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Sample records for ambient dose equivalent

  1. Topographic Effects on Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates from Radiocesium Fallout

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Land topography can affect air radiation dose rates by locating radiation sources closer to, or further, from detector locations when compared to perfectly flat terrain. Hills and slopes can also shield against the propagation of gamma rays. To understand the possible magnitude of topographic effects on air dose rates, this study presents calculations for ambient dose equivalent rates at a range of heights above the ground for varying land topographies. The geometries considered were angled ground at the intersection of two planar surfaces, which is a model for slopes neighboring flat land, and a simple conical geometry, representing settings from hilltops to valley bottoms. In each case the radiation source was radioactive cesium fallout, and the slope angle was varied systematically to determine the effect of topography on the air dose rate. Under the assumption of homogeneous fallout across the land surface, and for these geometries and detector locations, the dose rates at high altitudes are more strongly...

  2. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  3. Calculation of dose equivalent index, effective dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent for the giant resonance neutron spectra produced at an electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ANISN code has been used in this study to evaluate the attenuation of neutron beams of various spectra incident normally on slabs of different kinds of concrete. Spectra of the most common sources (Am-Be and Cf-252) and those of giant resonance neutrons, produced at electron accelerators, were studied. The concretes examined had densities between 2.1 and 4.64 g.cm-3. The calculation were made in terms of the deep dose equivalent index, the effective dose equivalent and the ambient dose equivalent. Values of attenuation length in the various materials were derived from the attenuation curves. The results found should allow for useful evaluations in every day practice for health physicist

  4. Longterm monitoring of ambient dose equivalent rates at aviation altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heber, B.; Burmeister, S.; Moeller, T.; Scharrenberg, E. [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Briese, J. [Deutsche Lufthansa AG, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Burda, O.; Klages, T.; Langner, F.; Marquardt, J.; Wissmann, F. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig Germany (Germany); Matthiae, D.; Reitz, G. [German Aerospace Center, Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Linder Hoehe, 51147 Koeln (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The complex radiation field at flight altitudes results mainly from the interaction of energetic charged particles with atmospheric molecules and atoms and consists of secondary neutrons, protons, gamma rays, electrons, positrons and muons. Due to the continuous interactions of primary and secondary particles within the atmosphere, the intensity of each component depends on the height. Since the Earth's magnetic field acts as rigidity filter for the charged primary particles, the flux of the primary particles into the atmosphere and the resulting intensity of secondary particles depend on the geomagnetic latitude being highest over the geomagnetic poles. The main primary component consists of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), mainly protons and alpha particles, whose flux is modulated in the heliosphere. Beside this slowly varying galactic component, solar energetic particle events may temporarily increase the intensity of this radiation field. In the frame of the Radiation Monitoring on Board Aircraft (RAMONA) collaboration, three NAVIgation and DOSimetry (NAVIDOS) systems were installed in 2008 and 2009 on board of three Lufthansa Airbus A340 aircraft. They have been maintained since then by the consortium. Two of the NAVIDOS units rely on the DOSimetry TELescopes (DOSTELs), one is based on a LIULIN detector. This unique setup is ideally suited to investigate variations in the radiation field at different flight altitudes and geomagnetic positions and has been used to measure the radiation exposure during the recent extended solar minimum and thereafter. With increasing solar activity in 2010 the measured dose rates have been decreasing. Since these variations depend on the location of the aircraft, a detailed data analysis is required and presented.

  5. Numerical model for computation of effective and ambient dose equivalent at flight altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishev Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model for assessment of the effective dose and ambient dose equivalent produced by secondary cosmic ray particles of galactic and solar origin at commercial aircraft altitudes is presented. The model represents a full chain analysis based on ground-based measurements of cosmic rays, from particle spectral and angular characteristics to dose estimation. The model is based on newly numerically computed yield functions and realistic propagation of cosmic ray in the Earth magnetosphere. The yield functions are computed using a straightforward full Monte Carlo simulation of the atmospheric cascade induced by primary protons and α-particles and subsequent conversion of secondary particle fluence (neutrons, protons, gammas, electrons, positrons, muons and charged pions to effective dose or the ambient dose equivalent. The ambient dose equivalent is compared with reference data at various conditions such as rigidity cut-off and level of solar activity. The method is applied for computation of the effective dose rate at flight altitude during the ground level enhancement of 13 December 2006. The solar proton spectra are derived using neutron monitor data. The computation of the effective dose rate during the event explicitly considers the derived anisotropy i.e. the pitch angle distribution as well as the propagation of the solar protons in the magnetosphere of the Earth.

  6. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  7. Ambient neutron dose equivalent outside concrete vault rooms for 15 and 18 MV radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), due to neutrons outside three bunkers that house a 15- and a 18-MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D and a 15-MV Elekta Inor clinical linacs, has been calculated. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX (v. 2.5) has been used to simulate the neutron production and transport. The complete geometries including linacs and full installations have been built up according to the specifications of the manufacturers and the planes provided by the corresponding medical physical services of the hospitals where the three linacs operate. Two of these installations, those lodging the Varian linacs, have an entrance door to the bunker while the other one does not, although it has a maze with two bends. Various treatment orientations were simulated in order to establish plausible annual equivalent doses. Specifically anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral orientations and an additional one with the gantry rotated 30 deg. have been studied. Significant dose rates have been found only behind the walls and the door of the bunker, near the entrance and the console, with a maximum of 12 μSv h-1. Dose rates per year have been calculated assuming a conservative workload for the three facilities. The higher dose rates in the corresponding control areas were 799 μSv y-1, in the case of the facility which operates the 15-MV Clinac, 159 μSv y-1, for that with the 15-MV Elekta, and 21 μSv y-1 for the facility housing the 18-MV Varian. A comparison with measurements performed in similar installations has been carried out and a reasonable agreement has been found. The results obtained indicate that the neutron contamination does not increase the doses above the legal limits and does not produce a significant enhancement of the dose equivalent calculated. When doses are below the detection limits provided by the measuring devices available today, MCNPX simulation provides an useful method to evaluate neutron dose equivalents based on a

  8. APMP comparison for the calibration of ambient dose equivalent meters in ISO neutron reference fields - APMRRI(III)-S1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison for the calibration of ambient dose equivalent meter was organized by TCRI of APMP. Seven laboratories (ARPANSA, BARC, INER, KRISS, NIM, NMIJ, and VNIIM) were participated in the comparison exercise. Two moderator-type neutron ambient dose equivalent meters (one is cylindrical and the other is spherical) were circulated and calibrated in ISO standard neutron fields of 252Cf, 241Am-Be, and D2O moderated 252Cf sources. The stability of the transfer instruments was checked by the pilot lab (KRISS) between the measurements of two successive participants. Some outliers exist in each measurement set and the weighted means of ail measurement results are not adequate as a reference value because of the large chi-square values. The median was used to calculate the reference value. (authors)

  9. Determination of the conversion coefficient for ambient dose equivalent, H(10), from air kerma measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namely the operational magnitudes can be determined by the product of a conversion coefficient by exposure air kerma or fluence, etc. In particular in Mexico for the first time is determined the conversion coefficient (Cc) for operational magnitude Environmental Dose Equivalent H(10) by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) technique. First 30 TLD-100 dosimeters are calibrated in terms of air kerma, then these dosimeters are irradiated inside a sphere ICRU type of PMMA and with the aid of theory cavity the absorbed dose in PMMA is determined at a depth of 10 mm within the sphere DPMMA(10), subsequently absorbed dose to ICRU tissue is corrected and the dose equivalent H(10) is determined. The Cc is determined as the ratio of H(10)/Ka obtaining a value of 1.20 Sv Gy-1 with a uc= 3.66%, this being consistent with the published value in ISO-4037-3 of 1.20 Sv Gy-1 with a uc= 2%. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with 134Cs and 137Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modelling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modelling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rate...

  11. Application of 10B counter with moderator for neutron ambient dose equivalent measurement in radiation monitoring at JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to use the instrument based on the 10B-counter (CHM-14) with polyethylene moderator as a dosimeter of the neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) in the field of nuclear installations of JINR was investigated. It was shown that the instrument can be used to measure H*(10) of neutrons in the energy range from 0.4 eV to 20 MeV with the uncertainty within 30% due to the dependence of response on neutron energy. The use of the correction factors can extend the energy range of measurement of the neutron dose H*(10) up to hundreds of MeV. The uncertainty due to angular dependence of the instrument response is not more than 35%

  12. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with (134)Cs and (137)Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modeling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modeling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rates above flat, undisturbed fields in Fukushima Prefecture are consistent with decrement by radioactive decay and downward migration of cesium into soil. Analysis of remediation strategies for farmland soils confirmed that topsoil removal and interchanging a topsoil layer with a subsoil layer result in similar reductions in the air dose rate. These two strategies are more effective than reverse tillage to invert and mix the topsoil.

  13. Simulation of ambient dose equivalent from -rays from radioactive decays with FLUKA and DORIAN

    CERN Document Server

    Vujanovic, Milena

    2015-01-01

    During my stay (29. June- 25. September 2015.) as a participant of Summer Student Programme I was working in Radiation Protection group at CERN. The primary task of my project was to extend the functionality of the DORIAN (DOse Rate Inspector and ANalyzer) code that is used for prediction and analysis of residual dose rated due to accelerator radi- ation induced activation. This task consisted of writing and validating a dedicated FLUKA user routine to simulate the radiation coming from radioactive decays. The results of the FLUKA simulations using this user routine then had to be integrated into the DORIAN code.

  14. Neutron spectrometry and determination of neutron ambient dose equivalents in different LINAC radiotherapy rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Rosello, J.; Brualla, L. [ERESA, Avda. Tres Cruces s/n. E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Nunez, L. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital. Puerta de Hierro. E-28222 Majadahonda (Spain); Colmenares, R. [Serv. de Oncologia Radioterapica, Hosp. Ramon y Cajal, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Particulas. Univ. de Santiago. E-15782 Santiago de Compostela. Spain (Spain); Hartmann, G.H. [DKFZ E0400 Im Neuenheimer Feld 280. D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) (Germany); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica. Universidad de Sevilla. E-41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Fernandez, F. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Justo Dorado 11 E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A project has been set up to study the effect on a radiotherapy patient of the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photonuclear reactions induced by photons above {approx}8 MeV. These neutrons may reach directly the patient, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well, contributing to peripheral dose. Spectrometry was performed with a calibrated and validated set of Bonner spheres at a point located at 50 cm from the isocenter, as well as at the place where a digital device for measuring neutrons, based on the upset of SRAM memories induced by thermal neutrons, is located inside the treatment room. Exposures have taken place in six LINAC accelerators with different energies (from 15 to 23 MV) with the aim of relating the spectrometer measurements with the readings of the digital device under various exposure and room geometry conditions. The final purpose of the project is to be able to relate, under any given treatment condition and room geometry, the readings of this digital device to patient neutron effective dose and peripheral dose in organs of interest. This would allow inferring the probability of developing second malignancies as a consequence of the treatment. Results indicate that unit neutron fluence spectra at 50 cm from the isocenter do not depend on accelerator characteristics, while spectra at the place of the digital device are strongly influenced by the treatment room geometry.

  15. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AMBIENT DOSE EQUIVALENT AND ABSORBED DOSE IN AIR IN THE CASE OF LARGE-SCALE CONTAMINATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT BY RADIOACTIVE CESIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main aims of the study was an experimental determination of the conversion coefficient from ambient dose equivalent rate, Н*(10, to absorbed dose rate in air, D, in the case of radioactive contamination of the environment following the Chernobyl accident. More than 800 measurements of gamma-dose rates in air were performed at the typical locations (one-storey residential house, street, yard, kitchen-garden, ploughed field, undisturbed grassland, forest of rural settlements and their surroundings in the heavily contaminated areas of the Bryansk region, Russia in the period of 1996–2010. Five commercially available models of portable gamma-ray dosimeters were employed in the investigation. All tested dosimeters were included into the State register of approved measuring instruments of Russia. In all dosimeters, scintillation detectors are used as detection elements. A photon spectrometry technique is applied in the dosimeters to determine gamma dose rate in air. The dosimeters are calibrated in terms of exposure rate, X, absorbed dose rate in air, D, and ambient dose equivalent rate, Н*(10. A very good agreement was found between different dosimeters calibrated in the same units; the reading ratios were close to 1 and the correlation coefficients (Pearson’s or Spearman’s were higher than 0.99. The Н*(10/D ratio values were location-specific ranging from 1.23 Sv/Gy for undisturbed grasslands and forests to 1.47 Sv/Gy for wooden houses and asphalted streets. A statistically significant negative correlation (Spearman’s coefficient = -0.833; P<0.01; n=9 was found between the Н*(10/D ratio and the average energy of gamma-rays determined with a NaI(Tl-based gamma-ray monitor. For the whole area of a settlement and its surroundings, the average ratio of Н*(10 to D was calculated as 1.33 Sv/Gy. The overall conversion coefficient from ambient dose equivalent rate, Н*(10, to external effective dose rate, Ė, for adults was estimated

  16. Assessment of fast and thermal neutron ambient dose equivalents around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco, P. O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Qureshi, M.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    A set of five {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources are utilized in research and teaching at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Three of these sources have an activity of 16Ci each and the other two are of 5Ci each. A well-shielded storage area was designed for these sources. The aim of the study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the KFUPM neutron source storage area. Poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) Nuclear track detectors (NTDs) based fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters have been utilized side by side for 33 days to assess accumulated low ambient dose equivalents of fast and thermal neutrons at 30 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. Fast neutron measurements have been carried out using bare NTDs, which register fast neutrons through recoils of protons, in the detector material. NTDs were mounted with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters on their surfaces for thermal neutron detection via B10(n,{alpha})Li6 and Li6(n,{alpha})H3 nuclear reactions. The calibration factors of NTD both for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) with and without a polyethylene moderator. The calibration factors for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were found to be 1.33 proton tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1} and 31.5 alpha tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1}, respectively. The results show variations of accumulated dose with the locations around the storage area. The fast neutron dose equivalents rates varied from as low as 182nSvh{sup -1} up to 10.4{mu}Svh{sup -1} whereas those for thermal neutron ranged from as low as 7nSvh{sup -1} up to 9.3{mu}Svh{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosimeter was able to detect dose rates as low as 7 and 182nSvh{sup -1} from accumulated dose for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, which were not possible to detect with the available active neutron

  17. Calibration procedures of area monitors in terms of the Ambient Dose Equivalent H*(10), for gamma, x-ray radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis procedures for calibrating portable survey meters in terms of the new ICRU quantities H*(10) ambient dose equivalent are discussed. Also the remendations of International Comission on Radiation Protection in their report ICRP 60 that inludes the operational magnitudes that the International Comission of Radiation Units proposed for calibrating area monitors

  18. Measurement of the neutron spectrum and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-07

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement of the neutron spectral distribution and fluence from the 252Cf source (model NS-120, LLNL serial # 7001677, referred as the SMALL Cf source) and determination of the ambient neutron dose rate equivalent and kerma at 100 cm for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). The dosimetric quantities should be based on the neutron spectrum and the current neutron-to-dose conversion coefficients.

  19. Corrigendum to "Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit"

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy

    2016-06-01

    A recent paper published in Life Sciences in Space Research (El-Jaby and Richardson, 2015) presented estimates of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates, in air, from surface altitudes up to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit. These estimates were based on MCNPX (LANL, 2011) (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) radiation transport simulations of galactic cosmic radiation passing through Earth's atmosphere. During a recent review of the input decks used for these simulations, a systematic error was discovered that is addressed here. After reassessment, the neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates estimated are found to be 10 to 15% different, though, the essence of the conclusions drawn remains unchanged.

  20. Determination of the equivalent of environmental dose, H*(d), in a radiotherapy installation; Determinacao do equivalente de dose ambiental, H*(d), em uma instalacao de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, M.A.F.; Borges, J.C. [Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE/UFRJ Caixa Postal 68509 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mota, H.C. [Instituto de Radio Protecao e Dosimetria, IRD/CNEN Caixa Postal 37750 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    In order to put into practice radiological protection has been required conversion factors for environmental dose equivalent determination to air kerma value for different kinds of photon and electron beams, such dose values have been determined in a spheric phantom of 30 cm diameter in a alignment field and expanded in a depth of this sphere. Details will be given for determining of equivalent dose distribution calculation using Monte Carlo computational method (ESG4) following the recommendations of ICRU. (Author)

  1. Measurement of the ambient gamma dose equivalent and kerma from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter and the small 60Co source at 2 meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 100 cm from the 252Cf source and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 200 cm from the 60Co source for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). An Exradin A6 ion chamber with Shonka air-equivalent plastic walls in combination with a Supermax electrometer were used to measure the exposure rate and free-in-air kerma rate of the two sources at the requested distances. The measured gamma exposure, kerma, and dose equivalent rates are tabulated.

  2. Assessment of ambient dose equivalent rate performance of an automatic survey meter as an instrument to quantify the presence of radiation in soils

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, E M; Okuno, E

    2002-01-01

    Those who work in radiation protection are faced with various quantities that were created to account for the effects of ionizing radiation in the human body. As far as the experimental point of view is concerned, each available equipment is planned to measure a distinct quantity, for a specific radiation protection application, and it is not always clear which one it is. This paper shows a series of tests, planned and applied to a portable gamma ray spectrometer, in order to assure that the monitoring low dose levels of radiation with it is reliable. The equipment is fully automated and does not allow modifications of the conversion factors from counts to ambient dose equivalent. It is therefore necessary to assure that the values provided by the equipment are correct and refer to the actual situation one expects to find in practice. The system is based on an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, mounted with its electronics in a portable case, suitable for field measurements. It measures ambient dose equivalent r...

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B.

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit.

  4. Effect of Remediation Parameters on in-Air Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates When Remediating Open Sites with Radiocesium-contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Akihiro; Machida, Masahiko

    2016-10-01

    Calculations are reported for ambient dose equivalent rates [H˙*(10)] at 1 m height above the ground surface before and after remediating radiocesium-contaminated soil at wide and open sites. The results establish how the change in H˙*(10) upon remediation depends on the initial depth distribution of radiocesium within the ground, on the size of the remediated area, and on the mass per unit area of remediated soil. The remediation strategies considered were topsoil removal (with and without recovering with a clean soil layer), interchanging a topsoil layer with a subsoil layer, and in situ mixing of the topsoil. The results show the ratio of the radiocesium components of H˙*(10) post-remediation relative to their initial values (residual dose factors). It is possible to use the residual dose factors to gauge absolute changes in H˙*(10) upon remediation. The dependency of the residual dose factors on the number of years elapsed after fallout deposition is analyzed when remediation parameters remain fixed and radiocesium undergoes typical downward migration within the soil column. PMID:27575348

  5. Determination of conversion factors of kerma and fluence to ambient dose equivalent for X-rays generated between 50 kVp to 125 kVp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ambient dose equivalent was determined experimentally on the interval of energy of X ray applied in diagnostic radiology. A PMMA sphere was used to simulate the trunk human (phantom), based on the definition of the report ICRU 39. The absorbed dose in different positions in the phantom was determined using LiF-TLD 100. The X ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector (HP Ge). It was also determined the HVL and the effective energy in this energy range. The conversion coefficient of the Kair and Φ to H*(d) were determined to 10, 50 and 60 mm deep in the PMMA sphere. The obtained values were compared with data of the literature. The maximum uncertainty obtained for the coefficients was 7.2%. All parameters were also determined to the X ray quality of the incident and transmitted beam by the patient, according to the recommendation of the standard DIN 6872. The conversion factor was calculated for those situations where the X-ray beam is transmitted by a layer and Pb and it is necessary to estimate the effective dose, as in the case of shielding project of radiology diagnosis room. (author)

  6. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam

  7. Determination of attenuation factors for mortar of barite in terms of environmental dose equivalent and effective dose; Determinacao de fatores de atenuacao para argamassa de barita em termos do equivalente de dose ambiental e dose efetiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T.; Campos, L.L.R., E-mail: airtontavares@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araujo, F.G.S. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Santos, M.A.P. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Nogueira, M.S., E-mail: mnogueira@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimeto da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work addresses the characterization of barite mortars used as Xray shielding materials through the following quantities: mass attenuation coefficient, air kerma, effective dose and ambient dose - H⁎(10). The experiment was carried out with the use of the following reference qualities: RQR4, RQR6, RQR9 e RQR10, specified in accordance with norm IEC 61267: Medical diagnostic Xray equipment - radiation conditions for use in the determination of characteristics. In this study values was determined experimentally for the attenuation of the Cream barite (density 2.99g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Sao Paulo), Purple barite (density 2.95g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Bahia) and White barite (density 3.10g/cm{sup 3}, collected in the state of Paraiba). These materials, in the form of mortar, were disposed in the form of squares namely poof bodies, whose dimensions were 10 x 10 cm and thickness ranging from 3 to 15 mm approximately. In the experimental procedure, these proof bodies were irradiated with a Pantak, model HF320 industrial X-ray apparatus. The potentials applied to the respective X-ray tube were: 60kV, 80kV, 120kV and 150kV at a constant current of 1mA. The attenuation responses in function of thickness, for each of the materials analyzed, were used to draw the attenuation and transmission curves. The efficiency of the barite studied concerning the capacity to attenuate X-ray radiation for X-ray beams ranging from 60 to 150 kV indicated.

  8. From body burden to effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessary data to calculate the effective committed dose equivalent and the effective dose-equivalent rate from measured body burdens are presented. Both ingestion and inhalation intakes are considered, for single intake as well as for continuous exposure

  9. Determination of the conversion coefficient for ambient dose equivalent, H(10), from air kerma measurements; Determinacion del coeficiente de conversion para la dosis equivalente ambiental, H*(10), a partir de mediciones de kerma en aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez J, F. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Namely the operational magnitudes can be determined by the product of a conversion coefficient by exposure air kerma or fluence, etc. In particular in Mexico for the first time is determined the conversion coefficient (Cc) for operational magnitude Environmental Dose Equivalent H(10) by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) technique. First 30 TLD-100 dosimeters are calibrated in terms of air kerma, then these dosimeters are irradiated inside a sphere ICRU type of PMMA and with the aid of theory cavity the absorbed dose in PMMA is determined at a depth of 10 mm within the sphere D{sub PMMA}(10), subsequently absorbed dose to ICRU tissue is corrected and the dose equivalent H(10) is determined. The Cc is determined as the ratio of H(10)/K{sub a} obtaining a value of 1.20 Sv Gy{sup -1} with a u{sub c}= 3.66%, this being consistent with the published value in ISO-4037-3 of 1.20 Sv Gy{sup -1} with a u{sub c}= 2%. (Author)

  10. Using tissue equivalent proportional counters to determine dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) have been used in the laboratory for over 30 years to determine neutron dose in mixed radiation fields, but they are seldom used by operational health physicists. But a number of TEPC-based instruments are being developed in Europe and in the United States. The purpose of this paper is: to introduce operational health physicists to tissue equivalent proportional counters, to examine some of the algorithms used to convert data from TEPCs into dose equivalent, to examine how TEPC measurements meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11 (DOE 1988) and 10CFR20, and to examine some of the TEPC-based instruments that are available. Many operational health physicists are not familiar with the concept of microdosimetry and the specialized terms that are used in analyzing the data from TEPCs, so a brief discussion is included. At present, quality factors are defined in terms of linear energy transfer, but TEPCs measure lineal energy

  11. 77 FR 55832 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... made under the provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as ] amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of a new equivalent method...

  12. APMP Key Comparison for Calibration of Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent Meter%亚太地区中子周围剂量当量(率)仪的校准比对

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘毅娜; 王志强; 徐科; 骆海龙

    2016-01-01

    Proper calibration methods are important aspects to ensure good results of neutron ambient dose equivalent meters .The APMP.RI(Ⅲ )‐S1 for the calibration of neutron ambient dose equivalent meters was introduced in this paper .The radionuclide neutron reference radiation fields and the calibration results of the metrology institutes of Korea ,Australia ,India ,China Taiwan ,China ,Japan and Russia were shown .Two comparison transfer instruments were also calibrated by China Institute of Atomic Energy in the 241 Am‐Be and 252 Cf neutron reference radiation fields ,and the calibration results were compared with the APMP.RI(Ⅲ )‐S1 results .The results show that the calibration factors obtained with the shadow cone method and the distance inverse‐square method of our laboratory and the reference value are consistent with each other within the uncertainties .%适当的校准方法是保证中子周围剂量当量(率)仪测量结果准确可靠的重要因素。本文介绍了亚太地区首次中子周围剂量当量(率)仪校准比对APM P.RI(Ⅲ)‐S1,以及韩国、澳大利亚、印度、中国台湾、中国大陆、日本和俄罗斯等国家和地区的计量院的放射性核素中子参考辐射场及比对结果。本文利用实验室建立的241 Am‐Be和252 Cf中子源参考辐射场对两台比对传递仪器进行了校准,并将校准结果进行了比较。结果表明,本实验室采用影锥法和距离反平方法的校准因子与比对参考值在不确定度范围内一致。

  13. 光子注量到周围剂量当量转换系数的Monte-Carlo模拟%Monte-Carlo Simulation of Conversion Coefficient for Ambient Dose Equivalent from PhotonFluence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花正东; 王德忠; 刘诚; 陈继亮; 王方

    2013-01-01

    The conversion coefficients for ambient dose equivalent from photon fluence were calculated using Monte-Carlo code EGS5 with photon energy 10 keV ~ 10 MeV. The two cases were considered in the simulation:1 ) without the secondary electrons in transport;2 ) with the secondary electrons in transport. Our results shows good agreement with prior study and the data recommended by ICRP 74 Report. The fitted formulae for calculating the con-version coefficients in the photon energy 20 keV ~ 10 MeV were given based on the data obtained by EGS5 code.%本文采用蒙特卡罗程序EGS5计算了10 keV~10 MeV光子注量到周围剂量当量的转换系数。模拟计算中考虑了两种情况:1)不带次级电子模拟;2)带次级电子模拟。把两种情况下的计算值与前研究者的计算值及ICRP 74号报告中的建议值进行了比较。并给出了用于计算光子注量与周围剂量当量间的转换系数的拟合公式。

  14. Mapping of isoexposure curves for evaluation of equivalent environmental doses for radiodiagnostic mobile equipment; Mapeamento de curvas de isoexposicao para avaliacao de equivalente de dose ambiente para equipamentos moveis de radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacelar, Alexandre, E-mail: abacelar@hcpa.ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Setor de Fisica Medica e Radioprotecao; Andrade, Jose Rodrigo Mendes, E-mail: jose.andrade@santacasa.tche.b [Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericordia de Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Atencao a Saude e Qualidade de Vida; Fischer, Andreia Caroline Fischer da Silveira; Accurso, Andre; Hoff, Gabriela, E-mail: andreia.silveira.001@acad.pucrs.b, E-mail: andre.accurso@acad.pucrs.b [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC/RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Experimentacao e Simulacao Computacional em Fisica Medica

    2011-10-26

    This paper generates iso exposure curves in areas where the mobile radiodiagnostic equipment are used for evaluation of iso kerma map and the environment equivalent dose (H{sup *}(d)). It was used a Shimadzu mobile equipment and two Siemens, with non anthropomorphic scatter. The exposure was measured in a mesh of 4.20 x 4.20 square meter in steps of 30 cm, at half height from the scatterer. The calculation of H{sup *}(d) were estimated for a worker present in all the procedures in a period of 11 months, being considered 3.55 m As/examination and 44.5 procedures/month (adult UTI) and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI), and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI). It was observed that there exist points where the H{sup *}(d) was over the limit established for the free area inside the radius of 30 cm from the central beam of radiation in the case of pediatric UTI and 60 cm for adult UTI. The points localized 2.1 m from the center presented values lower than 25% of those limit

  15. Neutron dose equivalent rate in intermediate energy heavy ion target area

    CERN Document Server

    Li Gui Sheng; Li Zong Wei; Su You Wu; Zhang Shu Mi

    2000-01-01

    The fluence rate distributions of neutrons emitted in the reactions of 50 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O-ion on thick Be, Cu, Au targets were measured with an activation method of threshold detectors and the neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1 m from the targets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area were obtained using the conversion coefficients for neutron fluence rate to ambient dose equivalent rate.

  16. Dose equivalent conversion coefficients, instrument and dosemeter responses for a set of neutron radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of calculations of spectrum (energy and angle) weighted conversion coefficients from fluence to the quantities effective dose equivalent, ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)), directional dose equivalent at 10 mm (H'(10)) and MADE; and of the responses per unit fluence of a spherical rem meter, a nuclear emulsion dosemeter, an albedo dosemeter and a PADC (CR39) dosemeter, for a set of neutron spectra. Calculations have been performed for both unidirectional fields and for rotational symmetry. The values of conversion coefficients and instrument and dosemeter responses are compared. (author)

  17. Determination of the effective dose equivalent in gynecologic radium therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the authors describe how to determine the effective dose equivalent absorbed by occupationally exposed persons during a gynecologic radium therapy. The observed irradiation conditions of the physician and the medical staff are approximated by a standard geometry, for which conversion factors between the measured personal dose, the effective dose equivalent and different organ doses, respectively, are calculated. The results are job-specific conversion factors between dose to a personal dosimeter and the effective dose equivalent for the occupationally exposed persons involved. According to the individual tasks, these factors are between 0.59 and 1.13. (orig.)

