsed. All are presented with complaints of mass per vagina, next with difficulty in voiding urine. Majority of them are followed by vaginal hysterectomy then abdominal hysterectomy. 9 out of 11 were undergone sacrospinous ligament fixation and 2 are abdominal sacrocolpopexy done. The post-operative complications were fever in one patient and urinary tract infection in other patient. No recurrence of prolapsed noted up to 2 years of follow-up. Sacrospinous colpopexy is simple and efficacious procedure, which is indicated in vault prolapsed

  8. Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Michael E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC practices. Methods This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30 were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources. Results Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening. Conclusions Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were

  9. Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keenum Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there was a difference in the total number of office visits for low back pain over one year after a four week clinical trial of either a form of physical therapy (Exercise Program or a form of chiropractic care (Flexion Distraction for chronic low back pain. Methods In this randomized clinical trial follow up study, 195 participants were followed for one year after a four-week period of either a form of chiropractic care (FD or a form of physical therapy (EP. Weekly structured telephone interview questions regarded visitation of various health care practitioners and the practice of self-care for low back pain. Results Participants in the physical therapy group demonstrated on average significantly more visits to any health care provider and to a general practitioner during the year after trial care (p Conclusion During a one-year follow-up, participants previously randomized to physical therapy attended significantly more health care visits than those participants who received chiropractic care.

  10. The ADHD Clinic: a collaborative model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lisa; Allan, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common chronic and often life-persistent neurobehavioral disorder. At Children's Mercy Hospital, collaboration between a developmental-behavioral pediatrician and a behavioral psychologist, both of whom specialize in ADHD, allows the use of both medication and behavior modification which are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and which are equally effective as stand-alone therapies. Children who receive both of these treatment modalities also fare better than those who receive only medication in a number of areas. This article will describe our collaborative clinic model and will address considerations of parent preference about these therapeutic approaches. PMID:25011340

  11. Improving documentation of clinical care within a clinical information network – an essential initial step in efforts to understand and improve care in kenyan hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    English, MC; Tuti, T; Paton, C.; Malla, L; Clinical Information Network

    2016-01-01

    In many low income countries health information systems are poorly equipped to provide detailed information on hospital care and outcomes. Information is thus rarely used to support practice improvement. We describe efforts to tackle this challenge and to foster learning concerning collection and use of information. This could improve hospital services in Kenya. We are developing a Clinical Information Network, a collaboration spanning 14 hospitals, policy makers and researchers with the g...

  12. Leveraging HIV platforms to work toward comprehensive primary care in rural Malawi: the Integrated Chronic Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Emily B; Kalanga, Noel; Mailosi, Bright; Mwalwanda, Stanley; Kachimanga, Chiyembekezo; Nyangulu, Kondwani; Dunbar, Elizabeth; Kerr, Lila; Nazimera, Lawrence; Dullie, Luckson

    2015-12-01

    This case study describes an integrated chronic care clinic that utilizes a robust HIV program as a platform for NCD screening and treatment. A unique model, the integrated chronic care clinic provides longitudinal care for patients with an array of chronic diseases including HIV and common NCDs, allowing for a single visit for all of a patient's conditions. Set in Malawi's remote Neno District, this clinic structure aims to (1) increase access to care for NCD patients, (2) maximize efficiency given the severe human resource shortages, and (3) replicate strong HIV outcomes for patients with other chronic conditions. The goal is to increase the number of health facilities in Neno capable of fully delivering Malawi's Essential Health Package, the set of cost-effective interventions endorsed by Malawi MOH to reduce burden of disease and leading causes of death. While implementation is ongoing and processes are evolving, this model of healthcare delivery has already improved the accessibility of NCD care by allowing patients to have all of their chronic conditions treated on the same day at their nearest health facility, notably without additional investment of human and financial resources. Currently, 6781 patients on antiretroviral therapy and 721 patients with NCDs are benefitting, including 379 with hypertension, 187 with asthma, 144 with epilepsy, and 76 with diabetes. Among the NCD patient population, 15.1% are HIV-positive. Success hinged largely on several factors, including clear leadership and staff ownership of their specific duties, and a well-defined and uniform patient flow process. Furthermore, deliberate and regular conversations about challenges allowed for constant iteration and improvement of processes. Moving forward, several tasks remain. We are refining the data management process to further consolidate medical records, along with integrating our tracking processes for clients who miss appointments. Additionally, we are exploring opportunities for

  13. Gaining entry-level clinical competence outside of the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne; Taper, Janette

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, an emphasis has been placed on dietetic interns' attainment of entry-level clinical competence in acute care facilities. The perceived risks and benefits of acquiring entry-level clinical competence within long-term and acute care clinical environments were examined. The study included a purposive sample of recent graduates and dietitians (n=14) involved in an integrated internship program. Study subjects participated in in-depth individual interviews. Data were thematically analyzed with the support of data management software QSR N6. Perceived risks and benefits were associated with receiving clinical training exclusively in either environment; risks in one area surfaced as benefits in the other. Themes that emerged included philosophy of care, approach to practice, working environment, depth and breadth of experience, relationships (both client and professional), practice outcomes, employment opportunities, and attitude. Entry-level clinical competence is achievable in both acute and long-term care environments; however, attention must be paid to identified risks. Interns who consider gaining clinical competence exclusively in one area can reduce risks and better position themselves for employment in either practice area by incorporating an affiliation in the other area into their internship program. PMID:18334052

  14. Clinical events classification for using the EHR to provide better patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovkina, Tatyana; Richards, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The Healthcare Record has been used in a "Before and After" situation to improve patient care. The main paradigm of the modern Health Care is changing towards pervasive person-centric care including prevention and home care. Medical compunetics is a very important applicative field for improving the interoperability and the quality of the healthcare information system, especially in the current climate with the empowerment patients. The success depends on the choice of the Clinical Events Classification for structuring the span of clinical information. For the purposes of universalizing medical electronic data-bases, it is very important to organize the data regarding Clinical Events in such manner that it would be possible to use this information-structure in different fields of Clinical Practice: e.g., for the creation of the diagnostic and drug-assistance protocols, for the evaluation of the quality of drug prescribing, and for communication with patients as well. For this purpose all Clinical Events were divided to 5 classes. This Paper will describe a "Before and After" situation consequent upon the introduction of the Clinical Events Classification and the introduction of Protocols for drug-prescribing. Use of the Protocol brought about a 50% reduction in mortality. PMID:20543351

  15. Information and research needs of acute-care clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, M; Buttlar, L

    1996-01-01

    The majority of nurses surveyed used the library on a regular but limited basis to obtain information needed in caring for or making decisions about their patients. A minority indicated that the libraries in their own institutions totally met their information needs. In fact, only 4% depended on the library to stay abreast of new information and developments in the field. Many of the nurses had their own journal subscriptions, which could account in part for the limited use of libraries and the popularity of the professional journal as the key information source. This finding correlates with the research of Binger and Huntsman, who found that 95% of staff development educators relied on professional journal literature to keep up with current information in the field, and only 45% regularly monitored indexing-and-abstracting services. The present study also revealed that nurses seek information from colleagues more than from any other source, supporting the findings of Corcoran-Perry and Graves. Further research is necessary to clarify why nurses use libraries on a limited basis. It appears, as Bunyan and Lutz contend, that a more aggressive approach to marketing the library to nurses is needed. Further research should include an assessment of how the library can meet the information needs of nurses for both research and patient care. Options to be considered include offering library orientation sessions for new staff nurses, providing current-awareness services by circulating photocopied table-of-contents pages, sending out reviews of new monographs, inviting nurses to submit search requests on a topic, scheduling seminars and workshops that teach CD-ROM and online search strategies, and providing information about electronic databases covering topics related to nursing. Information on databases may be particularly important in light of the present study's finding that databases available in CD-ROM format are consulted very little. Nursing education programs should

  16. Evaluating a Clinical Decision Support Interface for End-of-Life Nurse Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Keenan, Gail M; Lopez, Karen D; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are tools that assist healthcare personnel in the decision-making process for patient care. Although CDSSs have been successfully deployed in the clinical setting to assist physicians, few CDSS have been targeted at professional nurses, the largest group of health providers. We present our experience in designing and testing a CDSS interface embedded within a nurse care planning and documentation tool. We developed four prototypes based on different CDSS feature designs, and tested them in simulated end-of-life patient handoff sessions with a group of 40 nurse clinicians. We show how our prototypes directed nurses towards an optimal care decision that was rarely performed in unassisted practice. We also discuss the effect of CDSS layout and interface navigation in a nurse’s acceptance of suggested actions. These findings provide insights into effective nursing CDSS design that are generalizable to care scenarios different than end-of-life.

  17. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Lori J; Van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequently cited in both subjective and objective studies. As a result, interventions are targeted towards modifiable factors to ameliorate their impact. This paper reviews normal sleep physiology and the impact that sleep disturbance has on patient psychophysiological recovery, and the contribution that the clinical environment has on intensive care patients' sleep. PMID:25852963

  18. CLINICAL PROFILE OF CHILDHOOD POISONING IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Accidents including poisoning are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among children in the west. Poisoning, while never accounting for a large number of accidental deaths, have acquired prominence now because they have not decreased at the same rate as the infectious diseases. METHODS An observational study was done in Department of Paediatrics KIMS Bangalore to know the incidence and pattern of childhood poisoning, to know the morbidity and mortality resulting from childhood poisoning. 86 children aged between 0-18 years were admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit with history of poisoning during the 2-year period of the study (Nov 13-Nov 15 were included. Diagnosis of poisoning was made on the basis of history and examination findings, Relevant investigations were done and Profile of patients with poisoning, their symptoms, type of poisoning and outcome were analysed. RESULTS The average duration of stay in the hospital was 2.7 days. Poisoning was accidental in 80 (93% patients whereas suicidal intent was present in only 6 (7% patients. Total 5 (5.8% patients died of which 4 were due to insecticide and pesticide poisoning and one was due to kerosene poisoning. CONCLUSION In the present study the probable reason for higher incidence of poisoning by insecticides & pesticides could be the involvement of higher age group and more involvement of adolescent children.

