WorldWideScience

Sample records for ambient dose equivalent

  1. Ambient Dose Equivalent in S. Paulo and Bauru cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umisedo, Nancy K.; Okuno, Emico; Cancio, Francisco S.; Aldred, Martha A.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2008-08-01

    The Laboratory of Dosimetry (Institute of Physics, University of S. Paulo) performs since 1981 the external individual monitoring of workers exposed to X and gamma rays based on thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). Personal dose equivalent refers only to the exposure of workers due to the working activities, and the dose due to background radiation, also measured with TLD, must be subtracted to evaluate it. A compilation of ambient dose equivalent was done to evaluate the dose due to the background radiation in the work places, and also to contribute to the knowledge of the level of indoor radiation to which the public is exposed.

  2. Topographic Effects on Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates from Radiocesium Fallout

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Land topography can affect air radiation dose rates by locating radiation sources closer to, or further, from detector locations when compared to perfectly flat terrain. Hills and slopes can also shield against the propagation of gamma rays. To understand the possible magnitude of topographic effects on air dose rates, this study presents calculations for ambient dose equivalent rates at a range of heights above the ground for varying land topographies. The geometries considered were angled ground at the intersection of two planar surfaces, which is a model for slopes neighboring flat land, and a simple conical geometry, representing settings from hilltops to valley bottoms. In each case the radiation source was radioactive cesium fallout, and the slope angle was varied systematically to determine the effect of topography on the air dose rate. Under the assumption of homogeneous fallout across the land surface, and for these geometries and detector locations, the dose rates at high altitudes are more strongly...

  3. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  4. Changes in ambient dose equivalent rates around roads at Kawamata town after the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in ambient dose equivalent rates noted through vehicle-borne surveys have elucidated ecological half-lives of radioactive caesium in the environment. To confirm that the ecological half-lives are appropriate for predicting ambient dose equivalent rates within living areas, it is important to ascertain ambient dose equivalent rates on/around roads. In this study, radiation monitoring on/around roads at Kawamata town, located about 37 km northwest of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, was performed using monitoring vehicles and survey meters. It was found that the ambient dose equivalent rates around roads were higher than those on roads as of October 2012. And withal the ecological half-lives on roads were essentially consistent with those around roads. With dose predictions using ecological half-lives on roads, it is necessary to make corrections to ambient dose equivalent rates through the vehicle-borne surveys against those within living areas. (authors)

  5. Calculation of dose equivalent index, effective dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent for the giant resonance neutron spectra produced at an electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ANISN code has been used in this study to evaluate the attenuation of neutron beams of various spectra incident normally on slabs of different kinds of concrete. Spectra of the most common sources (Am-Be and Cf-252) and those of giant resonance neutrons, produced at electron accelerators, were studied. The concretes examined had densities between 2.1 and 4.64 g.cm-3. The calculation were made in terms of the deep dose equivalent index, the effective dose equivalent and the ambient dose equivalent. Values of attenuation length in the various materials were derived from the attenuation curves. The results found should allow for useful evaluations in every day practice for health physicist

  6. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Boev, Blazo; Zunic, Zora S; Ivanova, Kremena; Ristova, Mimoza; Tsenova, Martina; Ajka, Sorsa; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso; Bossew, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m(3) for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. PMID:26943159

  7. Longterm monitoring of ambient dose equivalent rates at aviation altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex radiation field at flight altitudes results mainly from the interaction of energetic charged particles with atmospheric molecules and atoms and consists of secondary neutrons, protons, gamma rays, electrons, positrons and muons. Due to the continuous interactions of primary and secondary particles within the atmosphere, the intensity of each component depends on the height. Since the Earth's magnetic field acts as rigidity filter for the charged primary particles, the flux of the primary particles into the atmosphere and the resulting intensity of secondary particles depend on the geomagnetic latitude being highest over the geomagnetic poles. The main primary component consists of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), mainly protons and alpha particles, whose flux is modulated in the heliosphere. Beside this slowly varying galactic component, solar energetic particle events may temporarily increase the intensity of this radiation field. In the frame of the Radiation Monitoring on Board Aircraft (RAMONA) collaboration, three NAVIgation and DOSimetry (NAVIDOS) systems were installed in 2008 and 2009 on board of three Lufthansa Airbus A340 aircraft. They have been maintained since then by the consortium. Two of the NAVIDOS units rely on the DOSimetry TELescopes (DOSTELs), one is based on a LIULIN detector. This unique setup is ideally suited to investigate variations in the radiation field at different flight altitudes and geomagnetic positions and has been used to measure the radiation exposure during the recent extended solar minimum and thereafter. With increasing solar activity in 2010 the measured dose rates have been decreasing. Since these variations depend on the location of the aircraft, a detailed data analysis is required and presented.

  8. Applicability of Ambient Dose Equivalent H (d) in Mixed Radiation Fields - A Critical Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For purposes of routine radiation protection, it is desirable to characterize the potential irradiation of individuals in terms of a single dose equivalent quantity that would exist in a phantom approximating the human body. The phantom of choice is the ICRU sphere made of 30 cm diameter tissue-equivalent plastic with a density of 1 g/cm3 and a mass composition of 76.2% O, 11.1% C, 10.1% H and 2.6% N. Ambient dose equivalent, H(d), was defined in ICRU report 51 as the dose equivalent that would be produced by an expanded and aligned radiation field at a depth d in the ICRU sphere. The recommended reference depths are 10 mm for strongly penetrating radiation and 0.07 mm for weakly penetrating radiation, respectively. As an operational quantity in radiation protection, H(d) shall serve as a conservative and directly measurable estimate of protection quantities, e.g. effective dose E, which in turn are intended to give an indication of the risk associated with radiation exposure. The situation attains increased complexity in radiation environments being composed of a variety of charged and uncharged particles in a broad energetic spectrum. Radiation fields of similarly complex nature are, for example, encountered onboard aircraft and in space. Dose equivalent was assessed as a function of depth in quasi tissue-equivalent spheres by means of thermoluminescent dosemeters evaluated according to the high-temperature ratio (HTR) method. The presented experiments were performed both onboard aircraft and the Russian space station Mir. As a result of interaction processes within the phantom body, the incident primary spectrum may be significantly modified with increasing depth. For the radiation field at aviation altitudes we found the maximum of dose equivalent in a depth of 60 mm which conflicts with the 10 mm value recommended by ICRU. Contrary, for the space radiation environment the maximum dose equivalent was found at the surface of the sphere. This suggests that skin

  9. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am–Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies. - Highlights: • A new method for estimating H⁎(10) using prompt gamma emissions from HDPE. • Linear combination of 2.2 MeV and 4.4 MeV gamma intensities approximates DCC (ICRP). • Feasibility of the method was established theoretically and experimentally. • The response of the present technique is very similar to that of the rem meters

  10. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyada, P.; Sarkar, P.K., E-mail: pradip.sarkar@manipal.edu

    2015-06-11

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am–Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies. - Highlights: • A new method for estimating H{sup ⁎}(10) using prompt gamma emissions from HDPE. • Linear combination of 2.2 MeV and 4.4 MeV gamma intensities approximates DCC (ICRP). • Feasibility of the method was established theoretically and experimentally. • The response of the present technique is very similar to that of the rem meters.

  11. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  12. In-flight measured and predicted ambient dose equivalent and latitude differences on effective dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results from 2 years (2001-2002) of experimental measurements of in-board radiation doses received at Iberia commercial flights are presented. The routes studied cover the most significant destinations and provide a good estimate of the route doses as required by the new Spanish regulations on air crew radiation protection. Details on the experimental procedures and calibration methods are given. The experimental measurements from the different instruments (Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter and the combination of a high pressure ion chamber and a high-energy neutron compensated rem-counter) and their comparison with the predictions from some route-dose codes (CARI-6, EPCARD 3.2) are discussed. In contrast with the already published data, which are mainly focused on North latitudes over parallel 50, many of the data presented in this work have been obtained for routes from Spain to Central and South America. (authors)

  13. Determination of ambient and personal dose equivalent for personnel and cargo security screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years, imaging technology using ionising radiation has been gaining in importance for the screening of goods and persons for security reasons and in order to detect contraband. For radiation protection purposes it is extremely important to know that dose persons are exposed to when passing through a personnel scanner or, as a stowaway, in a cargo scanner, so as to remain within the prescribed dose limits. Within the scope of a research project, measurements were performed on different types of personnel X-ray scanners as well as cargo X-ray scanners, using the transmission and/or the backscattering method. All scanners investigated operate with a high dose rate and use short irradiation time. Owing to this method of scanning reliable values can only be determined for the personal and ambient dose equivalents, Hp(10) and H*(10), by using a specially developed measuring system. The aim of this project was to determine the range of magnitudes of doses for representative personnel and cargo X-ray scanner systems. Depending on the type of scanner, the determined dose values for personnel scanners range from 0.07 μSv to 6 μSv. Measurements and instruments used in this study are described and the dose values obtained are discussed in detail. (authors)

  14. Ambient neutron dose equivalent outside concrete vault rooms for 15 and 18 MV radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), due to neutrons outside three bunkers that house a 15- and a 18-MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D and a 15-MV Elekta Inor clinical linacs, has been calculated. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX (v. 2.5) has been used to simulate the neutron production and transport. The complete geometries including linacs and full installations have been built up according to the specifications of the manufacturers and the planes provided by the corresponding medical physical services of the hospitals where the three linacs operate. Two of these installations, those lodging the Varian linacs, have an entrance door to the bunker while the other one does not, although it has a maze with two bends. Various treatment orientations were simulated in order to establish plausible annual equivalent doses. Specifically anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral orientations and an additional one with the gantry rotated 30 deg. have been studied. Significant dose rates have been found only behind the walls and the door of the bunker, near the entrance and the console, with a maximum of 12 μSv h-1. Dose rates per year have been calculated assuming a conservative workload for the three facilities. The higher dose rates in the corresponding control areas were 799 μSv y-1, in the case of the facility which operates the 15-MV Clinac, 159 μSv y-1, for that with the 15-MV Elekta, and 21 μSv y-1 for the facility housing the 18-MV Varian. A comparison with measurements performed in similar installations has been carried out and a reasonable agreement has been found. The results obtained indicate that the neutron contamination does not increase the doses above the legal limits and does not produce a significant enhancement of the dose equivalent calculated. When doses are below the detection limits provided by the measuring devices available today, MCNPX simulation provides an useful method to evaluate neutron dose equivalents based on a

  15. Measurement of the neutron spectrum and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement of the neutron spectral distribution and fluence from the 252Cf source (model NS-120, LLNL serial # 7001677, referred as the SMALL Cf source) and determination of the ambient neutron dose rate equivalent and kerma at 100 cm for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). The dosimetric quantities should be based on the neutron spectrum and the current neutron-to-dose conversion coefficients.

  16. Attenuation factors in terms of air kerma to ambient dose equivalent and effective dose for diagnostic X rays rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, the attenuation of the quantities fluence and air kerma free-in-air by various layers of lead was compared with that of the quantities effective dose, E, and ambient dose equivalent, H*(d). This work aims to calculate the attenuation factors from 50 kV, 125 kV and 150 kV of X ray beams used for medical diagnostic, after transmission through barriers of lead. The X ray qualities used were those recommended by the Birch and Marshall for primary diagnostic X rays. Several lead layers were irradiated with a 50 cm x 50 cm field of primary X ray spectra. The transmitted spectra were calculated to obtain the attenuation factors for beams found in radiodiagnostic services. The calculations were done using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code and voxel model MAX. The values obtained were compared with data derived from the literature. In addition, attenuation factors for X ray qualities after penetration of lead layers were studied to get data which might be of interest in shielding of diagnostic rooms. (author)

  17. APMP comparison for the calibration of ambient dose equivalent meters in ISO neutron reference fields - APMRRI(III)-S1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison for the calibration of ambient dose equivalent meter was organized by TCRI of APMP. Seven laboratories (ARPANSA, BARC, INER, KRISS, NIM, NMIJ, and VNIIM) were participated in the comparison exercise. Two moderator-type neutron ambient dose equivalent meters (one is cylindrical and the other is spherical) were circulated and calibrated in ISO standard neutron fields of 252Cf, 241Am-Be, and D2O moderated 252Cf sources. The stability of the transfer instruments was checked by the pilot lab (KRISS) between the measurements of two successive participants. Some outliers exist in each measurement set and the weighted means of ail measurement results are not adequate as a reference value because of the large chi-square values. The median was used to calculate the reference value. (authors)

  18. Determination of the conversion coefficient for ambient dose equivalent, H(10), from air kerma measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namely the operational magnitudes can be determined by the product of a conversion coefficient by exposure air kerma or fluence, etc. In particular in Mexico for the first time is determined the conversion coefficient (Cc) for operational magnitude Environmental Dose Equivalent H(10) by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) technique. First 30 TLD-100 dosimeters are calibrated in terms of air kerma, then these dosimeters are irradiated inside a sphere ICRU type of PMMA and with the aid of theory cavity the absorbed dose in PMMA is determined at a depth of 10 mm within the sphere DPMMA(10), subsequently absorbed dose to ICRU tissue is corrected and the dose equivalent H(10) is determined. The Cc is determined as the ratio of H(10)/Ka obtaining a value of 1.20 Sv Gy-1 with a uc= 3.66%, this being consistent with the published value in ISO-4037-3 of 1.20 Sv Gy-1 with a uc= 2%. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with 134Cs and 137Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modelling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modelling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rate...

  20. Ambient dose equivalent H*(d) - an appropriate philosophy for radiation monitoring onboard aircraft and in space?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper authors deals with the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) and their application for onboard Aircraft and Space station. The discussion and the carried out experiments demonstrated that the philosophy of H*(10) leads to an underestimation of the whole-body radiation exposure when applied onboard aircraft and in space. It therefore has to be considered to introduce a new concept that could be based on microdosimetric principles, offering the unique potential of a more direct correlation to radiobiological parameters

  1. Application of 10B counter with moderator for neutron ambient dose equivalent measurement in radiation monitoring at JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to use the instrument based on the 10B-counter (CHM-14) with polyethylene moderator as a dosimeter of the neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) in the field of nuclear installations of JINR was investigated. It was shown that the instrument can be used to measure H*(10) of neutrons in the energy range from 0.4 eV to 20 MeV with the uncertainty within 30% due to the dependence of response on neutron energy. The use of the correction factors can extend the energy range of measurement of the neutron dose H*(10) up to hundreds of MeV. The uncertainty due to angular dependence of the instrument response is not more than 35%

  2. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with (134)Cs and (137)Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modeling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modeling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rates above flat, undisturbed fields in Fukushima Prefecture are consistent with decrement by radioactive decay and downward migration of cesium into soil. Analysis of remediation strategies for farmland soils confirmed that topsoil removal and interchanging a topsoil layer with a subsoil layer result in similar reductions in the air dose rate. These two strategies are more effective than reverse tillage to invert and mix the topsoil. PMID:26408835

  3. Optimisation of a secondary standard chamber for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), for low photon energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A secondary standard ionisation chamber for photon radiation for measuring an ionisation current, which is directly proportional to the conventionally true value of the ambient dose equivalent, H* (10), was optimised. The chamber was developed in the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf and is used successfully worldwide by dosimetry laboratories. The chamber response with respect to H*(10) for photon energies from 40 to 1250 keV is nearly constant. For lower photon energies the response is strongly energy-dependent and does not fulfil the requirements concerning the quality of a secondary standard given in ISO 4037-2, i.e. for energies for which the determination of the conventionally true value of H*(10) is very difficult. Considering the dose limits defined in the Directive 96/29/Euratom, in the case of whole-body irradiation the knowledge of the personal dose equivalent is of importance down to energies of ∼12 keV. For area dosimetry, this means that the knowledge of H*(10) for energies approximately ≥12 keV is necessary. To get one secondary standard chamber for H*(10) for the whole photon energy range and to close the gap for low energies in the dissemination of the conventionally true value of H*(10), the chamber was optimised for a flat response for energies from ∼12 to 1250 keV. (authors)

  4. Simulation of ambient dose equivalent from -rays from radioactive decays with FLUKA and DORIAN

    CERN Document Server

    Vujanovic, Milena

    2015-01-01

    During my stay (29. June- 25. September 2015.) as a participant of Summer Student Programme I was working in Radiation Protection group at CERN. The primary task of my project was to extend the functionality of the DORIAN (DOse Rate Inspector and ANalyzer) code that is used for prediction and analysis of residual dose rated due to accelerator radi- ation induced activation. This task consisted of writing and validating a dedicated FLUKA user routine to simulate the radiation coming from radioactive decays. The results of the FLUKA simulations using this user routine then had to be integrated into the DORIAN code.

  5. Neutron spectrometry and determination of neutron ambient dose equivalents in different LINAC radiotherapy rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Rosello, J.; Brualla, L. [ERESA, Avda. Tres Cruces s/n. E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Nunez, L. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital. Puerta de Hierro. E-28222 Majadahonda (Spain); Colmenares, R. [Serv. de Oncologia Radioterapica, Hosp. Ramon y Cajal, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Particulas. Univ. de Santiago. E-15782 Santiago de Compostela. Spain (Spain); Hartmann, G.H. [DKFZ E0400 Im Neuenheimer Feld 280. D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) (Germany); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica. Universidad de Sevilla. E-41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Fernandez, F. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Justo Dorado 11 E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A project has been set up to study the effect on a radiotherapy patient of the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photonuclear reactions induced by photons above {approx}8 MeV. These neutrons may reach directly the patient, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well, contributing to peripheral dose. Spectrometry was performed with a calibrated and validated set of Bonner spheres at a point located at 50 cm from the isocenter, as well as at the place where a digital device for measuring neutrons, based on the upset of SRAM memories induced by thermal neutrons, is located inside the treatment room. Exposures have taken place in six LINAC accelerators with different energies (from 15 to 23 MV) with the aim of relating the spectrometer measurements with the readings of the digital device under various exposure and room geometry conditions. The final purpose of the project is to be able to relate, under any given treatment condition and room geometry, the readings of this digital device to patient neutron effective dose and peripheral dose in organs of interest. This would allow inferring the probability of developing second malignancies as a consequence of the treatment. Results indicate that unit neutron fluence spectra at 50 cm from the isocenter do not depend on accelerator characteristics, while spectra at the place of the digital device are strongly influenced by the treatment room geometry.

  6. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AMBIENT DOSE EQUIVALENT AND ABSORBED DOSE IN AIR IN THE CASE OF LARGE-SCALE CONTAMINATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT BY RADIOACTIVE CESIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main aims of the study was an experimental determination of the conversion coefficient from ambient dose equivalent rate, Н*(10, to absorbed dose rate in air, D, in the case of radioactive contamination of the environment following the Chernobyl accident. More than 800 measurements of gamma-dose rates in air were performed at the typical locations (one-storey residential house, street, yard, kitchen-garden, ploughed field, undisturbed grassland, forest of rural settlements and their surroundings in the heavily contaminated areas of the Bryansk region, Russia in the period of 1996–2010. Five commercially available models of portable gamma-ray dosimeters were employed in the investigation. All tested dosimeters were included into the State register of approved measuring instruments of Russia. In all dosimeters, scintillation detectors are used as detection elements. A photon spectrometry technique is applied in the dosimeters to determine gamma dose rate in air. The dosimeters are calibrated in terms of exposure rate, X, absorbed dose rate in air, D, and ambient dose equivalent rate, Н*(10. A very good agreement was found between different dosimeters calibrated in the same units; the reading ratios were close to 1 and the correlation coefficients (Pearson’s or Spearman’s were higher than 0.99. The Н*(10/D ratio values were location-specific ranging from 1.23 Sv/Gy for undisturbed grasslands and forests to 1.47 Sv/Gy for wooden houses and asphalted streets. A statistically significant negative correlation (Spearman’s coefficient = -0.833; P<0.01; n=9 was found between the Н*(10/D ratio and the average energy of gamma-rays determined with a NaI(Tl-based gamma-ray monitor. For the whole area of a settlement and its surroundings, the average ratio of Н*(10 to D was calculated as 1.33 Sv/Gy. The overall conversion coefficient from ambient dose equivalent rate, Н*(10, to external effective dose rate, Ė, for adults was estimated

  7. The ambient dose equivalent at flight altitudes: a fit to a large set of data using a Bayesian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of finding a simple, generally applicable description of worldwide measured ambient dose equivalent rates at aviation altitudes between 8 and 12 km is difficult to solve due to the large variety of functional forms and parametrisations that are possible. We present an approach that uses Bayesian statistics and Monte Carlo methods to fit mathematical models to a large set of data and to compare the different models. About 2500 data points measured in the periods 1997-1999 and 2003-2006 were used. Since the data cover wide ranges of barometric altitude, vertical cut-off rigidity and phases in the solar cycle 23, we developed functions which depend on these three variables. Whereas the dependence on the vertical cut-off rigidity is described by an exponential, the dependences on barometric altitude and solar activity may be approximated by linear functions in the ranges under consideration. Therefore, a simple Taylor expansion was used to define different models and to investigate the relevance of the different expansion coefficients. With the method presented here, it is possible to obtain probability distributions for each expansion coefficient and thus to extract reliable uncertainties even for the dose rate evaluated. The resulting function agrees well with new measurements made at fixed geographic positions and during long haul flights covering a wide range of latitudes.

  8. Assessment of fast and thermal neutron ambient dose equivalents around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco, P. O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Qureshi, M.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    A set of five {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources are utilized in research and teaching at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Three of these sources have an activity of 16Ci each and the other two are of 5Ci each. A well-shielded storage area was designed for these sources. The aim of the study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the KFUPM neutron source storage area. Poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) Nuclear track detectors (NTDs) based fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters have been utilized side by side for 33 days to assess accumulated low ambient dose equivalents of fast and thermal neutrons at 30 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. Fast neutron measurements have been carried out using bare NTDs, which register fast neutrons through recoils of protons, in the detector material. NTDs were mounted with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters on their surfaces for thermal neutron detection via B10(n,{alpha})Li6 and Li6(n,{alpha})H3 nuclear reactions. The calibration factors of NTD both for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) with and without a polyethylene moderator. The calibration factors for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were found to be 1.33 proton tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1} and 31.5 alpha tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1}, respectively. The results show variations of accumulated dose with the locations around the storage area. The fast neutron dose equivalents rates varied from as low as 182nSvh{sup -1} up to 10.4{mu}Svh{sup -1} whereas those for thermal neutron ranged from as low as 7nSvh{sup -1} up to 9.3{mu}Svh{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosimeter was able to detect dose rates as low as 7 and 182nSvh{sup -1} from accumulated dose for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, which were not possible to detect with the available active neutron

  9. Calibration procedures of area monitors in terms of the Ambient Dose Equivalent H*(10), for gamma, x-ray radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis procedures for calibrating portable survey meters in terms of the new ICRU quantities H*(10) ambient dose equivalent are discussed. Also the remendations of International Comission on Radiation Protection in their report ICRP 60 that inludes the operational magnitudes that the International Comission of Radiation Units proposed for calibrating area monitors

  10. Measurement of the neutron spectrum and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-07

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement of the neutron spectral distribution and fluence from the 252Cf source (model NS-120, LLNL serial # 7001677, referred as the SMALL Cf source) and determination of the ambient neutron dose rate equivalent and kerma at 100 cm for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). The dosimetric quantities should be based on the neutron spectrum and the current neutron-to-dose conversion coefficients.

  11. Quality factors, ambient and personal dose equivalent for neutrons, based on the new ICRU stopping power data for protons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality factors and fluence-to-ambient and fluence-to personal-dose equivalent conversion factors for neutrons have been recalculated for neutrons with energies ranging from thermal to 20 MeV. The new calculations are based on the recommendations given in ICRU Publication 60 for the quality factor and on stopping power data for protons and alpha particles as recommended in the ICRU report 49. (author)

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit. PMID:26256622

  13. Measurement of the ambient gamma dose equivalent and kerma from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter and the small 60Co source at 2 meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 100 cm from the 252Cf source and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 200 cm from the 60Co source for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). An Exradin A6 ion chamber with Shonka air-equivalent plastic walls in combination with a Supermax electrometer were used to measure the exposure rate and free-in-air kerma rate of the two sources at the requested distances. The measured gamma exposure, kerma, and dose equivalent rates are tabulated.

  14. Assessment of ambient dose equivalent rate performance of an automatic survey meter as an instrument to quantify the presence of radiation in soils

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, E M; Okuno, E

    2002-01-01

    Those who work in radiation protection are faced with various quantities that were created to account for the effects of ionizing radiation in the human body. As far as the experimental point of view is concerned, each available equipment is planned to measure a distinct quantity, for a specific radiation protection application, and it is not always clear which one it is. This paper shows a series of tests, planned and applied to a portable gamma ray spectrometer, in order to assure that the monitoring low dose levels of radiation with it is reliable. The equipment is fully automated and does not allow modifications of the conversion factors from counts to ambient dose equivalent. It is therefore necessary to assure that the values provided by the equipment are correct and refer to the actual situation one expects to find in practice. The system is based on an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, mounted with its electronics in a portable case, suitable for field measurements. It measures ambient dose equivalent r...

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B.

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit.

  16. Ambient dose equivalent and effective dose from scattered x-ray spectra in mammography for Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh anode/filter combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, scattered x-ray distributions were produced by irradiating a tissue equivalent phantom under clinical mammographic conditions by using Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh anode/filter combinations, for 25 and 30 kV tube voltages. Energy spectra of the scattered x-rays have been measured with a Cd0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT) detector for scattering angles between 30 deg. and 165 deg. Measurement and correction processes have been evaluated through the comparison between the values of the half-value layer (HVL) and air kerma calculated from the corrected spectra and measured with an ionization chamber in a nonclinical x-ray system with a W/Mo anode/filter combination. The shape of the corrected x-ray spectra measured in the nonclinical system was also compared with those calculated using semi-empirical models published in the literature. Scattered x-ray spectra measured in the clinical x-ray system have been characterized through the calculation of HVL and mean photon energy. Values of the air kerma, ambient dose equivalent and effective dose have been evaluated through the corrected x-ray spectra. Mean conversion coefficients relating the air kerma to the ambient dose equivalent and to the effective dose from the scattered beams for Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh anode/filter combinations were also evaluated. Results show that for the scattered radiation beams the ambient dose equivalent provides an overestimate of the effective dose by a factor of about 5 in the mammography energy range. These results can be used in the control of the dose limits around a clinical unit and in the calculation of more realistic protective shielding barriers in mammography

  17. Effect of Remediation Parameters on in-Air Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates When Remediating Open Sites with Radiocesium-contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Akihiro; Machida, Masahiko

    2016-10-01

    Calculations are reported for ambient dose equivalent rates [H˙*(10)] at 1 m height above the ground surface before and after remediating radiocesium-contaminated soil at wide and open sites. The results establish how the change in H˙*(10) upon remediation depends on the initial depth distribution of radiocesium within the ground, on the size of the remediated area, and on the mass per unit area of remediated soil. The remediation strategies considered were topsoil removal (with and without recovering with a clean soil layer), interchanging a topsoil layer with a subsoil layer, and in situ mixing of the topsoil. The results show the ratio of the radiocesium components of H˙*(10) post-remediation relative to their initial values (residual dose factors). It is possible to use the residual dose factors to gauge absolute changes in H˙*(10) upon remediation. The dependency of the residual dose factors on the number of years elapsed after fallout deposition is analyzed when remediation parameters remain fixed and radiocesium undergoes typical downward migration within the soil column. PMID:27575348

  18. Determination of conversion factors of kerma and fluence to ambient dose equivalent for X-rays generated between 50 kVp to 125 kVp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ambient dose equivalent was determined experimentally on the interval of energy of X ray applied in diagnostic radiology. A PMMA sphere was used to simulate the trunk human (phantom), based on the definition of the report ICRU 39. The absorbed dose in different positions in the phantom was determined using LiF-TLD 100. The X ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector (HP Ge). It was also determined the HVL and the effective energy in this energy range. The conversion coefficient of the Kair and Φ to H*(d) were determined to 10, 50 and 60 mm deep in the PMMA sphere. The obtained values were compared with data of the literature. The maximum uncertainty obtained for the coefficients was 7.2%. All parameters were also determined to the X ray quality of the incident and transmitted beam by the patient, according to the recommendation of the standard DIN 6872. The conversion factor was calculated for those situations where the X-ray beam is transmitted by a layer and Pb and it is necessary to estimate the effective dose, as in the case of shielding project of radiology diagnosis room. (author)

  19. Aircraft crew radiation workplaces: Comparison of measured and calculated ambient dose equivalent rate data using the EURADOS in-flight radiation data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 2000, the chairman of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) invited a number of experts with experience of cosmic radiation dosimetry to form a working group (WG 5) on aircraft crew dosimetry. Three observers from the Article 31 Group of Experts as well as one observer from the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) were also appointed. The European Commission funded the meetings. Full meetings were organised in January 2001 and in November 2001. An editorial group, who are the authors of this publication, started late in 2002 to finalise a draft report, which was submitted to the Article 31 Group of Experts in June 2003. The methods and data reported are the product of the work of 26 research institutes from the EU, USA and Canada. Some of the work was supported by contracts with the European Commission, Directorate General XII, Science, Research and Development. A first overview of the EC report was published late in 2004. In this publication we focus on a comparison of measured and calculated ambient dose rate data using the EURADOS In-Flight Data Base. The evaluation of results obtained by different methods and groups, and comparison of measurement results and the results of calculations were performed in terms of the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H*(10). Aspects of measurement uncertainty are reported also. The paper discusses the estimation of annual doses for given flight hours and gives an outline of further research needed in the field of aircraft crew dosimetry, such as the influence of solar particle events. (authors)

  20. Ambient dose equivalent measurements in secondary radiation fields at proton therapy facility CCB IFJ PAN in Krakow using recombination chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowska Edyta A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents recombination methods used for secondary radiation measurements at the Facility for Proton Radiotherapy of Eye Cancer at the Institute for Nuclear Physics, IFJ, in Krakow (Poland. The measurements of H*(10 were performed, with REM-2 tissue equivalent chamber in two halls of cyclotrons AIC-144 and Proteus C-235 and in the corridors close to treatment rooms. The measurements were completed by determination of gamma radiation component, using a hydrogen-free recombination chamber. The results were compared with the measurements using rem meter types FHT 762 (WENDI-II and NM2 FHT 192 gamma probe and with stationary dosimetric system.

  1. Practical measuring system for the ambient equivalent dose rate by PSF driven by USB and its actual results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the detailed system in the title developed, and results obtained by its actual application to a contaminated region around Fukushima prefecture. The system is driven by USB, measures the linear distribution of the dose with plastic scintillation fiber (PSF), by parallel moving of which, the plane distribution of the dose can be measurable. The system is composed from 4 components of the radio-sensor PSF, photon detectors, pulse processor where the photon signal is converted to position information with time-of-flight principle, and display on PC. Three kinds of exchangeable PSF (length 20 m) with different bundle numbers (12, 7 and 1) are prepared to measure the low, middle and high dose levels of radiation, respectively, and each is rigidified by insertion in the individual metal flexible tube. The processor can convert the count rate to dose rate with linearity corrected by 137Cs gamma source; e.g., for the low dose rate, 0.1-10 mcSv, linearity is confirmed. The processor has 3 cables and 550 g weight in contrast to the ordinary machine's 12 cables and 20 kg. PSF and processor are waterproof for outdoor use. A software for mapping the measured results is also developed for color display. Mapping results of the application of the system to 80 m x 60 m site around a public hall and the swimming pool of a primary school are quite persuasive before and after de-contamination work like disappearance of hot spots after the work, and suggestive of its usefulness in dealing with the Fukushima contamination problems. (T.T.)

  2. Measurements of the ambient dose equivalent of produced x-rays at the linear accelerator UNILAC of GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the UNILAC (UNIversal Linear ACcelerator) of the GSI (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, facility for the research with heavy ions, Darmstadt, Germany) two different pre-stripper sections deliver ions for further acceleration. One of these consists of an ECR - ion source (Electron Cyclotron Resonance), a RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) - and an IH (Interdigital H-field) - accelerating structure. After leaving the IH - structure the ions have a specific energy of 1.4 MeV/nucleon. The ion source and the accelerating structures produce x-rays during operation. Recently various accelerator facilities for carbon ion cancer treatment - consisting of linacs and synchrotrons - were planned, are under construction or are already in operation. It turned out that data of the radiation fields near linac structures (RFQ, IH) are scarce. The aim of this paper is to improve the knowledge of the production of x-rays in the ion source and the sections of the preaccelerator. Measurements have been performed by means of various passive and active dosemeter systems. For the passive dose measurements, TLD cards (Harshaw type with 4 TLD-700 elements) partially covered by absorption layers and surrounded by a polyethylene cylinder were used, in order to adapt their reading to the x-ray energy spectra at the measurement positions. A recently developed dosemeter at GSI suitable to measure the dose quantity H*(10) in the energy range 10 keV to several MeV was applied. The measurements are carried out in the vicinity of the ECR - ion source during the production of 7Li, 12C and 48Ca ion beams. A x-ray spectrum measured with a HPGe-detector near the ECR - ion source together with the dosemeter readings give hints on the fraction of the dose caused by low energy x-rays. Spatial dose distributions of the radiation fields around the RFQ and IH structures have been measured during their operation with different accelerating voltages (the produced radiation depends strongly on the

  3. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam

  4. Sievert, gray and dose equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzner, P M

    1983-12-01

    The concepts of physical quantity and physical units of measurement are presented. The relations between quantities, the names and symbols for SI (International System) base units, derived units and special names of SI units are illustrated. From the definition of the radiation quantity dose equivalent, the SI unit for this quantity is shown to be dimensionally identical with the joule per kilogram. The sievert (Sv) is the special (restricted) name for the SI unit of the quantity dose equivalent, with 1 Sv = 1 J/kg. PMID:6668293

  5. Determination of attenuation factors for mortar of barite in terms of environmental dose equivalent and effective dose; Determinacao de fatores de atenuacao para argamassa de barita em termos do equivalente de dose ambiental e dose efetiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T.; Campos, L.L.R., E-mail: airtontavares@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araujo, F.G.S. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Santos, M.A.P. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Nogueira, M.S., E-mail: mnogueira@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimeto da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work addresses the characterization of barite mortars used as Xray shielding materials through the following quantities: mass attenuation coefficient, air kerma, effective dose and ambient dose - H⁎(10). The experiment was carried out with the use of the following reference qualities: RQR4, RQR6, RQR9 e RQR10, specified in accordance with norm IEC 61267: Medical diagnostic Xray equipment - radiation conditions for use in the determination of characteristics. In this study values was determined experimentally for the attenuation of the Cream barite (density 2.99g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Sao Paulo), Purple barite (density 2.95g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Bahia) and White barite (density 3.10g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Paraiba). These materials, in the form of mortar, were disposed in the form of squares namely poof bodies, whose dimensions were 10 x 10 cm and thickness ranging from 3 to 15 mm approximately. In the experimental procedure, these proof bodies were irradiated with a Pantak, model HF320 industrial X-ray apparatus. The potentials applied to the respective X-ray tube were: 60kV, 80kV, 120kV and 150kV at a constant current of 1mA. The attenuation responses in function of thickness, for each of the materials analyzed, were used to draw the attenuation and transmission curves. The efficiency of the barite studied concerning the capacity to attenuate X-ray radiation for X-ray beams ranging from 60 to 150 kV indicated.

  6. From body burden to effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessary data to calculate the effective committed dose equivalent and the effective dose-equivalent rate from measured body burdens are presented. Both ingestion and inhalation intakes are considered, for single intake as well as for continuous exposure

  7. Ambient dose assessment around TRACY using deterministic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient dose was measured in the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) supercritical experiments. In the analyses, The DORT code, the ANISN code and the MCNP code were used. Ambient dose equivalent calculated with DORT and ANSIN were compared to results calculated with MCNP. So we found that ambient dose equivalents calculated with DORT and ANISN, is larger than ones of MCNP, by 7∼50%. As a cause of this difference, we estimate that it is the difference of calculated source distribution inside the fuel solution, and that it is reflecting effect in wall. In following study, examination concerning this point is necessary. (author)

  8. Determination of the conversion coefficient for ambient dose equivalent, H(10), from air kerma measurements; Determinacion del coeficiente de conversion para la dosis equivalente ambiental, H*(10), a partir de mediciones de kerma en aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez J, F. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Namely the operational magnitudes can be determined by the product of a conversion coefficient by exposure air kerma or fluence, etc. In particular in Mexico for the first time is determined the conversion coefficient (Cc) for operational magnitude Environmental Dose Equivalent H(10) by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) technique. First 30 TLD-100 dosimeters are calibrated in terms of air kerma, then these dosimeters are irradiated inside a sphere ICRU type of PMMA and with the aid of theory cavity the absorbed dose in PMMA is determined at a depth of 10 mm within the sphere D{sub PMMA}(10), subsequently absorbed dose to ICRU tissue is corrected and the dose equivalent H(10) is determined. The Cc is determined as the ratio of H(10)/K{sub a} obtaining a value of 1.20 Sv Gy{sup -1} with a u{sub c}= 3.66%, this being consistent with the published value in ISO-4037-3 of 1.20 Sv Gy{sup -1} with a u{sub c}= 2%. (Author)

  9. Using tissue equivalent proportional counters to determine dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) have been used in the laboratory for over 30 years to determine neutron dose in mixed radiation fields, but they are seldom used by operational health physicists. But a number of TEPC-based instruments are being developed in Europe and in the United States. The purpose of this paper is: to introduce operational health physicists to tissue equivalent proportional counters, to examine some of the algorithms used to convert data from TEPCs into dose equivalent, to examine how TEPC measurements meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11 (DOE 1988) and 10CFR20, and to examine some of the TEPC-based instruments that are available. Many operational health physicists are not familiar with the concept of microdosimetry and the specialized terms that are used in analyzing the data from TEPCs, so a brief discussion is included. At present, quality factors are defined in terms of linear energy transfer, but TEPCs measure lineal energy

  10. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). Two of the new equivalent methods for PM are automated monitoring... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Office of Research and Development; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION:...

  11. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... of 40 CFR Part 53, as amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326- 54341). The new equivalent method for... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that...

  12. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... 53, as amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The new equivalent methods are automated... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of three new...

  13. 光子注量到周围剂量当量转换系数的Monte-Carlo模拟%Monte-Carlo Simulation of Conversion Coefficient for Ambient Dose Equivalent from PhotonFluence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花正东; 王德忠; 刘诚; 陈继亮; 王方

    2013-01-01

    The conversion coefficients for ambient dose equivalent from photon fluence were calculated using Monte-Carlo code EGS5 with photon energy 10 keV ~ 10 MeV. The two cases were considered in the simulation:1 ) without the secondary electrons in transport;2 ) with the secondary electrons in transport. Our results shows good agreement with prior study and the data recommended by ICRP 74 Report. The fitted formulae for calculating the con-version coefficients in the photon energy 20 keV ~ 10 MeV were given based on the data obtained by EGS5 code.%本文采用蒙特卡罗程序EGS5计算了10 keV~10 MeV光子注量到周围剂量当量的转换系数。模拟计算中考虑了两种情况:1)不带次级电子模拟;2)带次级电子模拟。把两种情况下的计算值与前研究者的计算值及ICRP 74号报告中的建议值进行了比较。并给出了用于计算光子注量与周围剂量当量间的转换系数的拟合公式。

  14. Dioxin equivalency: Challenge to dose extrapolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.F. Jr.; Silkworth, J.B. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Extensive research has shown that all biological effects of dioxin-like agents are mediated via a single biochemical target, the Ah receptor (AhR), and that the relative biologic potencies of such agents in any given system, coupled with their exposure levels, may be described in terms of toxic equivalents (TEQ). It has also shown that the TEQ sources include not only chlorinated species such as the dioxins (PCDDs), PCDFs, and coplanar PCBs, but also non-chlorinated substances such as the PAHs of wood smoke, the AhR agonists of cooked meat, and the indolocarbazol (ICZ) derived from cruciferous vegetables. Humans have probably had elevated exposures to these non-chlorinated TEQ sources ever since the discoveries of fire, cooking, and the culinary use of Brassica spp. Recent assays of CYP1A2 induction show that these ``natural`` or ``traditional`` AhR agonists are contributing 50--100 times as much to average human TEQ exposures as do the chlorinated xenobiotics. Currently, the safe doses of the xenobiotic TEQ sources are estimated from their NOAELs and large extrapolation factors, derived from arbitrary mathematical models, whereas the NOAELs themselves are regarded as the safe doses for the TEQs of traditional dietary components. Available scientific data can neither support nor refute either approach to assessing the health risk of an individual chemical substance. However, if two substances be toxicologically equivalent, then their TEQ-adjusted health risks must also be equivalent, and the same dose extrapolation procedure should be used for both.

  15. Mapping of isoexposure curves for evaluation of equivalent environmental doses for radiodiagnostic mobile equipment; Mapeamento de curvas de isoexposicao para avaliacao de equivalente de dose ambiente para equipamentos moveis de radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacelar, Alexandre, E-mail: abacelar@hcpa.ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Setor de Fisica Medica e Radioprotecao; Andrade, Jose Rodrigo Mendes, E-mail: jose.andrade@santacasa.tche.b [Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericordia de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Atencao a Saude e Qualidade de Vida; Fischer, Andreia Caroline Fischer da Silveira; Accurso, Andre; Hoff, Gabriela, E-mail: andreia.silveira.001@acad.pucrs.b, E-mail: andre.accurso@acad.pucrs.b [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC/RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Experimentacao e Simulacao Computacional em Fisica Medica

    2011-10-26

    This paper generates iso exposure curves in areas where the mobile radiodiagnostic equipment are used for evaluation of iso kerma map and the environment equivalent dose (H{sup *}(d)). It was used a Shimadzu mobile equipment and two Siemens, with non anthropomorphic scatter. The exposure was measured in a mesh of 4.20 x 4.20 square meter in steps of 30 cm, at half height from the scatterer. The calculation of H{sup *}(d) were estimated for a worker present in all the procedures in a period of 11 months, being considered 3.55 m As/examination and 44.5 procedures/month (adult UTI) and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI), and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI). It was observed that there exist points where the H{sup *}(d) was over the limit established for the free area inside the radius of 30 cm from the central beam of radiation in the case of pediatric UTI and 60 cm for adult UTI. The points localized 2.1 m from the center presented values lower than 25% of those limit

  16. Comparison of Personal Dose Equivalent and Effective Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the work of the Joint ICRP/ICRU Task Group in providing conversion coefficients for personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and in making comparisons with the protection quantity effective dose, E, for monoenergetic photons, neutrons and electrons is described. Because Hp(d) is defined in soft tissue in the body and, at the time of writing the Task Group Report, there were few available calculations of dose equivalent in soft tissue in human phantoms, some approximations were required to examine the behaviour of the quantity. The calibration quantity in the ICRU tissue equivalent slab, Hp.slab(d), has also been examined. In general Hp(10) can provide a good measure of E without underestimation or excessive overestimation, but there are exceptions to this in some circumstances, especially for neutron radiations. Such problems can be alleviated by suitable positioning of personal dosemeters, appropriate to the radiation field to which people are exposed, and ensuring the dosemeters are designed and calibrated to measure Hp(10). (author)

  17. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent for personal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of effective dose equivalent was recommended as a primary limit in the ICRP publication 26. And dose equivalent index and ALI were introduced as the secondary limits for external and internal dose limitation system respectively. The evaluation method of effective dose equivalent and its application to a routinal dosimetry were studied as the followings, 1). For the external dose evaluation, the measuring method of 1 cm deep dose equivalent by a TL-dosemeter using Li2B4O7(Cu) element is shown. Also the relationship between 1 cm deep dose equivalent and effective dose equivalent is disscused. 2). For the internal dose evaluation, the monitering methods and the dose evaluation method are shown for the case of 239Pu or 137Cs intake. (author)

  18. Neutron dose equivalent rate in intermediate energy heavy ion target area

    CERN Document Server

    Li Gui Sheng; Li Zong Wei; Su You Wu; Zhang Shu Mi

    2000-01-01

    The fluence rate distributions of neutrons emitted in the reactions of 50 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O-ion on thick Be, Cu, Au targets were measured with an activation method of threshold detectors and the neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1 m from the targets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area were obtained using the conversion coefficients for neutron fluence rate to ambient dose equivalent rate.

  19. Dose equivalent conversion coefficients, instrument and dosemeter responses for a set of neutron radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of calculations of spectrum (energy and angle) weighted conversion coefficients from fluence to the quantities effective dose equivalent, ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)), directional dose equivalent at 10 mm (H'(10)) and MADE; and of the responses per unit fluence of a spherical rem meter, a nuclear emulsion dosemeter, an albedo dosemeter and a PADC (CR39) dosemeter, for a set of neutron spectra. Calculations have been performed for both unidirectional fields and for rotational symmetry. The values of conversion coefficients and instrument and dosemeter responses are compared. (author)

  20. Determination of the effective dose equivalent in gynecologic radium therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the authors describe how to determine the effective dose equivalent absorbed by occupationally exposed persons during a gynecologic radium therapy. The observed irradiation conditions of the physician and the medical staff are approximated by a standard geometry, for which conversion factors between the measured personal dose, the effective dose equivalent and different organ doses, respectively, are calculated. The results are job-specific conversion factors between dose to a personal dosimeter and the effective dose equivalent for the occupationally exposed persons involved. According to the individual tasks, these factors are between 0.59 and 1.13. (orig.)

  1. Ambient dose measurement in some CT departments in Khartoum State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is now one of the most important radiological examinations world wide.The frequency of CT examinations is increasing rapidly from 2% of all radiological examinations in some countries a decade age to 10-15% now. During the imaging procedure, staff may expose to a significant dose. Therefore, ambient dose measurement is important in the shortage of regular personal monitoring in sudan. This study intended to evaluate the ambient dose at some CT departments (Medical Military hospital, Alamal National Hospital, Elnelin Diagnostic Center and Modern Medical Centre). These departments were equipped with daul, 16 and 64 multi detector CT machines. A survey meter (Radios) was used to measure ambient doses in three locations: Doors, Control Rooms and Adjacent Rooms. The ambient dose equivalent (scatter dose) was measured at various distances from the isocenter of the CT unit at various angles to establish isodose cartography. The mean and range of radiation at control room is 10.00-0.20 and mean (7.05μSv/hr,) reception 1.0-0 (0.40) and doors 4.00-100.00 (73.5) for height 1 meter above the ground. For height 2 meters at control room 0-10.00 (6,75), reception 0-90.00 (30) at door 9.00-90.00 (49.50). This study confirms that low levels of radiation dose are received by staff during CT imaging and these levels are within safe limits as prescribed by the national and international regulations. (Author)

  2. Apparent dose equivalents resulting from severe heating of film dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unusual reported dose equivalents due to high-energy photons for two individuals prompted the investigation of the effects of severe heating conditions expected in closed vehicles during southwestern summer months on commercial film dosimeters. A historical review of dosimetry records revealed several additional reported high-energy photon exposures for individuals using only beta-emitting radioisotopes during hot summer months. Between 20-100% of experimentally heated badges had apparent dose equivalents exceeding the minimal detectable dose equivalent that were not flagged as being heat damaged or having unusual exposure patterns by the dosimetry companies. Reported dose equivalents for these badges were as high as 2.1 mSv

  3. Determination of conversion factors of kerma and fluence to ambient dose equivalent for X-rays generated between 50 kV{sub p} to 125 kV{sub p}; Determinacao dos fatores de conversao de kerma no ar e de fluencia para o equivalente de dose ambiental para raios-X gerados no intervalo de 50 kV{sub p} a 125 kV{sub p}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    1997-12-31

    The ambient dose equivalent was determined experimentally on the interval of energy of X ray applied in diagnostic radiology. A PMMA sphere was used to simulate the trunk human (phantom), based on the definition of the report ICRU 39. The absorbed dose in different positions in the phantom was determined using LiF-TLD 100. The X ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector (HP Ge). It was also determined the HVL and the effective energy in this energy range. The conversion coefficient of the K{sub air} and {Phi} to H{sup *}(d) were determined to 10, 50 and 60 mm deep in the PMMA sphere. The obtained values were compared with data of the literature. The maximum uncertainty obtained for the coefficients was 7.2%. All parameters were also determined to the X ray quality of the incident and transmitted beam by the patient, according to the recommendation of the standard DIN 6872. The conversion factor was calculated for those situations where the X-ray beam is transmitted by a layer and Pb and it is necessary to estimate the effective dose, as in the case of shielding project of radiology diagnosis room. (author) 51 refs., 35 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Neutron detector simultaneously measures fluence and dose equivalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, R. F.; Dyer, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Neutron detector acts as both an area monitoring instrument and a criticality dosimeter by simultaneously measuring dose equivalent and fluence. The fluence is determined by activation of six foils one inch below the surface of the moderator. Dose equivalent is determined from activation of three interlocked foils at the center of the moderator.