  18. Ambient dose measurement in some CT departments in Khartoum State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is now one of the most important radiological examinations world wide.The frequency of CT examinations is increasing rapidly from 2% of all radiological examinations in some countries a decade age to 10-15% now. During the imaging procedure, staff may expose to a significant dose. Therefore, ambient dose measurement is important in the shortage of regular personal monitoring in sudan. This study intended to evaluate the ambient dose at some CT departments (Medical Military hospital, Alamal National Hospital, Elnelin Diagnostic Center and Modern Medical Centre). These departments were equipped with daul, 16 and 64 multi detector CT machines. A survey meter (Radios) was used to measure ambient doses in three locations: Doors, Control Rooms and Adjacent Rooms. The ambient dose equivalent (scatter dose) was measured at various distances from the isocenter of the CT unit at various angles to establish isodose cartography. The mean and range of radiation at control room is 10.00-0.20 and mean (7.05μSv/hr,) reception 1.0-0 (0.40) and doors 4.00-100.00 (73.5) for height 1 meter above the ground. For height 2 meters at control room 0-10.00 (6,75), reception 0-90.00 (30) at door 9.00-90.00 (49.50). This study confirms that low levels of radiation dose are received by staff during CT imaging and these levels are within safe limits as prescribed by the national and international regulations. (Author)

  19. Determination of conversion factors of kerma and fluence to ambient dose equivalent for X-rays generated between 50 kV{sub p} to 125 kV{sub p}; Determinacao dos fatores de conversao de kerma no ar e de fluencia para o equivalente de dose ambiental para raios-X gerados no intervalo de 50 kV{sub p} a 125 kV{sub p}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    1997-12-31

    The ambient dose equivalent was determined experimentally on the interval of energy of X ray applied in diagnostic radiology. A PMMA sphere was used to simulate the trunk human (phantom), based on the definition of the report ICRU 39. The absorbed dose in different positions in the phantom was determined using LiF-TLD 100. The X ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector (HP Ge). It was also determined the HVL and the effective energy in this energy range. The conversion coefficient of the K{sub air} and {Phi} to H{sup *}(d) were determined to 10, 50 and 60 mm deep in the PMMA sphere. The obtained values were compared with data of the literature. The maximum uncertainty obtained for the coefficients was 7.2%. All parameters were also determined to the X ray quality of the incident and transmitted beam by the patient, according to the recommendation of the standard DIN 6872. The conversion factor was calculated for those situations where the X-ray beam is transmitted by a layer and Pb and it is necessary to estimate the effective dose, as in the case of shielding project of radiology diagnosis room. (author) 51 refs., 35 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Neutron detector simultaneously measures fluence and dose equivalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, R. F.; Dyer, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Neutron detector acts as both an area monitoring instrument and a criticality dosimeter by simultaneously measuring dose equivalent and fluence. The fluence is determined by activation of six foils one inch below the surface of the moderator. Dose equivalent is determined from activation of three interlocked foils at the center of the moderator.

  1. Experimental Uncertainties of TEPC Dose Equivalent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Wei-hua; XIAO; Xue-fu; WANG; Zhi-qiang; LIU; Yi-na; LI; Chun-juan; LUO; Hai-long

    2013-01-01

    The tissue-equivalent proportional counters(TEPC)are widely used for radiation protection in mixed radiation fields.The operational quantity H*(10)can be directly obtained by means of microdosimetric spectra measurements with TEPC.An empirical evaluation of uncertainties is reported in this paper.The sources of uncertainties involved in measuring microdosimetric spectra mainly are the sensitive

  2. Equivalent-spherical-shield neutron dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron doses through 162-cm-thick spherical shields were calculated to be 1090 and 448 mrem/h for regular and magnetite concrete, respectively. These results bracket the measured data, for reinforced regular concrete, of /approximately/600 mrem/h. The calculated fraction of the high-energy (>20 MeV) dose component also bracketed the experimental data. The measured and calculated doses were for a graphite beam stop bombarded with 100 nA of 800-MeV protons. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. 75 FR 9894 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of one new equivalent method for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby...

  4. Committed dose equivalent in the practice of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of internal exposure, the dose is not received at the moment of exposure, as happens with external exposure, since the incorporated radionuclide irradiates the various organs and tissues during the time it is present in the body. By definition, the committed dose equivalent corresponds to the received dose integrated over 50 years from the date of intake. In order to calculate it, one has to know the intake activity and the value of the committed dose equivalent per unit of intake activity. The uncertainties of the first parameter are such that the committed dose equivalent can only be regarded as an order of magnitude and not as a very accurate quantity. The use of it is justified, however, for, like the dose equivalent for external exposure, it expresses the risk of stochastic effects for the individual concerned since these effects, should they appear, would do so only after a latent period which is generally longer than the dose integration time. Moreover, the use of the committed dose equivalent offers certain advantages for dosimetric management, especially when it is simplified. A practical problem which may arise is that the annual dose limit is apparently exceeded by virtue of the fact that one is taking account, in the first year, of doses which will actually be received only in the following years. These problems are rare enough in practice to be dealt with individually in each case. (author)

  5. Frequency and collective effective dose equivalent of medical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to ICRP recommendation, medical exposure refers to the intentional exposure of patients for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, and to the exposures resulting from the artificial replacement of body organs or functions. Since the objective of radiotherapy is to give a large amount of radiation dose to the patient to kill cancer cells, neither individual nor collective effective doses are directly relevant for comparisons with doses from other sources, not even with diagnostic procedures. For this reason, in present report, therapeutic uses of radiations and radiopharmaceuticals are not included in the medical exposures. Medical exposures in Japan have been investigated by the nationwide surveys on the type and the frequency of radiological procedures and by the dose determinations with phantom experiments or calculations since 1960. Present report reviews the frequency of diagnostic radiological procedures and the collective effective dose equivalents from these procedures, and excess deaths from the medical exposures in Japan. In 1986, the number of X-ray diagnostic examinations was estimated to be about 1.41 x 108. The preliminary result in 1991 shows the number will be about 1.8 x 108. The resultant collective effective dose equivalent from X-ray diagnosis in 1986 was about 1.84 x 105 person Sv. Consequently per Caput mean effective dose equivalent was about 1.48 mSv/person in 1986. The total collective effective dose equivalent from all the diagnostic radiological procedures in Japan was estimated to be about 2.96 x 105 person Sv/year. per Caput mean effective dose equivalent from the total diagnostic radiological procedures in Japan was evaluated to be about 2.3 mSv/year. This value may be comparable to the mean annual effective dose equivalent received from natural radiations for the worldwide population. Mean effective dose equivalent per diagnostic radiological examination was calculated to be about 1.00 mSv/examination. (author)

  6. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  7. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  8. Biological effects and equivalent doses in radiotherapy: a software solution

    CERN Document Server

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Biffi, Katia; Marcovici, Celine Lantieri

    2013-01-01

    The limits of TDF (time, dose, and fractionation) and linear quadratic models have been known for a long time. Medical physicists and physicians are required to provide fast and reliable interpretations regarding the delivered doses or any future prescriptions relating to treatment changes. We therefore propose a calculation interface under the GNU license to be used for equivalent doses, biological doses, and normal tumor complication probability (Lyman model). The methodology used draws from several sources: the linear-quadratic-linear model of Astrahan, the repopulation effects of Dale, and the prediction of multi-fractionated treatments of Thames. The results are obtained from an algorithm that minimizes an ad-hoc cost function, and then compared to the equivalent dose computed using standard calculators in seven French radiotherapy centers.

  9. 76 FR 62402 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods... provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as amended on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35597). The new O 3 equivalent method is an..., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711. Designation of this new equivalent method is intended...

  10. 76 FR 15974 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Four New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the... Part 53, as amended on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35597). The new PM 2.5 equivalent method is an...

  11. 75 FR 30022 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the... of 40 CFR Part 53, as amended on November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new equivalent method...

  12. 75 FR 22126 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the... November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new equivalent method for O 3 is an automated method...

  13. 75 FR 45627 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the... of 40 CFR part 53, as amended on November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new equivalent method...

  14. Chlorpromazine equivalents versus defined daily doses : How to compare antipsychotic drug doses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, CAW; Monster, TBM; Brouwers, JRBJ; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2003-01-01

    Classic chlorpromazine (CPZ) equivalents can be used to chart relative antipsychotic potencies of antipsychotic drugs. Values of CPZ equivalents per drug are ambiguous in literature. In drug use evaluation studies, antipsychotic doses are frequently compared by use of the defined daily dose (DDD). T

  15. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  16. Actions for adoption of effective dose equivalent standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations related with radiological protection have been revised to adopt SI units and to accept the ICRP recommendation requesting to use the effective dose equivalent for radiation exposure control. The present report mainly deals with actions to be taken in the field of radiation instrumentation to promote the adoption of effective dose equivalent standards. In the past, exposure in roentgen has been generally used as a quantity to represent the intensity of a X-ray or alpha-ray field, because it can be measured relatively easily and accurately. The introduction of the effective dose equivalent is intended to establish annual exposure limits to ensure that the possibility of death of workers in a radioactive environment and that of development of hereditary disorders in their children or grandchildren will be maintained below permissible levels. The quantity is expressed as the sum of each organ's dose equivalent multiplied by a weight that reflects risks. Presently, such weights are assigned to seven organs including the gential glands and red marrow. Fixed-type area monitors and portable survey meters are used for work environment monitoring while film badges, TLDs, dosimeters, etc., are employed for personnel monitoring. (Nogami, K.)

  17. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poje Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent and/or neutron dose rate to which medical personnel could be exposed. Also, the neutron dose dependence on collimator aperture was analyzed. The obtained neutron dose rates outside the accelerator rooms were several times smaller than the neutron dose rates inside the accelerator rooms. Nevertheless, the measured neutron dose equivalent was not negligible from the aspect of the personal dosimetry with almost 2 mSv a year per person in the areas occupied by staff (conservative estimation. In rooms with 15 MV accelerators, the neutron exposure to the personnel was significantly lower than in the rooms having 18 MV accelerators installed. It was even more pronounced in the room reconstructed after the 60Co decommissioning. This study confirms that shielding from the neutron radiation should be considered when building vaults for high energy linear accelerators, especially when the space constraints exist.

  18. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... 53, as amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The new equivalent methods are automated... the applicant. Jennifer Orme-Zavaleta, Director, National Exposure Research Laboratory. BILLING...

  19. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... of 40 CFR Part 53, as amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326- 54341). The new equivalent method for... methods should be directed to the applicants. Dated: May 23, 2012. Jennifer Orme-Zavaleta,...

  20. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  1. Quartz red TL SAR equivalent dose overestimation for Chinese loess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Z.P.; Murray, A.S.; Bailey, R.M.;

    2006-01-01

    For the red TL of quartz extracted from Chinese loess, the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure overestimates the known laboratory doses in dose recovery test. The overestimation is the result of the first heating during the measurement of natural TL signal causing a sensitivity...... reduction, which is not corrected for using a SAR protocol. The SARA procedure was used to measure the sensitivity change. Using this as a correction factor is tested by comparison with the quartz optically stimulated luminiscence (OSL) equivalent dose. SARA is also employed to determine the residual level...... of red TL, which is found to be more than 100 Gy. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Determination of dose equivalent and risk in thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these report are presented the calculations of dose equivalent and risk, utilizing the dosimetric model described in publication 30 of the International Comission on Radiological Protection. This information was obtained by the workers of the thorium cycle, employed at the Praia and Santo Amaro Facilities, by assessing the quantity and concentration of thorium in the air. The samples and the number of measurements were established through design of experiments techniques, and the results were evaluated with the aid of variance analysis. The estimater of dose equivalent for internal and external radiation exposure and risk associated were compared with the maximum recommended limits. The results indicate the existence of operation areas whose values were above those limits, requiring so an improvement in the procedures and services in order to meet the requirements of the radiological protetion. (author)

  3. Equivalent dose determination using a quartz isothermal TL signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, D.A.G.; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on further developments in the use of an isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) signal for determining the equivalent dose (De) in unheated sedimentary quartz. In order to minimise sensitivity change during the first measurement, the ITL signal is measured at 270 °C following a preheat at ...... the same age range as the OSL signal, and it appears especially advantageous for application to quartz samples for which the OSL signal saturates below 500 Gy.......We report on further developments in the use of an isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) signal for determining the equivalent dose (De) in unheated sedimentary quartz. In order to minimise sensitivity change during the first measurement, the ITL signal is measured at 270 °C following a preheat...... signal can be fully reset by sunlight, and grows with dose over at least the same range as the OSL signal. A single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol can be used with this ITL signal. Dose recovery experiments confirm the suitability of the measurement protocol; the De values are in acceptable...

  4. Neutron dose equivalent rate for heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiGui-Sheng; ZhangTian-Mei; 等

    1998-01-01

    The fluence rate distribution of neutrons in the reactionsof 50MeV/u 18O-ion on thick Be,Cu and Au targets have been measured with an activation method of threshold detectors andthe neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1m from the tqrgets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area are obtained by using the conversion factors from neutron fluence rate to neutron doseequivalent rate.

  5. Applicability of OSL pre-dose phenomenon of quartz in the estimation of equivalent dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koul, D.K., E-mail: dkkoul@barc.gov.i [Astrophysical Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Chougaonkar, M.P. [Environmental Assessment Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Polymeris, G.S. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, GR-67100, Xanthi (Greece)

    2010-01-15

    The feasibility of utilizing the pre-dosed OSL signal in the estimation of the equivalent dose has been investigated. The results based on (i) the behavior of growth curve, (ii) dose recovery tests and (iii) non-bleachability of reservoir centres, R-centres, suggests that (i) the pre-dosed OSL does not seem to work satisfactorily in dose estimation unlike the pre-dosed 110 deg. C TL emission and (ii) it may not be applicable in case of bleached specimen.

  6. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). Two of the new equivalent methods for PM are automated monitoring..., Inc., 1600 Washington Blvd., Grants Pass, Or 97526. EQPM-1013-211, ``Environnement S.A. Model MP101M... method is identified as follows: EQNA-1013-210, ``Environnement S.A. Model AS32M cavity attenuated...

  7. Collective effective dose equivalent, population doses and risk estimates from occupational exposures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collective dose equivalent and population dose from occupational exposures in Japan, 1988 were estimated on the basis of a nationwide survey. The survey was conducted on annual collective dose equivalents by sex, age group and type of radiation work for about 0.21 million workers except for the workers in nuclear power stations. The data on the workers in nuclear power stations were obtained from the official report of the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. The total number of workers including nuclear power stations was estimated to be about 0.26 million. Radiation works were subdivided as follows: medical works including dental; non-atomic energy industry; research and education; atomic energy industry and nuclear power station. For the determination of effective dose equivalent and population dose, organ or tissue doses were measured with a phantom experiment. The resultant doses were compared with the doses previously calculated using a chord length technique and with data from ICRP publications. The annual collective effective dose equivalent were estimated to be about 21.94 person·Sv for medical workers, 7.73 person·Sv for industrial workers, 0.75 person·Sv for research and educational workers, 2.48 person·Sv for atomic energy industry and 84.4 person ·Sv for workers in nuclear power station. The population doses were calculated to be about 1.07 Sv for genetically significant dose, 0.89 Sv for leukemia significant dose and 0.42 Sv for malignant significant dose. The population risks were estimated using these population doses. (author)

  8. Determination of neutron and photon dose equivalent at workplaces in nuclear facilities in Sweden: a joint SSI-EURADOS comparison exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the dosimetry (personal and area monitoring) has been investigated inside the containment buildings of two pressurised water reactors and in the environment of a transport cask with spent fuel elements. The dosimetric quantities of main interest were ambient dose equivalent and personal dose equivalent, as operational quantities, and effective dose equivalent, as limit quantity. They were either directly determined by means of instruments and dosemeters or calculated from the experimentally determined directional spectral neutron fluence. Several groups employing different techniques carried out the investigations. The comprehensive comparison exercise has shown that a well specified Boner sphere spectrometer and a set of proton recoil detectors are well-suited to determine the neutron field for reference purposes. The neutron fields were rather soft with up to 70% of the neutron dose equivalent contributed by neutrons of energies less than 100 keV. On account of their energy dependence, rem counters overestimate, and TEPC systems underestimate, the neutron dose equivalent, even if calibrated in the field of a D2 O-moderated 252 Cf source. The application of the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) will result in about 50% higher values of neutron ambient dose equivalent. In the determination of the photon ambient dose equivalent, which amounts to about 30% of the total dose equivalent, differences up to 50% were observed between the readings of GM counters and TEPC's, chiefly caused by high energy photons present in the containment building. (Author)

  9. Committed equivalent organ doses and committed effective doses from intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed equivalent doses to individual organs for intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu m AMAD particles of 359 nuclides by infants aged 3 months, by children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and by adults. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on the way committed doses increase with the integration period is given in NRPB-M289. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  10. 10 CFR 20.1208 - Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. 20.1208 Section 20... Limits § 20.1208 Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. (a) The licensee shall ensure that the dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus during the entire pregnancy, due to the occupational exposure of a...

  11. Determination of skin dose reduction by lead equivalent gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protective gloves are always used in medical facilities to protect radiation workers from unnecessary radiation exposure. A study on radiation protection gloves which are produced by local company had been performed by the Medical Physics Group, MINT. The gloves were made of lead equivalent material, as the attenuating element. The gloves were evaluated in term of the percentage of skin dose reduction by using a newly developed procedure and facilities in MINT. Attenuation measurements of the gloves had been carried out using direct beams and scattered radiations of different qualities. TLD rings were fitted on finger phantom; and water phantom were used in the measurement. The result were obtained and analysed based on data supplied by manufacturer. (Author)

  12. The effective dose equivalent from external and internal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various sources of low-level ionizing radiation are discussed and compared in terms of mean effective dose equivalent to man. For the most nonoccupationally exposed individuals, natural sources given the dominating contribution to the effective dose equivalent. The size of this contribution is strongly dependent on human activities. Natural sources contribution on average 2.4 mSV per year, of which half is due to irradiation of lungs and airways from short lived radon daughters present in indoor air. In Sweden this radon daughter contribution is considerably higher and contributes a mean of 3 mSv per year, thus giving a total contribution from natural radiation of about 4 mSV per year. In extreme cases, radon daughter contributions of several hundreds of mSv per year may be reached. Medical exposure, mainly diagnostic X-rays, contributes 0.4-1 mSv per year both in Sweden and as a world average. The testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere has given 1-2 mSv to each person in the world as a mean. The contribution from the routine operation of nuclear reactors is insignificant. The reactor accident in Chernobyl resulted in widely varying exposures of the European population. The average for Sweden is estimated to be 0.1 mSv during the first year and about 1 mSv during a 50-year period. For groups of Swedes who eat a considerable amount of game this contribution will be 10 times higher, and for the Lapps who breed reindeer in the most contaminated areas, typical values of 20-70 mSv and extreme values of about 1 Sv may be reached in 50 years. This means that the Chernobyl reactor accident for several years will be their dominating source of irradiation

  13. Comparison of organ dose and dose equivalent for human phantoms of CAM vs. MAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Qualls, Garry D.; Slaba, Tony C.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-04-01

    For the evaluation of organ dose and dose equivalent of astronauts on space shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) missions, the CAMERA models of CAM (Computerized Anatomical Male) and CAF (Computerized Anatomical Female) of human tissue shielding have been implemented and used in radiation transport model calculations at NASA. One of new human geometry models to meet the “reference person” of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is based on detailed Voxel (volumetric and pixel) phantom models denoted for male and female as MAX (Male Adult voXel) and FAX (Female Adult voXel), respectively. We compared the CAM model predictions of organ doses to those of MAX model, since the MAX model represents the male adult body with much higher fidelity than the CAM model currently used at NASA. Directional body-shielding mass was evaluated for over 1500 target points of MAX for specified organs considered to be sensitive to the induction of stochastic effects. Radiation exposures to solar particle event (SPE), trapped protons, and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) were assessed at the specific sites in the MAX phantom by coupling space radiation transport models with the relevant body-shielding mass. The development of multiple-point body-shielding distributions at each organ made it possible to estimate the mean and variance of organ doses at the specific organ. For the estimate of doses to the blood forming organs (BFOs), data on active marrow distributions in adult were used to weight the bone marrow sites over the human body. The discrete number of target points of MAX organs resulted in a reduced organ dose and dose equivalent compared to the results of CAM organs especially for SPE, and should be further investigated. Differences of effective doses between the two approaches were found to be small (<5%) for GCR.

  14. Assessment of out-of-field absorbed dose and equivalent dose in proton fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clasie, Ben; Wroe, Andrew; Kooy, Hanne; Depauw, Nicolas; Flanz, Jay; Paganetti, Harald; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, as in other forms of radiation therapy, scattered and secondary particles produce undesired dose outside the target volume that may increase the risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer and interact with electronic devices in the treatment room. The authors implement a Monte Carlo model of this dose deposited outside passively scattered fields and compare it to measurements, determine the out-of-field equivalent dose, and estimate the change in the dose if the same target volumes were treated with an active beam scanning technique. Methods: Measurements are done with a thimble ionization chamber and the Wellhofer MatriXX detector inside a Lucite phantom with field configurations based on the treatment of prostate cancer and medulloblastoma. The authors use a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation, demonstrated to agree well with measurements inside the primary field, to simulate fields delivered in the measurements. The partial contributions to the dose are separated in the simulation by particle type and origin. Results: The agreement between experiment and simulation in the out-of-field absorbed dose is within 30% at 10-20 cm from the field edge and 90% of the data agrees within 2 standard deviations. In passive scattering, the neutron contribution to the total dose dominates in the region downstream of the Bragg peak (65%-80% due to internally produced neutrons) and inside the phantom at distances more than 10-15 cm from the field edge. The equivalent doses using 10 for the neutron weighting factor at the entrance to the phantom and at 20 cm from the field edge are 2.2 and 2.6 mSv/Gy for the prostate cancer and cranial medulloblastoma fields, respectively. The equivalent dose at 15-20 cm from the field edge decreases with depth in passive scattering and increases with depth in active scanning. Therefore, active scanning has smaller out-of-field equivalent dose by factors of 30-45 in the entrance region and this factor decreases with depth

  15. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  16. Investigation of photoneutron dose equivalent from high-energy photons in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial distribution of photoneutron dose equivalent during radiotherapy at different beam size, depth, and distance from a 15 MV linear accelerator was investigated with bubble detectors in a water phantom. The photoneutron dose equivalent was mainly from fast neutrons, and decreased with distance at a fixed field and with depth. Besides, photoneutron dose equivalent was slightly affected by beam size due to the variation of tungsten area exposed in the beam direction and photoneutrons occurred at the jaws. Fast photoneutron dose equivalent of shallow critical organs was represented still considerably outside the beam size

  17. Measurement of dose equivalent distribution on-board commercial jet aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual effective doses of aircrew members often exceed the limit of 1 mSv for the public due to the increased level of cosmic radiation at the flight altitudes, and thus, it is recommended to monitor them [International Commission on Radiation Protection. 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. ICRP Publication 60. Ann. ICRP 21(1-3), (1991)]. According to the Monte Carlo simulations [Battistoni, G., Ferrari, A., Pelliccioni, M. and Villari, R. Evaluation of the doses to aircrew members taking into consideration the aircraft structures. Adv. Space Res. 36, 1645-1652 (2005) and Ferrari, A., Pelliccioni, M. and Villari, R. Evaluation of the influence of aircraft shielding on the aircrew exposure through an aircraft mathematical model. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 108(2), 91-105 (2004)], the ambient dose equivalent rate H*(10) depends on the location in the aircraft. The aim of this article is to experimentally evaluate H*(10) on-board selected types of aircraft. The authors found that H*(10) values are higher in the front and the back of the cabin and lesser in the middle of the cabin. Moreover, total dosimetry characteristics obtained in this way are in a reasonable agreement with other data, in particular with the above-mentioned simulations. (authors)

  18. Development of Two-Dosemeter Algorithm for Better Estimation of Effective Dose Equivalent and Effective Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimal algorithm, which suitably combines two dosemeter readings, one dosemeter on the chest and the other on the back, for better estimation of effective dose equivalent (HE) and effective dose (E), was developed by utilising hundreds of broad parallel photon beam irradiation geometries. The developed algorithm, weighting front (chest) and back dosemeter readings by 0.58 and 0.42, respectively, was found to be superior to other currently available algorithms, neither underestimating HE or E by more than 14%, nor overestimating by more than a few tens of a per cent for a broad range of frontal and dorsal incident beams. Like other algorithms, however, this algorithm tends to overestimate HE and E significantly for the lateral, overhead and underfoot beam directions. This study also suggests that this overestimation problem significantly decreases when one uses typical commercial dosemeters instead of isotropic-responding dosemeters. (author)

  19. Heavy ion contributions to organ dose equivalent for the 1977 galactic cosmic ray spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Norbury, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Estimates of organ dose equivalents for the skin, eye lens, blood forming organs, central nervous system, and heart of female astronauts from exposures to the 1977 solar minimum galactic cosmic radiation spectrum for various shielding geometries involving simple spheres and locations within the Space Transportation System (space shuttle) and the International Space Station (ISS) are made using the HZETRN 2010 space radiation transport code. The dose equivalent contributions are broken down by charge groups in order to better understand the sources of the exposures to these organs. For thin shields, contributions from ions heavier than alpha particles comprise at least half of the organ dose equivalent. For thick shields, such as the ISS locations, heavy ions contribute less than 30% and in some cases less than 10% of the organ dose equivalent. Secondary neutron production contributions in thick shields also tend to be as large, or larger, than the heavy ion contributions to the organ dose equivalents.

  20. Impact of sweating on equivalent dose of patients treated with 131Iiodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Banani, Aida; Gheisari, Farshid; Alikhani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radioiodine therapy is used for the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) who undergo total thyroidectomy. After radioiodine administration, regulations require to quarantine these patients until their retained activity reduces to DTC without metastasis who had undergone total thyroidectomy and were treated with radioiodine were included in this study. 30 patients were chosen among patients who were able to exercise, did not have renal failure, and did not use diuretics. Patients were divided into two control and intervention groups. Intervention group members walked on treadmills under a specific program, in 3 time intervals. The control group did not have any specific activity. Immediately after each exercise process, both groups took a shower, and their doses were measured by a survey dosimeter. Results: It was revealed that there was a significant difference between mean values before and after each exercise time. The calculated P value which evaluates the overall impact was 0.939 which revealed that there was no significant difference between total ambient equivalent dose reductions of both groups. Conclusion: According to the study, it may conclude that sweating is an effective alternative way for radioiodine excretion, and if sweating is accompanied with well-hydrated status they may have synergism effect to shorten quarantine period. This could be an important consideration in patients which over-hydration is intolerable especially those with cardiac, liver, or renal problems. PMID:27385884

  1. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient's risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve

  2. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  3. Application of combined TLD and CR-39 PNTD method for measurement of total dose and dose equivalent on ISS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benton, E.R. [Eril Research, Inc., Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Deme, S.; Apathy, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    To date, no single passive detector has been found that measures dose equivalent from ionizing radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit. We have developed the I.S.S. Passive Dosimetry System (P.D.S.), utilizing a combination of TLD in the form of the self-contained Pille TLD system and stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (P.N.T.D.) oriented in three mutually orthogonal directions, to measure total dose and dose equivalent aboard the International Space Station (I.S.S.). The Pille TLD system, consisting on an on board reader and a large number of Ca{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:Dy TLD cells, is used to measure absorbed dose. The Pille TLD cells are read out and annealed by the I.S.S. crew on orbit, such that dose information for any time period or condition, e.g. for E.V.A. or following a solar particle event, is immediately available. Near-tissue equivalent CR-39 P.N.T.D. provides Let spectrum, dose, and dose equivalent from charged particles of LET{sub {infinity}}H{sub 2}O {>=} 10 keV/{mu}m, including the secondaries produced in interactions with high-energy neutrons. Dose information from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is used to correct the absorbed dose component {>=} 10 keV/{mu}m measured in TLD to obtain total dose. Dose equivalent from CR-39 P.N.T.D. is combined with the dose component <10 keV/{mu}m measured in TLD to obtain total dose equivalent. Dose rates ranging from 165 to 250 {mu}Gy/day and dose equivalent rates ranging from 340 to 450 {mu}Sv/day were measured aboard I.S.S. during the Expedition 2 mission in 2001. Results from the P.D.S. are consistent with those from other passive detectors tested as part of the ground-based I.C.C.H.I.B.A.N. intercomparison of space radiation dosimeters. (authors)

  4. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent to proton therapy patients outside of the proton radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X; Köhler, A; Newhauser, W D

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron dose equivalent values and neutron spectral fluences close to but outside of the therapeutic proton radiation field are presented. The neutron spectral fluences were determined at five locations with Bonner sphere measurements and established by unfolding techniques. More than 50 additional neutron dose equivalent values were measured with LiI and BF sub 3 thermal neutron detectors surrounded by a 25 cm polyethylene moderating sphere. For a large-field treatment, typical values of neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic proton absorbed dose, H/D, at 50 cm distance from isocenter, range from 1 mSv/Gy (at 0 deg.with respect to the proton beam axis) to 5 mSv/Gy (at 90 deg.). Experiments reveal that H/D varies significantly with the treatment technique, e.g., patient orientation, proton beam energy, and range-modulation. The relative uncertainty in H/D values is approximately 40% (one standard deviation).

  5. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases. PMID:27455499

  6. Can we use the equivalent sphere model to approximate organ doses in space radiation environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-10-01

    For space radiation protection it is often useful to calculate dose or dose equivalent in blood forming organs (BFO). It has been customary to use a 5cm equivalent sphere to approximate the BFO dose. However, many previous studies have concluded that a 5cm sphere gives very different dose values from the exact BFO values. A study by Bier, Townsend and Maxson (Adv. Space Res. 21, 1998) concludes that a 9cm sphere is a reasonable approximation for BFO doses in solar particle event environments. In this study we use a deterministic radiation transport to investigate the reason behind these observations and to extend earlier studies. We take different space radiation environments, including solar particle events and galactic cosmic rays at different solar modulation, and calculate the dose and dose equivalent in the skin, eye and BFO using their thickness distribution functions from the Computerized Anatomical Man model. We then determine in which cases and at what radius parameters the equivalent sphere model is a reasonable approximation.