  19. Governing the research-care divide in clinical biobanking: Dutch perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckhout, Martin; Douglas, Conor M W

    2015-01-01

    Biobanking, the large-scale, systematic collection of data and tissue for open-ended research purposes, is on the rise, particularly in clinical research. The infrastructures for the systematic procurement, management and eventual use of human tissue and data are positioned between healthcare and research. However, the positioning of biobanking infrastructures and transfer of tissue and data between research and care is not an innocuous go-between. Instead, it involves changes in both domains and raises issues about how distinctions between research and care are drawn and policed. Based on an analysis of the emergence and development of clinical biobanking in the Netherlands, this article explores how processes of bio-objectification associated with biobanking arise, redefining the ways in which distinctions between research and clinical care are governed. PMID:26246123

  20. Developing a sustainable foot care clinic in a homeless shelter within an academic-community partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Patricia M; Champlin, Barbara E; Hunt, Roberta J

    2012-12-01

    Nursing faculty are confronted with the need to design community learning activities with vulnerable populations to prepare students for nursing practice. The creation of sustainable academic-community partnerships with agencies providing care to underserved populations meets this challenge. This article describes the development and implementation of a foot care clinic in a homeless shelter, created through a model of curricular integration, faculty engagement, and a long-term academic-community partnership. A transformative pedagogical approach based on service-learning was used to facilitate student understanding of social justice through activities that promote citizenship, develop advocacy skills, and increase knowledge and skills related to the role of the public health nurse in the community. The process of designing and developing a community clinical learning activity and the essential components for sustainability are discussed. Student outcomes are addressed. Recommendations for implementing a foot care clinic within an academic–community partnership are outlined. PMID:23362514

  1. Urgency in Pediatric Dentistry: Care Profile of the Integrated Pediatric Clinic of FOUFAL

    OpenAIRE

    Noelle Albuquerque AMORIM; Taciane Roberta Cardoso da SILVA; SANTOS Lucineide de Melo; Maria Dânia Holanda TENÓRIO; José Ivo Limeira dos REIS

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the profile of the urgency care provided atthe Integrated Pediatric Clinic of the School of Dentistry of theFederal University of Alagoas (FOUFAL).Method: 221 patient files were analyzed between April toNovember 2006 and the following data were analyzed by descriptivestatistics: patient identification, type of urgency, involved tooth(teeth), diagnosis and proposed treatment. Only complete files wereincluded.Results: Urgency care was most frequently sought by femalechildr...

  2. Natriuretic peptide vs. clinical information for diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Wachter Rolf; Pouwels Claudia; Kleta Sibylle; Wetzel Dirk; Kochen Michael M; Lüers Claus; Scherer Martin; Koschack Janka; Herrmann-Lingen Christoph; Pieske Burkert; Binder Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Screening of primary care patients at risk for left ventricular systolic dysfunction by a simple blood-test might reduce referral rates for echocardiography. Whether or not natriuretic peptide testing is a useful and cost-effective diagnostic instrument in primary care settings, however, is still a matter of debate. Methods N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, clinical information, and echocardiographic data of left ventricular systolic function wer...

  3. Setting up a health care quality management system in a multidisciplinary clinical research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Laktionova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issues of setting up a quality management system in a multidisciplinary specialized clinical research center. It describes the experience with information technologies used in a prophylactic facility to set up effective out- and inpatient health care control. Measures to optimize work under present-day conditions to upgrade the quality of health care are given using the federal health facility as an example.

  4. Development of a Clinical Protocol for Home Hospice Care for Koreans

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Won-Hee; Lee, Chang-Geol

    2005-01-01

    As the Korean government's recognition of the importance of hospice service grows, the government has initiated a variety of hospice services in Korea. Each hospice organization has shown a significant difference in its health care delivery methods, constitution and care content. Developing a clinical protocol is essential for establishing standardized hospice services. A preliminary protocol was drawn up by examining the records of terminal patients (n=541) in a home hospice organization whi...

  5. Does the presence of a pharmacist in primary care clinics improve diabetes medication adherence?

    OpenAIRE

    Kocarnik Beverly Mielke; Liu Chuan-Fen; Wong Edwin S; Perkins Mark; Maciejewski Matthew L; Yano Elizabeth M; Au David H; Piette John D; Bryson Chris L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) are an essential element of therapy for the management of type 2 diabetes, OHA adherence is often suboptimal. Pharmacists are increasingly being integrated into primary care as part of the move towards a patient-centered medical home and may have a positive influence on medication use. We examined whether the presence of pharmacists in primary care clinics was associated with higher OHA adherence. Methods This retrospective cohort s...

  6. Clinical Audit of Diabetes Care in the Bahrain Defence Forces Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Baharna, Marwa M.; Whitford, David L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Primary care audits in Bahrain have consistently revealed a failure to meet recognised standards of delivery of process and outcome measures to patients with diabetes. This study aimed to establish for the first time the quality of diabetes care in a Bahraini hospital setting. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was conducted of a random sample of patients attending the Diabetes and Endocrine Center at the Bahrain Defence Forces Hospital over a 15-month period which ended in J...

  7. Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva; Vestergaard, Erik;

    2013-01-01

    ) and a comparison group (405 students). The intervention was provided by an interprofessional clinical study unit (ICS) and included students from nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, laboratory technology and radiography. Self-efficacy data were collected through web-based questionnaires......Background: Interprofessional collaboration potentially enhances patient safety and satisfaction, and reduces tensions and conflicts among health care professionals. Such collaboration is challenging, however, because health care professionals lack sufficient knowledge of other professional roles...

  8. Identifying the barriers to conducting outcomes research in integrative health care clinic settings - a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Findlay-Reece Barbara; Kania Ania; Mulkins Andrea; Verhoef Marja J; Mior Silvano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Integrative health care (IHC) is an interdisciplinary blending of conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with the purpose of enhancing patients' health. In 2006, we designed a study to assess outcomes that are relevant to people using such care. However, we faced major challenges in conducting this study and hypothesized that this might be due to the lack of a research climate in these clinics. To investigate these challenges, we initiated a...

  9. Care of burns in Scotland: 3-year data from the managed clinical network national registry

    OpenAIRE

    Gilhooly, Charlotte; Kinsella, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Managed Clinical Network for Care of Burns in Scotland (COBIS) was launched in April 2007. Primary aims included establishing and maintaining a registry of complex burn injury in Scotland and setting mechanisms to regularly audit outcome of burn treatment against nationally agreed standards of care. On behalf of COBIS, we present 3-year incidence and mortality data of Scottish patients admitted with a complex burn injury in this abstract. Methods From January 2010 o...

  10. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon Carla; Twells Laurie; Bishop Lisa; Young Stephanie; Hawboldt John; O'Shea Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC) to usual physician care (UC) in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retros...

  11. Use of dependency and prioritization tools by clinical nurse specialists in palliative care: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Mairéad

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim was to assess the utility of three needs assessment\\/dependency tools for use in community-based palliative care services. Specific objectives were to assess a sample of patients receiving specialist palliative care community nursing using these tools, to assess the predictive ability of each tool, and to explore the utility of prioritizing and measuring patient dependency from a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) perspective.

  12. Knowledge of sexually transmitted infections among women attending primary health care clinics in Moshi, Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Untreated STIs may have serious complications. Knowledge of STIs is important in order to prevent this, and to promote care seeking and treatment. Previous studies have found knowledge to be associated with sexual behavior and socioeconomical factors. The aim of our study was to describe the knowledge of STIs among women attending primary health care clinics in Moshi, Tanzania, to identify their sources of knowledge and evaluate if the level of knowledge is associated with soc...

  13. Breast cancer and depression: issues in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thingbaijam B. Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Many of breast-cancer patients experience distress and most of them experience depression which may lead to amplification of physical symptoms, increased functional impairment, and poor treatment adherence. We did a review on available literature from PubMed about prevalence, distress magnitudes, coping styles, and treatment methods of major depression in women with breast cancer from 1978 to 2010. Diagnosis and treatment of depressive episodes in women with breast cancer is challenging because of overlapping symptoms and co-morbid conditions. Major depression is often under-recognized and undertreated among breast cancer patients. This review highlighted the issues on identifying and managing depression in breast cancer patients in clinical settings. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:240-6Keywords: Breast cancer, coping, depression, distress

  14. Evaluation of Faculty Members’ and Students’ Attitude Towards Ambulatory Teaching Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafari, M.D.

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Ambulatory medicine is one of the most important parts of medical education. Due to its profound relation with professional future of physicians, ambulatory medicine is especially under attention and many studies have been performed to survey its quality and to design some ways to promote it. There is obvious deficiency in our evidence about ambulatory medicine. The aim of this study was to survey the quality of teaching of the ambulatory medicine from the viewpoint of the faculty members and students of medical faculty of Mazandaran.Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive and cross-sectional study. The study's population consisted of students, residents and clinical faculty members who were included by simple sampling. Data collection was performed by a questionnaire with 22 questions about demographic and educational variables as well as respondents’ opinions about environmental conditions, independent activities, instructors’ supervision, and social training in the ambulatory clinics. The validity of the questionnaire was controlled by content validity with expertise consultation, and its reliability was controlled by test-retest(r=0.85. Data were analyzed using spss13 software.Results: Response rate was 79%, the mean age of 36 faculties was 43.6+- 8.7 years and 32% of them were female. The mean age of 146 students was 25+-3.6 years and 61% were female. The attitude of the majority of the students (88.3% towards the quality of ambulatory teaching was negative, but majority of faculties (66.7% had positive attitudes. There was no significant difference among teaching departments. Attitude of junior trainees was even worse. Attitude of faculty members and students was similar towards inappropriate physical environment of ambulatory clinics, but it was significantly different from independent activities of trainees in clinics (p=0.000; relational drugs prescription (p=0.000; management (p=0.004, and supervision

  15. Multidisciplinary Aortopathy Clinics Should Now Be the Standard of Care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Timothy J; Bowdin, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is often undiagnosed and has a very poor prognosis when presented with acute aortic dissection. Early diagnosis, expert medical management, and elective aortic surgery are the cornerstones of improvement of long-term survival in thoracic aortic disease (TAD). International guidelines now recommend the acute and long-term management of patients with TAD to occur within multidisciplinary aortopathy clinics under the care of professionals with specific training and experience. Multidisciplinary "heart teams" are recognized to be more focused on patient-centric care, to facilitate faster clinical decision times with increased adherence to guideline-directed therapy, and to improve knowledge translation and physician and patient satisfaction. The range of differential diagnoses for TAD has expanded rapidly over the past decade. Diagnosis of an index case with a syndromic or nonsyndromic familial TAD allows for preventative care. Effective family screening can save lives by allowing for elective management of thoracic aortic aneurysm rather than emergent care of acute aortic complications. Expert cardiac imaging with access to the full range of required imaging modalities is central to all clinical management decisions. Medical and surgical management of TAD is now provided as personalized care according to patient- and disease-specific factors. Special considerations apply to pregnancy management for women with TAD. Multidisciplinary aortopathy clinics should now be the standard of care for the management of TAD in Canada and we should implement best practice guidelines. With the already established and emerging clinics, the stage is now set to build a Canadian Aortopathy Clinics Trials network. PMID:26621141

  16. Risk prediction models for mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Alba, Ana C; Agoritsas, Thomas; Jankowski, Milosz; Courvoisier, Delphine; Walter, Stephen D.; Guyatt, Gordon H; Ross, Heather J

    2013-01-01

    Optimal management of heart failure requires accurate assessment of prognosis. Many prognostic models are available. Our objective was to identify studies that evaluate the use of risk prediction models for mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure and describe their performance and clinical applicability.