  5. Equivalent-spherical-shield neutron dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron doses through 162-cm-thick spherical shields were calculated to be 1090 and 448 mrem/h for regular and magnetite concrete, respectively. These results bracket the measured data, for reinforced regular concrete, of /approximately/600 mrem/h. The calculated fraction of the high-energy (>20 MeV) dose component also bracketed the experimental data. The measured and calculated doses were for a graphite beam stop bombarded with 100 nA of 800-MeV protons. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Committed dose equivalent in the practice of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of internal exposure, the dose is not received at the moment of exposure, as happens with external exposure, since the incorporated radionuclide irradiates the various organs and tissues during the time it is present in the body. By definition, the committed dose equivalent corresponds to the received dose integrated over 50 years from the date of intake. In order to calculate it, one has to know the intake activity and the value of the committed dose equivalent per unit of intake activity. The uncertainties of the first parameter are such that the committed dose equivalent can only be regarded as an order of magnitude and not as a very accurate quantity. The use of it is justified, however, for, like the dose equivalent for external exposure, it expresses the risk of stochastic effects for the individual concerned since these effects, should they appear, would do so only after a latent period which is generally longer than the dose integration time. Moreover, the use of the committed dose equivalent offers certain advantages for dosimetric management, especially when it is simplified. A practical problem which may arise is that the annual dose limit is apparently exceeded by virtue of the fact that one is taking account, in the first year, of doses which will actually be received only in the following years. These problems are rare enough in practice to be dealt with individually in each case. (author)

  7. Frequency and collective effective dose equivalent of medical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to ICRP recommendation, medical exposure refers to the intentional exposure of patients for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, and to the exposures resulting from the artificial replacement of body organs or functions. Since the objective of radiotherapy is to give a large amount of radiation dose to the patient to kill cancer cells, neither individual nor collective effective doses are directly relevant for comparisons with doses from other sources, not even with diagnostic procedures. For this reason, in present report, therapeutic uses of radiations and radiopharmaceuticals are not included in the medical exposures. Medical exposures in Japan have been investigated by the nationwide surveys on the type and the frequency of radiological procedures and by the dose determinations with phantom experiments or calculations since 1960. Present report reviews the frequency of diagnostic radiological procedures and the collective effective dose equivalents from these procedures, and excess deaths from the medical exposures in Japan. In 1986, the number of X-ray diagnostic examinations was estimated to be about 1.41 x 108. The preliminary result in 1991 shows the number will be about 1.8 x 108. The resultant collective effective dose equivalent from X-ray diagnosis in 1986 was about 1.84 x 105 person Sv. Consequently per Caput mean effective dose equivalent was about 1.48 mSv/person in 1986. The total collective effective dose equivalent from all the diagnostic radiological procedures in Japan was estimated to be about 2.96 x 105 person Sv/year. per Caput mean effective dose equivalent from the total diagnostic radiological procedures in Japan was evaluated to be about 2.3 mSv/year. This value may be comparable to the mean annual effective dose equivalent received from natural radiations for the worldwide population. Mean effective dose equivalent per diagnostic radiological examination was calculated to be about 1.00 mSv/examination. (author)

  8. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  9. Influence of thermoluminescence trapping parameter from abundant quartz powder on equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glow curves of abundant quartz powder were obtained with the RGD-3B thermoluminescence (TL) reader. TL peaks with 448, 551, 654, 756 K were identified at the heating rate of 5 K/s. The activation energy, frequency factor and lifetime of trapped charge were evaluated at ambient temperature for four peaks by the method of various heating rates. Within a certain range of activation energy, the equivalent dose increases exponentially with the activation energy. The equivalent dose increases from 54 Gy to 485 Gy with the temperature from 548 K to 608 K, and it fluctuates around 531 Gy with the temperature from 608 K to 748 K. (authors)

  10. The cost of collective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful application of the ALARA principle is dependent on a monetary evaluation of collective dose, so that the costs of control may be directly compared with the costs of detriment. The paper initially reviews the traditional, quantitative methods of valuing human life from which a monetary value of the man-sievert can be derived by subsequent application of risk factors. The political, ethical and economic implications of employing such techniques in radiological protection are noted. An alternative approach to the problem is then outlined, based on estimating the marginal value of a change in risk. At low levels of individual risk this includes only the tangible, economic consequences of detriment from output losses and medical costs. However, as risk levels rise, social costs related to the anxiety associated with radiation-induced health effects are also incorporated and the valuation increases disproportionally. While such valuations are in principle measurable, in the absence of empirical data a risk/detriment cost relationship is proposed, leading to a variable monetary value of the man-sievert which is a function of the per caput dose of a given population sub-group. Application of this methodology will help to ensure that radiological protection resources are spent in areas where they are most required. (author)

  11. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  12. Biological effects and equivalent doses in radiotherapy: a software solution

    CERN Document Server

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Biffi, Katia; Marcovici, Celine Lantieri

    2013-01-01

    The limits of TDF (time, dose, and fractionation) and linear quadratic models have been known for a long time. Medical physicists and physicians are required to provide fast and reliable interpretations regarding the delivered doses or any future prescriptions relating to treatment changes. We therefore propose a calculation interface under the GNU license to be used for equivalent doses, biological doses, and normal tumor complication probability (Lyman model). The methodology used draws from several sources: the linear-quadratic-linear model of Astrahan, the repopulation effects of Dale, and the prediction of multi-fractionated treatments of Thames. The results are obtained from an algorithm that minimizes an ad-hoc cost function, and then compared to the equivalent dose computed using standard calculators in seven French radiotherapy centers.

  13. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  14. Estimates of dose equivalent rates from natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental monitoring in Khartoum is being conducted using thermoluminescent dosimetry.The purpose of the study is to estimate dose-equivalent rates from natural background radiation.TL phosphorus LiF.Mg, Cu, P and CaSO4:Mn were used to measure the exposure over land for natural background radiation of terrestrial origin plus cosmic radiation and at position over the Blue Nile to account for natural background radiation of extraterrestrial origin (cosmic rays).The associated dose-equivalent rates have been determined.It was found that the dose-equivalent rates from cosmic radiation obtained through this work using the two types of the TLD phosphorus GR-200 A and CaSO4 are 0.295 mSv per year and 0.265 mSv per year, respectively.While the dose-equivalent rates from total natural background radiation obtained through this work are 0.395 mSv per year using GR-200 A and CaSO4 phosphorus, respectively. (Author)

  15. Actions for adoption of effective dose equivalent standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations related with radiological protection have been revised to adopt SI units and to accept the ICRP recommendation requesting to use the effective dose equivalent for radiation exposure control. The present report mainly deals with actions to be taken in the field of radiation instrumentation to promote the adoption of effective dose equivalent standards. In the past, exposure in roentgen has been generally used as a quantity to represent the intensity of a X-ray or alpha-ray field, because it can be measured relatively easily and accurately. The introduction of the effective dose equivalent is intended to establish annual exposure limits to ensure that the possibility of death of workers in a radioactive environment and that of development of hereditary disorders in their children or grandchildren will be maintained below permissible levels. The quantity is expressed as the sum of each organ's dose equivalent multiplied by a weight that reflects risks. Presently, such weights are assigned to seven organs including the gential glands and red marrow. Fixed-type area monitors and portable survey meters are used for work environment monitoring while film badges, TLDs, dosimeters, etc., are employed for personnel monitoring. (Nogami, K.)

  16. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poje Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent and/or neutron dose rate to which medical personnel could be exposed. Also, the neutron dose dependence on collimator aperture was analyzed. The obtained neutron dose rates outside the accelerator rooms were several times smaller than the neutron dose rates inside the accelerator rooms. Nevertheless, the measured neutron dose equivalent was not negligible from the aspect of the personal dosimetry with almost 2 mSv a year per person in the areas occupied by staff (conservative estimation. In rooms with 15 MV accelerators, the neutron exposure to the personnel was significantly lower than in the rooms having 18 MV accelerators installed. It was even more pronounced in the room reconstructed after the 60Co decommissioning. This study confirms that shielding from the neutron radiation should be considered when building vaults for high energy linear accelerators, especially when the space constraints exist.

  17. Quartz red TL SAR equivalent dose overestimation for Chinese loess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Z.P.; Murray, A.S.; Bailey, R.M.;

    2006-01-01

    For the red TL of quartz extracted from Chinese loess, the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure overestimates the known laboratory doses in dose recovery test. The overestimation is the result of the first heating during the measurement of natural TL signal causing a sensitivity...... reduction, which is not corrected for using a SAR protocol. The SARA procedure was used to measure the sensitivity change. Using this as a correction factor is tested by comparison with the quartz optically stimulated luminiscence (OSL) equivalent dose. SARA is also employed to determine the residual level...... of red TL, which is found to be more than 100 Gy. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included. PMID:25349458

  19. Development of a neutron personal dose equivalent detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new neutron-measuring instrument that is intended to measure a neutron personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) was developed. This instrument is composed of two parts: (1) a conventional moderator-based neutron dose equivalent meter and (2) a neutron shield made of borated polyethylene, which covers a backward hemisphere to adjust the angular dependence. The whole design was determined on the basis of MCNP calculations so as to have response characteristics that would generally match both the energy and angular dependencies of Hp(10). This new instrument will be a great help in assessing the reference values of neutron Hp(10) during field testing of personal neutron dosemeters in workplaces and also in interpreting their readings. (authors)

  20. Development and characterization of a neutron personal dose equivalent monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors developed a new neutron-measuring instrument that was designed to measure a neutron personal dose equivalent, Hp(10). This instrument is composed of a conventional moderator-based neutron dose equivalent meter and a neutron shield made of borated polyethylene which covers a backward hemisphere to adjust the angular dependence. The whole design was determined on the basis of MCNP calculations so as to have response characteristics which would generally match both the energy and angular dependencies of Hp(10). The verification experiments for energy and angular responses were done using monoenergetic neutrons produced by the accelerator and polyenergetic neutrons from the moderated 252Cf source. Experiments showed that the new instrument has reasonably acceptable responses as a reference neutron dosemeter. The authors conclude that this new instrument will be a great help in assessing the reference values of neutron Hp(10) during field testing of personal neutron dosemeters in the workplace and also in interpreting their readings. (author)

  1. Determination of dose equivalent and risk in thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these report are presented the calculations of dose equivalent and risk, utilizing the dosimetric model described in publication 30 of the International Comission on Radiological Protection. This information was obtained by the workers of the thorium cycle, employed at the Praia and Santo Amaro Facilities, by assessing the quantity and concentration of thorium in the air. The samples and the number of measurements were established through design of experiments techniques, and the results were evaluated with the aid of variance analysis. The estimater of dose equivalent for internal and external radiation exposure and risk associated were compared with the maximum recommended limits. The results indicate the existence of operation areas whose values were above those limits, requiring so an improvement in the procedures and services in order to meet the requirements of the radiological protetion. (author)

  2. From body burden to effective dose equivalent. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact set of data is presented for the evaluation of measurements performed with a whole body counter. For each nuclide the following information is collected: physical halflife; metabolic data; the relation between chemical compound and inhalation class; the fraction of intake in the human body at 18 points in time after a single intake; the relation between intake and effective committed dose equivalent; the equilibrium body burden following continuous intake; the relation between a constant body burden and dose-equivalent rate. This report is an extension of an earlier paper (ECN-116). It completes the list of nuclides, i.e. apart from noble gas nuclides almost all nuclides with a physical halflife exceeding 12 hours have been considered, either in this paper or in part I. (Auth.)

  3. Neutron dose equivalent rate for heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiGui-Sheng; ZhangTian-Mei; 等

    1998-01-01

    The fluence rate distribution of neutrons in the reactionsof 50MeV/u 18O-ion on thick Be,Cu and Au targets have been measured with an activation method of threshold detectors andthe neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1m from the tqrgets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area are obtained by using the conversion factors from neutron fluence rate to neutron doseequivalent rate.

  4. Calibration factor for estimating personal dose equivalent with imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A personal imaging plate (IP) dosimeter is in the process of being developed for neutron fields using the BaFBr:Eu2+ phosphor. A configuration incorporating a polyethylene radiator placed before the IP detector is used to produce protons via (n,p) elastic scattering. For a dosimeter sensitive to thermal neutrons, a Nylon plate (100μm thick) is placed between the polyethylene (1.2mm thick) radiator and the IP (130μm thick sensitive layer) detector to produce protons via the 14N(n,p)14C reaction. Dosimeters having these configurations have been exposed to neutrons from 241Am-Be and 252Cf sources at the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety of Cadarache at angles of 0 deg. (normal incidence), 30 deg. and 60 deg. and several dose equivalents. The personal dose equivalent response in terms of Hp(10) is evaluated from the net measured photostimulated luminescence densities (PSLmm-2). The calibration factor obtained for estimating the personal dose equivalent with this dosimeter is 9.20x10-5mSvPSL-1mm2 for 241Am-Be and 13.07x10-5mSvPSL-1mm2 for 252Cf

  5. Measurements of dose equivalent fields near phantom in the treatment room for proton therapy in Dubna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present regular sessions on proton therapy of cancer and some other diseases are carried out at the Medical-Technical facility of the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. During irradiation a patient is alone in the treatment room. This is fully justified in case of X-ray or gamma therapy. In case of proton therapy, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), around the patient is expected to be significantly lower. Dose measurements around the irradiated phantom have been performed in the treatment room for proton therapy using proton at 170 MeV energy. The ratio of the ambient dose equivalent to the maximum absorbed dose in the phantom was equal to 0.05 mSv/Gy at 0.5 m distance from the phantom in the condition similar to real patient irradiation. The effective quality factor of secondary radiation is almost constant in space around the phantom, its value is equal to 3.5. This value shows a predominant role of neutrons. The obtained data should be taken into account if the possibility of presence of accompanying person in the treatment room is considered because of some medical or psychological reasons

  6. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as Hp,slab(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for Hp,slab(10) and Hp,slab(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For Hp(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to Hp,slab(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) guidance.

  7. A portable dose equivalent meter based on microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally accepted that the physical basis of the relative biological effectiveness of different radiations is the difference in the spatial distribution of ionization along the charged particle tracks. Thus it is possible to measure physical quantities which may be related to biological damage, and use them to estimate the radiation protection quantity 'dose equivalent'. A prototype instrument utilizing a spherical proportional counter and a microcomputer to make such measurements has been developed and tested. The detector is filled with gas at low pressure in order to simulate micrometer diameter volumes of tissue. Energy deposition in these small volumes is a stochastic quantity which depends on charged particle stopping power, path length through the site, energy loss straggling, and energy transport by secondary charged particles (delta rays). It has been suggested that this energy deposition distribution be used as a basis for defining radiation quality factor (anti Q). However, to the extent that the energy deposition in the site is proportional to the geometric chord length distribution, energy deposition can also be used to determine the linear energy transfer. The mean quality factor can then be calculated on the basis of the current definition. The prototype instrument uses two amplifiers, with gains of 50 and 1000, processing the pulses from a single detector in order to resolve the wide range of energy deposition events produced by neutron and gamma irradiation. Each amplifier is connected to a specially designed analog to digital converter and a 128 channel multichannel analyzer. A microcomputer controls the sytem and calculates dose and dose equivalent. Test results for a variety of accelerator produced neutron irradiations show that, from 0.1 to 15 MeV, system accuracy is +- 0.5 for anti Q and +- 15% for dose equivalent. (orig.)

  8. Equivalent dose determination using a quartz isothermal TL signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, D.A.G. [Laboratory of Mineralogy and Petrology (Luminescence Research Group), Department of Geology and Soil Science, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 (S8), B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Radiation Research Department, Riso DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Nordic Laboratory for Luminescence Dating, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Aarhus, Riso DTU, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: dimitri.vandenberghe@ugent.be; Jain, M. [Radiation Research Department, Riso DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Murray, A.S. [Nordic Laboratory for Luminescence Dating, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Aarhus, Riso DTU, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2009-05-15

    We report on further developments in the use of an isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) signal for determining the equivalent dose (D{sub e}) in unheated sedimentary quartz. In order to minimise sensitivity change during the first measurement, the ITL signal is measured at 270 deg. C following a preheat at 300 deg. C for 10 s. The decay curve can be represented well by the sum of two exponentially decaying functions plus a constant. The two decaying components hold the dosimetric information; they both appear to originate with the 325 deg. C region of the glow curve, and are thermally stable. This composite signal can be fully reset by sunlight, and grows with dose over at least the same range as the OSL signal. A single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol can be used with this ITL signal. Dose recovery experiments confirm the suitability of the measurement protocol; the D{sub e} values are in acceptable agreement with the expected burial dose in samples from a variety of depositional environments and ages. Our results suggest that measurement of the ITL signal at 270 deg. C enables the quartz 325 deg. C TL peak to be used for accurate dose measurements on a single aliquot. The signal allows dating over at least the same age range as the OSL signal, and it appears especially advantageous for application to quartz samples for which the OSL signal saturates below {approx}500 Gy.

  9. Collective effective dose equivalent, population doses and risk estimates from occupational exposures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collective dose equivalent and population dose from occupational exposures in Japan, 1988 were estimated on the basis of a nationwide survey. The survey was conducted on annual collective dose equivalents by sex, age group and type of radiation work for about 0.21 million workers except for the workers in nuclear power stations. The data on the workers in nuclear power stations were obtained from the official report of the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. The total number of workers including nuclear power stations was estimated to be about 0.26 million. Radiation works were subdivided as follows: medical works including dental; non-atomic energy industry; research and education; atomic energy industry and nuclear power station. For the determination of effective dose equivalent and population dose, organ or tissue doses were measured with a phantom experiment. The resultant doses were compared with the doses previously calculated using a chord length technique and with data from ICRP publications. The annual collective effective dose equivalent were estimated to be about 21.94 person·Sv for medical workers, 7.73 person·Sv for industrial workers, 0.75 person·Sv for research and educational workers, 2.48 person·Sv for atomic energy industry and 84.4 person ·Sv for workers in nuclear power station. The population doses were calculated to be about 1.07 Sv for genetically significant dose, 0.89 Sv for leukemia significant dose and 0.42 Sv for malignant significant dose. The population risks were estimated using these population doses. (author)

  10. Determination of neutron and photon dose equivalent at workplaces in nuclear facilities in Sweden: a joint SSI-EURADOS comparison exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the dosimetry (personal and area monitoring) has been investigated inside the containment buildings of two pressurised water reactors and in the environment of a transport cask with spent fuel elements. The dosimetric quantities of main interest were ambient dose equivalent and personal dose equivalent, as operational quantities, and effective dose equivalent, as limit quantity. They were either directly determined by means of instruments and dosemeters or calculated from the experimentally determined directional spectral neutron fluence. Several groups employing different techniques carried out the investigations. The comprehensive comparison exercise has shown that a well specified Boner sphere spectrometer and a set of proton recoil detectors are well-suited to determine the neutron field for reference purposes. The neutron fields were rather soft with up to 70% of the neutron dose equivalent contributed by neutrons of energies less than 100 keV. On account of their energy dependence, rem counters overestimate, and TEPC systems underestimate, the neutron dose equivalent, even if calibrated in the field of a D2 O-moderated 252 Cf source. The application of the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) will result in about 50% higher values of neutron ambient dose equivalent. In the determination of the photon ambient dose equivalent, which amounts to about 30% of the total dose equivalent, differences up to 50% were observed between the readings of GM counters and TEPC's, chiefly caused by high energy photons present in the containment building. (Author)

  11. Measurement of neutron equivalent dose in a pelletron accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron equivalent dose at various locations of the accelerator room and in the beam hall of the pelletron accelerator at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneshwar, is measured using Kodak NTA film and CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector. The detectors were exposed for 20 hours and 6 hours respectively to neutron field produced due to the bombardment of 5 MeV and 4 MeV protons, obtained from a cesium sputtered SNICS ion source, on the LiBr2 target. The calculated neutron fluence rate is of the order of 106 n.cm-2.s-1 and the measured neutron equivalent dose is given. The measured neutron fluence rate behind the shielding wall in both the halls is less than 5 n.cm-2.s-1 which is much lower than maximum recommended value based on 30 mSv/y by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, taking 40 working hours a week and flux to dose conversion factor as 3.13 x 10-8 rem/n/cm2. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. 76 FR 15974 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Part 53, as amended on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35597). The new PM 2.5 equivalent method is an automated...-195, ``Grimm Technologies, Inc. Model EDM 180 PM 2.5 Monitor,'' light scattering continuous ambient... the Grimm Technologies, Inc. Model EDM 180 Operation and Instruction Manual. The optional...

  13. Dose equivalent to fingertips of nuclear medicine personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most frequently used diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures is done with 99 mTc radionuclides. Activities of radionuclides being administered may be even as high as 1 GBq. Medical personnel remain under constant dosimetric surveillance and are protected from radiation by using personal and permanent shields (like lead aprons, gloves or lead glass). Owing to this protection, effective doses are low, ranging within several per cent of the limit value. The situation is, however, quite different if one considers the exposure to hands of the personnel handling the radiopharmaceuticals. All isotope handling procedures, such as elution of technetium, preparation of radiopharmaceuticals or application of the latter to the patients are performed manually, with little use of manipulators. As a result, the dose to the hands during the handling of radioisotopes may be significant from the point of view of radiological protection. Our research leads to the following conclusions: 1. Fingertips of the middle finger, index and thumb are the most exposed to ionizing radiation parts of the hand. 2. The limit of the equivalent dose to the skin (500 mSv) may be exceeded, on the fingertips in particular. 3. The considerable dose reduction to hands exposed to ionizing radiation may be achieved by improving procedures through the work automation for example. (authors)

  14. Committed equivalent organ doses and committed effective doses from intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed equivalent doses to individual organs for intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu m AMAD particles of 359 nuclides by infants aged 3 months, by children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and by adults. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on the way committed doses increase with the integration period is given in NRPB-M289. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  15. A single-aliquot OSL protocol using bracketing regenerative doses to accurately determine equivalent doses in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Folz, E

    1999-01-01

    In most cases, sediments show inherent heterogeneity in their luminescence behaviours and bleaching histories, and identical aliquots are not available: single-aliquot determination of the equivalent dose (ED) is then the approach of choice and the advantages of using regenerative protocols are outlined. Experiments on five laboratory bleached and dosed quartz samples, following the protocol described by Murray and Roberts (1998. Measurement of the equivalent dose in quartz using a regenerative-dose single aliquot protocol. Radiation Measurements 27, 171-184), showed the hazards of using a single regeneration dose: a 10% variation in the regenerative dose yielded some equivalent dose estimates that differed from the expected value by more than 5%. A protocol is proposed that allows the use of different regenerative doses to bracket the estimated equivalent dose. The measured ED is found to be in excellent agreement with the known value when the main regeneration dose is within 10% of the true equivalent dose.

  16. A single-aliquot OSL protocol using bracketing regenerative doses to accurately determine equivalent doses in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most cases, sediments show inherent heterogeneity in their luminescence behaviours and bleaching histories, and identical aliquots are not available: single-aliquot determination of the equivalent dose (ED) is then the approach of choice and the advantages of using regenerative protocols are outlined. Experiments on five laboratory bleached and dosed quartz samples, following the protocol described by Murray and Roberts (1998. Measurement of the equivalent dose in quartz using a regenerative-dose single aliquot protocol. Radiation Measurements 27, 171-184), showed the hazards of using a single regeneration dose: a 10% variation in the regenerative dose yielded some equivalent dose estimates that differed from the expected value by more than 5%. A protocol is proposed that allows the use of different regenerative doses to bracket the estimated equivalent dose. The measured ED is found to be in excellent agreement with the known value when the main regeneration dose is within 10% of the true equivalent dose

  17. An algorithm for unfolding neutron dose and dose equivalent from digitized recoil-particle tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work had demonstrated the feasibility of a digital approach to neutron dosimetry. A Monte Carlo simulation code of one detector design utilizing the operating principles of time-projection chambers was completed. This thesis presents and verifies one version of the dosimeter's computer algorithm. This algorithm processes the output of the ORNL simulation code, but is applicable to all detectors capable of digitizing recoil-particle tracks. Key features include direct measurement of track lengths and identification of particle type for each registered event. The resulting dosimeter should allow more accurate determinations of neutron dose and dose equivalent compared with conventional dosimeters, which cannot measure these quantities directly. Verification of the algorithm was accomplished by running a variety of recoil particles through the simulated detector volume and comparing the resulting absorbed dose and dose equivalent to those unfolded by the algorithm

  18. Determination of skin dose reduction by lead equivalent gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protective gloves are always used in medical facilities to protect radiation workers from unnecessary radiation exposure. A study on radiation protection gloves which are produced by local company had been performed by the Medical Physics Group, MINT. The gloves were made of lead equivalent material, as the attenuating element. The gloves were evaluated in term of the percentage of skin dose reduction by using a newly developed procedure and facilities in MINT. Attenuation measurements of the gloves had been carried out using direct beams and scattered radiations of different qualities. TLD rings were fitted on finger phantom; and water phantom were used in the measurement. The result were obtained and analysed based on data supplied by manufacturer. (Author)

  19. An algorithm for unfolding neutron dose and dose equivalent from digitized recoil-particle tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has demonstrated the feasibility of a digital approach to neutron dosimetry. In contrast to current analog methods, the digital approach specifically refers to methods of collection and processing of ionization products created by recoil particles within detector volumes. A dosimeter utilizing the digital approach would consist of both a detector and a computer algorithm. The detector would measure the integral number of subexcitation electrons produced by recoil particles within various subvolumes of its sensitive volume. The computer algorithm would unfold the quantities absorbed dose, linear energy transfer, and dose equivalent given that digital track-structure information. ORNL researchers have completed a Monte Carlo simulation code of one detector design utilizing the operating principles of time-projection chambers. This thesis presents and verifies one version of the dosimeter's computer algorithm. This algorithm processes the output of the ORNL simulation code, but is applicable to all detectors capable of digitizing recoil-particle tracks. Key features include direct measurement of track lengths and identification of particle type for each registered event. The resulting dosimeter should allow more accurate determinations of neutron dose and dose equivalent compared with conventional dosimeters, which cannot measure these quantities directly. Verification of the algorithm was accomplished by running a variety of recoil particles through the simulated detector volume and comparing the resulting absorbed dose and dose equivalent to those unfolded by the algorithm

  20. The effective dose equivalent from external and internal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various sources of low-level ionizing radiation are discussed and compared in terms of mean effective dose equivalent to man. For the most nonoccupationally exposed individuals, natural sources given the dominating contribution to the effective dose equivalent. The size of this contribution is strongly dependent on human activities. Natural sources contribution on average 2.4 mSV per year, of which half is due to irradiation of lungs and airways from short lived radon daughters present in indoor air. In Sweden this radon daughter contribution is considerably higher and contributes a mean of 3 mSv per year, thus giving a total contribution from natural radiation of about 4 mSV per year. In extreme cases, radon daughter contributions of several hundreds of mSv per year may be reached. Medical exposure, mainly diagnostic X-rays, contributes 0.4-1 mSv per year both in Sweden and as a world average. The testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere has given 1-2 mSv to each person in the world as a mean. The contribution from the routine operation of nuclear reactors is insignificant. The reactor accident in Chernobyl resulted in widely varying exposures of the European population. The average for Sweden is estimated to be 0.1 mSv during the first year and about 1 mSv during a 50-year period. For groups of Swedes who eat a considerable amount of game this contribution will be 10 times higher, and for the Lapps who breed reindeer in the most contaminated areas, typical values of 20-70 mSv and extreme values of about 1 Sv may be reached in 50 years. This means that the Chernobyl reactor accident for several years will be their dominating source of irradiation

  1. A correlation study of eye lens dose and personal dose equivalent for interventional cardiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the dosimetry part of the European ELDO project, funded by the DoReMi Network of Excellence, in which a method was developed to estimate cumulative eye lens doses for past practices based on personal dose equivalent values, Hp(10), measured above the lead apron at several positions at the collar, chest and waist levels. Measurement campaigns on anthropomorphic phantoms were carried out in typical interventional settings considering different tube projections and configurations, beam energies and filtration, operator positions and access routes and using both mono-tube and biplane X-ray systems. Measurements showed that eye lens dose correlates best with Hp(10) measured on the left side of the phantom at the level of the collar, although this correlation implicates high spreads (41 %). Nonetheless, for retrospective dose assessment, Hp(10) records are often the only option for eye dose estimates and the typically used chest left whole-body dose measurement remains useful. (authors)

  2. Committed equivalent organ doses and committed effective doses from intakes of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NRPB has published a software package, NRPB-SR245, which contains the most recent data on doses per unit intake of radionuclides. The data incorporates the new ICRP recommendations on tissue weighting factors and current NRPB advice on gut transfer factors. The software package lists the committed effective doses for ingestion and inhalation of 1 μm AMAD particles of 359 nuclides by infants aged 3 months, by children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and by adults, together with the highest committed equivalent organ dose. The software package is available from NRPB Information Services, price Pound 50.00 + VAT. (author)

  3. Interaction of 2-Gy Equivalent Dose and Margin Status in Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of local control (LC) in a series of patients treated with either perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (Group 1) or with PHDRB combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (Group 2). Patient and Methods: Patients (n = 312) enrolled in several PHDRB prospective Phase I-II studies conducted at the Clinica Universidad de Navarra were analyzed. Treatment with PHDRB alone, mainly because of prior irradiation, was used in 126 patients to total doses of 32 Gy/8 b.i.d. or 40 Gy/10 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections. Treatment with PHDRB plus EBRT was used in 186 patients to total doses of 16 Gy/4 b.i.d. or 24 Gy/6 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections along with 45 Gy of EBRT with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: No dose-margin interaction was observed in Group 1 patients. In Group 2 patients there was a significant interaction between margin status and 2-Gy equivalent (Eq2Gy) dose (p = 0.002): (1) patients with negative margins had 9-year LC of 95.7% at Eq2Gy = 62.9Gy; (2) patients with close margins of >1 mm had 9-year LC of 92.4% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy, and (3) patients with positive/close <1-mm margins had 9-year LC of 68.0% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy. Conclusions: Two-gray equivalent doses ≥70 Gy may compensate the effect of close margins ≥1 mm but do not counterbalance the detrimental effect of unfavorable (positive/close <1 mm) resection margins. No dose-margin interaction is observed in patients treated at lower Eq2Gy doses ≤50 Gy with PHDRB alone.

  4. The Use Of Optical Properties Of Cr-39 In Alpha Particle Equivalent Dose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, optical properties of alpha irradiated Cr-39 were measured as a function of optical photon wavelength from 200-1100 nm. Optical energy gap and optical absorption at finite wavelength was also calculated and correlated to alpha fluence and dose equivalent. Alpha doses were calculated from the corresponding irradiation fluence and specific energy loss using TRIM computer program. It was found that, the optical absorption of unattached Cr-39 was varied with alpha fluence and corresponding equivalent doses. Also the optical energy gab was varied with fluence and dose equivalent of alpha particles. This work introduces a reasonably simple method for the Rn dose equivalent calculation by Cr-39 track

  5. Assessment of out-of-field absorbed dose and equivalent dose in proton fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clasie, Ben; Wroe, Andrew; Kooy, Hanne; Depauw, Nicolas; Flanz, Jay; Paganetti, Harald; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, as in other forms of radiation therapy, scattered and secondary particles produce undesired dose outside the target volume that may increase the risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer and interact with electronic devices in the treatment room. The authors implement a Monte Carlo model of this dose deposited outside passively scattered fields and compare it to measurements, determine the out-of-field equivalent dose, and estimate the change in the dose if the same target volumes were treated with an active beam scanning technique. Methods: Measurements are done with a thimble ionization chamber and the Wellhofer MatriXX detector inside a Lucite phantom with field configurations based on the treatment of prostate cancer and medulloblastoma. The authors use a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation, demonstrated to agree well with measurements inside the primary field, to simulate fields delivered in the measurements. The partial contributions to the dose are separated in the simulation by particle type and origin. Results: The agreement between experiment and simulation in the out-of-field absorbed dose is within 30% at 10-20 cm from the field edge and 90% of the data agrees within 2 standard deviations. In passive scattering, the neutron contribution to the total dose dominates in the region downstream of the Bragg peak (65%-80% due to internally produced neutrons) and inside the phantom at distances more than 10-15 cm from the field edge. The equivalent doses using 10 for the neutron weighting factor at the entrance to the phantom and at 20 cm from the field edge are 2.2 and 2.6 mSv/Gy for the prostate cancer and cranial medulloblastoma fields, respectively. The equivalent dose at 15-20 cm from the field edge decreases with depth in passive scattering and increases with depth in active scanning. Therefore, active scanning has smaller out-of-field equivalent dose by factors of 30-45 in the entrance region and this factor decreases with depth

  6. Characterization of the radiation intelligent monitor, MIR7026 model, for environment equivalent dose measurements, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation presents safe conditions for the working people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes the methods, procedures and materials used to characterize the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), as an ambient dose equivalent meter, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results are in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainly in these tests was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  7. A correlation study of eye lens dose and personal dose equivalent for interventional cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J; Struelens, L; Dabin, J; Koukorava, C; Donadille, L; Jacob, S; Schnelzer, M; Auvinen, A; Vanhavere, F; Clairand, I

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the dosimetry part of the European ELDO project, funded by the DoReMi Network of Excellence, in which a method was developed to estimate cumulative eye lens doses for past practices based on personal dose equivalent values, H(p)(10), measured above the lead apron at several positions at the collar, chest and waist levels. Measurement campaigns on anthropomorphic phantoms were carried out in typical interventional settings considering different tube projections and configurations, beam energies and filtration, operator positions and access routes and using both mono-tube and biplane X-ray systems. Measurements showed that eye lens dose correlates best with H(p)(10) measured on the left side of the phantom at the level of the collar, although this correlation implicates high spreads (41 %). Nonetheless, for retrospective dose assessment, H(p)(10) records are often the only option for eye dose estimates and the typically used chest left whole-body dose measurement remains useful. PMID:23858492

  8. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  9. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  10. Investigation of photoneutron dose equivalent from high-energy photons in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial distribution of photoneutron dose equivalent during radiotherapy at different beam size, depth, and distance from a 15 MV linear accelerator was investigated with bubble detectors in a water phantom. The photoneutron dose equivalent was mainly from fast neutrons, and decreased with distance at a fixed field and with depth. Besides, photoneutron dose equivalent was slightly affected by beam size due to the variation of tungsten area exposed in the beam direction and photoneutrons occurred at the jaws. Fast photoneutron dose equivalent of shallow critical organs was represented still considerably outside the beam size

  11. Measurement of dose equivalent distribution on-board commercial jet aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual effective doses of aircrew members often exceed the limit of 1 mSv for the public due to the increased level of cosmic radiation at the flight altitudes, and thus, it is recommended to monitor them [International Commission on Radiation Protection. 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. ICRP Publication 60. Ann. ICRP 21(1-3), (1991)]. According to the Monte Carlo simulations [Battistoni, G., Ferrari, A., Pelliccioni, M. and Villari, R. Evaluation of the doses to aircrew members taking into consideration the aircraft structures. Adv. Space Res. 36, 1645-1652 (2005) and Ferrari, A., Pelliccioni, M. and Villari, R. Evaluation of the influence of aircraft shielding on the aircrew exposure through an aircraft mathematical model. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 108(2), 91-105 (2004)], the ambient dose equivalent rate H*(10) depends on the location in the aircraft. The aim of this article is to experimentally evaluate H*(10) on-board selected types of aircraft. The authors found that H*(10) values are higher in the front and the back of the cabin and lesser in the middle of the cabin. Moreover, total dosimetry characteristics obtained in this way are in a reasonable agreement with other data, in particular with the above-mentioned simulations. (authors)

  12. Local skin and eye lens equivalent doses in interventional neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandborg, Michael [Linkoeping University, Department of Radiological Sciences, Radiation Physics and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualisation (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Linkoeping (Sweden); Rossitti, Sandro [Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pettersson, Haakan [Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-03-15

    To assess patient skin and eye lens doses in interventional neuroradiology and to assess both stochastic and deterministic radiation risks. Kerma-area product (P{sub KA}) was recorded and skin doses measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters. Estimated dose at interventional reference point (IRP) was compared with measured absorbed doses. The average and maximum fluoroscopy times were 32 and 189 min for coiling and 40 and 144 min for embolisation. The average and maximum P{sub KA} for coiling were 121 and 436 Gy cm{sup 2}, respectively, and 189 and 677 Gy cm{sup 2} for embolisation. The average and maximum values of the measured maximum absorbed skin doses were 0.72 and 3.0 Sv, respectively, for coiling and 0.79 and 2.1 Sv for embolisation. Two out of the 52 patients received skin doses in excess of 2 Sv. The average and maximum doses to the eye lens (left eye) were 51 and 515 mSv (coiling) and 71 and 289 mSv (embolisation). The ratio between the measured dose and the dose at the IRP was 0.44 {+-} 0.18 mSv/mGy indicating that the dose displayed by the x-ray unit overestimates the maximum skin dose but is still a valuable indication of the dose. The risk of inducing skin erythema and lens cataract during our hospital procedures is therefore small. (orig.)

  13. Local skin and eye lens equivalent doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess patient skin and eye lens doses in interventional neuroradiology and to assess both stochastic and deterministic radiation risks. Kerma-area product (PKA) was recorded and skin doses measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters. Estimated dose at interventional reference point (IRP) was compared with measured absorbed doses. The average and maximum fluoroscopy times were 32 and 189 min for coiling and 40 and 144 min for embolisation. The average and maximum PKA for coiling were 121 and 436 Gy cm2, respectively, and 189 and 677 Gy cm2 for embolisation. The average and maximum values of the measured maximum absorbed skin doses were 0.72 and 3.0 Sv, respectively, for coiling and 0.79 and 2.1 Sv for embolisation. Two out of the 52 patients received skin doses in excess of 2 Sv. The average and maximum doses to the eye lens (left eye) were 51 and 515 mSv (coiling) and 71 and 289 mSv (embolisation). The ratio between the measured dose and the dose at the IRP was 0.44 ± 0.18 mSv/mGy indicating that the dose displayed by the x-ray unit overestimates the maximum skin dose but is still a valuable indication of the dose. The risk of inducing skin erythema and lens cataract during our hospital procedures is therefore small. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for high energy radiations, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer code system and basic data have been investigated for evaluating fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for photons and neutrons up to 10 Gev. The present work suggested that the conversion factors would be obtained by incorporating effective quality factors of charged particles into the HERMES (High Energy Radiation Monte Carlo Elaborate System) code system. The evaluation method of the effective values of the quality factors for charged particles of human body elements were established on the basis of the Q-L relationships specified in the ICRP Publication 60 ; These effective quality factors for charged particles are essential to the calculation of the dose equivalent conversion factors for neutrons. Effective dose and dose equivalents on the principal axis of the ICRU sphere were also calculated by use of the EGS4 code in the HERMES code system. The availability of dose equivalents in the ICRU sphere were discussed on the comparison with dose equivalents for high energy photons. (author)

  15. Development of Two-Dosemeter Algorithm for Better Estimation of Effective Dose Equivalent and Effective Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimal algorithm, which suitably combines two dosemeter readings, one dosemeter on the chest and the other on the back, for better estimation of effective dose equivalent (HE) and effective dose (E), was developed by utilising hundreds of broad parallel photon beam irradiation geometries. The developed algorithm, weighting front (chest) and back dosemeter readings by 0.58 and 0.42, respectively, was found to be superior to other currently available algorithms, neither underestimating HE or E by more than 14%, nor overestimating by more than a few tens of a per cent for a broad range of frontal and dorsal incident beams. Like other algorithms, however, this algorithm tends to overestimate HE and E significantly for the lateral, overhead and underfoot beam directions. This study also suggests that this overestimation problem significantly decreases when one uses typical commercial dosemeters instead of isotropic-responding dosemeters. (author)

  16. Size distributions of the ambient and radon daughter aerosols in southern England and implications for dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution of ambient aerosols indoors and outside have been measured at several urban, suburban and rural locations in southern England, using an eleven stage, wire screen diffusion battery. At four indoor locations with relatively high radon daughter concentrations, the size distributions of the radon daughter aerosol were also measured, using the diffusion battery in conjunction with Cr-39 etched track detectors of alpha-activity. The transformation from size distribution of the ambient aerosol to the radon daughter activity-size distribution was examined, using various models of radon daughter attachment rates. The implications of the radon daughter aerosol size distributions estimated for the different indoor and outdoor locations are discussed in terms of variation in the conversion between exposure and effective dose equivalent

  17. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report 2012 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following issues: Part A: General information: natural environmental radioactivity; artificial radioactivity in the environment; occupational radiation exposure; radiation exposures from medical applications; the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation; non-ionizing radiation. Part B: Current data and their evaluation: natural environmental radioactivity; artificial radioactivity in the environment; occupational radiation exposures; radiation exposures from medical applications; the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation; non-ionizing radiation. The report includes data on the stock of radioactive waste, radiation accidents and unusual events.

  18. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy

  19. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, T.I.; Wohni, T.

    1984-02-01

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy.

  20. The use of lineary-quadrate model of equivalent doses in neoplasms' radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical bases of lineary-quadrate model of equivalent doses as well as the principles of its use are presented. The tables and the formulae simplifying the mathematical calculations of equivalent doses are enclosed. Two computer programs DAFR and DARE are also given. 28 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs. (A.S.)

  1. Change of annual collective dose equivalent of radiation workers at KURRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The change of exposure dose equivalent of radiation workers at KURRI (Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute) in the past 30 years is reported together with the operational accomplishments. The reactor achieved criticality on June 24, 1964 and reached the normal power of 1000 kW on August 17 of the same year, and the normal power was elevated to 5000 kW on July 16, 1968 until today. The change of the annual effective dose equivalent, the collective dose equivalent, the average annual dose equivalent and the maximum dose equivalent are indicated in the table and the figure. The chronological table on the activities of the reactor is added. (T.H.)

  2. Determination of the equivalent of environmental dose, H*(d), in a radiotherapy installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to put into practice radiological protection has been required conversion factors for environmental dose equivalent determination to air kerma value for different kinds of photon and electron beams, such dose values have been determined in a spheric phantom of 30 cm diameter in a alignment field and expanded in a depth of this sphere. Details will be given for determining of equivalent dose distribution calculation using Monte Carlo computational method (ESG4) following the recommendations of ICRU. (Author)

  3. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  4. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects

  5. Equivalent dose determination using a quartz isothermal TL signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, D.A.G.; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    300 °C for 10 s. The decay curve can be represented well by the sum of two exponentially decaying functions plus a constant. The two decaying components hold the dosimetric information; they both appear to originate with the 325 °C region of the glow curve, and are thermally stable. This composite...... agreement with the expected burial dose in samples from a variety of depositional environments and ages. Our results suggest that measurement of the ITL signal at 270 °C enables the quartz 325 °C TL peak to be used for accurate dose measurements on a single aliquot. The signal allows dating over at least...

  6. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  7. Marrow cell kinetics model: Equivalent prompt dose approximations for two special cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M.D.; Jones, T.D.

    1992-11-01

    Two simple algebraic expressions are described for approximating the equivalent prompt dose'' as defined in the model of Jones et al. (1991). These approximations apply to two specific radiation exposure patterns: (1) a pulsed dose immediately followed by a protracted exposure at relatively low, constant dose rate and (2) an exponentially decreasing exposure field.

  8. Marrow cell kinetics model: Equivalent prompt dose approximations for two special cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M.D.; Jones, T.D.

    1992-11-01

    Two simple algebraic expressions are described for approximating the ``equivalent prompt dose`` as defined in the model of Jones et al. (1991). These approximations apply to two specific radiation exposure patterns: (1) a pulsed dose immediately followed by a protracted exposure at relatively low, constant dose rate and (2) an exponentially decreasing exposure field.

  9. The effect of radiation intervals on the thermoluminescence equivalent doses of debris flow samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate measurement of equivalent doses is the key to the dating of debris flow samples. Using different radiation intervals measure debris flow material samples, the equivalent doses obtained are different, indicating irradiation interval impacts the equivalent dose of the debris flow material samples. Test debris flow samples used the known equivalent dose of 30 Gy, and measure them in different intervals of irradiation dosimetry. 2.5 Gy/min β-source (90Sr-90Y) irradiation intervals were selected to 1, 2, 4, 6 min, the equivalent dose obtained respectively 19.3, 22.3, 26.4, 23.0 Gy; 8 Gy/min of β source (90Sr-90Y) irradiation intervals were selected to 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 min, the equivalent dose obtained respectively 17.6, 19.6, 25.3, 15.6 Gy. The research indicate that he most suitable irradiation interval which by the dose rate 2.5 Gy/min of the β source (90Sr-90Y) measure the debris flow material is 4 min. And the most suitable irradiation interval which by the dose rate 8 Gy/min of the β source (90Sr-90Y) measure the debris flow material is 1.5 min. (authors)

  10. Medical irradiation and the use of the 'effective dose equivalent' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By applying the linear-dose effect relation, the weighting factors for total risks recommended by IRCP can be transformed to weighting factors for somatic effects. Another weighting factor Msub(s) has to be used which takes into account the dependence of the latent period for occurrence of malignant disease and the variation of the incidence with time. On this basis a somatically significant dose equivalent can be defined as 'the dose equivalent which if received by every member of the population, would be expected to produce the same total somatic injury to the population as does the actual dose equivalent received by the various individuals', and an approximation has been derived for this. Tables are presented of the somatic effective dose equivalents calculated for different x-ray examinations for various organs and tissues. The S.E.D. equivalents have also been calculated for some of the most frequent radiopharmaceutical examinations, together with the absorbed dose to some critical organs. An attempt was also made to calculated leukemia significant dose equivalent based on absorbed dose to the marrow and a leukemia significant factor. (U.K.)

  11. Radiation-equivalent dose of chemical mutagens: problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation equivalent unit was intended as a means of comparing chemically-induced genetic effects with one another and with that of radiation. It was to be a unit of convenience with no absolute value. In this concept the fact that radiations and chemicals might act by different mechanisms is unimportant since only the effect is compared. Although dissimilarity of mechanism is of no consequence when comparing effects of different mutagens with the same end-point in the same species, it is important that the mechanism be similar when extrapolating to man from the effect of a given mutagen in another system. That is why mammalian systems are preferable to sub-mammalian systems for this purpose

  12. Application of combined TLD and CR-39 PNTD method for measurement of total dose and dose equivalent on ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, no single passive detector has been found that measures dose equivalent from ionizing radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit. We have developed the I.S.S. Passive Dosimetry System (P.D.S.), utilizing a combination of TLD in the form of the self-contained Pille TLD system and stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (P.N.T.D.) oriented in three mutually orthogonal directions, to measure total dose and dose equivalent aboard the International Space Station (I.S.S.). The Pille TLD system, consisting on an on board reader and a large number of Ca2SO4:Dy TLD cells, is used to measure absorbed dose. The Pille TLD cells are read out and annealed by the I.S.S. crew on orbit, such that dose information for any time period or condition, e.g. for E.V.A. or following a solar particle event, is immediately available. Near-tissue equivalent CR-39 P.N.T.D. provides Let spectrum, dose, and dose equivalent from charged particles of LET∞H2O ≥ 10 keV/μm, including the secondaries produced in interactions with high-energy neutrons. Dose information from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is used to correct the absorbed dose component ≥ 10 keV/μm measured in TLD to obtain total dose. Dose equivalent from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is combined with the dose component <10 keV/μm measured in TLD to obtain total dose equivalent. Dose rates ranging from 165 to 250 μGy/day and dose equivalent rates ranging from 340 to 450 μSv/day were measured aboard I.S.S. during the Expedition 2 mission in 2001. Results from the P.D.S. are consistent with those from other passive detectors tested as part of the ground-based I.C.C.H.I.B.A.N. intercomparison of space radiation dosimeters. (authors)

  13. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs

  14. Exposure reductions encouraged by the determination of the effective dose equivalent for non-uniform exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Order 5480.11 requires calculation of the effective dose equivalent (EDE) due to non-uniform radiation fields using ICRP-26 weighting factors. To comply with this requirement, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) developed a simple dose calculation scheme based on a draft report by the External Dosimetry Working Group of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The calculations involved are fairly simple and provide a conservative dose estimate. The resulting EDE estimate provides a much better representation of the risk to the monitored individual than the more prevalent practice of assigning the highest measured dose. Details of the dose assessment methodology are included as an attachment

  15. Can we use the equivalent sphere model to approximate organ doses in space radiation environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-10-01

    For space radiation protection it is often useful to calculate dose or dose equivalent in blood forming organs (BFO). It has been customary to use a 5cm equivalent sphere to approximate the BFO dose. However, many previous studies have concluded that a 5cm sphere gives very different dose values from the exact BFO values. A study by Bier, Townsend and Maxson (Adv. Space Res. 21, 1998) concludes that a 9cm sphere is a reasonable approximation for BFO doses in solar particle event environments. In this study we use a deterministic radiation transport to investigate the reason behind these observations and to extend earlier studies. We take different space radiation environments, including solar particle events and galactic cosmic rays at different solar modulation, and calculate the dose and dose equivalent in the skin, eye and BFO using their thickness distribution functions from the Computerized Anatomical Man model. We then determine in which cases and at what radius parameters the equivalent sphere model is a reasonable approximation.

  16. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases. PMID:27455499

  17. Calculation of total effective dose equivalent and collective dose in the event of a LOCA in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and collective dose (CD) are calculated for the most adverse potential accident in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant from the viewpoint of radionuclides release to the environment. Calculations are performed using a Gaussian diffusion model and a slightly modified version of AIREM computer code to adopt for conditions in Bushehr. The results are comparable with the final safety analysis report which used DOZAM code. Results of our calculations show no excessive dose in populated regions. Maximum TEDE is determined to be in the WSW direction. CD in the area around the nuclear power plant by a distance of 30 km (138 man Sv) is far below the accepted limits. Thyroid equivalent dose is also calculated for the WSW direction (maximum 25.6 mSv) and is below the limits at various distances from the reactor stack. (authors)

  18. Evaluation of annual average equivalent dose of workers for nuclear medicine facilities in the Northeast Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira, Renata F.; Silva Neto, Jose Almeida; Antonio Filho, Joao, E-mail: jaf@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE/DEN), Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Luiz A.P., E-mail: lasantos@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine (NM) is a radiation technique normally used to make therapeutic treatments or diagnosis. In this technique a small quantity of radioactive material combined with drugs is used to have the diagnostic images. Any activity involving ionizing radiation should be justified and it must have its working procedures to be optimized. The purpose of this paper is show the importance of optimization of the radiation protection systems and determines an optimal dose for occupational people in nuclear medicine. Such an optimization aims to avoid any possible contamination or accidents, and reduce costs of protection. The optimization for a service which manipulates ionizing radiation can be done using different techniques, and among other, we can mention the technique of expanded cost-benefit analysis. The data collection was divided into the equivalent dose annual average and the equivalent dose average in period. The database for this study was a survey of received doses from 87 occupational people of 10 nuclear medicine facilities in the northeast Brazil and it was made in a period of 13 years (1979-1991). The results show that the equivalent dose average in the period H was 2.39 mSv. Actually, since 1992 the analysis is in progress and it shows that equivalent dose annual average could reduce even more if procedures of work are followed correctly. (author)

  19. Assessment of the ambient dose rate around research reactors by thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Tanveer A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of radiation levels in and around the nuclear research reactors is essential to safe-guarding life and the environment. Background radiation monitoring at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science & Technology (PINSTECH has been carried out since the early sixties, before the criticality of the 5 MW Pakistan Research Reactor, so as to confirm the safe operation of PINSTECH nuclear facilities. In the present study, ambient dose rate levels were measured around PINSTECH by using TLD-200 (G-2 cards installed at 15 different locations over a five year period (1998-2002. The mean dose rates for individual locations in the said period ranged from 0.14 ± 0.01 to 0.19 ± 0.03 µSv/h, with a mean value of 0.16 ± 0.03 µSv/h. The cu- mulative average annual effective dose equivalent spread over 5 years was 204.4 ± 17 µSv. The data were compared with the world and averages in other countries. It was concluded that, from the health hazard point of view, the operation of research reactors and other nuclear facilities at PINSTECH presents no risk to public health.

  20. Assessment of the ambient dose rate around research reactors by thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring of radiation levels in and around the nuclear research reactors is essential to safeguarding life and the environment. Background radiation monitoring at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) has been carried out since the early sixties, before the criticality of the 5 MW Pakistan Research Reactor, so as to confirm the safe operation of PINSTECH nuclear facilities. In the present study, ambient dose rate levels were measured around PINSTECH by using TLD-200 (G-2 cards) installed at 15 different locations over a five year period (1998-2002). The mean dose rates for individual locations in the said period ranged from 0.1 0.01 to 0.19 ± 0.03 μSv/h, with a mean value of 0.16 ±0.03 μSv/h. The cumulative average annual effective dose equivalent spread over 5 years was 204.4 ± 17 μSv. The data were compared with the world and averages in other countries. It was concluded that, from the health hazard point of view, the operation of research reactors and other nuclear facilities at PINSTECH presents no risk to public health. (author)

  1. Reconstruction of chronic dose equivalents for Rongelap and Utirik residents: 1954 to 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, E T; Greenhouse, N A; Miltenberger, R P

    1980-10-01

    From June 1946 to August 1958, the US Department of Defense and Atomic Energy Commission conducted nuclear weapons tests in the Northern Marshall Islands. BRAVO, an aboveground test in the Castle series, resulted in radioactive fallout contaminating Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. On March 3, 1954, the inhabitants of these atolls were relocated until radiation exposure rates declined to acceptable levels. Environmental and personnel radiological monitoring programs were begun in the mid 1950's by Brookhaven National Laboratory to ensure that dose equivalents received or committed remained within US Federal Radiation Council Guidelines for members of the general public. Body burden and dose equivalent histories along with activity ingestion patterns post return are presented. Dosimetric methods, results, and internal dose equivalent distributions for subgroups of the population are also described.