  7. Assessment of the ambient dose rate around research reactors by thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Tanveer A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of radiation levels in and around the nuclear research reactors is essential to safe-guarding life and the environment. Background radiation monitoring at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science & Technology (PINSTECH has been carried out since the early sixties, before the criticality of the 5 MW Pakistan Research Reactor, so as to confirm the safe operation of PINSTECH nuclear facilities. In the present study, ambient dose rate levels were measured around PINSTECH by using TLD-200 (G-2 cards installed at 15 different locations over a five year period (1998-2002. The mean dose rates for individual locations in the said period ranged from 0.14 ± 0.01 to 0.19 ± 0.03 µSv/h, with a mean value of 0.16 ± 0.03 µSv/h. The cu- mulative average annual effective dose equivalent spread over 5 years was 204.4 ± 17 µSv. The data were compared with the world and averages in other countries. It was concluded that, from the health hazard point of view, the operation of research reactors and other nuclear facilities at PINSTECH presents no risk to public health.

  8. Evaluation of annual average equivalent dose of workers for nuclear medicine facilities in the Northeast Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira, Renata F.; Silva Neto, Jose Almeida; Antonio Filho, Joao, E-mail: jaf@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE/DEN), Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Luiz A.P., E-mail: lasantos@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine (NM) is a radiation technique normally used to make therapeutic treatments or diagnosis. In this technique a small quantity of radioactive material combined with drugs is used to have the diagnostic images. Any activity involving ionizing radiation should be justified and it must have its working procedures to be optimized. The purpose of this paper is show the importance of optimization of the radiation protection systems and determines an optimal dose for occupational people in nuclear medicine. Such an optimization aims to avoid any possible contamination or accidents, and reduce costs of protection. The optimization for a service which manipulates ionizing radiation can be done using different techniques, and among other, we can mention the technique of expanded cost-benefit analysis. The data collection was divided into the equivalent dose annual average and the equivalent dose average in period. The database for this study was a survey of received doses from 87 occupational people of 10 nuclear medicine facilities in the northeast Brazil and it was made in a period of 13 years (1979-1991). The results show that the equivalent dose average in the period H was 2.39 mSv. Actually, since 1992 the analysis is in progress and it shows that equivalent dose annual average could reduce even more if procedures of work are followed correctly. (author)

  9. Reconstruction of chronic dose equivalents for Rongelap and Utirik residents: 1954 to 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, E T; Greenhouse, N A; Miltenberger, R P

    1980-10-01

    From June 1946 to August 1958, the US Department of Defense and Atomic Energy Commission conducted nuclear weapons tests in the Northern Marshall Islands. BRAVO, an aboveground test in the Castle series, resulted in radioactive fallout contaminating Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. On March 3, 1954, the inhabitants of these atolls were relocated until radiation exposure rates declined to acceptable levels. Environmental and personnel radiological monitoring programs were begun in the mid 1950's by Brookhaven National Laboratory to ensure that dose equivalents received or committed remained within US Federal Radiation Council Guidelines for members of the general public. Body burden and dose equivalent histories along with activity ingestion patterns post return are presented. Dosimetric methods, results, and internal dose equivalent distributions for subgroups of the population are also described.

  10. The ICRP protection quantities, equivalent and effective dose: their basis and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.D. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Streffer, C. [Institute for Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Equivalent and effective dose are protection quantities defined by the The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). They are frequently referred to simply as dose and may be misused. They provide a method for the summation of doses received from external sources and from intakes of radionuclides for comparison with dose limits and constraints, set to limit the risk of cancer and hereditary effects. For the assessment of internal doses, ICRP provides dose coefficients (Sv Bq{sup -1}) for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by workers and members of the public, including children. Dose coefficients have also been calculated for in utero exposures following maternal intakes and for the transfer of radionuclides in breast milk. In each case, values are given of committed equivalent doses to organs and tissues and committed effective dose. Their calculation involves the use of defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including the use of reference phantoms representing the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used as a simple representation of the different effectiveness of different radiations in causing stochastic effects at low doses. A single set of tissue weighting factors is used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, despite age- and gender-related differences in estimates of risk and contributions to risk. The results are quantities that are not individual specific but are reference values for protection purposes, relating to doses to phantoms. The ICRP protection quantities are not intended for detailed assessments of dose and risk to individuals. They should not be used in epidemiological analyses or the assessment of the possibility of occurrence and severity of tissue reactions (deterministic effects) at higher doses. Dose coefficients are published as reference values and as such have no associated uncertainty. Assessments of

  11. The ICRP protection quantities, equivalent and effective dose: their basis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J D; Streffer, C

    2007-01-01

    Equivalent and effective dose are protection quantities defined by the The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). They are frequently referred to simply as dose and may be misused. They provide a method for the summation of doses received from external sources and from intakes of radionuclides for comparison with dose limits and constraints, set to limit the risk of cancer and hereditary effects. For the assessment of internal doses, ICRP provides dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1)) for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by workers and members of the public, including children. Dose coefficients have also been calculated for in utero exposures following maternal intakes and for the transfer of radionuclides in breast milk. In each case, values are given of committed equivalent doses to organs and tissues and committed effective dose. Their calculation involves the use of defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including the use of reference phantoms representing the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used as a simple representation of the different effectiveness of different radiations in causing stochastic effects at low doses. A single set of tissue weighting factors is used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, despite age- and gender-related differences in estimates of risk and contributions to risk. The results are quantities that are not individual specific but are reference values for protection purposes, relating to doses to phantoms. The ICRP protection quantities are not intended for detailed assessments of dose and risk to individuals. They should not be used in epidemiological analyses or the assessment of the possibility of occurrence and severity of tissue reactions (deterministic effects) at higher doses. Dose coefficients are published as reference values and as such have no associated uncertainty. Assessments of uncertainties

  12. The ICRP protection quantities, equivalent and effective dose: their basis and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equivalent and effective dose are protection quantities defined by the The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). They are frequently referred to simply as dose and may be misused. They provide a method for the summation of doses received from external sources and from intakes of radionuclides for comparison with dose limits and constraints, set to limit the risk of cancer and hereditary effects. For the assessment of internal doses, ICRP provides dose coefficients (Sv Bq-1) for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by workers and members of the public, including children. Dose coefficients have also been calculated for in utero exposures following maternal intakes and for the transfer of radionuclides in breast milk. In each case, values are given of committed equivalent doses to organs and tissues and committed effective dose. Their calculation involves the use of defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including the use of reference phantoms representing the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used as a simple representation of the different effectiveness of different radiations in causing stochastic effects at low doses. A single set of tissue weighting factors is used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, despite age- and gender-related differences in estimates of risk and contributions to risk. The results are quantities that are not individual specific but are reference values for protection purposes, relating to doses to phantoms. The ICRP protection quantities are not intended for detailed assessments of dose and risk to individuals. They should not be used in epidemiological analyses or the assessment of the possibility of occurrence and severity of tissue reactions (deterministic effects) at higher doses. Dose coefficients are published as reference values and as such have no associated uncertainty. Assessments of uncertainties

  13. Annual dose equivalents estimation received by Cienfuegos population due medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study represents the first evaluation of the effective equivalent dose that receives the population of the Cienfuegos province in Cuba because of medical practice. The evaluation is based on the tables of doses depending on several parameters that influence over these ones, and also based on large diagnostic examinations statistics of all medical institutions over a 9 years period. Values of examinations frequency, contribution to total dose from radiography, fluoroscopy, dental radiography and nuclear medicine, and other characteristics of the last ones are offered. A comparative reflection dealing with received doses by radiography and fluoroscopy techniques is also included. (authors). 4 refs

  14. Prediction analysis of dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters used at a MOX fuel facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, N; Yoshida, T; Takada, C

    2011-07-01

    To predict how accurately neutron dosemeters can measure the neutron dose equivalent (rate) in MOX fuel fabrication facility work environments, the dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters were calculated by the spectral folding method. The dosemeters selected included two types of personal dosemeter, namely a thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosemeter and an electronic neutron dosemeter, three moderator-based neutron survey meters, and one special instrument called an H(p)(10) monitor. The calculations revealed the energy dependences of the responses expected within the entire range of neutron spectral variations observed in neutron fields at workplaces. PMID:21498409

  15. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Drake, P. [Vattenfall AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Lindborg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Schmitz, Th. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Tichy, M

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification.

  16. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the α/β ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor α/β and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF2) data, and the above α/β ratio, the estimated median α value was 0.077 Gy-1, β was 0.009 Gy-2, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy9.3 (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis

  17. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent on student's practice on intra-oral dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tried to discuss the problems on radiological protection of students in the practice of technique of intra-oral radiography with use of classmates. This radiographic practice has been performed after the technical training use of 'DXTTR' as a preclinical training. The practice was performed as training to take peri-apical, bite-wing, occlusal and eccentric projections. The mean film numbers which were used to complete those technique were 56 films. In these practice, dosimetries were performed on six locations of the body surface of every student who was taken radiograms using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measured locations were orbit, bilateral submandible, neck, chest and abdomen. The effective dose equivalent was estimated using weighting factors of International Comission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) pub. 26 and the values of tissue dose equivalent obtained by TLD measurements. The results showed that the mean value of dose equivalent of each part was 5.40 mSv at orbit, 5.06 mSv at submandible, 0.75 mSv at neck, 0.04 mSv at chest and 0.02 mSv at abdomen. The maximum value of effective equivalent dose was 17.03 mSv which was lower than the dose equivalent limit for workers (50 mSv/year) recommended by ICRP pub. 26. The mean value of effective dose equivalent was 2.36 mSv. ICRP recommended the radiation protection for students aged 18 years or over that the procedures for restricting exposure should be broadly similar to those for occupational exposure. So the results indicate that those training was considered to be controlled in some reasonable level. The mean value of risk was estimated to be 3.94 x 10-5. Because intra-oral radiographic training with use of classmates is performed under extreme non-uniform irradiation, the evaluation of effective dose equivalent was considered to be important to control this special educational exposure and useful for optimization of the educational programs of radiographic technical training. (author)

  18. Influence of radiocesium transfer and decontamination on ambient dose in Japanese forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-depositional migration of radiocesium and decontamination on ambient dose rate in Japanese forest environment following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. We measured cesium-137 deposition from canopy to forest floor in association with rainfall and litterfall in two coniferous stands (plantation of Japanese cedar) and a deciduous broad-leaved forest stand (oak with red pine). We also measured temporal evolution of ambient dose rate at different height in each forest site. Radiocesium inventory balance in each forest component (e.g., canopy, litter and mineral soil layer) were established to determine causes of the measured changes of ambient dose rate in three forest sites. Furthermore, we assessed influence of forest decontamination (removal of organic layer of forest floor) on spatial pattern of radiocesium at the forest floor and reduction of ambient dose rate.

  19. Evaluation of Equivalent Dose Rate of Interim Dry Storage Casks Loaded with Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equivalent dose rate calculations of the CASTOR RBMK-1500 and CONSTOR RBMK-1500 casks were performed using SCALE 4.3 computer codes system. These casks are planned for an interim storage of spent nuclear fuel at Ignalina NPP. The dose rate calculations were made on the sidelong, upper and lower surface of the cask and at the certain distance. Results show that dose rate values on the surface of the cask are much less then permissible value 1000 μSv/h when average burnup of fuel assembly is 20 GWd/tU. (author)

  20. Direction distributions of neutrons and reference values of the personal dose equivalent in workplace fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the EC project EVIDOS, double-differential (energy and direction) fluence spectra were determined by means of novel direction spectrometers. By folding the spectra with fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients, contributions to H*(10) for 14 directions, and values of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and the effective dose E for 6 directions of a person's orientation in the field were determined. The results of the measurements and calculations obtained within the EVIDOS project in workplace fields in nuclear installations in Europe, i.e., at Krummel (boiling water reactor and transport cask), at Mol (Venus research reactor and fuel facility Belgonucleaire) and at Ringhals (pressurised reactor and transport cask) are presented. (authors)

  1. Risk estimation of benzene-induced leukemia by radiation equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki epidemiological study, risk assessment system for radiation has been well developed and is practically applied to the international protection standards. Hence, defining the radiation equivalent dose for chemical agents could place in the order of their risk. As well as the radiation, benzene causes leukemia to humans. Therefore, we evaluated the radiation-equivalent dose for benzene based on chromosome aberration rates induced by its metabolites and low-dose rate radiation because chromosome aberration is thought to be closely related to the leukemogenesis. Using radiation risk coefficient, the leukemia risk caused by 1 mg/m3 benzene inhalation was estimated 5.5 - 7.3 x 10-8, which is underestimated compared to other studies based on human epidemiological researches. (author)

  2. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons (2H+) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  3. Estimates of internal-dose equivalent from inhalation and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents internal radiation dose conversion factors for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of nuclear fuel cycles. This volume provides an updated summary of estimates of committed dose equivalent for radionuclides considered in three previous Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports. Intakes by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the deposition and retention of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The gastorintestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in systemic organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions, recommended in ICRP Publication 30. The first-year annual dose rate, maximum annual dose rate, and fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each radionuclide is given for selected target organs and the effective dose equivalent. These estimates include contributions from specified source organs plus the systemic activity residing in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has been incorporated into these estimates. 15 references

  4. Estimates of internal-dose equivalent from inhalation and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents internal radiation dose conversion factors for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of nuclear fuel cycles. This volume provides an updated summary of estimates of committed dose equivalent for radionuclides considered in three previous Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports. Intakes by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the deposition and retention of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m are given. The gastorintestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in systemic organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions, recommended in ICRP Publication 30. The first-year annual dose rate, maximum annual dose rate, and fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each radionuclide is given for selected target organs and the effective dose equivalent. These estimates include contributions from specified source organs plus the systemic activity residing in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has been incorporated into these estimates. 15 references.

  5. Estimation of the effects of normal tissue sparing using equivalent uniform dose-based optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we intend to estimate the effects of normal tissue sparing between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment plans generated with and without a dose volume (DV-based physical cost function using equivalent uniform dose (EUD. Twenty prostate cancer patients were retrospectively selected for this study. For each patient, two IMRT plans were generated (i EUD-based optimization with a DV-based physical cost function to control inhomogeneity (EUDWith DV and (ii EUD-based optimization without a DV-based physical cost function to allow inhomogeneity (EUDWithout DV. The generated plans were prescribed a dose of 72 Gy in 36 fractions to planning target volume (PTV. Mean dose, D30%, and D5%were evaluated for all organ at risk (OAR. Normal tissue complication probability was also calculated for all OARs using BioSuite software. The average volume of PTV for all patients was 103.02 ± 27 cm3. The PTV mean dose for EUDWith DVplans was 73.67 ± 1.7 Gy, whereas for EUDWithout DVplans was 80.42 ± 2.7 Gy. It was found that PTV volume receiving dose more than 115% of prescription dose was negligible in EUDWith DV plans, whereas it was 28% in EUDWithout DV plans. In almost all dosimetric parameters evaluated, dose to OARs in EUDWith DVplans was higher than in EUDWithout DVplans. Allowing inhomogeneous dose (EUDWithout DV inside the target would achieve better normal tissue sparing compared to homogenous dose distribution (EUDWith DV. Hence, this inhomogeneous dose could be intentionally dumped on the high-risk volume to achieve high local control. Therefore, it was concluded that EUD optimized plans offer added advantage of less OAR dose as well as selectively boosting dose to gross tumor volume.

  6. An Evaluation of Dose Equivalence between Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy and Conventional Broadbeam Radiation Using Clonogenic and Cell Impedance Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Johari Ibahim; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Yuqing Yang; Marina Zaitseva; Andrew W Stevenson; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Premila Paiva

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) has shown the potential to deliver improved outcomes over conventional broadbeam (BB) radiation therapy. To implement synchrotron MRT clinically for cancer treatment, it is necessary to undertake dose equivalence studies to identify MRT doses that give similar outcomes to BB treatments. AIM: To develop an in vitro approach to determine biological dose equivalence between MRT and BB using two different cell-based assays. METHO...

  7. 75 FR 51039 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... provisions of 40 CFR Part 53, as amended on November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new PM 10 equivalent... tabletop or rack mounts, microprocessor controlled menu-driven user interface, onboard diagnostics...

  8. Optimization of equivalent uniform dose using the L-curve criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V; Dempsey, James F; Palta, Jatinder R [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    Optimization of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) in inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prevents variation in radiobiological effect between different radiotherapy treatment plans, which is due to variation in the pattern of dose nonuniformity. For instance, the survival fraction of clonogens would be consistent with the prescription when the optimized EUD is equal to the prescribed EUD. One of the problems in the practical implementation of this approach is that the spatial dose distribution in EUD-based inverse planning would be underdetermined because an unlimited number of nonuniform dose distributions can be computed for a prescribed value of EUD. Together with ill-posedness of the underlying integral equation, this may significantly increase the dose nonuniformity. To optimize EUD and keep dose nonuniformity within reasonable limits, we implemented into an EUD-based objective function an additional criterion which ensures the smoothness of beam intensity functions. This approach is similar to the variational regularization technique which was previously studied for the dose-based least-squares optimization. We show that the variational regularization together with the L-curve criterion for the regularization parameter can significantly reduce dose nonuniformity in EUD-based inverse planning.

  9. Determination of dose equivalent via linear energy transfer (LET) spectrometry using CR-39 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For neutron dosimetry, the measurement of detailed energy distribution is preferred which is then converted to dose by folding with suitable conversion coefficients. This approach needs the detectors capable of discriminating different types of radiations and also the use of complex mathematical procedures (unfolding) to generate the neutron spectra. However, in situations where the energy distribution is difficult to measure and/or as a supplement to the above method, the dose values can also be determined by measuring the absorbed dose and the linear energy transfer (LET) in the medium, and convening to equivalent dose with conversion coefficients based on relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Since RBE depends on the LET of the ionizing radiation, analysis of the LET spectrum is a more direct way of defining the radiation quality. This method is simpler and convenient as it neither requires the discrimination of different radiation components nor the unfolding procedures. In this work, the LET spectrum in water in the range of 12 keV/μm to 382 keV/μm due to 14 MeV (D-T) neutrons is estimated using the track size parameters in different types of CR-39 track detectors. The effect of additional polyethylene (PE) radiator on the LET spectrum is also studied. The detection sensitivity, LET spectra and microdosimetric characteristics are presented and the dose equivalent values are compared with that obtained using a neutron rem meter. (author)

  10. A comparative study of three ionizing chambers for measurements of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C.; Cardoso, J.; Silva, H.

    2015-11-01

    A comparative study of three ionization chambers which directly measure the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp(10), was performed. Results show that the ratio between the response (air kerma) determined by Monte Carlo and the experimental response (collected charge) normalized by the monitor unit is the same whatever is the chamber and that this ratio is proportional to the conversion coefficients for air kerma from photon fluence.

  11. Evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for high energy radiations, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer code system and basic data have been investigated for evaluating fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for photons and neutrons up to 10 GeV. The present work suggested that the conversion factors would be obtained by incorporating effective quality factors of charged particles into the HERMES (High Energy Radiation Monte Carlo Elaborate System) code system. The effective quality factors for charged particles were calculated on the basis of the Q-L relationships specified in the ICRP Publication-60. (author)

  12. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Poje Marina; Ivković Ana; Jurković Slaven; Žauhar Gordana; Vuković Branko; Radolić Vanja; Miklavčić Igor; Kaliman Zoran; Planinić Josip; Brkić Hrvoje; Faj Dario

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator) that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate ...

  13. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB)

  14. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons to 1 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2011-04-01

    The personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk, where personal dosemeters are usually worn, and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 × 30 × 15 cm(3) slab-type phantom. For this condition, the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H(p,slab)(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several megaelectronvolts, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work, conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p,slab)(10) and H(p,slab)(3) both by using the kerma approximation and tracking secondary charged particles. For H(p)(0.07), the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H(p,slab)(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom, conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological

  15. Assessment of equivalent dose on the lens in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is presented as a useful test method for the evaluation of craniofacial structures. Among them stands the temporomandibular joint (T MJ) imaging as complementary to clinical evaluation. It must be considered that there is no reference levels established for diagnosis of this imaging modality. In this same context, recently the limit for crystalline lens was reviewed by ICRP which set new values to the equivalent dose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kerma at the surface of the crystalline lens in T MJ CBCT and derive the equivalent dose. It was used an anthropomorphic phantom of the head and neck (manufactured by: Radiation Support Devices, model; Rs-230) containing equivalent tissue with dimensions of a typical patient. The dosimetric measurements were obtained by using seven pairs of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti) positioned on the surface of the crystalline lens, divided into two pairs (one pair for each eye) per scanner evaluated. The tomographic images were obtained in three CBCT equipment s (Kodak 9000, Gendex GXCB 500 and i-Cat). Values of equivalent dose obtained were: 5.82 mSv (Kodak 9000); 5.38 mSv (Gendex GXCB 500) and 7.98 mSv (i-Cat). These results demonstrate that for this type of procedure the doses are below the annual limit but may vary in accordance with the scanner and the exposure factors used in the image acquisition. The Gendex GXCB500 uses larger Fov and higher kV. It results in levels close to those obtained on Kodak 9000. Larger doses are associated with the i-Cat. Another factor that rises is the repetition of examinations due to positioning errors and / or patient movement, which may exceed the annual limit established by ICRP. Although the ICRP limits are not applied to medical exposures, it is advisable to consider the sensitivity of the organ. For this reason, it is concluded that doses per T MJ procedure on CBCT are below the annual limit and may vary

  16. Assessment of equivalent dose on the lens in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M. V. L.; Campos, P. S. F. [Federal University of Bahia, Department of Health Sciences, Salvador (Brazil); Andrade, M. E. A. [Federal University of Pernambuco, Department of Nuclear Energy, Recife (Brazil); Soares, M. R. [Federal University of Sergipe, Department of Physics, Sao Cristovao (Brazil); Batista, W. O., E-mail: marcusradiology@gmail.com [Federal Institute of Bahia, Department of Applied Sciences, 40.301-015 Salvador (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is presented as a useful test method for the evaluation of craniofacial structures. Among them stands the temporomandibular joint (T MJ) imaging as complementary to clinical evaluation. It must be considered that there is no reference levels established for diagnosis of this imaging modality. In this same context, recently the limit for crystalline lens was reviewed by ICRP which set new values to the equivalent dose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kerma at the surface of the crystalline lens in T MJ CBCT and derive the equivalent dose. It was used an anthropomorphic phantom of the head and neck (manufactured by: Radiation Support Devices, model; Rs-230) containing equivalent tissue with dimensions of a typical patient. The dosimetric measurements were obtained by using seven pairs of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti) positioned on the surface of the crystalline lens, divided into two pairs (one pair for each eye) per scanner evaluated. The tomographic images were obtained in three CBCT equipment s (Kodak 9000, Gendex GXCB 500 and i-Cat). Values of equivalent dose obtained were: 5.82 mSv (Kodak 9000); 5.38 mSv (Gendex GXCB 500) and 7.98 mSv (i-Cat). These results demonstrate that for this type of procedure the doses are below the annual limit but may vary in accordance with the scanner and the exposure factors used in the image acquisition. The Gendex GXCB500 uses larger Fov and higher kV. It results in levels close to those obtained on Kodak 9000. Larger doses are associated with the i-Cat. Another factor that rises is the repetition of examinations due to positioning errors and / or patient movement, which may exceed the annual limit established by ICRP. Although the ICRP limits are not applied to medical exposures, it is advisable to consider the sensitivity of the organ. For this reason, it is concluded that doses per T MJ procedure on CBCT are below the annual limit and may vary

  17. Measuring neutron dose and quality factors with tissue equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods used to obtain absolute neutron dose measurements and quality factor determination from the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) are reviewed. Exposure to nearly monoenergetic neutrons with energies from 200 keV to 7.5 MeV indicate that the absorbed dose due to fast neutrons measured by the TEPC averaged 3% higher, with a standard deviation (1 sigma) of 9%, than the tissue kerma calculated from neutron fluence measurements. The absorbed dose due to fast neutrons measured by the TEPC agreed within 0.6% of the calculated tissue kerma for a PuBe neutron source, whose neutron yield was determined within 2% by the United States National Bureau of Standards. Data are presented which show the TEPC measures quality factors accurately enough for health physics purposes for neutrons with energies between 200 keV and 5 MeV

  18. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions (3He2+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the U.S. Government 2010. (authors)

  19. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons (3H+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the US Government 2010. (authors)

  20. Establishing an effective dose equivalent monitoring program for a commercial nuclear power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barbara Jane

    The purpose of this thesis is to determine whether monitoring personnel with multiple dosimeter badges to determine effective dose equivalent (EDE) is both acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and practical for the nuclear power industry. Until now, most nuclear power plants have used a single dosimeter or occasionally multiple dosimeters to monitor the "deep dose equivalent (DDE)" as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Units (ICRU). The measurement of EDE, to replace DDE, is now deemed by international and regulatory agencies to better approximate a worker's dose related to long-term risks of occupational radiation exposure. The definition of DDE, and the formulation of EDE for use as a new indicator of occupational exposure, are presented in this thesis. Radiation exposure measurements using multiple dosimeters on each worker for certain tasks were collected for this thesis on workers at a Dominion/Virginia Company nuclear power plant. These multiple dosimeter measurements have been examined to determine how such a new personnel monitoring system compares to the former one at the Dominion plant, in which only one dosimeter reading was used predominately to calculated deep dose equivalent. This is based on the assumption that most workers were exposed to uniform radiation fields and that the single dosimeter reading was representative of the highest average exposure for the worker's task. These multiple dosimetry measurements show that it is both feasible and advantageous to provide such dosimetry in situations where exposures may be non-uniform and significant enough to approach yearly exposure limits in a single day, such as in the tasks required during refueling outages.

  1. Neutron fluences and dose equivalents measured with passive detectors on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron fluences were measured on LDEF in the low energy ( 1 MeV) ranges. The low energy detectors used the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction with Gd foil absorbers to separate thermal (neutron response. High energy detectors contained sets of fission foils (181Ta, 209Bi, 232Th, 238U) with different neutron energy thresholds. The measured neutron fluences together with predicted spectral shapes were used to estimate neutron dose equivalents. The detectors were located in the A0015 and P0006 experiments at the west and Earth sides of LDEF under shielding varying from 1 to 19 g/cm2. Dose equivalent rates varied from 0.8 to 3.3 microSv/d for the low energy neutrons and from 160 to 390 microSv/d for the high energy neutrons. This compares with TLD measured absorbed dose rates in the range of 1000-3000 microGy/d near these locations and demonstrates that high energy neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total dose equivalent in LEO. Comparisons between measurements and calculations were made for high energy neutrons based on fission fragment tracks generated by fission foils at different shielding depths. A simple 1-D slab geometry was used in the calculations. Agreement between measurements and calculations depended on both shielding depth and threshold energy of the fission foils. Differences increased as both shielding and threshold energy increased. The modeled proton/neutron spectra appeared deficient at high energies. A 3-D model of the experiments is needed to help resolve the differences.

  2. Equivalence of Gyn GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image guided cervical brachytherapy with EUD-based dose prescription

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, William; Rae, William ID; Alber, Markus L

    2013-01-01

    Background To establish a generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) -based prescription method for Image Guided Brachytherapy (IGBT) that reproduces the Gyn GEC-ESTRO WG (GGE) prescription for cervix carcinoma patients on CT images with limited soft tissue resolution. Methods The equivalence of two IGBT planning approaches was investigated in 20 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) and 5 concomitant high dose rate IGBT treatments. The GGE planning strategy based on dose to ...

  3. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains information on the natural (background) radiation exposure (chapter II), the natural radiation exposure as influenced by anthropogenic effects (chapter III), the anthropogenic radiation exposure (chapter IV), and the radiation doses to the environment and the population emanating from the Chernobyl fallout (chapter V). The natural radiation exposure is specified referring to the contributions from cosmic and terrestrial background radiation and intake of natural radioactive substances. Changes of the natural environment resulting from anthropogenic effects (technology applications) inducing an increase in concentration of natural radioactive substances accordingly increase the anthropogenic radiation exposure. Indoor air radon concentration in buildings for instance is one typical example of anthropogenic increase of concentration of natural radioactivity, primarily caused by the mining industry or by various materials processing activities, which may cause an increase in the average radiation dose to the population. Measurements so far show that indoor air concentration of radon exceeds a level of 200 Bq/m3 in less than 2% of the residential buildings; the EUropean Commission therefore recommends to use this concentration value as a maximum value for new residential buildings. Higher concentrations are primarily measured in areas with relevant geological conditions and abundance of radon, or eg. in mining areas. (orig./CB)

  4. Incorporation of functional imaging data in the evaluation of dose distributions using the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miften, Moyed M.; Das, Shiva K.; Su, Min; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2004-05-01

    Advances in the fields of IMRT and functional imaging have greatly increased the prospect of escalating the dose to highly active or hypoxic tumour sub-volumes and steering the dose away from highly functional critical structure regions. However, current clinical treatment planning and evaluation tools assume homogeneous activity/function status in the tumour/critical structures. A method was developed to incorporate tumour/critical structure heterogeneous functionality in the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD). The tumour and critical structures functional EUD (FEUD) values were calculated from the dose-function histogram (DFH), which relates dose to the fraction of total function value at that dose. The DFH incorporates flouro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) functional data for tumour, which describes the distribution of metabolically active tumour clonogens, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion data for critical structures. To demonstrate the utility of the method, the lung dose distributions of two non-small cell lung caner patients, who received 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy treatment with curative intent, were evaluated. Differences between the calculated lungs EUD and FEUD values of up to 50% were observed in the 3D conformal plans. In addition, a non-small cell lung cancer patient was inversely planned with a target dose prescription of 76 Gy. Two IMRT plans (plan-A and plan-B) were generated for the patient based on the CT, FDG-PET and SPECT treatment planning images using dose-volume objective functions. The IMRT plans were generated with the goal of achieving more critical structures sparing in plan-B than plan-A. Results show the target volume EUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 5% with a value of 73.31 Gy, and the FEUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 2.6% with a value of 75.77 Gy. The FEUD plan-B values for heart and lungs were lower than plan-A by 22% and 18%, respectively

  5. Incorporation of functional imaging data in the evaluation of dose distributions using the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miften, Moyed M; Das, Shiva K; Su, Min; Marks, Lawrence B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2004-05-07

    Advances in the fields of IMRT and functional imaging have greatly increased the prospect of escalating the dose to highly active or hypoxic tumour sub-volumes and steering the dose away from highly functional critical structure regions. However, current clinical treatment planning and evaluation tools assume homogeneous activity/function status in the tumour/critical structures. A method was developed to incorporate tumour/critical structure heterogeneous functionality in the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD). The tumour and critical structures functional EUD (FEUD) values were calculated from the dose-function histogram (DFH), which relates dose to the fraction of total function value at that dose. The DFH incorporates flouro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) functional data for tumour, which describes the distribution of metabolically active tumour clonogens, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion data for critical structures. To demonstrate the utility of the method, the lung dose distributions of two non-small cell lung caner patients, who received 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy treatment with curative intent, were evaluated. Differences between the calculated lungs EUD and FEUD values of up to 50% were observed in the 3D conformal plans. In addition, a non-small cell lung cancer patient was inversely planned with a target dose prescription of 76 Gy. Two IMRT plans (plan-A and plan-B) were generated for the patient based on the CT, FDG-PET and SPECT treatment planning images using dose-volume objective functions. The IMRT plans were generated with the goal of achieving more critical structures sparing in plan-B than plan-A. Results show the target volume EUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 5% with a value of 73.31 Gy, and the FEUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 2.6% with a value of 75.77 Gy. The FEUD plan-B values for heart and lungs were lower than plan-A by 22% and 18%, respectively

  6. Neutron spectrum and dose-equivalent in shuttle flights during solar maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, J.E.; Badhwar, G.D.; Lindstrom, D.J. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center)

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents unambiguous measurements of the spectrum of neutrons found in spacecraft during spaceflight. The neutron spectrum was measured from thermal energies to about 10 MeV using a completely passive system of metal foils as neutron detectors. These foils were exposed to the neutron flux bare, covered by thermal neutron absorbers (Gd) and inside moderators (Bonner spheres). This set of detectors was flown on three U.S. Space Shuttle flights, STS-28, STS-36 and STS-31, during the solar maximum. We show that the measurements of the radioactivity of these foils lead to a differential neutron energy spectrum in all three flights that can be represented by a power law, J(E){approx equal}E{sup -0.765} neutrons cm{sup -2} day {sup -1} MeV{sup -1}. We also show that the measurements are even better represented by a linear combination of the terrestrial neutron albedo and a spectrum of neutrons locally produced in a aluminium by protons, computed by a previous author. We use both approximations to the neutron spectrum to produce a worst case and most probable case for the neutron spectra and the resulting dose-equivalents, computed using ICRP-51 neutron fluence-dose conversion tables. We compare these to the skin dose-equivalents due to charged particles during the same flights. (author).