  17. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities. PMID:23134277

  18. Etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in a population-based study: Link between etiology and patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capelastegui Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiologic profile of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP for each age group could be similar among inpatients and outpatients. This fact brings up the link between etiology of CAP and its clinical evolution and outcome. Furthermore, the majority of pneumonia etiologic studies are based on hospitalized patients, whereas there have been no recent population-based studies encompassing both inpatients and outpatients. Methods To evaluate the etiology of CAP, and the relationship among the different pathogens of CAP to patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes, a prospective population-based study was conducted in Spain from April 1, 2006, to June 30, 2007. Patients (age >18 with CAP were identified through the family physicians and the hospital area. Results A total of 700 patients with etiologic evaluation were included: 276 hospitalized and 424 ambulatory patients. We were able to define the aetiology of pneumonia in 55.7% (390/700. The most frequently isolated organism was S. pneumoniae (170/390, 43.6%, followed by C. burnetti (72/390, 18.5%, M. pneumoniae (62/390, 15.9%, virus as a group (56/390, 14.4%, Chlamydia species (39/390, 106%, and L. pneumophila (17/390, 4.4%. The atypical pathogens and the S. pneumoniae are present in pneumonias of a wide spectrum of severity and age. Patients infected by conventional bacteria were elderly, had a greater hospitalization rate, and higher mortality within 30 days. Conclusions Our study provides information about the etiology of CAP in the general population. The microbiology of CAP remains stable: infections by conventional bacteria result in higher severity, and the S. pneumoniae remains the most important pathogen. However, atypical pathogens could also infect patients in a wide spectrum of severity and age.

  19. A case study: the clinical application of quadrangular dialogue--a caring in nursing teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jane F

    2004-01-01

    Teaching caring in nursing is expected of nursing faculty, but the practical application is rarely explained. It has been regarded as the moral responsibility of faculty to teach in a caring way. This case study relates how one faculty applied the concepts to quadrangular dialogue a caring model of nursing education to the experience of baccalaureate student nurses in their first clinical rotation. The components of quadrangular dialogue will be described, and applied to a specific patient who was cared for by students in one semester. This model is developed from Habermas' (1995) Theory of Communicative Action and Moral Consciousness, Bishop and Scudder's (1990) Triadic Dialogue and a caring in nursing paradigm developed by this author. It explains how the patient, nursing student and nursing faculty are all first person in the interaction, while the illness is object. By acknowledging the humanness of participants, validation and fulfillment for each follow. PMID:16646898

  20. Establishing a community-based lung cancer multidisciplinary clinic as part of a large integrated health care system: aurora health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjegovich-Weidman, Marija; Haid, Max; Kumar, Santhosh; Huibregtse, Carol; McDonald, Jean; Krishnan, Santosh

    2010-11-01

    A community cancer clinic, through cooperation with its parent health care system, developed a lung cancer multidisciplinary clinic (MDC) to enhance patient care and prevent out-migration to competing health care systems. The local medical and radiation oncologists collaborated with a thoracic surgeon from the tertiary care hospital in establishing the lung MDC. All the participating physicians are employed by the health care system. A cancer care coordinator assured that all necessary tests were obtained and available to the physicians at least 1 day before the clinic. The multidisciplinary team also included a pulmonologist and met every third week. Other sub-specialists were involved as necessary. Final treatment recommendations using National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines were made for each patient at the MDC visit. This clinic, once established, resulted in significant improvements in the quality of care, patient satisfaction and retention of patients. Time from diagnosis to initiation of treatment was reduced to a mean of 18 days from a mean of 24 days. The community cancer clinic had an increase in lung cancer patient care by 28% and a 9.1% increase in gross revenue. The tertiary care hospital benefited by providing all patients with definitive surgery, including minimally invasive surgery. The tertiary hospital thoracic surgeon had a 75% increase in referrals from the lung MDC geographic area over the previous year. This collaboration in the development of MDCs demonstrates how patients, caregivers, and the health care system benefit from MDCs. PMID:21358947

  1. Patient Satisfaction with Health Care Services Provided at HIV Clinics at Amana and Muhimbili Hospitals in Dar es Salaam.

    OpenAIRE

    Kagashe, G A B; Rwebangila, F

    2011-01-01

    Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided. To determine satisfaction of HIV patients with health care services provided at the HIV clinics and specifically, to determine patients' satisfaction with the general physical environment o...

  2. HCUP State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) - Restricted Access Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) contain the universe of hospital-based ambulatory surgery encounters in participating States. Some States include...

  3. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective. PMID:26683238

  4. The human microbiome: opportunities and challenges for clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, G B

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing appreciation of the importance of the human microbiome to our normal physiology. This complex microbial ecosystem plays a range of roles, including influencing the development and function of our immune systems, providing essential nutrients, regulating metabolism and protecting us from opportunistic infections. Our increasing understanding of these processes is due, to a large extent, to the development of high-throughput sequencing technologies, providing for the first time a means by which complex microbial dynamics can be detailed. There is also a growing recognition that disruption of commensal microbiota, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, is associated with several common disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease, type 2 diabetes and oncogenesis. Further, where innate immunity fails to protect us, the microbial communities that colonise the external surfaces of our bodies represent a ready source of infection. This review discusses the mechanisms that govern our interaction with our resident microbiota, both in health and disease, the technological advances that allow us to gain insight into these relationships, and the way in which our growing understanding can inform clinical practice. PMID:25443179

  5. Moving toward a United States strategic plan in primary care informatics: a White Paper of the Primary Care Informatics Working Group, American Medical Informatics Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Little

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The Primary Care Informatics Working Group (PCIWG of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA has identified the absence of a national strategy for primary care informatics. Under PCIWG leadership, major national and international societies have come together to create the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics (NAPCI, to promote a connection between the informatics community and the organisations that support primary care. The PCIWG clinical practice subcommittee has recognised the necessity of a global needs assessment, and proposed work in point-of-care technology, clinical vocabularies, and ambulatory electronic medical record development. Educational needs include a consensus statement on informatics competencies, recommendations for curriculum and teaching methods, and methodologies to evaluate their effectiveness. The research subcommittee seeks to define a primary care informatics research agenda, and to support and disseminate informatics research throughout the primary care community. The AMIA board of directors has enthusiastically endorsed the conceptual basis for this White Paper.

  6. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  7. The Philadelphia PRIME Program: A Model For Primary Care Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, Lisa M; Asch, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Expanding primary care and ambulatory experiences in internal medicine training programs is limited by insufficient resources devoted to their development and implementation, heavy inpatient service demands and loyalty to the traditional inpatient based training model. Overcoming these barriers is a challenge likely to create new approaches to ambulatory education. The Pilot Education and Ambulatory Care (PACE) program at the Sepulveda VA is one such initiative that represents a multidiscipli...

  8. Public health clinic-based hepatitis C testing and linkage to care in Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade-Nwulia, O; Mehta, S H; Lasola, J; Latkin, C; Niculescu, A; O'Connor, C; Chaulk, P; Ghanem, K; Page, K R; Sulkowski, M S; Thomas, D L

    2016-05-01

    Testing and linkage to care are important determinants of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment effectiveness. Public health clinics serve populations at high risk of HCV. We investigated their potential to serve as sites for HCV testing, initiation of and linkage to HCV care. Cross-sectional study of patients accessing sexually transmitted infection (STI) care at the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) STI clinics, from June 2013 through April 2014 was conducted. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with HCV infection and specialist linkage to care. Between 24 June 2013 and 15 April 2014, 2681 patients were screened for HCV infection. Overall, 189 (7%) were anti-HCV positive, of whom 185 (98%) received follow-up HCV RNA testing, with 155 (84%) testing RNA positive. Of 155 RNA-positive individuals, 138 (89%) returned to the STI clinic for HCV RNA results and initial HCV care including counselling regarding transmission and harm reduction in alcohol, and 132 (85%) were referred to a specialist for HCV care. With provision of patient navigation services, 81 (52%) attended an offsite HCV specialist appointment. Alcohol use and lack of insurance coverage were associated with lower rates of specialist linkage (OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1-0.9] and OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1-0.9], respectively). We identified a high prevalence of HCV infection in BCHD STI clinics. With availability of patient navigation services, a large proportion of HCV-infected patients linked to off-site specialist care. PMID:26840570

  9. [Ambulatory invasive and noninvasive blood pressure monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K; Wortmann, A; Engels, G

    1989-08-01

    Indirect arterial blood pressure measurement has not changed substantially since its introduction by Riva-Rocci in 1986, Korotkoff in 1905 and Recklinghausen in 1906. Random measurements in the clinic or practice reflect only incompletely the dynamic nature of the blood pressure. Blood pressure recordings by patients themselves have provided more information through better temporal resolution, however, exact characterization of the pressure response throughout the entire day and, in particular, during physical exertion are not enabled; the latter are especially important with regard to diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. In 1966, therefore, radiotelemetric transmission of direct, continuously-measured arterial blood pressure was developed which enabled beat-to-beat registration of blood pressure, outside the laboratory, during normal daily life and sport activities. The initial results showed a marked variability of the blood pressure during the course of the day (Figure 1). Excessive blood pressure increases were observed during exposure to cold, static and dynamic exercise and to a lesser degree during automobile driving and exposure to heat (Figure 3). Recording of the pressure curves via transmission by radiotelemetry shows a high degree of accuracy and temporal resolution, spatial and situational freedom but is invasive and costly in terms of personnel. The same holds true for direct continuous blood pressure registration and storage on a portable tape recorder. Portable, automatic blood pressure measuring units for ambulatory monitoring employ indirect auscultatory or oscillometric recording with a cuff. As compared with the radiotelemetric direct continuous blood pressure measuring method, the indirect method has subordinate temporal resolution, that is, the measurements are only intermittent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2676813

  10. Effective Strategies for Global Health Research, Training and Clinical Care: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical car...