  2. Reconstruction of chronic dose equivalents for Rongelap and Utirik residents: 1954 to 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From June 1946 to August 1958, the US Department of Defense and Atomic Energy Commission conducted nuclear weapons tests in the Northern Marshall Islands. BRAVO, an aboveground test in the Castle series, resulted in radioactive fallout contaminating Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. On March 3, 1954, the inhabitants of these atolls were relocated until radiation exposure rates declined to acceptable levels. Environmental and personnel radiological monitoring programs were begun in the mid 1950's by Brookhaven National Laboratory to ensure that dose equivalents received or committed remained within US Federal Radiation Council Guidelines for members of the general public. Body burden and dose equivalent histories along with activity ingestion patterns post return are presented. Dosimetric methods, results, and internal dose equivalent distributions for subgroups of the population are also described

  3. Evaluation of fluctuation of equivalent dose rate due to radionuclide radiation in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide gamma radiation in building materials twist natural gamma field, therefore, dosimetry investigation of ionizing radiation of natural radionuclides was carried out near various building constructions. It was detected that equivalent dose rate of natural radionuclides increases exponentially (this empirical dependence stays in force to 10-15 meters from a building) while approaching a building under investigation. It was measured that buildings increase ionizing radiation approximately 1,5-2 times. Wooden buildings are an exception. They change natural background to 5 %. The values of equivalent dose rate in buildings are distributed according to Gaussian distribution. The measured equivalent dose rate is 1,5 times smaller in wooden houses then in block, silicate and ceramic bricks houses. (author)

  4. Determination of eye lenses dose equivalent in terms of Hp(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Italian radioprotection legislation requires the determination of personal dose equivalent in terms of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) and the determination of the eye lenses dose equivalent in terms of Hp(3). Whereas the calibration of a dosemeter for the determination of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) is feasible, the calibration of a dosemeter in terms of Hp(3) is impossible, owing to the absence of the suitable phantom and the conversion coefficients hpk(3) from air kerma to Hp(3). Using an anthropomorphic phantom for the irradiation, the aim of this work is to determine the experimental values of the conversion coefficients and to relate the result of the dosemeter worn on the forehead with the dose equivalent to the eye lenses. The study is performed in the X energy range from 30 keV to 100 keV, i.e. the one most widely used in medical practices

  5. General validity of linear summation of dose equivalents for mixed radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current definition of dose equivalent for a mixture of radiations used in radiation protection implies some interaction between the radiations. This interaction cannot be derived from the existing biophysical models. A simple concept of interaction is introduced based on the postulate that in the chain of radiation inactivation events, there exists an intermediate stage where different initial lesions, produced by different radiations, become functionally indistinguishable. Hence, they are additive thereafter to produce the same end point observed. It can be shown that the definition of dose equivalent and the definition of average quality factors for mixed radiations can be derived from this concept. Furthermore, this simple concept can be shown to be consistent with many of the published experimental results in radiobiology using mixed radiations. The lesion additivity concept helps to provide both theoretical and experimental support for the otherwise arbitrary definitions of dose equivalent and average quality factor

  6. The ICRP protection quantities, equivalent and effective dose: their basis and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.D. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Streffer, C. [Institute for Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Equivalent and effective dose are protection quantities defined by the The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). They are frequently referred to simply as dose and may be misused. They provide a method for the summation of doses received from external sources and from intakes of radionuclides for comparison with dose limits and constraints, set to limit the risk of cancer and hereditary effects. For the assessment of internal doses, ICRP provides dose coefficients (Sv Bq{sup -1}) for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by workers and members of the public, including children. Dose coefficients have also been calculated for in utero exposures following maternal intakes and for the transfer of radionuclides in breast milk. In each case, values are given of committed equivalent doses to organs and tissues and committed effective dose. Their calculation involves the use of defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including the use of reference phantoms representing the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used as a simple representation of the different effectiveness of different radiations in causing stochastic effects at low doses. A single set of tissue weighting factors is used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, despite age- and gender-related differences in estimates of risk and contributions to risk. The results are quantities that are not individual specific but are reference values for protection purposes, relating to doses to phantoms. The ICRP protection quantities are not intended for detailed assessments of dose and risk to individuals. They should not be used in epidemiological analyses or the assessment of the possibility of occurrence and severity of tissue reactions (deterministic effects) at higher doses. Dose coefficients are published as reference values and as such have no associated uncertainty. Assessments of

  7. The ICRP protection quantities, equivalent and effective dose: their basis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J D; Streffer, C

    2007-01-01

    Equivalent and effective dose are protection quantities defined by the The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). They are frequently referred to simply as dose and may be misused. They provide a method for the summation of doses received from external sources and from intakes of radionuclides for comparison with dose limits and constraints, set to limit the risk of cancer and hereditary effects. For the assessment of internal doses, ICRP provides dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1)) for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by workers and members of the public, including children. Dose coefficients have also been calculated for in utero exposures following maternal intakes and for the transfer of radionuclides in breast milk. In each case, values are given of committed equivalent doses to organs and tissues and committed effective dose. Their calculation involves the use of defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including the use of reference phantoms representing the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used as a simple representation of the different effectiveness of different radiations in causing stochastic effects at low doses. A single set of tissue weighting factors is used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, despite age- and gender-related differences in estimates of risk and contributions to risk. The results are quantities that are not individual specific but are reference values for protection purposes, relating to doses to phantoms. The ICRP protection quantities are not intended for detailed assessments of dose and risk to individuals. They should not be used in epidemiological analyses or the assessment of the possibility of occurrence and severity of tissue reactions (deterministic effects) at higher doses. Dose coefficients are published as reference values and as such have no associated uncertainty. Assessments of uncertainties

  8. The ICRP protection quantities, equivalent and effective dose: their basis and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equivalent and effective dose are protection quantities defined by the The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). They are frequently referred to simply as dose and may be misused. They provide a method for the summation of doses received from external sources and from intakes of radionuclides for comparison with dose limits and constraints, set to limit the risk of cancer and hereditary effects. For the assessment of internal doses, ICRP provides dose coefficients (Sv Bq-1) for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by workers and members of the public, including children. Dose coefficients have also been calculated for in utero exposures following maternal intakes and for the transfer of radionuclides in breast milk. In each case, values are given of committed equivalent doses to organs and tissues and committed effective dose. Their calculation involves the use of defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including the use of reference phantoms representing the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used as a simple representation of the different effectiveness of different radiations in causing stochastic effects at low doses. A single set of tissue weighting factors is used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, despite age- and gender-related differences in estimates of risk and contributions to risk. The results are quantities that are not individual specific but are reference values for protection purposes, relating to doses to phantoms. The ICRP protection quantities are not intended for detailed assessments of dose and risk to individuals. They should not be used in epidemiological analyses or the assessment of the possibility of occurrence and severity of tissue reactions (deterministic effects) at higher doses. Dose coefficients are published as reference values and as such have no associated uncertainty. Assessments of uncertainties

  9. Annual dose equivalents estimation received by Cienfuegos population due medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study represents the first evaluation of the effective equivalent dose that receives the population of the Cienfuegos province in Cuba because of medical practice. The evaluation is based on the tables of doses depending on several parameters that influence over these ones, and also based on large diagnostic examinations statistics of all medical institutions over a 9 years period. Values of examinations frequency, contribution to total dose from radiography, fluoroscopy, dental radiography and nuclear medicine, and other characteristics of the last ones are offered. A comparative reflection dealing with received doses by radiography and fluoroscopy techniques is also included. (authors). 4 refs

  10. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification

  11. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Drake, P. [Vattenfall AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Lindborg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Schmitz, Th. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Tichy, M

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification.

  12. Determination of Personal Dose Equivalent at INFLPR 7 MeV Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the measurements of the personal dose equivalent performed in INFLPR - 7 MeV Linear Accelerator building by means of the secondary standard chamber Hp (10), T34035 type. The conventional true value of the personal dose equivalent Hp (10, R, a), in a slab phantom for the radiation quality R, at a angle of incidence between the radiation beam and the normal to the chamber front face, is directly proportional with the electric charge measured by the chamber, QR, for the radiation quality S and the angle incidence a = 00. The measurements were made for the accelerator electron operation mode

  13. Measurement of absorbed dose with a bone-equivalent extrapolation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) made of Solid Water trade mark sign and bone-equivalent material was used for determining absorbed dose in a bone-equivalent phantom irradiated with clinical radiation beams (cobalt-60 gamma rays; 6 and 18 MV x rays; and 9 and 15 MeV electrons). The dose was determined with the Spencer-Attix cavity theory, using ionization gradient measurements and an indirect determination of the chamber air-mass through measurements of chamber capacitance. The collected charge was corrected for ionic recombination and diffusion in the chamber air volume following the standard two-voltage technique. Due to the hybrid chamber design, correction factors accounting for scatter deficit and electrode composition were determined and applied in the dose equation to obtain absorbed dose in bone for the equivalent homogeneous bone phantom. Correction factors for graphite electrodes were calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and the calculated results were verified through relative air cavity dose measurements for three different polarizing electrode materials: graphite, steel, and brass in conjunction with a graphite collecting electrode. Scatter deficit, due mainly to loss of lateral scatter in the hybrid chamber, reduces the dose to the air cavity in the hybrid PEEC in comparison with full bone PEEC by 0.7% to ∼2% depending on beam quality and energy. In megavoltage photon and electron beams, graphite electrodes do not affect the dose measurement in the Solid Water trade mark sign PEEC but decrease the cavity dose by up to 5% in the bone-equivalent PEEC even for very thin graphite electrodes (<0.0025 cm). In conjunction with appropriate correction factors determined with Monte Carlo techniques, the uncalibrated hybrid PEEC can be used for measuring absorbed dose in bone material to within 2% for high-energy photon and electron beams

  14. [Equivalent dose or dose equivalence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franić, Z

    1994-03-01

    In the Croatian language the terms denoting certain physical quantities in the field of radiation protection dosimetry lack precision. Consequently, either the English expressions or mathematical formulas are used instead. The situation is even worse as only a limited number of textbooks, reference books and professional papers are available in the Croatian language. This paper reviews dosimetric quantities and their definitions, and sets forth a survey of the radiation dosimetry terms in literature. The terminology is both non-uniform and imprecise, especially since the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have introduced new concepts of some dosimetric quantities. Also, Croatian terms for certain dosimetric quantities still have not been fully accepted. Bearing in mind the need for clear and well defined technical terms the author proposes Croatian terms for several dosimetric quantities. PMID:8067912

  15. A system for 3-D absorbed dose measurements with tissue-equivalence for thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ferrous sulphate gel with a proper composition to thermalise epithermal neutrons with tissue equivalence with brain tissue gives the possibility of making phantoms which act as a continuous dosimeter for the gamma radiation, with the possibility of 3-D dose determination. If in the phantom a volume of gel containing 10B (in the amount typical for BNCT) is set, information on the absorbed dose in the tumour site may also be drawn. ((orig.))

  16. Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A; Stewart, Robert D; Farr, Jonathan B; Hsi, Wen C

    2006-07-01

    Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10,000 children. PMID:16898451

  17. Calculation of personal dose equivalent for positron-emitting radionuclides using Monte Carlo code EGS5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion coefficients, H'(d,α)/φ, for monoenergetic positrons and positron-emitting radionuclides were calculated by using the user code UCICRPM of the Monte Carlo code EGS5 to estimate the radiation dose for medical staff involved in positron emission tomography examinations. From these coefficients, the dose equivalent rates per unit activity at 0.07 and 10 mm depths in a soft tissue for a straight-line source of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) were calculated by using the developed user code UCF18DOSE. The dose equivalent rates per unit activity at 0.07 and 10 mm depths were measured by using a personal dosemeter (DOSE 3) under the same conditions as those considered in the calculation. The calculated dose equivalent rates per unit activity at 0.07 and 10 mm depths were 0.116 and 0.0352 pSv min-1 Bq-1, respectively, at 20 cm from the 18F-FDG injection tube. (authors)

  18. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 197 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose Equivalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Alpha particles, fission fragments, heavy nuclei 20 1 All values relate to the radiation incident on the... (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR... Dose Equivalent Unless otherwise directed by NRC, DOE shall use the radiation weighting factors...

  19. Dependence on age at intake of committed dose equivalents from radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of committed dose equivalents on age at intake is needed to assess the significance of exposures of young persons among the general public resulting from inhaled or ingested radionuclides. The committed dose equivalents, evaluated using ICRP principles, depend on the body dimensions of the young person at the time of intake of a radionuclide and on subsequent body growth. Representation of growth by a series of exponential segments facilitates the derivation of general expressions for the age dependence of committed dose equivalents if metabolic models do not change with age. The additional assumption that intakes of radionuclides in air or food are proportional to a person's energy expenditure (implying age-independent dietary composition) enables the demonstration that the age of the most highly exposed 'critical groups' of the general public from these radionuclides is either about 1 year or 17 years. With the above assumptions the exposure of the critical group is less than three times the exposure of adult members of the general public. Approximate values of committed dose equivalents which avoid both underestimation and excessive overestimation are shown to be obtainable by simplified procedures. Modified procedures are suggested for use if metabolic models change with age. (author)

  20. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the α/β ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor α/β and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF2) data, and the above α/β ratio, the estimated median α value was 0.077 Gy-1, β was 0.009 Gy-2, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy9.3 (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis

  1. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent on student's practice on intra-oral dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tried to discuss the problems on radiological protection of students in the practice of technique of intra-oral radiography with use of classmates. This radiographic practice has been performed after the technical training use of 'DXTTR' as a preclinical training. The practice was performed as training to take peri-apical, bite-wing, occlusal and eccentric projections. The mean film numbers which were used to complete those technique were 56 films. In these practice, dosimetries were performed on six locations of the body surface of every student who was taken radiograms using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measured locations were orbit, bilateral submandible, neck, chest and abdomen. The effective dose equivalent was estimated using weighting factors of International Comission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) pub. 26 and the values of tissue dose equivalent obtained by TLD measurements. The results showed that the mean value of dose equivalent of each part was 5.40 mSv at orbit, 5.06 mSv at submandible, 0.75 mSv at neck, 0.04 mSv at chest and 0.02 mSv at abdomen. The maximum value of effective equivalent dose was 17.03 mSv which was lower than the dose equivalent limit for workers (50 mSv/year) recommended by ICRP pub. 26. The mean value of effective dose equivalent was 2.36 mSv. ICRP recommended the radiation protection for students aged 18 years or over that the procedures for restricting exposure should be broadly similar to those for occupational exposure. So the results indicate that those training was considered to be controlled in some reasonable level. The mean value of risk was estimated to be 3.94 x 10-5. Because intra-oral radiographic training with use of classmates is performed under extreme non-uniform irradiation, the evaluation of effective dose equivalent was considered to be important to control this special educational exposure and useful for optimization of the educational programs of radiographic technical training. (author)

  2. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from panoramic radiography to the critical organs of head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalent and effective dose, and estimate radiation risk to the critical organs of head and neck region from the use of adult and child mode in panoramic radiography. The results were as follows. 1. The salivary glands showed the highest equivalent and effective dose in adult and child mode. The equivalent and effective dose in adult mode were 837 μSv and 20.93 μSv, those in child mode were 462 μSv and 11.54 μSv, respectively. 2. Total effective doses to the critical head and neck organs were estimated 34.2l μSv in adult mode, 20.14 μSv in child mode. From these data, the probabilities of stochastic effect from adult and child mode were 2.50xl0-6 and 1.47x10-6 3. The other remainder showed the greatest risk of fatal cancer. The risk estimate were 4.5 and 2.7 fatal malignancies in adult and child mode from million examinations. The bone marrow and thyroid gland showed about 0.1 fatal cancer in adult. and child mode from these examinations.

  3. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from panoramic radiography to the critical organs of head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ae Ryeon [Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalent and effective dose, and estimate radiation risk to the critical organs of head and neck region from the use of adult and child mode in panoramic radiography. The results were as follows. 1. The salivary glands showed the highest equivalent and effective dose in adult and child mode. The equivalent and effective dose in adult mode were 837 {mu}Sv and 20.93 {mu}Sv, those in child mode were 462 {mu}Sv and 11.54 {mu}Sv, respectively. 2. Total effective doses to the critical head and neck organs were estimated 34.2l {mu}Sv in adult mode, 20.14 {mu}Sv in child mode. From these data, the probabilities of stochastic effect from adult and child mode were 2.50xl0{sup -6} and 1.47x10{sup -6} 3. The other remainder showed the greatest risk of fatal cancer. The risk estimate were 4.5 and 2.7 fatal malignancies in adult and child mode from million examinations. The bone marrow and thyroid gland showed about 0.1 fatal cancer in adult. and child mode from these examinations.

  4. Evaluation of Equivalent Dose Rate of Interim Dry Storage Casks Loaded with Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equivalent dose rate calculations of the CASTOR RBMK-1500 and CONSTOR RBMK-1500 casks were performed using SCALE 4.3 computer codes system. These casks are planned for an interim storage of spent nuclear fuel at Ignalina NPP. The dose rate calculations were made on the sidelong, upper and lower surface of the cask and at the certain distance. Results show that dose rate values on the surface of the cask are much less then permissible value 1000 μSv/h when average burnup of fuel assembly is 20 GWd/tU. (author)

  5. Influence of radiocesium transfer and decontamination on ambient dose in Japanese forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-depositional migration of radiocesium and decontamination on ambient dose rate in Japanese forest environment following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. We measured cesium-137 deposition from canopy to forest floor in association with rainfall and litterfall in two coniferous stands (plantation of Japanese cedar) and a deciduous broad-leaved forest stand (oak with red pine). We also measured temporal evolution of ambient dose rate at different height in each forest site. Radiocesium inventory balance in each forest component (e.g., canopy, litter and mineral soil layer) were established to determine causes of the measured changes of ambient dose rate in three forest sites. Furthermore, we assessed influence of forest decontamination (removal of organic layer of forest floor) on spatial pattern of radiocesium at the forest floor and reduction of ambient dose rate.

  6. Scattered neutron dose equivalent from an active scanning proton beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A study of neutron production from a novel active scanning proton beam delivery system at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI) has been performed. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using a neutron rem (roentgen equivalent in man) detector which has an upper energy limit of 10 MeV. Measurement were taken at 0, 45, and 90 degrees from the proton beam central axis and for various proton beam energies (127-208 MeV) and scanned field sizes ( 25-144 cm2. The maximum neutron dose observed was 0.43 mSv / (proton treatment Gy) at 90 degrees from the beam axis for a beam energy of 208.4 MeV and a scanned field size of 144 cm. It is still possible to further mitigate this secondary neutron dose during treatment by optimizing parameters within the treatment nozzle and using shielding.

  7. Dose equivalent measurements in a strongly pulsed high-energy radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S; Kyllonen, J E; Menzel, Hans Gregor; Otto, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The stray radiation field outside the shielding of high-energy accelerators comprises neutrons, photons and charged particles with a wide range of energies. Often, accelerators operate by accelerating and ejecting short pulses of particles, creating an analogue, pulsed radiation field. The pulses can be as short as 10 mu s with high instantaneous fluence rates and dose rates. Measurements of average dose equivalent (rate) for radiation protection purposes in these fields present a challenge for instrumentation. The performance of three instruments (i.e. a recombination chamber, the Sievert Instrument and a HANDITEPC) measuring total dose equivalent is compared in a high-energy reference radiation field (CERF) and a strongly pulsed, high-energy radiation field at the CERN proton synchrotron (PS).

  8. Direction distributions of neutrons and reference values of the personal dose equivalent in workplace fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the EC project EVIDOS, double-differential (energy and direction) fluence spectra were determined by means of novel direction spectrometers. By folding the spectra with fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients, contributions to H*(10) for 14 directions, and values of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and the effective dose E for 6 directions of a person's orientation in the field were determined. The results of the measurements and calculations obtained within the EVIDOS project in workplace fields in nuclear installations in Europe, i.e., at Krummel (boiling water reactor and transport cask), at Mol (Venus research reactor and fuel facility Belgonucleaire) and at Ringhals (pressurised reactor and transport cask) are presented. (authors)

  9. Risk estimation of benzene-induced leukemia by radiation equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki epidemiological study, risk assessment system for radiation has been well developed and is practically applied to the international protection standards. Hence, defining the radiation equivalent dose for chemical agents could place in the order of their risk. As well as the radiation, benzene causes leukemia to humans. Therefore, we evaluated the radiation-equivalent dose for benzene based on chromosome aberration rates induced by its metabolites and low-dose rate radiation because chromosome aberration is thought to be closely related to the leukemogenesis. Using radiation risk coefficient, the leukemia risk caused by 1 mg/m3 benzene inhalation was estimated 5.5 - 7.3 x 10-8, which is underestimated compared to other studies based on human epidemiological researches. (author)

  10. Direction distributions of neutrons and reference values of the personal dose equivalent in workplace fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T; Boschung, M; Coeck, M; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Fiechtner, A; Lacoste, V; Lindborg, L; Reginatto, M; Schuhmacher, H; Tanner, R; Vanhavere, F

    2007-01-01

    Within the EC project EVIDOS, double-differential (energy and direction) fluence spectra were determined by means of novel direction spectrometers. By folding the spectra with fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients, contributions to H*(10) for 14 directions, and values of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and the effective dose E for 6 directions of a person's orientation in the field were determined. The results of the measurements and calculations obtained within the EVIDOS project in workplace fields in nuclear installations in Europe, i.e., at Krümmel (boiling water reactor and transport cask), at Mol (Venus research reactor and fuel facility Belgonucléaire) and at Ringhals (pressurised reactor and transport cask) are presented. PMID:17369265

  11. Equivalent uniform dose for accelerated partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This study aims to quantify the radiobiology of the MammoSite applicator and examine whether there is a relationship between equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and radiotherapy-associated toxicity. Methods and materials: A previously-published version of the linear quadratic (LQ) model, designed to address the impact of dose-gradients in brachytherapy applications, was used to determine the biological effective dose (BED), equivalent dose in 2 Gray per fraction (EQD2) and EUD for the most common fractionation scheme for the MammoSite catheter (34 Gy in 10 fractions prescribed to 1 cm from the balloon surface), using a range of balloon sizes in a series of patients treated with single or multiple dwell positions. Toxicity from the MammoSite catheter was assessed and statistical associations with the calculated EUDs were investigated. Results: The acute- and late-toxicity EUDs respectively range from 34.8–39.4 Gy and 33.4–37.6 Gy, with EUD decreasing as balloon diameter increases and/or the number of dwell positions increases. There was a positive association between EUD and hyperpigmentation and telangiectasia. Conclusions: For APBI using the Mammosite applicator, EUD is higher than the marginal prescription dose and, for the dose-fractionation patterns considered here, was associated with acute and late skin toxicity. EUD is a potentially useful parameter to characterize non-uniform dose distributions related to brachytherapy treatments. Further evaluation in future studies is warranted

  12. Effective equivalent dose in the critical group due to release of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure that the emissions of radioactive material by liquid and gaseous pathways are below applicable limits it is necessary to evaluate the effective equivalent dose in the critical group, which is a magnitude that takes into consideration the modeling used and the terms radioactive activity source. The calculation of this dose considers each radionuclide released by the activity of Nuclear plant, liquid and gaseous by, and the sum of the values obtained is controlled so that this dose does not exceed the goals of the regulatory body, the CNEN and the goals established by the Nuclear power plant. To hit these targets various controls are used such as: controls for effluent monitors instrumentation, environmental monitoring programs, effluent release controls and dose calculation in the environment. According to the findings, it is concluded that during the period of operation of the plants, this dose is below of the required limits

  13. Ambient dose measurement and personal dosimetry in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose measurements reported were performed with TLD dosemeters consisting of two glass tubes filled with CaSO4:TM powder. The measurements were done around a positron emission tomograph, in a nuclear medicine outpatient department, and in a hospital (therapy with unsealed radioactive substances). The personal doses measured during the campaign reported did not exceed the range of radiation doses and its fluctuations due to natural radiation exposure of the population. (DG)

  14. Estimates of internal-dose equivalent from inhalation and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents internal radiation dose conversion factors for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of nuclear fuel cycles. This volume provides an updated summary of estimates of committed dose equivalent for radionuclides considered in three previous Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports. Intakes by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the deposition and retention of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The gastorintestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in systemic organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions, recommended in ICRP Publication 30. The first-year annual dose rate, maximum annual dose rate, and fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each radionuclide is given for selected target organs and the effective dose equivalent. These estimates include contributions from specified source organs plus the systemic activity residing in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has been incorporated into these estimates. 15 references

  15. Estimates of internal-dose equivalent from inhalation and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents internal radiation dose conversion factors for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of nuclear fuel cycles. This volume provides an updated summary of estimates of committed dose equivalent for radionuclides considered in three previous Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports. Intakes by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the deposition and retention of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m are given. The gastorintestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in systemic organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions, recommended in ICRP Publication 30. The first-year annual dose rate, maximum annual dose rate, and fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each radionuclide is given for selected target organs and the effective dose equivalent. These estimates include contributions from specified source organs plus the systemic activity residing in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has been incorporated into these estimates. 15 references.

  16. The application of equivalent uniform dose-based objective function in intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To propose an objective function based on equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to investigate the feasibility of its application in IMRT optimization. Methods: Both EUD-based and dose- based objective functions were applied to optimize the IMRT plan for 6 lung cancer patients. Genetic algorithm was selected and the population size, number of generation, mutation rate and crossover frequency were 101, 100, 0.008 and 0.8. The algorithm was implemented in C program and the dose calculation model was based on three-dimensional pencil beams. Results: It was found that EUD-based criteria provided better target coverage and was capable of improving the sparing of critical structures beyond the specified requirements. The penalty function led to much-improved target dose homogeneity. The average calculated EUD for organs at risk, normal tissue and tumor were 9.32 Gy, 35.21 Gy and 83.76 Gy. The corresponding data for the dose-based plan were 12.20 Gy, 36.96 Gy and 86.21 Gy. Conclusions: Equivalent uniform dose based objective function needs only a small number of parameters and allows the exploration of a much larger universe of solutions. It is nice derivability and convexity. It also could be a surrogate of biologic index such as tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability. (authors)

  17. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons (2H+) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  18. Estimation of the effects of normal tissue sparing using equivalent uniform dose-based optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we intend to estimate the effects of normal tissue sparing between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment plans generated with and without a dose volume (DV-based physical cost function using equivalent uniform dose (EUD. Twenty prostate cancer patients were retrospectively selected for this study. For each patient, two IMRT plans were generated (i EUD-based optimization with a DV-based physical cost function to control inhomogeneity (EUDWith DV and (ii EUD-based optimization without a DV-based physical cost function to allow inhomogeneity (EUDWithout DV. The generated plans were prescribed a dose of 72 Gy in 36 fractions to planning target volume (PTV. Mean dose, D30%, and D5%were evaluated for all organ at risk (OAR. Normal tissue complication probability was also calculated for all OARs using BioSuite software. The average volume of PTV for all patients was 103.02 ± 27 cm3. The PTV mean dose for EUDWith DVplans was 73.67 ± 1.7 Gy, whereas for EUDWithout DVplans was 80.42 ± 2.7 Gy. It was found that PTV volume receiving dose more than 115% of prescription dose was negligible in EUDWith DV plans, whereas it was 28% in EUDWithout DV plans. In almost all dosimetric parameters evaluated, dose to OARs in EUDWith DVplans was higher than in EUDWithout DVplans. Allowing inhomogeneous dose (EUDWithout DV inside the target would achieve better normal tissue sparing compared to homogenous dose distribution (EUDWith DV. Hence, this inhomogeneous dose could be intentionally dumped on the high-risk volume to achieve high local control. Therefore, it was concluded that EUD optimized plans offer added advantage of less OAR dose as well as selectively boosting dose to gross tumor volume.

  19. Estimation of the effects of normal tissue sparing using equivalent uniform dose-based optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, K; Maria Das, K J; Balasubramanian, K; Deka, A C; Patil, B R

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we intend to estimate the effects of normal tissue sparing between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans generated with and without a dose volume (DV)-based physical cost function using equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Twenty prostate cancer patients were retrospectively selected for this study. For each patient, two IMRT plans were generated (i) EUD-based optimization with a DV-based physical cost function to control inhomogeneity (EUDWith DV) and (ii) EUD-based optimization without a DV-based physical cost function to allow inhomogeneity (EUDWithout DV). The generated plans were prescribed a dose of 72 Gy in 36 fractions to planning target volume (PTV). Mean dose, D30%, and D5% were evaluated for all organ at risk (OAR). Normal tissue complication probability was also calculated for all OARs using BioSuite software. The average volume of PTV for all patients was 103.02 ± 27 cm(3). The PTV mean dose for EUDWith DV plans was 73.67 ± 1.7 Gy, whereas for EUDWithout DV plans was 80.42 ± 2.7 Gy. It was found that PTV volume receiving dose more than 115% of prescription dose was negligible in EUDWith DV plans, whereas it was 28% in EUDWithout DV plans. In almost all dosimetric parameters evaluated, dose to OARs in EUDWith DV plans was higher than in EUDWithout DV plans. Allowing inhomogeneous dose (EUDWithout DV) inside the target would achieve better normal tissue sparing compared to homogenous dose distribution (EUDWith DV). Hence, this inhomogeneous dose could be intentionally dumped on the high-risk volume to achieve high local control. Therefore, it was concluded that EUD optimized plans offer added advantage of less OAR dose as well as selectively boosting dose to gross tumor volume. PMID:27217624

  20. An Evaluation of Dose Equivalence between Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy and Conventional Broadbeam Radiation Using Clonogenic and Cell Impedance Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Johari Ibahim; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Yuqing Yang; Marina Zaitseva; Andrew W Stevenson; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Premila Paiva

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) has shown the potential to deliver improved outcomes over conventional broadbeam (BB) radiation therapy. To implement synchrotron MRT clinically for cancer treatment, it is necessary to undertake dose equivalence studies to identify MRT doses that give similar outcomes to BB treatments. AIM: To develop an in vitro approach to determine biological dose equivalence between MRT and BB using two different cell-based assays. METHO...

  1. 75 FR 51039 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... provisions of 40 CFR Part 53, as amended on November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new PM 10 equivalent... monitor operated for 24 hours at a flow rate of 16.67 LPM between 5 and 40 C using 47 mm PTFE...

  2. 75 FR 30022 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ...-0510-191, ``Determination of Lead Concentration in TSP by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry... analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) based on EPA SW-846 Method 6020A. The... of 40 CFR Part 53, as amended on November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new equivalent method...

  3. Measurements of dose equivalent of mixed radiation outside the Serpukhov proton synchrotron shield

    CERN Document Server

    Antipov, A V; Golovachik, V T; Khefert, M; Krupnyi, G I; Kustarev, V N; Lebedev, V N

    1979-01-01

    Comparative measurements of radiation doses outside the Serpukhov proton synchrotron shield were made with the component method (CM) and the 'Cerberus' instrument used at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) and CERN as radiation monitors, and also with the 'Sukhona-2' recombination dosimeter, a linear energy transfer radiation spectrometer based on a tissue equivalent (TE) proportional counter and a TE ionization chamber, employed at the IHEP for the direct measurements of doses and for calibrating monitoring devices used in radiation fields having an unknown composition and spectrum. (23 refs) .

  4. Determination of dose equivalent via linear energy transfer (LET) spectrometry using CR-39 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For neutron dosimetry, the measurement of detailed energy distribution is preferred which is then converted to dose by folding with suitable conversion coefficients. This approach needs the detectors capable of discriminating different types of radiations and also the use of complex mathematical procedures (unfolding) to generate the neutron spectra. However, in situations where the energy distribution is difficult to measure and/or as a supplement to the above method, the dose values can also be determined by measuring the absorbed dose and the linear energy transfer (LET) in the medium, and convening to equivalent dose with conversion coefficients based on relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Since RBE depends on the LET of the ionizing radiation, analysis of the LET spectrum is a more direct way of defining the radiation quality. This method is simpler and convenient as it neither requires the discrimination of different radiation components nor the unfolding procedures. In this work, the LET spectrum in water in the range of 12 keV/μm to 382 keV/μm due to 14 MeV (D-T) neutrons is estimated using the track size parameters in different types of CR-39 track detectors. The effect of additional polyethylene (PE) radiator on the LET spectrum is also studied. The detection sensitivity, LET spectra and microdosimetric characteristics are presented and the dose equivalent values are compared with that obtained using a neutron rem meter. (author)

  5. Evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for high energy radiations, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer code system and basic data have been investigated for evaluating fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for photons and neutrons up to 10 GeV. The present work suggested that the conversion factors would be obtained by incorporating effective quality factors of charged particles into the HERMES (High Energy Radiation Monte Carlo Elaborate System) code system. The effective quality factors for charged particles were calculated on the basis of the Q-L relationships specified in the ICRP Publication-60. (author)

  6. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Poje Marina; Ivković Ana; Jurković Slaven; Žauhar Gordana; Vuković Branko; Radolić Vanja; Miklavčić Igor; Kaliman Zoran; Planinić Josip; Brkić Hrvoje; Faj Dario

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator) that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate ...

  7. Neutron dose equivalent measured at the maze door with various openings for the jaws and MLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to explore the effects of the jaws and the MLC openings on the neutron dose equivalent (DE) at the maze door and neutron flux at the patient plane. Methods: The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze entrance door of a 15 MV therapy linear accelerator room. All measurements were performed using various field sizes up to 40 cm x 40 cm. Activation detectors constructed from natural Indium (In) were exposed at Cd envelope to neutrons in order to estimate relative changes of epithermal neutron fluences in the patient plane. Results: Our study showed that the dose equivalent at the maze door is at the highest when the jaw are closed and that maximal jaws opening reduces the DE by more than 20%. The neutron dose equivalent at the maze door measured for radiation fields defined by jaws do not differ significantly from the DE measured when MLC determines the same size radiation field. The epithermal capture reaction rate measured using different jaw openings differs by approximately 10%. When an MLC leaf is inserted into a fixed geometry for one opening of the jaws, an increase of the epithermal neutron capture reaction rate in Indium activation detectors was observed. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in the neutron DE when MLC defines radiation field instead of jaws. This leads to the conclusion that the overall number of neutrons remains similar and it does not depend on how primary photon beam was stopped--by the jaws or the MLC. An increase of the fast neutron capture reaction rate when MLC leaves are inserted probably originates from the neutron scattering.

  8. Personal dose equivalent angular response factors for photons with energies up to 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When performing personal dosemeter calibrations, the dosemeters are typically irradiated while mounted on slab-type phantoms and oriented facing the source. Performance testing standards or intercomparison studies may also specify various rotational angles to test the response of the dosemeter and associated algorithm as this rotation introduces changes in the quantity of delivered dose. Correction factors for rotational effects are available, but many have not been updated in recent years and were typically calculated using the kerma approximation. The personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body, but typically the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm slab-type phantom. In this work personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons with energies up to 1 GeV have been calculated for depths of 0.007, 0.3 and 1.0 cm in the slab phantom for rotational angles ranging from 15 deg. to 75 deg.. Angular response factors have been determined by comparing the conversion coefficients for each angle and energy to those reported in an earlier work for a non-rotational (e.g. perpendicular to the phantom face) geometry. The angular response factors were determined for discrete angles, but fits of the factors are provided. (authors)

  9. Application of radio-thermoluminescence to the experimental study of the dose equivalent index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, the Systems of dose limitation proposed by the ICRP since 1965 are analysed. The notion of 'critical organ' is replaced by the system based on the effective dose equivalent (ICRP 77). In the same document, the 'dose equivalent index' (HI) is suggested as a secondary limit. Here, its first definition, later modifications, advantages, and inconveniences are discussed. The second part of the study is devoted to the experimental determination of HI for X and gamma (Co60) beams by radioluminescent (RTL) dosimetry. In order to take into account the different chromatic relative sensitivities of the detectors used lithium fluoride (powder and pellets), lithium borate (pellets) and calcium sulfate activated by dysprosium (powder) these latter are measured within the (10-1250) keV energy range. With the help of the preceding values and the results of the RTL measurements carried out inside the ICRU spherical phantom, the corresponding absorbed doses are deduced in order to calculate HI. (author)

  10. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB)

  11. Assessment of equivalent dose on the lens in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is presented as a useful test method for the evaluation of craniofacial structures. Among them stands the temporomandibular joint (T MJ) imaging as complementary to clinical evaluation. It must be considered that there is no reference levels established for diagnosis of this imaging modality. In this same context, recently the limit for crystalline lens was reviewed by ICRP which set new values to the equivalent dose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kerma at the surface of the crystalline lens in T MJ CBCT and derive the equivalent dose. It was used an anthropomorphic phantom of the head and neck (manufactured by: Radiation Support Devices, model; Rs-230) containing equivalent tissue with dimensions of a typical patient. The dosimetric measurements were obtained by using seven pairs of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti) positioned on the surface of the crystalline lens, divided into two pairs (one pair for each eye) per scanner evaluated. The tomographic images were obtained in three CBCT equipment s (Kodak 9000, Gendex GXCB 500 and i-Cat). Values of equivalent dose obtained were: 5.82 mSv (Kodak 9000); 5.38 mSv (Gendex GXCB 500) and 7.98 mSv (i-Cat). These results demonstrate that for this type of procedure the doses are below the annual limit but may vary in accordance with the scanner and the exposure factors used in the image acquisition. The Gendex GXCB500 uses larger Fov and higher kV. It results in levels close to those obtained on Kodak 9000. Larger doses are associated with the i-Cat. Another factor that rises is the repetition of examinations due to positioning errors and / or patient movement, which may exceed the annual limit established by ICRP. Although the ICRP limits are not applied to medical exposures, it is advisable to consider the sensitivity of the organ. For this reason, it is concluded that doses per T MJ procedure on CBCT are below the annual limit and may vary

  12. Assessment of equivalent dose on the lens in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M. V. L.; Campos, P. S. F. [Federal University of Bahia, Department of Health Sciences, Salvador (Brazil); Andrade, M. E. A. [Federal University of Pernambuco, Department of Nuclear Energy, Recife (Brazil); Soares, M. R. [Federal University of Sergipe, Department of Physics, Sao Cristovao (Brazil); Batista, W. O., E-mail: marcusradiology@gmail.com [Federal Institute of Bahia, Department of Applied Sciences, 40.301-015 Salvador (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is presented as a useful test method for the evaluation of craniofacial structures. Among them stands the temporomandibular joint (T MJ) imaging as complementary to clinical evaluation. It must be considered that there is no reference levels established for diagnosis of this imaging modality. In this same context, recently the limit for crystalline lens was reviewed by ICRP which set new values to the equivalent dose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kerma at the surface of the crystalline lens in T MJ CBCT and derive the equivalent dose. It was used an anthropomorphic phantom of the head and neck (manufactured by: Radiation Support Devices, model; Rs-230) containing equivalent tissue with dimensions of a typical patient. The dosimetric measurements were obtained by using seven pairs of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti) positioned on the surface of the crystalline lens, divided into two pairs (one pair for each eye) per scanner evaluated. The tomographic images were obtained in three CBCT equipment s (Kodak 9000, Gendex GXCB 500 and i-Cat). Values of equivalent dose obtained were: 5.82 mSv (Kodak 9000); 5.38 mSv (Gendex GXCB 500) and 7.98 mSv (i-Cat). These results demonstrate that for this type of procedure the doses are below the annual limit but may vary in accordance with the scanner and the exposure factors used in the image acquisition. The Gendex GXCB500 uses larger Fov and higher kV. It results in levels close to those obtained on Kodak 9000. Larger doses are associated with the i-Cat. Another factor that rises is the repetition of examinations due to positioning errors and / or patient movement, which may exceed the annual limit established by ICRP. Although the ICRP limits are not applied to medical exposures, it is advisable to consider the sensitivity of the organ. For this reason, it is concluded that doses per T MJ procedure on CBCT are below the annual limit and may vary

  13. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons to 1 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2011-04-01

    The personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk, where personal dosemeters are usually worn, and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 × 30 × 15 cm(3) slab-type phantom. For this condition, the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H(p,slab)(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several megaelectronvolts, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work, conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p,slab)(10) and H(p,slab)(3) both by using the kerma approximation and tracking secondary charged particles. For H(p)(0.07), the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H(p,slab)(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom, conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological

  14. Measuring neutron dose and quality factors with tissue equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods used to obtain absolute neutron dose measurements and quality factor determination from the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) are reviewed. Exposure to nearly monoenergetic neutrons with energies from 200 keV to 7.5 MeV indicate that the absorbed dose due to fast neutrons measured by the TEPC averaged 3% higher, with a standard deviation (1 sigma) of 9%, than the tissue kerma calculated from neutron fluence measurements. The absorbed dose due to fast neutrons measured by the TEPC agreed within 0.6% of the calculated tissue kerma for a PuBe neutron source, whose neutron yield was determined within 2% by the United States National Bureau of Standards. Data are presented which show the TEPC measures quality factors accurately enough for health physics purposes for neutrons with energies between 200 keV and 5 MeV

  15. Equivalence of Gyn GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image guided cervical brachytherapy with EUD-based dose prescription

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, William; Rae, William ID; Alber, Markus L

    2013-01-01

    Background To establish a generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) -based prescription method for Image Guided Brachytherapy (IGBT) that reproduces the Gyn GEC-ESTRO WG (GGE) prescription for cervix carcinoma patients on CT images with limited soft tissue resolution. Methods The equivalence of two IGBT planning approaches was investigated in 20 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) and 5 concomitant high dose rate IGBT treatments. The GGE planning strategy based on dose to ...

  16. Establishing an effective dose equivalent monitoring program for a commercial nuclear power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barbara Jane

    The purpose of this thesis is to determine whether monitoring personnel with multiple dosimeter badges to determine effective dose equivalent (EDE) is both acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and practical for the nuclear power industry. Until now, most nuclear power plants have used a single dosimeter or occasionally multiple dosimeters to monitor the "deep dose equivalent (DDE)" as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Units (ICRU). The measurement of EDE, to replace DDE, is now deemed by international and regulatory agencies to better approximate a worker's dose related to long-term risks of occupational radiation exposure. The definition of DDE, and the formulation of EDE for use as a new indicator of occupational exposure, are presented in this thesis. Radiation exposure measurements using multiple dosimeters on each worker for certain tasks were collected for this thesis on workers at a Dominion/Virginia Company nuclear power plant. These multiple dosimeter measurements have been examined to determine how such a new personnel monitoring system compares to the former one at the Dominion plant, in which only one dosimeter reading was used predominately to calculated deep dose equivalent. This is based on the assumption that most workers were exposed to uniform radiation fields and that the single dosimeter reading was representative of the highest average exposure for the worker's task. These multiple dosimetry measurements show that it is both feasible and advantageous to provide such dosimetry in situations where exposures may be non-uniform and significant enough to approach yearly exposure limits in a single day, such as in the tasks required during refueling outages.

  17. Neutron fluences and dose equivalents measured with passive detectors on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron fluences were measured on LDEF in the low energy ( 1 MeV) ranges. The low energy detectors used the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction with Gd foil absorbers to separate thermal (neutron response. High energy detectors contained sets of fission foils (181Ta, 209Bi, 232Th, 238U) with different neutron energy thresholds. The measured neutron fluences together with predicted spectral shapes were used to estimate neutron dose equivalents. The detectors were located in the A0015 and P0006 experiments at the west and Earth sides of LDEF under shielding varying from 1 to 19 g/cm2. Dose equivalent rates varied from 0.8 to 3.3 microSv/d for the low energy neutrons and from 160 to 390 microSv/d for the high energy neutrons. This compares with TLD measured absorbed dose rates in the range of 1000-3000 microGy/d near these locations and demonstrates that high energy neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total dose equivalent in LEO. Comparisons between measurements and calculations were made for high energy neutrons based on fission fragment tracks generated by fission foils at different shielding depths. A simple 1-D slab geometry was used in the calculations. Agreement between measurements and calculations depended on both shielding depth and threshold energy of the fission foils. Differences increased as both shielding and threshold energy increased. The modeled proton/neutron spectra appeared deficient at high energies. A 3-D model of the experiments is needed to help resolve the differences.

  18. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions (3He2+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the U.S. Government 2010. (authors)

  19. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons (3H+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the US Government 2010. (authors)

  20. Radium equivalent and annual effective dose from geological samples from Pedra - Pernambuco - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of an uranium-anomalous area utilized for agricultural activities in Pedra, Brazil, was monitored. For this, samples from the granite and calcium-silicate amphibole rocks underlying this area and also from samples of the soil derived from these rocks were collected and analyzed by high-resolution gamma spectrometry. The equivalent radium (Raeq) was used as a reference for estimating the rate of the effective equivalent dose. The average, minimum and maximum values for the samples were of 319.2 Bq kg-1 (91.1-758.5 Bq kg-1) for soil; 327.5 Bq kg-1 (36.3-1624.0 Bq kg-1) for granitic rocks and 70,124.5 Bq kg-1 (16,979.6-147,159.0 Bq kg-1) for the calcium-silicate amphibole rocks. An estimation of the external exposition was carried out based on the calculation of the parameters obtained.