  7. Assessment of doses caused by electrons in thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials, using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Absorbed doses caused by electron irradiation were calculated with Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) for thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials. The layers were so thin that the calculation of energy deposition was on the border of the scope of MCNP. Therefore, in this article application of three different methods of calculation of energy deposition is discussed. This was done by means of two scenarios: in the first one, electrons were emitted from the centre of a sphere of water and also recorded in that sphere; and in the second, an irradiation with the PTB Secondary Standard BSS2 was modelled, where electrons were emitted from an (90)Sr/(90)Y area source and recorded inside a cuboid phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The speed and accuracy of the different methods were of interest. While a significant difference in accuracy was visible for one method in the first scenario, the difference in accuracy of the three methods was insignificant for the second one. Considerable differences in speed were found for both scenarios. In order to demonstrate the need for calculating the dose in thin small zones, a third scenario was constructed and simulated as well. The third scenario was nearly equal to the second one, but a pike of lead was assumed to be inside the phantom in addition. A dose enhancement (caused by the pike of lead) of ∼113 % was recorded for a thin hollow cylinder at a depth of 0.007 cm, which the basal-skin layer is referred to in particular. Dose enhancements between 68 and 88 % were found for a slab with a radius of 0.09 cm for all depths. All dose enhancements were hardly noticeable for a slab with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm(2), which is usually applied to operational radiation protection.

  8. Radium equivalent and annual effective dose from geological samples from Pedra - Pernambuco - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of an uranium-anomalous area utilized for agricultural activities in Pedra, Brazil, was monitored. For this, samples from the granite and calcium-silicate amphibole rocks underlying this area and also from samples of the soil derived from these rocks were collected and analyzed by high-resolution gamma spectrometry. The equivalent radium (Raeq) was used as a reference for estimating the rate of the effective equivalent dose. The average, minimum and maximum values for the samples were of 319.2 Bq kg-1 (91.1-758.5 Bq kg-1) for soil; 327.5 Bq kg-1 (36.3-1624.0 Bq kg-1) for granitic rocks and 70,124.5 Bq kg-1 (16,979.6-147,159.0 Bq kg-1) for the calcium-silicate amphibole rocks. An estimation of the external exposition was carried out based on the calculation of the parameters obtained.

  9. Determination of lead equivalent thickness, dose reduction and homogeneity through WRP-glove used in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of lead equivalent thickness was conducted on set of rubber gloves that were formulated for used in medical applications. A narrow beam of scattered radiation was employed for the transmission measurement. Radcal corporation ionisation chamber of 6 cc was used to measure the incident and transmitted x-ray beam. The lead equivalent thickness for the gloves were determined at 50 kV, 80 kV, 100 kV and 125 kV. The homogeneity of the gloves and its efficiency for dose reduction were also measured. A knowledge on photon mass attenuation coefficient of lead in incident x-ray energy is essential in the measurement. The measurements were carried out based on the procedure as outlined by IEC 1331-1 with a minor modification to suit the facilities in MINT. (Author)

  10. Neutron equivalent dose-rate measuring according to the single-sphere albedo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reproduces the results of calibration radiation using the single-sphere albedo measuring method. It was done for the purpose of optimising the arrangement of detectors on the surface of the sphere and reduce the diameter of the moderator sphere from hitherto 30 cm whilst in addition determining the energy- and direction-dependency of a neutron equivalent dose-rate meter with He-3 detectors. Optimisation of the detector arrangement on the sphere's surface resulted in a corresponding boron-plastic capsulation with detector depths inside or outside the moderator di=-6 mm, and da=5 mm with albedo neutron detectors and thermal neutron detectors, respectively. (orig./DG)

  11. Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents from step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure the photon and neutron out-of-treatment-field dose equivalents to various organs from different treatment strategies (conventional vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]) at different treatment energies and delivered by different accelerators. Methods and Materials: Independent measurements were made of the photon and neutron out-of-field dose equivalents resulting from one conventional and six IMRT treatments for prostate cancer. The conventional treatment used an 18-MV beam from a Clinac 2100; the IMRT treatments used 6-MV, 10-MV, 15-MV, and 18-MV beams from a Varian Clinac 2100 accelerator and 6-MV and 15-MV beams from a Siemens Primus accelerator. Photon doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Rando phantom, and neutron fluence was measured with gold foils. Dose equivalents to the colon, liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, thyroid, and active bone marrow were determined for each treatment approach. Results: For each treatment approach, the relationship between dose equivalent per MU, distance from the treatment field, and depth in the patient was examined. Photon dose equivalents decreased approximately exponentially with distance from the treatment field. Neutron dose equivalents were independent of distance from the treatment field and decreased with increasing tissue depth. Neutrons were a significant contributor to the out-of field dose equivalent for beam energies ≥15 MV. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents can be estimated to any point in a patient undergoing a similar treatment approach from the distance of that point to the central axis and from the tissue depth. This information is useful in determining the dose to critical structures and in evaluating the risk of associated carcinogenesis

  12. Estimation of neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates on plutonium oxide container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium, produced in the nuclear reactor, is reprocessed from spent fuel and stored as PuO2 for subsequent use. X-Rays, low energy Gamma rays and neutrons emitted from Plutonium isotopes and their oxides, are the sources of external exposure. The neutrons have a wide energy distribution with a maximum of 13 MeV and mean energy of 1-5 MeV. In the present study measurement of neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates were carried out on the surface of PuO2 container and at different distances from it. Neutron and gamma dose rates were also measured outside the Bird Cage (BC) after keeping the PuO2 container inside it. A model of PuO2 container inside BC is shown in the present work

  13. Impact on ambient dose rate in metropolitan Tokyo from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazumasa; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Van Le, Tan; Arai, Moeko; Saito, Kyoko; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    A car-borne survey was made in metropolitan Tokyo, Japan, in December 2014 to estimate external dose. This survey was conducted for all municipalities of Tokyo and the results were compared with measurements done in 2003. The ambient dose rate measured in the whole area of Tokyo in December 2014 was 60 nGy h(-1) (23-142 nGy h(-1)), which was 24% higher than the rate in 2003. Higher dose rates (>70 nGy h(-1)) were observed on the eastern and western ends of Tokyo; furthermore, the contribution ratio from artificial radionuclides ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) to ambient dose rate in eastern Tokyo was twice as high as that of western Tokyo. Based on the measured ambient dose rate, the effective dose rate after the accident was estimated to be 0.45 μSv h(-1) in Tokyo. This value was 22% higher than the value before the accident as of December 2014. PMID:27055250

  14. Correlation-study about the ambient dose rate and the weather conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Masato; Hatano, Yuko; Aoyama, Tomoo; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kita, Kazuyuki; Ishizuka, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    The long-term radiation risks are believed to be heavily affected by the resuspension process. We therefore focus on the surface-atmosphere exchange process of released radioactive materials in this study. Radioactive materials were deposited on the soil and float in the air, and such complicated process are influenced by the weather conditions deeply. We need to reveal the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate. In this study, we study the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate with the correction of the decrease due to the radioactive decay. We found that there is a negative correlation between the ambient dose rate and the soil water content by the correlation coefficient. Using this result, we reconstruct the ambient dose rate from the weather conditions by the multiple regression analysis and found that the reconstructed data agree with the observation very well. Using Kalman filter, which can be sequentially updates the state estimate, we obtained such a good agreement.

  15. Equivalent dose measurements on board an Armenian Airline flight and Concord (9-17 km)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigations of the neutron component (E=1-10 MeV) of cosmic radiation on board the 'Armenian Airlines' aircrafts using nuclear photoemulsion are presented. The emulsions were exposed on the flights from Yerevan to Moscow, St.-Petersburg, Beirut, Athens, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Paris and Sofia, and on Concord supersonic flights from Paris to New York. The dependence of the neutron fluxes, and on absorbed and equivalent doses on the flight parameters were investigated. On the flights of the supersonic Concord, with an altitude of 17 km, the neutron fluxes were essentially higher in comparison to those measured on Armenian airliners. It is interesting to note, that the neutron flux and equivalent dose rate decrease with altitude up to 470 km in space, for example, on board the STS-57. The shape of the differential energy spectrum for fast neutrons is the same on all Armenian airlines flights, but significantly different at 17 km altitude, where the flux in the energy region above 3 MeV is increasing

  16. Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, Hp(d)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA - Bologna has organised a one day-workshop on the subject: Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, Hp(d). The aim of the workshop was the discussion of the new implications and modifications to be expected in the routine individual monitoring of external radiation, due to the issue of the Decree 241/00 (G.U. 31/8/2000) in charge since 01/01/2001. The decree set up in Italian law the standards contained in the European Directive EURATOM 96/29-Basic Standards for the Protection of Health of Workers and the General Public against Dangers arising from Ionizing Radiation. Among others, the definition of the operational quantities for external radiation for personal and environmental monitoring, Hp(d) e H*(d) respectively as defined by ICRU (International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurements), requires to update the methods of measurements and calibration of the personal dosemeters and environmental monitors. This report collects the papers presented at the workshop dealing with the Personal Dose Equivalent, Hp(d), the conversion coefficients, Hp(d)/Ka e Hp(d)/, obtained through Monte Carlo calculations published by ICRU and ICRP (International Commission for Radiation Protection), the new calibration procedures and the practical implication in the routine of individual monitoring in terms of Hp(d). Eventually, in the last chapter, the answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) are briefly reported

  17. Evaluation of the directional dose equivalent H,(0.07) for ring dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The personnel dosimetry laboratory (LDP) of the Metrology department received an user's of radiation beta application that incidentally had irradiated 14 couples of ring dosemeters for extremities of the type TLD-100 given by the LDP. This sample of 14 couples of rings tentatively it was irradiated in the months of July-August of the year 2004, and he requested in an expedite way the evaluation of the received dose equivalent. The LSCD builds two calibration curves in terms of the directional dose equivalent H'(0.07) using two sources patterns of 90 Sr-90 Y for beta radiation: one of 74 MBq and another of 1850 MBq with traceability to the PTB. The first curve in the interval of 0 to 5 mSv, the second in the range of 5 to 50 mSv, taking into account effects by positioned of the rings in the phantom. Both calibration curves were validated by adjustment lack, symmetry of residuals and normality of the same ones. It is evaluated and analyzing the H'(0.007) for these 14 couples of rings using the Tukey test of media of a single road. It was found that the H, its could be classified in 4 groups, and that the probability that its has irradiated in a random way it was smaller to the level at α = 0.05. (Author)

  18. Produtividade e qualidade do morangueiro sob dois ambientes e doses de biofertilizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrislene N. Dias

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOO cultivo em ambiente protegido desponta como importante na criação de um microclima mais favorável à produção. Neste contexto, o objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a produtividade e a qualidade do morango submetido a dois ambientes de cultivo e doses de biofertilizante misto. O experimento foi conduzido na Fazenda Experimental da Universidade da Integração Internacional da Lusofonia Afro-Brasileira (UNILAB, no Maciço de Baturité, CE, com cultivar Oso Grande, no período de setembro de 2013 a janeiro de 2014. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso com parcelas subdivididas, com quatro repetições. Nas parcelas avaliou-se o efeito de dois ambientes de cultivo e nas subparcelas o efeito de cinco doses de biofertilizante. A partir de 37 dias após o transplantio (DAT contava-se, semanalmente, o número de frutos para obtenção da produtividade por planta, massa, diâmetro, comprimento e teor de sólidos solúveis dos frutos. A maior produtividade de frutos (10.734 kg ha-1 foi obtida nas plantas desenvolvidas no ambiente telado, na dose zero. As características de qualidade dos frutos cultivados em condições de campo aberto apresentaram maiores valores indicando que a temperatura e a luminosidade afetam tais características.

  19. Switch from epoetin to darbepoetin alfa in hemodialysis: dose equivalence and hemoglobin stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrieta J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Javier Arrieta,1 Iñigo Moina,1 José Molina,2 Isabel Gallardo,3 María Luisa Muñiz,4 Carmen Robledo,5 Oscar García,5 Fernando Vidaur,6 Rosa Inés Muñoz,3 Izaskun Iribar,7 Román Aguirre,7 Antonio Maza8 1Hospital de Basurto, Bilbao, 2Hospital de Donostia, Donostia-San Sebastián, 3Hospital de Galdakao-Usansolo, Galdakao, 4Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo, 5Hospital de Santiago, Vitoria-Gasteiz, 6Policlínica de Guipúzcoa, Donostia-San Sebastián, 7Hemobesa Clinica Virgen Blanca, Bilbao, 8Dialbilbo, Bilbao, Spain Aim: The objective of the study reported here was to describe dose equivalence and hemoglobin (Hb stability in a cohort of unselected hemodialysis patients who were switched simultaneously from epoetin alfa to darbepoetin alfa. Methods: This was a multicenter, observational, retrospective study in patients aged $18 years who switched from intravenous (IV epoetin alfa to IV darbepoetin alfa in October 2007 (Month 0 and continued on hemodialysis for at least 24 months. The dose was adjusted to maintain Hb within 1.0 g/dL of baseline. Results: We included 125 patients (59.7% male, mean [standard deviation (SD] age 70.4 [13.4] years. No significant changes were observed in Hb levels (mean [SD] 11.9 [1.3] g/dL, 12.0 [1.5], 12.0 [1.5], and 12.0 [1.7] at Months −12, 0, 12 and 24, respectively, P=0.409. After conversion, the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA dose decreased significantly (P<0.0001, with an annual mean of 174.7 (88.7 international units (IU/kg/week for epoetin versus 95.7 (43.4 (first year and 91.4 (42.7 IU/kg/week (second year for darbepoetin (65% and 64% reduction, respectively. The ESA resistance index decreased from 15.1 (8.5 IU/kg/week/g/dL with epoetin to 8.1 (3.9 (first year and 7.9 (4.0 (second year with darbepoetin (P<0.0001. The conversion rate was 354:1 in patients requiring high (>200 IU/kg/week doses of epoetin and 291:1 in patients requiring low doses. Conclusion: In patients on hemodialysis receiving ESAs

  20. Produtividade e qualidade do morangueiro sob dois ambientes e doses de biofertilizante

    OpenAIRE

    Chrislene N Dias; Albanise B. Marinho; Rafaela da S. Arruda; Marcio J. P. e Silva; Ednângelo D. Pereira; Carlos N. V. Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    RESUMOO cultivo em ambiente protegido desponta como importante na criação de um microclima mais favorável à produção. Neste contexto, o objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a produtividade e a qualidade do morango submetido a dois ambientes de cultivo e doses de biofertilizante misto. O experimento foi conduzido na Fazenda Experimental da Universidade da Integração Internacional da Lusofonia Afro-Brasileira (UNILAB), no Maciço de Baturité, CE, com cultivar Oso Grande, no período de setembro de 20...

  1. Influencing factors of dose equivalence for X and γ rays with different energy based on Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The accuracy of dosimeter measurement of X and γ rays needs to be resolved. Purpose: The aim is to study the correction term of the equivalent process of low energy X-ray and the natural radioactive source. Methods: Instead of the standard sources, X-ray machine was adopted on the dose instrument calibration. The influence factors of the equivalence between low-energy X-ray and high-energy X or γ rays were simulated using Monte Carlo (MCNP) software. Results: The influences of distance, space scattering, response of detector on dose equivalence were obtained. The simulation results were also analyzed. Conclusion: The method can be used in dose equivalent correction for low-energy X-ray, high-energy X or γ rays, which is significant for the widespread use of X rays. (authors)

  2. Imaging and profiling of absorbed dose in a tissue-equivalent GEL-phantom exposed to epithermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Palazzi, P. [Dip. Fisica Univ., Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Mauri, M. [Politecnico, Milano (Italy); Rosi, G.; Nava, E.; Tinti, R. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy)

    2000-10-01

    Last improvements are presented of the method for dose imaging and profiling in tissue-equivalent phantoms exposed to neutron fields suitable for BNCT. The method brings to separate knowledge of the various dose components of the secondary radiation induced by thermal or epithermal neutrons in tissue. (author)

  3. Effective Dose Equivalent To The Cypriot Population Due To Natural Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was initiated by the Biomedical Research Foundation, two years ago, to estimate the various natural radiation components that contribute to the Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) to the Cypriot population. The present study has shown that the contribution due to cosmic radiation is estimated to be less than 270 microSiverts per annum, while that due to airborne Rn-222 concentration in Cypriot houses is estimated to be less then 330 microSieverts per annum. The contribution due to terrestrial gamma radiations, which is currently under investigation, is so far estimated to be around 108 microSieverts per annum. Therefore the EDE to the Cypriot population due to natural radiation is likely to be around 700 microSieverts per annum, not taking into account the internal exposure due to other naturally occuring radionuclides. (author)

  4. Development of a extremity thermoluminescence dosemeter for photon dose equivalent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extremely thermoluminescence dosimeter, to be used when the extremity may become the limiting organ, based on CaSO4:Dy pellet was developed to be worn as wristlet by technicians who work with unsealed sources or handle radioactive materials. This system permits photon dose equivalent assessment as well as the effective energy determination. Such dosemeter has to be worn in addition to a whole-body dosemeter. The system consists of two pieces of polyethylene with dimensions of 40 mm x 20 mm x 10 mm that can be superimposed and three discs of CaSO4:Dy plus Teflon (PTFE), as sensitive material, between different filters. The detectors are produced by the Dosimetric Materials Laboratory of IPEN and have diameter of 6.0 mm and a thickness of 0.8 mm. One detector is placed between plastic filters of 3.0 mm thickness that guarantees electronic equilibrium for 60Co gamma rays. Another detector is located between 1.0 mm thick lead filters plus 3.0 mm plastic filters. A third detector is sandwiched between filters of lead 0.8 mm thick with a central hole of 2.0 mm diameter and plastic filters of 3.0 mm thickness. The detectors are sealed in a plastic film 20 mg.cm-2 thick. All TL detectors are in contact with filters. The filter area is a little larger than the TL detector. The validation of the proposed dosimetric system was performed for 60Co gamma doses between 0.1 and 200 mGy. In this range the relationship dose-response is linear. The energy response of the dosimetric system was evaluated for an energy range between 30 and 662 keV. The maximum, relative to 60Co, energy dependence TL response is observed at 31.2 keV (factor 10.2). To obtain the dose equivalent and the effective energy from the correlation between the three TL readings was developed an algorithm. Taking into account the results obtained in simulated laboratory comparisons, better than ±5%, we conclude that the proposed dosimetric system agrees with the requirements for its application as extremity

  5. Monitoring of doses in hemodynamic medical team with dosemeters calibrated to measure the personal dose equivalent; Monitoracao das doses na equipe medica de hemodinamica com dosimetro calibrado em equivalente de dose pessoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T.C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: alonso@cdtn.br; Silva, T.A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br

    2005-07-01

    In hemodynamic, the exposure time of the workers to the radiation are larger than in the conventional one. Consequently, the received doses are larger. The dose of the medical team is also affected significantly by the uniqueness of the exams that are accomplished in two ways of irradiation and several angles of incidences, what stands out the need of the dosimeters use with metrologic reliability adapted for such situations. The individual monitoring of the doses received by individuals occupationally exposed to the radiation is accomplished with films dosimeters or thermo luminescent ones, with the main objective to guarantee that the limits of doses are not surpassed. The used in the system Brazilian metrologic system is still the individual dose for photons, in spite of the international recommendations for the use of the equivalent personal dose, that is the greatness adapted to assess the equivalent dose and the effective dose. In this work, the dosimeter composed by the Harshaw-Bicron badge and the detecting thermoluminescent of lithium fluoride was tested and adapted to measure the equivalent of personal dose in the depths 0,07 mm and 10 mm. It was applied in the hemodynamics practices and the doses were compared with those obtained by the routine film dosimeter. The results suggest, for daily use of the interventional services, the indication of the new dosimeter in substitution to the of the type films. (author)

  6. Optimal use of β-blockers in high-risk hypertension: A guide to dosing equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet B McGill

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Janet B McGillDepartment of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USAAbstract: Hypertension is the number one diagnosis made by primary care physicians, placing them in a unique position to prescribe the antihypertensive agent best suited to the individual patient. In individuals with diabetes mellitus, blood pressure (BP levels > 130/80 mmHg confer an even higher risk for cardiovascular and renal disease, and these patients will benefit from aggressive antihypertensive treatment using a combination of agents. β‑blockers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of hypertension in high-risk patients. β‑blockers are a heterogeneous class of agents, and this review presents the differences between β‑blockers and provides evidence-based protocols to assist in understanding dose equivalence in the selection of an optimal regimen in patients with complex needs. The clinical benefits provided by β‑blockers are only effective if patients adhere to medication treatment long term. β‑blockers with proven efficacy, once-daily dosing, and lower side effect profiles may become instrumental in the treatment of hypertensive diabetic and nondiabetic patients.Keywords: antihypertensive, blood pressure, atenolol, carvedilol, labetalol, metoprolol, nebivolol

  7. Calculation and analysis of photon dose equivalent distributions in the ICRU sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed dose equivalent distributions have been calculated in the ICRU sphere by Monte Carlo methods for photons in the energy range 0.010 - 10.0 MeV using the kerma approximation, with statistical accuracy generally better than +- 1%. Results are presented as depth-dose distributions along the principal axis and other selected axes and as isodose distributions, for parallel unidirectional, parallel opposed, planar rotational, planar isotropic and spatially isotropic irradiation. Various DE quantities are discussed and their numerical values presented as functions of photon energy. Six appendices are included which discuss (I.) conversion factors for different basic normalisation quantities, (II.) briefly the Monte Carlo procedure used, (III.) the meaning of kerma and the kerma approximation, (IV.) a comparison of the work presented in this report and the calculations of Dimbylow in 1983, (V.) a test experiment using a 30 cm spherical phantom, (VI.) the results of backscatter measurements and calculations using a 30 cm spherical phantom and cubic phantoms. (orig.)

  8. Percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media for small fields of CyberKnife

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Suh, Tae Suk; Hong, Seung-Woo; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media are studied. For lung equivalent media a Balsa wood is used, and for a soft bone equivalent media a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as an inhomogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT film by using photon beams from 6MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5, 10 to 30 mm. As a simulation tool GEANT4 Monte Carlo code v9.4.p02 is used. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT film in and beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT film and the dose without EBT film ca...

  9. Reconstruction of biologically equivalent dose distribution on CT-image from measured physical dose distribution of therapeutic beam in water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the standpoint of quality assurance in radiotherapy, it is very important to compare the dose distributions realized by an irradiation system with the distribution planned by a treatment planning system. To compare the two dose distributions, it is necessary to convert the dose distributions on CT images to distributions in a water phantom or convert the measured dose distributions to distributions on CT images. Especially in heavy-ion radiotherapy, it is reasonable to show the biologically equivalent dose distribution on the CT images. We developed tools for the visualization and comparison of these distributions in order to check the therapeutic beam for each patient at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). To estimate the distribution in a patient, the dose is derived from the measurement by mapping it on a CT-image. Fitting the depth-dose curve to the calculated SOBP curve also gives biologically equivalent dose distributions in the case of a carbon beam. Once calculated, dose distribution information can be easily handled to make a comparison with the planned distribution and display it on a grey-scale CT-image. Quantitative comparisons of dose distributions can be made with anatomical information, which also gives a verification of the irradiation system in a very straightforward way. (author)

  10. Equivalence of Gyn GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image guided cervical brachytherapy with EUD-based dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish a generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) -based prescription method for Image Guided Brachytherapy (IGBT) that reproduces the Gyn GEC-ESTRO WG (GGE) prescription for cervix carcinoma patients on CT images with limited soft tissue resolution. The equivalence of two IGBT planning approaches was investigated in 20 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) and 5 concomitant high dose rate IGBT treatments. The GGE planning strategy based on dose to the most exposed 2 cm3 (D2cc) was used to derive criteria for the gEUD-based planning of the bladder and rectum. The safety of gEUD constraints in terms of GGE criteria was tested by maximizing dose to the gEUD constraints for individual fractions. The gEUD constraints of 3.55 Gy for the rectum and 5.19 Gy for the bladder were derived. Rectum and bladder gEUD-maximized plans resulted in D2cc averages very similar to the initial GGE criteria. Average D2ccs and EUDs from the full treatment course were comparable for the two techniques within both sets of normal tissue constraints. The same was found for the tumor doses. The derived gEUD criteria for normal organs result in GGE-equivalent IGBT treatment plans. The gEUD-based planning considers the entire dose distribution of organs in contrast to a single dose-volume-histogram point

  11. Calculation of Absorbed Dose in Target Tissue and Equivalent Dose in Sensitive Tissues of Patients Treated by BNCT Using MCNP4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Pooya, S. M. Hosseini

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is used for treatment of many diseases, including brain tumors, in many medical centers. In this method, a target area (e.g., head of patient) is irradiated by some optimized and suitable neutron fields such as research nuclear reactors. Aiming at protection of healthy tissues which are located in the vicinity of irradiated tissue, and based on the ALARA principle, it is required to prevent unnecessary exposure of these vital organs. In this study, by using numerical simulation method (MCNP4C Code), the absorbed dose in target tissue and the equiavalent dose in different sensitive tissues of a patiant treated by BNCT, are calculated. For this purpose, we have used the parameters of MIRD Standard Phantom. Equiavelent dose in 11 sensitive organs, located in the vicinity of target, and total equivalent dose in whole body, have been calculated. The results show that the absorbed dose in tumor and normal tissue of brain equal to 30.35 Gy and 0.19 Gy, respectively. Also, total equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs, other than tumor and normal tissue of brain, is equal to 14 mGy. The maximum equivalent doses in organs, other than brain and tumor, appear to the tissues of lungs and thyroid and are equal to 7.35 mSv and 3.00 mSv, respectively.