  11. Improving detection of familial hypercholesterolaemia in primary care using electronic audit and nurse-led clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Green, P.; Neely, D; Humphries, S.E.; Medway FH Audit Steering Committee; Saunders, T; Gray, V; Gordon, L; Payne, J.; Carter, S.; Neuwirth, C; Rees, A; Gallagher, H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale, aims and objectives In the UK fewer than 15% of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) cases are diagnosed, representing a major gap in coronary heart disease prevention. We wished to support primary care doctors within the Medway Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) to implement NICE guidance (CG71) and consider the possibility of FH in adults who have raised total cholesterol concentrations, thereby improving the detection of people with FH. Methods Utilizing clinical decision...

  12. Identifying low-value clinical practices in critical care medicine: protocol for a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Niven, Daniel J; McCormick, T Jared; Straus, Sharon E; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jeffs, Lianne P.; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing unnecessary, low-value clinical practice (ie, de-adoption) is key to improving value for money in healthcare, especially among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) where resource consumption exceeds other medical and surgical populations. Research suggests that low-value clinical practices are common in medicine, however systematically and objectively identifying them is a widely cited barrier to de-adoption. We will conduct a scoping review to identify low-v...

  13. Clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Fawad; Shafi, Azhar; Ali, Sheeraz; Siddiqui, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 patients undergoing first line chemotherapy with minimum of two cycles at inpatient department and chemotherapy bay of Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre Pakistan. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting develops before administration of chemotherapy. Clinical signs and symp...

  14. Analysis of X-Ray Film Quality in Primary Health Care Clinics in Riyadh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Omar Alsubael

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between image quality and processing conditions was assessed in a survey of 26 primary health care clinics in Riyadh City. Each clinic is equipped with a basic X-ray room and a darkroom that has a small table-top automatic processor. Rooms were evaluated for the quality of safe light, light leakage, storage of films and chemicals and processor temperature setting. A relationship was obtained between the quality of these parameters and the analysis of characteristic curves (H ...

  15. Clinical Alarms in Intensive Care Units: Perceived Obstacles of Alarm Management and Alarm Fatigue in Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Ok Min; Kim, Hwasoon; Lee, Young Whee; Cho, Insook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the current situation of clinical alarms in intensive care unit (ICU), nurses' recognition of and fatigue in relation to clinical alarms, and obstacles in alarm management. Methods Subjects were ICU nurses and devices from 48 critically ill patient cases. Data were collected through direct observation of alarm occurrence and questionnaires that were completed by the ICU nurses. The observation time unit was one hour block. On...

  16. The Technical Quality of Delivered Care for People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz Gastroenterology Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi; Mohammad Hossein Somi; Sima Asghari; Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi; Farid Gharibi; Saeideh Alidoost

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is considered as one of the chronic diseasesrequiring complicated treatment. This study aimed to assess technical quality of providing care for patients with IBD. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 94 people with IBD using interviews and simple random sampling methods in Gastroenterology, Endoscopy and clinic of Imam Reza Hospital and Golgasht Clinic in Tabriz in 2012. The data collection tool was a researcher-desi...

  17. Dependence and caring in clinical communication: The relevance of attachment and other theories

    OpenAIRE

    Salmon, Peter; Young, Bridget

    2009-01-01

    Objective Clinical relationships are usually asymmetric, being defined by patients’ dependence and practitioners’ care. Our aims are to: (i) identify literature that can contribute to theory for researching and teaching clinical communication from this perspective; (ii) highlight where theoretical development is needed; and (iii) test the utility of the emerging theory by identifying whether it leads to implications for educational practice. Methods Selective and critical review of research c...

  18. Women's Management of Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis and Experiences of Clinical Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Bilardi

    Full Text Available Few data are available on how women manage recurring bacterial vaginosis (BV and their experiences of the clinical care of this condition. This study aimed to explore women's recurrent BV management approaches and clinical care experiences, with a view to informing and improving the clinical management of BV.A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty-five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past 5 years took part in semi-structured interviews.The majority of women reported frustration and dissatisfaction with current treatment regimens and low levels of satisfaction with the clinical management of BV. Overall, women disliked taking antibiotics regularly, commonly experienced adverse side effects from treatment and felt frustrated at having symptoms recur quite quickly after treatment. Issues in clinical care included inconsistency in advice, misdiagnosis and inappropriate diagnostic approaches and insensitive or dismissive attitudes. Women were more inclined to report positive clinical experiences with sexual health physicians than primary care providers. Women's frustrations led most to try their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications in an attempt to treat symptoms and prevent recurrences, including well-known risk practices such as douching.In the face of considerable uncertainty about the cause of BV, high rates of recurrence, unacceptable treatment options and often insensitive and inconsistent clinical management, women are trying their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications to prevent recurrences, often with little effect. Clinical management of BV could be improved through the use of standardised diagnostic approaches, increased sensitivity and understanding of the impact of BV, and the provision of evidence based advice about known BV related risk factors.

  19. A clinical approach to the nutritional care process in protein-energy wasting hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mar Ruperto; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J; Guillermina Barril

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Malnutrition/wasting/cachexia are complex-disease conditions that frequently remain undiagnosed and/or untreated in up to 75% of prevalent hemodialysis (HD) patients. The nutrition care process (NCP) based on assessment, diagnosis, intervention and monitoring of nutritional status is a systematic method that nutrition professionals use to make decisions in clinical practice. Objective: This review examines from a clinical-nutritional practice point of view: a) nutritional status...

  20. Enhancement of clinical teaching for undergraduate students in primary health care facilities / Reginah Masakona

    OpenAIRE

    Masakona, Reginah

    2014-01-01

    The study comprises an investigation of the quality of the clinical teaching environment of undergraduate students in the accredited Primary health care ( PHC) facilities used by a provincial nursing college in Limpopo. The researcher, who is employed full time in one of the accredited PHC facilities to which undergraduate students are admitted for clinical practice, became aware of the tension between the undergraduate students and professional nurses working in the PHC facility during th...

  1. Hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease: 1. Diagnosis, comprehensive care and assessment. Association of Hemophilia Clinic Directors of Canada.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present current strategies for the assessment and comprehensive care of patients with hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease. OPTIONS: Hospital care, home care, single-provider care and multidisciplinary care. OUTCOMES: Morbidity and quality of life associated with bleeding and treatment. EVIDENCE: Relevant clinical studies and reports published from 1974 to 1994 were examined. A search was conducted of own reprint files, MEDLINE, citations in the articles reviewed and referenc...

  2. Integrating substance abuse care with community diabetes care: implications for research and clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ghitza UE; Wu LT; Tai B

    2013-01-01

    Udi E Ghitza,1 Li-Tzy Wu,2 Betty Tai11Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cigarette smoking and alcohol use are prevalent among individuals with diabetes in the US, but little is known about screening and treatment for substance use disorders in the d...

  3. Lessons learned from pilot site implementation of an ambulatory electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Cliff; Aponte, Phil; Hopkins, Robert; Bragg, David; Ballard, David J

    2006-10-01

    As ambulatory care practices face increasing pressure to implement electronic health records (EHRs), there is a growing need to determine the essential elements of a successful implementation strategy. HealthTexas Provider Network is in the process of implementing an EHR system comprising GE Centricity Physician Office-EMR 2005, Clinical Content Consultants (now part of GE), and Kryptiq Secure Messaging throughout all 88 practices in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and is hoping to extend the system to other practices affiliated with Baylor Health Care System as well. We describe the preimplementation clinical process redesign and quality improvement training that has been conducted networkwide in preparation for the introduction of the EHR, as well as the specific steps taken to prepare and train clinic staff for the integration of the EHR into daily workflows. The first pilot site, Family Medical Center at North Garland, implemented the system in May 2006. Based on both the positive aspects of this experience and the challenges we encountered, we identified 20 essential elements for successful implementation in the areas of site selection, implementation strategy, staff education and preparation, team project management, content, hardware and software, and workflow process. Broadly, we determined that 1) a pilot site's understanding of and willingness to work within the fluid nature of the implementation process during what is essentially a testing phase is a key ingredient in achieving success at the pilot site and in improving the process for later sites; 2) input from and representation of viewpoints of all types of EHR users during preimplementation decision making enables customization of the system and sufficient preplanning to ensure minimal workflow disruptions during and after implementation; and 3) a high level of technical and training support during the early days of implementation is invaluable. PMID:17106488

  4. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians. PMID:22786734

  5. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures. PMID:26903784

  6. Impact of Pharmaceutical Home Care on Compliances and Clinical Outcomes of Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luh P. F Larasanty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Indonesian health universal coverage system the hypertensive patients that grouped into the refer back patient treatment category, is one target of pharmaceutical home care. The aim of this study was to carried out the impact of pharmaceutical home care on patient compliances and clinical outcomes of hypertension without compeling indication out-patient on Wangaya General Hospital in the municipality of Denpasar Bali. Design research is an experimental study with one group pre-post test design. The thirteen patients who met the inclusion criteria will be given pharmaceutical home care services for 16 visits over three months period. The complianced levels were scored and statistical analyzed using linear regression and wilcoxon test. The pharmaceutical home care visit could increase the patients adherence to antihypertensive drug administration, increasing diet compliance, and adherence of physical exercise from good adherence to excellent adherence (p value=0,001, Pharmaceutical home care visit could increase patient compliance to restrictions of smoking and alcohol consumption from good adherence to very good adherence. The decreasing of the patient’s systolic blood pressure correlated to the pharmacist home visit (p value=0,000. The pharmaceutical home care has influenced on health behavior of hypertensive patients and the patients concordance to take their medication and introduced better clinical outcome.