  1. Determination of lead equivalent thickness, dose reduction and homogeneity through WRP-glove used in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of lead equivalent thickness was conducted on set of rubber gloves that were formulated for used in medical applications. A narrow beam of scattered radiation was employed for the transmission measurement. Radcal corporation ionisation chamber of 6 cc was used to measure the incident and transmitted x-ray beam. The lead equivalent thickness for the gloves were determined at 50 kV, 80 kV, 100 kV and 125 kV. The homogeneity of the gloves and its efficiency for dose reduction were also measured. A knowledge on photon mass attenuation coefficient of lead in incident x-ray energy is essential in the measurement. The measurements were carried out based on the procedure as outlined by IEC 1331-1 with a minor modification to suit the facilities in MINT. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of neutron dose equivalent from the Mevion S250 proton accelerator: measurements and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron production is of concern for proton therapy, especially for passive scattering proton beam delivery methods. The levels of neutron dose equivalent vary significantly with system design and treatment parameters. The purpose of this study was to examine neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose (H/D) around the Mevion S250 proton therapy system, a novel design of proton therapy systems. The benchmark comparisons between measurement and simulation were found to be within a factor of 2 for most cases. The H/D values were evaluated as a function of various parameters. The results showed that, at a standard reference condition (10 × 10 cm2 field size, distance 1 m detector-to-isocenter lateral to the primary proton beam direction), the H/D values range from 0.72 to 3.37 mSv Gy−1 for all configurations studied. The H/D values generally (1) decreased as the neutron detectors moved away from the isocenter, (2) decreased with increasing aperture field sizes, (3) increased with increasing angle from the initial beam axis and (4) were independent of treatment nozzle position. The H/D trends were consistent with other existing passive scattering proton accelerators reported in the literature. (paper)

  3. A new online detector for estimation of peripheral neutron equivalent dose in organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L., E-mail: leticia@us.es; Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009, Spain and Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41007 (Spain); Lorenzoli, M.; Pola, A. [Departimento di Ingegneria Nuclear, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Bedogni, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Frascati Roma 00044 (Italy); Terrón, J. A. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41007 (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 4880 (Chile); Expósito, M. R. [Departamento de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Lagares, J. I.; Sansaloni, F. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas y Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Peripheral dose in radiotherapy treatments represents a potential source of secondary neoplasic processes. As in the last few years, there has been a fast-growing concern on neutron collateral effects, this work focuses on this component. A previous established methodology to estimate peripheral neutron equivalent doses relied on passive (TLD, CR39) neutron detectors exposed in-phantom, in parallel to an active [static random access memory (SRAMnd)] thermal neutron detector exposed ex-phantom. A newly miniaturized, quick, and reliable active thermal neutron detector (TNRD, Thermal Neutron Rate Detector) was validated for both procedures. This first miniaturized active system eliminates the long postprocessing, required for passive detectors, giving thermal neutron fluences in real time. Methods: To validate TNRD for the established methodology, intrinsic characteristics, characterization of 4 facilities [to correlate monitor value (MU) with risk], and a cohort of 200 real patients (for second cancer risk estimates) were evaluated and compared with the well-established SRAMnd device. Finally, TNRD was compared to TLD pairs for 3 generic radiotherapy treatments through 16 strategic points inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The performed tests indicate similar linear dependence with dose for both detectors, TNRD and SRAMnd, while a slightly better reproducibility has been obtained for TNRD (1.7% vs 2.2%). Risk estimates when delivering 1000 MU are in good agreement between both detectors (mean deviation of TNRD measurements with respect to the ones of SRAMnd is 0.07 cases per 1000, with differences always smaller than 0.08 cases per 1000). As far as the in-phantom measurements are concerned, a mean deviation smaller than 1.7% was obtained. Conclusions: The results obtained indicate that direct evaluation of equivalent dose estimation in organs, both in phantom and patients, is perfectly feasible with this new detector. This will open the door to an

  4. Contribution ratios of natural radionuclides to ambient dose rate in air after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important that the contribution ratio of natural radioactivity to ambient dose rate in air is clarified after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. In this study, ambient dose rates in air were observed at 34 places in eastern Japan and the contribution ratios were clarified. The mean contribution ratio of the natural radionuclides was 71 % (range 0-100 %). In most places, the natural radionuclides made a larger contribution to the ambient dose rate in air. (author)

  5. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains information on the natural (background) radiation exposure (chapter II), the natural radiation exposure as influenced by anthropogenic effects (chapter III), the anthropogenic radiation exposure (chapter IV), and the radiation doses to the environment and the population emanating from the Chernobyl fallout (chapter V). The natural radiation exposure is specified referring to the contributions from cosmic and terrestrial background radiation and intake of natural radioactive substances. Changes of the natural environment resulting from anthropogenic effects (technology applications) inducing an increase in concentration of natural radioactive substances accordingly increase the anthropogenic radiation exposure. Indoor air radon concentration in buildings for instance is one typical example of anthropogenic increase of concentration of natural radioactivity, primarily caused by the mining industry or by various materials processing activities, which may cause an increase in the average radiation dose to the population. Measurements so far show that indoor air concentration of radon exceeds a level of 200 Bq/m3 in less than 2% of the residential buildings; the EUropean Commission therefore recommends to use this concentration value as a maximum value for new residential buildings. Higher concentrations are primarily measured in areas with relevant geological conditions and abundance of radon, or eg. in mining areas. (orig./CB)

  6. Incorporation of functional imaging data in the evaluation of dose distributions using the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miften, Moyed M.; Das, Shiva K.; Su, Min; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2004-05-01

    Advances in the fields of IMRT and functional imaging have greatly increased the prospect of escalating the dose to highly active or hypoxic tumour sub-volumes and steering the dose away from highly functional critical structure regions. However, current clinical treatment planning and evaluation tools assume homogeneous activity/function status in the tumour/critical structures. A method was developed to incorporate tumour/critical structure heterogeneous functionality in the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD). The tumour and critical structures functional EUD (FEUD) values were calculated from the dose-function histogram (DFH), which relates dose to the fraction of total function value at that dose. The DFH incorporates flouro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) functional data for tumour, which describes the distribution of metabolically active tumour clonogens, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion data for critical structures. To demonstrate the utility of the method, the lung dose distributions of two non-small cell lung caner patients, who received 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy treatment with curative intent, were evaluated. Differences between the calculated lungs EUD and FEUD values of up to 50% were observed in the 3D conformal plans. In addition, a non-small cell lung cancer patient was inversely planned with a target dose prescription of 76 Gy. Two IMRT plans (plan-A and plan-B) were generated for the patient based on the CT, FDG-PET and SPECT treatment planning images using dose-volume objective functions. The IMRT plans were generated with the goal of achieving more critical structures sparing in plan-B than plan-A. Results show the target volume EUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 5% with a value of 73.31 Gy, and the FEUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 2.6% with a value of 75.77 Gy. The FEUD plan-B values for heart and lungs were lower than plan-A by 22% and 18%, respectively

  7. Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents from step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure the photon and neutron out-of-treatment-field dose equivalents to various organs from different treatment strategies (conventional vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]) at different treatment energies and delivered by different accelerators. Methods and Materials: Independent measurements were made of the photon and neutron out-of-field dose equivalents resulting from one conventional and six IMRT treatments for prostate cancer. The conventional treatment used an 18-MV beam from a Clinac 2100; the IMRT treatments used 6-MV, 10-MV, 15-MV, and 18-MV beams from a Varian Clinac 2100 accelerator and 6-MV and 15-MV beams from a Siemens Primus accelerator. Photon doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Rando phantom, and neutron fluence was measured with gold foils. Dose equivalents to the colon, liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, thyroid, and active bone marrow were determined for each treatment approach. Results: For each treatment approach, the relationship between dose equivalent per MU, distance from the treatment field, and depth in the patient was examined. Photon dose equivalents decreased approximately exponentially with distance from the treatment field. Neutron dose equivalents were independent of distance from the treatment field and decreased with increasing tissue depth. Neutrons were a significant contributor to the out-of field dose equivalent for beam energies ≥15 MV. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents can be estimated to any point in a patient undergoing a similar treatment approach from the distance of that point to the central axis and from the tissue depth. This information is useful in determining the dose to critical structures and in evaluating the risk of associated carcinogenesis

  8. Calibration of personal dosimeters for photon radiation with respect to the personal dose equivalent Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main steps of the calibration of personal dosimeters in terms of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) are described. Special consideration is given to ISO photon reference radiations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(10), various calibration methods including an example of a routine calibration, and positioning of dosimeters for the calibration. In particular, radiation qualities used for measuring the response as a function of the photon energy and of the direction of the incident radiation in an intercomparison of a Co-ordinated Research Project of the IAEA are dealt with. (author)

  9. Neutron equivalent dose-rate measuring according to the single-sphere albedo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reproduces the results of calibration radiation using the single-sphere albedo measuring method. It was done for the purpose of optimising the arrangement of detectors on the surface of the sphere and reduce the diameter of the moderator sphere from hitherto 30 cm whilst in addition determining the energy- and direction-dependency of a neutron equivalent dose-rate meter with He-3 detectors. Optimisation of the detector arrangement on the sphere's surface resulted in a corresponding boron-plastic capsulation with detector depths inside or outside the moderator di=-6 mm, and da=5 mm with albedo neutron detectors and thermal neutron detectors, respectively. (orig./DG)

  10. Modifications of a commercial individual dosimeter to measure the personal dose equivalent, Hp(d)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A four-filters commercial dosemeter manufactured by Victoreen, which uses LiF TL cristal (lithium fluoride thermoluminescent), namely TLD 100, was modified to measure the personnel dose equivalent, Hp(d), in the depth of 0,07 mm and 10 mm. During an international intercomparison program, the developed algorithm for measuring Hp(10) showed good results within the acceptable accuracy. This paper describes the dosemeter calibration procedure of the dosemeter calibration in terms of Hp(10), as well as conditions and results of the intercomparison. (author)

  11. Natural radioactivity and evaluation of effective dose equivalent of granites in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual effective dose equivalent due to natural gamma radiation from 238U, 232Th and 40K have been evaluated from granites in Turkey. Forty samples were taken for spectrometric analysis. Specific concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K in granite samples were determined. Spectroscopy system was used with 1.8 keV (FWHM) coaxial high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Average values of concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K were detected at 15.85, 33.76 and 359 Bq kg-1, respectively. The average value of radon varies from 0.073 to 0.185 Bq m-2 h -1 exhalation depends on the specific concentration of uranium. The dose rate due to this highest activity which have been evaluated by a Monte Carlo transport calculations does not exceed 0.4 mSv a-1. (authors)

  12. Estimation of neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates on plutonium oxide container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium, produced in the nuclear reactor, is reprocessed from spent fuel and stored as PuO2 for subsequent use. X-Rays, low energy Gamma rays and neutrons emitted from Plutonium isotopes and their oxides, are the sources of external exposure. The neutrons have a wide energy distribution with a maximum of 13 MeV and mean energy of 1-5 MeV. In the present study measurement of neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates were carried out on the surface of PuO2 container and at different distances from it. Neutron and gamma dose rates were also measured outside the Bird Cage (BC) after keeping the PuO2 container inside it. A model of PuO2 container inside BC is shown in the present work

  13. Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, Hp(d)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA - Bologna has organised a one day-workshop on the subject: Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, Hp(d). The aim of the workshop was the discussion of the new implications and modifications to be expected in the routine individual monitoring of external radiation, due to the issue of the Decree 241/00 (G.U. 31/8/2000) in charge since 01/01/2001. The decree set up in Italian law the standards contained in the European Directive EURATOM 96/29-Basic Standards for the Protection of Health of Workers and the General Public against Dangers arising from Ionizing Radiation. Among others, the definition of the operational quantities for external radiation for personal and environmental monitoring, Hp(d) e H*(d) respectively as defined by ICRU (International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurements), requires to update the methods of measurements and calibration of the personal dosemeters and environmental monitors. This report collects the papers presented at the workshop dealing with the Personal Dose Equivalent, Hp(d), the conversion coefficients, Hp(d)/Ka e Hp(d)/, obtained through Monte Carlo calculations published by ICRU and ICRP (International Commission for Radiation Protection), the new calibration procedures and the practical implication in the routine of individual monitoring in terms of Hp(d). Eventually, in the last chapter, the answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) are briefly reported

  14. Evaluation of the directional dose equivalent H,(0.07) for ring dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The personnel dosimetry laboratory (LDP) of the Metrology department received an user's of radiation beta application that incidentally had irradiated 14 couples of ring dosemeters for extremities of the type TLD-100 given by the LDP. This sample of 14 couples of rings tentatively it was irradiated in the months of July-August of the year 2004, and he requested in an expedite way the evaluation of the received dose equivalent. The LSCD builds two calibration curves in terms of the directional dose equivalent H'(0.07) using two sources patterns of 90 Sr-90 Y for beta radiation: one of 74 MBq and another of 1850 MBq with traceability to the PTB. The first curve in the interval of 0 to 5 mSv, the second in the range of 5 to 50 mSv, taking into account effects by positioned of the rings in the phantom. Both calibration curves were validated by adjustment lack, symmetry of residuals and normality of the same ones. It is evaluated and analyzing the H'(0.007) for these 14 couples of rings using the Tukey test of media of a single road. It was found that the H, its could be classified in 4 groups, and that the probability that its has irradiated in a random way it was smaller to the level at α = 0.05. (Author)

  15. ACN-0 type device for monitoring and centralizing equivalent dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACN-0 device for monitoring and centralizing equivalent dose rates is used at different points of an enclosure for measurements within the range 0.3-30 μSv/h for X and gamma radiation of energies between 0.06-3 MeV. The broad measuring range makes it possible to use the device for radiation protection purposes, as well as in nuclear incidents and accidents in order to locate high-hazard areas where the equivalent dose rate is higher than admitted levels. The device can accommodate as radiation transducers both GMT-601 probes (made at NIPNE-HH) and other similar probes. The main features of the device (with GMT-601 probes) are :- Measuring range, 0.3-30 μSv/h; - Energy range for X and gamma radiation, 0.06-3 MeV; - Signal threshold, 101,000 pulses/s; - Programmable radiometric hysteresis; - Outside voltage supply, + 400 V; - Potential-free contact switches using RM-2 relays for signal and external driving outlets; -Supply, 220 V, 50 Hz; - Size, L=490 mm, l=360 mm, h 160 mm; - Weight, 6.45 kg. The device can be used to adapt the radiometric equipment to the control and automation of technological processes of level-detection in closed containers. (authors)

  16. Equivalent dose measurements on board an Armenian Airline flight and Concord (9-17 km)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigations of the neutron component (E=1-10 MeV) of cosmic radiation on board the 'Armenian Airlines' aircrafts using nuclear photoemulsion are presented. The emulsions were exposed on the flights from Yerevan to Moscow, St.-Petersburg, Beirut, Athens, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Paris and Sofia, and on Concord supersonic flights from Paris to New York. The dependence of the neutron fluxes, and on absorbed and equivalent doses on the flight parameters were investigated. On the flights of the supersonic Concord, with an altitude of 17 km, the neutron fluxes were essentially higher in comparison to those measured on Armenian airliners. It is interesting to note, that the neutron flux and equivalent dose rate decrease with altitude up to 470 km in space, for example, on board the STS-57. The shape of the differential energy spectrum for fast neutrons is the same on all Armenian airlines flights, but significantly different at 17 km altitude, where the flux in the energy region above 3 MeV is increasing

  17. Extremity dosimeters characterization and calibration for beta radiation fields to evaluate the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two extremity personal dosimeters were type tested and calibrated to measure the personal dose equivalent, Hρ(d), at 0.07 mm depth, at beta particle fields from a 90 Sr+90 Y radiation source. One dosimeter is a graphite mixed CaSO4:Dy thermoluminescent (TL) detector in the Harshaw /Bicron Ext-Rad ring; the other is a LiF:Mg,Ti TL detector in a velcro ring. Type tests were carried out to verify the detection limit, linearity, and the angular dependence of both dosimeters. Dosimeters were used to evaluate the personal dose equivalent of operators who deal with 90 Sr+90 Y ophthalmic and dermatologic applicators at a beta therapy service. Results suggest that the CaSO4:Dy dosimeter is more reliable and adequate for measurements at beta radiation fields than the LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeter which shows a trend to subestimate the values of Hρ(0.07). Two extremity personal dosimeters were type tested. (author)

  18. Impact on ambient dose rate in metropolitan Tokyo from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazumasa; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Van Le, Tan; Arai, Moeko; Saito, Kyoko; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    A car-borne survey was made in metropolitan Tokyo, Japan, in December 2014 to estimate external dose. This survey was conducted for all municipalities of Tokyo and the results were compared with measurements done in 2003. The ambient dose rate measured in the whole area of Tokyo in December 2014 was 60 nGy h(-1) (23-142 nGy h(-1)), which was 24% higher than the rate in 2003. Higher dose rates (>70 nGy h(-1)) were observed on the eastern and western ends of Tokyo; furthermore, the contribution ratio from artificial radionuclides ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) to ambient dose rate in eastern Tokyo was twice as high as that of western Tokyo. Based on the measured ambient dose rate, the effective dose rate after the accident was estimated to be 0.45 μSv h(-1) in Tokyo. This value was 22% higher than the value before the accident as of December 2014. PMID:27055250

  19. Ambient radiation dose to the population of the city of Sao Paulo-Brazil: indoor gamma distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to present results of indoor ambient dose equivalent rate (H*(10)) in the city of Sao Paulo. Studies show that people of industrialized cities spend indoor approximately 80% of their time, and that there are great variations of the rate of H*(10) all over the world. Values of environmental radiation are important base to epidemiological studies, or analyses of consequences and effects of radioactive or nuclear accidents and also to assist research on biological effects of low doses, a very controversial subject in the literature. There are no reports in the literature about environmental radiation in the city of Sao Paulo, showing the important of this study. Environmental radiation exists everywhere in the planet, so the human beings are exposed to it at any time or place, being indoor or outdoor. Three types of commercial indoor ambient with large flow of the population were analyzed: bank offices, shops in the neighborhood of the banks, and shopping centers. A gamma ray portable spectrometer was used, composed by a crystal of NaI (Tl). The mean value of the H*(10) rate obtained was 173,8(17) nSv/h. The results analyzed by commerce type and by the health divisions of the city are also presented. (author)

  20. Correlation-study about the ambient dose rate and the weather conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Masato; Hatano, Yuko; Aoyama, Tomoo; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kita, Kazuyuki; Ishizuka, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    The long-term radiation risks are believed to be heavily affected by the resuspension process. We therefore focus on the surface-atmosphere exchange process of released radioactive materials in this study. Radioactive materials were deposited on the soil and float in the air, and such complicated process are influenced by the weather conditions deeply. We need to reveal the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate. In this study, we study the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate with the correction of the decrease due to the radioactive decay. We found that there is a negative correlation between the ambient dose rate and the soil water content by the correlation coefficient. Using this result, we reconstruct the ambient dose rate from the weather conditions by the multiple regression analysis and found that the reconstructed data agree with the observation very well. Using Kalman filter, which can be sequentially updates the state estimate, we obtained such a good agreement.

  1. Directional distributions of neutrons and reference values of personal dose equivalent in workplace fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Within the EC project EVIDOS ('Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields'), double-differential (energy and direction) fluence spectra of neutrons were determined with novel instruments based, respectively, on silicon diodes and superheated drop detectors. The directional spectrometer based on silicon detectors consists of six detector capsules, each containing a stack of 4 silicon detectors, mounted onto the surface of a polyethylene sphere 30 cm in diameter and of electronics to amplify and record pulse height spectra of all detectors. The directional spectrometer with superheated drop detectors uses a 'telescope design' with a single detector at the centre of a moderating-sphere of nylon-6 30 cm in diameter. By changing the temperature of the superheated drop detector from 25oC to 55oC, a series of responses with threshold behavior is obtained as a function of neutron energy. By rotating the sphere into selected directions, neutrons chiefly incident into a cone corresponding to a solid angle of about 1/6 steradians are registered. The response functions of both spectrometers have been determined for a series of directions using measurements in quasi-mono-energetic neutron fields and MCNP calculations for neutrons in the energy range from thermal up to 15 MeV. The signals measured in workplace fields are analyzed using unfolding codes and yield neutron fluence spectra with respect to energy and direction. By folding the spectra with fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients, distributions of H*(10) contributions for 14 directions and values of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and effective dose E for 6 directions of a person's orientation in the field were determined. The results of measurements and calculations obtained within the EVIDOS project in workplace fields in nuclear installations in Europe, i.e. at Kruemmel (boiling water reactor, transport cask), at Mol (Venus research reactor, fuel facility

  2. A new concept in radiation dose calculation by using of 1 cm dose equivalent rate constant with shielding effect and accompanying software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept called 1 cm dose equivalent rate constant with shielding effect is introduced for estimation of radiation dose. This new concept represents an expansion of the former standard 1 cm dose equivalent rate constant (defined as μSv·m2·MBq-1·h-1) adjusted attenuation for any given thickness of shielding material (iron, lead and concrete). The 1 cm dose equivalent rate constant with shielding effect for various shielding conditions can be rapidly computed with a free-software application, KINGS-B621, which may be easily downloaded from the internet. The computed rate constants can be put out as text files which are compatible with commercially available spread-sheet software, so it is easy for users to apply the data to creation of documents concerning radiation dose. (author)

  3. Produtividade e qualidade do morangueiro sob dois ambientes e doses de biofertilizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrislene N. Dias

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOO cultivo em ambiente protegido desponta como importante na criação de um microclima mais favorável à produção. Neste contexto, o objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a produtividade e a qualidade do morango submetido a dois ambientes de cultivo e doses de biofertilizante misto. O experimento foi conduzido na Fazenda Experimental da Universidade da Integração Internacional da Lusofonia Afro-Brasileira (UNILAB, no Maciço de Baturité, CE, com cultivar Oso Grande, no período de setembro de 2013 a janeiro de 2014. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso com parcelas subdivididas, com quatro repetições. Nas parcelas avaliou-se o efeito de dois ambientes de cultivo e nas subparcelas o efeito de cinco doses de biofertilizante. A partir de 37 dias após o transplantio (DAT contava-se, semanalmente, o número de frutos para obtenção da produtividade por planta, massa, diâmetro, comprimento e teor de sólidos solúveis dos frutos. A maior produtividade de frutos (10.734 kg ha-1 foi obtida nas plantas desenvolvidas no ambiente telado, na dose zero. As características de qualidade dos frutos cultivados em condições de campo aberto apresentaram maiores valores indicando que a temperatura e a luminosidade afetam tais características.

  4. Produtividade e qualidade do morangueiro sob dois ambientes e doses de biofertilizante

    OpenAIRE

    Chrislene N Dias; Albanise B. Marinho; Rafaela da S. Arruda; Marcio J. P. e Silva; Ednângelo D. Pereira; Carlos N. V. Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    RESUMOO cultivo em ambiente protegido desponta como importante na criação de um microclima mais favorável à produção. Neste contexto, o objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a produtividade e a qualidade do morango submetido a dois ambientes de cultivo e doses de biofertilizante misto. O experimento foi conduzido na Fazenda Experimental da Universidade da Integração Internacional da Lusofonia Afro-Brasileira (UNILAB), no Maciço de Baturité, CE, com cultivar Oso Grande, no período de setembro de 20...

  5. Influencing factors of dose equivalence for X and γ rays with different energy based on Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The accuracy of dosimeter measurement of X and γ rays needs to be resolved. Purpose: The aim is to study the correction term of the equivalent process of low energy X-ray and the natural radioactive source. Methods: Instead of the standard sources, X-ray machine was adopted on the dose instrument calibration. The influence factors of the equivalence between low-energy X-ray and high-energy X or γ rays were simulated using Monte Carlo (MCNP) software. Results: The influences of distance, space scattering, response of detector on dose equivalence were obtained. The simulation results were also analyzed. Conclusion: The method can be used in dose equivalent correction for low-energy X-ray, high-energy X or γ rays, which is significant for the widespread use of X rays. (authors)

  6. Calculation of conversion factor of Kerma in the air for ambient dose equivalent in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to estimate the average conversion factor of Kerma in air to H * (10) using photon beams coming from clinic linear accelerators, transmitted through concrete walls of a radiotherapic treatment room. The transmitted photon spectra by both 1 meter and 2 meters concrete walls, in an area of 40 x 40 cm2, were calculated when the primary beam impart in an angle of 0 deg. The (secondary) photon beams transmitted respectively by 0,5 meter, 1,0 meter, 1,0 meter and 2,0 meter concrete walls, after they scattered by an angle of 90 deg in a cylindric phantom inside the room, were also determined. Generally, 50 millions of histories were computed for each simulation made for the primary beam. For the 90 deg spread, the number of histories was 100 millions. The computational code used on this work was the MCNP4B. The most common clinic accelerators used on radiotheraphic treatments were used on this work CLINAC-4, CLINAC-6, CLINAC-18 and CLINAC-2500. From the spectra analysis obtained in this work, it was possible to dispose the conversion factor for realistic beams found in radiotherapeutic establishment. (author)

  7. The equivalent dose comparison of different grain size quartz from lakeshore sediments in the arid region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the feasibility of OSL dating of lakeshore sediments, equivalent dose (De) values of quartz fractions in different grain-size were measured using the 'Double-SAR' protocol of optical dating in four lakeshore sediments. There are two obvious different relations between De values and grain sizes. The first situation is that the De values are accordant with each other for fractions between 63 μm and 400 μm with a slightly decreasing tread of De values as increasing of grain-size. The second situation is that the De values are accordant to each other for fractions between 125 μm and 300 μm, while the De values of the 63-90 μm fraction are obviously smaller than others. The first is consistent with those reported elsewhere, while the second can't be understood by the previous theory. (authors)

  8. Determination of dose equivalent levels at a laboratory for neutron detector tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increase in the demand for the calibration of neutron detectors, there is a need for a calibration service. In this context, the Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, which already offers calibration services of radiation detectors with standard X, gamma, beta and alpha beams, has recently projected a new test laboratory for neutron detectors. In this work the equivalent dose levels for the staff and public at the Neutron Tests Laboratory (LTN) were evaluated with an 241Am(Be) radioactive source. The evaluations were performed according to the Brazilian regulations of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Two gamma and neutron radiation detectors were used for the measurements. They were taken in different positions at the LTN, considering the source exposed and inside its shielding. The results obtained were all within the Brazilian recommended limits, showing that the shielding of the LTN guarantees the safety to the staff and general public. (author)

  9. Simulation studies on a prototype ionisation chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype ionisation chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), similar to the one developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesantalt (PTB), was designed and constructed by the Metrological Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation (LMRI) of Nuclear and Technological Inst. (ITN). Tests already performed have shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very similar to the PTB chamber, mainly the energy dependence for the X-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137Cs and 60Co. However, the results obtained also show a dependence on the energy and angles of incident radiation and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionisation chamber. In order to optimise the performance of the chamber, the LMRI initiated numerical simulation of this ionisation chamber by Monte Carlo method using the MCNPX code. (authors)

  10. Effective Dose Equivalent To The Cypriot Population Due To Natural Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was initiated by the Biomedical Research Foundation, two years ago, to estimate the various natural radiation components that contribute to the Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) to the Cypriot population. The present study has shown that the contribution due to cosmic radiation is estimated to be less than 270 microSiverts per annum, while that due to airborne Rn-222 concentration in Cypriot houses is estimated to be less then 330 microSieverts per annum. The contribution due to terrestrial gamma radiations, which is currently under investigation, is so far estimated to be around 108 microSieverts per annum. Therefore the EDE to the Cypriot population due to natural radiation is likely to be around 700 microSieverts per annum, not taking into account the internal exposure due to other naturally occuring radionuclides. (author)

  11. Development of a extremity thermoluminescence dosemeter for photon dose equivalent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extremely thermoluminescence dosimeter, to be used when the extremity may become the limiting organ, based on CaSO4:Dy pellet was developed to be worn as wristlet by technicians who work with unsealed sources or handle radioactive materials. This system permits photon dose equivalent assessment as well as the effective energy determination. Such dosemeter has to be worn in addition to a whole-body dosemeter. The system consists of two pieces of polyethylene with dimensions of 40 mm x 20 mm x 10 mm that can be superimposed and three discs of CaSO4:Dy plus Teflon (PTFE), as sensitive material, between different filters. The detectors are produced by the Dosimetric Materials Laboratory of IPEN and have diameter of 6.0 mm and a thickness of 0.8 mm. One detector is placed between plastic filters of 3.0 mm thickness that guarantees electronic equilibrium for 60Co gamma rays. Another detector is located between 1.0 mm thick lead filters plus 3.0 mm plastic filters. A third detector is sandwiched between filters of lead 0.8 mm thick with a central hole of 2.0 mm diameter and plastic filters of 3.0 mm thickness. The detectors are sealed in a plastic film 20 mg.cm-2 thick. All TL detectors are in contact with filters. The filter area is a little larger than the TL detector. The validation of the proposed dosimetric system was performed for 60Co gamma doses between 0.1 and 200 mGy. In this range the relationship dose-response is linear. The energy response of the dosimetric system was evaluated for an energy range between 30 and 662 keV. The maximum, relative to 60Co, energy dependence TL response is observed at 31.2 keV (factor 10.2). To obtain the dose equivalent and the effective energy from the correlation between the three TL readings was developed an algorithm. Taking into account the results obtained in simulated laboratory comparisons, better than ±5%, we conclude that the proposed dosimetric system agrees with the requirements for its application as extremity

  12. Value of the physical basis of equivalent uniform dose as applied to intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the mathematic and physical basis of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and its optimization mechanism in the control of dose distribution in the organs at risk (OAR) and targets in IMRT optimization process, as well as its significance in clinical application. Methods: The mathematic limit analysis method and MATLAB mathematic analysis software were applied to observe the consistence with two different methods. The results of all formulae introduced by Niemierko were compared with the numerical value directly computed. The optimization mechanism of the dose distribution in the target/OAR in IMRT optimization process on the base of 2 units most simplified EUD optimization analysis model was studied. Results: When parameter α tends to + ∞, -∞, 0 and 1, the result of EUD directly computed on the MATLAB mathematic analysis software was similar to that relied on the limit analysis on condition, which provided evidence for experience that we should apply a positive value to OAR and a negative value to targets. By giving a suitable parameter 'α' and 'n', we may get a better target coverage and improve the sparing of critical structures through small number of iterations while using multiple dose-volume constrains for each anatomic structure and with considering great trial-and-error to adjust a larger number of objective function parameters, all of which were helpful to improve the target control probability and reduce the normal tissue complication probability. Conclusions: The use of parameter 'α' does significantly influence the optimization results on EUD based optimization method for patients with head and neck cancer and prostate cancer. Meanwhile, the EUD based optimization method has significant advantages in aspects of optimization results and optimization efficiency when compared with DVH based optimization, which does have greater significance in clinical application. (authors)

  13. Determination of attenuation factors for mortar of barite in terms of environmental dose equivalent and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses the characterization of barite mortars used as Xray shielding materials through the following quantities: mass attenuation coefficient, air kerma, effective dose and ambient dose - H⁎(10). The experiment was carried out with the use of the following reference qualities: RQR4, RQR6, RQR9 e RQR10, specified in accordance with norm IEC 61267: Medical diagnostic Xray equipment - radiation conditions for use in the determination of characteristics. In this study values was determined experimentally for the attenuation of the Cream barite (density 2.99g/cm3, collected in the state of Sao Paulo), Purple barite (density 2.95g/cm3, collected in the state of Bahia) and White barite (density 3.10g/cm3, collected in the state of Paraiba). These materials, in the form of mortar, were disposed in the form of squares namely poof bodies, whose dimensions were 10 x 10 cm and thickness ranging from 3 to 15 mm approximately. In the experimental procedure, these proof bodies were irradiated with a Pantak, model HF320 industrial X-ray apparatus. The potentials applied to the respective X-ray tube were: 60kV, 80kV, 120kV and 150kV at a constant current of 1mA. The attenuation responses in function of thickness, for each of the materials analyzed, were used to draw the attenuation and transmission curves. The efficiency of the barite studied concerning the capacity to attenuate X-ray radiation for X-ray beams ranging from 60 to 150 kV indicated

  14. Dose distribution measurements by MRI of a phantom containing lung tissue equivalent compartments made of ferrous sulphate gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel dosimetry based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been shown to provide verification of calculated dose distributions in soft tissue equivalent homogeneous phantoms. This study demonstrates how measurements of dose distribution can also be achieved in a phantom containing porous, lung-equivalent, Fricke gel. A phantom was made of Fe2+-infused low-density gel and conventional ferrous sulphate gel, filled in separate compartments in a Perspex container. Absorbed dose measurements were accomplished by MR imaging and by calibrating the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate (R1) versus absorbed dose by means of TLD measurements. This study shows that the production of lung-equivalent low-density (LD) dosimeter gel (mean CT number of -610 HU) is feasible. The MR signal detected in the LD gel dosimeter was substantially more noisy (i.e. displayed larger random fluctuations) than the signal from conventional gel, as expected. A deviation between calculated (TPS) and measured dose of about 3% (6 MV) and 4-7% (15 MV) was found in the LD region of the phantom. These results correspond well with data from other studies of dose distribution in lung-equivalent phantoms. The Fe2+-infused LD gel therefore seems suitable for measurement of absorbed dose distribution in phantoms that contain lung tissue compartments. (author)

  15. Study of response of radiation monitors for environmental dose equivalent measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental dose equivalent H * (10), is the magnitude recommended by ICRU 39 for environmental monitoring in fields of radiation of photons. Most of the equipment used for area monitoring, only quantifies the magnitudes exposure or dose not being designed to this new magnitude. In Brazil, particularly, is not yet regulated the use of H * (10). However, with the revision of the standard 3.01 it will necessary the use of monitors that allow the achievement of measures according to H * (10). The transition for using new magnitudes will be a slow process and the contribution that the laboratories of metrology of ionizing radiation in the country can give is, at first, promote and create the habit of using the unit Sievert (Sv) in the calibration of the instruments, and that is the unit recommended for H * (10). In a second step, the tests for determining the response of the instruments for H * (10) should be made and this is the harder step, taking into account the large number of area monitors around the country. These tests will provide information about the limitations of the instrument to the new magnitude, that is, the range where the instrument will have the best performance in quantification of new magnitude. This paper evaluates the performance for H * (10), with the variation of energy and angle of incidence of radiation, of three of the most used monitors in the country

  16. Comparison of diagnostic protocols and the equivalent effective dose in renal cancer and herniated lumbar disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cancer (RC) and herniated lumbar disc (HLD) were the two pathologies selected for the study of the diagnostic protocols applied in different centers to determine how their variability is reflected in the effective equivalent dose (EED) and establish the optimal radiological protocol for diagnostic purposes, while using the lowest possible dose. On the basis of 222 case histories, it was observed that the EED resulting from the diagnosis of HLD can vary as much as a factor of 3(6.2-18.9 mSv). Likewise, the EED related to the diagnosis of RC can be modified by a factor of 1.5(32.6-48.3 mSv), depending on the diagnostic protocol employed. It can be considered that the optimal protocol to reach a diagnosis of HLD includes chest x-ray, lumbar spine x-ray and lumbar CT scan, while that required for the diagnosis of RC involves chest x-ray, IVU, abdominal CT scan and digital subtraction angiography. The optimization of the study protocols-especially the reduction of the number of exposures, modernization and quality control of the equipment, among other aspects, can reduce the EED by a factor of 2. (Author)

  17. Optimal use of β-blockers in high-risk hypertension: A guide to dosing equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet B McGill

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Janet B McGillDepartment of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USAAbstract: Hypertension is the number one diagnosis made by primary care physicians, placing them in a unique position to prescribe the antihypertensive agent best suited to the individual patient. In individuals with diabetes mellitus, blood pressure (BP levels > 130/80 mmHg confer an even higher risk for cardiovascular and renal disease, and these patients will benefit from aggressive antihypertensive treatment using a combination of agents. β‑blockers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of hypertension in high-risk patients. β‑blockers are a heterogeneous class of agents, and this review presents the differences between β‑blockers and provides evidence-based protocols to assist in understanding dose equivalence in the selection of an optimal regimen in patients with complex needs. The clinical benefits provided by β‑blockers are only effective if patients adhere to medication treatment long term. β‑blockers with proven efficacy, once-daily dosing, and lower side effect profiles may become instrumental in the treatment of hypertensive diabetic and nondiabetic patients.Keywords: antihypertensive, blood pressure, atenolol, carvedilol, labetalol, metoprolol, nebivolol

  18. Calculation and analysis of photon dose equivalent distributions in the ICRU sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed dose equivalent distributions have been calculated in the ICRU sphere by Monte Carlo methods for photons in the energy range 0.010 - 10.0 MeV using the kerma approximation, with statistical accuracy generally better than +- 1%. Results are presented as depth-dose distributions along the principal axis and other selected axes and as isodose distributions, for parallel unidirectional, parallel opposed, planar rotational, planar isotropic and spatially isotropic irradiation. Various DE quantities are discussed and their numerical values presented as functions of photon energy. Six appendices are included which discuss (I.) conversion factors for different basic normalisation quantities, (II.) briefly the Monte Carlo procedure used, (III.) the meaning of kerma and the kerma approximation, (IV.) a comparison of the work presented in this report and the calculations of Dimbylow in 1983, (V.) a test experiment using a 30 cm spherical phantom, (VI.) the results of backscatter measurements and calculations using a 30 cm spherical phantom and cubic phantoms. (orig.)

  19. Semiempirical method for calculating equivalent dose rates of non-standard operations during transportation of SNF in dry shielded canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For effective implementation of ALARA approach, one should correctly know the values of expected equivalent dose rates. Doses of the personnel who will carry out preparation of workplaces will depend on accuracy of such estimation as well as the doses received by the personnel, which will perform work. In cases complicated for calculation, the most close to reality results can be received through application of so-called 'semiempirical' methods of calculation. The algorithm of calculation is given in this paper in a schematic way. Calculation algorithm used the data of EDR measurements from the container loaded with a nominal SNF, the container design specific features, the container configuration for such usage, work performance procedure technique, and also tabulated and analytical formulas of calculating radiation protection. The subsequent comparison of the measured values of equivalent dose rate with pre-computed dose rate has shown correctness of the calculation algorithm: the divergence did not exceed 3 per cent. For procedure of (from spent nuclear fuel storage pool of Unit 2 to Unit 1) the spent nuclear fuel transportation in Framatome Company manufactured container, in case of loading the container with a non-standard (other, than the design) SNF, we carried out semiempirical calculation of expected equivalent dose rates. In conclusion, correct pre-computation of dose-rate and using of principle ALARA allowed us exclude inexpedient operations (plums of water) and considerably to reduce a collective dose (almost in 8 times)

  20. Percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media for small fields of CyberKnife

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Suh, Tae Suk; Hong, Seung-Woo; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media are studied. For lung equivalent media a Balsa wood is used, and for a soft bone equivalent media a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as an inhomogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT film by using photon beams from 6MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5, 10 to 30 mm. As a simulation tool GEANT4 Monte Carlo code v9.4.p02 is used. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT film in and beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT film and the dose without EBT film ca...

  1. Immune responses of different mouse strains after challenge with equivalent lethal doses of toxoplasma Gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Y.H.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Most immunological studies that utilize different strains of inbred mice following T. gondii infection fail to compensate for differences in host susceptibility to the size of the parasite innoculum. To address this concern, susceptible C57BL/6 and resistant CBA/J mice were orally infected with either an equivalent 50 % lethal dose (LD50 of brain cysts of the 76K strain of T. gondii (15 cysts in C57BL/6, 400 cysts in CBA/J or the same dose of parasites in each mouse strain. C57BL/6 mice receiving 400 cysts (LD50 of CBA/J mice died post infection, whereas CBA/J mice that received 15 cysts (LD50 of C57BL/6 mice survived. Parasite loads in the brains and serum Toxoplasma specific lgG1 titers of LD50-infected C57BL/6 mice were significantly higher than those in LD50- or 15 cysts-infected CBA/J mice, whereas splenocyte proliferation to Toxoplasma antigen and the percentage of CD8α+T cells were reduced in LD50-infected C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, serum lgG2a and lgM titers, the percentage of γδ T cells and IFN-γ expression of spleen of LD50- infected CBA/J mice were higher than those of either 15 cysts- infected CBA/J mice or LD50-infected C57BL/6 mice. These observations demonstrate that the immune response between LD50- infected C57BL/6 and CBA/J mice was more prominent when compared to C57BL/6 or CBA/J mice receiving the same parasite inoculum. These observations would suggest that caution must be excersized in the planning and interpretation of data when the size of the parasite inoculum has not been adjusted for mouse strain.

  2. Assessment of the effective dose equivalent and of the risk for examined patients in nuclear medicine in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The somatic effective dose equivalent for the whole body is obtained through multiplication of the man organ doses with the somatic effective weighting factors w and by addition of all the value (w.Hsub(i)) of all organs except the gonads. The mean somatic effective dose equivalent of all patients examined in the whole country is 4.3 mSv. The effective collective dose Ss,eff amounts to some 483 man.Sv. The effective dose is the product of the number of patients and the somatic effective dose equivalent. This is a dosimetric parameter for quantification the total damage imposed on a group of persons by radiation application. 67 % of this dose caused through investigations using I-131, and 17 % using Tc-99m. The somatic radiation risk averaged within all procedures amounts to 3.8.10-5. With this calculated radiation risk for all patients examined in 1978 in the GDR 4.4 fatal cancers can be arised

  3. Equivalence of Gyn GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image guided cervical brachytherapy with EUD-based dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish a generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) -based prescription method for Image Guided Brachytherapy (IGBT) that reproduces the Gyn GEC-ESTRO WG (GGE) prescription for cervix carcinoma patients on CT images with limited soft tissue resolution. The equivalence of two IGBT planning approaches was investigated in 20 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) and 5 concomitant high dose rate IGBT treatments. The GGE planning strategy based on dose to the most exposed 2 cm3 (D2cc) was used to derive criteria for the gEUD-based planning of the bladder and rectum. The safety of gEUD constraints in terms of GGE criteria was tested by maximizing dose to the gEUD constraints for individual fractions. The gEUD constraints of 3.55 Gy for the rectum and 5.19 Gy for the bladder were derived. Rectum and bladder gEUD-maximized plans resulted in D2cc averages very similar to the initial GGE criteria. Average D2ccs and EUDs from the full treatment course were comparable for the two techniques within both sets of normal tissue constraints. The same was found for the tumor doses. The derived gEUD criteria for normal organs result in GGE-equivalent IGBT treatment plans. The gEUD-based planning considers the entire dose distribution of organs in contrast to a single dose-volume-histogram point

  4. ambiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Leal Salcedo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El derecho internacional ambiental es un conocimiento de carácter transversal, que entre otras consideraciones refleja las preocupaciones de la sociedad por la implementación de un modelo de desarrollo sustentable para el respeto a las reglas del medio natural que garantizan la integridad y renovación de los sistemas naturales. El presente artículo enfoca esta visión a través del análisis de material documental revisado, entre ellos tratados internacionales que permiten distinguir el desarrollo del derecho internacional ambiental y el papel de Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU, en el propósito común del derecho individual y colectivo de disfrutar de una vida, un ambiente seguro, sano y ecológicamente equilibrado. En función a estas disertaciones las consideraciones finales exponen parte de la visión que ha estructurado la ONU y que representan un aporte considerable en el fomento de la conciencia mundial sobre la necesidad de establecer vínculos entre las naciones para el continuo desarrollo de esta rama del derecho.

  5. Reconstruction of biologically equivalent dose distribution on CT-image from measured physical dose distribution of therapeutic beam in water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the standpoint of quality assurance in radiotherapy, it is very important to compare the dose distributions realized by an irradiation system with the distribution planned by a treatment planning system. To compare the two dose distributions, it is necessary to convert the dose distributions on CT images to distributions in a water phantom or convert the measured dose distributions to distributions on CT images. Especially in heavy-ion radiotherapy, it is reasonable to show the biologically equivalent dose distribution on the CT images. We developed tools for the visualization and comparison of these distributions in order to check the therapeutic beam for each patient at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). To estimate the distribution in a patient, the dose is derived from the measurement by mapping it on a CT-image. Fitting the depth-dose curve to the calculated SOBP curve also gives biologically equivalent dose distributions in the case of a carbon beam. Once calculated, dose distribution information can be easily handled to make a comparison with the planned distribution and display it on a grey-scale CT-image. Quantitative comparisons of dose distributions can be made with anatomical information, which also gives a verification of the irradiation system in a very straightforward way. (author)

  6. Assessment of physician and patient (child and adult) equivalent doses during renal angiography by Monte Carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, A; Nikparvar, B; Jabbari, I

    2014-11-01

    Renal angiography is one of the medical imaging methods in which patient and physician receive high equivalent doses due to long duration of fluoroscopy. In this research, equivalent doses of some radiosensitive tissues of patient (adult and child) and physician during renal angiography have been calculated by using adult and child Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantoms and Monte Carlo method (MCNPX). The results showed, in angiography of right kidney in a child and adult patient, that gall bladder with the amounts of 2.32 and 0.35 mSv, respectively, has received the most equivalent dose. About the physician, left hand, left eye and thymus absorbed the most amounts of doses, means 0.020 mSv. In addition, equivalent doses of the physician's lens eye, thyroid and knees were 0.023, 0.007 and 7.9E-4 mSv, respectively. Although these values are less than the reported thresholds by ICRP 103, it should be noted that these amounts are related to one examination. PMID:25063788

  7. Assessment of physician and patient (child and adult) equivalent doses during renal angiography by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal angiography is one of the medical imaging methods in which patient and physician receive high equivalent doses due to long duration of fluoroscopy. In this research, equivalent doses of some radiosensitive tissues of patient (adult and child) and physician during renal angiography have been calculated by using adult and child Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantoms and Monte Carlo method (MCNPX). The results showed, in angiography of right kidney in a child and adult patient, that gall bladder with the amounts of 2.32 and 0.35 mSv, respectively, has received the most equivalent dose. About the physician, left hand, left eye and thymus absorbed the most amounts of doses, means 0.020 mSv. In addition, equivalent doses of the physician's lens eye, thyroid and knees were 0.023, 0.007 and 7.9 - 4 mSv, respectively. Although these values are less than the reported thresholds by ICRP 103, it should be noted that these amounts are related to one examination. (authors)

  8. Calculation of the individual effective dose equivalent in Italy following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates are presented here for the individual effective dose equivalents (EDE) from dietary intake of radiocaesium-contaminated food by the average Italian consumer in different age groups. Food items of consumption rate greater than 50kg/y were included in the food basket studies. In view of the pattern of food consumption in Italy, the radiocaesium concentrations of foodstuffs such as milk, milk products, bread, pasta, meat fruit, vegetables and babyfoods were measured between January 1987 and December 1988 inclusive. These measurements were carried out mainly by the environmental radioactivity laboratories in three administrative districts of Italy. The results show that the total individual EDE values received in 1987 from foodstuffs were around 175, 110 and 70 μSv/year for adults, children (up to 10 years old) and infants (up to one year old), respectively. The corresponding values for 1988 are about 15, 10 and 20 μSv/year, respectively. The EDE committed in the latter half relative to the first half of 1987 was a factor of 2.5 and 3 less for adults and children, respectively, and a factor of about 2 for infants. In 1988, no significant change was observed in EDE values during the year. (author)

  9. Mapping of isoexposure curves for evaluation of equivalent environmental doses for radiodiagnostic mobile equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper generates iso exposure curves in areas where the mobile radiodiagnostic equipment are used for evaluation of iso kerma map and the environment equivalent dose (H*(d)). It was used a Shimadzu mobile equipment and two Siemens, with non anthropomorphic scatter. The exposure was measured in a mesh of 4.20 x 4.20 square meter in steps of 30 cm, at half height from the scatterer. The calculation of H*(d) were estimated for a worker present in all the procedures in a period of 11 months, being considered 3.55 m As/examination and 44.5 procedures/month (adult UTI) and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI), and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI). It was observed that there exist points where the H*(d) was over the limit established for the free area inside the radius of 30 cm from the central beam of radiation in the case of pediatric UTI and 60 cm for adult UTI. The points localized 2.1 m from the center presented values lower than 25% of those limit

  10. Natural neutron fluence rate and the equivalent dose in localities with different elevation and latitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of neutron field measurements in the ground-level atmosphere in localities with various elevations z (from 113 m to 2632 m) placed between geodetic latitudes 48o-52oN and longitudes 16o - 20o E are presented. A highly sensitive 3 He counter and a Bonner spectrometer were used in the measurements. The determined total neutron fluence rate Φt and the equivalent dose rate H induced by the natural neutron background in these localities change according to the exponential law ∼exp(αz), where α = (0.85 ± 0.05) x 10-3 m-1. Extrapolation of this dependence to sea level, gives Φt (0) = (100 ± 20) m-2.s-1 and H(0) (4.1 ± 1.2) nSv.h-1. The results of the measurements confirm a weak dependence of the total neutron fluence rate on the composition of dry ground. A considerable dependence of the natural neutron spectrum shape on the ground moisture content was observed. As measurements were made in the summer season during a long-lasting period without precipitation, the obtained value of H(z) could be considered as a maximum. The results are compared with calculated values using the Los Alamos Lahet Code System (LCS) both for the sea level and maximum elevation sites. The LCS was also used for calculation of the latitude variations in the total neutron fluence rates. (author)

  11. Calculation of Absorbed Dose in Target Tissue and Equivalent Dose in Sensitive Tissues of Patients Treated by BNCT Using MCNP4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Pooya, S. M. Hosseini

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is used for treatment of many diseases, including brain tumors, in many medical centers. In this method, a target area (e.g., head of patient) is irradiated by some optimized and suitable neutron fields such as research nuclear reactors. Aiming at protection of healthy tissues which are located in the vicinity of irradiated tissue, and based on the ALARA principle, it is required to prevent unnecessary exposure of these vital organs. In this study, by using numerical simulation method (MCNP4C Code), the absorbed dose in target tissue and the equiavalent dose in different sensitive tissues of a patiant treated by BNCT, are calculated. For this purpose, we have used the parameters of MIRD Standard Phantom. Equiavelent dose in 11 sensitive organs, located in the vicinity of target, and total equivalent dose in whole body, have been calculated. The results show that the absorbed dose in tumor and normal tissue of brain equal to 30.35 Gy and 0.19 Gy, respectively. Also, total equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs, other than tumor and normal tissue of brain, is equal to 14 mGy. The maximum equivalent doses in organs, other than brain and tumor, appear to the tissues of lungs and thyroid and are equal to 7.35 mSv and 3.00 mSv, respectively.