  12. Mapping of isoexposure curves for evaluation of equivalent environmental doses for radiodiagnostic mobile equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper generates iso exposure curves in areas where the mobile radiodiagnostic equipment are used for evaluation of iso kerma map and the environment equivalent dose (H*(d)). It was used a Shimadzu mobile equipment and two Siemens, with non anthropomorphic scatter. The exposure was measured in a mesh of 4.20 x 4.20 square meter in steps of 30 cm, at half height from the scatterer. The calculation of H*(d) were estimated for a worker present in all the procedures in a period of 11 months, being considered 3.55 m As/examination and 44.5 procedures/month (adult UTI) and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI), and 3.16 m As/examination and 20.1 procedure/month (pediatric UTI). It was observed that there exist points where the H*(d) was over the limit established for the free area inside the radius of 30 cm from the central beam of radiation in the case of pediatric UTI and 60 cm for adult UTI. The points localized 2.1 m from the center presented values lower than 25% of those limit

  13. The neutron dose equivalent evaluation and shielding at the maze entrance of a Varian Clinac 23EX treatment room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rate (Hn,D and HG) at the outer maze entrance and the adjacent treatment console area after the installation of a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator with a higher beam energy than its predecessor. The evaluation was based on measurements and comparison with several empirical calculations. The effectiveness of borated polyethylene (BPE) boards, as a maze wall lining material, on neutron dose and photon dose reduction is also reported. Methods: A single energy Varian 6 MV photon linear accelerator (linac) was replaced with a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator capable of producing 18 MV photons in a vault originally designed for the former accelerator. In order to evaluate and redesign the shielding of the vault, the neutron dose equivalent Hn,D was measured using an Andersson-Braun neutron Rem meter and the photon dose equivalent HG was measured using a Geiger Mueller and an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter at the outer maze entrance. The measurement data were compared to semiempirical calculations such as the Kersey method, the modified Kersey method, and a newly proposed method by Falcao et al. Additional measurements were taken after BPE boards were installed on the maze walls as a neutron absorption lining material. Results: With the gantry head tilted close to the inner maze entrance and with the jaws closed, both neutron dose equivalent and photon dose equivalent reached their maximum. Compared to the measurement results, the Kersey method overestimates the neutron dose equivalent Hn,D by about two to four times (calculation/measurement ratio≅2.4-3.8). Falcao's method largely overestimates the Hn,D (calculation/measurement ratio≅3.9-5.5). The modified Kersey method has a calculation to measurement ratio about 0.6-0.9. The photon dose equivalent calculation including McGinley's capture gamma dose equivalent equation estimates about 77%-98% of the measurement. After applying BPE boards as a lining material on

  14. Skin dose estimation due to a contamination by a radionuclide {beta} emitter: are doses equivalent good estimator of protection quantities?; Estimation de la dose extremite due a une contamination par un radionucleide emetteur {beta}: l'equivalent de dose est-il un bon estimateur de la grandeur de protection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgois, L. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France)

    2011-04-15

    When handling radioactive {beta} emitters, measurements in terms of personal dose equivalents H{sub p} (0.07) are used to estimate the equivalent dose limit to skin or extremities given by regulations. First of all, analytical expressions for individual dose equivalents H{sub p} (0.07) and equivalent doses to the extremities H{sub skin} are given for a point source and for contamination with a radionuclide {beta} emitter. Second of all, operational quantities and protection quantities are compared. It is shown that in this case the operational quantities significantly overstate the protection quantities. For a skin contamination the ratio between operational quantities and protection quantities is 2 for a maximum {beta} energy of 3 MeV and 90 for a maximum {beta} energy of 150 keV. (author)

  15. ambiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Leal Salcedo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El derecho internacional ambiental es un conocimiento de carácter transversal, que entre otras consideraciones refleja las preocupaciones de la sociedad por la implementación de un modelo de desarrollo sustentable para el respeto a las reglas del medio natural que garantizan la integridad y renovación de los sistemas naturales. El presente artículo enfoca esta visión a través del análisis de material documental revisado, entre ellos tratados internacionales que permiten distinguir el desarrollo del derecho internacional ambiental y el papel de Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU, en el propósito común del derecho individual y colectivo de disfrutar de una vida, un ambiente seguro, sano y ecológicamente equilibrado. En función a estas disertaciones las consideraciones finales exponen parte de la visión que ha estructurado la ONU y que representan un aporte considerable en el fomento de la conciencia mundial sobre la necesidad de establecer vínculos entre las naciones para el continuo desarrollo de esta rama del derecho.

  16. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent on student's practice on intra-oral dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Shin-ichi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Toyama, Michio; Takase, Hiroshi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    We tried to discuss the problems on radiological protection of students in the practice of technique of intra-oral radiography with use of classmates. This radiographic practice has been performed after the technical training use of 'DXTTR' as a preclinical training. The practice was performed as training to take peri-apical, bite-wing, occlusal and eccentric projections. The mean film numbers which were used to complete those technique were 56 films. In these practice, dosimetries were performed on six locations of the body surface of every student who was taken radiograms using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measured locations were orbit, bilateral submandible, neck, chest and abdomen. The effective dose equivalent was estimated using weighting factors of International Comission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) pub. 26 and the values of tissue dose equivalent obtained by TLD measurements. The results showed that the mean value of dose equivalent of each part was 5.40 mSv at orbit, 5.06 mSv at submandible, 0.75 mSv at neck, 0.04 mSv at chest and 0.02 mSv at abdomen. The maximum value of effective equivalent dose was 17.03 mSv which was lower than the dose equivalent limit for workers (50 mSv/year) recommended by ICRP pub. 26. The mean value of effective dose equivalent was 2.36 mSv. ICRP recommended the radiation protection for students aged 18 years or over that the procedures for restricting exposure should be broadly similar to those for occupational exposure. So the results indicate that those training was considered to be controlled in some reasonable level. The mean value of risk was estimated to be 3.94 x 10{sup -5}. Because intra-oral radiographic training with use of classmates is performed under extreme non-uniform irradiation, the evaluation of effective dose equivalent was considered to be important to control this special educational exposure and useful for optimization of the educational programs of radiographic technical training

  17. Intercomparison 2013 on measurements of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields in the African region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intercomparison exercise on the measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) was jointly organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers through its Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory in the African region. This intercomparison exercise was aimed at verifying the performance of the individual monitoring services of the participants in order to assess their capabilities to measure the quantity Hp(10) in photon (gamma and X ray) fields helping them to comply with dose limitation requirements. The scope of this intercomparison was aimed at passive dosemeters, which determine the personal dose equivalent in photon radiation fields, mainly for thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters. Twenty-seven countries from the Africa region and from outside Africa participated in this exercise. The intercomparison protocol, including the preparation of the dosemeters and the irradiation procedures, is described and the results are presented, analysed and discussed. (authors)

  18. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  19. A calculational method of photon dose equivalent based on the revised technical standards of radiological protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective conversion factor for photons from 0.03 to 10 MeV were calculated to convert the absorbed dose in air to the 1 cm, 3 mm, and 70 μm depth dose equivalents behind iron, lead, concrete, and water shields up to 30 mfp thickness. The effective conversion factor changes slightly with thickness of the shields and becomes nearly constant at 5 to 10 mfp. The difference of the effective conversion factor was less than 2% between plane normal and point isotropic geometries. It is suggested that the present method, making the data base of the exposure buildup factors useful, would be very effective as compared to a new evaluation of the dose equivalent buildup factors. 5 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs

  20. Internal individual dose monitoring and estimation of dose equivalent from workers of the development and production of radioisotopes in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of internal individual dose monitoring from workers of the development and production of radioisotopes in CIAE (1995-2000) are presented. The annual average committed effective dose is 1.8 x 10-2 - 8.0 x 10-1 mSv and the collective committed effective dose is 2.9 x 10-3 - 9.8 x 10-2 man·Sv in 1995-2000. The collective committed effective dose is 1.6 x 10-1 man·Sv and the annual average committed effective dose is 1.8 x 10-1 mSv for the 873 persons from 1995-2000

  1. Medical irradiation and the use of the ''effective dose equivalent'' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the effective dose for all kinds of medical irradiation. In order to estimate the 'somatic effective dose' the weighting factors recommended by ICRP 26 have been separated into those for somatic effects and for genetic effects. Calculation of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology procedures must consider the various technical parameters which determine the absorbed dose in the various organs, i.e. beam quality, typical entrance dose and the number of films of each view. Knowledge about these parameters is not always well established and therefore the effective dose estimates are very uncertain. The average dose absorbed by various organs in the case of administration of radionuclides to the body depends to a much higher degree on biological parameters than in the case of external irradiation. In contrast to the variability and lack of reliability of biological data, the physical methods for internal dose calculation are quite elaborate. However, these methods have to be extended to involve the target dose from the radioactivity distributed within the remaining parts of the body. An attempt was made to estimate the somatic effective dose for the most common diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. This would make it possible to compare the risk of X-ray and nuclear medicine techniques on a more equitable basis. The collective effective dose from medical irradiation is estimated for various countries on the basis of reported statistical data. (H.K.)

  2. The collective dose equivalent in evaluated region of bone-coal power stations and bone-coal shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1991-1993, the radioactivity levels of the bone-coal mines were investigated in Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Zhejiang and Anhui Provinces, respectively, where the reserve of bone-coal is about 90% of our country's total reserve. the annual additional collective dose equivalent within 80 km evaluated region of bone-coal power stations in Nijiangkou and Anren is 1.7 and 1.9 man·mSv, respectively, and that of Zhuantanyan bone-coal shaft is 1.4 man·mSv. The collective dose equivalent caused by bone-coal cinder brick produced for 25 years in the five provinces is 1.6 x 105 man·Sv. (authors)

  3. The collective dose equivalent in evaluated region of bone-coal power stations and bone-coal shafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; JIANG Shan; KONG Ling-Li; LI Ying; YE Ji-Da; SHI Jin-Hua; WU Zong-Mei

    2005-01-01

    During 1991-1993, the radioactivity levels of the bone-coal mines were investigated in Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Zhejiang and Anhui Provinces, respectively, where the reserve of bone-coal is about 90% of our country's total reserve. The annual additional collective dose equivalent within 80km evaluated region of bone-coal power stations in Nijiangkou and Anren is 1.7 and 1.9 man .mSv,respectively,and that of Zhuantanyan bone-coal shaft is 1.4 man.mSv.The collective dose equivalent caused by bone-coal cinder brick produced for 25 years in the provinces is 1.6×105 man.Sv.

  4. Decomposition of the absorbed dose by LET in tissue-equivalent materials within the SHIELD-HIT transport code

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolevsky, N; Buyukcizmeci, N; Ergun, A; Latysheva, L; Ogul, R

    2015-01-01

    The SHIELD-HIT transport code, in several versions, has been used for modeling the interaction of therapeutic beams of light nuclei with tissue-equivalent materials for a long time. All versions of the code include useful option of decomposition of the absorbed dose by the linear energy transfer (LET), but this option has not been described and published so far. In this work the procedure of decomposition of the absorbed dose by LET is described and illustrated by using the decomposition of the Bragg curve in water phantom, irradiated by beams of protons, alpha particles, and of ions lithium, carbon and oxygen.

  5. Dose to tissues and effective dose equivalent by inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the results of a sensitivity analysis are described which shows the influence of relevant physical and biological parameters on the dose from inhaled Rn-222, Rn-220 and their daughters to the basal cell layer of the bronchi, to the pulmonary tissues and to other body tissues. The used models for deposition, retention and dosimetry of inhaled daughters take into regard the variation of following parameters: The AMAD of inhaled radioactive particles; the fraction of unattached daughters atoms; the velocity of ciliary transport; the desorption rate of attached daughter atoms from their particles; the absorption rate to blood; and the depth of the basal cell layer in the bronchial generations. A computer programme was set-up for the calculation of the activity and dose distribution in the lungs as function of these parameters. For the evaluation of the effective dose from inhaled mixtures of Rn-222- and Rn-220-daughters three different alternatives for the weighting of the mean doses to the target tissues in the lungs are described, taking into regard possible differences between the cancerogenic sensitivity of the target cells in the bronchial and alveolar region. On the basis of the results of this sensitivity analysis mean values for the effective dose to adults per unit of inhaled potential α-energy (in Joule) and per unit of potential α-energy (in WLM) of daughters mixtures are derived as function of the unattached fraction of potential α-energy in air and the desorption half-life time of attached daughter atoms in the lungs. In addition the effective dose from inhaled Rn-222 and Rn-220 (+ Po-216) is estimated and compared with the effective dose from inhaled daughters. Finally the consequences for the assessment of intake and exposure limits for workers and for members of the public are outlined. (orig.)

  6. Fixed-dose combination ezetimibe+atorvastatin lowers LDL-C equivalent to co-administered components in randomized trials: use of a dose-response model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Chen, Erluo; Tomassini, Joanne E; McPeters, Gail; Polis, Adam B; Triscari, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Co-administration of ezetimibe with atorvastatin is a generally well-tolerated treatment option that reduces LDL-C levels and improves other lipids with greater efficacy than doubling the atorvastatin dose. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the equivalent lipid-modifying efficacy of fixed-dose combination (FDC) ezetimibe/atorvastatin compared with the component agents co-administered individually in support of regulatory filing. Two randomized, 6-week, double-blind cross-over trials compared the lipid-modifying efficacy of ezetimibe/atorvastatin 10/20 mg (n = 353) or 10/40 mg (n = 280) vs. separate co-administration of ezetimibe 10 mg plus atorvastatin 20 mg (n = 346) or 40 mg (n = 280), respectively, in hypercholesterolemic patients. Percent changes from baseline in LDL-C (primary endpoint) and other lipids (secondary endpoints) were assessed by analysis of covariance; triglycerides were evaluated by longitudinal-data analysis. Expected differences between FDC and the corresponding co-administered doses were predicted from a dose-response relationship model; sample size was estimated given the expected difference and equivalence margins (±4%). LDL-C-lowering equivalence was based on 97.5% expanded confidence intervals (CI) for the difference contained within the margins; equivalence margins for other lipids were not prespecified. Ezetimibe/atorvastatin FDC 10/20 mg was equivalent to co-administered ezetimibe+atorvastatin 20 mg in reducing LDL-C levels (54.0% vs. 53.8%) as was FDC 10/40 mg and ezetimibe+atorvastatin 40 mg (58.9% vs. 58.7%), as predicted by the model. Changes in other lipids were consistent with equivalence (97.5% expanded CIs <±3%, included 0); triglyceride changes varied more. All treatments were generally well tolerated. Hypercholesterolemic patients administered ezetimibe/atorvastatin 10/20 and 10/40 mg FDC had equivalent LDL-C lowering. This FDC formulation proved to be an efficacious and generally well

  7. Relationship between Individual External Doses, Ambient Dose Rates and Individuals' Activity-Patterns in Affected Areas in Fukushima following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Wataru; Uesaka, Motoki; Yamada, Chie; Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Ishii, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 11, 2011, released radioactive material into the atmosphere and contaminated the land in Fukushima and several neighboring prefectures. Five years after the nuclear disaster, the radiation levels have greatly decreased due to physical decay, weathering, and decontamination operations in Fukushima. The populations of 12 communities were forced to evacuate after the accident; as of March 2016, the evacuation order has been lifted in only a limited area, and permanent habitation is still prohibited in most of the areas. In order for the government to lift the evacuation order and for individuals to return to their original residential areas, it is important to assess current and future realistic individual external doses. Here, we used personal dosimeters along with the Global Positioning System and Geographic Information System to understand realistic individual external doses and to relate individual external doses, ambient doses, and activity-patterns of individuals in the affected areas in Fukushima. The results showed that the additional individual external doses were well correlated to the additional ambient doses based on the airborne monitoring survey. The results of linear regression analysis suggested that the additional individual external doses were on average about one-fifth that of the additional ambient doses. The reduction factors, which are defined as the ratios of the additional individual external doses to the additional ambient doses, were calculated to be on average 0.14 and 0.32 for time spent at home and outdoors, respectively. Analysis of the contribution of various activity patterns to the total individual external dose demonstrated good agreement with the average fraction of time spent daily in each activity, but the contribution due to being outdoors varied widely. These results are a valuable contribution to understanding realistic individual external doses and the corresponding

  8. Relationship between Individual External Doses, Ambient Dose Rates and Individuals’ Activity-Patterns in Affected Areas in Fukushima following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Ishii, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on March 11, 2011, released radioactive material into the atmosphere and contaminated the land in Fukushima and several neighboring prefectures. Five years after the nuclear disaster, the radiation levels have greatly decreased due to physical decay, weathering, and decontamination operations in Fukushima. The populations of 12 communities were forced to evacuate after the accident; as of March 2016, the evacuation order has been lifted in only a limited area, and permanent habitation is still prohibited in most of the areas. In order for the government to lift the evacuation order and for individuals to return to their original residential areas, it is important to assess current and future realistic individual external doses. Here, we used personal dosimeters along with the Global Positioning System and Geographic Information System to understand realistic individual external doses and to relate individual external doses, ambient doses, and activity-patterns of individuals in the affected areas in Fukushima. The results showed that the additional individual external doses were well correlated to the additional ambient doses based on the airborne monitoring survey. The results of linear regression analysis suggested that the additional individual external doses were on average about one-fifth that of the additional ambient doses. The reduction factors, which are defined as the ratios of the additional individual external doses to the additional ambient doses, were calculated to be on average 0.14 and 0.32 for time spent at home and outdoors, respectively. Analysis of the contribution of various activity patterns to the total individual external dose demonstrated good agreement with the average fraction of time spent daily in each activity, but the contribution due to being outdoors varied widely. These results are a valuable contribution to understanding realistic individual external doses and the corresponding

  9. Calculation of equivalent dose index for electrons from 5,0 to 22,0 MeV by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The index of equivalent dose in depth and in a sphere surface of a soft tissue equivalent material were determined by Monte Carlo method for electron irradiations from 5,0 to 22.00 MeV. The effect of different irradiation geometries which simulate the incidence of onedirectional opposite rotational and isotropic beams was studied. It is also shown that the detector of wall thickness with 0.5g/cm2 and isotropic response com be used to measure index of equivalent dose for fast electrons. The alternative concept of average equivalent dose for radiation protection is discussed. (M.C.K.)

  10. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  11. Estimation of neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates on plutonium oxide container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron and gamma dose rate measurements were essential around the storage container of PuO2 for operational radiation protection purpose. In the present study, various types of active dose rate meters and passive dosimeters were used for the measurement of neutron and gamma dose rates in addition to the theoretical calculations. The neutron and gamma dose rate on the surface of PuO2 container varied from 0.42 mSv/h to 0.71 mSv/h and from 1.83 mSv/h to 2.15 mSv/h respectively which decreased with increasing distance from the surface of the container. The neutron dose rates calculated theoretically did not match with that of experimental values at shorter distances, however, at larger distance such as 20 and 50 cm the agreement between theoretical and experimental values were reasonably good. The observations also suggested that the neutrons emitted from PuO2 were mostly above the thermal neutron energy. The theoretical value of gamma dose rate on the surface and at distances from the bird cage matches very well with the measured values. The gamma dose rates are quite higher than the neutron dose rates for PuO2 container. (author)

  12. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Poston, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed.

  13. Evaluation of the effective equivalent dose in the general public due to the discharge of uranium in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some facilities available at IPEN-CNEN/SP may discharge uranium in their liquid effluents. The uranium contents of these effluents are analyzed by photometry or fluorimetry, and according to the results obtained a decision is made, by the Environmental Monitoring Division, upon their discharge to the environment. In 1988 a total activity of 3.66x109 Bq of uranium was discharge in a volume of approximately 30 m3. The effective equivalent dose in the general public was evaluated by making a conservative assumption that all the liquid effluents containing uranium are discharged directly to the soil reaching the groundwater. The dose calculation was carried out by using a generic model which described the transport of radionuclides in the groundwater. In order to be conservative it was also assumed that the critical pathway is the direct in gestion of water through hypothetical wells around the Institute. Conservative assumptions were also made in the characterization of the local aquifer parameters such as vertical and longitudinal dispersivity, effective porosity of the soil, hydraulic conductivity etc., in roder to overestimate the effective equivalent dose. The result obtained, of 5.3x10-10 mSv/a is far below the dose limit for the public adopted by the Radiological Protection Board. The derived limit for the discharge was also evaluated, using the same model, giving a result of 3.6x1013Bq/a. (author)

  14. Measurements of Neutron Energy Spectra and Neutron Dose Equivalent Rates of Workplaces in TQNPC-Ⅲ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Monitoring for neutron doses is one of the important activities for radiation protection. And the information about neutron energy distributions of the measured fields is necessary for the correct

  15. Ambient and biological monitoring of cokeoven workers: determinants of the internal dose of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeneelen, F J; van Leeuwen, F E; Oosterink, S; Anzion, R B; van der Loop, F; Bos, R P; van Veen, H G

    1990-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured in the breathing zone air of 56 battery workers at two cokeovens during three consecutive days. The concentration of total PAH ranged up to 186 micrograms/m3. Preshift and end of shift urine samples were collected to determine 1-hydroxypyrene, a metabolite of pyrene. Control urine samples were available from 44 workers in the shipping yard of a hot rolling mill. The median values of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine of smoking and non-smoking controls were 0.51 and 0.17 mumol/mol creatinine, respectively. Concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene up to 11.2 mumol/mol were found in the urine of the cokeoven workers. At the start of the three day working period after 32 hours off work, the 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations were four times higher and at the end of the working period 10 times higher compared with control concentrations. Excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene occurred with a half life of 6-35 hours. Both the ambient air monitoring data and the biological monitoring data showed that the topside workers were the heaviest exposed workers. The relation between air monitoring data and biological monitoring data was not strong. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify determinants of the internal dose. The combination of exposure and smoking amplify each other and the use of a protective airstream helmet decreases the internal dose. An effect of alcohol consumption and the use of medication on the toxicokinetics of pyrene was not found.

  16. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. (author)

  17. Study Of Dose Distribution In A Human Body In Space Flight With The Spherical Tissue-Equivalent Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Akatov, Yu; Petrov, V.; Kartsev, I.; Polenov, Boris; Petrov, V.; Lyagushin, V.

    In the space experiment MATROSHKA-R, the spherical tissue equivalent phantom (30 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module. Due to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a real human body. If compared with the anthropomorphic phantom Rando used inside and outside the ISS, the spherical phantom has lower mass, smaller size, and requires less crew time for the detector retrieval; its tissue-equivalent properties are closer to the standard human body tissue than the Rando-phantom material. In the first phase of the experiment the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid state track detectors). There were two experimental sessions with the spherical phantom in the crew cabin, (1) from Jan. 29, 2004 to Apr. 30, 2004 and (2) from Aug. 11, 2004 to Oct. 10, 2005. The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. The results obtained with the passive detectors returned to the ground after each session show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being observed close to the outer wall of the crew cabin, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom (0.31 mGy/day) is obviously due to the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and Earth' radiation belt contribution on the ISS trajectory. Minimum dose rate (0.15 mGy/day) is caused mainly by the strongly penetrating GCR particles and is observed behind more than 5 g/cm2 tissue shielding. Critical organ doses, mean-tissue and effective doses of a crew member in the crew cabin are also estimated with the spherical phantom. The estimated effective

  18. Modelling the dynamics of ambient dose rates induced by radiocaesium in the Fukushima terrestrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Marc-André; Mourlon, Christophe; Calmon, Philippe; Manach, Erwan; Debayle, Christophe; Baccou, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Since the Fukushima accident, Japanese scientists have been intensively monitoring ambient radiations in the highly contaminated territories situated within 80 km of the nuclear site. The surveys that were conducted through mainly carborne, airborne and in situ gamma-ray measurement devices, enabled to efficiently characterize the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of air dose rates induced by Caesium-134 and Caesium-137 in the terrestrial systems. These measurements revealed that radiation levels decreased at rates greater than expected from physical decay in 2011-2012 (up to a factor of 2), and dependent on the type of environment (i.e. urban, agricultural or forest). Unlike carborne measurements that may have been strongly influenced by the depuration of road surfaces, no obvious reason can be invoked for airborne measurements, especially above forests that are known to efficiently retain and recycle radiocaesium. The purpose of our research project is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the data acquired by Japanese, and identify the environmental mechanisms or factors that may explain such decays. The methodology relies on the use of a process-based and spatially-distributed dynamic model that predicts radiocaesium transfer and associated air dose rates inside/above a terrestrial environment (e.g., forests, croplands, meadows, bare soils and urban areas). Despite the lack of site-specific data, our numerical study predicts decrease rates that are globally consistent with both aerial and in situ observations. The simulation at a flying altitude of 200 m indicated that ambient radiation levels decreased over the first 12 months by about 45% over dense urban areas, 15% above evergreen coniferous forests and between 2 and 12% above agricultural lands, owing to environmental processes that are identified and discussed. In particular, we demonstrate that the decrease over evergreen coniferous regions might be due the combined effects of canopy

  19. A study of dose equivalent for the nurses in Hirosaki University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual relationships in 1997-1999 between exposure dose of those nurses engaging in full-time radiological works and the number of patients subjected to radiological examinations were investigated in authors' hospital. The annual number of those patients was rather constant. Exposure was measured by film-, carrot- and ring-badges. Eight to nine nurses engaged in radiological examinations like CT, fluoroscopy, urinary tract fluoroscopy and angiography, and other 8 nurses, therapy with sealed 137Cs and 192Ir and unsealed 131I as well. No significant changes in exposure dose were observed in the former group of nurses and in the latter. The dose decreased annually to the level of the former due to skill advancement. (K.H.)

  20. An Analytical Model of Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose for Passively-Scattered Proton Radiotherapy and Validation with Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Farah, Jad [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Service de Dosimétrie Externe, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  1. Reference and Equivalent Methods Used to Measure National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Criteria Air Pollutants - Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are a number of Federal Reference Method (FRM) and Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) systems used to monitor the six criteria air pollutants (Lead [Pb], Carbon Monoxide [CO], Sulfur Dioxide [SO2], Nitrogen Dioxide [NO2], Ozone [O3], Particulate Matter [PM]) to determine if an...

  2. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Justus, Alan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, S Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olsher, Richard H [RP-2; Devine, Robert T [RP-2

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  3. Monte Carlo estimation of photoneutrons spectra and dose equivalent around an 18 MV medical linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem-Bezoubiri, A.; Bezoubiri, F.; Badreddine, A.; Mazrou, H.; Lounis-Mokrani, Z.

    2014-04-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of an 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator, lodged at Blida Anti-Cancer Centre in Algeria, was developed during this study to estimate the photoneutrons spectra and doses at the patient table in a radiotherapy treatment room, for radiation protection purposes.

  4. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titt, Uwe, E-mail: utitt@mdanderson.org; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Sell, Martin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research, 123 Old Brompton Road, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses.

  5. Effect of intensiti modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fu Zhou; Qian Sun; Ya-Jun Zhang; Geng-Ming Wang; Bin He; Tao Qi; An Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of the intensity modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer.Methods:A total of 82 cases of non-small cell lung cancer were divided into observation group and control group according to the random number table method. Patients in the control group received conventional radiotherapy while observation group received intensity modulated radiotherapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimization method. The treatment effects, survival times, blood vessel-related factors, blood coagulation function and the levels of inflammatory factors and so on were compared between the two groups of patients.Results:The effective rate of the observation group after treatment was higher than that of the control group. Progression free survival and median overall survival times were longer than those of patients in the control group (P<0.05). The serum VEGF and HIF-αα levels as well as D-D, TT, PT, APTT and FIB levels were lower in observation group patients after treatment than those in the control group(P<0.05). At the same time point, serum TNF-αα, CRP and PCT levels in the observation group after treatment were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Serum M2-PK, CA125, CEA and SCC values of patients in the observation group after treatment were all significantly lower than those in the control group (P< 0.05).Conclusions:Intensity modulated radiation therapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimized method can improve the treatment effect, prolong the survival time, optimize micro inflammatory environment and inhibit tumor biological behavior at the same time.

  6. Individual External Dose Monitoring of All Citizens of Date City by Passive Dosimeter 5 to 52 Months After the Fukushima NPP Accident (series): 1. Comparison of Individual Dose with Ambient Dose Rate Monitored by Aircraft Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2016-01-01

    Date (d\\textschwa 'te) City in Fukushima Prefecture has conducted a population-wide individual dose monitoring program after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, which provides a unique and comprehensive data set of the individual doses of citizens. The relationship between the individual doses and the corresponding ambient doses assessed from airborne surveys was examined. The results show that the individual doses were about 0.15 times the ambient doses, which were a quarter of the value employed by the Japanese government, throughout the period of the airborne surveys used. The knowledge obtained in this study could enable the prediction of individual doses in the early phase of future radiological accidents involving large-scale contamination.

  7. Estimating the equivalent dose of late Pleistocene fine silt quartz from the Lower Mississippi Valley using a standardized OSL growth curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Zhixiong, E-mail: zshen@tulane.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Mauz, Barbara, E-mail: mauz@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Geography, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZT (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    The establishment of a standardized growth curve is desired for optical dating as it facilitates the dating procedures. Here, we analyzed the dose responses of 16 fine silt quartz samples from the Lower Mississippi Valley in order to identify common properties that would allow establishing a standardized OSL growth curve (SGC). The analysis confirms the dependence of the standardized dose response upon the size of test dose. This dependence was corrected by converting the standardized dose response to an equivalent standardized dose response obtained by a 1.8 Gy test dose. Equivalent SGCs were established for two different grain size ranges by combining the data of several samples and fitting the sum of a single saturating exponential function and a linear function to the equivalent standardized dose response of these data. Equivalent doses up to 500 Gy determined with an equivalent SGC agree well with those obtained with a conventional SAR protocol, suggesting that the equivalent SGCs established in this study are reliable.

  8. Study of dose distribution in a human body in international space station compartments with the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Tolochek, Raisa V.; Kartsev, Ivan S.; Petrov, Vladislav M.; Nikolaev, Igor V.; Moskalyova, Svetlana I.; Lyagushin, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is known to be key hazard of manned space mission. To estimate accurately radiation health risk detailed study of dose distribution inside human body by means of human phantom is conducted. In the space experiment MATROSHKA-R, the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom (32 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been used on board the ISS for more than 8 years. Owing to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a real human body. If compared with the anthropomorphic phantom Rando used inside and outside the ISS, the spherical phantom has lower mass, smaller size and requires less crew time for the detector installation/retrieval; its tissue-equivalent properties are closer to the standard human body tissue than the Rando-phantom material. Originally the spherical phantom was installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module, then in the Piers-1, MIM-2 and MIM-1 modules of the ISS Russian segment, and finally in JAXA Kibo module. Total duration of the detector exposure is more than 1700 days in 8 sessions. In the first phase of the experiment with the spherical phantom, the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid-state track detectors). The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. After each session the passive detectors are returned to the ground. The results obtained show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being observed close to the outer wall of the compartment, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom is obviously due to the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and Earth' radiation belt contribution on

  9. Preliminary On-Orbit Neutron Dose Equivalent and Energy Spectrum Results from the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semones, Edward; Leitgab, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument was activated on ISS on February 1st, 2016. Integrated in ISS-RAD, the Fast Neutron Detector (FND) performs, for the first time on ISS, routine and precise direct neutron measurements between 0.5 and 8 MeV. Preliminary results for neutron dose equivalent and neutron flux energy distributions from online/on-board algorithms and offline ground analyses will be shown, along with comparisons to simulated data and previously measured neutron spectral data. On-orbit data quality and pre-launch analysis validation results will be discussed as well.