  7. Conducting radiogenomic research – Do not forget careful consideration of the clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of radiogenomics has evolved substantially over the last few years. Cooperative research groups have been established and high throughput genotyping has become increasingly feasible and affordable. Nevertheless, a number of clinical and dosimetric issues need to be carefully considered in order to fully exploit these new possibilities.

  8. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  9. Rehabilitation Therapists’ Clinical Questions in the Context of Evidence-based Patient Care : An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lorie A. Kloda; Bartlett, Joan C.

    2009-01-01

    In this qualitative study, rehabilitation therapists (occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and speech-language pathologists) working in stroke care will be asked about their clinical questions. The goals of the study are: to identify common characteristics of questions, to develop a typology of questions, and to uncover reasons why certain questions are pursued.

  10. Clinic, hospital try to fulfill vision of coordinated care with joint venture company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Coordinated Care Services Inc., a joint venture of Carle Foundation and Carle Clinic Association in Urbana, IL, shares its initial successes and ongoing challenges after one year of operation. The biggest barrier to further improvements remains insufficient information management capability. PMID:11186347

  11. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  12. Patient safety and quality of care: How may clinical simulation contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Jensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The usability of health information technology (IT is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector influences the development and application of health IT. When health IT is introduced in local clinical work practices, potential patient safety hazards and insufficient support of work practices need to be examined. Qualitative methods, such as clinical simulation, may be used to evaluate new technology in correlation with the clinical context and to study the interaction between users, technology and work practice. Compared with the “classic” methods, such as heuristic inspection and usability testing, clinical simulation takes the clinical context into account. Clinical simulation can be useful in many processes in the human-centred design cycle. In the requirement specification, clinical simulation can be useful to analyze user requirements and work practice as well to evaluate requirements. In the design of health IT, clinical simulation can be used to evaluate clinical information systems and serve as common ground to help to achieve a shared understanding between various communities of practice. In a public procurement process, a clinical simulation-based assessment can help give insight into different solutions and how they support work practice. Before organizational implementation, clinical simulation is a very suitable means, by which to assess an application in connection with work practice.

  13. Transformation of VHA health data into clinically useful information to provide quality veteran care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Eisen, MD, MSc

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Veterans Health Administration (VHA is the largest integrated healthcare system in the United States, caring for nearly 6 million of the nation's 23 million veterans annually. VHA provides a full range of primary care, mental health, medical specialty, surgical, and rehabilitative services to enrolled veterans. It employs over 240,000 staff (including 65,000 health professionals and manages over 1,400 sites of care (medical centers, outpatient clinics, nursing homes, and counseling centers. The critical need for a comprehensive electronic medical record system is demonstrated by the observation that approximately 130 million outpatient encounters, 600,000 hospitalizations, over 400 million laboratory tests and radiological procedures, and 170 million prescription fills are provided annually. In addition, nearly 1 billion clinically related free-text notes are recorded annually, representing a small fraction of the total electronic data collected over the past two decades.

  14. Embracing case management for computerization of care pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jing; Li, Jing; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Xiang; Liu, Haifeng; Xie, Guotong

    2014-01-01

    The computerization of care pathways (CPs) has drawn considerable attention, for improving quality of health care and reducing costs. A well-known big challenge of implementing CPs is their flexibility and ad hoc variations in execution of clinical tasks. We observe that case management suits well to address this problem, and this paper proposes a CMMN-based CP model, where CMMN (Case Management Model and Notation) is becoming an industry standard. Via an experimental experience on modelling CHF (congestive heart failure) ambulatory CP, we illustrate that the usage of case management paves the way to popularize CPs, particularly for its quick deployment and execution in industrial products. PMID:25160134

  15. Medical errors in primary care clinics – a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoo Ee Ming

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is vital in patient care. There is a lack of studies on medical errors in primary care settings. The aim of the study is to determine the extent of diagnostic inaccuracies and management errors in public funded primary care clinics. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in twelve public funded primary care clinics in Malaysia. A total of 1753 medical records were randomly selected in 12 primary care clinics in 2007 and were reviewed by trained family physicians for diagnostic, management and documentation errors, potential errors causing serious harm and likelihood of preventability of such errors. Results The majority of patient encounters (81% were with medical assistants. Diagnostic errors were present in 3.6% (95% CI: 2.2, 5.0 of medical records and management errors in 53.2% (95% CI: 46.3, 60.2. For management errors, medication errors were present in 41.1% (95% CI: 35.8, 46.4 of records, investigation errors in 21.7% (95% CI: 16.5, 26.8 and decision making errors in 14.5% (95% CI: 10.8, 18.2. A total of 39.9% (95% CI: 33.1, 46.7 of these errors had the potential to cause serious harm. Problems of documentation including illegible handwriting were found in 98.0% (95% CI: 97.0, 99.1 of records. Nearly all errors (93.5% detected were considered preventable. Conclusions The occurrence of medical errors was high in primary care clinics particularly with documentation and medication errors. Nearly all were preventable. Remedial intervention addressing completeness of documentation and prescriptions are likely to yield reduction of errors.

  16. Respiratory Virus Detection and Clinical Diagnosis in Children Attending Day Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Nina; Pedersen, Bård; Nordbø, Svein Arne; Skanke, Lars Høsøien; Krokstad, Sidsel; Smyrnaios, Anastasios; Døllner, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory viruses often have been studied in children with respiratory tract infection (RTI), but less knowledge exists about viruses in asymptomatic children. We have studied the occurrence of a broad panel of respiratory viruses in apparently healthy children attending day care, taking into account the influence of possible confounding factors, such as age, clinical signs of respiratory tract infection (RTI), location (day-care section) and season. Methods We have studied 161 children in two day-care centers, each with separate sections for younger and older children, during four autumn and winter visits over a two-year period. A total of 355 clinical examinations were performed, and 343 nasopharyngeal samples (NPS) were analyzed by semi-quantitative, real-time, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for 19 respiratory pathogens. Result Forty-three percent of all NPS were PCR-positive for ≥ 1 of 13 virus species, with high species variation during visits. Rhinovirus 26% (88/343 NPS), enterovirus 12% (40/343) and parechovirus 9% (30/343) were detected in every visit, and the rates varied in relation to age, day-care section and season. Ten other viruses were detected in ≤ 3% of the NPS. Generally, viruses occurred together in the NPS. In 24% (79/331) of the clinical examinations with available NPS, the children had clear signs of RTI, while in 41% (135/331) they had mild signs, and in 35% (117/331) the children had no signs of RTI. Moreover, viruses were found in 70% (55/79) of children with clear signs of RTI, in 41% (55/135) with mild signs and in 30% (35/117) without any signs of RTI (p < 0.001). Conclusions Positive PCR tests for respiratory viruses, particularly picornaviruses, were frequently detected in apparently healthy children attending day care. Virus detection rates were related to age, presence of clinical signs of RTI, location in day care and season. PMID:27433803

  17. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Jennifer A; Kuntz, Gretchen M; Edwards, Mary E; Butson, Linda C; Auten, Beth

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n = 21), interviews (n = 2), and an online survey (n = 167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly affective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians' perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics. PMID:26211792

  18. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Gretchen M.; Edwards, Mary E.; Butson, Linda C.; Auten, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n=21), interviews (n=2), and an online survey (n=167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly effective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians’ perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics. PMID:26211792

  19. Clinical Care Pathways for Patients With Hepatitis C: Reducing Critical Barriers to Effective Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Nik; Lattimore, Sam; Irving, William Lucien; Thomson, Brian James

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Engagement of individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with care pathways remains a major barrier to realizing the benefits of new and more effective antiviral therapies. After an exploratory study, we have undertaken an evidence-based redesign of care pathways for HCV, including the following: (1) reflex testing of anti-HCV-positive samples for HCV RNA; (2) annotation of laboratory results to recommend referral of actively infected patients to specialist clinics; (3) educational programs for primary care physicians and nurses; and (4) the establishment of needs-driven community clinics in substance misuse services. Methods.  In this study, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of progression through care pathways of individuals with a new diagnosis of HCV infection made between January 2010 and January 2012. We also analyzed patient flow through new care pathways and compared this with our baseline study of identical design. Results.  A total of 28 980 samples were tested for anti-HCV antibody during the study period and yielded 273 unique patients with a new diagnosis of HCV infection. Of these, 38% were tested in general practice, 21% were tested in substance misuse services, 23% were tested in secondary care, and 18% were tested in local prisons. Overall, 80% of patients were referred to specialist clinics, 70% attended for assessment, and 38% commenced treatment, in comparison to 49%, 27%, and 10%, respectively, in the baseline study. Referral rates from all testing sources improved. Conclusions.  This study provides timely evidence that progression through care pathways can be enhanced, and it demonstrates reduction of key barriers to eradication of HCV. PMID:26900576

  20. Sharing clinical information across care settings: the birth of an integrated assessment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrard Jean-Claude

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population ageing, the emergence of chronic illness, and the shift away from institutional care challenge conventional approaches to assessment systems which traditionally are problem and setting specific. Methods From 2002, the interRAI research collaborative undertook development of a suite of assessment tools to support assessment and care planning of persons with chronic illness, frailty, disability, or mental health problems across care settings. The suite constitutes an early example of a "third generation" assessment system. Results The rationale and development strategy for the suite is described, together with a description of potential applications. To date, ten instruments comprise the suite, each comprising "core" items shared among the majority of instruments and "optional" items that are specific to particular care settings or situations. Conclusion This comprehensive suite offers the opportunity for integrated multi-domain assessment, enabling electronic clinical records, data transfer, ease of interpretation and streamlined training.