  12. Use of the effective dose equivalent concept of the International Commission on Radiological Protection by EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) is encouraged. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the EPA Science Advisory Board's Radiation Advisory Committee has repeatedly recommended that EPA use the effective dose equivalent concept of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in developing risk estimates and establishing regulations related to the exposure of humans to radionuclides in the environment, the EPA has not been consistent in its use of the effective dose equivalent concept or the weighting factors applied in quantifying dose. The Committee believes that effective dose equivalent, rather than dose equivalent to specific organs, should be applied as the basis for regulations dealing with radiation exposure. The Committee strongly encourages EPA to carefully examine its position on the effective dose equivalent concept, the numerical value of organ-specific weighting factors, and the application of effective dose equivalent in establishing regulations and strive to ensure consistency within EPA and between EPA and other government, national, and international recommendations

  13. The neutron dose equivalent evaluation and shielding at the maze entrance of a Varian Clinac 23EX treatment room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rate (Hn,D and HG) at the outer maze entrance and the adjacent treatment console area after the installation of a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator with a higher beam energy than its predecessor. The evaluation was based on measurements and comparison with several empirical calculations. The effectiveness of borated polyethylene (BPE) boards, as a maze wall lining material, on neutron dose and photon dose reduction is also reported. Methods: A single energy Varian 6 MV photon linear accelerator (linac) was replaced with a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator capable of producing 18 MV photons in a vault originally designed for the former accelerator. In order to evaluate and redesign the shielding of the vault, the neutron dose equivalent Hn,D was measured using an Andersson-Braun neutron Rem meter and the photon dose equivalent HG was measured using a Geiger Mueller and an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter at the outer maze entrance. The measurement data were compared to semiempirical calculations such as the Kersey method, the modified Kersey method, and a newly proposed method by Falcao et al. Additional measurements were taken after BPE boards were installed on the maze walls as a neutron absorption lining material. Results: With the gantry head tilted close to the inner maze entrance and with the jaws closed, both neutron dose equivalent and photon dose equivalent reached their maximum. Compared to the measurement results, the Kersey method overestimates the neutron dose equivalent Hn,D by about two to four times (calculation/measurement ratio≅2.4-3.8). Falcao's method largely overestimates the Hn,D (calculation/measurement ratio≅3.9-5.5). The modified Kersey method has a calculation to measurement ratio about 0.6-0.9. The photon dose equivalent calculation including McGinley's capture gamma dose equivalent equation estimates about 77%-98% of the measurement. After applying BPE boards as a lining material on

  14. SU-E-T-567: Neutron Dose Equivalent Evaluation for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy with Apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the neutron contamination from the aperture in pencil beam scanning during proton therapy. Methods: A Monte Carlo based proton therapy research platform TOPAS and the UF-series hybrid pediatric phantoms were used to perform this study. First, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment pediatric plans with average spot size of 10 mm at iso-center were created and optimized for three patients with and without apertures. Then, the plans were imported into TOPAS. A scripting method was developed to automatically replace the patient CT with a whole body phantom positioned according to the original plan iso-center. The neutron dose equivalent was calculated using organ specific quality factors for two phantoms resembling a 4- and 14-years old patient. Results: The neutron dose equivalent generated by the apertures in PBS is 4–10% of the total neutron dose equivalent for organs near the target, while roughly 40% for organs far from the target. Compared to the neutron dose equivalent caused by PBS without aperture, the results show that the neutron dose equivalent with aperture is reduced in the organs near the target, and moderately increased for those organs located further from the target. This is due to the reduction of the proton dose around the edge of the CTV, which causes fewer neutrons generated in the patient. Conclusion: Clinically, for pediatric patients, one might consider adding an aperture to get a more conformal treatment plan if the spot size is too large. This work shows the somewhat surprising fact that adding an aperture for beam scanning for facilities with large spot sizes reduces instead of increases a potential neutron background in regions near target. Changran Geng is supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11475087)

  15. Calculated organ equivalent doses for individuals in a sitting posture above a contaminated ground and a PET imaging room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, phantoms representing sitting postures were developed and implemented in the MCNPX code to perform dose calculations. For the ground contamination case, isotropic planar source of 137Cs was used. The male sitting phantom received an effective dose rate of 37.73 nSv h-1 for a contamination of 30 kBq m-2. The gonadal equivalent dose of the male sitting phantom was 40 % larger than that from the standing phantom. For the positron emission tomography clinic, a point photon source with the energy of 511 keV was used. The gonadal equivalent dose of the male sitting phantom was 117 % larger than that for the standing phantom. For an 8-h day, the effective dose of the sitting phantom was 2.54 μSv for 550 MBq F-18. This study concludes that phantoms with realistic postures could and should be considered in organ equivalent dose calculations in certain environmental and medical dosimetry studies where accurate data are desired. (authors)

  16. Dose equivalent quantities in the ICRU tissue sphere for 0.4-10.0 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the fluctuations of the cross sections in the energy range from 0.4-10.0 MeV on the responses of neutrons in the ICRU standard tissue sphere is investigated. The point energy Monte Carlo method was used for the estimation of the dose equivalent and the absorbed dose. A new approach was adopted where band-averaged responses were calculated instead of the previous approach which generates them as point values. The need for interpolation of the fluence-to-dose conversion factors between the point values is this eliminated. Based on the depth-dose distributions in the standard sphere, the index quantities, the newly-defined operational quantities and the effective quality factors were evaluated. The differences between the calculated indices and the previous results varied from -13% to +4% for the deep dose equivalent, and from -19% to +7% for the shallow dose equivalent. The energy dependencies of the responses were dominated by the oxygen content in tissue due to both the resonant oxygen cross section and the characteristic behavior of the proton quality factors

  17. Spectrum-dose conversion operators, G(E) functions of NaI(Tl) scintillators adapted for effective dose equivalent quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G(E) functions of spectrum-dose conversion operators are shown for eight kinds of NaI(Tl) scintillators for various radiation quantities. The G(E) function method evaluates dose directly from an observed gamma-ray pulse-height spectrum with ease and high accuracy. Dimensions of the considered detectors are 1''φ x 1'', 2''φ x 2'', 3''φ x 3'', 4''φ x 4'', 5''φ x 4'' for cylindrical type and 2''φ, 3''φ, 5''φ for spherical type. For radiation quantities, four kinds of kermas, four kinds of 1 cm depth dose equivalents in the ICRU sphere, and effective dose equivalents calculated with a numerical human phantom under five irradiation geometries are considered. The energy range of gamma-rays is 50 keV to 10 MeV. The detector response functions calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation code, MARTHA were used to derive G(E) functions. (author)

  18. Evaluation of absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose equivalent due to terrestrial gamma radiation in rocks in a part of Southwestern Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The average outdoor absorbed dose rate in air and the average annual effective dose equivalent due to terrestrial gamma radiation from 40K, 238U and 232Th in rocks in Ondo and Ekiti States, Southwestern Nigeria have been evaluated from measurements of the concentrations of these radionuclides in this environmental material. The concentration measurements were obtained using a very sensitive gamma spectroscopic system consisting of a 7.6x7.6 cm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to a computerised ACCUSPEC installation. The average absorbed dose rate and average annual effective dose equivalent was found to be 8.33±2.76 nGy.h-1 and 8.7±2.9 μSv.y-1 respectively. (author)

  19. Evaluation of absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose equivalent due to terrestrial gamma radiation in rocks in a part of Southwestern Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, O.S

    2002-07-01

    The average outdoor absorbed dose rate in air and the average annual effective dose equivalent due to terrestrial gamma radiation from {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th in rocks in Ondo and Ekiti States, Southwestern Nigeria have been evaluated from measurements of the concentrations of these radionuclides in this environmental material. The concentration measurements were obtained using a very sensitive gamma spectroscopic system consisting of a 7.6x7.6 cm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to a computerised ACCUSPEC installation. The average absorbed dose rate and average annual effective dose equivalent was found to be 8.33{+-}2.76 nGy.h{sup -1} and 8.7{+-}2.9 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} respectively. (author)

  20. Skin dose estimation due to a contamination by a radionuclide {beta} emitter: are doses equivalent good estimator of protection quantities?; Estimation de la dose extremite due a une contamination par un radionucleide emetteur {beta}: l'equivalent de dose est-il un bon estimateur de la grandeur de protection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgois, L. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France)

    2011-04-15

    When handling radioactive {beta} emitters, measurements in terms of personal dose equivalents H{sub p} (0.07) are used to estimate the equivalent dose limit to skin or extremities given by regulations. First of all, analytical expressions for individual dose equivalents H{sub p} (0.07) and equivalent doses to the extremities H{sub skin} are given for a point source and for contamination with a radionuclide {beta} emitter. Second of all, operational quantities and protection quantities are compared. It is shown that in this case the operational quantities significantly overstate the protection quantities. For a skin contamination the ratio between operational quantities and protection quantities is 2 for a maximum {beta} energy of 3 MeV and 90 for a maximum {beta} energy of 150 keV. (author)

  1. Radon and daughters in cigarette smoke measured with SSNTD and corresponding committed equivalent dose to respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium (238U) and Thorium (232Th) contents were measured inside various tobacco samples by using a method based on determining detection efficiencies of the CR-39 and LR-115 II solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) for the emitted alpha particles. Alpha and beta activities per unit volume, due to radon (222Rn), thoron (220Rn) and their decay products, were evaluated inside cigarette smokes of tobacco samples studied. Annual committed equivalent doses due to short-lived radon decay products from the inhalation of various cigarette smokes were determined in the thoracic and extrathoracic regions of the respiratory tract. Three types of cigarettes made in Morocco of black tobacco show higher annual committed equivalent doses in the extrathoracic and thoracic regions of the respiratory tract than the other studied cigarettes (except one type of cigarettes made in France of yellow tobacco); their corresponding annual committed equivalent dose ratios are larger than 1.8. Measured annual committed equivalent doses ranged from 1.8x10-9 to 1.10x10-3 Sv yr-1 in the extrathoracic region and from 1.3x10-10 to 7.6x10-6 Sv yr-1 in the thoracic region of the respiratory tract for a smoker consuming 20 cigarettes a day

  2. The intercomparison of 137Cs irradiator output measurement and personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), using TLD and film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intercomparison of output measurement of 137Cs irradiator and personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) using TLD and film have been carried out in the year of 2006 to 2008. According to IAEA recommendation, intercomparison is one of audit activities but it is performed in the spirit of collaboration and support rather than in the spirit of inspection. The aim of intercomparison of output measurement of 137Cs irradiator is to verify the dose stated by the participant laboratories. Intercomparison is also to assess the competency of the participant, to keep traceability and consistency of measurement result, to assure that instrument work correctly and the result of evaluation was in agreement, and also for fulfilling one of the clauses of ISO-17025-2005. Besides that, this intercomparison aimed to facilitate link between the system and members of national measurement and transfer of experience in measurement technique and dose evaluation of radiation. The benefit of intercomparison is important among others as tests of proficiency in dose evaluation or measurement, upgrading quality of service and for obeying supervisor body legislation (BAPETEN). TLD was used as a means of output 137Cs irradiator measurement, whereas film and TLD were used for dose intercomparison. This paper presented result of intercomparison of output measurement and evaluation of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) in the year of 2006 to 2008 followed by 6 participants: Balai Pengamanan Fasilitas Kesehatan (BPFK) Jakarta, Medan, Surabaya, Makasar, PTLR and Laboratory of Keselamatan dan Kesehatan Lingkungan (KKL)-PTKMR BATAN. In this intercomparison, the dose of TLD stated by participant were compared with the dose measured by Radiation Metrology Laboratory (LMR), and the results showed the differences were within 10 %, so it was satisfied. The results of intercomparison of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) were evaluated based on ISO/IEC Guide 43-1, 1997 analysis and expressed as En. The values of En

  3. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent on student's practice on intra-oral dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Shin-ichi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Toyama, Michio; Takase, Hiroshi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    We tried to discuss the problems on radiological protection of students in the practice of technique of intra-oral radiography with use of classmates. This radiographic practice has been performed after the technical training use of 'DXTTR' as a preclinical training. The practice was performed as training to take peri-apical, bite-wing, occlusal and eccentric projections. The mean film numbers which were used to complete those technique were 56 films. In these practice, dosimetries were performed on six locations of the body surface of every student who was taken radiograms using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measured locations were orbit, bilateral submandible, neck, chest and abdomen. The effective dose equivalent was estimated using weighting factors of International Comission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) pub. 26 and the values of tissue dose equivalent obtained by TLD measurements. The results showed that the mean value of dose equivalent of each part was 5.40 mSv at orbit, 5.06 mSv at submandible, 0.75 mSv at neck, 0.04 mSv at chest and 0.02 mSv at abdomen. The maximum value of effective equivalent dose was 17.03 mSv which was lower than the dose equivalent limit for workers (50 mSv/year) recommended by ICRP pub. 26. The mean value of effective dose equivalent was 2.36 mSv. ICRP recommended the radiation protection for students aged 18 years or over that the procedures for restricting exposure should be broadly similar to those for occupational exposure. So the results indicate that those training was considered to be controlled in some reasonable level. The mean value of risk was estimated to be 3.94 x 10{sup -5}. Because intra-oral radiographic training with use of classmates is performed under extreme non-uniform irradiation, the evaluation of effective dose equivalent was considered to be important to control this special educational exposure and useful for optimization of the educational programs of radiographic technical training

  4. Simulation studies on a prototype ionization chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Metrological Laboratory of lonizing Radiation and Radioactivity (LMRIR) of Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) has designed and constructed a prototype ionization chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), similar to the developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and now commercialized by PTW. Tests already performed had shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very close to the PTB chamber, namely the energy dependence for the x-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137Cs and 60Co. However, the results obtained also show a high dependence on the energy for some incident radiation angles and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber. In order to try to optimize the performance of the chamber, namely to decrease the energy dependence and to improve the magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber, the LMRIR initiated numerical simulation of this ionization chamber using a Monte-Carlo method for simulation of radiation transport using, in a first step, the MCNPX code. So, simulation studies of some physical parameters are been performed in order to optimize the response of the ionization chamber, namely the diameter of the central electrode of the ionization chamber, the thickness of the front wall of the ionization chamber, among others. Preliminary results show that probably the actual geometry of the ionization chamber is not yet the optimized configuration. The simulation study will carry on in order to find the optimum geometry. (author)

  5. Total external dose equivalent and effective dose derived to the Piedmont population in the period 30 Apr 1986 - 22 Sep 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some dosimetric evaluations concerning the population of the Piemonte Region, obtained after the measurements made following the Chernobyl accident, are reported. The individual effective mean dose equivalent derived from the exposure and intake in the period April 30, 1986 - September 22, 1987, is about 0.50 mSv

  6. Intercomparison 2013 on measurements of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields in the African region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intercomparison exercise on the measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) was jointly organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers through its Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory in the African region. This intercomparison exercise was aimed at verifying the performance of the individual monitoring services of the participants in order to assess their capabilities to measure the quantity Hp(10) in photon (gamma and X ray) fields helping them to comply with dose limitation requirements. The scope of this intercomparison was aimed at passive dosemeters, which determine the personal dose equivalent in photon radiation fields, mainly for thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters. Twenty-seven countries from the Africa region and from outside Africa participated in this exercise. The intercomparison protocol, including the preparation of the dosemeters and the irradiation procedures, is described and the results are presented, analysed and discussed. (authors)

  7. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  8. A calculational method of photon dose equivalent based on the revised technical standards of radiological protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective conversion factor for photons from 0.03 to 10 MeV were calculated to convert the absorbed dose in air to the 1 cm, 3 mm, and 70 μm depth dose equivalents behind iron, lead, concrete, and water shields up to 30 mfp thickness. The effective conversion factor changes slightly with thickness of the shields and becomes nearly constant at 5 to 10 mfp. The difference of the effective conversion factor was less than 2% between plane normal and point isotropic geometries. It is suggested that the present method, making the data base of the exposure buildup factors useful, would be very effective as compared to a new evaluation of the dose equivalent buildup factors. 5 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs

  9. Estimation of the effective equivalent dose and of the risk of patients examinated by radionuclide methods in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 115,194 patients were examined by radionuclide methods in the GDR in 1978. The most frequent methods of examination are thyroid scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate (32%) and the renal function test (ING) with 131I-hippurate (21%). For 49% of all patients /sup 99m/Tc-compounds, for 28% 131I-hippurate and for 8% 131I-iodide was used. For the estimation of the radiation-dependent somatic risk the conception of the somatically effective equivalent dose was used. For 27 in vivo radionuclide methods the somatically effective equivalent dose was determined. The calculations were performed in patient collectives of the Nuclear Medical Hospital of Berlin-Buch and the values are considered to be representative for the whole GDR. It was shown that in 67% of all radionuclide examinations carried out in the GDR in 1978 the somatically effective equivalent dose is lower than that by the annual natural radiation exposure of the population at the level of about 1.7 mSv. The medium somatically effective equivalent dose for all patients examined in the GDR is about 4.3 mSv. This yields a value of about 483 man . Sv for the somatically effective collective dose. 67% of this collective dose are caused by examination with 131I. Using the risk factor for the whole body of 1.25 x 10-2 Sv-1, recommended in the ICRP publication No. 26 for the radiation-dependent induction of lethal malignomas, and a manifestation portion of 0.7 for the consideration of the age distribution of the patients a radiation-dependent somatic risk of about 3.8 x 10-5 is obtained for all radionuclide examinations. For the patients examined by in vivo radionuclide methods in the GDR in 1978 4.4 radiation-induced malignomas with lethal effect are calculated by this risk. (author)

  10. Estimation of Absorbed Dose Rate and Collective Effective Dose Equivalent Due to Gamma Radiation from Selected Radionuclides in Soil in Ondo and Ekiti State, South-Western Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides, namely 40K, 238U and 232Th, in surface soils in Ondo and Ekiti States, south-western Nigeria have been measured using a very sensitive gamma ray spectroscopic system consisting of a 760 mm x 760 mm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to a Canberra Series 10 Plus multichannel analyser. The mean absorbed dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent and the collective effective dose equivalent in these states have been estimated from the measured concentrations of the radionuclides, which are 0.015 ± 0.008 μGy.h-1, 18.4 μSv.y-1 and 73.6 man.Sv.y-1 respectively. (author)

  11. Estimation of Absorbed Dose Rate and Collective Effective Dose Equivalent Due to Gamma Radiation from Selected Radionuclides in Soil in Ondo and Ekiti State, South-Western Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, I.R.; Ajayi, O.S

    1999-07-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, in surface soils in Ondo and Ekiti States, south-western Nigeria have been measured using a very sensitive gamma ray spectroscopic system consisting of a 760 mm x 760 mm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to a Canberra Series 10 Plus multichannel analyser. The mean absorbed dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent and the collective effective dose equivalent in these states have been estimated from the measured concentrations of the radionuclides, which are 0.015 {+-} 0.008 {mu}Gy.h{sup -1}, 18.4 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} and 73.6 man.Sv.y{sup -1} respectively. (author)

  12. Non-vascular interventional procedures: effective dose to patient and equivalent dose to abdominal organs by means of DICOM images and Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Mariaconcetta; Marchioni, Chiara; Insero, Teresa; Donnarumma, Raffaella; D'Adamo, Alessandro; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Cannavale, Alessandro; Di Castro, Elisabetta

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates X-ray exposure in patient undergoing abdominal extra-vascular interventional procedures by means of Digital Imaging and COmmunications in Medicine (DICOM) image headers and Monte Carlo simulation. The main aim was to assess the effective and equivalent doses, under the hypothesis of their correlation with the dose area product (DAP) measured during each examination. This allows to collect dosimetric information about each patient and to evaluate associated risks without resorting to in vivo dosimetry. The dose calculation was performed in 79 procedures through the Monte Carlo simulator PCXMC (A PC-based Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical X-ray examinations), by using the real geometrical and dosimetric irradiation conditions, automatically extracted from DICOM headers. The DAP measurements were also validated by using thermoluminescent dosemeters on an anthropomorphic phantom. The expected linear correlation between effective doses and DAP was confirmed with an R(2) of 0.974. Moreover, in order to easily calculate patient doses, conversion coefficients that relate equivalent doses to measurable quantities, such as DAP, were obtained. PMID:26211013

  13. Non-vascular interventional procedures: effective dose to patient and equivalent dose to abdominal organs by means of DICOM images and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates X-ray exposure in patient undergoing abdominal extra-vascular interventional procedures by means of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image headers and Monte Carlo simulation. The main aim was to assess the effective and equivalent doses, under the hypothesis of their correlation with the dose area product (DAP) measured during each examination. This allows to collect dosimetric information about each patient and to evaluate associated risks without resorting to in vivo dosimetry. The dose calculation was performed in 79 procedures through the Monte Carlo simulator PCXMC (A PC-based Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical X-ray examinations), by using the real geometrical and dosimetric irradiation conditions, automatically extracted from DICOM headers. The DAP measurements were also validated by using thermoluminescent dosemeters on an anthropomorphic phantom. The expected linear correlation between effective doses and DAP was confirmed with an R2 of 0.974. Moreover, in order to easily calculate patient doses, conversion coefficients that relate equivalent doses to measurable quantities, such as DAP, were obtained. (authors)

  14. Comparisons of equivalent dose values obtained with different protocols using a lacustrine sediment sample from Xuchang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparisons of seven protocols for equivalent dose (De) determination using the conventional optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal and the recuperation OSL (ReOSL) signal were made on a sample that is representative of a series of samples taken from a lacustrine sedimentary sequence at the archaeological site of Xuchang Man. Fine-grained quartz (4-11 μm) was extracted and the OSL signal was found to be dominated by the fast component. The De values obtained using different protocols varied from 222 ± 4 Gy to 368 ± 8 Gy. The dose response curves were all fitted with a single saturating exponential function except in the case of the multiple-aliquot additive dose protocol with sensitivity correction for the recuperated OSL signal (ReMAAD). The characteristic saturation dose (D0) values obtained with the conventional OSL signal varied between 107 ± 6 Gy and 154 ± 7 Gy and showed no relationship with De values. The ReMAAD dose response curve was linear, and yielded an equivalent dose of 269 ± 12 Gy. The ReMAAD protocol may potentially serve as a means of dating relatively older samples provided the bleaching at the time of deposition was complete.

  15. Assessment of individual dose equivalents Hp(0.07 of medical staff occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Papierz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The paper presents the Nofer Institutes of Occupational Medicine in Łódź's results of the assessment of individual dose equivalents Hp(0.07 of medical staff exposed to X-rays in Poland in 2012. In addition, the collected data was analysed in terms of types of medical units performing medical procedures and the categorization of personnel. Material and Methods: Dosimetric service was provided for medical staff of interventional radiology departments occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in terms of individual dose equivalents Hp(0.07. In 2012, personal dosimetry Hp(0.07 determinations were performed by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź and covered 2044 employees from 174 health facilities. The determinations were performed using thermoluminescence dosimetry according to the procedure accredited by the Polish Centre for Accreditation (document number AB 327. The measurements were performed using ring-dosimeters in the periods of 1 or 2 months. Results: Mean annual individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07 in 2012 was equal to 3.3 mSv (annual limit for Hp(0.07 is 500 mSv. The average value of annual individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07 decreased comparing to the previous year. In 2012, no single case of exceeding the annual limit for Hp(0.07 was reported. Data stored in the file indicates that more than 96% of all of the annual doses did not exceed the level of 10 mSv. Conclusions: The analysis of data on occupational exposure to ionizing radiation confirms a stable level of exposure and satisfactory radiological protection in interventional radiology facilities monitored by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź in Poland in 2012. Med Pr 2014;65(2:167–171

  16. Internal individual dose monitoring and estimation of dose equivalent from workers of the development and production of radioisotopes in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of internal individual dose monitoring from workers of the development and production of radioisotopes in CIAE (1995-2000) are presented. The annual average committed effective dose is 1.8 x 10-2 - 8.0 x 10-1 mSv and the collective committed effective dose is 2.9 x 10-3 - 9.8 x 10-2 man·Sv in 1995-2000. The collective committed effective dose is 1.6 x 10-1 man·Sv and the annual average committed effective dose is 1.8 x 10-1 mSv for the 873 persons from 1995-2000

  17. Medical irradiation and the use of the ''effective dose equivalent'' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the effective dose for all kinds of medical irradiation. In order to estimate the 'somatic effective dose' the weighting factors recommended by ICRP 26 have been separated into those for somatic effects and for genetic effects. Calculation of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology procedures must consider the various technical parameters which determine the absorbed dose in the various organs, i.e. beam quality, typical entrance dose and the number of films of each view. Knowledge about these parameters is not always well established and therefore the effective dose estimates are very uncertain. The average dose absorbed by various organs in the case of administration of radionuclides to the body depends to a much higher degree on biological parameters than in the case of external irradiation. In contrast to the variability and lack of reliability of biological data, the physical methods for internal dose calculation are quite elaborate. However, these methods have to be extended to involve the target dose from the radioactivity distributed within the remaining parts of the body. An attempt was made to estimate the somatic effective dose for the most common diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. This would make it possible to compare the risk of X-ray and nuclear medicine techniques on a more equitable basis. The collective effective dose from medical irradiation is estimated for various countries on the basis of reported statistical data. (H.K.)

  18. Radiation dose during sequential renal scintigraphy for the determination of 131I-Hipuran clearance equivalents during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dose for various techniques have been derived from the literature and are presented in a table (equivalent dose for kidney, whole body, ovary, thyroid of mother and fetus). Calculation of the increase in the gentically significant dose to all pregnant women in 1977 produces a value of 0.196 mrem/year for the D.D.R.. In our opinion this could be reduced to 20% if the indications for the examination are strictly defined by the gynaecologists. Compared with X-ray diagnostic irradiation, the increase in the gentically significant dose of 0.0392 mrem/year would then be very small. This confirms that suitable methods for determining disturbances of renal function can be used during the pregnancy if the risk of failing to make a diagnosis is balanced against the risk of the radiation. (orig.)

  19. The collective dose equivalent in evaluated region of bone-coal power stations and bone-coal shafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; JIANG Shan; KONG Ling-Li; LI Ying; YE Ji-Da; SHI Jin-Hua; WU Zong-Mei

    2005-01-01

    During 1991-1993, the radioactivity levels of the bone-coal mines were investigated in Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Zhejiang and Anhui Provinces, respectively, where the reserve of bone-coal is about 90% of our country's total reserve. The annual additional collective dose equivalent within 80km evaluated region of bone-coal power stations in Nijiangkou and Anren is 1.7 and 1.9 man .mSv,respectively,and that of Zhuantanyan bone-coal shaft is 1.4 man.mSv.The collective dose equivalent caused by bone-coal cinder brick produced for 25 years in the provinces is 1.6×105 man.Sv.

  20. The collective dose equivalent in evaluated region of bone-coal power stations and bone-coal shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1991-1993, the radioactivity levels of the bone-coal mines were investigated in Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Zhejiang and Anhui Provinces, respectively, where the reserve of bone-coal is about 90% of our country's total reserve. the annual additional collective dose equivalent within 80 km evaluated region of bone-coal power stations in Nijiangkou and Anren is 1.7 and 1.9 man·mSv, respectively, and that of Zhuantanyan bone-coal shaft is 1.4 man·mSv. The collective dose equivalent caused by bone-coal cinder brick produced for 25 years in the five provinces is 1.6 x 105 man·Sv. (authors)

  1. Characterization and calibration of extremity dosimeters for beta radiation field in terms of mass and metallurgic individual equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two extremity personal dosimeters were 'type tested' and calibrated to measure the personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), at 0.07 mm depth, at beta particle fields from a 90 Sr+90 Y radiation source. One dosimeter is a graphite mixed Ca SO4:Dy thermoluminescent (TL) detector in the Harshaw/Bicron Ext-Rad ring; the other is a LiF:Mg, Ti TL detector in a Velcro ring. The 'Type tests' were carried out to verify the detection limit, linearity, and angular dependence of both dosimeters. The calibrated dosimeters were used to evaluate the personal dose equivalent of operators who deal with 90 Sr + 90 Y ophthalmic and dermatological applicators at a beta therapy service. Results suggest that the Ca SO4:Dy dosimeter is more reliable and adequate for measurements at beta radiation fields than the LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeter which subestimates the values of Hp (0.07). (author)

  2. Decomposition of the absorbed dose by LET in tissue-equivalent materials within the SHIELD-HIT transport code

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolevsky, N; Buyukcizmeci, N; Ergun, A; Latysheva, L; Ogul, R

    2015-01-01

    The SHIELD-HIT transport code, in several versions, has been used for modeling the interaction of therapeutic beams of light nuclei with tissue-equivalent materials for a long time. All versions of the code include useful option of decomposition of the absorbed dose by the linear energy transfer (LET), but this option has not been described and published so far. In this work the procedure of decomposition of the absorbed dose by LET is described and illustrated by using the decomposition of the Bragg curve in water phantom, irradiated by beams of protons, alpha particles, and of ions lithium, carbon and oxygen.

  3. Dose equivalence between continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA), Darbepoetin and Epoetin in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, A; Abad, S; Verdalles, U; Aragoncillo, I; Velazquez, K; Quiroga, B; Escudero, V; López-Gómez, JM

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a prevalent situation in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and can be well managed with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) has a long half-life that allows to be administered once monthly. The lowest recommended dose for patients with non dialysis CKD is 120 μg per month. The objectives were to assess the efficacy of subcutaneous monthly dosing of CERA in CKD stages 4 and 5 not on dialysis, and to determine the equivalent dose to epoetin β and darbepoetin α. Methods: This is a cohort study. A 30-patient group that ESAs was changed to CERA (μg/month) was used as treatment group. We used the following clinically-based equivalent dosing: epoetin β (IU/week) and darbepoetin α (μg/week): 3000/15= 50; 4000/20=75; 6000/30=100; 8000/40=150. Another group of 30 patients with similar characteristics was used as control group and received the same epoetin β and darbepoetin α doses. Results: The mean CERA initial dose and at 6 months was 81.9 ± 35.2 and 82.0 ± 37.82 μg/month (p=0.37). The mean erythropoietin resistance index (ERI) and hemoglobin at baseline and at 6 months in the CERA group and in the control group were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Monthly dosing treatment with CERA is safe and effective. A dose of 75-100 μg/month is enough to maintain stable levels of hemoglobin. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (4): 315-318. PMID:26052197

  4. A point-kernel shielding code for calculations of neutron and secondary gamma-ray 1cm dose equivalents: PKN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A point-kernel integral technique code, PKN, and the related data library have been developed to calculate neutron and secondary gamma-ray dose equivalents in water, concrete and iron shields for neutron sources in 3-dimensional geometry. The comparison between calculational results of the present code and those of the 1-dimensional transport code ANISN = JR, and the 2-dimensional transport code DOT4.2 showed a sufficient accuracy, and the availability of the PKN code has been confirmed. (author)

  5. Simulation study on equivalent dose field of electron beam irradiation flue gas desulfurization and denitrification model and its parameters optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an electron beam irradiation flue gas desulfurization and denitrification technical model, the track and the equivalent dose field of electron beams with different inject energy were simulated with Geant4 toolkit. Simulation results show that electron beam with 1.75 MeV matches with 1000 MW(e) level power plant flue gas desulfurization and denitrification technical design. The simulation results will be beneficial to the engineering design and the accelerator parameter optimization. (authors)

  6. Calculation of equivalent dose index for electrons from 5,0 to 22,0 MeV by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The index of equivalent dose in depth and in a sphere surface of a soft tissue equivalent material were determined by Monte Carlo method for electron irradiations from 5,0 to 22.00 MeV. The effect of different irradiation geometries which simulate the incidence of onedirectional opposite rotational and isotropic beams was studied. It is also shown that the detector of wall thickness with 0.5g/cm2 and isotropic response com be used to measure index of equivalent dose for fast electrons. The alternative concept of average equivalent dose for radiation protection is discussed. (M.C.K.)

  7. A Survey of Organ Equivalent and Effective Doses from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Osei, Ernest K.; Darko, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of radiation risks associated with radiological examinations has been a subject of interest with the increased use of X-rays. Effective dose, which is a risk-weighted measure of radiation to organs in the body associated with radiological examination, is considered a good indicator of radiological risk. We have therefore investigated patient effective doses from radiological examinations. Organ and effective doses were estimated for 94 patients who underwent computed tomogr...

  8. Determination of radon equivalent alpha-doses in different human organs from water ingestion using SSNTD and dosimetric compartmental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon (222Rn) is a chemically inert and very mobile gaseous daughter of uranium (238U) which is found in all rocks and soils. Radon is very soluble in water. Inhalation and ingestion of radon and its decay products represent the main source of exposure to ionizing radiation for population in most countries. Radon is soluble in the human body fluids and fats. Radon alpha activities per unit volume have been measured inside different drinking water samples belonging to different aquifers and sources by using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). Radon initial equivalent alpha doses due to water ingestion have been evaluated in the stomach assuming that all the radon ingested appears in this organ. The influence of the origin and quality of the water samples studied has been investigated. Radon equivalent alpha doses have been determined in other human organs by using dosimetric compartmental models. The influence of the radon mean residence time on the radon equivalent alpha doses in the different compartments of the gastrointestinal system has been studied. (author)

  9. Assessment of organ-specific neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy using computational whole-body age-dependent voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton beams used for radiotherapy will produce neutrons when interacting with matter. The purpose of this study was to quantify the equivalent dose to tissue due to secondary neutrons in pediatric and adult patients treated by proton therapy for brain lesions. Assessment of the equivalent dose to organs away from the target requires whole-body geometrical information. Furthermore, because the patient geometry depends on age at exposure, age-dependent representations are also needed. We implemented age-dependent phantoms into our proton Monte Carlo dose calculation environment. We considered eight typical radiation fields, two of which had been previously used to treat pediatric patients. The other six fields were additionally considered to allow a systematic study of equivalent doses as a function of field parameters. For all phantoms and all fields, we simulated organ-specific equivalent neutron doses and analyzed for each organ (1) the equivalent dose due to neutrons as a function of distance to the target; (2) the equivalent dose due to neutrons as a function of patient age; (3) the equivalent dose due to neutrons as a function of field parameters; and (4) the ratio of contributions to secondary dose from the treatment head versus the contribution from the patient's body tissues. This work reports organ-specific equivalent neutron doses for up to 48 organs in a patient. We demonstrate quantitatively how organ equivalent doses for adult and pediatric patients vary as a function of patient's age, organ and field parameters. Neutron doses increase with increasing range and modulation width but decrease with field size (as defined by the aperture). We analyzed the ratio of neutron dose contributions from the patient and from the treatment head, and found that neutron-equivalent doses fall off rapidly as a function of distance from the target, in agreement with experimental data. It appears that for the fields used in this study, the neutron dose lateral to the

  10. Comparison of Organ Dose and Dose Equivalent Using Ray Tracing of Male and Female Voxel Phantoms to Space Flight Phantom Torso Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Qualls, Garry D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Phantom torso experiments have been flown on the space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) providing validation data for radiation transport models of organ dose and dose equivalents. We describe results for space radiation organ doses using a new human geometry model based on detailed Voxel phantoms models denoted for males and females as MAX (Male Adult voXel) and Fax (Female Adult voXel), respectively. These models represent the human body with much higher fidelity than the CAMERA model currently used at NASA. The MAX and FAX models were implemented for the evaluation of directional body shielding mass for over 1500 target points of major organs. Radiation exposure to solar particle events (SPE), trapped protons, and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) were assessed at each specific site in the human body by coupling space radiation transport models with the detailed body shielding mass of MAX/FAX phantom. The development of multiple-point body-shielding distributions at each organ site made it possible to estimate the mean and variance of space dose equivalents at the specific organ. For the estimate of doses to the blood forming organs (BFOs), active marrow distributions in adult were accounted at bone marrow sites over the human body. We compared the current model results to space shuttle and ISS phantom torso experiments and to calculations using the CAMERA model.

  11. Dose to tissues and effective dose equivalent by inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the results of a sensitivity analysis are described which shows the influence of relevant physical and biological parameters on the dose from inhaled Rn-222, Rn-220 and their daughters to the basal cell layer of the bronchi, to the pulmonary tissues and to other body tissues. The used models for deposition, retention and dosimetry of inhaled daughters take into regard the variation of following parameters: The AMAD of inhaled radioactive particles; the fraction of unattached daughters atoms; the velocity of ciliary transport; the desorption rate of attached daughter atoms from their particles; the absorption rate to blood; and the depth of the basal cell layer in the bronchial generations. A computer programme was set-up for the calculation of the activity and dose distribution in the lungs as function of these parameters. For the evaluation of the effective dose from inhaled mixtures of Rn-222- and Rn-220-daughters three different alternatives for the weighting of the mean doses to the target tissues in the lungs are described, taking into regard possible differences between the cancerogenic sensitivity of the target cells in the bronchial and alveolar region. On the basis of the results of this sensitivity analysis mean values for the effective dose to adults per unit of inhaled potential α-energy (in Joule) and per unit of potential α-energy (in WLM) of daughters mixtures are derived as function of the unattached fraction of potential α-energy in air and the desorption half-life time of attached daughter atoms in the lungs. In addition the effective dose from inhaled Rn-222 and Rn-220 (+ Po-216) is estimated and compared with the effective dose from inhaled daughters. Finally the consequences for the assessment of intake and exposure limits for workers and for members of the public are outlined. (orig.)

  12. Measuring instruments of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt for realization of the units of the dosimetric quantities standard ion dose, photon-equivalent dose and air-kerma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realization of the units of the dosimetric quantities exposure, air-kerma and photon-equivalent dose is an important task of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The report describes the measuring instruments and other technical equipment as well as the determination of the numerous corrections needed. All data and correction factors required for the realization of the units mentioned above are given in many diagrams and tables. (orig.)

  13. Off-axis dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams during proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of secondary neutrons is an undesirable byproduct of proton therapy and it is important to quantify the contribution from secondary neutrons to patient dose received outside the treatment volume. The purpose of this study is to investigate the off-axis dose equivalent from secondary neutrons experimentally using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) at ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK. In this experiment, we placed several layers of CR-39 PNTD laterally outside the treatment volume inside a phantom and in air at various depths and angles with respect to the primary beam axis. Three different proton beams with max energies of 78, 162 and 226 MeV and 4 cm modulation width, a 5 cm diameter brass aperture, and a small snout located 38 cm from isocenter were used for the entire experiment. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed based on the experimental setup using a simplified snout configuration and the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The measured ratio of secondary neutron dose equivalent to therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranged from 0.3 ± 0.08 mSv Gy−1 for 78 MeV proton beam to 37.4 ± 2.42 mSv Gy−1 for 226 MeV proton beam. Both experiment and simulation showed a similar decreasing trend in dose equivalent with distance to the central axis and the magnitude varied by a factor of about 2 in most locations. H/D was found to increase as the energy of the primary proton beam increased and higher H/D was observed at 135° compared to 45° and 90°. The overall higher H/D in air indicates the predominance of external neutrons produced in the nozzle rather than inside the body. (paper)

  14. Estimation of neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates on plutonium oxide container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron and gamma dose rate measurements were essential around the storage container of PuO2 for operational radiation protection purpose. In the present study, various types of active dose rate meters and passive dosimeters were used for the measurement of neutron and gamma dose rates in addition to the theoretical calculations. The neutron and gamma dose rate on the surface of PuO2 container varied from 0.42 mSv/h to 0.71 mSv/h and from 1.83 mSv/h to 2.15 mSv/h respectively which decreased with increasing distance from the surface of the container. The neutron dose rates calculated theoretically did not match with that of experimental values at shorter distances, however, at larger distance such as 20 and 50 cm the agreement between theoretical and experimental values were reasonably good. The observations also suggested that the neutrons emitted from PuO2 were mostly above the thermal neutron energy. The theoretical value of gamma dose rate on the surface and at distances from the bird cage matches very well with the measured values. The gamma dose rates are quite higher than the neutron dose rates for PuO2 container. (author)

  15. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  16. Relationship between Individual External Doses, Ambient Dose Rates and Individuals’ Activity-Patterns in Affected Areas in Fukushima following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Ishii, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 11, 2011, released radioactive material into the atmosphere and contaminated the land in Fukushima and several neighboring prefectures. Five years after the nuclear disaster, the radiation levels have greatly decreased due to physical decay, weathering, and decontamination operations in Fukushima. The populations of 12 communities were forced to evacuate after the accident; as of March 2016, the evacuation order has been lifted in only a limited area, and permanent habitation is still prohibited in most of the areas. In order for the government to lift the evacuation order and for individuals to return to their original residential areas, it is important to assess current and future realistic individual external doses. Here, we used personal dosimeters along with the Global Positioning System and Geographic Information System to understand realistic individual external doses and to relate individual external doses, ambient doses, and activity-patterns of individuals in the affected areas in Fukushima. The results showed that the additional individual external doses were well correlated to the additional ambient doses based on the airborne monitoring survey. The results of linear regression analysis suggested that the additional individual external doses were on average about one-fifth that of the additional ambient doses. The reduction factors, which are defined as the ratios of the additional individual external doses to the additional ambient doses, were calculated to be on average 0.14 and 0.32 for time spent at home and outdoors, respectively. Analysis of the contribution of various activity patterns to the total individual external dose demonstrated good agreement with the average fraction of time spent daily in each activity, but the contribution due to being outdoors varied widely. These results are a valuable contribution to understanding realistic individual external doses and the corresponding

  17. Equivalent dose (palaeo-dose) estimation in thermoluminescence dating using a single aliquot of poly-mineral fine grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single aliquot protocol for the estimation of the natural dose in thermoluminescence dating (SATL) is presented that makes use of poly-mineral fine grains extracted from ceramic materials. The protocol is demonstrated using aliquots made from two Neolithic sherds and is compared with results from an additive dose poly-mineral technique. The results of both techniques are in close agreement and highlight the potential advantages of the new procedure, especially when sample availability is restricted, e.g. dating of small pottery fragments, or in cases of authenticity testing. (authors)

  18. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Poston, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed.

  19. Evaluation of the effective equivalent dose in the general public due to the discharge of uranium in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some facilities available at IPEN-CNEN/SP may discharge uranium in their liquid effluents. The uranium contents of these effluents are analyzed by photometry or fluorimetry, and according to the results obtained a decision is made, by the Environmental Monitoring Division, upon their discharge to the environment. In 1988 a total activity of 3.66x109 Bq of uranium was discharge in a volume of approximately 30 m3. The effective equivalent dose in the general public was evaluated by making a conservative assumption that all the liquid effluents containing uranium are discharged directly to the soil reaching the groundwater. The dose calculation was carried out by using a generic model which described the transport of radionuclides in the groundwater. In order to be conservative it was also assumed that the critical pathway is the direct in gestion of water through hypothetical wells around the Institute. Conservative assumptions were also made in the characterization of the local aquifer parameters such as vertical and longitudinal dispersivity, effective porosity of the soil, hydraulic conductivity etc., in roder to overestimate the effective equivalent dose. The result obtained, of 5.3x10-10 mSv/a is far below the dose limit for the public adopted by the Radiological Protection Board. The derived limit for the discharge was also evaluated, using the same model, giving a result of 3.6x1013Bq/a. (author)

  20. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M R; Poston, J W; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1996-04-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed. PMID:8617586

  1. A Survey of Organ Equivalent and Effective Doses from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantification of radiation risks associated with radiological examinations has been a subject of interest with the increased use of X-rays. Effective dose, which is a risk-weighted measure of radiation to organs in the body associated with radiological examination, is considered a good indicator of radiological risk. We have therefore investigated patient effective doses from radiological examinations. Organ and effective doses were estimated for 94 patients who underwent computed tomography examinations and for 338 patients who had conventional radiography examinations. The OrgDose (version 2) program was used for the estimation of effective doses. The tube potential ranges: 57 kVp to 138 kVp depending on the examination and patient size. The entrance surface doses have a wide range even for the same examination: 0.44–10.31 mGy (abdomen) and 0.66–16.08 mGy (lumbar spine) and the corresponding effective dose ranges 0.025–0.77 mSv and 0.025–0.95 mSv respectively. Effective dose for adult abdomen-pelvic CT examinations ranges 5.4–19.8 mSv with a mean of 13.6 mSv and for pediatrics ranges 2.1–5.5 mSv with a mean of 2.7 mSv. The mean effective dose for adult chest and head CT examinations are 7.9 and 1.8 mSv respectively and for pediatrics are 1.7 and 1.1 mSv

  2. Reference and Equivalent Methods Used to Measure National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Criteria Air Pollutants - Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are a number of Federal Reference Method (FRM) and Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) systems used to monitor the six criteria air pollutants (Lead [Pb], Carbon Monoxide [CO], Sulfur Dioxide [SO2], Nitrogen Dioxide [NO2], Ozone [O3], Particulate Matter [PM]) to determine if an...

  3. A new laser thermoluminescence dosimetry system for the determination of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and the irradiation condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of radiation protection additional information about the irradiation conditions may be important if a personal dose above a specified threshold is detected. The objective of the development of a new personal dosemeter therefore is to determine the personal dose equivalent with the necessary accuracy and, also, to provide information about the irradiation conditions. To fulfill these requirements, a new laser-heated TL dosemeter (TLD) system, commercially available and produced by International Sensor Technology Inc. has been modified. A new algorithm based on linear programming is applied to improve the dose determination. A TL-sheet is inserted into the dosemeter badge to allow information to be obtained about the irradiation conditions. (author)

  4. Measurements of Neutron Energy Spectra and Neutron Dose Equivalent Rates of Workplaces in TQNPC-Ⅲ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Monitoring for neutron doses is one of the important activities for radiation protection. And the information about neutron energy distributions of the measured fields is necessary for the correct

  5. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. (author)

  6. An overview of equivalent doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in medical, industrial and nuclear areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, A.R.; Silva, F.C.A. da; Hunt, J.G., E-mail: alexandre.r.lima@terra.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (BraziL)

    2013-07-01

    Some epidemiological evidences were recently reviewed by the ICRP and it was suggested that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriments is about 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on 2011, the ICRP has recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens dose equivalent limit of 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not exceeding 50 mSv in a single year. Following the ICRP recommendation, the Brazilian Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) adopted immediately the new limit to the eyes lens. This study aimed to show an overview about the doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in situations of planned exposures in the medical, industrial and nuclear areas, emphasizing the greatest radiological risks applications. It was observed that there are some limitations, such as example, to use individual monitor calibrated on Hp(3), to assess the equivalent dose in the eye lens. This limitation obstructs some experimental studies and monitoring of the levels of radiation received in the eye lens of radiation workers. Recent studies have showed that the lenses of eyes monitoring of workers, mainly in the planned exposure, must be follow-up. However, such researches were obtained only in medical exposures, mainly in interventional medicine procedures. Studies with planned exposure on nuclear and industrial areas are really needed and will be very important due to the new recommended by ICRP dose limits. (author)

  7. An overview of equivalent doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in medical, industrial and nuclear areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some epidemiological evidences were recently reviewed by the ICRP and it was suggested that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriments is about 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on 2011, the ICRP has recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens dose equivalent limit of 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not exceeding 50 mSv in a single year. Following the ICRP recommendation, the Brazilian Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) adopted immediately the new limit to the eyes lens. This study aimed to show an overview about the doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in situations of planned exposures in the medical, industrial and nuclear areas, emphasizing the greatest radiological risks applications. It was observed that there are some limitations, such as example, to use individual monitor calibrated on Hp(3), to assess the equivalent dose in the eye lens. This limitation obstructs some experimental studies and monitoring of the levels of radiation received in the eye lens of radiation workers. Recent studies have showed that the lenses of eyes monitoring of workers, mainly in the planned exposure, must be follow-up. However, such researches were obtained only in medical exposures, mainly in interventional medicine procedures. Studies with planned exposure on nuclear and industrial areas are really needed and will be very important due to the new recommended by ICRP dose limits. (author)

  8. Measurement of personal dose equivalent of X and gamma radiation by ring dosimeter: Results of intercomparison measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Adamowicz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to present the results of the interlaboratory comparisons for ring dosimeters and to confirm that the applied method is suitable for measuring the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. In addition, calibration procedures used in dosimetric measurements in persons occupationally exposed to ionizing photon radiation X and γ were presented. Materials and Methods: Ring dosimeters made of flexible plastics with the diameter of approximately 20 mm, equipped with two thermoluminescence (TL detectors type MTS-N, were the subject of interlaboratory comparisons. Irradiated detectors were red out using a new manual TLD's reader (FIMEL, France. All TLD exposures were done for validation of TLD readers and were performed using the reference X-ray and γ beams with the ISO rod phantom. The methodology of performed exposures corresponded with the methods applied by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS, the European organizer of interlaboratory comparisons. Results: The energy, dose and angular characteristics of the ring dosimeter allowed to elaborate the formula for estimating and verifying the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. The test was performed to check and confirm the correctness of the estimated characteristics. The test results were satisfactory, and thus the readiness to implement TLD reader in the used method and to participate in interlaboratory comparisons was confirmed. Conclusions: According to the requirements of the Polish Centre for Accreditation, the laboratory was participating in the interlaboratory comparison organized by EURADOS in terms of the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. The result of the comparison was satisfactory, therefore the correctness of the testing procedure was confirmed. Med Pr 2013;64(5:631–637

  9. Modelling the dynamics of ambient dose rates induced by radiocaesium in the Fukushima terrestrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Marc-André; Mourlon, Christophe; Calmon, Philippe; Manach, Erwan; Debayle, Christophe; Baccou, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Since the Fukushima accident, Japanese scientists have been intensively monitoring ambient radiations in the highly contaminated territories situated within 80 km of the nuclear site. The surveys that were conducted through mainly carborne, airborne and in situ gamma-ray measurement devices, enabled to efficiently characterize the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of air dose rates induced by Caesium-134 and Caesium-137 in the terrestrial systems. These measurements revealed that radiation levels decreased at rates greater than expected from physical decay in 2011-2012 (up to a factor of 2), and dependent on the type of environment (i.e. urban, agricultural or forest). Unlike carborne measurements that may have been strongly influenced by the depuration of road surfaces, no obvious reason can be invoked for airborne measurements, especially above forests that are known to efficiently retain and recycle radiocaesium. The purpose of our research project is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the data acquired by Japanese, and identify the environmental mechanisms or factors that may explain such decays. The methodology relies on the use of a process-based and spatially-distributed dynamic model that predicts radiocaesium transfer and associated air dose rates inside/above a terrestrial environment (e.g., forests, croplands, meadows, bare soils and urban areas). Despite the lack of site-specific data, our numerical study predicts decrease rates that are globally consistent with both aerial and in situ observations. The simulation at a flying altitude of 200 m indicated that ambient radiation levels decreased over the first 12 months by about 45% over dense urban areas, 15% above evergreen coniferous forests and between 2 and 12% above agricultural lands, owing to environmental processes that are identified and discussed. In particular, we demonstrate that the decrease over evergreen coniferous regions might be due the combined effects of canopy

  10. A study of dose equivalent for the nurses in Hirosaki University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual relationships in 1997-1999 between exposure dose of those nurses engaging in full-time radiological works and the number of patients subjected to radiological examinations were investigated in authors' hospital. The annual number of those patients was rather constant. Exposure was measured by film-, carrot- and ring-badges. Eight to nine nurses engaged in radiological examinations like CT, fluoroscopy, urinary tract fluoroscopy and angiography, and other 8 nurses, therapy with sealed 137Cs and 192Ir and unsealed 131I as well. No significant changes in exposure dose were observed in the former group of nurses and in the latter. The dose decreased annually to the level of the former due to skill advancement. (K.H.)

  11. A dosimetric evaluation of tissue equivalent phantom prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin for absorbed dose imaging in Gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue equivalent gel phantoms have been widely studied in radiation therapy for both relative and reference dosimetry. A Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) spherical phantom was evaluated by means of magnetic resonance image method (MRI) to measure absorbed dose distribution resulted from gamma knife irradiation. The FXG phantom was prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue equivalent material, of easy preparation, can be used to mold phantoms into different shapes and volumes, is commercially available and inexpensive. The results show that the Fricke gel phantom prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin satisfy the requirements to be used for the quality control in stereotactic radiosurgery using Gamma Knife technique and may constitute one more option of dosimeter in radiation therapy applications.

  12. A dosimetric evaluation of tissue equivalent phantom prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin for absorbed dose imaging in Gamma knife radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Rodrigues, O., Jr.; Cervantes, J. H.; Rabbani, S. R.; Campos, L. L.

    2009-05-01

    Tissue equivalent gel phantoms have been widely studied in radiation therapy for both relative and reference dosimetry. A Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) spherical phantom was evaluated by means of magnetic resonance image method (MRI) to measure absorbed dose distribution resulted from gamma knife irradiation. The FXG phantom was prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue equivalent material, of easy preparation, can be used to mold phantoms into different shapes and volumes, is commercially available and inexpensive. The results show that the Fricke gel phantom prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin satisfy the requirements to be used for the quality control in stereotactic radiosurgery using Gamma Knife technique and may constitute one more option of dosimeter in radiation therapy applications.

  13. An Analytical Model of Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose for Passively-Scattered Proton Radiotherapy and Validation with Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Farah, Jad [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Service de Dosimétrie Externe, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  14. Organ and tissue equivalent doses from abdominal x-ray examinations calculated with the MAX/EGS4 exposure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The incident air kerma (INAK), the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), and the dose-area product (DAP) are considered relevant measurable quantities, suitable to be used for the evaluation of exposure to the patient in x-ray diagnosis. The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) phantom connected to the EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate conversion coefficients between average equivalent dose to organs and tissues at risk and the measurable quantities INAK, ESAK, and DAP, respectively, for a variety of commonly performed x-ray examinations. This investigation presents conversion coefficients between organ and tissue equivalent dose and ESAK for abdominal x-ray examinations for the MAX phantom, which will be compared with corresponding results for mathematical MIRD5-type phantoms published by others. The comparison shows agreement and disagreement between the data for the two exposure models, which clearly reflect the anatomical differences with respect to shape and position of the organs at risk. (orig.)

  15. Neutron equivalent dose attenuation in the geometry of UNK service trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain regularities of radiation dose field formation in terms of the idealized geometry of the UNK service trunk are studied. Four different technical solutions enabling to reduce dose rate over the trunk by 10 times are suggested. Dimensions of the required additional protection and its positioning for every of four variants are calculated and presented. Optimal variant of protective overlapping of the trunk outlet made of reinforced 3.5 t/m3 density concrete was selected on the basis of the obtained results. 5 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Equivalent dose (palaeodose) estimation in thermoluminescence dating using a single aliquot of polymineral fine grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, C T; Zacharias, N

    2006-01-01

    A single aliquot protocol for the estimation of the natural dose in thermoluminescence dating (SATL) is presented that makes use of polymineral fine grains extracted from ceramic materials. The protocol is demonstrated using aliquots made from two Neolithic sherds and is compared with results from an additive dose polymineral technique. The results of both techniques are in close agreement and highlight the potential advantages of the new procedure, especially when sample availability is restricted, e.g. dating of small pottery fragments, or in cases of authenticity testing. PMID:16822781

  17. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Justus, Alan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, S Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olsher, Richard H [RP-2; Devine, Robert T [RP-2

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  18. Estimating the equivalent dose of late Pleistocene fine silt quartz from the Lower Mississippi Valley using a standardized OSL growth curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Zhixiong, E-mail: zshen@tulane.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Mauz, Barbara, E-mail: mauz@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Geography, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZT (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    The establishment of a standardized growth curve is desired for optical dating as it facilitates the dating procedures. Here, we analyzed the dose responses of 16 fine silt quartz samples from the Lower Mississippi Valley in order to identify common properties that would allow establishing a standardized OSL growth curve (SGC). The analysis confirms the dependence of the standardized dose response upon the size of test dose. This dependence was corrected by converting the standardized dose response to an equivalent standardized dose response obtained by a 1.8 Gy test dose. Equivalent SGCs were established for two different grain size ranges by combining the data of several samples and fitting the sum of a single saturating exponential function and a linear function to the equivalent standardized dose response of these data. Equivalent doses up to 500 Gy determined with an equivalent SGC agree well with those obtained with a conventional SAR protocol, suggesting that the equivalent SGCs established in this study are reliable.

  19. Monte Carlo estimation of photoneutrons spectra and dose equivalent around an 18 MV medical linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem-Bezoubiri, A.; Bezoubiri, F.; Badreddine, A.; Mazrou, H.; Lounis-Mokrani, Z.

    2014-04-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of an 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator, lodged at Blida Anti-Cancer Centre in Algeria, was developed during this study to estimate the photoneutrons spectra and doses at the patient table in a radiotherapy treatment room, for radiation protection purposes.

  20. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titt, Uwe, E-mail: utitt@mdanderson.org; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Sell, Martin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research, 123 Old Brompton Road, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses.

  1. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses

  2. ORION: a computer code for evaluating environmental concentrations and dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code ORION has been developed to evaluate the environmental concentrations and the dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from air-borne radionuclides released from multiple nuclear installations. The modified Gaussian plume model is applied to calculate the dispersion of the radionuclide. Gravitational settling, dry deposition, precipitation scavenging and radioactive decay are considered to be the causes of depletion and deposition on the ground or on vegetation. ORION is written in the FORTRAN IV language and can be run on IBM 360, 370, 303X, 43XX and FACOM M-series computers. 8 references, 6 tables

  3. Preliminary On-Orbit Neutron Dose Equivalent and Energy Spectrum Results from the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semones, Edward; Leitgab, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument was activated on ISS on February 1st, 2016. Integrated in ISS-RAD, the Fast Neutron Detector (FND) performs, for the first time on ISS, routine and precise direct neutron measurements between 0.5 and 8 MeV. Preliminary results for neutron dose equivalent and neutron flux energy distributions from online/on-board algorithms and offline ground analyses will be shown, along with comparisons to simulated data and previously measured neutron spectral data. On-orbit data quality and pre-launch analysis validation results will be discussed as well.