  10. ORION: a computer code for evaluating environmental concentrations and dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code ORION has been developed to evaluate the environmental concentrations and the dose equivalent to human organs or tissue from air-borne radionuclides released from multiple nuclear installations. The modified Gaussian plume model is applied to calculate the dispersion of the radionuclide. Gravitational settling, dry deposition, precipitation scavenging and radioactive decay are considered to be the causes of depletion and deposition on the ground or on vegetation. ORION is written in the FORTRAN IV language and can be run on IBM 360, 370, 303X, 43XX and FACOM M-series computers. 8 references, 6 tables

  11. Modelling of Radionuclides Transfer and Ambient Dose Rates in Fukushima Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.A.; Mourlon, C.; Simon-Cornu, M. [Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, CE Cadarache-Bat 153, BP3 - 13115 St-Paul-lez- Durance cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    the precise different deposition sequences and the meteorological conditions. Moreover, the characteristics of Japanese cedar forests seem to be very specific and the foliar absorption parameter has to be adjusted, in link with the very particular foliage of this tree species. The model is able to reproduce quite well the caesium deposition in soil, but also the throughfall and the stem flow that occurred during the six months after the accident. Several ambient dose rate calculations have been also tested against measurements in various stations of evergreen (Japanese cedar, spruces and pines) and deciduous forests in eastern Fukushima Prefecture, where deposition essentially occurred as humid and 85% of the total deposit was on the soil in the 3 months following the accident. The ambient dose rates are well correlated with the caesium concentrations in the soil, and even more in the tree canopy. (authors)

  12. Equivalent intraperitoneal doses of ibuprofen supplemented in drinking water or in diet: a behavioral and biochemical assay using antinociceptive and thromboxane inhibitory dose-response curves in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Raghda A M; El Gayar, Nesreen H; Georgy, Sonia S; Hamza, May

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ibuprofen is used chronically in different animal models of inflammation by administration in drinking water or in diet due to its short half-life. Though this practice has been used for years, ibuprofen doses were never assayed against parenteral dose-response curves. This study aims at identifying the equivalent intraperitoneal (i.p.) doses of ibuprofen, when it is administered in drinking water or in diet. Methods. Bioassays were performed using formalin test and incisional pain model for antinociceptive efficacy and serum TXB2 for eicosanoid inhibitory activity. The dose-response curve of i.p. administered ibuprofen was constructed for each test using 50, 75, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). The dose-response curves were constructed of phase 2a of the formalin test (the most sensitive phase to COX inhibitory agents), the area under the 'change in mechanical threshold'-time curve in the incisional pain model and serum TXB2 levels. The assayed ibuprofen concentrations administered in drinking water were 0.2, 0.35, 0.6 mg/ml and those administered in diet were 82, 263, 375 mg/kg diet. Results. The 3 concentrations applied in drinking water lay between 73.6 and 85.5 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the formalin test; between 58.9 and 77.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the incisional pain model; and between 71.8 and 125.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of serum TXB2 levels. The 3 concentrations administered in diet lay between 67.6 and 83.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the formalin test; between 52.7 and 68.6 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the incisional pain model; and between 63.6 and 92.5 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of serum TXB2 levels. Discussion. The increment in pharmacological effects of different doses of continuously administered ibuprofen in drinking water or diet do not parallel those of i.p. administered ibuprofen. It is therefore difficult to assume the equivalent parenteral daily doses based on mathematical calculations.

  13. Role of the parameters involved in the plan optimization based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose and radiobiological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widesott, L.; Strigari, L.; Pressello, M. C.; Benassi, M.; Landoni, V.

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the role and the weight of the parameters involved in the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) method, for prostate and head-and-neck plans. We systematically varied the parameters (gEUDmax and weight) involved in the gEUD-based optimization of rectal wall and parotid glands. We found that the proper value of weight factor, still guaranteeing planning treatment volumes coverage, produced similar organs at risks dose-volume (DV) histograms for different gEUDmax with fixed a = 1. Most of all, we formulated a simple relation that links the reference gEUDmax and the associated weight factor. As secondary objective, we evaluated plans obtained with the gEUD-based optimization and ones based on DV criteria, using the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. gEUD criteria seemed to improve sparing of rectum and parotid glands with respect to DV-based optimization: the mean dose, the V40 and V50 values to the rectal wall were decreased of about 10%, the mean dose to parotids decreased of about 20-30%. But more than the OARs sparing, we underlined the halving of the OARs optimization time with the implementation of the gEUD-based cost function. Using NTCP models we enhanced differences between the two optimization criteria for parotid glands, but no for rectum wall.

  14. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.;

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated...... separately using Monte Carlo techniques. We have used circular aperture field of 6 cm in diameter as a representative field. The tumor was assumed to be in the cranium. The range and modulation width for both carbon and proton beams were set to 15 cm and 10 cm, respectively. Results: In carbon therapy......, absorbed neutron doses to tonsils and pharynx close to the field-edge were found to be 5x10-4 mSv/GyE and 4x10-4 mSv/GyE, respectively. Whereas, neutron equivalent doses to tonsils and pharynx were estimated to be 0.57mSv/GyE and 0.55 mSv/GyE in scanned proton therapy, respectively. In heavy ion carbon...

  15. Optimization of artificial neural networks for the reconstruction of the neutrons spectrum and their equivalent doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work was used the robust design methodology of artificial neural networks to determine a good topology of net able to solve with efficiency the problems of neutrons spectrometry and dosimetry. For the design of the topology of optimized net 36 different net architectures based on an orthogonal arrangement with a configuration L9(34), L4(32) were trained. For the training of the neural networks, was used a computer code developed in the ambient of Mat lab programming, which automates the process and analysis of the information, reducing the time used in this activity considerably for the investigator. For the training of the propagation nets forward was utilized a neutrons spectrum compendium published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, where of the total 80% was used for the training and 20% for the test, it trained with an inverse propagation algorithm being the entrance data the count rates corresponding to the 7 spheres of the spectrometric system of Bonner spheres, as exit data, the neural network obtains the neutrons spectrum expressed in 60 energy groups and are calculated of simultaneous way 15 dosimetric quantities. (Author)

  16. Neutron dose equivalent rate meter on the basis of the single sphere Albedo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In area monitoring there is a need for a more accurate neutron reference dose rate meter, especially for the purpose of albedo dosemeter calibrations in neutron stray radiation fields of interest. The so-called Single Sphere Albedo Counter makes use of three active 3He proportional counters as thermal neutron detectors positioned in the centre and on the surface (albedo dosemeter configurations) of a polyethylene sphere. The linear combination of the detector readings allows for the indication of different quantities like H*(10),D,φ, and reduces the energy dependence significantly. The paper describes the dosimetric properties of a prototype instrument and its application in routine monitoring. (author)

  17. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson William

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. Methods The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions treated with SBRT were reviewed. Local control (LC was defined pathologically by negative biopsy or radiographically by lack of tumor enlargement on CT or stable/declining standardized uptake value (SUV on PET scan. The SBRT dose regimen was converted to the single fraction equivalent dose (SFED to characterize the dose-control relationship using a logistic tumor control probability (TCP model. Additionally, the kinetics of decline in maximum SUV (SUVmax were analyzed. Results The SBRT regimen was 40-50 Gy/5 fractions (n = 23 or 42-60 Gy/3 fractions (n = 30 delivered to lung (n = 39, liver (n = 11 and bone (n = 3 metastases. Median follow-up for patients alive at the time of analysis was 28.0 months (range, 4-68. The actuarial LC was 88% at 18 months. On univariate analysis, higher dose per fraction (p max was 7.9 and declined with an estimated half-life of 3.8 months to a post-treatment plateau of approximately 3. Conclusions An aggressive SBRT regimen with SFED ≥ 45 Gy is effective for controlling metastatic melanoma and RCC. The SFED metric appeared to be as robust as the BED in characterizing dose-response, though additional studies are needed. The LC rates achieved are comparable to those obtained with SBRT for other histologies, suggesting a dominant mechanism of in vivo tumor ablation that overrides intrinsic differences in cellular radiosensitivity between histologic subtypes.

  18. Development of a Reference System for the determination of the personal dose equivalent and the constancy of X- Ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reference system for the determination of the personal dose equivalent, Hp (10), and a quality control program of X-ray equipment used In radioprotection require the periodic verification of the X-ray beams constancy. In this work, two parallel-plate ionization chambers were developed with inner electrodes of different materials, and inserted into PMMA slab phantoms. One ionization chamber was developed with inner carbon electrodes and the other with inner aluminium electrodes. The two ionization chambers can be used as a Tandem system. The different energy response of the two ionization chambers allowed the development of the Tandem system that is very useful for the checking of the constancy of beam qualities. Standard intermediary energy X-ray beams (from 48 keV to 118 keV), radioprotection level, were established through the development of a dosimetric methodology and the analysis of their physical parameters. The ionization chambers were studied in relation to their operational characteristics, and they were calibrated in X-ray beams (radioprotection, diagnostic radiology, mammography and radiotherapy levels) in accordance to international recommendations. They presented good performance. The determination procedure of personal dose equivalent, Hp (10), was established. (author)

  19. Fentanyl tolerance in the treatment of cancer pain: a case of successful opioid switching from fentanyl to oxycodone at a reduced equivalent dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutou, Ichiro; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Yoji

    2015-06-01

    Opioids are not generally deemed to have an analgesic ceiling effect on cancer pain. However, there have been occasional reports of tolerance to opioid development induced by multiple doses of fentanyl. The authors report a case of suspected tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioid, in which an increasing dose of fentanyl failed to relieve the patient's cancer pain symptoms, but opioid switching to oxycodone injections enabled a dose reduction to below the equivalent dose conversion ratio. The patient was a 60-year-old man diagnosed with pancreatic body carcinoma with multiple metastases. The base dose consisted of 12 mg/day of transdermal fentanyl patches (equivalent to 3.6 mg/day, 150 μg/h fentanyl injection), and rescue therapy consisted of 10 mg immediate-release oxycodone powders. Despite the total daily dose of fentanyl reaching 5.6 mg (equivalent to 560 mg oral morphine), the analgesic effect was inadequate; thus, an urgent adjustment was necessary. Due to the moderate dose of fentanyl, the switch to oxycodone injection was done incrementally at a daily dose equivalent to 25% of the fentanyl injection. The total dose of oxycodone was replaced approximately 53.5% of the dose of fentanyl prior to opioid switching.

  20. Adoption of new ICRU operational magnitude for the measurement of equivalent doses in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This papers compares the results using a dosimetric irradiation in free air under normal incidence and with an IAEA phantom of 30x30x30 in terms of new ICRU magnitudes for the dosimetric systems designed by the National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom with a Kodak Monitoring film type 2. At the same time , this papers presents the characterization requisites and firsts essays as an angular and energy dependence that should be satisfied to establish the regulations for the personal dosimetry service. Finally, it concludes that the dosimetric systems used by the Nuclear Energy general Direction (DGEN) is available for the measurement of the new ICRU Hp and Hs amounts without any additional modifications to the manufacturing of the dosimeter and that users should be trained once again in interpreting body doses with the new philosophy of the ICRP 60

  1. Dosimetric equivalence of non-standard high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy catheter patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative HDR prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Methods: Prostate HDR brachytherapy uses a grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. On CT data from ten previously-treated patients new catheters were digitized following three catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a p...

  2. Conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent Hp(3) fir eye-lens dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been performed within the frame of the European Union ORAMED project (Optimization of Radiation protection for Medical staff). The main goal of the project is to improve standards of protection for medical staff for procedure resulting in potentially high exposures and to develop methodologies for better assessing and for reducing exposures to medical staff. The Work Package WP2 is involved in the development of practical eye lens dosimetry in interventional radiology. This study is complementary of the part of the ENEA report concerning the calculations with the MCNP code of the conversion factors related to the operational quantity Hp(3). A set of energy and angular dependent conversion coefficients Hp(3)/Kair in the new proposed square cylindrical phantom of ICRU tissue, have been calculated with the Monte-Carlo code PENELOPE. The Hp(3) values have been determined in terms of absorbed dose, according to the definition of this quantity, and also with the kerma approximation as formerly reported in ICRU reports. At low photon energy, up to 1 MeV, the two sets of conversion coefficients are consistent. Nevertheless, the differences increase at higher energy. This is mainly due to the lack of electronic equilibrium, especially for small angle incidences. The values of the conversion coefficients obtained with the code MCNP published by ENEA, agree with the kerma approximation calculations with PENELOPE. They are coherent with previous calculations in phantoms different in shape. But above 1 MeV, differences between conversion coefficient values calculated with the absorbed dose and with kerma approximation are significantly increasing, especially at low incidence angles. At those energies the electron transport has to be simulated. (author)

  3. Volumic activities measurements and equivalent doses calculation of indoor 222Rn in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmajid Choukri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As a way of prevention, we have measured the volumic activities of indoor 222Rn and we have calculated the corresponding effective dose in some dwellings and enclosed areas in Morocco. Seasonal variation of Radon activities and Relationships between variation of these activities and some parameters such height, depth and type of construction were also established in this work.Methods: The passive time-integrated method of using a solid state nuclear track detector (LR-115 type II was employed. These films, cut in pieces of 3.4 ´ 2.5 cm2, were placed in detector holders and enclosed in heat-scaled polyethylene bags.Results: The measured volumic activities of radon vary in houses, between 31 and 136 Bq/m3 (0.55 and 2.39 mSv/year with an average value of 80 Bq/m3 (1.41 mSv/year. In enclosed work area, they vary between 60 Bq/m3 (0.38 mSv/year in an ordinary area to 1884 Bq/m3 (11.9 mSv/year at not airy underground level of 12 m. the relatively higher volumic activities of 222Rn in houses were measured in Youssoufia and khouribga towns situated in regions rich in phosphate deposits. Measurements at the geophysical observatory of Berchid show that the volumic activity of radon increases with depth, this is most probably due to decreased ventilation. Conclusion: The obtained results show that the effective dose calculated for indoor dwellings are comparable to those obtained in other regions in the word. The risks related to the volumic activities of indoor radon could be avoided by simple precautions such the continuous ventilation. The reached high value of above 1884 Bq/m3 don't present any risk for workers health in the geophysical observatory of Berchid because workers spend only a few minutes by day in the cellar to control and reregister data.

  4. Thyroid equivalent doses due to radioiodine-131 intake for evacuees from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary health concern among residents and evacuees in affected areas immediately after a nuclear accident is the internal exposure of the thyroid to radioiodine, particularly I-131, and subsequent thyroid cancer risk. In Japan, the natural disasters of the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 destroyed an important function of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1-NPP) and a large amount of radioactive material was released to the environment. Here we report for the first time extensive measurements of the exposure to I-131 revealing I-131 activity in the thyroid of 46 out of the 62 residents and evacuees measured. The median thyroid equivalent dose was estimated to be 4.2 mSv and 3.5 mSv for children and adults, respectively, much smaller than the mean thyroid dose in the Chernobyl accident (490 mSv in evacuees). Maximum thyroid doses for children and adults were 23 mSv and 33 mSv, respectively. (author)

  5. Is wax equivalent to tissue in electron conformal therapy planning? A Monte Carlo study of material approximation introduced dose difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ray R; Feygelman, Vladimir; Harris, Eleanor R; Rao, Nikhil; Moros, Eduardo G; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2013-01-07

    With CT-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, material composition is often assigned based on the standard Hounsfield unit ranges. This is known as the density threshold method. In bolus electron conformal therapy (BolusECT), the bolus material, machineable wax, would be assigned as soft tissue and the electron density is assumed equivalent to soft tissue based on its Hounsfield unit. This study investigates the dose errors introduced by this material assignment. BEAMnrc was used to simulate electron beams from a Trilogy accelerator. SPRRZnrc was used to calculate stopping power ratios (SPR) of tissue to wax, SPR (tissue) (wax), and tissue to water, SPR(tissue) (water), for 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV electron beams, of which 12 and 15MeV beams are the most commonly used energies in BolusECT. DOSXYZnrc was applied in dose distribution calculations in a tissue phantom with either flat wax slabs of various thicknesses or a wedge-shaped bolus on top. Dose distribution for two clinical cases, a chest wall and a head and neck, were compared with the bolus material treated as wax or tissue. The SPR(tissue) (wax) values for 12 and 15MeV beams are between 0.935 and 0.945, while the SPR(tissue) (water) values are between 0.990 and 0.991. For a 12 MeV beam, the dose in tissue immediately under the bolus is overestimated by 2.5% for a 3 cm bolus thickness if the wax bolus is treated as tissue. For 15 MeV beams, the error is 1.4%. However, in both clinical cases the differences in the PTV DVH is negligible. Due to stopping power differences, dose differences of up to 2.5% are observed in MC simulations if the bolus material is misassigned as tissue in BolusECT dose calculations. However, for boluses thinner than 2 cm that are more likely encountered in practice, the error is within clinical tolerance.

  6. Effects of ISS equivalent ionizing radiation dose on Human T-lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Maria Antonia; Pani, Giuseppe; Benotmane, Rafi; Mastroleo, Felice; Aboul-El-Ardat, Khalil; Janssen, Ann; Leysen, Liselotte; Vanhavere, Filip; Leys, Natalie; Galleri, Grazia; Pippia, Proto; Baatout, Sarah

    One of the objectives of the current international space programs is to investigate the effects of cosmic environment on Humans. It is known that during a long exposure to the space conditions, including ionizing radiations and microgravity, the immune system of the astronauts is impaired. In past years several experiments were performed to identify responsible factors of in vitro mitogenic activation process in human T-lymphocytes under simulated microgravity effect and during dedicated space missions. It come out that the lack of immune response in microgravity occurs at the cellular and molecular level. In order to evaluate effects on pure primary T-lymphocytes from peripheral blood exposed to International Space Station (ISS)-like ionizing radiation, we applied a mixture of Cesium-137, as representative of low energy particles, and Californium-252, as representative of hight energy particles, with rate similar to those monitored inside the ISS during previous space mission (Goossens et all. 2006). This facility is available at SCK•CEN (Belgium) (Mastroleo et al., 2009). Although the dose received by the cells was relatively low, flow cytometry analysis 24 hours after irradiation showed a decrease in cell viability coupled with the increase of the caspase-3 activity. However, Bcl-2 activity did not seem to be affected by the radiation. Furthermore, activation of cells induced an increase of the cell size and alteration of cellular morphology. Cell cycle as well as 8-oxo-G were also modified upon radiation and activation. Gene expression analysis shows a modulation of genes rather as a consequence of exposure than with the activation status. 330 genes have been identified to be significantly modulated in function of the time and have been grouped in four different cluster representing significant expression profiles. Preliminary functional analysis shows mainly genes involved in the immune response and inflammatory diseases as well as oxidative stress and

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF INDIVIDUAL THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSEMETERS PERFORMANCES FOR MEASURING THE DOSE EQUIVALENTS IN SKIN AND EYE LENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Sheleenkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a comparative analysis of existing and newly developed thermoluminescent detectors DTG-4, TTLD-580, TLD-1011(TM and DTVS-01 and dosemeters MKD-A and MKD-B for the purposes of individual dosimetric control of skin and eye lens exposure to radiation. The dependence of sensitivity of different thermoluminescent dosemeters, designed for dose equivalents measurements in skin and eye lens on the type (photons and ȕ-particles and energy of radiation was determined experimentally. There are conclusions about the limits of applicability of existing detectors and dosemeters under different radiation exposure conditions. The article evaluates the possibility of different dosimeter use for specific radiation exposure conditions.

  8. Neutron equivalent dose rates at the surroundings of the electron linear accelerator operated by the university of Sao Paulo - Physics institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the determination of the neutron dose rates at the surroundings of an electron linear accelerators it is necessary the knowledge of the neutron spectrum or its mean energy, because the conversion factor of the flux in equivalent dose rates, is strongly dependent on the neutron energy. Taking this fact into consideration, equivalent dose rates were determined in the three representative sites of the IF/USP Linear Electron Accelerator. Also, due to the radiation field be pulsed, a theoretical and experimental study has been realized to evaluate the effect produced by the variation of the field on the detector. (author)

  9. Simulations of thermally transferred OSL signals in quartz: Accuracy and precision of the protocols for equivalent dose evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, Vasilis, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Adamiec, Grzegorz [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Physics, GADAM Centre of Excellence, ul. Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Athanassas, C. [Laboratory of Archaeometry, Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Athens153 10 (Greece); Chen Reuven [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Baker, Atlee; Larsen, Meredith; Thompson, Zachary [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > This paper presents extensive numerical simulations of the ReSAR protocol for luminescence dating. > We simulate several experimental versions of the ReSAR protocol and compare their relative accuracy and precision. > Simulations are carried out using a recently published kinetic model for quartz, consisting of 11 energy levels. > Natural doses above 400 Gy are underestimated in the protocols. > Possible sources of this underestimation are investigated. - Abstract: Thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) signals in sedimentary quartz have been the subject of several recent studies, due to the potential shown by these signals to increase the range of luminescence dating by an order of magnitude. Based on these signals, a single aliquot protocol termed the ReSAR protocol has been developed and tested experimentally. This paper presents extensive numerical simulations of this ReSAR protocol. The purpose of the simulations is to investigate several aspects of the ReSAR protocol which are believed to cause difficulties during application of the protocol. Furthermore, several modified versions of the ReSAR protocol are simulated, and their relative accuracy and precision are compared. The simulations are carried out using a recently published kinetic model for quartz, consisting of 11 energy levels. One hundred random variants of the natural samples were generated by keeping the transition probabilities between energy levels fixed, while allowing simultaneous random variations of the concentrations of the 11 energy levels. The relative intrinsic accuracy and precision of the protocols are simulated by calculating the equivalent dose (ED) within the model, for a given natural burial dose of the sample. The complete sequence of steps undertaken in several versions of the dating protocols is simulated. The relative intrinsic precision of these techniques is estimated by fitting Gaussian probability functions to the resulting simulated

  10. Committed effective dose equivalent in Slovakia due to dietary intake of 134,137Cs after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of 134,137Cs intake resulting from the consumption of selected kinds of food over the 1986-1989 period are summarized, and the individual committed effective dose equivalents and collective doses are estimated. Based on the results of continuous food monitoring, the 137Cs intake is assessed to have been about 8 kBq for children and about 10 kBq for adults; the figures for 134Cs are 3.3 and 4.3 kBq, respectively. More than 70% of this intake refers to the year 1986. The committed effective dose equivalent due to internal contamination by the two radionuclides ranges from 54 to 263 μSv; the averages are 149 μSv for children and 197 μSv for adults. The collective committed effective dose equivalent for the population of Slovakia from this source was estimated to 952 manSv. (author). 10 figs., 9 tabs., 11 refs

  11. The study of equivalent dose of uranium in long bean (V. U. Sesquipedalis) and the effect on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Yoshandi, Tengku Mohammad; Majid, Sukiman Sarmania Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok, E-mail: khoo@ukm.edu.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    In the case of accidental release of Uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) radionuclides in a nuclear facility or in the environment, internal contamination by either acute or chronic exposure has the potential to induce both radiological and chemical toxic effects. A study was conducted to estimate the {sup 238}U radionuclide concentration in the long beans using Induced Coupled Mass Plasma-Spectrometry (ICP-MS). {sup 238}U radionuclide is a naturally occurring radioactive material that can be found in soil and can be transferred to the long bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. Sesquapedalis) directly or indirectly via water or air. Kidney and liver are the major sites of deposition of {sup 238}U radionuclide. The obtained dose exposed in the liver and kidney is used to assess the safety level for public intake of {sup 238}U radionuclide from the consumption of long beans. The concentration of {sup 238}U radionuclide measured in long bean samples was 0.0226 ± 0.0009 mg/kg. Total activity of {sup 238}U radionuclide was 0.0044 ± 0.0002 Bq/day with the daily intake of 0.3545 ± 0.0143 µg/day and the annual committed effective dose due to ingestion of {sup 238}U radionuclide in long beans was 0.2230 ± 0.0087 µSv/year. The committed equivalent dose of {sup 238}U radionuclide from the assessment in the liver and kidney are 0.4198 ± 0.0165 nSv and 10.9335 ± 0.4288 nSv. The risk of cancer of {sup 238}U radionuclide was determined to be (86.0466 ± 3.3748) × 10-9. Thus, the results concluded that {sup 238}U radionuclide in local long beans was in the permitted level and safe to consume without posing any significant radiological threat to population.

  12. The study of equivalent dose of uranium in long bean (V. U. Sesquipedalis) and the effect on human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Yoshandi, Tengku Mohammad; Majid, Sukiman Sarmania Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2016-01-01

    In the case of accidental release of Uranium-238 (238U) radionuclides in a nuclear facility or in the environment, internal contamination by either acute or chronic exposure has the potential to induce both radiological and chemical toxic effects. A study was conducted to estimate the 238U radionuclide concentration in the long beans using Induced Coupled Mass Plasma-Spectrometry (ICP-MS). 238U radionuclide is a naturally occurring radioactive material that can be found in soil and can be transferred to the long bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. Sesquapedalis) directly or indirectly via water or air. Kidney and liver are the major sites of deposition of 238U radionuclide. The obtained dose exposed in the liver and kidney is used to assess the safety level for public intake of 238U radionuclide from the consumption of long beans. The concentration of 238U radionuclide measured in long bean samples was 0.0226 ± 0.0009 mg/kg. Total activity of 238U radionuclide was 0.0044 ± 0.0002 Bq/day with the daily intake of 0.3545 ± 0.0143 µg/day and the annual committed effective dose due to ingestion of 238U radionuclide in long beans was 0.2230 ± 0.0087 µSv/year. The committed equivalent dose of 238U radionuclide from the assessment in the liver and kidney are 0.4198 ± 0.0165 nSv and 10.9335 ± 0.4288 nSv. The risk of cancer of 238U radionuclide was determined to be (86.0466 ± 3.3748) × 10-9. Thus, the results concluded that 238U radionuclide in local long beans was in the permitted level and safe to consume without posing any significant radiological threat to population.

  13. Occupational dose equivalent limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers methods of limiting individual radiation risks by recognizing the variation of risk with age at exposure, taking into account both somatic and genetic risks and proposes a simple formula for controlling individual cumulative exposure and hence risk. (Author)

  14. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassoun, J., E-mail: ghassoun@ucam.ac.ma [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco); Senhou, N. [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)

    2012-04-15

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Monte Carlo method has been used to model radiotherapy room of a 18 MV linear accelerator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The neutron and the gamma ray dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid (TE) phantom were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radiotherapy room shielding performance has been also investigated.

  15. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. - Highlights: ► The Monte Carlo method has been used to model radiotherapy room of a 18 MV linear accelerator. ► The neutron and the gamma ray dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid (TE) phantom were evaluated. ► The radiotherapy room shielding performance has been also investigated.

  16. Using Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Atlases to Combine and Analyze Prospective Dosimetric and Radiation Pneumonitis Data From 2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Dose Escalation Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fan; Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Borst, Gerben R. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Lebesque, Joos V. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate {>=}20% were plotted. Results: The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. Conclusions: The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power.

  17. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses.

  18. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. PMID:22257567

  19. An evaluation of dose equivalence between synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy and conventional broad beam radiation using clonogenic and cell impedance assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Johari Ibahim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT has shown the potential to deliver improved outcomes over conventional broadbeam (BB radiation therapy. To implement synchrotron MRT clinically for cancer treatment, it is necessary to undertake dose equivalence studies to identify MRT doses that give similar outcomes to BB treatments. AIM: To develop an in vitro approach to determine biological dose equivalence between MRT and BB using two different cell-based assays. METHODS: The acute response of tumour and normal cell lines (EMT6.5, 4T1.2, NMuMG, EMT6.5ch, 4T1ch5, SaOS-2 to MRT (50-560 Gy and BB (1.5-10 Gy irradiation was investigated using clonogenic and real time cell impedance sensing (RT-CIS/xCELLigence assays. MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 or 50 µm-wide planar, polychromatic kilovoltage X-ray microbeams with 200 µm peak separation. BB irradiations were performed using a Co60 teletherapy unit or a synchrotron radiation source. BB doses that would generate biological responses similar to MRT were calculated by data interpolation and verified by clonogenic and RT-CIS assays. RESULTS: For a given cell line, MRT equivalent BB doses identified by RT-CIS/xCELLigence were similar to those identified by clonogenic assays. Dose equivalence between MRT and BB were verified in vitro in two cell lines; EMT6.5ch and SaOS-2 by clonogenic assays and RT-CIS/xCELLigence. We found for example, that BB doses of 3.4±0.1 Gy and 4.40±0.04 Gy were radiobiologically equivalent to a peak, microbeam dose of 112 Gy using clonogenic and RT-CIS assays respectively on EMT6.5ch cells. CONCLUSION: Our data provides the first determination of biological dose equivalence between BB and MRT modalities for different cell lines and identifies RT-CIS/xCELLigence assays as a suitable substitute for clonogenic assays. These results will be useful for the safe selection of MRT doses for future veterinary and clinical trials.

  20. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghasemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF 3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine′s (AAPM report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10 -6 (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size and 8.36 × 10 -8 Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size, respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10 -5 and 1.74 × 10 -5 Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size, respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  1. Survey report on personal dose equivalent and indoor and outdoor staying time for children in the southern Miyagi Prefecture after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of personal dose equivalent for children using optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters has been carried out in the southern Miyagi Prefecture from 1 September 2011, about a half year after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The survey results until November 2013 are summarized in this paper. This is the only survey report in Miyagi Prefecture as any survey of personal dose equivalent was not carried out in this area. Findings of indoor and outdoor staying time (home and school) for children were also reported. It was found that the most time (14 - 15 hours a day) was spent at the inside of their houses for all ages. Children stay at the inside of their houses and school about 21 hours a day in a total. These results are quite important to explain individual dose for children and to take measures to reduce exposure dose as well. (author)

  2. Influence of chemical and physical forms of ambient air acids on airway doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, T.V.

    1989-02-01

    The effects of ambient relative humidity and particle size on acid deposition within the airways have been examined with a computer model. For H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ particles initially at 90% relative humidity in ambient air that are inhaled via the nose or mouth, there is significant deposition of acid in the airways even in the presence of typical values of respiratory NH/sub 3/. When these same particles are found in a fog at 100.015% relative humidity, there is significant deposition of acid in the nasal region during nose breathing but insignificant deposition to the deep lung for either nose or mouth breathing. The factors governing the partitioning of labile acid gases in the gas and liquid phases prior to inhalation are also discussed.