  1. Quality of COPD care in hospital outpatient clinics in Denmark: The KOLIBRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, P.; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Munch, E.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in 22 hospital-based outpatient clinics in Denmark and evaluated if participation by the staff in an educational programme could improve the quality of care and adherence to the COPD guidelines. Methods: We performed two audits of the...... hospital records one year apart before and after the educational programme for the participating doctors and nurses. A total of 941 patient records were included in the first audit and 927 in the second. The indicators of quality of care comprised amongst others referral to pulmonary rehabilitation......, smoking cessation advice, nutritional advice, instruction in inhalation technique and assessment of BMI, smoking status, pack years, lung function parameters, dyspnoea oxygen saturation and comorbidities. Results. In general, the quality of care for COPD patients in Denmark was suboptimal and not in...

  2. Clinical accompaniment: the critical care nursing students’ experiences in a private hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tsele

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of clinical accompaniment of the student enrolled for the post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General is an important dimension of the educational/learning programme. The clinical accompanist/mentor is responsible for ensuring the student’s compliance with the clinical outcomes of the programme in accordance with the requirements laid down by the Nursing Education Institution and the South African Nursing Council. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of the students enrolled for a post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General, in relation to the clinical accompaniment in a private hospital in Gauteng. An exploratory, descriptive and phenomenological research design was utilised and individual interviews were conducted with the ten students in the research hospital. A content analysis was conducted and the results revealed both positive and negative experiences by the students in the internal and external worlds. The recommendations include the formulation of standards for clinical accompaniment of students. the evaluation of the quality of clinical accompaniment of students and empowerment of the organisation, clinical accompanists/mentors and clinicians.

  3. Risk management and clinical governance for complex home-based health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary; Noyes, Jane

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare professionals have an obligation to enable children with complex needs to lead 'ordinary lives' at home but the views of professionals and family members often diverge in relation to the management of risks. Nurses are increasingly taking on the clinical responsibility for children with complex needs within a multidisciplinary, multi-agency team, yet have little training or experience in adapting risk management and clinical governance frameworks to home-based settings. Risk management frameworks for home-based care for children with complex health and social care needs are introduced in this article. Best practice guidance and resources for adapting risk management frameworks are presented to meet this identified gap in knowledge and experience. Children, young people and their parents have increasing expectations relating to the type and quality of home-based support they receive. Developing and applying clinical governance and risk management frameworks are part of improving outcomes for children with complex needs and their families. PMID:17694890

  4. Implementation and evaluation of a clinical data management programme in a primary care centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, J

    2014-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care.

  5. Admission to intensive care can be reliably predicted using only clinical judgment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Not all patients in need of critical care arrive in clinical distress and some deteriorate after arrival. Identifying these patients early in their clinical course could potentially improve outcome. The present study was performed with the aim of assessing whether nursing and physician...... staffwere able to identify patients in need of critical care using only clinical judgment and to compare this with the National Early Warning Score (NEWS). Methods This was a prospective cohort study of all adult patients with a first-time admission to a medical admission unit at a 450-bed regional teaching...... hospital over a 3-month period in 2010. All subspecialties of internal medicine are present as well as a level 2 ICU. Upon first contact with the patient after arrival, nursing staffand physicians were asked to report their estimation of the probability of ICU admission (0 to 100%). Survival status was...

  6. ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae in critical care areas – a clinical and cost analysis from a tertiary health care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hena Rani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: ESBLs pose a major threat in clinical therapeutics. In the present study we have tried to do clinical analysis of one hundred ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from various clinical specimens from patients admitted in critical care areas. Methods: ESBLs detection was done by CLSI, DDS and Vitek methods. Clinical analysis of each patient was done by regularly visiting in CCA and reviewing patient’s status and medical records. Results: All of the 13 patients on foley’s catheter grew ESBLs positive isolates and amongst 10 non catheterized patients, 9 grew ESBLs negative isolates. Thirteen out of 14 patients on CVP/arterial line grew ESBLs positive isolates. Out of 24 patients who underwent surgery, 22 grew ESBLs positive isolate. Forty seven out of 68 patients who were on 3rd or 4th generation cephalosporins within last 1 month of giving the sample grew ESBLs positive isolates. Conclusion: We have found a statistically significant (p<0.0.05 relationship in between foley’s catheterization and production of ESBLs from urinary isolates. There was no statistically significant association in between CVP/arterial line and blood culture isolates. We did not find difference in mortality rates in between patients infected with ESBLs positive or negative isolates. The mortality in patients was associated with their primary illness or associated co-morbid conditions. We found that the detection of ESBLs is important for the de-escalation of therapy thereby saving net cost of treatment.

  7. Factors impacting on nurses' transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Saras

    2002-12-01

    Since nurse education moved to universities, a reoccurring concern of health consumers, health administrators, and some practising nurses is that nurses are not able to transfer the theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. Much has been written about this concern usually under the heading of the theory-practice gap. A common reason that has been highlighted as the cause of this gap is that the theoretical knowledge that nurses learn in academia is predicated on concepts such as humanism and holistic caring. In contrast, the bureaucratic organisation where nurses provide care tends to be based on management concepts where cost containment and outcome measures are more acceptable. Hence nurses' learned values of holistic caring are pitted against the reality of the practice setting. So what is this practice reality? This paper attempts to provide an insider view of why the theoretical knowledge of holistic care may be difficult to enact in the clinical setting. In-depth taped interviews with nurses and participant observation were conducted in acute care hospitals in Western Australia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The findings indicated that utilitarian nursing and role models had impacted on the transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. The paper outlines some measures that nurses themselves can undertake to ensure the narrowing of the theory-practice gap in this area. PMID:19036306

  8. An approach to measure compliance to clinical guidelines in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brommels Mats

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to measure six months compliance to Swedish clinical guidelines in psychiatric care after an active supported implementation process, using structured measures derived from the guidelines. Methods In this observational study four psychiatric clinics each participated in active implementation of the clinical guidelines for the assessment and treatment of depression and guidelines for assessment and treatment of patients with suicidal behaviours developed by The Stockholm Medical Advisory Board for Psychiatry. The implementation programme included seminars, local implementation teams, regular feedback and academic visits. Additionally two clinics only received the guidelines and served as controls. Compliance to guidelines was measured using indicators, which operationalised requirements of preferred clinical practice. 725 patient records were included, 365 before the implementation and 360 six months after. Results Analyses of indicators registered showed that the actively implementing clinics significantly improved their compliance to the guidelines. The total score differed significantly between implementation clinics and control clinics for management of depression (mean scores 9.5 (1.3 versus 5.0 (1.5, p Conclusion Compliance to clinical guidelines measured by process indicators of required clinical practice was enhanced by an active implementation.

  9. The Emerging Microbe Project: Developing Clinical Care Plans Based on Pathogen Identification and Clinical Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A. O'Donnell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For many students in the health sciences, including doctor of pharmacy (PharmD students, basic and clinical sciences often appear detached from each other. In the infectious disease field, PharmD students additionally struggle with mastering the diversity of microorganisms and the corresponding therapies. The objective of this study was to design an interdisciplinary project that integrates fundamental microbiology with clinical research and decision-making skills. The Emerging Microbe Project guided students through the identification of a microorganism via genetic sequence analysis. The unknown microbe provided the basis for a patient case that asked the student to design a therapeutic treatment strategy for an infected patient. Outside of lecture, students had two weeks to identify the pathogen using nucleotide sequences, compose a microbiology report on the pathogen, and recommend an appropriate therapeutic treatment plan for the corresponding clinical case. We hypothesized that the students would develop a better understanding of the interplay between basic microbiology and infectious disease clinical practice, and that they would gain confidence and skill in independently selecting appropriate antimicrobial therapies for a new disease state. The exercise was conducted with PharmD students in their second professional year of pharmacy school in a required infectious disease course. Here, we demonstrate that the Emerging Microbe Project significantly improved student learning through two assessment strategies (assignment grades and exam questions, and increased student confidence in clinical infectious disease practice. This exercise could be modified for other health sciences students or undergraduates depending upon the level of clinical focus required of the course.

  10. The Emerging Microbe Project: Developing Clinical Care Plans Based on Pathogen Identification and Clinical Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lauren A; Perry, Michael W; Doup, Dane't R

    2015-12-01

    For many students in the health sciences, including doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, basic and clinical sciences often appear detached from each other. In the infectious disease field, PharmD students additionally struggle with mastering the diversity of microorganisms and the corresponding therapies. The objective of this study was to design an interdisciplinary project that integrates fundamental microbiology with clinical research and decision-making skills. The Emerging Microbe Project guided students through the identification of a microorganism via genetic sequence analysis. The unknown microbe provided the basis for a patient case that asked the student to design a therapeutic treatment strategy for an infected patient. Outside of lecture, students had two weeks to identify the pathogen using nucleotide sequences, compose a microbiology report on the pathogen, and recommend an appropriate therapeutic treatment plan for the corresponding clinical case. We hypothesized that the students would develop a better understanding of the interplay between basic microbiology and infectious disease clinical practice, and that they would gain confidence and skill in independently selecting appropriate antimicrobial therapies for a new disease state. The exercise was conducted with PharmD students in their second professional year of pharmacy school in a required infectious disease course. Here, we demonstrate that the Emerging Microbe Project significantly improved student learning through two assessment strategies (assignment grades and exam questions), and increased student confidence in clinical infectious disease practice. This exercise could be modified for other health sciences students or undergraduates depending upon the level of clinical focus required of the course. PMID:26753029

  11. Ambulatory Measurement of Ground Reaction Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Liedtke, Christian; Droog, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of ground reaction forces is important in the biomechanical analysis of gait and other motor activities. It is the purpose of this study to show the feasibility of ambulatory measurement of ground reaction forces using two six degrees of freedom sensors mounted under the shoe. One se

  12. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Guillermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI. This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all

  13. A hospitalização por asma e a carência de acompanhamento ambulatorial Asthma-related hospitalizations and lack of outpatient follow-up treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Sarinho

    2007-08-01

    . METHODS: A prospective case series study of hospitalized patients with asthma. The patients were asked to complete a questionnaire at admission in order to determine the frequency of prophylactic outpatient follow-up treatment. Patients presenting two or more attacks of asthma that were responsive to bronchodilators were classified as having asthma. RESULTS: In the intervals between asthma attacks, 67% (112/167 - data regarding 2 patients were not available of the patients had been treated only in the emergency room. Although 53.3%(89/167 - data regarding 2 patients were not provided of the patients had been referred to outpatient treatment, only 16% (27/169 had visited an outpatient asthma clinic regularly for preventive treatment, and only 13% (22/169 had used prophylactic medication. CONCLUSION: Most of the children and adolescents hospitalized with asthma had not undergone preventive outpatient follow-up treatment. Various problems related to the health care system, such as non-referral for outpatient follow-up treatment at hospital discharge, limited access to outpatient clinics, and the cost of prophylactic medication, might have contributed to the low rate of outpatient follow-up treatment in the population studied. Public health care policies that allow asthma control programs to work effectively should be implemented.