  4. Study of dose distribution in a human body in international space station compartments with the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Tolochek, Raisa V.; Kartsev, Ivan S.; Petrov, Vladislav M.; Nikolaev, Igor V.; Moskalyova, Svetlana I.; Lyagushin, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is known to be key hazard of manned space mission. To estimate accurately radiation health risk detailed study of dose distribution inside human body by means of human phantom is conducted. In the space experiment MATROSHKA-R, the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom (32 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been used on board the ISS for more than 8 years. Owing to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a real human body. If compared with the anthropomorphic phantom Rando used inside and outside the ISS, the spherical phantom has lower mass, smaller size and requires less crew time for the detector installation/retrieval; its tissue-equivalent properties are closer to the standard human body tissue than the Rando-phantom material. Originally the spherical phantom was installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module, then in the Piers-1, MIM-2 and MIM-1 modules of the ISS Russian segment, and finally in JAXA Kibo module. Total duration of the detector exposure is more than 1700 days in 8 sessions. In the first phase of the experiment with the spherical phantom, the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid-state track detectors). The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. After each session the passive detectors are returned to the ground. The results obtained show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being observed close to the outer wall of the compartment, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom is obviously due to the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and Earth' radiation belt contribution on

  5. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses HE and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  6. A new Monte Carlo program for calculations of dose distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π--meson beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reports on the structure and first results from a new Monte Carlo programme for calculations of energy distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π--beams. Each pion or generated secondary particle is transported until to the complete loss of its kinetic energy taking into account pion processes like multiple Coulomb scattering, pion reactions in flight and absorption of stopped pions. The code uses mainly data from experiments, and physical models have been added only in cases of lacking data. Depth dose curves for a pensil beam of 170 MeV/c within a water phantom are discussed as a function of various parameters. Isodose contours are plotted resulting from a convolution of an extended beam profile and the dose distribution of a pencil beams. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of conversion coefficients between air Kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors for diagnostic X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two sets of quantities are import in radiological protection: the protection and operational quantities. Both sets can be related to basic physical quantities such as kerma through conversion coefficients. For diagnostic x-ray beams the conversion coefficients and backscatter factors have not been determined yet, those parameters are need for calibrating dosimeters that will be used to determine the personal dose equivalent or the entrance skin dose. Conversion coefficients between air kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic x-ray qualities RQR and RQA recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The air kerma in the phantom and the mean energy of the spectrum were measured for such purpose. Harshaw LiF-100H thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used for measurements after being calibrated against an 180 cm3 Radcal Corporation ionization chamber traceable to a reference laboratory. A 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab phantom was used for deep-dose measurements. Tl dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at 5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm depth in the phantom upstream the beam direction Another required parameter for determining the conversion coefficients from was the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum. The spectroscopy of x-ray beams was done with a CdTe semiconductor detector that was calibrated with 133 Ba, 241 Am and 57 Co radiation sources. Measurements of the x-ray spectra were carried out for all RQR and RQA IEC qualities. Corrections due to the detector intrinsic efficiency, total energy absorption, escape fraction of the characteristic x-rays, Compton effect and attenuation in the detector were done aiming an the accurate determination of the mean energy. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected with the stripping method by using these response functions. The typical combined standard uncertainties of conversion coefficients and

  8. Individual External Dose Monitoring of All Citizens of Date City by Passive Dosimeter 5 to 52 Months After the Fukushima NPP Accident (series): 1. Comparison of Individual Dose with Ambient Dose Rate Monitored by Aircraft Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2016-01-01

    Date (d\\textschwa 'te) City in Fukushima Prefecture has conducted a population-wide individual dose monitoring program after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, which provides a unique and comprehensive data set of the individual doses of citizens. The relationship between the individual doses and the corresponding ambient doses assessed from airborne surveys was examined. The results show that the individual doses were about 0.15 times the ambient doses, which were a quarter of the value employed by the Japanese government, throughout the period of the airborne surveys used. The knowledge obtained in this study could enable the prediction of individual doses in the early phase of future radiological accidents involving large-scale contamination.

  9. Optimization of artificial neural networks for the reconstruction of the neutrons spectrum and their equivalent doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work was used the robust design methodology of artificial neural networks to determine a good topology of net able to solve with efficiency the problems of neutrons spectrometry and dosimetry. For the design of the topology of optimized net 36 different net architectures based on an orthogonal arrangement with a configuration L9(34), L4(32) were trained. For the training of the neural networks, was used a computer code developed in the ambient of Mat lab programming, which automates the process and analysis of the information, reducing the time used in this activity considerably for the investigator. For the training of the propagation nets forward was utilized a neutrons spectrum compendium published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, where of the total 80% was used for the training and 20% for the test, it trained with an inverse propagation algorithm being the entrance data the count rates corresponding to the 7 spheres of the spectrometric system of Bonner spheres, as exit data, the neural network obtains the neutrons spectrum expressed in 60 energy groups and are calculated of simultaneous way 15 dosimetric quantities. (Author)

  10. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.;

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated...... separately using Monte Carlo techniques. We have used circular aperture field of 6 cm in diameter as a representative field. The tumor was assumed to be in the cranium. The range and modulation width for both carbon and proton beams were set to 15 cm and 10 cm, respectively. Results: In carbon therapy......, absorbed neutron doses to tonsils and pharynx close to the field-edge were found to be 5x10-4 mSv/GyE and 4x10-4 mSv/GyE, respectively. Whereas, neutron equivalent doses to tonsils and pharynx were estimated to be 0.57mSv/GyE and 0.55 mSv/GyE in scanned proton therapy, respectively. In heavy ion carbon...

  11. Development of a Reference System for the determination of the personal dose equivalent and the constancy of X- Ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reference system for the determination of the personal dose equivalent, Hp (10), and a quality control program of X-ray equipment used In radioprotection require the periodic verification of the X-ray beams constancy. In this work, two parallel-plate ionization chambers were developed with inner electrodes of different materials, and inserted into PMMA slab phantoms. One ionization chamber was developed with inner carbon electrodes and the other with inner aluminium electrodes. The two ionization chambers can be used as a Tandem system. The different energy response of the two ionization chambers allowed the development of the Tandem system that is very useful for the checking of the constancy of beam qualities. Standard intermediary energy X-ray beams (from 48 keV to 118 keV), radioprotection level, were established through the development of a dosimetric methodology and the analysis of their physical parameters. The ionization chambers were studied in relation to their operational characteristics, and they were calibrated in X-ray beams (radioprotection, diagnostic radiology, mammography and radiotherapy levels) in accordance to international recommendations. They presented good performance. The determination procedure of personal dose equivalent, Hp (10), was established. (author)

  12. Modelling of Radionuclides Transfer and Ambient Dose Rates in Fukushima Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.A.; Mourlon, C.; Simon-Cornu, M. [Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, CE Cadarache-Bat 153, BP3 - 13115 St-Paul-lez- Durance cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    the precise different deposition sequences and the meteorological conditions. Moreover, the characteristics of Japanese cedar forests seem to be very specific and the foliar absorption parameter has to be adjusted, in link with the very particular foliage of this tree species. The model is able to reproduce quite well the caesium deposition in soil, but also the throughfall and the stem flow that occurred during the six months after the accident. Several ambient dose rate calculations have been also tested against measurements in various stations of evergreen (Japanese cedar, spruces and pines) and deciduous forests in eastern Fukushima Prefecture, where deposition essentially occurred as humid and 85% of the total deposit was on the soil in the 3 months following the accident. The ambient dose rates are well correlated with the caesium concentrations in the soil, and even more in the tree canopy. (authors)

  13. Modelling of Radionuclides Transfer and Ambient Dose Rates in Fukushima Forest Ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the precise different deposition sequences and the meteorological conditions. Moreover, the characteristics of Japanese cedar forests seem to be very specific and the foliar absorption parameter has to be adjusted, in link with the very particular foliage of this tree species. The model is able to reproduce quite well the caesium deposition in soil, but also the throughfall and the stem flow that occurred during the six months after the accident. Several ambient dose rate calculations have been also tested against measurements in various stations of evergreen (Japanese cedar, spruces and pines) and deciduous forests in eastern Fukushima Prefecture, where deposition essentially occurred as humid and 85% of the total deposit was on the soil in the 3 months following the accident. The ambient dose rates are well correlated with the caesium concentrations in the soil, and even more in the tree canopy. (authors)

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson William

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. Methods The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions treated with SBRT were reviewed. Local control (LC was defined pathologically by negative biopsy or radiographically by lack of tumor enlargement on CT or stable/declining standardized uptake value (SUV on PET scan. The SBRT dose regimen was converted to the single fraction equivalent dose (SFED to characterize the dose-control relationship using a logistic tumor control probability (TCP model. Additionally, the kinetics of decline in maximum SUV (SUVmax were analyzed. Results The SBRT regimen was 40-50 Gy/5 fractions (n = 23 or 42-60 Gy/3 fractions (n = 30 delivered to lung (n = 39, liver (n = 11 and bone (n = 3 metastases. Median follow-up for patients alive at the time of analysis was 28.0 months (range, 4-68. The actuarial LC was 88% at 18 months. On univariate analysis, higher dose per fraction (p max was 7.9 and declined with an estimated half-life of 3.8 months to a post-treatment plateau of approximately 3. Conclusions An aggressive SBRT regimen with SFED ≥ 45 Gy is effective for controlling metastatic melanoma and RCC. The SFED metric appeared to be as robust as the BED in characterizing dose-response, though additional studies are needed. The LC rates achieved are comparable to those obtained with SBRT for other histologies, suggesting a dominant mechanism of in vivo tumor ablation that overrides intrinsic differences in cellular radiosensitivity between histologic subtypes.

  15. Neutron dose equivalent rate meter on the basis of the single sphere Albedo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In area monitoring there is a need for a more accurate neutron reference dose rate meter, especially for the purpose of albedo dosemeter calibrations in neutron stray radiation fields of interest. The so-called Single Sphere Albedo Counter makes use of three active 3He proportional counters as thermal neutron detectors positioned in the centre and on the surface (albedo dosemeter configurations) of a polyethylene sphere. The linear combination of the detector readings allows for the indication of different quantities like H*(10),D,φ, and reduces the energy dependence significantly. The paper describes the dosimetric properties of a prototype instrument and its application in routine monitoring. (author)

  16. Adoption of new ICRU operational magnitude for the measurement of equivalent doses in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This papers compares the results using a dosimetric irradiation in free air under normal incidence and with an IAEA phantom of 30x30x30 in terms of new ICRU magnitudes for the dosimetric systems designed by the National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom with a Kodak Monitoring film type 2. At the same time , this papers presents the characterization requisites and firsts essays as an angular and energy dependence that should be satisfied to establish the regulations for the personal dosimetry service. Finally, it concludes that the dosimetric systems used by the Nuclear Energy general Direction (DGEN) is available for the measurement of the new ICRU Hp and Hs amounts without any additional modifications to the manufacturing of the dosimeter and that users should be trained once again in interpreting body doses with the new philosophy of the ICRP 60

  17. Dosimetric equivalence of non-standard high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy catheter patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative HDR prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Methods: Prostate HDR brachytherapy uses a grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. On CT data from ten previously-treated patients new catheters were digitized following three catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a p...

  18. Conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent Hp(3) fir eye-lens dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been performed within the frame of the European Union ORAMED project (Optimization of Radiation protection for Medical staff). The main goal of the project is to improve standards of protection for medical staff for procedure resulting in potentially high exposures and to develop methodologies for better assessing and for reducing exposures to medical staff. The Work Package WP2 is involved in the development of practical eye lens dosimetry in interventional radiology. This study is complementary of the part of the ENEA report concerning the calculations with the MCNP code of the conversion factors related to the operational quantity Hp(3). A set of energy and angular dependent conversion coefficients Hp(3)/Kair in the new proposed square cylindrical phantom of ICRU tissue, have been calculated with the Monte-Carlo code PENELOPE. The Hp(3) values have been determined in terms of absorbed dose, according to the definition of this quantity, and also with the kerma approximation as formerly reported in ICRU reports. At low photon energy, up to 1 MeV, the two sets of conversion coefficients are consistent. Nevertheless, the differences increase at higher energy. This is mainly due to the lack of electronic equilibrium, especially for small angle incidences. The values of the conversion coefficients obtained with the code MCNP published by ENEA, agree with the kerma approximation calculations with PENELOPE. They are coherent with previous calculations in phantoms different in shape. But above 1 MeV, differences between conversion coefficient values calculated with the absorbed dose and with kerma approximation are significantly increasing, especially at low incidence angles. At those energies the electron transport has to be simulated. (author)

  19. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions) or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions) treated with SBRT were reviewed. Local control (LC) was defined pathologically by negative biopsy or radiographically by lack of tumor enlargement on CT or stable/declining standardized uptake value (SUV) on PET scan. The SBRT dose regimen was converted to the single fraction equivalent dose (SFED) to characterize the dose-control relationship using a logistic tumor control probability (TCP) model. Additionally, the kinetics of decline in maximum SUV (SUVmax) were analyzed. The SBRT regimen was 40-50 Gy/5 fractions (n = 23) or 42-60 Gy/3 fractions (n = 30) delivered to lung (n = 39), liver (n = 11) and bone (n = 3) metastases. Median follow-up for patients alive at the time of analysis was 28.0 months (range, 4-68). The actuarial LC was 88% at 18 months. On univariate analysis, higher dose per fraction (p < 0.01) and higher SFED (p = 0.06) were correlated with better LC, as was the biologic effective dose (BED, p < 0.05). The actuarial rate of LC at 24 months was 100% for SFED ≥45 Gy v 54% for SFED <45 Gy. TCP modeling indicated that to achieve ≥90% 2 yr LC in a 3 fraction regimen, a prescription dose of at least 48 Gy is required. In 9 patients followed with PET scans, the mean pre-SBRT SUVmax was 7.9 and declined with an estimated half-life of 3.8 months to a post-treatment plateau of approximately 3. An aggressive SBRT regimen with SFED ≥ 45 Gy is effective for controlling metastatic melanoma and RCC. The SFED metric appeared to be as robust as the BED in characterizing dose-response, though

  20. Ambient and personal dose assessment of a container inspection site using a mobile X-ray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient monitor and phantom studies of absorbed and effective doses by TLDs were carried out in a non-intrusive inspection station for containers, Terminal I, of Taichung harbor, Taiwan. The doses from the X-ray scan in the control room and driver waiting room, located outside of the radiation control area, were quite small and could not be distinguished from the natural background radiation. The doses in the driver cab and the inspector cab of the X-ray scan car were also within background radiation levels. The protection wall, a 40-cm thick concrete barrier, can effectively attenuate the intensity of the primary X-ray scan. The possible effective dose of a person in the container or trailer is about 3.15±0.23 μSv/scan and 2.31±0.38 μSv/scan. This dose is below the annual background dose. If someone was to be scanned by the X-ray, the effective dose would be at an acceptable level. - Highlights: ► We used TLDs to evaluate the dose in the environment and in the Rando phantom. ► The absorbed dose in the container Terminal showed a natural background level. ► The protection wall effectively lowers the X-ray intensity. ► The effective dose of a person in the container or trailer is about 3 μSv/scan.

  1. Calculation of the annual effective dose equivalents from the radioactive cloud in the vicinity of nuclear power plants under various meteorological dispersion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure has been developed for calculation of annual effective dose equivalents and dose equivalents to human tissues or organs due to external γ-activity from an atmospheric release of radioisotopes during normal operation of nuclear power plants. The procedure is based upon the point-kernel integration method which yields analytical expressions for calculation of absorbed doses under various meteorological conditions due to radionuclides in finite meandring sector-averaged Gaussian plumes. For the caulcations of absorbed doses the computer algorithm FCLTD has been developed. FCLTD uses numerical solution based upon the 24-point Gauss quadrature formula. Effective dose equivalents and dose equivalents may be calculated for any type of plume, release height and atmospheric stability and initial photon spectra of radionuclides. Lists of the computer algorithm FCLTD are presented in the Appendix. As an example of application of the method 135Xe release has been considered. The developed procedure may be used for calculation of the annual dose equivalents in connection with the NTD INTERATOMENERGO No. 38.320.56-81. (author)

  2. ISDOSE 3.0: A simple code to calculate inhalation and submersion dose equivalents from routine and accidental releases of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ISDOSE (Inhalation and Submersion DOSE equivalent) computer code was developed at Battelle Memorial Institute for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to calculate submersion and inhalation doses from atmospheric releases of radionuclides from routine and unanticipated events during the preclosure phase at a nuclear waste repository. This user's manual presents the third version of the ISDOSE code (ISDOSE 3.0). ISDOSE is a simple code; i.e., it performs functions that can be verified easily by hand calculations. ISDOSE uses two dose conversion factor libraries: one for submersion dose conversion factors and one for inhalation dose conversion factors. The libraries contain data for 30 radionuclides that are of interest during the preclosure phase of the repository. The conversion factors are based on recommendations and dosimetric data published by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The libraries contain both effective dose equivalent factors and dose equivalent factors for 11 organs. The inhalation dose equivalent factor library contains data for the different solubility classes of each radionuclide. ISDOSE can be set up to calculate a collective dose equivalent to a given population, or a maximum individual dose equivalent. The population distribution input parameter is in the form of a circular grid, which is divided into 16 sectors and 5 concentric annuli (i.e., 80 sections). A wind frequency input value is required for each of the sixteen sectors of the grid, and a ξ/Q value, the dispersion factor for airborne contaminants, is required for each of the 80 sections of the grid. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Thyroid equivalent doses due to radioiodine-131 intake for evacuees from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary health concern among residents and evacuees in affected areas immediately after a nuclear accident is the internal exposure of the thyroid to radioiodine, particularly I-131, and subsequent thyroid cancer risk. In Japan, the natural disasters of the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 destroyed an important function of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1-NPP) and a large amount of radioactive material was released to the environment. Here we report for the first time extensive measurements of the exposure to I-131 revealing I-131 activity in the thyroid of 46 out of the 62 residents and evacuees measured. The median thyroid equivalent dose was estimated to be 4.2 mSv and 3.5 mSv for children and adults, respectively, much smaller than the mean thyroid dose in the Chernobyl accident (490 mSv in evacuees). Maximum thyroid doses for children and adults were 23 mSv and 33 mSv, respectively. (author)

  4. Effects of ISS equivalent ionizing radiation dose on Human T-lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Maria Antonia; Pani, Giuseppe; Benotmane, Rafi; Mastroleo, Felice; Aboul-El-Ardat, Khalil; Janssen, Ann; Leysen, Liselotte; Vanhavere, Filip; Leys, Natalie; Galleri, Grazia; Pippia, Proto; Baatout, Sarah

    One of the objectives of the current international space programs is to investigate the effects of cosmic environment on Humans. It is known that during a long exposure to the space conditions, including ionizing radiations and microgravity, the immune system of the astronauts is impaired. In past years several experiments were performed to identify responsible factors of in vitro mitogenic activation process in human T-lymphocytes under simulated microgravity effect and during dedicated space missions. It come out that the lack of immune response in microgravity occurs at the cellular and molecular level. In order to evaluate effects on pure primary T-lymphocytes from peripheral blood exposed to International Space Station (ISS)-like ionizing radiation, we applied a mixture of Cesium-137, as representative of low energy particles, and Californium-252, as representative of hight energy particles, with rate similar to those monitored inside the ISS during previous space mission (Goossens et all. 2006). This facility is available at SCK•CEN (Belgium) (Mastroleo et al., 2009). Although the dose received by the cells was relatively low, flow cytometry analysis 24 hours after irradiation showed a decrease in cell viability coupled with the increase of the caspase-3 activity. However, Bcl-2 activity did not seem to be affected by the radiation. Furthermore, activation of cells induced an increase of the cell size and alteration of cellular morphology. Cell cycle as well as 8-oxo-G were also modified upon radiation and activation. Gene expression analysis shows a modulation of genes rather as a consequence of exposure than with the activation status. 330 genes have been identified to be significantly modulated in function of the time and have been grouped in four different cluster representing significant expression profiles. Preliminary functional analysis shows mainly genes involved in the immune response and inflammatory diseases as well as oxidative stress and

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF INDIVIDUAL THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSEMETERS PERFORMANCES FOR MEASURING THE DOSE EQUIVALENTS IN SKIN AND EYE LENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Sheleenkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a comparative analysis of existing and newly developed thermoluminescent detectors DTG-4, TTLD-580, TLD-1011(TM and DTVS-01 and dosemeters MKD-A and MKD-B for the purposes of individual dosimetric control of skin and eye lens exposure to radiation. The dependence of sensitivity of different thermoluminescent dosemeters, designed for dose equivalents measurements in skin and eye lens on the type (photons and ȕ-particles and energy of radiation was determined experimentally. There are conclusions about the limits of applicability of existing detectors and dosemeters under different radiation exposure conditions. The article evaluates the possibility of different dosimeter use for specific radiation exposure conditions.

  6. Evaluation of patient skin dose equivalent due to diagnostic procedures with X-rays in Lagos State Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the study of Patient Skin Dose Equivalents in Lagos State, Nigeria, as one of the strategies of patient protection and x-ray procedure quality assessment. 13 most frequent x-ray diagnostic procedures were studied, these were: chest, skull, cervical spine, lumbosacral spine, sinusis, pelvis, plain abdomen, shoulder, foot, hysterosalpingography, intravenous urography, barium meal and barium enema. 1977 procedures were monitored for a period of 12 months in both private and public hospitals carefully selected from all over the state. The results obtained compared favorably well with those from similar studies reported in the literature. The slight differences observed have been ascribed to variations in the patient anatomy, exposure conditions and choice of radiographic parameters. (author)

  7. Optical dating of coarse-silt sized quartz from loess: Evaluation of equivalent dose determinations and SAR procedural checks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study discusses the values of equivalent dose (De) determined for samples taken for optical dating from a loess section at Loveland, Iowa, North America. A modified single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure was applied to quartz grains of 35-50μm diameter which were isolated using hydrofluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6). 'Preheat plots' were constructed to select appropriate De values for use in subsequent age determinations. The De values of the younger (Peoria loess) samples varied little with preheat temperatures between 160 and 300 deg. C. However, the older (Pisgah Formation) samples showed a decrease in De values with increasing preheat temperature, by as much as a factor of two. Interestingly, both younger and older samples could recover a known laboratory administered radiation dose for a range of preheat temperatures. These apparently contradictory findings present a dilemma regarding which De values are the most appropriate to use for dating the samples. The behaviour of the samples is examined to investigate the cause of the variations in De values with preheat temperature for older samples. In addition, two modified SAR procedures were tested in an attempt to generate more reproducible De values. The data from the three SAR methods are examined, and the question of how to discriminate between De values is discussed. This study demonstrates that preheat temperature can play a significant role in the determination of De values. The use of plots of normalised luminescence signal (Lx/Tx) versus preheat temperature is proposed to supplement dose recovery tests and preheat plateau tests

  8. Neutron equivalent dose rates at the surroundings of the electron linear accelerator operated by the university of Sao Paulo - Physics institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the determination of the neutron dose rates at the surroundings of an electron linear accelerators it is necessary the knowledge of the neutron spectrum or its mean energy, because the conversion factor of the flux in equivalent dose rates, is strongly dependent on the neutron energy. Taking this fact into consideration, equivalent dose rates were determined in the three representative sites of the IF/USP Linear Electron Accelerator. Also, due to the radiation field be pulsed, a theoretical and experimental study has been realized to evaluate the effect produced by the variation of the field on the detector. (author)

  9. Committed effective dose equivalent in Slovakia due to dietary intake of 134,137Cs after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of 134,137Cs intake resulting from the consumption of selected kinds of food over the 1986-1989 period are summarized, and the individual committed effective dose equivalents and collective doses are estimated. Based on the results of continuous food monitoring, the 137Cs intake is assessed to have been about 8 kBq for children and about 10 kBq for adults; the figures for 134Cs are 3.3 and 4.3 kBq, respectively. More than 70% of this intake refers to the year 1986. The committed effective dose equivalent due to internal contamination by the two radionuclides ranges from 54 to 263 μSv; the averages are 149 μSv for children and 197 μSv for adults. The collective committed effective dose equivalent for the population of Slovakia from this source was estimated to 952 manSv. (author). 10 figs., 9 tabs., 11 refs

  10. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent and penetration in concrete for 230 MeV proton bombardment of Al, Fe, and Pb targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary neutron production from protons striking accelerator beam delivery components and the patient constitute the principal radiation hazard for 70-300 MeV accelerators used in proton radiation therapy. Because of the large mean free path of these high energy neutrons, neutron attenuation requires massive shields. To this end, we measured neutron dose as a function of emission angle and depth in concrete for the radiation environment produced by 230 MeV protons striking stopping targets of aluminium, iron, and lead. By using microdosimetric instrumentation, dose equivalent values were deduced. From these data, dose equivalent penetration as a function of depth in concrete and neutron emission angle were determined. Neutron production was found to vary rapidly with emission angle, while differences in dose equivalent values per incident proton as a function of depth and angle depended only slightly on target material. (author)

  11. The study of equivalent dose of uranium in long bean (V. U. Sesquipedalis) and the effect on human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Yoshandi, Tengku Mohammad; Majid, Sukiman Sarmania Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2016-01-01

    In the case of accidental release of Uranium-238 (238U) radionuclides in a nuclear facility or in the environment, internal contamination by either acute or chronic exposure has the potential to induce both radiological and chemical toxic effects. A study was conducted to estimate the 238U radionuclide concentration in the long beans using Induced Coupled Mass Plasma-Spectrometry (ICP-MS). 238U radionuclide is a naturally occurring radioactive material that can be found in soil and can be transferred to the long bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. Sesquapedalis) directly or indirectly via water or air. Kidney and liver are the major sites of deposition of 238U radionuclide. The obtained dose exposed in the liver and kidney is used to assess the safety level for public intake of 238U radionuclide from the consumption of long beans. The concentration of 238U radionuclide measured in long bean samples was 0.0226 ± 0.0009 mg/kg. Total activity of 238U radionuclide was 0.0044 ± 0.0002 Bq/day with the daily intake of 0.3545 ± 0.0143 µg/day and the annual committed effective dose due to ingestion of 238U radionuclide in long beans was 0.2230 ± 0.0087 µSv/year. The committed equivalent dose of 238U radionuclide from the assessment in the liver and kidney are 0.4198 ± 0.0165 nSv and 10.9335 ± 0.4288 nSv. The risk of cancer of 238U radionuclide was determined to be (86.0466 ± 3.3748) × 10-9. Thus, the results concluded that 238U radionuclide in local long beans was in the permitted level and safe to consume without posing any significant radiological threat to population.

  12. The study of equivalent dose of uranium in long bean (V. U. Sesquipedalis) and the effect on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Yoshandi, Tengku Mohammad; Majid, Sukiman Sarmania Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok, E-mail: khoo@ukm.edu.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    In the case of accidental release of Uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) radionuclides in a nuclear facility or in the environment, internal contamination by either acute or chronic exposure has the potential to induce both radiological and chemical toxic effects. A study was conducted to estimate the {sup 238}U radionuclide concentration in the long beans using Induced Coupled Mass Plasma-Spectrometry (ICP-MS). {sup 238}U radionuclide is a naturally occurring radioactive material that can be found in soil and can be transferred to the long bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. Sesquapedalis) directly or indirectly via water or air. Kidney and liver are the major sites of deposition of {sup 238}U radionuclide. The obtained dose exposed in the liver and kidney is used to assess the safety level for public intake of {sup 238}U radionuclide from the consumption of long beans. The concentration of {sup 238}U radionuclide measured in long bean samples was 0.0226 ± 0.0009 mg/kg. Total activity of {sup 238}U radionuclide was 0.0044 ± 0.0002 Bq/day with the daily intake of 0.3545 ± 0.0143 µg/day and the annual committed effective dose due to ingestion of {sup 238}U radionuclide in long beans was 0.2230 ± 0.0087 µSv/year. The committed equivalent dose of {sup 238}U radionuclide from the assessment in the liver and kidney are 0.4198 ± 0.0165 nSv and 10.9335 ± 0.4288 nSv. The risk of cancer of {sup 238}U radionuclide was determined to be (86.0466 ± 3.3748) × 10-9. Thus, the results concluded that {sup 238}U radionuclide in local long beans was in the permitted level and safe to consume without posing any significant radiological threat to population.

  13. Occupational dose equivalent limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers methods of limiting individual radiation risks by recognizing the variation of risk with age at exposure, taking into account both somatic and genetic risks and proposes a simple formula for controlling individual cumulative exposure and hence risk. (Author)

  14. Evaluation of dose equivalent and identification of energy rangeby the electronic personal dosemeter for neutron 'Saphydose-N' at different workplaces of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: According to the transposition of the Directive 96/29/EURATOM into the French legislation, any worker operating in a controlled area has to be monitored by 'passive' and 'active' dosemeters. Electronic personal dosemeters are especially needed for optimization of workplaces. In nuclear facilities, some of the workers are likely to be exposed to mixed neutron-photon fields. If the dosimetry of the photons is relatively well controlled, the neutron dosimetry raises more difficulties. In this context, the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed an electronic device based on a silicon detector: the 'Saphydose-N' dosemeter. It is composed of several detectors and covers more than eight energy decades. The Saphydose-N device complies with recommendations of standard IEC 1323. As the radiation fields produced in laboratory are not strictly representative to those encountered at workplaces, IRSN evaluated the response of Saphydose-N at various workplaces from nuclear industry. Several campaigns were performed in the framework of the European contract EVIDOS ('Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields'). Saphydose-N was carried out at a fuel processing plant, at the Nuclear Power Plant close to the boiling water reactor, near the transport and storage cask and at the Research Reactor. This paper mainly aims at presenting the measurements, the identification of the energy range and the results obtained with the electronic personal neutron Saphydose-N at different facilities. The results are compared with reference values, defined by other partners in EVIDOS project, for ambient and personal dose equivalent. (author)

  15. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassoun, J., E-mail: ghassoun@ucam.ac.ma [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco); Senhou, N. [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)

    2012-04-15

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Monte Carlo method has been used to model radiotherapy room of a 18 MV linear accelerator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The neutron and the gamma ray dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid (TE) phantom were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radiotherapy room shielding performance has been also investigated.

  16. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. - Highlights: ► The Monte Carlo method has been used to model radiotherapy room of a 18 MV linear accelerator. ► The neutron and the gamma ray dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid (TE) phantom were evaluated. ► The radiotherapy room shielding performance has been also investigated.

  17. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ - supplementary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes a revision of the SFACTOR computer code, which has been developed to estimate the average dose equivalent to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, gamma radiation, and spontaneous fission. The principal refinement to the program is the addition of a method for calculating components of the dose equivalent rate from alpha particles to endosteal cells and red bone marrow from a source in mineral bone. Other details of the calculations remain unchanged. Corrected tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 19 radionuclides in an adult

  18. In vitro effects on macrophages induced by noncytotoxic doses of silica particles possibly relevant to ambient exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RAW 246.7 macrophage cell line was exposed in vitro to aged crystalline silica particles of respirable size for 24 h at a range of doses starting from 15 μg/2x106 cells, which is a realistic exposure level of macrophages in the airways of ambiently exposed individuals. The particle sample used for the experiments was prepared to mimic some aspects of ambient crystalline silica particles: size distribution, morphology, and surface reactivity. Our purpose was to determine whether a nontoxic quartz load comparable to that of ambient exposure would be able to induce macrophage activation and impairment of the phagocytic ability, factors altering the lung's capacity to deal with increased particle loads (as occurs during high-pollution episodes) or infections and affecting the local and systemic responses through the release of biologically active compounds (cytokines, reactive oxygen species, NO, isoprostanes). Exposure of RAW 264.7 cells to aged silica particles induced macrophage activation (evidenced by the morphological features observed with scanning electron microscopy and by the release of TNF-α and IL-6) and impairment of phagocytosis of test particles, even at noncytotoxic doses. The reduction of the phagocytic function of the cells after silica treatment was dose-dependent, as evidenced by an increase of the population of unphagocytic cells, paralleled by a decrease of the actively phagocytizing cell population. We evaluated the oxidative stress induced by aged silica particles, quantifying the peroxidation products (8-isoprostanes) in the culture media of treated cells, and found a strong release at low doses. Isoprostanes are a complex family of compounds which have been used as in vivo markers of lipid peroxidation in human disorders, but that, as far as we know, have never been evaluated in relation to airborne particulate matter exposure. Lipid peroxides are involved in various cellular events in the inflammatory response, and isoprostanes are also

  19. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. PMID:22257567

  20. Effective Equivalent Doses of External Irradiation of Population by Man-made Radionuclides from the Soil in the Sarajevo Region Over the Period of 1986-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of exposition of human body to radioactive materials is seen as radiation-hygienic measure of utmost importance, since the doses absorbed due to radionuclides present in soil, air, food and water are significant integral parts of the total dose that the human being receives in all kinds and conditions of exposition. External irradiation by radionuclides deposed in soil is a major contributor to the whole dose of irradiation of population. Assuming that fission radionuclides Cs-134 and Cs-137 had a specially significant contribution to the total dose of irradiation of the population over the investigation period (1986-1989), we established their levels of activity in the soil in different localities of the Sarajevo region, and then calculated the effective equivalent dose for the population for each year of investigation. The mean values for the yearly effective equivalent doses of external irradiation of the population by fission radionuclides Cs-134 and Cs-137 from the soil in the Sarajevo region were 0.77 mSv/year in 1989. Contribution by Cs-134 to the total effective equivalent dose was 63.64 % in 1986 year, to be reeducated in 1987 to 45.67 %, in 1988 to 35.89 % and in the year 1989 to 33.33 %. The effective equivalent dose was different to a great extent by the investigated localities (town sections) during the started period. It can be inferred from the above that the average population of the Sarajevo region did not receive a larger dose of radiation than the one established by the International Commission for Radiological Protection as the limit for subsequent exposition to radiation. (author)

  1. Using Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Atlases to Combine and Analyze Prospective Dosimetric and Radiation Pneumonitis Data From 2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Dose Escalation Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fan; Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Borst, Gerben R. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Lebesque, Joos V. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate {>=}20% were plotted. Results: The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. Conclusions: The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power.

  2. An evaluation of dose equivalence between synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy and conventional broad beam radiation using clonogenic and cell impedance assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Johari Ibahim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT has shown the potential to deliver improved outcomes over conventional broadbeam (BB radiation therapy. To implement synchrotron MRT clinically for cancer treatment, it is necessary to undertake dose equivalence studies to identify MRT doses that give similar outcomes to BB treatments. AIM: To develop an in vitro approach to determine biological dose equivalence between MRT and BB using two different cell-based assays. METHODS: The acute response of tumour and normal cell lines (EMT6.5, 4T1.2, NMuMG, EMT6.5ch, 4T1ch5, SaOS-2 to MRT (50-560 Gy and BB (1.5-10 Gy irradiation was investigated using clonogenic and real time cell impedance sensing (RT-CIS/xCELLigence assays. MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 or 50 µm-wide planar, polychromatic kilovoltage X-ray microbeams with 200 µm peak separation. BB irradiations were performed using a Co60 teletherapy unit or a synchrotron radiation source. BB doses that would generate biological responses similar to MRT were calculated by data interpolation and verified by clonogenic and RT-CIS assays. RESULTS: For a given cell line, MRT equivalent BB doses identified by RT-CIS/xCELLigence were similar to those identified by clonogenic assays. Dose equivalence between MRT and BB were verified in vitro in two cell lines; EMT6.5ch and SaOS-2 by clonogenic assays and RT-CIS/xCELLigence. We found for example, that BB doses of 3.4±0.1 Gy and 4.40±0.04 Gy were radiobiologically equivalent to a peak, microbeam dose of 112 Gy using clonogenic and RT-CIS assays respectively on EMT6.5ch cells. CONCLUSION: Our data provides the first determination of biological dose equivalence between BB and MRT modalities for different cell lines and identifies RT-CIS/xCELLigence assays as a suitable substitute for clonogenic assays. These results will be useful for the safe selection of MRT doses for future veterinary and clinical trials.

  3. Project ''PHANTOM'' - measurement of the absorbed dose, the ''averaged LET'' and the thermal neutron fluence in a tissue equivalent Phantom onboard space station MIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water filled phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems. This tissue equivalent phantom is equipped with 4 channels to deposit dosemeters in different depths. In the framework of the project 'PHANTOM' (phase 1-3) thermoluminescent dosemeters of the commercially available Types TLD - 600 and TLD - 700 were exposed from May 1997 to February 1999 for an overall of 572 days in the different channels (perpendicular and normal to the hull of the spacecraft) of the phantom. The phantom was positioned in the commander cabin, the board engineer cabin and in the module KWANT 2. Besides the measurement of the depth dose distribution, the 'averaged LET' was determined using the HTR - method. The HTR - method utilizes the different LET - efficiencies of the main - and the high temperature glow peaks of LiF dosemeters for the evaluation of the 'averaged LET' in mixed radiation fields. Therefore it is possible to calculate the depth distribution of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The results show, that despite of the depth decrease of the absorbed dose, the depth dose equivalent is almost constant. This can be explained by the production of secondary particles inside the phantom. The flux of the thermal neutrons was determined using the pair method. Calibration was performed at the research reactor of the Austrian Universities. First results show, that the contribution of thermal neutrons are roughly 10% of the total neutron dose equivalent. (orig.)

  4. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghasemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF 3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine′s (AAPM report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10 -6 (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size and 8.36 × 10 -8 Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size, respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10 -5 and 1.74 × 10 -5 Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size, respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  5. Intercomparison of measurements of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields in the West Asia Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with its statutory function, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been assisting its Member States in establishing and upgrading their radiation protection infrastructures, including activities in occupation radiation protection. Individual external dosimetry services for photon radiation have been under establishment or upgrading with support through the Technical Cooperation Model Projects RAW/9/006, Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure (concluded in 2000), and RAW/9/008, Development of Technical Capabilities for Sustainable Radiation and Waste Safety Infrastructure (2001-2004), in all the participating countries in the West Asia Region. Two regional training courses were organized by the IAEA, in Germany in 1998, on Design, Implementation and Management of Individual Monitoring Services (IMS), and in the Syrian Arabic Republic in 2001, on Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to External Sources, under the above stated projects. However, no performance testing has yet been carried out and no regional intercomparisons have been established before in this region. Only two Member States from the region (the Syrian Arab Republic and Lebanon) participated in the interregional Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of Radiological Measurements for Purposes of Monitoring Personal Dose Equivalent Hp(10) in 1999

  6. Survey report on personal dose equivalent and indoor and outdoor staying time for children in the southern Miyagi Prefecture after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of personal dose equivalent for children using optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters has been carried out in the southern Miyagi Prefecture from 1 September 2011, about a half year after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The survey results until November 2013 are summarized in this paper. This is the only survey report in Miyagi Prefecture as any survey of personal dose equivalent was not carried out in this area. Findings of indoor and outdoor staying time (home and school) for children were also reported. It was found that the most time (14 - 15 hours a day) was spent at the inside of their houses for all ages. Children stay at the inside of their houses and school about 21 hours a day in a total. These results are quite important to explain individual dose for children and to take measures to reduce exposure dose as well. (author)

  7. Determination of the dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of occupationally exposed personnel in the practice of proton emission tomography (PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Venezuela recently it was implanted the Positron Emission Tomography technique (PET) with the perspective of implanting it at national level. Even when in our country practices it of nuclear medicine it exists from early of 70, there is not experience in the determination of the occupational doses by exposure to the external radiation in hands. By this reason, a concern exists in the workers of the centers of nuclear medicine where it is practiced the Positron Emission Tomography technique. In absence of the TLD dosimetry to measure dose in hands in our country, measurements of the dose equivalent of the workers of the PET national reference center were made, using a detector of hands type diode. It was determined the dose in hands in terms of dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in two work positions, that is: the corresponding to the transfer of the receiving vial of (18F) FDG to the shield, quality control and uni doses division. The second work position corresponds the person in charge of administering, via intravenous, the (18F) FDG. In this work it realizes the dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) measures in each one of the work positions before described by daily production. The informed doses correspond to a total average produced activity of 20.4 GBq (550 mCi). The results of the measurements in terms of dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) correspond to 2.1 ± 20% mSv in the work position of division and 0.4 ± 10% mSv in the position of injection of the radioactive material. At short term this foreseen until 4 productions per week, what means an annual dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of 400 mSv approximately, without taking into account abnormal situations as its are spills of the (18F) FDG in the work place. This work is the starting point so that the regulatory authority settles down, in Venezuela, dose restrictions in the PET practices and implant, in the centers of nuclear medicine, an optimization politics of this practice in conformity with the ALARA principle

  8. Relation among gamma-ray energy spectra, exposure rates and effective dose equivalents rates in the working places of the KUR reactor room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure rates and Effective dose equivalents are estimated on the basis of gamma-ray energy spectra in some places of the KUR reactor room. A relation among those radiation protection quantities are investigated to know the most appropriate way for estimation of radiation risks to radiation worekers. (author)

  9. Application of the high-temperature ratio method for evaluation of the depth distribution of dose equivalent in a water-filled phantom on board space station Mir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water-filled tissue equivalent phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia. It contains four channels perpendicular to each other, where dosemeters can be exposed at different depths. Between May 1997 and February 1999 the phantom was installed at three different locations on board the Mir space station. Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were exposed at various depths inside the phantom either parallel or perpendicular to the hull of the spacecraft. The high-temperature ratio (HTR) method was used for the evaluation of the TLDs. The method was developed at the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna, Austria, and has already been used for measurements in mixed radiation fields on earth and in space with great success. It uses the changes of peak height ratios in LiF:Mg,Ti glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer (LET), and therefore allows determination of an 'averaged' LET as well as measurement of the absorbed dose. A mean quality factor and, subsequently, the dose equivalent can be calculated according to the Q(LET() relationship proposed by the ICRP. The small size of the LiF dosemeters means that the HTR method can be used to determine the gradient of absorbed dose and dose equivalent inside the tissue equivalent body. (author)

  10. Estimation of neutron-equivalent dose in organs of patients undergoing radiotherapy by the use of a novel online digital detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron peripheral contamination in patients undergoing high-energy photon radiotherapy is considered as a risk factor for secondary cancer induction. Organ-specific neutron-equivalent dose estimation is therefore essential for a reasonable assessment of these associated risks. This work aimed to develop a method to estimate neutron-equivalent doses in multiple organs of radiotherapy patients. The method involved the convolution, at 16 reference points in an anthropomorphic phantom, of the normalized Monte Carlo neutron fluence energy spectra with the kerma and energy-dependent radiation weighting factor. This was then scaled with the total neutron fluence measured with passive detectors, at the same reference points, in order to obtain the equivalent doses in organs. The latter were correlated with the readings of a neutron digital detector located inside the treatment room during phantom irradiation. This digital detector, designed and developed by our group, integrates the thermal neutron fluence. The correlation model, applied to the digital detector readings during patient irradiation, enables the online estimation of neutron-equivalent doses in organs. The model takes into account the specific irradiation site, the field parameters (energy, field size, angle incidence, etc) and the installation (linac and bunker geometry). This method, which is suitable for routine clinical use, will help to systematically generate the dosimetric data essential for the improvement of current risk-estimation models. (paper)

  11. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  12. Development of a neutron dosemeter for personnel dosimetry with direct response of dose equivalent in neutron fields of different energy spectra. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of neutron dosemeters in personnel dosimetry using dielectric track detectors is described. Etched mica foils are evaluated by means of spark counting. The efficiency is presented in dependence on etching time. For single evaluation of the etch pits due to fission fragments the dose equivalent can be calculated as a multiple of the sparks number

  13. Intercomparison of personal dose equivalent measurements by active personal dosimeters. Final report of a joint IAEA-EURADOS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    standard laboratory. The final results, as assessed by the irradiation laboratories and discussed with the APD suppliers, were: - The general dosimetric performance of the tested APD is comparable with the performance of standard passive dosimetric systems; - The accuracy at reference photon radiation, the reproducibility and the repeatability of measurements are even better than for most passive dosimeters; - Only three devices have given satisfactory results both for 60 kV (RQR4) and for 120 kV (RQR9) pulsed radiation. Not all the devices have been designed for any radiation field and the end-user should at least take into account information about the dose equivalent rate and energy ranges before using the dosimeters. The performance results confirm that the IEC standard requirements are adequate but that they can be insufficient for some applications such as with pulsed radiation fields

  14. Problems of evaluation of personal dose equivalent Hp(10)N of neutrons in rooms of containment in Nuclear Power Plant Temelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the experimental measurements of the personal neutron dose equivalent Hp(10)N in the selected containment rooms at NPP Temelin are presented. The attention is qiven to the conversion factor FN which is used for Hp(10)N evaluation by means of albedo Harshaw dosimeter and which strongly depends on neutron spectra. On the bases of neutron dose measurement by means of NPDS track dosimeter, electronic Siemens EPDN-2 dosimeter, Eberline dosimeter with radiometer FH40G-10 and Harsheaw albedo dosimeter was found that the value of FN = 0.5 in heavy moderated neutron fission spectra which were found in above mentioned localities. For personal dose equivalent measurement of gamma radiation the film badge, thermoluminescent and RPL dosimeters used in NPP Temelin are giving reliable results also in mixtures with neutrons. (authors)

  15. A Monte Carlo study of the impact of the choice of rectum volume definition on estimates of equivalent uniform doses and the volume parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values for the rectum are difficult because it is a hollow, non-rigid, organ. Finding the true cumulative dose distribution for a number of treatment fractions requires a CT scan before each treatment fraction. This is labour intensive, and several surrogate distributions have therefore been suggested, such as dose wall histograms, dose surface histograms and histograms for the solid rectum, with and without margins. In this study, a Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the relationships between the cumulative dose distributions based on all treatment fractions and the above-mentioned histograms that are based on one CT scan only, in terms of equivalent uniform dose. Furthermore, the effect of a specific choice of histogram on estimates of the volume parameter of the probit NTCP model was investigated. It was found that the solid rectum and the rectum wall histograms (without margins) gave equivalent uniform doses with an expected value close to the values calculated from the cumulative dose distributions in the rectum wall. With the number of patients available in this study the standard deviations of the estimates of the volume parameter were large, and it was not possible to decide which volume gave the best estimates of the volume parameter, but there were distinct differences in the mean values of the values obtained

  16. The research for the neutron ambient dose possibility of measurement using the instrument based on the 10B-counter with moderator in the fields at JINR nuclear-physics installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the research for the neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) possibility of measurement using the instrument based on the 10B-counter (CHM-14) with polyethylene moderator in the fields of JINR nuclear-physics installations have been presented. It was shown that the instrument can be used to measure H*(10) of neutrons in the energy range from 0.4 eV to 20 MeV with the uncertainty within 46% in radiation monitoring at JINR. The use of the correction factors can extend the energy range of the measurement of the neutron dose H*(10) up to hundreds of MeV. Neutron spectra, which were measured in the fields of nuclear installations of JINR earlier, places and conditions of their measurement, are presented too

  17. Monte carlo calculations of fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors in finite slab phantom for thermal to 10 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finite slab tissue equivalent phantom (ICRU slab) is rather practical phantom than the ICRU sphere since a large number of dosimeters can be calibrated. It is therefore the aim of this work to determine the conversion factors for the ICRU slab which might replace the ICRU sphere as a calibration phantom. By using the MCNP code, conversion factors are calculated in the ICRU slab resulting from external neutron irradiation with energies from thermal to 10 MeV. The depth-dose distributions in the ICRU slab are similar to those in the ICRU sphere. Resultly, the ICRU tissue equivalent finite slab phantom can be used for calibrating the individual dosimeter. (Author)

  18. Comparison between the calculated and measured dose distributions for four beams of 6 MeV linac in a human-equivalent phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Sonia M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose distributions in various parts of the body are of importance in radiotherapy. Also, the percent depth dose at different body depths is an important parameter in radiation therapy applications. Monte Carlo simulation techniques are the most accurate methods for such purposes. Monte Carlo computer calculations of photon spectra and the dose ratios at surfaces and in some internal organs of a human equivalent phantom were performed. In the present paper, dose distributions in different organs during bladder radiotherapy by 6 MeV X-rays were measured using thermoluminescence dosimetry placed at different points in the human-phantom. The phantom was irradiated in exactly the same manner as in actual bladder radiotherapy. Four treatment fields were considered to maximize the dose at the center of the target and minimize it at non-target healthy organs. All experimental setup information was fed to the MCNP-4b code to calculate dose distributions at selected points inside the proposed phantom. Percent depth dose distribution was performed. Also, the absorbed dose as ratios relative to the original beam in the surrounding organs was calculated by MCNP-4b and measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. Both measured and calculated data were compared. Results indicate good agreement between calculated and measured data inside the phantom. Comparison between MCNP-4b calculations and measurements of depth dose distribution indicated good agreement between both.

  19. Optimization of a single sphere albedo system using 3He counters for the measurement of neutron dose equivalent rates and the field calibration of personnel albedo neutron dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratory type of an active single sphere albedo dosemeter system using three 3He proportional counters in a polyethylene sphere for the measurement of neutron dose equivalent rates and the field calibration of personnel neutron dosemeters was optimized with respect to the detector-moderator combination by means of calibration exposures. One detector is located in the centre of the sphere to measure the neutron dose equivalent rate and the other two detectors near the moderator surface, in order to simulate the response of the albedo neutron detector and the thermal neutron detector. The response of the detectors to neutrons in the range between thermal and 14 MeV neutrons was investigated for various moderator-absorber combinations. Comparison was made between the system response and the response of the passive detector system. After completion the active system could be used for comprehensive neutron field measurements in radiation protection. By means of a microprocessor the linear combination of the three detector readings gives energy independent readings of the neutron dose equivalent rate, the absorbed dose rate and the neutron flux density at particle accelerators and nuclear facilities. (orig./HP)

  20. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Metwaly, Mohamed; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions.

  1. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions.