  3. Determination of the dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of occupationally exposed personnel in the practice of proton emission tomography (PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Venezuela recently it was implanted the Positron Emission Tomography technique (PET) with the perspective of implanting it at national level. Even when in our country practices it of nuclear medicine it exists from early of 70, there is not experience in the determination of the occupational doses by exposure to the external radiation in hands. By this reason, a concern exists in the workers of the centers of nuclear medicine where it is practiced the Positron Emission Tomography technique. In absence of the TLD dosimetry to measure dose in hands in our country, measurements of the dose equivalent of the workers of the PET national reference center were made, using a detector of hands type diode. It was determined the dose in hands in terms of dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in two work positions, that is: the corresponding to the transfer of the receiving vial of (18F) FDG to the shield, quality control and uni doses division. The second work position corresponds the person in charge of administering, via intravenous, the (18F) FDG. In this work it realizes the dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) measures in each one of the work positions before described by daily production. The informed doses correspond to a total average produced activity of 20.4 GBq (550 mCi). The results of the measurements in terms of dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) correspond to 2.1 ± 20% mSv in the work position of division and 0.4 ± 10% mSv in the position of injection of the radioactive material. At short term this foreseen until 4 productions per week, what means an annual dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of 400 mSv approximately, without taking into account abnormal situations as its are spills of the (18F) FDG in the work place. This work is the starting point so that the regulatory authority settles down, in Venezuela, dose restrictions in the PET practices and implant, in the centers of nuclear medicine, an optimization politics of this practice in conformity with the ALARA principle

  4. Application of the high-temperature ratio method for evaluation of the depth distribution of dose equivalent in a water-filled phantom on board space station Mir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water-filled tissue equivalent phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia. It contains four channels perpendicular to each other, where dosemeters can be exposed at different depths. Between May 1997 and February 1999 the phantom was installed at three different locations on board the Mir space station. Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were exposed at various depths inside the phantom either parallel or perpendicular to the hull of the spacecraft. The high-temperature ratio (HTR) method was used for the evaluation of the TLDs. The method was developed at the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna, Austria, and has already been used for measurements in mixed radiation fields on earth and in space with great success. It uses the changes of peak height ratios in LiF:Mg,Ti glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer (LET), and therefore allows determination of an 'averaged' LET as well as measurement of the absorbed dose. A mean quality factor and, subsequently, the dose equivalent can be calculated according to the Q(LET() relationship proposed by the ICRP. The small size of the LiF dosemeters means that the HTR method can be used to determine the gradient of absorbed dose and dose equivalent inside the tissue equivalent body. (author)

  5. Estimation of neutron-equivalent dose in organs of patients undergoing radiotherapy by the use of a novel online digital detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron peripheral contamination in patients undergoing high-energy photon radiotherapy is considered as a risk factor for secondary cancer induction. Organ-specific neutron-equivalent dose estimation is therefore essential for a reasonable assessment of these associated risks. This work aimed to develop a method to estimate neutron-equivalent doses in multiple organs of radiotherapy patients. The method involved the convolution, at 16 reference points in an anthropomorphic phantom, of the normalized Monte Carlo neutron fluence energy spectra with the kerma and energy-dependent radiation weighting factor. This was then scaled with the total neutron fluence measured with passive detectors, at the same reference points, in order to obtain the equivalent doses in organs. The latter were correlated with the readings of a neutron digital detector located inside the treatment room during phantom irradiation. This digital detector, designed and developed by our group, integrates the thermal neutron fluence. The correlation model, applied to the digital detector readings during patient irradiation, enables the online estimation of neutron-equivalent doses in organs. The model takes into account the specific irradiation site, the field parameters (energy, field size, angle incidence, etc) and the installation (linac and bunker geometry). This method, which is suitable for routine clinical use, will help to systematically generate the dosimetric data essential for the improvement of current risk-estimation models. (paper)

  6. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  7. The research for the neutron ambient dose possibility of measurement using the instrument based on the 10B-counter with moderator in the fields at JINR nuclear-physics installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the research for the neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) possibility of measurement using the instrument based on the 10B-counter (CHM-14) with polyethylene moderator in the fields of JINR nuclear-physics installations have been presented. It was shown that the instrument can be used to measure H*(10) of neutrons in the energy range from 0.4 eV to 20 MeV with the uncertainty within 46% in radiation monitoring at JINR. The use of the correction factors can extend the energy range of the measurement of the neutron dose H*(10) up to hundreds of MeV. Neutron spectra, which were measured in the fields of nuclear installations of JINR earlier, places and conditions of their measurement, are presented too

  8. Comparison between the calculated and measured dose distributions for four beams of 6 MeV linac in a human-equivalent phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Sonia M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose distributions in various parts of the body are of importance in radiotherapy. Also, the percent depth dose at different body depths is an important parameter in radiation therapy applications. Monte Carlo simulation techniques are the most accurate methods for such purposes. Monte Carlo computer calculations of photon spectra and the dose ratios at surfaces and in some internal organs of a human equivalent phantom were performed. In the present paper, dose distributions in different organs during bladder radiotherapy by 6 MeV X-rays were measured using thermoluminescence dosimetry placed at different points in the human-phantom. The phantom was irradiated in exactly the same manner as in actual bladder radiotherapy. Four treatment fields were considered to maximize the dose at the center of the target and minimize it at non-target healthy organs. All experimental setup information was fed to the MCNP-4b code to calculate dose distributions at selected points inside the proposed phantom. Percent depth dose distribution was performed. Also, the absorbed dose as ratios relative to the original beam in the surrounding organs was calculated by MCNP-4b and measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. Both measured and calculated data were compared. Results indicate good agreement between calculated and measured data inside the phantom. Comparison between MCNP-4b calculations and measurements of depth dose distribution indicated good agreement between both.

  9. Optimization of a single sphere albedo system using 3He counters for the measurement of neutron dose equivalent rates and the field calibration of personnel albedo neutron dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratory type of an active single sphere albedo dosemeter system using three 3He proportional counters in a polyethylene sphere for the measurement of neutron dose equivalent rates and the field calibration of personnel neutron dosemeters was optimized with respect to the detector-moderator combination by means of calibration exposures. One detector is located in the centre of the sphere to measure the neutron dose equivalent rate and the other two detectors near the moderator surface, in order to simulate the response of the albedo neutron detector and the thermal neutron detector. The response of the detectors to neutrons in the range between thermal and 14 MeV neutrons was investigated for various moderator-absorber combinations. Comparison was made between the system response and the response of the passive detector system. After completion the active system could be used for comprehensive neutron field measurements in radiation protection. By means of a microprocessor the linear combination of the three detector readings gives energy independent readings of the neutron dose equivalent rate, the absorbed dose rate and the neutron flux density at particle accelerators and nuclear facilities. (orig./HP)

  10. Natural variation of ambient dose rate in the air of Izu-Oshima Island after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ambient dose rate in air and radioactivity concentration in soil samples collected on Izu-Oshima Island were observed in 2012, 2013 and 2014, i.e. 1, 2 and 3 years after the severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A car-borne survey for the ambient dose rate in air was carried out for the entire island. Soil samples were collected for the radioactivity concentration measurements from 22 points. The ambient dose rates in air were 36 nGy h-1 in 2012, 34 nGy h-1 in 2013 and 29 nGy h-1 in 2014. The corresponding radioactivity concentrations in those years for 134Cs were 53, 39 and 29 Bq kg-1 and for 137Cs, 87, 73 and 75 Bq kg-1. All the values have decreased every year. (authors)

  11. Natural variation of ambient dose rate in the air of Izu-Oshima Island after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedera, Fumihiko; Inoue, Kazumasa; Sugino, Masato; Sano, Ryosuke; Furue, Mai; Shimizu, Hideo; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Le Van, Tan; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    The ambient dose rate in air and radioactivity concentration in soil samples collected on Izu-Oshima Island were observed in 2012, 2013 and 2014, i.e. 1, 2 and 3 years after the severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A car-borne survey for the ambient dose rate in air was carried out for the entire island. Soil samples were collected for the radioactivity concentration measurements from 22 points. The ambient dose rates in air were 36 nGy h(-1) in 2012, 34 nGy h(-1) in 2013 and 29 nGy h(-1) in 2014. The corresponding radioactivity concentrations in those years for (134)Cs were 53, 39 and 29 Bq kg(-1) and for (137)Cs, 87, 73 and 75 Bq kg(-1). All the values have decreased every year. PMID:26246583

  12. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Metwaly, Mohamed; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions.

  13. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions.

  14. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/μCi-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult

  15. Patient-centric dose equivalency pilot study of incobotulinumtoxin a (xeomin vs. abobotulinumtoxin a (dysport in the treatment of glabellar frown lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bank

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Incobotulinumtoxin A (xeomin has been proposed as an alternative to abobotulinumtoxin A (dysport and onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox in the treatment of glabellar frown lines. A recent study is comparing abobotulinumtoxin A and onabotulinumtoxin A revealed equivalent efficacy with a dose conversion ratio of 2.5:1. We sought to establish effectiveness and dosing equivalency of incobotulinumtoxin A vs. abobotulinumtoxin A. Methods: Inclusion criteria for this pilot study included patients of a single surgeon (LAC who had previously received a constant dose of abobotulinumtoxin A over at least four consecutive treatment sessions for the previous 12 months to achieve an 85-90% elimination of dynamic glabellar frown lines. The primary outcome sought dose comparison between established maintenance abobotulinumtoxin A dosing and incobotulinumtoxin A first-time dosing. A 2:1 conversion (abobotulinumtoxin A: incobotulinumtoxin A was chosen in most patients. Secondary outcomes were patient-reported onset of effect, physician-assessed effect at 10-12 weeks, pain associated with administration, and patient perceived need for re-treatment at 2 weeks. Results: A total of 32 subjects were included. The mean dose of incobotulinumtoxin A was 17.1 units (± 6.1, the median dose 20 units. The mean dose of abobotulinumtoxin A was 27.6 (± 11.7, the median dose 27.5 units. The mean difference in treatment units was -10.5 (95% confidence interval, P < 0.001. Among 30 patients who reported effect onset, the median was 8.5 days, with a range of 1-14. At 10-12 weeks, muscle paralysis was assessed to be 69.2% (± 27.3, vs. 90.3% (± 1.8 with abobotulinumtoxin A (P < 0.001. The majority of patients rated pain of administration as equal or greater to that of abobotulinumtoxin A (63% and 22%, respectively. Three patients (9% required re-treatment at 2 weeks with abobotulinumtoxin A due to lack of effective treatment with incobotulinumtoxin A. Abobotulinumtoxin A re

  16. Dose evaluation from multiple detector outputs using convex optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    A dose evaluation using multiple radiation detectors can be improved by the convex optimisation method. It enables flexible dose evaluation corresponding to the actual radiation energy spectrum. An application to the neutron ambient dose equivalent evaluation is investigated using a mixed-gas proportional counter. The convex derives the certain neutron ambient dose with certain width corresponding to the true neutron energy spectrum. The range of the evaluated dose is comparable to the error of conventional neutron dose measurement equipments. An application to the neutron individual dose equivalent measurement is also investigated. Convexes of particular dosemeter combinations evaluate the individual dose equivalent better than the dose evaluation of a single dosemeter. The combinations of dosemeters with high orthogonality of their response characteristics tend to provide a good suitability for dose evaluation.

  17. Comparison of whole-body phantom designs to estimate organ equivalent neutron doses for secondary cancer risk assessment in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary neutron fluence created during proton therapy can be a significant source of radiation exposure in organs distant from the treatment site, especially in pediatric patients. Various published studies have used computational phantoms to estimate neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy. In these simulations, whole-body patient representations were applied considering either generic whole-body phantoms or generic age- and gender-dependent phantoms. No studies to date have reported using patient-specific geometry information. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of patient–phantom matching when using computational pediatric phantoms. To achieve this goal, three sets of phantoms, including different ages and genders, were compared to the patients’ whole-body CT. These sets consisted of pediatric age-specific reference, age-adjusted reference and anatomically sculpted phantoms. The neutron equivalent dose for a subset of out-of-field organs was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit, where proton fields were used to irradiate the cranium and the spine of all phantoms and the CT-segmented patient models. The maximum neutron equivalent dose per treatment absorbed dose was calculated and found to be on the order of 0 to 5 mSv Gy−1. The relative dose difference between each phantom and their respective CT-segmented patient model for most organs showed a dependence on how close the phantom and patient heights were matched. The weight matching was found to have much smaller impact on the dose accuracy except for very heavy patients. Analysis of relative dose difference with respect to height difference suggested that phantom sculpting has a positive effect in terms of dose accuracy as long as the patient is close to the 50th percentile height and weight. Otherwise, the benefit of sculpting was masked by inherent uncertainties, i.e. variations in organ shapes, sizes and locations. Other sources of uncertainty included errors

  18. Status report about the revision of an IEC standard for personal dose equivalent meters for Hp(10) and Hp(0,07)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group (SC 45B/WG B8) exists within the international electrochemical commission (IEC) which is working on the combination and revision of the IEC standards 61283, 61323, 61344, 61525 and 61526. All these standards concern direct reading, electronic, personal dose equivalent meters for the quantities Hp(10) and Hp(0,07); they are different with regard to the kind of radiation (photons, and/or beta rays and/or neutrons). The new standard with the number 61526 shall cover the following topics: 1. Combination of all the mentioned standards; 2. Maintenance of the essential requirements of the former standards; 3. Inclusion of the determination of the uncertainty of measurement for the measured dose equivalent value according to the ''Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement''; 4. Consideration of all the relevant ISO-standards for reference radiation fields for photon, beta and neutron radiations; 5. Consideration of dose rate for alarm levels and dose rate warning devices. The actual status of the draft is reported. The concept, which is presented in detail, contains many new ideas as compared to former IEC standards. This early presentation is intended to improve the information about the current work on international standards and to serve as a stimulus for working in all (national and international) committees dealing with the production of standards. (orig.)

  19. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup −6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup −6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  20. Evaluation of personal dose equivalent 'HP(d)' in a external individual monitoring system for X and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The good of individual monitoring for external radiation is the assessment of occupational exposure from X and γ radiations in order to assure that the radiological conditions of the workplace are acceptable, safe and satisfactory. The evaluation of radiations doses for workers must not exceed dose limits specified for workers, according to national regulatory agencies. Nowadays, there are two external monitoring systems in use, both based on ICRU definitions. In the conventional system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of Hx. The personal dosimeter is worn over chest surface and it is calibrated in function of air kerma. In the new system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of HP(d) and the personal dosimeter is calibrated in function of phantom doses. The aim of this paper is to adapt an external dosimetry laboratory (based on photographic dosimetry) to evaluate the personal dosimeters in terms of HP(d). In this way, a simple methodology, based on linear programming, was utilized. In this adaptation, calibration curves were obtained for radiation qualities (W and N series) described by International Organization for Standardization (ISO 4037-1, 1995). These calibration curves offer a better accuracy on dose determinations and energy below 140 keV, improving the quality of service rendered the society. (author)

  1. Results on Dose Distributions in a Human Body from the Matroshka-R Experiment onboard the ISS Obtained with the Tissue-Equivalent Spherical Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Nikolaev, Igor; Kartsev, Ivan; Tolochek, Raisa; Lyagushin, Vladimir

    The tissue-equivalent spherical phantom (32 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been used on board the ISS in Matroshka-R experiment for more than 10 years. Both passive and active space radiation detectors can be located inside the phantom and on its surface. Due to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a human body. Originally the spherical phantom was installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module, then in the Piers-1, MIM-2, and MIM-1 modules of the ISS Russian segment, and finally in JAXA Kibo module. Total duration of the detector exposure is more than 2000 days in 9 sessions of the space experiment. In the first phase of the experiment with the spherical phantom the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid state track detectors). The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. After each session the passive detectors are returned to the ground. The results obtained show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being usually observed close to the outer wall of the compartment, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. However, because of the ISS module shielding properties an inverse dose distribution in a human body can be observed when the dose rate maximum is closer to the geometrical center of the module. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom is obviously due to the action of two radiation sources, namely, galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Earth’ radiation belts. Minimum dose rate is produced mainly by the strongly penetrating GCR particles and is mostly observed behind more than 5 g/cm2 tissue shielding. Critical organ doses, mean

  2. The bimodal effect of interleukin 1 on rat pancreatic beta-cells--stimulation followed by inhibition--depends upon dose, duration of exposure, and ambient glucose concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spinas, G A; Palmer, J P; Mandrup-Poulsen, T;

    1988-01-01

    220% at 3.3 mmol/l glucose, but at 11 mmol/l glucose a 60% suppression was seen. On the basis of these data we suggest that interleukin 1's effect on beta-cells is bimodal: stimulation followed by inhibition. Increasing interleukin 1 dose and ambient glucose concentration shift this response to the...

  3. Repeated exposure to an ambient level of NO{sub 2} enhances asthmatic response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, V. [The Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Svartengren, M. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Rak, S. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Allergy Center, Gothenburg (Sweden); Barck, C.; Bylin, G. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, and the Institute of Medicine at the Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-06-01

    We investigated the effects of NO{sub 2} and allergen on lung function in a repeated exposure model. For 4 subsequent days, 16 subjects with mild asthma and allergy to birch or grass pollen were exposed at rest to either purified air or 500 {mu}g x m{sup -3} NO{sub 2} for 30 min in an exposure chamber. Four hours later, an individually determined nonsymptomatic allergen dose was inhaled. Lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)) was measured by a portable spirometer at early phase (EP) 15 min after allergen and at late phase (LP) 3-10 h after allergen. Subjective symptoms and medication were followed by diary cards. Asthmatic response was significantly increased after repeated exposure to NO{sub 2} and allergen compared to air and allergen. The 4-day mean fall in FEV1 after NO{sub 2} was at EP-2.5% versus -0.4% for air (p=0.02) and at LP -4.4% versus -1.9% for air (p=0.01, ANOVA). An increase in EP response was seen already after a single NO{sub 2} exposure (p=0.03). There was a tendency (p=0.07) towards increased night-time symptoms of asthma after NO{sub 2} plus allergen. Although the effects were small, the results indicate that a repeated short exposure to an ambient level of NO{sub 2} enhances the airway response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose. (au) 28 refs.

  4. INREM II: a computer implementation of recent models for estimating the dose equivalent to organs of man from an inhaled or ingested radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a computer code, INREM II, which calculates the internal radiation dose equivalent to organs of man which results from the intake of a radionuclide by inhalation or ingestion. Deposition and removal of radioactivity from the respiratory tract is represented by the ICRP Task Group Lung Model. A four-segment catenary model of the GI tract is used to estimate movement of radioactive material that is ingested or swallowed after being cleared from the respiratory tract. Retention of radioactivity in other organs is specified by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. The formation and decay of radioactive daughters is treated explicitly, with each radionuclide species in the chain having its own uptake and retention parameters, as supplied by the user. The dose equivalent to a target organ is computed as the sum of contributions from each source organ in which radioactivity is assumed to be situated. This calculation utilizes a matrix of S-factors (rem/μCi-day) supplied by the user for the particular choice of source and target organs. Output permits the evaluation of crossfire components of dose when penetrating radiations are present. INREM II is coded in FORTRAN IV and has been compiled and executed on an IBM-360 computer

  5. Simulation of equivalent dose due to accidental electron beam loss in Indus-1 and Indus-2 synchrotron radiation sources using FLUKA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus-1 and Indus-2 are two Synchrotron radiation sources at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), India. Stored electron energy in Indus-1 and Indus-2 are 450MeV and 2.5GeV respectively. During operation of storage ring, accidental electron beam loss may occur in addition to normal beam losses. The Bremsstrahlung radiation produced due to the beam losses creates a major radiation hazard in these high energy electron accelerators. FLUKA, the Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to simulate the accidental beam loss. The simulation was carried out to estimate the equivalent dose likely to be received by a trapped person closer to the storage ring. Depth dose profile in water phantom for 450MeV and 2.5GeV electron beam is generated, from which percentage energy absorbed in 30cm water phantom (analogous to human body) is calculated. The simulation showed the percentage energy deposition in the phantom is about 19% for 450MeV electron and 4.3% for 2.5GeV electron. The dose build up factor in 30cm water phantom for 450MeV and 2.5GeV electron beam are found to be 1.85 and 2.94 respectively. Based on the depth dose profile, dose equivalent index of 0.026Sv and 1.08Sv are likely to be received by the trapped person near the storage ring in Indus-1 and Indus-2 respectively. (author)

  6. Measurement of neutron and gamma-ray absorbed doses inside human body in criticality accident situations using phantom and tissue-equivalent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personal dosimeters provide a fundamental evaluation of external exposures to human bodies in radiation accidents. For emergency medical treatment to heavily exposed patients, the evaluation of dose distribution inside the body has been tried by computational simulations. Experimental data on dose distributions inside the body are necessary for accurate simulation of human dosimetry, particularly in complex radiation fields of neutrons and gamma-rays such as criticality accidents. A preliminary experiment on the human dosimetry was carried out at the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) to acquire such experimental data in criticality accident situations. A combined use of two kinds of tissue-equivalent dosimeters together with a human phantom was employed to measure neutron and gamma-ray absorbed doses inside the body. The neutron and gamma-ray absorbed doses measured on the phantom were found to be in roughly the same level as those averaged over the phantom inside or those measured in free air. The dose distributions measured inside and on the phantom could be qualitatively interpreted from reflection an attenuation of neutrons and gamma-rays in the phantom, neutron-induced secondary gamma-rays emitted in the phantom, and so forth. (author)

  7. Reliability of equivalent-dose determination and age-models in the OSL dating of historical and modern palaeoflood sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medialdea, Alicia; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew Sean;

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of accurately estimating the deposition age of incompletely-bleached samples in luminescence dating has motivated developments in the analysis of single grain dose distributions, and a number of statistical approaches have been proposed over the last few years. In this study, we com...

  8. Linear Energy Transfer Painting With Proton Therapy: A Means of Reducing Radiation Doses With Equivalent Clinical Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fager, Marcus, E-mail: Marcus.Fager@UPHS.UPenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Toma-Dasu, Iuliana [Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Kirk, Maura; Dolney, Derek; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Carabe, Alejandro, E-mail: Alejandro.Carabe-Fernandez@UPHS.UPenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to propose a proton treatment planning method that trades physical dose (D) for dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub d}) while keeping the radiobiologically weighted dose (D{sub RBE}) to the target the same. Methods and Materials: The target is painted with LET{sub d} by using 2, 4, and 7 fields aimed at the proximal segment of the target (split target planning [STP]). As the LET{sub d} within the target increases with increasing number of fields, D decreases to maintain the D{sub RBE} the same as the conventional treatment planning method by using beams treating the full target (full target planning [FTP]). Results: The LET{sub d} increased 61% for 2-field STP (2STP) compared to FTP, 72% for 4STP, and 82% for 7STP inside the target. This increase in LET{sub d} led to a decrease of D with 5.3 ± 0.6 Gy for 2STP, 4.4 ± 0.7 Gy for 4STP, and 5.3 ± 1.1 Gy for 7STP, keeping the DRBE at 90% of the volume (DRBE, 90) constant to FTP. Conclusions: LET{sub d} painting offers a method to reduce prescribed dose at no cost to the biological effectiveness of the treatment.

  9. Linear Energy Transfer Painting With Proton Therapy: A Means of Reducing Radiation Doses With Equivalent Clinical Effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to propose a proton treatment planning method that trades physical dose (D) for dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) while keeping the radiobiologically weighted dose (DRBE) to the target the same. Methods and Materials: The target is painted with LETd by using 2, 4, and 7 fields aimed at the proximal segment of the target (split target planning [STP]). As the LETd within the target increases with increasing number of fields, D decreases to maintain the DRBE the same as the conventional treatment planning method by using beams treating the full target (full target planning [FTP]). Results: The LETd increased 61% for 2-field STP (2STP) compared to FTP, 72% for 4STP, and 82% for 7STP inside the target. This increase in LETd led to a decrease of D with 5.3 ± 0.6 Gy for 2STP, 4.4 ± 0.7 Gy for 4STP, and 5.3 ± 1.1 Gy for 7STP, keeping the DRBE at 90% of the volume (DRBE, 90) constant to FTP. Conclusions: LETd painting offers a method to reduce prescribed dose at no cost to the biological effectiveness of the treatment

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson William; Lewis Karl; Flaig Thomas; Gonzalez Rene; Schefter Tracey E; Kavanagh Brian D; Stinauer Michelle A; Chidel Mark; Glode Michael; Raben David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. Methods The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions) or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions) t...

  11. A method for measuring tissue-equivalent dose using a pin diode and activation foil in epithermal neutron beams with EN < 100 keV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Martin G; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2006-01-01

    Silicon (Si) pin diodes can be used for neutron dosimetry by observing the change in forward bias voltage caused by neutron induced displacement damage in the diode junction. Pin diode energy response depends on Si displacement damage KERMA (K(Si)). It is hypothesised that tissue-equivalent (TE) neutron dose could be expressed as a linear combination of K(Si) and foil activation terms. Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP) of parallel monoenergetic neutron beams incident on a cylindrical TE phantom were used to calculate TE dose, K(Si) and Au, Cu and Mn foil activations along the central axis of the phantom. For spectra with neutron energies <100 keV, it is possible to estimate the TE kerma based on silicon damage kerma and Cu or Mn foil measurements. More accurate estimates are possible for spectra where the maximum neutron energy does not exceed 30 keV. PMID:16644975

  12. Comparison of contributions to the equivalent dose of dosimetric traps by using CW-OSL curves and LM-OSL curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a process for measuring doses from ionizing radiation by using light for the stimulation. The process is called as infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) when the stimulation light is in the infrared region. IRSL has been extensively used for dating of feldspars. Equivalent dose (ED) is very important parameter for dating. In this study, The ED of pot shard taken from archaeological salvage excavation at Bueyuekardic-Erzincan, has been determined as 6.48±0.05Gy by using multiple-aliquot continuos wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) decay curves. ED contributions of dosimetric traps have been discussed by converting CW-OSL decay curves to the linear modulation optically stimulated luminescence (LM-OSL) decay curves. According to the results of ED contributions, it is clear that LM-OSL technique is more successful.

  13. Assessments of conversion coefficients between equivalent dose and accumulated activity using pre-dose scanning images of patients subjected to radioiodine treatment and the Fax/Egs4 computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioiodine is a technique for treatment of thyroid cancer. In this technique, the patients are submitted to the incorporation of the radioactive substance sodium iodide (Na131I), which reacts with physiologically metastasis, thyroid tissue remains of and other organs and tissues of the human body. The locations of these reactions are known as areas of highest concentration, hipercaptured areas, hiperconcentrator areas, ''hot areas'' or organ-sources and are viewed through images of nuclear medicine scan known as pre-dose (front and rear). To obtain these images, the patient receives, orally, a quantity of 131I with low activity (±74 MBq) and is positioned in the chamber of flicker. According to the attendance of hot areas shown in the images, the doctor determines the nuclear activity to be administered in treatment. This analysis is purely qualitative. In this study, the scanning images of pre-dose were adjusted to the dimensions of FAX voxel phantom, and the hot areas correspond to internal sources of the proposed model. Algorithms were developed to generate particles (photons and electrons) in these regions of the FAX. To estimate the coefficients of conversions between equivalent dose and accumulated activity in major radiosensitive organs, FAX and algorithms source were coupled to the Monte Carlo EGS4 code (Electron Gamma Shower, version 4). With these factors is possible to estimate the equivalent doses in the radiosensitive organs and tissues of patients as long as is know the activity administered and the half-life of organic sources. (author)

  14. Assessments of conversion coefficients between equivalent dose and accumulated activity using pre-dose scanning images of patients subjected to radioiodine treatment and the Fax/Egs4 computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioiodine is a technique for treatment of thyroid cancer. In this technique, the patients are submitted to the incorporation of the radioactive substance sodium iodide (Na131I), which reacts with physiologically metastasis, thyroid tissue remains of and other organs and tissues of the human body. The locations of these reactions are known as areas of highest concentration, hipercaptured areas, hiperconcentrator areas, 'hot areas' or organ-sources and are viewed through images of nuclear medicine scan known as pre-dose (front and rear). To obtain these images, the patient receives, orally, a quantity of 131I with low activity (± 74 MBq) and is positioned in the chamber of flicker. According to the attendance of hot areas shown in the images, the doctor determines the nuclear activity to be administered in treatment. This analysis is purely qualitative. In this study, the scanning images of pre-dose were adjusted to the dimensions of FAX voxel phantom, and the hot areas correspond to internal sources of the proposed model. Algorithms were developed to generate particles (photons and electrons) in these regions of the FAX. To estimate the coefficients of conversions between equivalent dose and accumulated activity in major radiosensitive organs, FAX and algorithms source were coupled to the Monte Carlo EGS4 code (Electron Gamma Shower, version 4). With these factors is possible to estimate the equivalent doses in the radiosensitive organs and tissues of patients as long as is know the activity administered and the half-life of organic sources. (author)

  15. Measurement of the neutron fluence and dose spectra using an extended Bonner sphere and a tissue-equivalent proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) set consisting of six polyethylene spheres was modified to enhance its response to a high-energy neutron by putting a lead shell inside a polyethylene moderator. The response matrix of an extended BS was calculated using the MCNPX code and calibrated using a 252Cf neutron source. In order to survey the unknown photon and neutron mixed field, a spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) was constructed and assembled as a portable measurement system. The extended BS and the self-constructed TEPC were employed to determine the dosimetric quantities of the neutron field produced from the thick lead target bombarded by the 2.5 GeV electron beam of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) and the neutron calibration field of Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (KAERI). (authors)

  16. Analysis of equivalent dose (H) starting from the exposition (X) received for patient families in myocardial perfusion study with 99mTc-Sestamibi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The myocardial perfusion study with 99mTc-Sestamibi has the major indication frequency for the coronary arterial illness diagnostic, due to its high sensibility and specificity. The patient families that are exposed to this study also receive the radiation of the injected radiopharmaceutical. The punctual source model (Psm) is generally used for the absorbed dose calculation of the radiation coming from patients under any procedure with radiopharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to compare the equivalent doses calculated theoretically (Dat) by means of Psm, regarding the measurements that routinely are made by means of a detector Geiger (Dam), as well as to quantify the maxim equivalent dose to which they are exposed the families of the subjected patients to this procedure. 30 voluntary patients were evaluated with clinical indication for myocardial perfusion study with 99mTc-Sestamibi with acquisition protocol of 1 day: Rest-effort, with dose of 15-30 mCi (555-1110 mBq) respectively. Immediate to each injection of 99mTc-Sestamibi was calculated the Dat, using the equation that the Psm describes, considering a distance of 1 meter; and the exposition speed was measured by means of a detector Geiger at a distance 1 meter to the heart height. The measurements comparison (Dat vs Dam) was realized by means of the test statistical t-student for independent samples, considering a significance level p≤0.05. For the data of the second injection, was realized a regression analysis to evaluate the lineal correlation among both measurements. Immediately after the injection of 15 mCi (555 mBq) of 99mTc-Sestamibi, the values of the Dam (1.37±0.43 mrem, 13.7±4.3 μSv) they differ significantly of the Dat (1.04 mrem, p99mTc-Sestamibi was carried out in an average time of 2.57±0.02 hr, having the patients group a calculated initial activity of 11.14±0.76 mCi (412.2±28.12 mBq). Differences were not observed statistically significant between the Dam (2.76±0.87 mrem

  17. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical research on a new antibiotic combination (amoxicillin and flucloxacillin in equivalent-weight dose)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nola, F; Soranzo, M L; Bosio, G; Sachelariu, N; Mastroviti, S

    1977-03-24

    A controlled double-blind biometric and an open clinical trial were conducted to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of a new equal-dose w/w association of amoxicillin and flucloxacillin. The following conclusions were drawn. Both antibiotics were present in high serum levels; those of flucloxacillin were higher and more persistent. Analysis of variance on 89 patients pointed to the superiority of the association by comparison with amoxicillin alone. The clinical study made it clear that the broad and complementary spectrum of the association, its synergy, absence of toxicity and good gastric tolerance make it a valuable and effective therapeutic aid, also in presence of germs that produce beta-lactase.