  14. Clinical status and philosophy of clinical care of radionuclide-treated beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A manual for therapy of beagles is reviewed. The following protocol is outlined and described: antibiotic therapy, chemotherapy for neoplasms, hormone therapy, nutritional therapy, radiation therapy, steroid therapy, and miscellaneous treatments. The manual also includes sections on diagnosis and discussions of individual cases. Tables summarizing clinical cases seen during 1974 are presented

  15. Ambulatory major surgery of benign tumors of the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and prospective study on the practice of ambulatory major surgery to eliminate benign tumours of the thyroid gland, was carried out in the General Surgery Service of 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba during the years 1996-2008, both included, through a previous clinical evaluation of 74 patients in the Endocrinology Outpatient Department, where it was decided that they could definitely have a surgical treatment. The female sex, the age groups from 31 to 45 years, the hemithyroidectomy as surgical technique, acupuncture as analgesic procedure and the follicular adenoma as cytohistological result prevailed in the case material. Mild complications occurred in 5 members of the sample, but recovery was absolute in all, so that even 72 of them were discharged before the 24 hours. Due to its good acceptance, this surgical method is beneficial for patient and hospital institutions.(author)

  16. The Vermont Model for Rural HIV Care Delivery: Eleven Years of Outcome Data Comparing Urban and Rural Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Christopher; Kutzko, Deborah; Alston, W. Kemper; Ramundo, Mary; Polish, Louis; Osler, Turner

    2010-01-01

    Context: Provision of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in rural areas has encountered unique barriers. Purpose: To compare medical outcomes of care provided at 3 HIV specialty clinics in rural Vermont with that provided at an urban HIV specialty clinic. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Findings: Over an 11-year period 363 new…

  17. Comprehensive clinical care for men who have sex with men: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Kenneth H; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Stall, Ron; Grulich, Andrew E; Colfax, Grant; Lama, Javier R

    2012-07-28

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have unique health-care needs, not only because of biological factors such as an increased susceptibility to infection with HIV and sexually transmitted infections associated with their sexual behaviour, but also because of internalisation of societal stigma related to homosexuality and gender non-conformity, resulting in depression, anxiety, substance use, and other adverse outcomes. Successful responses to the global HIV/AIDS epidemic will require the development of culturally sensitive clinical care programmes for MSM that address these health disparities and root causes of maladaptive behaviour (eg, societal homophobia). Health-care providers need to become familiar with local outreach agencies, hotlines, and media that can connect MSM with positive role models and social opportunities. Research is needed to understand how many MSM lead resilient and productive lives in the face of discrimination to develop assets-based interventions that build on community support. Optimum clinical care for sexual and gender minorities is a fundamental human right. MSM deserve to be treated with respect, and health-care providers need to interact with them in ways that promote disclosure of actionable health information. PMID:22819653

  18. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy at rural primary health care clinics in KwaZulu Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Ganesen-Moothusamy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available South Africa bears the greatest burden of HIV infection globally with the most infected people living in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN. Decentralised medical care for HIV positive patients and antiretroviral therapy (ART delivery to primary health care facilities were proposed nationally to achieve adequate ART coverage for patients in need of treatment. This study described the HIV positive patients who accessed medical care and were initiated on ART at two existing government Primary Health Care (PHC clinics with no added donor support, in Ilembe, KZN. This was an observational descriptive study of ART initiation from 01 April 2008 to 30 April 2009. Data were collected from clinical records kept on site. HIV Testing and the pre-ART programmes which consisted of medical care prior to ART initiation are briefly described. Socio-economic, demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who were initiated on ART were sampled and described. A minority (2.95% of the study population tested for HIV of which 36.0%tested positive. Majority (60.0% of patients who joined the pre-ART programme care did not return. The ART sample consisted of 375 patients of whom 65.0%were women, 85.9%were unmarried, 61.6%were unemployed and 50.4%had a secondary level of education. Tuberculosis (TB prevalence and incidence at ART initiation were 22.1%and 14.7%respectively. The prevalence of Syphilis and Hepatitis B co-infections were 13.1%and 8.6 %respectively. Two thirds of female patients (66.4% received a Pap smear result of which the majority (62.3% were abnormal. Uptake for HIV testing followed by relevant CD4 testing was poor. High TB, Hepatitis B and Syphilis co-infection was noted amongst patients initiated on ART. Cervical cancer screening must be intensified. Although ART initiation with no added external resources was successful, record keeping was suboptimal.

  19. Clinical major option: a model for implementing critical care nursing into baccalaureate preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K A

    2000-01-01

    What was initiated as a directive from a provincial government in an attempt to increase the number of critical care nurses has evolved into an exciting educational opportunity for many nurses and student nurses in the year 2000. Between 1993 and 1997 there has been significant downsizing of acute care beds across Canada (Code Blue: Critical Care Nursing in Nova Scotia, 1998). At the same time patient acuity has increased, due to shorter hospital stays, and the number of nurses working full-time has decreased with the increased use of casual nurses. Several studies at both the provincial and national levels report current and future shortages of specialized nurses (emergency, critical care and perioperative). It is expected that this shortage will continue into the future, a shortage that is driven by technological advances, as well as an aging general and nursing population. Continued shortages of these acute care nurses will result in fierce competition for skilled nurses as well as aggressive recruitment and retention strategies (Code Blue: Critical Care Nursing in Nova Scotia, 1998). It is generally agreed within the nursing community that specialty nurses in critical care require a unique body of knowledge that is not acquired in a basic undergraduate nursing program (Fitzsimmons, Hadley, & Shively, 1999). This specialized knowledge can be gained informally through experience; however, it is largely developed in additional formal education programs. The purpose of this article is to outline a strategy for the delivery of specialty education at three educational levels in acute care nursing with three streams: emergency, critical care and perioperative nursing. This clinical major option is to be delivered in partnership among the Queen Elizabeth Hospital II, the Health Science Centre and Dalhousie University School of Nursing, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. This model of offering specialty education in university preparation could be a template for preparing

  20. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Krystal A T; Tulloch Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K; McFarlane, Shelly R; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A; Boyne, Michael S; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-10-12

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90%) reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. Approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82%) or leather shoes (64%), fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%), and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. In conclusion, approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided. PMID:24765484

  1. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal A.T. Gayle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90% reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. In conclusion, approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82% or leather shoes (64%, fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%, and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. Approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  2. Justification for conducting neurological clinical trials as part of patient care within private practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, R G; Stepanova, D; Beran, M E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the benefits and drawbacks of conducting neurological clinical trials and research in private practice for the patients, clinician, Practice Manager, sponsors/Clinical Research Organisations (CROs) and Clinical Trial Coordinator (CTC) to determine if this is justified for all involved. A combination of literature reviews, original research articles and books were selected from 2005 to 2015. Provided that the practice has sufficient number of active trials to prevent financial loss, support staff, adequate facilities and equipment and time, the benefits outweigh the drawbacks. Clinical trials provide patients with more thorough monitoring, re-imbursement of trial-related expenses and the opportunity to try an innovative treatment at no charge when other options have failed. For the clinician, clinical trials provide more information to ensure better care for their patients and improved treatment methods, technical experience and global recognition. Trials collect detailed and up-to-date information on the benefits and risks of drugs, improving society's confidence in clinical research and pharmaceuticals, allow trial sponsors to explore new scientific questions and accelerate innovation. For the CTC, industry-sponsored clinical trials allow potential entry for a career in clinical research giving CTCs the opportunity to become Clinical Research Associates (CRAs), Study Start-Up Managers or Drug Safety Associates. PMID:27040457

  3. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level. PMID:25187892

  4. Effective Clinical Practices in Managed Care Findings From Ten Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Felt-Lisk; Kleinman, Lawrence C.

    2000-01-01

    Presents findings from a study designed to look at how some of the nation's high-performing HMOs have achieved their success. Notes that delivering high-quality care is a driving force for nearly all of the plans studied, as is a culture of respect for clinicians. For printed copies call The Commonwealth Fund at (888) 777-2744, ask for publication number 427. The plan-specific summary reports are also available in a volume titled "Effective Clinical Practices in Managed Care: Ten Case Studies...