  2. Natural variation of ambient dose rate in the air of Izu-Oshima Island after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ambient dose rate in air and radioactivity concentration in soil samples collected on Izu-Oshima Island were observed in 2012, 2013 and 2014, i.e. 1, 2 and 3 years after the severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A car-borne survey for the ambient dose rate in air was carried out for the entire island. Soil samples were collected for the radioactivity concentration measurements from 22 points. The ambient dose rates in air were 36 nGy h-1 in 2012, 34 nGy h-1 in 2013 and 29 nGy h-1 in 2014. The corresponding radioactivity concentrations in those years for 134Cs were 53, 39 and 29 Bq kg-1 and for 137Cs, 87, 73 and 75 Bq kg-1. All the values have decreased every year. (authors)

  3. Natural variation of ambient dose rate in the air of Izu-Oshima Island after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedera, Fumihiko; Inoue, Kazumasa; Sugino, Masato; Sano, Ryosuke; Furue, Mai; Shimizu, Hideo; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Le Van, Tan; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    The ambient dose rate in air and radioactivity concentration in soil samples collected on Izu-Oshima Island were observed in 2012, 2013 and 2014, i.e. 1, 2 and 3 years after the severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A car-borne survey for the ambient dose rate in air was carried out for the entire island. Soil samples were collected for the radioactivity concentration measurements from 22 points. The ambient dose rates in air were 36 nGy h(-1) in 2012, 34 nGy h(-1) in 2013 and 29 nGy h(-1) in 2014. The corresponding radioactivity concentrations in those years for (134)Cs were 53, 39 and 29 Bq kg(-1) and for (137)Cs, 87, 73 and 75 Bq kg(-1). All the values have decreased every year. PMID:26246583

  4. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Pleasant, J.C.; Killough, G.G.

    1977-11-01

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/..mu..Ci-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult.

  5. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/μCi-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult

  6. Measuring the photon depth dose distribution produced by a medical linear accelerator in a water-equivalent radio-fluorogenic gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes use of a water equivalent radio-fluorogenic gel dosimeter for measurement of a depth dose distribution from a medical linear accelerator. Relative depth dose distributions for a 6 MV photon beam were measured with a novel radio-fluorogenic gel comprised of aqueous gelatin and coumarin-3-carboxylic acid. Agreement was within 3 % of published values in most areas of electronic equilibrium. Results support continued development of radio-fluorogenic gel dosimetry systems for quality assurance of clinical photon beams. (author)

  7. Patient-centric dose equivalency pilot study of incobotulinumtoxin a (xeomin vs. abobotulinumtoxin a (dysport in the treatment of glabellar frown lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bank

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Incobotulinumtoxin A (xeomin has been proposed as an alternative to abobotulinumtoxin A (dysport and onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox in the treatment of glabellar frown lines. A recent study is comparing abobotulinumtoxin A and onabotulinumtoxin A revealed equivalent efficacy with a dose conversion ratio of 2.5:1. We sought to establish effectiveness and dosing equivalency of incobotulinumtoxin A vs. abobotulinumtoxin A. Methods: Inclusion criteria for this pilot study included patients of a single surgeon (LAC who had previously received a constant dose of abobotulinumtoxin A over at least four consecutive treatment sessions for the previous 12 months to achieve an 85-90% elimination of dynamic glabellar frown lines. The primary outcome sought dose comparison between established maintenance abobotulinumtoxin A dosing and incobotulinumtoxin A first-time dosing. A 2:1 conversion (abobotulinumtoxin A: incobotulinumtoxin A was chosen in most patients. Secondary outcomes were patient-reported onset of effect, physician-assessed effect at 10-12 weeks, pain associated with administration, and patient perceived need for re-treatment at 2 weeks. Results: A total of 32 subjects were included. The mean dose of incobotulinumtoxin A was 17.1 units (± 6.1, the median dose 20 units. The mean dose of abobotulinumtoxin A was 27.6 (± 11.7, the median dose 27.5 units. The mean difference in treatment units was -10.5 (95% confidence interval, P < 0.001. Among 30 patients who reported effect onset, the median was 8.5 days, with a range of 1-14. At 10-12 weeks, muscle paralysis was assessed to be 69.2% (± 27.3, vs. 90.3% (± 1.8 with abobotulinumtoxin A (P < 0.001. The majority of patients rated pain of administration as equal or greater to that of abobotulinumtoxin A (63% and 22%, respectively. Three patients (9% required re-treatment at 2 weeks with abobotulinumtoxin A due to lack of effective treatment with incobotulinumtoxin A. Abobotulinumtoxin A re

  8. Three-year monitoring study of radiocesium transfer and ambient dose rate in forest environments affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi; Loffredo, Nicolas; Kawamori, Ayumi; Hisadome, Keigo

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the transfer of canopy-intercepted radiocesium to the forest floor during 3 years (July 2011~) following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The cesium-137 (Cs-137) contents of throughfall, stemflow, and litterfall were monitored in two coniferous stands (plantation of Japanese cedar) and a deciduous broad-leaved forest stand (Japanese oak with red pine). We also measured an ambient dose rate at different height in the forest by using a survey meter (TCS-172B, Hitachi-Aloka Medical, LTD.) and a portable Ge gamma-ray detector (Detective-DX-100T, Ortec, Ametek, Inc.). Furthermore, effects of forest decontamination on the reduction of ambient dose rate were assessed quantitatively. Total Cs-137 deposition flux from the canopy to forest floor for the mature cedar, young cedar, and the mixed broad-leaved stands were 157 kBq/m^2, 167 kBq/m^2, and 54 kBq/m^2, respectively. These values correspond to 36%, 39% and 12% of total atmospheric input after the accident. The ambient dose rate showed an exponential decrease with time for all the forest sites, however the decreasing trend differed depending on the forest type. These data suggested that an ambient dose rate in forest environment can be variable in spatially and temporally reflecting the transfer of radiocesium from canopy to forest floor. We presented the analysis results of the relationship between radiocesium deposition flux and ambient dose rate at the forest floor. In addition to that, we reported the effects of forest decontamination (e.g., tree felling, removal of organic materials, woodchip pavement) on the reduction of ambient dose rate in the forest environment.

  9. Comparison of whole-body phantom designs to estimate organ equivalent neutron doses for secondary cancer risk assessment in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary neutron fluence created during proton therapy can be a significant source of radiation exposure in organs distant from the treatment site, especially in pediatric patients. Various published studies have used computational phantoms to estimate neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy. In these simulations, whole-body patient representations were applied considering either generic whole-body phantoms or generic age- and gender-dependent phantoms. No studies to date have reported using patient-specific geometry information. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of patient–phantom matching when using computational pediatric phantoms. To achieve this goal, three sets of phantoms, including different ages and genders, were compared to the patients’ whole-body CT. These sets consisted of pediatric age-specific reference, age-adjusted reference and anatomically sculpted phantoms. The neutron equivalent dose for a subset of out-of-field organs was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit, where proton fields were used to irradiate the cranium and the spine of all phantoms and the CT-segmented patient models. The maximum neutron equivalent dose per treatment absorbed dose was calculated and found to be on the order of 0 to 5 mSv Gy−1. The relative dose difference between each phantom and their respective CT-segmented patient model for most organs showed a dependence on how close the phantom and patient heights were matched. The weight matching was found to have much smaller impact on the dose accuracy except for very heavy patients. Analysis of relative dose difference with respect to height difference suggested that phantom sculpting has a positive effect in terms of dose accuracy as long as the patient is close to the 50th percentile height and weight. Otherwise, the benefit of sculpting was masked by inherent uncertainties, i.e. variations in organ shapes, sizes and locations. Other sources of uncertainty included errors

  10. SU-E-J-141: Activity-Equivalent Path Length Approach for the 3D PET-Based Dose Reconstruction in Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Ion beam therapy is sensitive to uncertainties from treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of induced positron emitter distributions is a practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of ion beam treatments. Treatment verification is usually done by comparing measured activity distributions with reference distributions, evaluated in nominal conditions. Although such comparisons give valuable information on treatment quality, a proper clinical evaluation of the treatment ultimately relies on the knowledge of the actual delivered dose. Analytical deconvolution methods relating activity and dose have been studied in this context, but were not clinically applied. In this work we present a feasibility study of an alternative approach for dose reconstruction from activity data, which is based on relating variations in accumulated activity to tissue density variations. Methods: First, reference distributions of dose and activity were calculated from the treatment plan and CT data. Then, the actual measured activity data were cumulatively matched with the reference activity distributions to obtain a set of activity-equivalent path lengths (AEPLs) along the rays of the pencil beams. Finally, these AEPLs were used to deform the original dose distribution, yielding the actual delivered dose. The method was tested by simulating a proton therapy treatment plan delivering 2 Gy on a homogeneous water phantom (the reference), which was compared with the same plan delivered on a phantom containing inhomogeneities. Activity and dose distributions were were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo toolkit. Results: The main features of the observed dose distribution in the inhomogeneous situation were reproduced using the AEPL approach. Variations in particle range were reproduced and the positions, where these deviations originated, were properly identified. Conclusions: For a simple inhomogeneous phantom the 3D dose reconstruction from PET

  11. Status report about the revision of an IEC standard for personal dose equivalent meters for Hp(10) and Hp(0,07)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group (SC 45B/WG B8) exists within the international electrochemical commission (IEC) which is working on the combination and revision of the IEC standards 61283, 61323, 61344, 61525 and 61526. All these standards concern direct reading, electronic, personal dose equivalent meters for the quantities Hp(10) and Hp(0,07); they are different with regard to the kind of radiation (photons, and/or beta rays and/or neutrons). The new standard with the number 61526 shall cover the following topics: 1. Combination of all the mentioned standards; 2. Maintenance of the essential requirements of the former standards; 3. Inclusion of the determination of the uncertainty of measurement for the measured dose equivalent value according to the ''Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement''; 4. Consideration of all the relevant ISO-standards for reference radiation fields for photon, beta and neutron radiations; 5. Consideration of dose rate for alarm levels and dose rate warning devices. The actual status of the draft is reported. The concept, which is presented in detail, contains many new ideas as compared to former IEC standards. This early presentation is intended to improve the information about the current work on international standards and to serve as a stimulus for working in all (national and international) committees dealing with the production of standards. (orig.)

  12. TL and EPR studies of CaSO4:Dy phosphor to investigate its efficacy in measurement of food irradiation dose at sub-ambient temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of sub-ambient temperatures of irradiation and dose response of CaSO4:Dy phosphor was investigated. The irradiation dose in the range 0.5-7.0 kGy was chosen to meet the requirement of commercial food irradiation at low temperature. Commercially available phosphor showed no significant change in glow curve structure with low temperature of irradiation. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the low temperature glow peak (142 oC), the phosphor was subjected to different post-preparation thermal treatments at 700-900 oC. The change in glows and improvement in dose response characteristics were explained by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. At sub-ambient temperature of irradiation, the behavior of thermally treated CaSO4:Dy phosphor with increasing dose revealed improved linear response of the low temperature glow peak and could be an efficient dosimetry system for the food commodities irradiated at low temperatures.

  13. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup −6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup −6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  14. Annual effective dose computation with estimation of radium equivalent activity and external hazard index in a building made of norm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of radioactivity in technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORMs) are important from radiation protection point of view because more than 50% of the total dose to human population from natural sources of radiation is contributed by these materials. The main contribution is due to inhalation of 222Rn, 220Rn and their progeny. The radiometric analysis data of the building material made of fly ash received from GCNEP, Haryana was used to calculate the dose to an individual residing in the campus comprising of township and office. The average Annual excess Effective Dose to an individual residing in township with a 0.8 Indoor occupancy factor (7008 hr) was found to be 0.56 mSv/year. The average Annual excess Effective Dose to an individual residing in an office for 2000 hr occupancy was found to be 0.16 mSv/year

  15. Results on Dose Distributions in a Human Body from the Matroshka-R Experiment onboard the ISS Obtained with the Tissue-Equivalent Spherical Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Nikolaev, Igor; Kartsev, Ivan; Tolochek, Raisa; Lyagushin, Vladimir

    The tissue-equivalent spherical phantom (32 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been used on board the ISS in Matroshka-R experiment for more than 10 years. Both passive and active space radiation detectors can be located inside the phantom and on its surface. Due to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a human body. Originally the spherical phantom was installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module, then in the Piers-1, MIM-2, and MIM-1 modules of the ISS Russian segment, and finally in JAXA Kibo module. Total duration of the detector exposure is more than 2000 days in 9 sessions of the space experiment. In the first phase of the experiment with the spherical phantom the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid state track detectors). The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. After each session the passive detectors are returned to the ground. The results obtained show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being usually observed close to the outer wall of the compartment, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. However, because of the ISS module shielding properties an inverse dose distribution in a human body can be observed when the dose rate maximum is closer to the geometrical center of the module. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom is obviously due to the action of two radiation sources, namely, galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Earth’ radiation belts. Minimum dose rate is produced mainly by the strongly penetrating GCR particles and is mostly observed behind more than 5 g/cm2 tissue shielding. Critical organ doses, mean

  16. Evaluation of personal dose equivalent 'HP(d)' in a external individual monitoring system for X and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The good of individual monitoring for external radiation is the assessment of occupational exposure from X and γ radiations in order to assure that the radiological conditions of the workplace are acceptable, safe and satisfactory. The evaluation of radiations doses for workers must not exceed dose limits specified for workers, according to national regulatory agencies. Nowadays, there are two external monitoring systems in use, both based on ICRU definitions. In the conventional system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of Hx. The personal dosimeter is worn over chest surface and it is calibrated in function of air kerma. In the new system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of HP(d) and the personal dosimeter is calibrated in function of phantom doses. The aim of this paper is to adapt an external dosimetry laboratory (based on photographic dosimetry) to evaluate the personal dosimeters in terms of HP(d). In this way, a simple methodology, based on linear programming, was utilized. In this adaptation, calibration curves were obtained for radiation qualities (W and N series) described by International Organization for Standardization (ISO 4037-1, 1995). These calibration curves offer a better accuracy on dose determinations and energy below 140 keV, improving the quality of service rendered the society. (author)

  17. The bimodal effect of interleukin 1 on rat pancreatic beta-cells--stimulation followed by inhibition--depends upon dose, duration of exposure, and ambient glucose concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spinas, G A; Palmer, J P; Mandrup-Poulsen, T;

    1988-01-01

    220% at 3.3 mmol/l glucose, but at 11 mmol/l glucose a 60% suppression was seen. On the basis of these data we suggest that interleukin 1's effect on beta-cells is bimodal: stimulation followed by inhibition. Increasing interleukin 1 dose and ambient glucose concentration shift this response to the...

  18. INREM II: a computer implementation of recent models for estimating the dose equivalent to organs of man from an inhaled or ingested radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a computer code, INREM II, which calculates the internal radiation dose equivalent to organs of man which results from the intake of a radionuclide by inhalation or ingestion. Deposition and removal of radioactivity from the respiratory tract is represented by the ICRP Task Group Lung Model. A four-segment catenary model of the GI tract is used to estimate movement of radioactive material that is ingested or swallowed after being cleared from the respiratory tract. Retention of radioactivity in other organs is specified by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. The formation and decay of radioactive daughters is treated explicitly, with each radionuclide species in the chain having its own uptake and retention parameters, as supplied by the user. The dose equivalent to a target organ is computed as the sum of contributions from each source organ in which radioactivity is assumed to be situated. This calculation utilizes a matrix of S-factors (rem/μCi-day) supplied by the user for the particular choice of source and target organs. Output permits the evaluation of crossfire components of dose when penetrating radiations are present. INREM II is coded in FORTRAN IV and has been compiled and executed on an IBM-360 computer

  19. Simulation of equivalent dose due to accidental electron beam loss in Indus-1 and Indus-2 synchrotron radiation sources using FLUKA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus-1 and Indus-2 are two Synchrotron radiation sources at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), India. Stored electron energy in Indus-1 and Indus-2 are 450MeV and 2.5GeV respectively. During operation of storage ring, accidental electron beam loss may occur in addition to normal beam losses. The Bremsstrahlung radiation produced due to the beam losses creates a major radiation hazard in these high energy electron accelerators. FLUKA, the Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to simulate the accidental beam loss. The simulation was carried out to estimate the equivalent dose likely to be received by a trapped person closer to the storage ring. Depth dose profile in water phantom for 450MeV and 2.5GeV electron beam is generated, from which percentage energy absorbed in 30cm water phantom (analogous to human body) is calculated. The simulation showed the percentage energy deposition in the phantom is about 19% for 450MeV electron and 4.3% for 2.5GeV electron. The dose build up factor in 30cm water phantom for 450MeV and 2.5GeV electron beam are found to be 1.85 and 2.94 respectively. Based on the depth dose profile, dose equivalent index of 0.026Sv and 1.08Sv are likely to be received by the trapped person near the storage ring in Indus-1 and Indus-2 respectively. (author)

  20. Measurement of neutron and gamma-ray absorbed doses inside human body in criticality accident situations using phantom and tissue-equivalent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personal dosimeters provide a fundamental evaluation of external exposures to human bodies in radiation accidents. For emergency medical treatment to heavily exposed patients, the evaluation of dose distribution inside the body has been tried by computational simulations. Experimental data on dose distributions inside the body are necessary for accurate simulation of human dosimetry, particularly in complex radiation fields of neutrons and gamma-rays such as criticality accidents. A preliminary experiment on the human dosimetry was carried out at the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) to acquire such experimental data in criticality accident situations. A combined use of two kinds of tissue-equivalent dosimeters together with a human phantom was employed to measure neutron and gamma-ray absorbed doses inside the body. The neutron and gamma-ray absorbed doses measured on the phantom were found to be in roughly the same level as those averaged over the phantom inside or those measured in free air. The dose distributions measured inside and on the phantom could be qualitatively interpreted from reflection an attenuation of neutrons and gamma-rays in the phantom, neutron-induced secondary gamma-rays emitted in the phantom, and so forth. (author)

  1. Repeated exposure to an ambient level of NO{sub 2} enhances asthmatic response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, V. [The Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Svartengren, M. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Rak, S. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Allergy Center, Gothenburg (Sweden); Barck, C.; Bylin, G. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, and the Institute of Medicine at the Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-06-01

    We investigated the effects of NO{sub 2} and allergen on lung function in a repeated exposure model. For 4 subsequent days, 16 subjects with mild asthma and allergy to birch or grass pollen were exposed at rest to either purified air or 500 {mu}g x m{sup -3} NO{sub 2} for 30 min in an exposure chamber. Four hours later, an individually determined nonsymptomatic allergen dose was inhaled. Lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)) was measured by a portable spirometer at early phase (EP) 15 min after allergen and at late phase (LP) 3-10 h after allergen. Subjective symptoms and medication were followed by diary cards. Asthmatic response was significantly increased after repeated exposure to NO{sub 2} and allergen compared to air and allergen. The 4-day mean fall in FEV1 after NO{sub 2} was at EP-2.5% versus -0.4% for air (p=0.02) and at LP -4.4% versus -1.9% for air (p=0.01, ANOVA). An increase in EP response was seen already after a single NO{sub 2} exposure (p=0.03). There was a tendency (p=0.07) towards increased night-time symptoms of asthma after NO{sub 2} plus allergen. Although the effects were small, the results indicate that a repeated short exposure to an ambient level of NO{sub 2} enhances the airway response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose. (au) 28 refs.

  2. Reliability of equivalent-dose determination and age-models in the OSL dating of historical and modern palaeoflood sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medialdea, Alicia; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew Sean;

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of accurately estimating the deposition age of incompletely-bleached samples in luminescence dating has motivated developments in the analysis of single grain dose distributions, and a number of statistical approaches have been proposed over the last few years. In this study, we com...

  3. Linear Energy Transfer Painting With Proton Therapy: A Means of Reducing Radiation Doses With Equivalent Clinical Effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to propose a proton treatment planning method that trades physical dose (D) for dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) while keeping the radiobiologically weighted dose (DRBE) to the target the same. Methods and Materials: The target is painted with LETd by using 2, 4, and 7 fields aimed at the proximal segment of the target (split target planning [STP]). As the LETd within the target increases with increasing number of fields, D decreases to maintain the DRBE the same as the conventional treatment planning method by using beams treating the full target (full target planning [FTP]). Results: The LETd increased 61% for 2-field STP (2STP) compared to FTP, 72% for 4STP, and 82% for 7STP inside the target. This increase in LETd led to a decrease of D with 5.3 ± 0.6 Gy for 2STP, 4.4 ± 0.7 Gy for 4STP, and 5.3 ± 1.1 Gy for 7STP, keeping the DRBE at 90% of the volume (DRBE, 90) constant to FTP. Conclusions: LETd painting offers a method to reduce prescribed dose at no cost to the biological effectiveness of the treatment

  4. Linear Energy Transfer Painting With Proton Therapy: A Means of Reducing Radiation Doses With Equivalent Clinical Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fager, Marcus, E-mail: Marcus.Fager@UPHS.UPenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Toma-Dasu, Iuliana [Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Kirk, Maura; Dolney, Derek; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Carabe, Alejandro, E-mail: Alejandro.Carabe-Fernandez@UPHS.UPenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to propose a proton treatment planning method that trades physical dose (D) for dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub d}) while keeping the radiobiologically weighted dose (D{sub RBE}) to the target the same. Methods and Materials: The target is painted with LET{sub d} by using 2, 4, and 7 fields aimed at the proximal segment of the target (split target planning [STP]). As the LET{sub d} within the target increases with increasing number of fields, D decreases to maintain the D{sub RBE} the same as the conventional treatment planning method by using beams treating the full target (full target planning [FTP]). Results: The LET{sub d} increased 61% for 2-field STP (2STP) compared to FTP, 72% for 4STP, and 82% for 7STP inside the target. This increase in LET{sub d} led to a decrease of D with 5.3 ± 0.6 Gy for 2STP, 4.4 ± 0.7 Gy for 4STP, and 5.3 ± 1.1 Gy for 7STP, keeping the DRBE at 90% of the volume (DRBE, 90) constant to FTP. Conclusions: LET{sub d} painting offers a method to reduce prescribed dose at no cost to the biological effectiveness of the treatment.

  5. E.D.E.N.: a tool for the estimation of dose coefficient equivalents for non-human biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current studies within the field of Environmental Risk Assessments associated with the presence of radionuclides in ecosystems tend to implement the usual approach developed for chemicals, that includes four steps: (1) pollutants inventory in the sources of exposure, (2) effect analysis, (3) exposure analysis and (4) risk calculation. In the case of ionising radiation, the third stage involves radiological dose calculation. For humans, this kind of calculation is internationally codified by the ICRP, that provides both models and associated dose coefficients. For non-human biota, this task is a new field of investigations and no international consensus exists at the present time. We thus propose a computer tool to evaluate the dose rate by which the energy produced by ionising radiations is deposited in representative organisms of non-human biota. This energy depends on several parameters, describing the geometry of the relative position of the ionising source and the target, in association with the main properties of the latter. Concerning the source, the radiation type (alpha, beta or gamma) should be taken into account as well as the energy emissions of the concerned nuclides. The target-organism is described by its geometry (assimilated to an ellipsoid characterised by its three axes), its chemical composition and its lifestyle (exposure pathways, dietary habits, behaviour). E.D.E.N. (Elementary Dose Evaluation for Natural environment) is the operational code that we are developing to evaluate the Dose Per Unit of Concentration (expressed in Gy.time-1 / Bq.mass-1 or Bq.volume-1) due to internal and external exposures of any non-human organism to any radionuclide. A user-friendly interface is provided to build the exposure scenario of interest, characterising the target and the sources involved. Several cases are presented to illustrate the possibilities of E.D.E.N. (author)

  6. Absorbed dose distributions in a tissue-equivalent absorber for Bremsstrahlung produced at the beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Pisharody, M; Berkvens, P; Colomp, P

    2000-01-01

    The absorbed-dose distributions for Bremsstrahlung, incident on a tissue-equivalent phantom, were measured with LiF : Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters at two insertion device beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The measurements were carried out for two different electron beam energies of 4 and 6 GeV. The corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra and power were measured using a high-resolution lead glass total absorption calorimeter. The results are compared with similar measurements carried out at other facilities. The normalized Bremsstrahlung absorbed dose in a cross-sectional area of 100 mm sup sup 2 , at a depth of 150 mm of the phantom, was measured as 6.1 and 3.6 kGy h sup sup - sup sup 1 W sup sup - sup sup 1 for the corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra of 4 and 6 GeV.

  7. Comparison of contributions to the equivalent dose of dosimetric traps by using CW-OSL curves and LM-OSL curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a process for measuring doses from ionizing radiation by using light for the stimulation. The process is called as infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) when the stimulation light is in the infrared region. IRSL has been extensively used for dating of feldspars. Equivalent dose (ED) is very important parameter for dating. In this study, The ED of pot shard taken from archaeological salvage excavation at Bueyuekardic-Erzincan, has been determined as 6.48±0.05Gy by using multiple-aliquot continuos wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) decay curves. ED contributions of dosimetric traps have been discussed by converting CW-OSL decay curves to the linear modulation optically stimulated luminescence (LM-OSL) decay curves. According to the results of ED contributions, it is clear that LM-OSL technique is more successful.

  8. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson William; Lewis Karl; Flaig Thomas; Gonzalez Rene; Schefter Tracey E; Kavanagh Brian D; Stinauer Michelle A; Chidel Mark; Glode Michael; Raben David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. Methods The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions) or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions) t...

  9. Measurement of the neutron fluence and dose spectra using an extended Bonner sphere and a tissue-equivalent proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) set consisting of six polyethylene spheres was modified to enhance its response to a high-energy neutron by putting a lead shell inside a polyethylene moderator. The response matrix of an extended BS was calculated using the MCNPX code and calibrated using a 252Cf neutron source. In order to survey the unknown photon and neutron mixed field, a spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) was constructed and assembled as a portable measurement system. The extended BS and the self-constructed TEPC were employed to determine the dosimetric quantities of the neutron field produced from the thick lead target bombarded by the 2.5 GeV electron beam of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) and the neutron calibration field of Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (KAERI). (authors)

  10. Assessments of conversion coefficients between equivalent dose and accumulated activity using pre-dose scanning images of patients subjected to radioiodine treatment and the Fax/Egs4 computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioiodine is a technique for treatment of thyroid cancer. In this technique, the patients are submitted to the incorporation of the radioactive substance sodium iodide (Na131I), which reacts with physiologically metastasis, thyroid tissue remains of and other organs and tissues of the human body. The locations of these reactions are known as areas of highest concentration, hipercaptured areas, hiperconcentrator areas, ''hot areas'' or organ-sources and are viewed through images of nuclear medicine scan known as pre-dose (front and rear). To obtain these images, the patient receives, orally, a quantity of 131I with low activity (±74 MBq) and is positioned in the chamber of flicker. According to the attendance of hot areas shown in the images, the doctor determines the nuclear activity to be administered in treatment. This analysis is purely qualitative. In this study, the scanning images of pre-dose were adjusted to the dimensions of FAX voxel phantom, and the hot areas correspond to internal sources of the proposed model. Algorithms were developed to generate particles (photons and electrons) in these regions of the FAX. To estimate the coefficients of conversions between equivalent dose and accumulated activity in major radiosensitive organs, FAX and algorithms source were coupled to the Monte Carlo EGS4 code (Electron Gamma Shower, version 4). With these factors is possible to estimate the equivalent doses in the radiosensitive organs and tissues of patients as long as is know the activity administered and the half-life of organic sources. (author)

  11. Assessments of conversion coefficients between equivalent dose and accumulated activity using pre-dose scanning images of patients subjected to radioiodine treatment and the Fax/Egs4 computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioiodine is a technique for treatment of thyroid cancer. In this technique, the patients are submitted to the incorporation of the radioactive substance sodium iodide (Na131I), which reacts with physiologically metastasis, thyroid tissue remains of and other organs and tissues of the human body. The locations of these reactions are known as areas of highest concentration, hipercaptured areas, hiperconcentrator areas, 'hot areas' or organ-sources and are viewed through images of nuclear medicine scan known as pre-dose (front and rear). To obtain these images, the patient receives, orally, a quantity of 131I with low activity (± 74 MBq) and is positioned in the chamber of flicker. According to the attendance of hot areas shown in the images, the doctor determines the nuclear activity to be administered in treatment. This analysis is purely qualitative. In this study, the scanning images of pre-dose were adjusted to the dimensions of FAX voxel phantom, and the hot areas correspond to internal sources of the proposed model. Algorithms were developed to generate particles (photons and electrons) in these regions of the FAX. To estimate the coefficients of conversions between equivalent dose and accumulated activity in major radiosensitive organs, FAX and algorithms source were coupled to the Monte Carlo EGS4 code (Electron Gamma Shower, version 4). With these factors is possible to estimate the equivalent doses in the radiosensitive organs and tissues of patients as long as is know the activity administered and the half-life of organic sources. (author)

  12. Analysis of equivalent dose (H) starting from the exposition (X) received for patient families in myocardial perfusion study with 99mTc-Sestamibi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The myocardial perfusion study with 99mTc-Sestamibi has the major indication frequency for the coronary arterial illness diagnostic, due to its high sensibility and specificity. The patient families that are exposed to this study also receive the radiation of the injected radiopharmaceutical. The punctual source model (Psm) is generally used for the absorbed dose calculation of the radiation coming from patients under any procedure with radiopharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to compare the equivalent doses calculated theoretically (Dat) by means of Psm, regarding the measurements that routinely are made by means of a detector Geiger (Dam), as well as to quantify the maxim equivalent dose to which they are exposed the families of the subjected patients to this procedure. 30 voluntary patients were evaluated with clinical indication for myocardial perfusion study with 99mTc-Sestamibi with acquisition protocol of 1 day: Rest-effort, with dose of 15-30 mCi (555-1110 mBq) respectively. Immediate to each injection of 99mTc-Sestamibi was calculated the Dat, using the equation that the Psm describes, considering a distance of 1 meter; and the exposition speed was measured by means of a detector Geiger at a distance 1 meter to the heart height. The measurements comparison (Dat vs Dam) was realized by means of the test statistical t-student for independent samples, considering a significance level p≤0.05. For the data of the second injection, was realized a regression analysis to evaluate the lineal correlation among both measurements. Immediately after the injection of 15 mCi (555 mBq) of 99mTc-Sestamibi, the values of the Dam (1.37±0.43 mrem, 13.7±4.3 μSv) they differ significantly of the Dat (1.04 mrem, p99mTc-Sestamibi was carried out in an average time of 2.57±0.02 hr, having the patients group a calculated initial activity of 11.14±0.76 mCi (412.2±28.12 mBq). Differences were not observed statistically significant between the Dam (2.76±0.87 mrem

  13. Intercomparison on measurements of the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp(d) in mixed (Neutron-Gamma) fields - An IAEA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within its occupational radiation protection programme, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated and funded an international intercomparison exercise of personal dosemeters to determine the quantity personal dose equivalent in mixed neutron-photon radiation. The objectives of the intercomparison are to assess the capabilities of the dosimetry services in measuring the quantity Hp(10) in mixed neutron-gamma fields; to assist IAEA member states in achieving sufficiently accurate dosimetry; and, if necessary, to provide guidelines for improvements (not simply a test of the performance of the existing dosimetry service). The intercomparison is directed to passive dosemeters to determine, in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields, either these two components separately or the total personal dose equivalent. The intercomparison consists of two phases Phase I - Type-test intercomparison: irradiation in selected calibration fields and results used to improve dosimetric procedures of participating laboratories, where needed. Phase II - Simulated workplace field intercomparison: irradiation in radiation fields similar to those in workplaces as a final check of performance. The exercise revealed clear deficiencies in the methodology used by several laboratories and necessitated a detailed analysis of the existing discrepancies. This papers summaries the finding and conclusions for radiation fields similar to those found in nuclear industry. (authors)

  14. Dose imaging in a thorax phantom with lung-equivalent volume at the epithermal neutron beam of LVR-15 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics, University of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy)], E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it; Vanossi, E. [Department of Energy, Polytechnic of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy); Bartesaghi, G. [Department of Physics, University of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy); Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Milan (Italy); Mariani, M. [Department of Energy, Polytechnic of Milan (Italy); Negri, A. [Department of Physics, University of Milan (Italy); INFN-National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Milan (Italy); Burian, J.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V.; Rejchrt, J. [Department of Reactor Physics, NRI Rez, plc (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-15

    A thorax phantom has been designed, consisting of PMMA and PE plates containing a cavity filled with a laboratory-made lung-substitute. Fricke-gel dosimeters have been placed in the lung-substitute volume, and the phantom has been irradiated at the epithermal column of LVR-15 reactor. Absorbed dose images have been obtained for both gamma radiation and charged particles emitted in the {sup 10}B reactions with thermal neutrons. Measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations have been performed too, in order to attain inter-comparison of results.

  15. A new film badge for the measurement of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using the gliding-shadow method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gliding-shadow method is a novel design principle for filters of a personal dosemeter badge which allows the energy and angular dependence of the dosemeter response to be considerably reduced. This is demonstrated with the aid of a new film dosemeter, because film dosemeters are used worldwide in routine individual monitoring predominantly because of their advantages in dose record documentation and in the retrospective investigation of the conditions of exposures. The new film badge was developed and optimized for the new measurand Hp(10)

  16. Effect of background and transport dose on the results of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) measurements in photon fields obtained during the intercomparison 2013 of the African region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arib, M; Herrati, A; Dari, F; Lounis-Mokrani, Z

    2015-12-01

    As part of the intercomparison on the measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10), jointly organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Algerian Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory, for the African region, up to 12 dosemeters were added to the packages of the 28 participants to evaluate the background and transport dose (BGTD), received by the dosemeters before and after their irradiation at the SSDL (environmental irradiations, scanning process at the airports, etc.). Out of the 28 participants, only 17 reported the corresponding BGTD measured values, which lied between 0.03 and 0.8 mSv. The mean measured value of BG was (0.25±0.14) mSv, which is significantly high compared with the lowest dose value used in the intercomparison exercise. The BGTD correction shifted the overall results of the intercomparison from an overestimation of dose (∼8 % before applying BGT dose correction) to an underestimation of dose (-9 % after correction). The measurement protocol and the detailed analysis of the results and applied corrections are discussed in this paper. PMID:25433048

  17. Influence of the neutron spectral distribution in the personal equivalent dose evaluation in mixed fields (neutron, γ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Related to the Argentina National Personal Dosimeters Intercomparison Program, a study of the personal dosimeters performance applied to mixed fields have been carried out. The main task was to obtain the neutron spectrum influence on the detectors response while using the commercial algorithms available. The irradiations have been made following the ISO 8529 recommendations, with an AmBe source and two realistic fields from RA-1 experimental reactor. The realistic neutron spectrum was characterised applying the Bonner Sphere System, based on 3He detector, MCNP4B and LOHUI82 codes for the response analysis and its later deconvolution. All national laboratories involved in mixed fields dose measurements were invited. The exercise was completed by 60% of the laboratories. In this work, the evaluation of the results is presented, showing the high importance of the work places spectra characterization. (author)

  18. Investigation of radiation protection instruments based on tissue-equivalent proportional counters. Results of a Eurados intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose-equivalent quantities which are recommended in radiation protection for environmental monitoring of penetrating radiation from external sources, are defined as the dose equivalents at specified points in the 30 cm diameter, tissue-equivalent ICRU sphere (ICRU, 1985). For area monitoring, the dose equivalent in 10 mm depth in the ICRU sphere, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), is suggested. In the case of neutron radiation, the appropriate calibration quantity is the neutron fluence Φ. The neutron fluence to ambient dose-equivalent conversion factor, hΦ = H*(10)/Φ, is a complicated function of the neutron energy reflecting the energy dependence of the kerma factor, the quality factor and the radiation transport in the ICRU sphere. An ideal dose-equivalent meter for neutrons should be sufficiently sensitive and should have a reading, M, so that the fluence response, M/Φ, is identical to the conversion factor, hΦ, over the entire range of neutron energies encountered in practice, i.e. from thermal neutrons to at least 15 MeVΘ. However, neutron monitors currently in use clearly fail to meet these requirements. The operational quantity, H*(10), is recommended by the ICRU as an estimator for the effective dose equivalent, Heff, for penetrating radiations. The depth of 10 mm was chosen as a compromise between the appropriate neutron energy dependence and sufficient sensitivity for photons below 50 keV

  19. On the Applicability of the Thermal Dose Cumulative Equivalent Minutes Metric to the Denaturation of Bovine Serum Albumin in a Polyacrylamide Tissue Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal dose has been proposed for various hyperthermic cancer treatment modalities as a measure of heat-induced tissue damage. However, the applicability of current thermal dose metrics to tissue is not well understood, particularly at the temperatures and rates of heating relevant to ablative cancer therapy using High-Intensity Focussed Ultrasound (HIFU). In this work, we assess whether the most widely employed thermal dose metric, Cumulative Equivalent Minutes (CEM), can adequately quantify heat-induced denaturation in a tissue-mimicking material (phantom) consisting of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins embedded in a polyacrylamide matrix. The phantom is exposed to various temperature profiles and imaged under controlled lighting conditions against a black background as it denatures and becomes progressively more opaque. Under the assumption that the mean backscattered luminous intensity provides a good measure of the extent of BSA denaturation, we establish a relationship between the amount of thermal damage caused to the phantom, exposure time, and temperature. We demonstrate that, for monotonically increasing and bounded temperature profiles, the maximal degree to which the phantom can denature is dependent on the peak temperature it reaches, irrespective of exposure duration. We also show that when the CEM is computed using the commonly employed piecewise-constant approximation of the parameter R, the CEM values corresponding to the same degree of damage delivered using different temperature profiles do not agree well with each other in general.

  20. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  1. Calculation Monte Carlo equivalent dose to organs in a treatment of prostate with Brachytherapy of high rate; Calculo Monte Carlo de dosis equivalente a organos en un tratamiento de prostata con braquiterapia de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C.; Vijande, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs when applies brachytherapy high dose (HDR) with sources of 60 Co or 192 Go to a localized carcinoma of the prostate. The results are compared with those reported in the literature on treatment with protons and intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy. (Author)

  2. Choice of conversion factors to the shallow and deep dose equivalents for use in a U.S. personnel dosimetry performance testing programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1981, the Health Physics Society Standards Committee adopted a standard that will be used in a future mandatory U.S. personnel dosimetry performance testing programme. In this standard, a set of factors is specified for converting from the quantities generally used to characterize the radiation fields in which radiation protection instruments are calibrated to the shallow and the deep dose equivalent specified for reporting the results of future performance tests. For photons, the choice of these conversion factors was the cause of considerable controversy. For this reason, it was decided to publish this relatively detailed discussion of the considerations which were the basis for the choice of all the factors used. (author)

  3. Calculation by the Monte Carlo method of the equivalent dose received by a human fetus from gamma sources localized in the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New uterus positions are proposed and worked out in detail to evaluate the exposure of the human fetus to radiation originated in the gastrointestinal-tract during the pregnancy period. In our evaluation each organ in the gastrointestinal-tract namely stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, ascendent colon, descendent colon, sigmoid and rectum was individually considered. Changes in the position of each of these organs were studied as a function of the uterus growth. There were evaluated cases in which the uterus was in three, six and nine month pregnancy for photon energies of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, 0.50 and 4 MeV. The average equivalent doses (H) of the uterus, in the uterine wall and in each one of the twelve compartiments which we considered as sub-divisions of the uterus were also determined and discussed. (Auhor)

  4. Investigation of a new LiF TLD individual dosimeter for measuring personal dose equivalent Hp(d) on different phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the design of a new LiF TL dosimeter optimized for measuring personal dose equivalent, Hp(d). The results obtained with four types of different phantoms, i.e. a PMMA slab, water slab, ICRU sphere and Alderson Rando phantom, and pertinent conversion coefficients show, that the conversion coefficients for the TE slab phantom are suitable for the calibration of TLD individual dosimeters on a PMMA slab phantom. In the energy range 17 keV to 1250 keV the energy response for H0(10) and Hp(0.07) is within-20% to 8.4% for frontal irradiation. For angles within +- 60 degree the dosimeters indicate Hp (10) within 0 to 22.5%, and Hp(0.07) within-11.1% to 1.3%. respectively

  5. Investigation of a new LiF TLD individual dosimeter for measuring personal dose equivalent Hp(d) on different phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes a new LiF TLD dosimeter designed for measuring personal dose equivalent, Hp(d). Its energy and angular response have been studied in detail on a PMMA slab phantom using the conversion factors for TE slab phantom. According to the results obtained with four types of different conversion coefficients and phantoms, i.e. a PMMA slab, Water slab, ICRU sphere and Alderson Rando phantom, the conversion coefficients for the TE slab phantom are suitable for the calibration of TLD individual dosimeters on PMMA slab phantom. In the energy range 17 keV to 1250 KeV the energy response for Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) is energy independent within -20% to 8.4% for frontal irradiation. For angles within ±60 deg the new TLD dosimeters indicate Hp(10) within 0 to 22.5% and Hp(0.07) within -11.1% to 1.3%, respectively. (authors)

  6. TH-C-19A-01: Analytic Design Method to Make a 2D Planar, Segmented Ion Chamber Water-Equivalent for Proton Dose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Quality Assurance (QA) measurements of proton therapy fields must accurately measure steep longitudinal dose gradients as well as characterize the dose distribution laterally. Currently, available devices for two-dimensional field measurements perturb the dose distribution such that routine QA measurements performed at multiple depths require multiple field deliveries and are time consuming. Methods: A design procedure for a two-dimensional detector array is introduced whereby the proton energy loss and scatter are adjusted so that the downstream dose distribution is maintained to be equivalent to that which would occur in uniform water. Starting with the design for an existing, functional two-dimensional segmented ion chamber prototype, a compensating material is introduced downstream of the detector to simultaneously equate the energy loss and lateral scatter in the detector assembly to the values in water. An analytic formalism and procedure is demonstrated to calculate the properties of the compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. The resulting design is validated with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: With respect to the specific prototype design considered, the results indicate that a graphite compensating layer of the proper dimensions can yield proton beam range perturbation less than 0.1mm and beam sigma perturbation less than 2% across the energy range of therapeutic proton beams. Conclusion: We have shown that, for a 2D gas-filled detector array, a graphite-compensating layer can balance the energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering relative to uniform water. We have demonstrated an analytic formalism and procedure to determine a compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-04-2-0022. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations

  7. Calculation of conversion factor of Kerma in the air for ambient dose equivalent in radiotherapy; Calculo dos fatores de conversao de Kerma no ar para equivalente de dose ambiental em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marco Antonio Frota

    2000-03-01

    This work aims to estimate the average conversion factor of Kerma in air to H {sup *} (10) using photon beams coming from clinic linear accelerators, transmitted through concrete walls of a radiotherapic treatment room. The transmitted photon spectra by both 1 meter and 2 meters concrete walls, in an area of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2}, were calculated when the primary beam impart in an angle of 0 deg. The (secondary) photon beams transmitted respectively by 0,5 meter, 1,0 meter, 1,0 meter and 2,0 meter concrete walls, after they scattered by an angle of 90 deg in a cylindric phantom inside the room, were also determined. Generally, 50 millions of histories were computed for each simulation made for the primary beam. For the 90 deg spread, the number of histories was 100 millions. The computational code used on this work was the MCNP4B. The most common clinic accelerators used on radiotheraphic treatments were used on this work CLINAC-4, CLINAC-6, CLINAC-18 and CLINAC-2500. From the spectra analysis obtained in this work, it was possible to dispose the conversion factor for realistic beams found in radiotherapeutic establishment. (author)

  8. Determination of the Neutron and Photon Dose Equivalent at Work Places in Nuclear Facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 1: Measurements and Data Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-scaled measurement program of neutron and photon dose equivalent rates was organized in 1992 and 1993 at the nuclear power plant at Ringhals and at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for spent fuel elements at Oskarshamn. The aim was to evaluate the uncertainty in these kinds of measurements in realistic radiation fields. For that purpose, groups experienced with different techniques and - in some cases - several groups with a particular technique, were invited to take part. Besides traditional rem counters, the following categories of instruments were involved: Bonner spheres systems, proton recoil detectors, tissue equivalent proportional counters, super heated drop detectors, GM counters and different types of personal dosemeters. Part I reports all initial results as presented by the individual participants as well as a first compilation of the results. A later report, Part II, will give detailed analysis of the results. The conclusions will be published in the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all 14 papers

  9. Use of Concept of Chemotherapy-Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose to Provide Quantitative Evaluation of Contribution of Chemotherapy to Local Tumor Control in Chemoradiotherapy Cervical Cancer Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of the contribution of chemotherapy to local tumor control in chemoradiotherapy cervical cancer trials in terms of the concept of the biologically effective dose. Methods and Materials: The local control rates of both arms of each study (radiotherapy vs. radiotherapy plus chemotherapy) reported from randomized controlled trials of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer were reviewed and expressed using the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) as TCP = exp(-exp E), where E is the logarithm of cell kill. By combining the two TCP values from each study, we calculated the chemotherapy-related log cell kill as Ec = ln[(lnTCPRadiotherapy)/(lnTCPChemoradiotherapy)]. Assuming a range of radiosensitivities (α = 0.1-0.5 Gy-1) and taking the calculated log cell kill, we calculated the chemotherapy-BED, and using the linear quadratic model, the number of 2-Gy fractions corresponding to each BED. The effect of a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities (α Gy-1) on the TCP was also explored. Results: The chemotherapy-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions range was 0.2-4 and was greater in tumors with lower radiosensitivity. In those tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity (α = 0.3 Gy-1), the equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions was 0.6-1.3, corresponding to 120-260 cGy of extra dose. The opportunities for clinically detectable improvement are only available in tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity with α = 0.22-0.28 Gy-1. The dependence of TCP on the tumor volume decreases as the radiosensitivity increases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the contribution of chemotherapy to the TCP in cervical cancer is expected to be clinically detectable in larger and less-radiosensitive tumors

  10. Intercomparison on measurements of the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp(d) in mixed (neutron-gamma) fields - an IAEA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Within its occupational radiation protection programme, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated and funded an international intercomparison exercise of personal dosimeters to determine the quantity personal dose equivalent in mixed neutron-photon radiation. Many IAEA member states have difficulties in calibrating neutron dosimeters and in accessing neutron calibration facilities and information on the energy and angle dependence of dosimeter response to photons and neutrons is not available to most participants. The objectives of the intercomparison are to assess the capabilities of the dosimetry services in measuring the quantity Hp(10) in mixed neutron-gamma fields; to assist IAEA member states in achieving sufficiently accurate dosimetry; and, if necessary, to provide guidelines for improvements (not simply a test of the performance of the existing dosimetry service). The intercomparison is directed to passive dosimeters to determine, in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields, either these two components separately or the total personal dose equivalent. The intercomparison consists of two phases: phase I - type-test intercomparison: irradiation in selected calibration fields and results used to improve dosimetric procedures of participating laboratories, where needed. Phase II - simulated workplace field intercomparison: irradiation in radiation fields similar to those in workplaces as a final check of performance. During the first phase, about 500 dosimeters were irradiated with 16 different radiation qualities. The readings reported by participants were compared to the reference values derived with primary standards at the two irradiating facilities. Only one third of the participants reported results that would enable them to pass the performance test without further improvement of the dosimetric procedures. This phase revealed clear deficiencies in the methodology used by several laboratories and necessitated a detailed analysis of

  11. Exposure dose and personal dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of measuring the occupational exposure dose and of its management is explained. The Law Concerning Prevention from Radiation Hazards enacted in Japan in 1957, has been the basis of radiation protection with modifications like the incorporation of ICRP recommendations. Three sorts of radiological quantity (dose) are defined as physical, protective and practical ones. As well, the administrative quantity regards the protective quantity as the practical one. Thereby, the practical 1 cm dose equivalent is administrative effective dose, comparable to the protective effective dose limit. The practical dose equivalent subjected to measurement in the aligned and expanded radiation field involves 3 states of ambient, directional and personal ones. The personal dose equivalent is defined to be at d depth in the human body by ICRP but actually in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) tissue equivalent slab phantom, and pragmatically measured with a personal dosimeter. Two kinds of radiation effects are known as deterministic and stochastic. The purpose of radiation protection is to suppress the former effect and to set the acceptable level for the latter, for which the equivalent dose limit and effective dose limit, respectively, are defined. Personal exposure dose of a man working at the aligned and expanded radiation field is measured with a survey-meter. Passive-type personal dosimeters have functions of the dose quantification, energy detection, discrimination of radiation sort and 1 cm/70 mc-m dose equivalent calculation. Total personal dose/y of a man must undergo the evaluation and acceptance from aspects of administrative effective dose limit defined. (T.T.)

  12. Recommendations on good practices in the field of workers radiation protection in the perspective of lowering of the legal limitation of the equivalent dose for the eyes lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As international bodies (ICRP, IAEA) have proposed or accepted a reduction of the equivalent dose limitation for the eyes crystalline lens for workers in situations of planned exposures, this report by the IRSN is an answer to a request made by the ASN for an opinion on expected good practices in terms of radiation protection of workers, particularly within the framework of interventional radiology and in operating rooms where these interventional actions occur. After having recalled the historical context and outlined the differences between different published data, the report identifies professional activities at risk (general aspects, case of interventional radiology, case of brachytherapy, nuclear medicine and medical research, case of industrial activities). It describes the characteristics of good practices in radiation protection in these different environments (general, interventional radiology, and so on) in order to protect workers or to optimise individual exposure. The next part addresses the issue of dose control: choice of dosimetric quantity, ways to assess lens exposure. A set of recommendations is then proposed

  13. Estimates of internal dose equivalent to 22 target organs for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the first of a two-volume tabulation of internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. This volume treats 68 radionuclides, all of mass number less than 150. Intake by inhalation and ingestion is considered. In the former case, the ICRP Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the behavior of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The GI tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in other organs was characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. Dose equivalent per microcurie intake of each parent nuclide is given for 22 target organs with contributions from specified source organs plus surplus activity in the rest of the body. Cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has also been considered in the calculations

  14. Estimation of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) following a hypothetical nuclear power release of radionuclides from a 4- loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety is an essential aspect in design and analysis of nuclear reactors to keep the system in a safe condition in case of accidents. One vital issue in safety assessment is the management of radiological accident and dispersion of released radionuclides during nuclear accident. With the increase in interest of nuclear energy and its introduction in the overall national energy mix, a corresponding environmental impact and radiological assessment is imperative. Modeling atmospheric dispersion is the first step of such assessments using versatile computer codes. Atmospheric dispersion modeling and radiological safety analysis have been performed for a postulated accident scenario of the genetic Enrico Fermi 4-loop PWR NPP in Trino, a kind of nuclear reactor type to be introduced in Ghana’s energy mix. The postulated procedure considered would be applied Ghana in selecting a suitable site for its nuclear power program as a requirement by licensee. The source term was generated from an inventory of peak radioisotope activities released by using the isotope generation code ORIGEN2. The MACCS2 and RASCAL 3.0.5 code were employed to perform the atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling. The idea is to select the best method that can better predict the radiological assessment in terms of radionuclide concentration and released doses from a nuclear facility. The codes were used to estimate the Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) and investigate how the release would be distributed to human organs as a function of distance. The adopted methodology was the use of predominant site-specific meteorological data and dispersion modeling. The study considered calculation of release dose of three selected radionuclide (Cs-137, 1-131 and Sr-90) due to their health implication on the environment during accident conditions. The results indicate that the maximum TEDE value of 1.2E-09Sv and 3.8E-80 were estimated from RASCAL and MACCS2 code respectively at a distance of 50km

  15. SU-E-T-55: Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) Comparison Between Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy and Conventional External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The goal of this research is to calculate and compare the Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) between permanent prostate Iodine-125 implant brachytherapy as monotherapy with the BED of conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: A retrospective study of 605 patients treated with Iodine-125 seed implant was performed in which physician A treated 274 patients and physician B treated 331 patients. All the Brachytherapy treatment plans were created using VariSeed 8 planning system. The Iodine-125 seed source activities and loading patterns varied slightly between the two physicians. The prescription dose is 145 Gy to PTV for each patient. The BED and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) were calculated based on the TG 137 formulas. The BED for conventional EBRT of the prostate given in our institution in 2Gy per fraction for 38 fractions was calculated and compared. Results: Physician A treated 274 patients with an average BED of 123.92±0.87 Gy and an average TCP of 99.20%; Physician B treated 331 patients with an average BED of 124.87±1.12 Gy and an average TCP of 99.30%. There are no statistically significant differences (T-Test) between the BED and TCP values calculated for these two group patients.The BED of the patients undergoing conventional EBRT is calculated to be 126.92Gy. The BED of the patients treated with permanent implant brachytherapy and EBRT are comparable. Our BED and TCP values are higher than the reported values by TG 137 due to higher Iodine-125 seed activity used in our institution. Conclusion: We calculated the BED,a surrogate of the biological response to a permanent prostate brachytherapy using TG 137 formulas and recommendation. The TCP of better than 99% is calculated for these patients. A clinical outcome study of these patients correlating the BED and TCP values with PSA and Gleason Levels as well as patient survival is warranted

  16. Measurement of the stochastic radial dose distribution for a 30-MeV proton beam using a wall-less tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, S; Sato, T; Ogawa, T

    2016-02-01

    The frequency distribution of the lineal energy, y, of a 30-MeV proton beam was measured as a function of the radial distance from the beam path, and the dosed mean of [Formula: see text] was obtained to investigate the radial dependence of [Formula: see text] A wall-less tissue-equivalent proportional counter, in a cylindrical volume with simulated diameters of 0.36, 0.72 and 1.44 µm was used for the measurement of y distributions, yf(y). The measured values of yf(y) summed in the radial direction agreed fairly well with the corresponding data taken from the microdosimetric calculations using the PHITS code. The [Formula: see text] value of the 30-MeV proton beam presented its smallest value at r = 0.0 and gradually increased with radial distance, and the [Formula: see text] values of heavy ions such as iron showed rapid decrease with radial distance. This experimental result demonstrated that the stochastic deposited energy distribution of high-energy protons in the microscopic region is rather constant in the core as well as in the penumbra region of the track structure. PMID:25956785

  17. Air kerma to personal dose equivalent conversion factors for ICRU and ISO recommended slab phantoms for photons from 20 keV to 1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report summarizes the studies carried out at ENEA-AMB-PRO-IRP (Institute for Radiation Protection) that were addressed to the determination of air kerma to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for two practical phantoms as proposed by ICRU (International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurements) and by ISO (International Standard Organization) for photon personal dosimeters' calibration procedure. The analyses, developed using the MCNP Monte Carlo code, were mainly aimed at establishing which of the two proposed phantoms better approximates the ICRU theoretical one. Furthermore a complete tabulation of the conversion coefficients is supplied for monoenergetic photon beams from 20 keV to 1 MeV as well as for the two ISO X-ray reference series Wide Spectrum and Narrow Spectrum. The study has been performed in the framework of the CEC Contract F13P-CT92-0064 'The Measurement of the Spectral and Angular Distribution of External Radiations in Workplace and Implications for Personal Dosimetry

  18. A Prototype Ionisation Chamber as a Secondary Standard for the Measurement of Personal Dose Equivalent, Hp(10), on a Slab Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and technical characteristics of a secondary standard chamber for measuring the conventionally true value of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), on a slab phantom are presented. The chamber was optimised to get a nearly constant response with respect to Hp(10) for photon energies from about 10 keV to 1400 keV and for angles of incidence, alpha, from 0 deg. to 75 deg. . Thus, once calibrated at the facility of the calibration laboratory, the Hp(10) chamber can be used at other facilities without any need to consider the spectral differences of radiation fields of the same nominal radiation quality but generated by two different facilities. This is a great advantage over the procedure recommended in ISO/FDIS 4037-3, according to which these differences have to be considered for low energy photon radiation and may lead to differences of the conversion coefficients from air kerma, Ka, to Hp(10) of up to several tens of per cent. (author)

  19. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ - supplementary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Jr, D E; Pleasant, J C; Killough, G G

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe revisions in the SFACTOR computer code and to provide useful documentation for that program. The SFACTOR computer code has been developed to implement current methodologies for computing the average dose equivalent rate S(X reverse arrow Y) to specified target organs in man due to 1 ..mu..Ci of a given radionuclide uniformly distributed in designated source orrgans. The SFACTOR methodology is largely based upon that of Snyder, however, it has been expanded to include components of S from alpha and spontaneous fission decay, in addition to electron and photon radiations. With this methodology, S-factors can be computed for any radionuclide for which decay data are available. The tabulations in Appendix II provide a reference compilation of S-factors for several dosimetrically important radionuclides which are not available elsewhere in the literature. These S-factors are calculated for an adult with characteristics similar to those of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's Reference Man. Corrections to tabulations from Dunning are presented in Appendix III, based upon the methods described in Section 2.3. 10 refs.

  20. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the equivalent dose (EUD) uniform as a parameter of quality of a plan; Evaluacion de la dosis equivalente uniform (EUD) como parametro de calidad de un plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Molla, R.; Quiros Higueras, J. D.; Perez Calatayud, J.; Marco Blancas, N. de; Bonaque, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of uniform equivalent dose (EUD) as a parameter of quality of dosimetric plans in radiotherapy. Has been sought a possible relationship with points in the dose volume histogram and exposed the difficulties encountered in the application of the evaluation with the EUD in clinical practice. Suggested a possible solution to these difficulties using the EUD (D98%). (Author)

  2. Aircraft crew radiation workplaces: Comparison of measured and calculated ambient dose equivalent rate data using the EURADOS in-flight radiation data base

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beck, P.; Bartlett, D.; Lindborg, L.; McAulay, I.; Schnuer, K.; Schraube, H.; Spurný, František

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 2 (2006), s. 182-189. ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : aircraft crew radiation * carbon ions beam * measurement results Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2006

  3. Estimation of the contribution of neutrons to the equivalent dose for personnel occupationally exposed and public in medical facilities: X-ray with energy equal or greater than 10MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and Occupationally Staff Exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents an estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  4. Estimation of the contribution by neutrons to the equivalent dose for exposed occupationally personnel and people in medical use facilities: X rays of equal or superior energy to 10 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and occupationally staff exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents and estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  5. Virtual reality technology used to estimate radiation doses in nuclear installations; Utilizacao de ambientes virtuais na estimativa de dose de radiacao em instalacoes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, Silas Cordeiro

    2008-03-15

    The physical integrity of people when walking in places subjected to radiation can be preserved by following some rules. Among these rules are safe limits of radiation level, proximity of radiation sources, time of exposition to radiation sources, and a combination of these factors. In this way, previous training and simulations of operation proceedings to be executed in places subjected to radiation help to better prepare the course in such places, minimizing the absorbed dose. On the other hand, virtual reality is a technology applicable in several areas, enabling the training and simulation of real places and hypothetical scenarios, with a good level of realism, but without danger if compared to the same activities in the real world. As a virtual environment does not presents any health risks, it is possible to train workers beforehand to several operation or maintenance scenarios. In this virtual environment, the dose tax distribution can be visualized, and the dose absorbed by the worker, represented and simulated in the virtual environment by a virtual character (avatar) can be shown. Therefore, the tasks to be done can be better planned, evaluating the workers actions and the performance so to reduce failures and health risks. Finally, this work presents a tool to build and navigate in virtual environments, enabling the training of activities in nuclear facilities. To that end is proposed a methodology to modify and adapt a free game engine. (author)

  6. Neutron Dosimetry with Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters: Their Limitations and How to Deal with Them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-pressure tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are instruments that measure absorbed dose based on the Bragg-Gray cavity theory. By keeping the filling pressure low, the energy loss of individual charged particles crossing the detector cavity corresponds to the energy loss in tissue over distances of the order of a few micrometres. However, the efficacy of the TEPC as a meter for ambient dose equivalent H*(10) deteriorates rapidly below a few hundred keV, reflecting the differences between the TEPC and the artifact used in the definition of H*(10); the typical TEPC has walls roughly 1 to 2 mm thick, whereas H*(10) is defined at a point 10 mm below the surface of the 30-cm-diam ICRU sphere. Several laboratories have investigated approaches to improving the TEPC ambient dose equivalent response, but all have involved modifying the detectors themselves by increasing the wall thickness, reducing the filling pressure, altering the gas composition, or some combination there of. Each of these approaches has positive and negative aspects, but, generally speaking, improving an instrument's ambient dose equivalent response in one energy region tends to degrade the response in other regions. However, National Physical Laboratory has, for several years, been refining analytical methods for improving the H*(10) response of TEPCs, which essentially use the shape of the TEPC spectrum, and how it varies with neutron energy to determine a correction factor for the measured ambient dose equivalent. This is achieved by comparing the measured spectra to a catalog of theoretical spectra, generated by a Monte Carlo code developed by the author over many years

  7. Determination of the equivalent doses due to the ingestion of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series presents in drinking waters of the region of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper determined the original dose equivalents from radionuclides of uranium and thorium series in a drinking water of well which is supplied to the population of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil. The collected waters are near to the mineralized phlegmatic bodies in rose quartz and amazonite feldspar. Radiometric measurements performed on the feldspar vein point out counting ratios surrounding 30000 cps and the analysis of collected samples of minerals presented tenors for the 226Ra and 219Pb varying from 0.50 to 2.30 Bq/sw. For determination of concentration of radionuclides UTotal, 226Ra, 228Ra and 219Pb, found in the not desalinated, two methods were used, spectrophotometry with arsenazo and radiochemistry, both realized in the CNEN-LAPOC laboratories. For the calculation of dose equivalent it was taken into consideration the following parameters: the dose coefficients for incorporation by ingestion for public individuals with ages over 17 years (Norma CNEN-NN-3.01, Regulatory Position 3.01/011) and daily ingestion of 4 liters of water, which is over the recommended by the WHO of 2L/day - 1993. The obtained values were compared with the reference value for compromised dose equivalent established by WHO for evaluate the risk potential to the health of population, by ingestion. The radionuclide concentrations in the wells varies from 0.054 to 0.21 Bq/L, resulting dose equivalents of 3.94 x 10-3 mSv/year and 0.17 mSv/year in the studied population

  8. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996; Umweltpolitik. Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Bericht ueber die `Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 1996` richtet sich an Bundestag und Bundesrat und darueber hinaus an alle an Fragen des Strahlenschutzes interessierte Buerger. Der Bericht belegt, dass die Strahlenbelastung der Bevoelkerung im Jahr 1996 gering war und insgesamt durchschnittlich 4 Millisievert (mSv) betrug. Dieser Wert war zu 60% auf natuerliche und zu 40% auf kuenstliche Strahlenquellen zurueckzufuehren. Den wesentlichen Beitrag zur natuerlichen Strahlenbelastung lieferte das radioaktive Gas Radon in Wohnungen. Die zivilisatorische Strahlenexposition der Bevoelkerung wurde fast ausschliesslich durch die Anwendung radioaktiver Stoffe und ionisierender Strahlen in der Medizin im Rahmen der Diagnostik hervorgerufen. Hier bestehen nach wie vor Moeglichkeiten zur Reduktion der Strahlenbelastung. Im Jahre 1996 waren 340 000 Personen beruflich

  9. Energy spectrum measurement and dose rate estimation of natural neutrons in Tibet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 徐勇军; 刘森林; 汪传高

    2015-01-01

    In this work, natural neutron spectra at nine sites in Tibet region were measured using a multi-sphere neutron spectrometer. The altitude-dependence of the spectra total fluence rate and ambient dose equivalent rate were analyzed. From the normalized natural neutron spectra at different altitudes, the spectrum fractions for neutrons of greater than 0.1 MeV do not differ obviously, while those of the thermal neutrons differ greatly from each other. The total fluence rate, effective dose rate and the ambient dose equivalent rate varied with the altitude according to an exponential law.

  10. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Meungwong, Pooriwat [Lampang Cancer Hospital, Lampang (Thailand); Traisathit, Patrinee [Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan [aculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiei (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale > or = grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with > or = grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  11. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (1). Overview of the lens, radiogenic cataract, and equivalent dose limit for the lens newly recommended by the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued the statement on tissue reactions. This stimulated interest in many countries. The Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye was established in the Japanese Health Physics Society, and in April 2013, started discussion about the international developments and recent studies related to the dosimetry of the lens of the eye. This committee now publishes the interim report consisting of parts I-VI. Of these, this Part I overviews the structure of the eye and lens, cataract types and the scientific evidence of its new dose threshold and equivalent dose limit newly recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  12. Improved tumour response prediction with equivalent uniform dose in pre-clinical study using direct intratumoural infusion of liposome-encapsulated 186Re radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crucial to all cancer therapy modalities is a strong correlation between treatment and effect. Predictability of therapy success/failure allows for the optimization of treatment protocol and aids in the decision of whether additional treatment is necessary to prevent tumour progression. This work evaluated the relationship between cancer treatment and effect for intratumoural infusions of liposome-encapsulated 186Re to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts of nude rats. Absorbed dose calculations using a dose-point kernel convolution technique showed significant intratumoural dose heterogeneity due to the short range of the beta-particle emissions. The use of three separate tumour infusion locations improved dose homogeneity compared to a single infusion location as a result of a more uniform radioactivity distribution. An improved dose-response correlation was obtained when using effective uniform dose (EUD) calculations based on a generic set of radiobiological parameters (R2 = 0.84) than when using average tumour absorbed dose (R2 = 0.22). Varying radiobiological parameter values over ranges commonly used for all types of tumours showed little effect on EUD calculations, which suggests that individualized parameter use is of little significance as long as the intratumoural dose heterogeneity is taken into consideration in the dose-response relationship. The improved predictability achieved when using EUD calculations for this cancer therapy modality may be useful for treatment planning and evaluation.

  13. Equivalent Equilibria.

    OpenAIRE

    Kandori, Michihiro

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides a way to formulate a general equilibrium model with both infinite time horizon and continuous uncertainty by 2.space, and provides a si mple proof of the equiva-lence of equilibria in complete markets, inc omplete markets with sequential trading, and incomplete markets with one-shot trades in single consumer economies. The proof is general in the sense that it does not assume time-homogeneous structure nor smo othness of preferences. The result guarantees that one can avoi...

  14. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir ≤0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or

  15. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs; Estudo da radiacao espalhada e produzida pela blindagem de concreto de salas de radioterapia e seus efeitos sobre doses equivalentes nos orgaos dos pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, K.L.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Gavazza, S.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Gomes, R.G.; Silva, M.G., E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: sergiogavazza@yahoo.com, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: raphaelmsm@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com, E-mail: maglosilva15@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Thalhofer, J.L.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: jardellt@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, R.F.G., E-mail: raphaelfgsantos@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Anhanguera, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia

    2015-07-01

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  16. Radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren bone-coal power station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren Bonc-coalPower Station (BCPS) was investigated systematically. The γ radiation dose ratelevel in the environment, the content of 238U and 226Ra in the ambient soil and thefarmland in the direction of downwind, the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 40Kand 222Rn, as well as α potential energy in air, and the concentrations of natural Uand Th in effluent are all higher than the corresponding values of the reference site.The additional annual effective dose equivalent to the residents living in the housesmade of bone-coal cinder brick is 2.7mSv.

  17. Experimental research of high-pressure tissue equivalent ionization chamber used for detecting in mixed radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design principle of tissue equivalent ionization chamber based on the theory of recombination was described, and the area neutron and gamma dose equivalent instrument was designed. This detection system can indirectly acquire the information of the ambient dose equivalent, the absorbed dose and the quality factor of the mixed radiation field using only one probe. Moreover, the detection system was tested by the accelerator and the standard radiation field. The results indicate that the system has good energy response and sensitivity to the neutron and gamma radiation, especially to the high energy gamma radiation and the neutrons with energy ranging from thermal to dozens of MeV. The uncertainty can be controlled within ±50%, while the dose rate of the radiation is above dozens of μSv/h, so this detection system can serve as the necessary measurement instruments and monitoring technology for the places having the mixed radiation field of neutron and gamma ray. (authors)

  18. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Meier, Matthias M.; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests

  19. Estimation of collective effective dose equivalent commitment to the population due to the airborne effluent from coal-fired power plants in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main exposure pathways of natural radionuclides in airborne effluent from CFRP (Coal-Fired Power Plants) are: 1. internal exposure of inhaling fly ash; 2. external exposure of surface deposition; 3. internal exposure of ingesting radionuclide through the food chain. Using the method and model adopted in 'exposure from Coal-Fired power plants' in UNSCEAR 1982 report, the collective dose to population living within a 80 km radius surrounding CFPP with capacity of 25 MW(e) or more was estimated. In addition, the collective dose from the CFPP with capacity of 0.5 ∼ 25 MW(e) was considered too. The estimation results show: 1. Collective dose from CFPP with capacity of 25 MW(e) or more and 0.5 ∼ 25 MW(e) is 2.4 x 103 man·Sv·a-1 and 0.5 x 103 man·Sv·a-1 respectively. The total collective dose from CFPP of China with capacity of 0.5 MW(e) or more is 2.9 x 103 man·Sv·a-1. 2. The collective dose from CFPP for generating 1 GWa electric energy is 37 man·Sv·(GWa)-1. 3. The critical pathway of natural radionuclides exposure from CFPP is inhalation. The critical nuclide is Th-232. And the contribution of Th-232 is about 57%. (2 tabs.)

  20. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields; Revision didactica del sistema de magnitudes operativas ICRU para la evaluacion de la dosis equivalente en campos externos de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H{sub E} and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  1. Incorporation of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids into lipid pools when given as supplements providing doses equivalent to typical intakes of oily fish 1 2 3 4

    OpenAIRE

    Browning, Lucy M; Walker, Celia G.; Mander, Adrian P; West, Annette L.; Madden, Jackie; Gambell, Joanna M; Young, Stephen; Wang, Laura; Jebb, Susan A.; Calder, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Estimation of the intake of oily fish at a population level is difficult. The measurement of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in biological samples may provide a useful biomarker of intake. Objective: We identified the most appropriate biomarkers for the assessment of habitual oily fish intake and changes in intake by elucidating the dose- and time-dependent response of EPA and DHA incorporation into various biological samples that represent roles in fatt...

  2. Estimates of internal dose equivalent to 22 target organs for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel-cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the second of a two-volume tabulation of internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. This volume treats 78 radionuclides, all of mass number greater than 200. Intake by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the behavior of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in other organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. Fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each parent nuclide is given for 22 target organs with contributions from specified source organs plus surplus activity in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has also been incorporated into these tabulations. Dose conversion factors are also presented in four sets of summary tables for easy reference. In addition to the foregoing tabulations, in which the value Q/sub α/ = 10 has been assumed for the quality factor corresponding to alpha emissions, an alternative table of dose conversion factors for alpha-emitting nuclides with Q/sub α/ = 20 is provided. Specific computational details in which the present calculations depart from the general methodologies presented in the previous volume of this series are discussed

  3. Determination of the equivalent doses due to the ingestion of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series presents in drinking waters of the region of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil; Determinacao das doses equivalentes devido a ingestao de radionuclideos das series do uranio e torio presentes em aguas de consumo do municipio de Santa Luzia, estado da Paraiba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastura, Valeria F. da S., E-mail: vpastura@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DRSN/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioprotecao e Seguranca Nuclear. Coordenacao de Materias Primas e Minerais; Campos, Thomas F. da C.; Petta, Reinaldo A., E-mail: thomascampos@geologia.ufrn.b, E-mail: petta@geologia.ufrn.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (LARANA/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Radioatividade Natural

    2011-10-26

    This paper determined the original dose equivalents from radionuclides of uranium and thorium series in a drinking water of well which is supplied to the population of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil. The collected waters are near to the mineralized phlegmatic bodies in rose quartz and amazonite feldspar. Radiometric measurements performed on the feldspar vein point out counting ratios surrounding 30000 cps and the analysis of collected samples of minerals presented tenors for the {sup 226}Ra and {sup 219}Pb varying from 0.50 to 2.30 Bq/sw. For determination of concentration of radionuclides U{sub Total}, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 219}Pb, found in the not desalinated, two methods were used, spectrophotometry with arsenazo and radiochemistry, both realized in the CNEN-LAPOC laboratories. For the calculation of dose equivalent it was taken into consideration the following parameters: the dose coefficients for incorporation by ingestion for public individuals with ages over 17 years (Norma CNEN-NN-3.01, Regulatory Position 3.01/011) and daily ingestion of 4 liters of water, which is over the recommended by the WHO of 2L/day - 1993. The obtained values were compared with the reference value for compromised dose equivalent established by WHO for evaluate the risk potential to the health of population, by ingestion. The radionuclide concentrations in the wells varies from 0.054 to 0.21 Bq/L, resulting dose equivalents of 3.94 x 10{sup -3} mSv/year and 0.17 mSv/year in the studied population

  4. Evaluation of the environmental equivalent dose rate using area monitors for neutrons in clinical linear accelerators; Avaliacao da taxa de equivalente de dose ambiente utilizando monitores de area para neutrons em aceleradores lineares clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Ana Paula; Pereira, Walsan Wagner; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da, E-mail: asalgado@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Batista, Delano V.S. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The Neutron Laboratory of the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute - IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, initiated studies on the process of calibration of neutron area monitors and the results of the measurements performed at radiotherapy treatment rooms, containing clinical accelerators

  5. The gliding-shadow method and its application in the design of a new film badge for the measurement of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel design principle for filters of a personal dosemeter badge, the gliding-shadow method, is presented which allows the angular dependence of the dosemeter response to be considerably reduced. This method has been applied to design a two-element film dosemeter. The new film dosemeter is capable of measuring Hp(10) for photons with energies ranging from 17 keV to 1250 keV and angles of incidence up to 75 with a maximum deviation of less than ±40% using a linear combination as the dose calculating algorithm. (orig.)

  6. Epidemiological studies on disturbances of human fetal development in areas with various doses of natural background radiation. I. Relationship between incidences of Down's syndrome or visible malformation and gonad dose equivalent rate of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between environmental radiation to the gonads and incidences of Down's syndrome and visible malformation was analyzed using Kendall's rank correlation method. The subjects, studied during a 3-yr period (1979-1981), were inhabitants of 46 prefectures in Japan that had various dose rates of natural background ionizing radiation. Results showed that the natural background very low-dose radiation rate was not a predominant factor responsible for inducing Down's syndrome or other visible malformations

  7. Ambient Space and Ambient Sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    The ambient is the aesthetic production of the sensation of being surrounded. As a concept, 'ambient' is mostly used in relation to the music genre 'ambient music' and Brian Eno's idea of environmental background music. However, the production of ambient sensations must be regarded as a central...... aspect of the aesthetization of modern culture in general, from architecture, transport and urbanized lifeforms to film, sound art, installation art and digital environments. This presentation will discuss the key aspects of ambient aesthetization, including issues such as objectlessness...

  8. Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S E

    1991-05-01

    Six human males each received 0.56 g phenylalanine (Phe) in the form of 1.0 g aspartame or 12.2 g bovine albumin in 200 ml water or water alone. Venous blood samples collected before consumption and during the following 4 hr were assayed for plasma levels of large, neutral amino acids (LNAA), aspartate, insulin and glucose. The area under the curve for plasma Phe was 40% greater, although not significant, after aspartame compared with albumin intake. The indicated increased clearance rate of plasma Phe after albumin may be caused by the significant increase of insulin, on which aspartame had no effect. There was a significant main effect of aspartame for plasma tyrosine but not for tryptophan, valine, isoleucine or leucine. Plasma aspartate was significantly increased at 0.25 hr after the aspartame intake. The percentage Phe/LNAA decreased slightly in response to albumin but increased 55% after aspartame and remained significantly increased for 2 hr. Tyrosine/LNAA increased and tryptophan/LNAA decreased modestly after aspartame intake. The study showed that the intake of aspartame in a not unrealistically high dose produced a marked and persistent increase of the availability of Phe to the brain, which was not observed after protein intake. The study indicated, furthermore, that Phe was cleared faster from the plasma after consumption of protein compared with aspartame. PMID:1946186

  9. Clinically relevant test methods to establish in vitro equivalence for spacers and valved holding chambers used with pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jolyon; Dolovich, Myrna B

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory guidance in Canada and Europe recommends that the manufacturer of an inhaled drug product delivered by pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) identify a spacer (S) or valved holding chamber (VHC) to be used with their designated product. It therefore becomes necessary to include the S/VHC in the process of establishing bioequivalence (BE) to the reference pMDI product for both new-entry generic and subsequent market entry products (SMEPs). S/VHCs substantially modify the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of the inhaled medication, and potentially the spatial distribution of the mass of active pharmaceutical ingredient(s) [API(s)] depositing in the respiratory tract. The processes whereby S/VHCs can influence BE outcomes are examined, and the inadequacy of compendial in vitro methods to provide pertinent information to assess BE for the pMDI+VHC combination is highlighted. A three-part strategy is proposed whereby in vitro testing for BE can simulate more clinically-relevant conditions than in the current compendial procedures: 1. The inclusion of a short delay between inhaler actuation and sampling onset is appropriate when determining APSD at flow rate(s) suitable for the intended patient population; 2. Assessment of total emitted mass ex S/VHC by simulating tidal breathing pattern(s) appropriate for intended use; 3. Incorporation of appropriate face model(s), representative of the intended patient age range(s), into test procedures for S/VHCs with facemask, enabling clinically-appropriate dead space and fit-to-face to be simulated. Although the compendial authorities have been slow to recognize the need for such in vitro testing, a Canadian standard provides direction for implementing most proposals, which should result in better performance predictions and more appropriate clinical outcomes, highlighting similarities and differences between reference and test products. PMID:22857273

  10. Performance of TEPCs at low pressures: some attempts to improve their dose equivalent response to the neutron energy range from 10keV to 1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A TEPC, from its operational principle, fulfils reasonably well the requirements of an area monitor with a dose equivalent response nearly independent of neutron energy to be used for radiation protection dosimetry at various work places. However, between neutron energies from 10 keV to 1 MeV, which are of relevance for environments with strongly moderated neutron fields, the response of TEPCs with thin walls is too low. Attempts to increase the response in this energy region by modifying gas pressure, gas composition and wall thickness show that significant improvement first requires operation of the TEPC at lower simulated diameters compared with the 2 μm diameter commonly used. Preliminary investigations to improve the operational properties of TEPCs at low pressures are presented. (author)

  11. Use of the Concept of Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose (BED) to Quantify the Contribution of Hyperthermia to Local Tumor Control in Radiohyperthermia Cervical Cancer Trials, and Comparison With Radiochemotherapy Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of contribution of hyperthermia to local tumor control in radiohyperthermia (RT/HT) cervical cancer trials, in terms of the radiation-equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) and to explore the potential of the combined modalities in the treatment of this neoplasm. Materials and Methods: Local control rates of both arms of each study (RT vs. RT+HT) reported from randomized controlled trials (RCT) on concurrent RT/HT for cervical cancer were reviewed. By comparing the two tumor control probabilities (TCPs) from each study, we calculated the HT-related log cell-kill and then expressed it in terms of the number of 2 Gy fraction equivalents, for a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities. We have compared the contribution of each modality and made some exploratory calculations on the TCPs that might be expected from a combined trimodality treatment (RT+CT+HT). Results: The HT-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions ranges from 0.6 to 4.8 depending on radiosensitivity. Opportunities for clinically detectable improvement by the addition of HT are only available in tumors with an alpha value in the approximate range of 0.22-0.28 Gy-1. A combined treatment (RT+CT+HT) is not expected to improve prognosis in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: The most significant improvements in TCP, which may result from the combination of RT/CT/HT for locally advanced cervical carcinomas, are likely to be limited only to those patients with tumors of relatively low-intermediate radiosensitivity.

  12. Effects of read-out light sources and ambient light on radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both read-out light sources and ambient light sources can produce a marked effect on coloration of radiochromic film. Fluorescent, helium neon laser, light emitting diode (LED) and incandescent read-out light sources produce an equivalent dose coloration of 660 cGy h-1, 4.3 cGy h-1, 1.7 cGy h-1 and 2.6 cGy h-1 respectively. Direct sunlight, fluorescent light and incandescent ambient light produce an equivalent dose coloration of 30 cGy h-1, 18 cGy h-1 and 0 cGy h-1 respectively. Continuously on, fluorescent light sources should not be used for film optical density evaluation and minimal exposure to any light source will increase the accuracy of results. (author)

  13. Doses to patients from photoneutrons emitted in a medical linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of doses to patients from emitted photoneutrons in a medical linear accelerator (Varian 2100C) was carried out. Dose calculation was performed using the Monte Carlo Geant4 code. The model was used to calculate the neutron fluence, as a function of the neutron energy, inside the treatment room to estimate the equivalent dose to patients. The ambient dose equivalent versus field sizes for patient has been reported in this study. The ambient dose equivalent using 1 x 1 cm2 field size, at isocenter and x-ray modes of 20, 18, 15 and 10 MV, was found to be 1.79, 1.60, 0.62, and 0.02 mSv.Gy-1, respectively. The mean energies of neutrons were 0.48, 0.44, 0.40, and 0.16 MeV at x-ray modes, of 20, 18, 15, and 10 MV, respectively. The results of ambient dose equivalent from emitted photoneutrons cannot be ignored and represent a risk for healthy tissues and contribute to secondary malignancy insurgence. (author)

  14. Det ambiente

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Om begrebet "det ambiente", der beskriver, hvad der sker, når vi fornemmer baggrundsmusikkens diskrete beats, betragter udsigten gennem panoramavinduet eller tager 3D-brillerne på og læner os tilbage i biografsædet. Bogen analyserer, hvorfan ambiente oplevelser skabes, og hvilke konsekvenser det...

  15. Ambient Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under the GNU LGPL licence version 3 or higher.

  16. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under th

  17. Det Ambiente

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Det ambiente er iscenesættelsen af en karakteristisk sanseoplevelse, der er kendetegnet ved fornemmelsen af at være omgivet. I dag bliver begrebet om det ambiente mest anvendt i forbindelse med musikgenren ’ambient musik’. Det ambiente er dog ikke essentielt knyttet til det musikalske, men må...... forstås som et betydeligt bredere fænomen i den moderne æstetiske kultur, der spiller en væsentlig rolle i oplevelsen af moderne transportformer, arkitektur, film, lydkunst, installationskunst og digitale multimedieiscenesættelser. En forståelse af det ambiente er derfor centralt for forståelsen af en...... moderne æstetiseret oplevelseskultur i almindelighed. Da det ambiente ikke hidtil har været gjort til genstand for en mere indgående teoretisk behandling, er der dog stor usikkerhed omkring, hvad fænomenet overhovedet indebærer. Hovedformålet med Det ambiente – Sansning, medialisering, omgivelse er derfor...

  18. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature. - Highlights: • Scenarios of external photon exposures were performed in VMC code. • The VOXTISS8 simulator was irradiated in standing and sitting postures.

  19. Ambient Gestures

    OpenAIRE

    Karam, Maria; Hare, Jonathon; Lewis, Paul; schraefel, m.c.

    2006-01-01

    We present Ambient Gestures, a novel gesture-based system designed to support ubiquitous ‘in the environment’ interactions with everyday computing technology. Hand gestures and audio feedback allow users to control computer applications without reliance on a graphical user interface, and without having to switch from the context of a non-computer task to the context of the computer. The Ambient Gestures system is composed of a vision recognition software application, a set of gestures to be p...

  20. Long-term intercomparison of Spanish environmental dosimetry services. Study of transit dose estimations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the layout and results of a three-year follow-up of a national intercomparison campaign organized on a voluntary basis among the Spanish Laboratories in charge of environmental monitoring at and in the vicinity of Spanish nuclear installations. The dosemeters were exposed in the field at an environmental reference station with a known ambient dose equivalent, and controlled meteorological parameters. The study aimed at verifying the consistency of the different laboratories in estimating the ambient dose equivalent in realistic fields and to evaluate the influence of two different procedures to estimate the transit dose during the transfer of the dosemeters both from and to the dosimetric laboratory and the monitored site. All the results were within 20% of the reference doses for all the dosemeters tested, and in most cases they were within 10%

  1. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms; Desenvolvimento de um modelo computacional para calculo do equivalente de dose de neutrons em barreiras primarias laminadas de salas de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  2. Comparison of cough induced by equivalent doses of alfentanil and fentanyl%等效剂量阿芬太尼与芬太尼在全麻诱导时诱发咳嗽的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帅训军; 艾登斌; 曹玺

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of cough induced by equivalent doses of alfentanil and fentanyl. METHODS: Fifty patients under- going general anesthesia were randomly assigned to alfentanil group , and fentanyl group. Two groups were received equivalent doses of alfen- tanil 8 μg/kg, and fentanil 2 μg/kg, via Ⅳ push within 5 seconds respectively. To observe the starting time incidence and severity of cough, heart rate ( HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded immediately before injection (T1) and 2 min (T2) after injection. RESULTS: Alfentanil group had an earlier starting time than fentanyl group, alfentanil group had a significantly lower incidence of cough than fentanyl group(P<0. 05). Compared with T1 , the HR and MAP of alfentanil group and fentanyl group at T2 were significant lower(P<0. 05). Compared with fentanyl group, the extent of decrease in the HR and MAP of alfentanil group were significant higher ( P < 0. 05 ). CONCLUSION: Alfentanil induces a lower incidence of cough and more steadier circulation than equivalent doses of fentanyl.%目的:比较等效剂量阿芬太尼与芬太尼对患者咳嗽的影响.方法:50例全麻手术患者,随机分为阿芬太尼组、芬太尼组,每组25例,两组患者分别在5 s内静脉注射阿芬太尼8 μg/kg、芬太尼2 μg/kg,观察给药后2 min内两组患者的咳嗽起始时间、咳嗽发生率以及严重程度,并记录给药前(T1)和给药后2 min(T2)两个时点的心率(HR)、平均动脉压(MAP)变化.结果:阿芬太尼组患者咳嗽的起始时间明显早于芬太尼组,阿芬太尼组咳嗽的发生率显著低于芬太尼组(P<0.05).与T1时相比,T2时芬太尼组和阿芬太尼组的HR和MAP均显著下降(P<0.05),且阿芬太尼组HR和MAP下降程度显著低于芬太尼组(P<0.05).结论:与等效剂量芬太尼相比,阿芬太尼诱发咳嗽的发生率较低,循环更为平稳.

  3. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation. - Highlights: ► Scenarios of external photon exposures were performed in VMC code. ► The FAX simulator was irradiated in sitting and standing postures. ► The irradiation geometry used was the antero-posterior (AP). ► The

  4. Effective dose and organ doses due to gas Bremsstrahlung from electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremsstrahlung on residual gas is an important source of beam losses in electron-positron storage rings. The Bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a narrow cone in the forward direction, which produces a 'hot spot' of dose at the end of a straight section. Estimates of radiation hazard due to gas Bremsstrahlung have so far been performed by calculating the maximum dose equivalent (MADE) or similar quantities. However, the use of quantities conceived for broad parallel beams in the case of very narrow beams significantly overestimates the organ doses and effective dose. In this paper a more sophisticated computational model was used to calculate values of effective dose and absorbed doses in various organs due to gas Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by 0.1-10 GeV electrons. The Bremsstrahlung photons generated by the interaction of a mono-energetic electron beam in a 1 m long air target were made to impinge on a selected organ of an hermaphrodite anthropomorphic mathematical model placed at 1 and 10 m distances from the end of the target. Organ dose and effective dose were calculated for five representative organs, namely the right eye, ovaries, breast, testes and thyroid. Fits to the calculated values are given, as well as the dependence of photon fluence and dosimetric quantities on various parameters. The results are compared with previous estimates based on MADE and with values of ambient dose equivalent. (authors)

  5. Performance of a cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter for use in neutron monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) allow the measurements of the absorbed dose and the ambient dose equivalent for neutron fields. A device based on this approach, called NAUSICAA(1,2), has already been developed by IRSN to be used in high energy neutron fields for space applications. The response of this detector underestimates significantly the dose equivalent at low energies (several hundred keV) which represent the major component of neutron fields at workplaces in the nuclear industry. A counter with a similar geometry (cylindrical detector) and a lower gas pressure was studied in order to simulate a 1 μm biological site. In 2003, the performance of the device was further improved by adding a small amount of 3He to the tissue-equivalent gas (propane based) in order to increase the response for the lower energies of neutrons. Three amplification circuits were used to cover lineal energy range from 10-1 to 104 keV μm-1. Tests were performed in monoenergetic neutron and source fields. This paper presents the experimental results obtained with this change. (authors)

  6. Determinations of H(10) and its dose components onboard aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, L; Beck, P; Bottolier-Depois, J F; Latocha, M; Lillhök, J; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Roth, J; Schraube, H; Spurny, F; Stehno, G; Trompier, F; Wissmann, F

    2007-01-01

    Aircrew is in general receiving a higher average annual dose than other occupationally exposed personnel, and about half of the effective dose is deposited by high-LET neutron secondaries. A recent investigation of the cancer incidence following the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki has put forward the possibility that the relative biological efficiency for neutrons could be underestimated. If so, the effective dose to aircrew from this component would increase and the estimation of this component will become even more important. Different ambient dose equivalent measurement techniques and calculation methods have recently been compared on a dedicated flight. The experimental results are compared with calculations made with the codes EPCARD 3.2 and an updated version of FLUKA and different galactic proton spectra. The aircraft circulated within the target areas at two constant altitudes with a flight route variation of only about 1 degrees in longitude and latitude to reduce the influence from variations in atmospheric and geomagnetic shielding. The instrumentation consisted of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) and a silicon diode spectrometer. Measurements were performed for 2 h to reduce the statistical uncertainties in the results. The TEPCs were evaluated either according to single-event analysis techniques or the variance-covariance method. Besides the total ambient dose equivalent, the instruments can be evaluated to reveal the low- and high-LET components. The EPCARD and FLUKA simulations can determine the contribution from each type of particle directly. The ratio between the calculated and the measured average value of the ambient dose equivalent rate was 1.00 +/- 0.08 with all instruments included for EPCARD and 0.97 +/- 0.07 when FLUKA was used. The measured high-LET component and the calculated neutron component are not quite identical, but should be similar. The agreement was always within 20%. The high-LET component contributed with

  7. X Ray Spectrometry of Low Energy Photons for Determining Conversion Coefficients from Air Kerma, Ka, to Personal Dose Equivalent, Hp(10), for Radiation Qualities of the ISO Narrow Spectrum Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulse height spectra of the radiation qualities N-10 to N-120 of the ISO narrow spectrum series (N) were measured using a commercial Ge spectrometer and a specially designed lead collimator. For the unfolding of these spectra, three response matrices of the Ge spectrometer for different maximum energies and energy resolutions were calculated by the EGS4 (Electron Gamma Shower version 4) code incorporating the PRESTA and LSCAT options. Then, the pulse height spectra were unfolded with two different algorithms to check the correctness. To verify the measuring and unfolding method, the first half value layers (HVLs) were determined using small ionisation chambers and the fluence spectra. The mean photon energies were calculated, also on the basis of the fluence spectra, and compared with published values. For each radiation quality N-10 to N-120 the conversion coefficients hpK(10;N,α) from air kerma Ka to personal dose equivalent at 10mm depth, Hp (10,α), were calculated for angles of incidence α of 15, 30, 45, 60 deg. and 75 deg. between the unidirectional photon field and the normal to the slab phantom surface. Because the fluence spectra were influenced by the air density, in particular the low energy spectra, the hpK(10;N,α) values were normalised to reference conditions. Differences of up to about 88% between the hpK(10;N,α) values presented in this work and those given in ISO/FDIS 4037-3 were found. (author)

  8. Conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent H{sub p}(3) fir eye-lens dosimetry; Coeficients de conversion du kerma dans l'air a l'equivalent de dose individuel H{sub p}(3) pour la dosimetrie du cristalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daures, J.; Gouriou, J.; Bordy, J.M

    2009-07-01

    This work has been performed within the frame of the European Union ORAMED project (Optimization of Radiation protection for Medical staff). The main goal of the project is to improve standards of protection for medical staff for procedure resulting in potentially high exposures and to develop methodologies for better assessing and for reducing exposures to medical staff. The Work Package WP2 is involved in the development of practical eye lens dosimetry in interventional radiology. This study is complementary of the part of the ENEA report concerning the calculations with the MCNP code of the conversion factors related to the operational quantity H{sub p}(3). A set of energy and angular dependent conversion coefficients H{sub p}(3)/K{sub air} in the new proposed square cylindrical phantom of ICRU tissue, have been calculated with the Monte-Carlo code PENELOPE. The H{sub p}(3) values have been determined in terms of absorbed dose, according to the definition of this quantity, and also with the kerma approximation as formerly reported in ICRU reports. At low photon energy, up to 1 MeV, the two sets of conversion coefficients are consistent. Nevertheless, the differences increase at higher energy. This is mainly due to the lack of electronic equilibrium, especially for small angle incidences. The values of the conversion coefficients obtained with the code MCNP published by ENEA, agree with the kerma approximation calculations with PENELOPE. They are coherent with previous calculations in phantoms different in shape. But above 1 MeV, differences between conversion coefficient values calculated with the absorbed dose and with kerma approximation are significantly increasing, especially at low incidence angles. At those energies the electron transport has to be simulated. (author)

  9. Politico-economic equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime and a...... state are equivalent to another such pair if both pairs give rise to the same allocation in politico-economic equilibrium. The equivalence conditions help to identify factors that render institutional change non-neutral and to construct politico-economic equilibria in new policy regimes. We exemplify...

  10. Ambient intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, David; Gegov, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers some history and the state of the art of Ambient Intelligence and from that seeks to identify new topics and future work. Ubiquitous computing, communications, human-centric computer interaction, embedded systems, context awareness, adaptive systems and distributed device networks are considered.

  11. Ambient intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, W; Aarts, E

    2005-01-01

    Addresses ambient intelligence used to support human contacts and accompany an individual''s path through the complicated modern world, from applications that are imminent, since they use essentially existing technologies, to ambitious ideas whose realization is still far away, due to major unsolved technical challenges.

  12. Determination of the dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of occupationally exposed personnel in the practice of proton emission tomography (PET/CT); Determinacion de la dosis equivalente Hp(0.07) en manos de trabajadores ocupacionalmente expuestos en la practica de Tomografia por Emision de Positrones (PET/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, D. [Servicio de Radiofisica Sanitaria, Unidad de Tecnologia Nuclear, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Km 11 Carretera Panamerican, Altos del Pipe, Caracas (Venezuela); Ruiz, N.; Esteves, L. [Centro Diagnostico Docente Las Mercedes, Calle Paris cruce con calle Caroni, Edif. CDD, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela)]. e-mail: dlea@ivic.ve

    2006-07-01

    In Venezuela recently it was implanted the Positron Emission Tomography technique (PET) with the perspective of implanting it at national level. Even when in our country practices it of nuclear medicine it exists from early of 70, there is not experience in the determination of the occupational doses by exposure to the external radiation in hands. By this reason, a concern exists in the workers of the centers of nuclear medicine where it is practiced the Positron Emission Tomography technique. In absence of the TLD dosimetry to measure dose in hands in our country, measurements of the dose equivalent of the workers of the PET national reference center were made, using a detector of hands type diode. It was determined the dose in hands in terms of dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in two work positions, that is: the corresponding to the transfer of the receiving vial of ({sup 18}F) FDG to the shield, quality control and uni doses division. The second work position corresponds the person in charge of administering, via intravenous, the ({sup 18}F) FDG. In this work it realizes the dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) measures in each one of the work positions before described by daily production. The informed doses correspond to a total average produced activity of 20.4 GBq (550 mCi). The results of the measurements in terms of dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) correspond to 2.1 {+-} 20% mSv in the work position of division and 0.4 {+-} 10% mSv in the position of injection of the radioactive material. At short term this foreseen until 4 productions per week, what means an annual dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of 400 mSv approximately, without taking into account abnormal situations as its are spills of the ({sup 18}F) FDG in the work place. This work is the starting point so that the regulatory authority settles down, in Venezuela, dose restrictions in the PET practices and implant, in the centers of nuclear medicine, an optimization politics of this practice in conformity

  13. Calibration of photographic dosemeters to evaluate the personal equivalent dose, Hp (10), irradiated by different radiation qualities and angles of incidence; Calibracao de dosimetros fotograficos para avaliar o equivalente de dose pessoal, Hp(10), irradiados por diferentes qualidades de radiacao e angulos de incidencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Christiana; Antonio Filho, Joao, E-mail: chsantoro@gmail.com, E-mail: jaf@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Marcus Aurelio P.; Goncalves Filho, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: masantos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: l.filho@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, Pe (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To use radiation detectors, should periodically perform tests and calibrations on instruments in order to verify its good functionality. One way to ascertain the quality of the instrument is to conduct a study of the angular dependence of the response of the radiation detectors. The photographic dosimetry has been used widely to quantify the radiation doses and to estimate levels of doses received by workers involved with X-and gamma radiation. Photographic dosimeters are used because provide wide range of exposure and good accuracy. One of the sources of error have been introduced by different irradiation geometries between calibration and measurement in radiation fields used in x-ray and gamma ray sources, therefore, there is a need for an evaluation of the sensitivity of dosimeters with variation of the angle of the incident beam. In this study were tested 190 photographic dosemeters in the Metrology Laboratory of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE) using the phantom H{sub p} (10), where the dosimeters are evaluated on the basis of the new operational magnitude for individual monitoring, the equivalent personal dose, H{sub p} (10). Angular dependence of these radiation detectors was studied in X radiation fields (in the range of 45 keV energy to 164 keV) and gamma radiation ({sup 137}Cs-662 keV e {sup 60}Co - 1250 keV)

  14. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  15. Equivalence in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李良杰

    2013-01-01

    There are many researches about translation theories and methods in western translation history. Equivalence in transla⁃tion has always been the central issue for discussion. This paper gives a general review and comment on equivalence in translation in terms of three representative translation theorists and their views about equivalence in translation.

  16. Índices agronômicos do meloeiro associados à dose adequada de nitrogênio, em ambiente protegido e no campo Muskmelon plant agronomical indice values associated with adequadenitrogen fertilizer rate, in unheated greenhouse and field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evando Luiz Coelho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho determinar a magnitude dos índices agronômicos da folha do meloeiro (Cucumis melo L., representados pela área (AFQ e massa da matéria seca da quinta folha à partir do ápice (MSQ, associados à dose de nitrogênio para a produção comercial máxima de frutos (PMF, em duas épocas de amostragens e em dois ambientes. Dois experimentos, ambiente protegido e campo, foram conduzidos adotando-se procedimentos similares. Cada experimento constou de quatro blocos ao acaso contendo cinco tratamentos que foram cinco doses de nitrogênio (0, 75, 150, 300 e 450 kg ha-1 de N, como uréia. Parte desse foi colocado nos sulcos (30%, antes do transplante e os 70% restantes foram aplicados via água de irrigação por gotejamento durante o ciclo da cultura. Inicialmente, aos 14 dias após o transplante (DAT, foi determinada a intensidade da clorose nas folhas por meio de notas de 0 (nenhuma clorose a 5 (clorose acentuada. Aos 25 e 53 DAT, no pegamento do primeiro e do segundo fruto, a AFQ e o MSQ foram determinados. Em ambos os experimentos, a intensidade da clorose diminuiu e AFQ e MSQ aumentaram com o aumento da dose de nitrogênio. Os valores da intensidade da clorose associados à PMF foram 0,22 e 1,11 no ambiente protegido e no campo, respectivamente. Na primeira e segunda amostragens, no ambiente protegido, os valores de AFQ associados à PMF foram 107 e 72 cm² e os de PSQ foram 0,36 e 0,26 g, respectivamente. No campo, os valores correspondentes foram 89 e 69 cm² e 0,39 e 0,30 g, respectivamente. Esses valores são propostos como índices do meloeiro indicadores da adequada dose do fertilizante nitrogenado.The objective of the experiments was to determine the values of the agronomical melon (Cucumis melo L. leaf indices, represented by both area (FLA and dry weight (FLW of the fifth leaf from the apex associated with the nitrogen rate for the maximum melon fruit yield (MFY, at two samples dates and two environmental

  17. Estimation of the contribution of neutrons to the equivalent dose for personnel occupationally exposed and public in medical facilities: X-ray with energy equal or greater than 10MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alfonso Mayer; Jimenez, Roberto Ortega; Sanchez, Mario A. Reyes, E-mail: amgesfm@hotmail.com, E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Moranchel y Mejia, Mario, E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM/IPN), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas. Departamento de lngenieria Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and Occupationally Staff Exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents an estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  18. Estimation of the contribution by neutrons to the equivalent dose for exposed occupationally personnel and people in medical use facilities: X rays of equal or superior energy to 10 MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega J, R.; Reyes S, M. A. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Moranchel y R, M., E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and occupationally staff exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents and estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  19. Measurement of conversion coefficients between air Kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors for diagnostic X-ray beams; Determinacao experimental dos coeficientes de conversao de Kerma no ar para o equivalente de dose pessoal, Hp(d), e fatores de retroespalhamento em feixes de raios-x diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, Paulo Henrique Goncalves

    2008-07-01

    Two sets of quantities are import in radiological protection: the protection and operational quantities. Both sets can be related to basic physical quantities such as kerma through conversion coefficients. For diagnostic x-ray beams the conversion coefficients and backscatter factors have not been determined yet, those parameters are need for calibrating dosimeters that will be used to determine the personal dose equivalent or the entrance skin dose. Conversion coefficients between air kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic x-ray qualities RQR and RQA recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The air kerma in the phantom and the mean energy of the spectrum were measured for such purpose. Harshaw LiF-100H thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used for measurements after being calibrated against an 180 cm{sup 3} Radcal Corporation ionization chamber traceable to a reference laboratory. A 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab phantom was used for deep-dose measurements. Tl dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at 5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm depth in the phantom upstream the beam direction Another required parameter for determining the conversion coefficients from was the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum. The spectroscopy of x-ray beams was done with a CdTe semiconductor detector that was calibrated with {sup 133} Ba, {sup 241} Am and {sup 57} Co radiation sources. Measurements of the x-ray spectra were carried out for all RQR and RQA IEC qualities. Corrections due to the detector intrinsic efficiency, total energy absorption, escape fraction of the characteristic x-rays, Compton effect and attenuation in the detector were done aiming an the accurate determination of the mean energy. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected with the stripping method by using these response functions. The typical combined standard uncertainties of

  20. Dose limit for external exposure of pregnant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ICRP publication 60 (The Recommendations of the commission-1990), the Commission has recommended that, once pregnancy has been declared, the equivalent dose limit to the pregnant worker should be 2 mSv for the surface of her abdomen during the remainder of the pregnancy. In addition, the commission has recommended that the fetus should be afforded the same broad level of protection as required for members of the public. The verifications of whether the commission's recommendations on the occupational exposure of pregnant women can be ensured under their working conditions are carried out. From the results, it seems to be unsuitable to accept the recommendations. It is proposed that external exposure for pregnant workers estimates ambient dose equivalent, H (10) on the surfaces of their abdomens and the dose limit to the pregnant women should be 1 mSv during the remainder of the pregnancy. (author)