  5. Clinical care of two patients with Ebola virus disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, G Marshall; Mehta, Aneesh K; Varkey, Jay B; Brantly, Kent; Plyler, Lance; McElroy, Anita K; Kraft, Colleen S; Towner, Jonathan S; Spiropoulou, Christina; Ströher, Ute; Uyeki, Timothy M; Ribner, Bruce S

    2014-12-18

    West Africa is currently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history. Two patients with EVD were transferred from Liberia to our hospital in the United States for ongoing care. Malaria had also been diagnosed in one patient, who was treated for it early in the course of EVD. The two patients had substantial intravascular volume depletion and marked electrolyte abnormalities. We undertook aggressive supportive measures of hydration (typically, 3 to 5 liters of intravenous fluids per day early in the course of care) and electrolyte correction. As the patients' condition improved clinically, there was a concomitant decline in the amount of virus detected in plasma. PMID:25390460

  6. Encouraging primary care research: evaluation of a one-year, doctoral clinical epidemiology research course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liira, Helena; Koskela, Tuomas; Thulesius, Hans; Pitkälä, Kaisu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Research and PhDs are relatively rare in family medicine and primary care. To promote research, regular one-year research courses for primary care professionals with a focus on clinical epidemiology were started. This study explores the academic outcomes of the first four cohorts of research courses and surveys the participants’ perspectives on the research course. Design An electronic survey was sent to the research course participants. All peer-reviewed scientific papers published by these students were retrieved by literature searches in PubMed. Setting Primary care in Finland. Subjects A total of 46 research course participants who had finished the research courses between 2007 and 2012. Results Of the 46 participants 29 were physicians, eight nurses, three dentists, four physiotherapists, and two nutritionists. By the end of 2014, 28 of the 46 participants (61%) had published 79 papers indexed in PubMed and seven students (15%) had completed a PhD. The participants stated that the course taught them critical thinking, and provided basic research knowledge, inspiration, and fruitful networks for research. Conclusion A one-year, multi-professional, clinical epidemiology based research course appeared to be successful in encouraging primary care research as measured by research publications and networking. Activating teaching methods, encouraging focus on own research planning, and support from peers and tutors helped the participants to embark on research projects that resulted in PhDs for 15% of the participants. Key PointsClinical research and PhDs are rare in primary care in Finland, which has consequences for the development of the discipline and for the availability of clinical lecturers at the universities.A clinical epidemiology oriented, one-year research course increased the activity in primary care research. Focus on own research planning and learning the challenges of research with peers appeared to enhance the success of a doctoral

  7. Relationship of Clinical Nursing Competence to Nursing Occupational Experience in Hospice/Palliative Care Nurses in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kaori Tsutsumi; Keiko Sekido

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between the clinical nursing competence and nursing occupational experience in hospice/palliative care nurses (HPN) in Japan. Methods: A mail survey using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire was conducted on clinical nursing competence regarding communication, care and prediction of worsening of symptoms with the authors’ previous research as a framework. The subjects were nurses working in hospice/palliative care units...

  8. Brief Bedside Refresher Training to Practice Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in the Ambulatory Surgery Center Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemery, Stephanie; Kelly, Kelley; Wilson, Connie; Wheeler, Corrine A

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest can occur in any health care setting at any time, requiring nursing staff to be prepared to quickly and adequately perform basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Currently, the American Heart Association certifies health care providers in Basic Life Support (BLS) for a 2-year period, but evidence indicates that psychomotor skills decline well before the end of the certification time frame. Nurses in the ambulatory surgery setting expressed concern regarding their ability to implement CPR successfully, given the infrequent occurrence of cardiac and respiratory arrests. Using a study by Niles et al. as a model, the authors piloted the implementation of brief CPR refresher training at the bedside of an ambulatory surgery center to assess and increase nurse confidence in BLS skills. PMID:26247660

  9. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder and its clinical correlates in a VA primary care behavioral health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Megan M; Zhang, Jinxin; Phillips, Katharine A

    2015-07-30

    We examined the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in a Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care behavioral health clinic. Of 100 Veterans, 11% (95% CI = 6.3-18.6%) had current BDD and 12% (95% CI = 7.0-19.8%) had lifetime BDD. However, only 8.3% of these Veterans had been diagnosed with BDD. BDD was significantly associated with a substantially elevated rate of suicide attempts, major depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This severe disorder appears to be underdiagnosed in VA settings. PMID:25935375

  10. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  11. Medical Service Provision and Costs: Do Walk-In Clinics Differ from Other Primary Care Delivery Settings?

    OpenAIRE

    Darrel J. Weinkauf; Boris Kralj

    1998-01-01

    Reductions in health care funding by both the federal and provincial governments in recent years have focused attention on the cost-effectiveness of health care delivery, particularly on the delivery of primary care services. We use data extracted from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) claims database to assess differences between walk-in clinics and other primary care delivery settings in initial visit costs, follow-up visit costs, service duplication, and diagnoses treated. Our analy...

  12. Qualitative inquiry: a method for validating patient perceptions of palliative care while enrolled on a cancer clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Slota, Christina; Ulrich, Connie M.; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Baker, Karen; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Palliative care is a vital component of patient-centered care. It has increasingly become central to the management and care of seriously ill patients by integrating physical, psychosocial, and spiritual supportive services. Through qualitative inquiry, this paper examines cancer patients’ perceptions of the process and outcomes of the pain and palliative care consultative services they received while enrolled in a clinical trial. Methods A qualitative analysis of open-ended questi...

  13. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Prasad, G V

    2012-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. To assist in their management, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become increasingly used in both clinical research settings and practice. ABPM has been used to better define post-transplant hypertension incidence and prevalence in different solid organ transplantation populations. ABPM provides additional information on cardiovascular risk beyond that obtained by clinic-based readings, based on its ability to assess 24-h blood pressure (BP) load, detect nocturnal non-dipping, and predict target organ damage. It has provided some assurance about the safety of living kidney donation. Information from ABPM can be used to guide living kidney donor selection, and because ABPM-related data has been correlated with clinically important kidney and heart transplant recipient outcomes, it may be a valuable adjunct in their management. Despite these advantages, barriers to wider use of ABPM include expense, clinical inertia in hypertension management, lack of prospective clinical trial data, and clinical problems that compete with hypertension for attention such as acute or chronic allograft dysfunction. The increasing amount of research and clinical use for ABPM may allow for closer assessment and intervention to help address the increased cardiovascular risk faced by many solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:22220828

  14. 'Healthy gums do matter': A case study of clinical leadership within primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D; Saleem, S; Hawthorn, E; Pealing, R; Ashley, M; Bridgman, C

    2015-09-25

    The Health and Social Care Act 2012 heralded wide reaching reforms intended to place clinicians at the heart of the health service. For NHS general dental practice, the conduits for this clinical leadership are the NHS England local professional networks. In Greater Manchester, the local professional network has developed and piloted a clinician led quality improvement project: 'Healthy Gums DO Matter, a Practitioner's Toolkit'. Used as a case study, the project highlighted the following facilitators to clinical leadership in dentistry: supportive environment; mentoring and transformational leadership; alignment of project goals with national policy; funding allowance; cross-boundary collaboration; determination; altruism; and support from wider academic and specialist colleagues. Barriers to clinical leadership identified were: the hierarchical nature of healthcare, territorialism and competing clinical commitments. PMID:26404983

  15. Usual Care and Informed Consent in Clinical Trials of Oxygen Management in Extremely Premature Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cortés-Puch

    Full Text Available The adequacy of informed consent in the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Pulse Oximetry Randomized Trial (SUPPORT has been questioned. SUPPORT investigators and publishing editors, heads of government study funding agencies, and many ethicists have argued that informed consent was adequate because the two oxygen saturation target ranges studied fell within a range commonly recommended in guidelines. We sought to determine whether each oxygen target as studied in SUPPORT and four similar randomized controlled trials (RCTs was consistent with usual care.PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for English articles back to 1990 providing information on usual care oxygen management in extremely premature infants. Data were extracted on intended and achieved oxygen saturation levels as determined by pulse oximetry. Twenty-two SUPPORT consent forms were examined for statements about oxygen interventions.While the high oxygen saturation target range (91 to 95% was consistent with usual care, the low range (85 to 89% was not used outside of the SUPPORT trial according to surveys and clinical studies of usual care. During usual care, similar lower limits (< 88% were universally paired with higher upper limits (≥ 92% and providers skewed achieved oxygen saturations toward the upper-end of these intended ranges. Blinded targeting of a low narrow range resulted in significantly lower achieved oxygen saturations and a doubling of time spent below the lower limit of the intended range compared to usual care practices. The SUPPORT consent forms suggested that the low oxygen saturation arm was a widely practiced subset of usual care.SUPPORT does not exemplify comparative effectiveness research studying practices or therapies in common use. Descriptions of major differences between the interventions studied and commonly practiced usual care, as well as potential risks associated with these differences, are essential elements of adequate

  16. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  17. Queues and care: how medical residents organize their work in a busy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, W; Mutran, E J; Zeitler, R R; Randall, C S

    1990-09-01

    How do medical residents organize their work in settings where queue demands are heavy and resources are limited? Under such conditions, a queue theory would predict the delivery of care that is indifferent to clients' needs or that gets rid of clients as quickly as possible. In an exploratory case study of medical residents in a Veterans Administration outpatient clinic, we found instead that the medical residents' work was characterized by a high level of professional commitment: they provided thorough medical examinations and attempted to expedite patient care in other ways. We attribute the residents' professional ethos to opportunities provided in the VA hospital to learn the craft of routine medicine and to be directly responsible for patient care; such opportunities were not available in other settings. PMID:2133482

  18. Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

    2013-07-01

    The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies. PMID:23721071

  19. Implementation of integrated stepped care for unhealthy alcohol use in HIV clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Edelman, E. Jennifer; Hansen, Nathan B.; Cutter, Christopher J.; Danton, Cheryl; Fiellin, Lynn E.; O’Connor, Patrick G.; Williams, Emily C.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Bryant, Kendall J.; FIELLIN, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective counseling and pharmacotherapy for unhealthy alcohol use are rarely provided in HIV treatment settings to patients. Our goal was to describe factors influencing implementation of a stepped care model to address unhealthy alcohol use in HIV clinics from the perspectives of social workers, psychologists and addiction psychiatrists. Methods We conducted two focus groups with Social Workers (n = 4), Psychologists (n = 2), and Addiction Psychiatrists (n = 4) involved in an ong...

  20. A qualitative study of the cultural changes in primary care organisations needed to implement clinical governance.

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Martin; Sheaff, Rod; Rogers, Anne; Campbell, Stephen; Halliwell, Shirley; Pickard, Susan; Sibbald, Bonnie; Roland, Martin

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is commony claimed that changing the culture of health organisations is a fundamental prerequisite for improving the National Health Service (NHS). Little is currently known about the nature or importance of culture and cultural change in primary care groups and trusts (PCG/Ts) or their constituent general practices. AIMS: To investigate the importance of culture and cultural change for the implementation of clinical governance in general practice by PCG/Ts, to identify perceiv...