  18. AGS421 - an innovative concept for autarkic monitoring of ambient dose rate; AGS421 - ein neues Konzept zur autarken ODL-Ueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzheimer, C.; Rother, M. [EH and S ENVINET, TechniData AG (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Modern radiation protection essentially relies on area-wide monitoring of ambient gamma dose rate. Deployment of common monitoring stations is constricted by the disadvantage of immobility due to required connections to infrastructure such as power mains and data communication lines. TechniData is proud to introduce an innovative concept for the purpose of ambient dose rate monitoring: the Autarkic Gamma Sensor AGS421. TechniData's AGS421 combines the advantages of high flexibility and extensive functionality of previous systems with exceptional independence from external structures as network and communication connections. Equipped with a solar-panel and a GSM-terminal, AGS421 provides for superior mobility and autarky at any extent. Considering mobile conditions, the AGS421 is smooth to integrate into existing monitoring networks, suited both for long term monitoring and temporary surveillance of gamma radiation. (orig.)

  19. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  20. Calculation Monte Carlo equivalent dose to organs in a treatment of prostate with Brachytherapy of high rate; Calculo Monte Carlo de dosis equivalente a organos en un tratamiento de prostata con braquiterapia de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C.; Vijande, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs when applies brachytherapy high dose (HDR) with sources of 60 Co or 192 Go to a localized carcinoma of the prostate. The results are compared with those reported in the literature on treatment with protons and intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy. (Author)

  1. Investigation of radiation protection instruments based on tissue-equivalent proportional counters. Results of a Eurados intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose-equivalent quantities which are recommended in radiation protection for environmental monitoring of penetrating radiation from external sources, are defined as the dose equivalents at specified points in the 30 cm diameter, tissue-equivalent ICRU sphere (ICRU, 1985). For area monitoring, the dose equivalent in 10 mm depth in the ICRU sphere, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), is suggested. In the case of neutron radiation, the appropriate calibration quantity is the neutron fluence Φ. The neutron fluence to ambient dose-equivalent conversion factor, hΦ = H*(10)/Φ, is a complicated function of the neutron energy reflecting the energy dependence of the kerma factor, the quality factor and the radiation transport in the ICRU sphere. An ideal dose-equivalent meter for neutrons should be sufficiently sensitive and should have a reading, M, so that the fluence response, M/Φ, is identical to the conversion factor, hΦ, over the entire range of neutron energies encountered in practice, i.e. from thermal neutrons to at least 15 MeVΘ. However, neutron monitors currently in use clearly fail to meet these requirements. The operational quantity, H*(10), is recommended by the ICRU as an estimator for the effective dose equivalent, Heff, for penetrating radiations. The depth of 10 mm was chosen as a compromise between the appropriate neutron energy dependence and sufficient sensitivity for photons below 50 keV

  2. Calculation of conversion factor of Kerma in the air for ambient dose equivalent in radiotherapy; Calculo dos fatores de conversao de Kerma no ar para equivalente de dose ambiental em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marco Antonio Frota

    2000-03-01

    This work aims to estimate the average conversion factor of Kerma in air to H {sup *} (10) using photon beams coming from clinic linear accelerators, transmitted through concrete walls of a radiotherapic treatment room. The transmitted photon spectra by both 1 meter and 2 meters concrete walls, in an area of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2}, were calculated when the primary beam impart in an angle of 0 deg. The (secondary) photon beams transmitted respectively by 0,5 meter, 1,0 meter, 1,0 meter and 2,0 meter concrete walls, after they scattered by an angle of 90 deg in a cylindric phantom inside the room, were also determined. Generally, 50 millions of histories were computed for each simulation made for the primary beam. For the 90 deg spread, the number of histories was 100 millions. The computational code used on this work was the MCNP4B. The most common clinic accelerators used on radiotheraphic treatments were used on this work CLINAC-4, CLINAC-6, CLINAC-18 and CLINAC-2500. From the spectra analysis obtained in this work, it was possible to dispose the conversion factor for realistic beams found in radiotherapeutic establishment. (author)

  3. Determination of the Neutron and Photon Dose Equivalent at Work Places in Nuclear Facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 1: Measurements and Data Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-scaled measurement program of neutron and photon dose equivalent rates was organized in 1992 and 1993 at the nuclear power plant at Ringhals and at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for spent fuel elements at Oskarshamn. The aim was to evaluate the uncertainty in these kinds of measurements in realistic radiation fields. For that purpose, groups experienced with different techniques and - in some cases - several groups with a particular technique, were invited to take part. Besides traditional rem counters, the following categories of instruments were involved: Bonner spheres systems, proton recoil detectors, tissue equivalent proportional counters, super heated drop detectors, GM counters and different types of personal dosemeters. Part I reports all initial results as presented by the individual participants as well as a first compilation of the results. A later report, Part II, will give detailed analysis of the results. The conclusions will be published in the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all 14 papers

  4. Estimates of internal dose equivalent to 22 target organs for radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel-cycle facilities. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the first of a two-volume tabulation of internal radiation dose conversion factors for man for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. This volume treats 68 radionuclides, all of mass number less than 150. Intake by inhalation and ingestion is considered. In the former case, the ICRP Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the behavior of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 μm are given. The GI tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in other organs was characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. Dose equivalent per microcurie intake of each parent nuclide is given for 22 target organs with contributions from specified source organs plus surplus activity in the rest of the body. Cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has also been considered in the calculations

  5. A Prototype Ionisation Chamber as a Secondary Standard for the Measurement of Personal Dose Equivalent, Hp(10), on a Slab Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and technical characteristics of a secondary standard chamber for measuring the conventionally true value of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), on a slab phantom are presented. The chamber was optimised to get a nearly constant response with respect to Hp(10) for photon energies from about 10 keV to 1400 keV and for angles of incidence, alpha, from 0 deg. to 75 deg. . Thus, once calibrated at the facility of the calibration laboratory, the Hp(10) chamber can be used at other facilities without any need to consider the spectral differences of radiation fields of the same nominal radiation quality but generated by two different facilities. This is a great advantage over the procedure recommended in ISO/FDIS 4037-3, according to which these differences have to be considered for low energy photon radiation and may lead to differences of the conversion coefficients from air kerma, Ka, to Hp(10) of up to several tens of per cent. (author)

  6. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the equivalent dose (EUD) uniform as a parameter of quality of a plan; Evaluacion de la dosis equivalente uniform (EUD) como parametro de calidad de un plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Molla, R.; Quiros Higueras, J. D.; Perez Calatayud, J.; Marco Blancas, N. de; Bonaque, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of uniform equivalent dose (EUD) as a parameter of quality of dosimetric plans in radiotherapy. Has been sought a possible relationship with points in the dose volume histogram and exposed the difficulties encountered in the application of the evaluation with the EUD in clinical practice. Suggested a possible solution to these difficulties using the EUD (D98%). (Author)

  8. Virtual reality technology used to estimate radiation doses in nuclear installations; Utilizacao de ambientes virtuais na estimativa de dose de radiacao em instalacoes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, Silas Cordeiro

    2008-03-15

    The physical integrity of people when walking in places subjected to radiation can be preserved by following some rules. Among these rules are safe limits of radiation level, proximity of radiation sources, time of exposition to radiation sources, and a combination of these factors. In this way, previous training and simulations of operation proceedings to be executed in places subjected to radiation help to better prepare the course in such places, minimizing the absorbed dose. On the other hand, virtual reality is a technology applicable in several areas, enabling the training and simulation of real places and hypothetical scenarios, with a good level of realism, but without danger if compared to the same activities in the real world. As a virtual environment does not presents any health risks, it is possible to train workers beforehand to several operation or maintenance scenarios. In this virtual environment, the dose tax distribution can be visualized, and the dose absorbed by the worker, represented and simulated in the virtual environment by a virtual character (avatar) can be shown. Therefore, the tasks to be done can be better planned, evaluating the workers actions and the performance so to reduce failures and health risks. Finally, this work presents a tool to build and navigate in virtual environments, enabling the training of activities in nuclear facilities. To that end is proposed a methodology to modify and adapt a free game engine. (author)

  9. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996; Umweltpolitik. Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Bericht ueber die `Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 1996` richtet sich an Bundestag und Bundesrat und darueber hinaus an alle an Fragen des Strahlenschutzes interessierte Buerger. Der Bericht belegt, dass die Strahlenbelastung der Bevoelkerung im Jahr 1996 gering war und insgesamt durchschnittlich 4 Millisievert (mSv) betrug. Dieser Wert war zu 60% auf natuerliche und zu 40% auf kuenstliche Strahlenquellen zurueckzufuehren. Den wesentlichen Beitrag zur natuerlichen Strahlenbelastung lieferte das radioaktive Gas Radon in Wohnungen. Die zivilisatorische Strahlenexposition der Bevoelkerung wurde fast ausschliesslich durch die Anwendung radioaktiver Stoffe und ionisierender Strahlen in der Medizin im Rahmen der Diagnostik hervorgerufen. Hier bestehen nach wie vor Moeglichkeiten zur Reduktion der Strahlenbelastung. Im Jahre 1996 waren 340 000 Personen beruflich

  10. Determination of the equivalent doses due to the ingestion of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series presents in drinking waters of the region of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper determined the original dose equivalents from radionuclides of uranium and thorium series in a drinking water of well which is supplied to the population of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil. The collected waters are near to the mineralized phlegmatic bodies in rose quartz and amazonite feldspar. Radiometric measurements performed on the feldspar vein point out counting ratios surrounding 30000 cps and the analysis of collected samples of minerals presented tenors for the 226Ra and 219Pb varying from 0.50 to 2.30 Bq/sw. For determination of concentration of radionuclides UTotal, 226Ra, 228Ra and 219Pb, found in the not desalinated, two methods were used, spectrophotometry with arsenazo and radiochemistry, both realized in the CNEN-LAPOC laboratories. For the calculation of dose equivalent it was taken into consideration the following parameters: the dose coefficients for incorporation by ingestion for public individuals with ages over 17 years (Norma CNEN-NN-3.01, Regulatory Position 3.01/011) and daily ingestion of 4 liters of water, which is over the recommended by the WHO of 2L/day - 1993. The obtained values were compared with the reference value for compromised dose equivalent established by WHO for evaluate the risk potential to the health of population, by ingestion. The radionuclide concentrations in the wells varies from 0.054 to 0.21 Bq/L, resulting dose equivalents of 3.94 x 10-3 mSv/year and 0.17 mSv/year in the studied population

  11. Energy spectrum measurement and dose rate estimation of natural neutrons in Tibet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 徐勇军; 刘森林; 汪传高

    2015-01-01

    In this work, natural neutron spectra at nine sites in Tibet region were measured using a multi-sphere neutron spectrometer. The altitude-dependence of the spectra total fluence rate and ambient dose equivalent rate were analyzed. From the normalized natural neutron spectra at different altitudes, the spectrum fractions for neutrons of greater than 0.1 MeV do not differ obviously, while those of the thermal neutrons differ greatly from each other. The total fluence rate, effective dose rate and the ambient dose equivalent rate varied with the altitude according to an exponential law.

  12. Neutron Dosimetry with Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters: Their Limitations and How to Deal with Them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-pressure tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are instruments that measure absorbed dose based on the Bragg-Gray cavity theory. By keeping the filling pressure low, the energy loss of individual charged particles crossing the detector cavity corresponds to the energy loss in tissue over distances of the order of a few micrometres. However, the efficacy of the TEPC as a meter for ambient dose equivalent H*(10) deteriorates rapidly below a few hundred keV, reflecting the differences between the TEPC and the artifact used in the definition of H*(10); the typical TEPC has walls roughly 1 to 2 mm thick, whereas H*(10) is defined at a point 10 mm below the surface of the 30-cm-diam ICRU sphere. Several laboratories have investigated approaches to improving the TEPC ambient dose equivalent response, but all have involved modifying the detectors themselves by increasing the wall thickness, reducing the filling pressure, altering the gas composition, or some combination there of. Each of these approaches has positive and negative aspects, but, generally speaking, improving an instrument's ambient dose equivalent response in one energy region tends to degrade the response in other regions. However, National Physical Laboratory has, for several years, been refining analytical methods for improving the H*(10) response of TEPCs, which essentially use the shape of the TEPC spectrum, and how it varies with neutron energy to determine a correction factor for the measured ambient dose equivalent. This is achieved by comparing the measured spectra to a catalog of theoretical spectra, generated by a Monte Carlo code developed by the author over many years

  13. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Meungwong, Pooriwat [Lampang Cancer Hospital, Lampang (Thailand); Traisathit, Patrinee [Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan [aculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiei (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale > or = grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with > or = grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  14. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (1). Overview of the lens, radiogenic cataract, and equivalent dose limit for the lens newly recommended by the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued the statement on tissue reactions. This stimulated interest in many countries. The Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye was established in the Japanese Health Physics Society, and in April 2013, started discussion about the international developments and recent studies related to the dosimetry of the lens of the eye. This committee now publishes the interim report consisting of parts I-VI. Of these, this Part I overviews the structure of the eye and lens, cataract types and the scientific evidence of its new dose threshold and equivalent dose limit newly recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  15. Improved tumour response prediction with equivalent uniform dose in pre-clinical study using direct intratumoural infusion of liposome-encapsulated 186Re radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crucial to all cancer therapy modalities is a strong correlation between treatment and effect. Predictability of therapy success/failure allows for the optimization of treatment protocol and aids in the decision of whether additional treatment is necessary to prevent tumour progression. This work evaluated the relationship between cancer treatment and effect for intratumoural infusions of liposome-encapsulated 186Re to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts of nude rats. Absorbed dose calculations using a dose-point kernel convolution technique showed significant intratumoural dose heterogeneity due to the short range of the beta-particle emissions. The use of three separate tumour infusion locations improved dose homogeneity compared to a single infusion location as a result of a more uniform radioactivity distribution. An improved dose-response correlation was obtained when using effective uniform dose (EUD) calculations based on a generic set of radiobiological parameters (R2 = 0.84) than when using average tumour absorbed dose (R2 = 0.22). Varying radiobiological parameter values over ranges commonly used for all types of tumours showed little effect on EUD calculations, which suggests that individualized parameter use is of little significance as long as the intratumoural dose heterogeneity is taken into consideration in the dose-response relationship. The improved predictability achieved when using EUD calculations for this cancer therapy modality may be useful for treatment planning and evaluation.

  16. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs; Estudo da radiacao espalhada e produzida pela blindagem de concreto de salas de radioterapia e seus efeitos sobre doses equivalentes nos orgaos dos pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, K.L.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Gavazza, S.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Gomes, R.G.; Silva, M.G., E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: sergiogavazza@yahoo.com, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: raphaelmsm@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com, E-mail: maglosilva15@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Thalhofer, J.L.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: jardellt@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, R.F.G., E-mail: raphaelfgsantos@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Anhanguera, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia

    2015-07-01

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  17. Radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren bone-coal power station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren Bonc-coalPower Station (BCPS) was investigated systematically. The γ radiation dose ratelevel in the environment, the content of 238U and 226Ra in the ambient soil and thefarmland in the direction of downwind, the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 40Kand 222Rn, as well as α potential energy in air, and the concentrations of natural Uand Th in effluent are all higher than the corresponding values of the reference site.The additional annual effective dose equivalent to the residents living in the housesmade of bone-coal cinder brick is 2.7mSv.

  18. Experimental research of high-pressure tissue equivalent ionization chamber used for detecting in mixed radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design principle of tissue equivalent ionization chamber based on the theory of recombination was described, and the area neutron and gamma dose equivalent instrument was designed. This detection system can indirectly acquire the information of the ambient dose equivalent, the absorbed dose and the quality factor of the mixed radiation field using only one probe. Moreover, the detection system was tested by the accelerator and the standard radiation field. The results indicate that the system has good energy response and sensitivity to the neutron and gamma radiation, especially to the high energy gamma radiation and the neutrons with energy ranging from thermal to dozens of MeV. The uncertainty can be controlled within ±50%, while the dose rate of the radiation is above dozens of μSv/h, so this detection system can serve as the necessary measurement instruments and monitoring technology for the places having the mixed radiation field of neutron and gamma ray. (authors)

  19. Spatial dependence and origin of the ambient dose due to neutron activation processes in linear accelerators; Dependencia espacial y origen de la dosis ambiental debeda a procesos de activacion neutronica en aceleradores lineales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Egea, E.; Sanchez Carrascal, M.; Torres Pozas, S.; Monja Ray, P. de la; Perez Molina, J. L.; Madan Rodriguez, C.; Luque Japon, L.; Morera Molina, A.; Hernandez Perez, A.; Barquero Bravo, Y.; Morengo Pedagna, I.; Oliva Gordillo, M. C.; Martin Olivar, R.

    2011-07-01

    In order to try to determine the high dose in the bunker of a Linear Accelerator clinical use trying to measure the spatial dependence of the same from the isocenter to gateway to the board cheeking to establish the origin of it. This dose measurements performed with an ionization chamber at different locations inside the bunker after an irradiation of 400 Monitor Units verifying the dose rate per minute for an hour, and accumulating the dose received during that period of time.

  20. Incorporation of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids into lipid pools when given as supplements providing doses equivalent to typical intakes of oily fish 1 2 3 4

    OpenAIRE

    Browning, Lucy M; Walker, Celia G.; Mander, Adrian P; West, Annette L.; Madden, Jackie; Gambell, Joanna M; Young, Stephen; Wang, Laura; Jebb, Susan A.; Calder, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Estimation of the intake of oily fish at a population level is difficult. The measurement of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in biological samples may provide a useful biomarker of intake. Objective: We identified the most appropriate biomarkers for the assessment of habitual oily fish intake and changes in intake by elucidating the dose- and time-dependent response of EPA and DHA incorporation into various biological samples that represent roles in fatt...

  1. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields; Revision didactica del sistema de magnitudes operativas ICRU para la evaluacion de la dosis equivalente en campos externos de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H{sub E} and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  2. Determination of the equivalent doses due to the ingestion of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series presents in drinking waters of the region of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil; Determinacao das doses equivalentes devido a ingestao de radionuclideos das series do uranio e torio presentes em aguas de consumo do municipio de Santa Luzia, estado da Paraiba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastura, Valeria F. da S., E-mail: vpastura@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DRSN/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioprotecao e Seguranca Nuclear. Coordenacao de Materias Primas e Minerais; Campos, Thomas F. da C.; Petta, Reinaldo A., E-mail: thomascampos@geologia.ufrn.b, E-mail: petta@geologia.ufrn.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (LARANA/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Radioatividade Natural

    2011-10-26

    This paper determined the original dose equivalents from radionuclides of uranium and thorium series in a drinking water of well which is supplied to the population of Santa Luzia, Paraiba state, Brazil. The collected waters are near to the mineralized phlegmatic bodies in rose quartz and amazonite feldspar. Radiometric measurements performed on the feldspar vein point out counting ratios surrounding 30000 cps and the analysis of collected samples of minerals presented tenors for the {sup 226}Ra and {sup 219}Pb varying from 0.50 to 2.30 Bq/sw. For determination of concentration of radionuclides U{sub Total}, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 219}Pb, found in the not desalinated, two methods were used, spectrophotometry with arsenazo and radiochemistry, both realized in the CNEN-LAPOC laboratories. For the calculation of dose equivalent it was taken into consideration the following parameters: the dose coefficients for incorporation by ingestion for public individuals with ages over 17 years (Norma CNEN-NN-3.01, Regulatory Position 3.01/011) and daily ingestion of 4 liters of water, which is over the recommended by the WHO of 2L/day - 1993. The obtained values were compared with the reference value for compromised dose equivalent established by WHO for evaluate the risk potential to the health of population, by ingestion. The radionuclide concentrations in the wells varies from 0.054 to 0.21 Bq/L, resulting dose equivalents of 3.94 x 10{sup -3} mSv/year and 0.17 mSv/year in the studied population

  3. Evaluation of the environmental equivalent dose rate using area monitors for neutrons in clinical linear accelerators; Avaliacao da taxa de equivalente de dose ambiente utilizando monitores de area para neutrons em aceleradores lineares clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Ana Paula; Pereira, Walsan Wagner; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da, E-mail: asalgado@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Batista, Delano V.S. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The Neutron Laboratory of the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute - IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, initiated studies on the process of calibration of neutron area monitors and the results of the measurements performed at radiotherapy treatment rooms, containing clinical accelerators

  4. Systematic survey of the dose enhancement in tissue-equivalent materials facing medium- and high-Z backscatterers exposed to X-rays with energies from 5 to 250 keV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenbusch, M; Harder, D; Regulla, D

    2014-05-01

    The present study has been inspired by the results of earlier dose measurements in tissue-equivalent materials adjacent to thin foils of aluminum, copper, tin, gold, and lead. Large dose enhancements have been observed in low-Z materials near the interface when this ensemble was irradiated with X-rays of qualities known from diagnostic radiology. The excess doses have been attributed to photo-, Compton, and Auger electrons released from the metal surfaces. Correspondingly, high enhancements of biological effects have been observed in single cell layers arranged close to gold surfaces. The objective of the present work is to systematically survey, by calculation, the values of the dose enhancement in low-Z media facing backscattering materials with a variety of atomic numbers and over a large range of photon energies. Further parameters to be varied are the distance of the point of interest from the interface and the kind of the low-Z material. The voluminous calculations have been performed using the PHOTCOEF algorithm, a proven set of interpolation functions fitted to long-established Monte Carlo results, for primary photon energies between 5 and 250 keV and for atomic numbers varying over the periodic system up to Z = 100. The calculated results correlate well with our previous experimental results. It is shown that the values of the dose enhancement (a) vary strongly in dependence upon Z and photon energy; (b) have maxima in the energy region from 40 to 60 keV, determined by the K and L edges of the backscattering materials; and (c) are valued up to about 130 for "International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) soft tissue" (soft tissue composition recommended by the ICRP) as the adjacent low-Z material. Maximum dose enhancement associated with the L edge occurs for materials with atomic numbers between 50 and 60, e.g., barium (Z = 56) and iodine (Z = 53). Such materials typically serve as contrast media in medical X-ray diagnostics. The gradual

  5. Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S E

    1991-05-01

    Six human males each received 0.56 g phenylalanine (Phe) in the form of 1.0 g aspartame or 12.2 g bovine albumin in 200 ml water or water alone. Venous blood samples collected before consumption and during the following 4 hr were assayed for plasma levels of large, neutral amino acids (LNAA), aspartate, insulin and glucose. The area under the curve for plasma Phe was 40% greater, although not significant, after aspartame compared with albumin intake. The indicated increased clearance rate of plasma Phe after albumin may be caused by the significant increase of insulin, on which aspartame had no effect. There was a significant main effect of aspartame for plasma tyrosine but not for tryptophan, valine, isoleucine or leucine. Plasma aspartate was significantly increased at 0.25 hr after the aspartame intake. The percentage Phe/LNAA decreased slightly in response to albumin but increased 55% after aspartame and remained significantly increased for 2 hr. Tyrosine/LNAA increased and tryptophan/LNAA decreased modestly after aspartame intake. The study showed that the intake of aspartame in a not unrealistically high dose produced a marked and persistent increase of the availability of Phe to the brain, which was not observed after protein intake. The study indicated, furthermore, that Phe was cleared faster from the plasma after consumption of protein compared with aspartame. PMID:1946186

  6. Clinically relevant test methods to establish in vitro equivalence for spacers and valved holding chambers used with pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jolyon; Dolovich, Myrna B

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory guidance in Canada and Europe recommends that the manufacturer of an inhaled drug product delivered by pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) identify a spacer (S) or valved holding chamber (VHC) to be used with their designated product. It therefore becomes necessary to include the S/VHC in the process of establishing bioequivalence (BE) to the reference pMDI product for both new-entry generic and subsequent market entry products (SMEPs). S/VHCs substantially modify the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of the inhaled medication, and potentially the spatial distribution of the mass of active pharmaceutical ingredient(s) [API(s)] depositing in the respiratory tract. The processes whereby S/VHCs can influence BE outcomes are examined, and the inadequacy of compendial in vitro methods to provide pertinent information to assess BE for the pMDI+VHC combination is highlighted. A three-part strategy is proposed whereby in vitro testing for BE can simulate more clinically-relevant conditions than in the current compendial procedures: 1. The inclusion of a short delay between inhaler actuation and sampling onset is appropriate when determining APSD at flow rate(s) suitable for the intended patient population; 2. Assessment of total emitted mass ex S/VHC by simulating tidal breathing pattern(s) appropriate for intended use; 3. Incorporation of appropriate face model(s), representative of the intended patient age range(s), into test procedures for S/VHCs with facemask, enabling clinically-appropriate dead space and fit-to-face to be simulated. Although the compendial authorities have been slow to recognize the need for such in vitro testing, a Canadian standard provides direction for implementing most proposals, which should result in better performance predictions and more appropriate clinical outcomes, highlighting similarities and differences between reference and test products. PMID:22857273

  7. Ambient Space and Ambient Sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    The ambient is the aesthetic production of the sensation of being surrounded. As a concept, 'ambient' is mostly used in relation to the music genre 'ambient music' and Brian Eno's idea of environmental background music. However, the production of ambient sensations must be regarded as a central...... aspect of the aesthetization of modern culture in general, from architecture, transport and urbanized lifeforms to film, sound art, installation art and digital environments. This presentation will discuss the key aspects of ambient aesthetization, including issues such as objectlessness...

  8. Development of a map of environmental radiation in Aragon; Elaboracion de un mapa de radiacion ambiental en Aragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvete, H. I.; Carrion, J. A.; Gale, C.; Garcia, B.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Perez, C.; Puimedon, J.; Rodriguez, S.; Sanchez, P.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Virto, A.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of the measurements of the environmental radioactivity levels obtained in selected locations of the 33 administrative divisions of the Autonomous Region of Aragon (Spain). The ambient dose levels have been recorded by using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) during a period of four years (2008-2012). the average ambient dose equivalent H (10) level in Aragon is 0.82 mSv/year. This research has been supported by the Aragon Government and the Obra Social de la Caixa under the grants GA-LC-014/2008 and GA-LC-035/2010. (Author) 6 refs.

  9. An attempt to estimate gamma-ray dose rate from radioactive waste storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesic, M.; Plecas, I.; Pavlovic, R.; Pavlovic, S. [Institute for Nuclear Sciences ' ' Vinca' ' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sokcic-Kostic, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Hauptabteilung Zyklotron

    2001-07-01

    Radioactive waste - {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co contaminated sludge from the irradiated fuel storage pool of the RA research reactor in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, is conditioned and stored in specially designed casks in 1997. Main purpose of this paper is to describe an attempt to estimate a gamma-ray ambient dose equivalent rate from the cask with the conditioned sludge by reference Monte Carlo MCNP code and compare the result to the measuring data. The aim of the study is to master with a reliable computational tool that allows faithful estimation of the total ambient gamma-ray dose equivalent rates from the cask. Values of so obtained gamma-ray ambient dose equivalent rates are compared to the measured values at the same spots of the cask and acceptable agreement were found. These data could be used in a further study on minimisation of the total ambient dose equivalent rate of a regular array or random pile of casks, stored in the storage location. (orig.)

  10. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under th

  11. Det ambiente

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Om begrebet "det ambiente", der beskriver, hvad der sker, når vi fornemmer baggrundsmusikkens diskrete beats, betragter udsigten gennem panoramavinduet eller tager 3D-brillerne på og læner os tilbage i biografsædet. Bogen analyserer, hvorfan ambiente oplevelser skabes, og hvilke konsekvenser det...

  12. On Equivalence And Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙贝

    2013-01-01

      Equivalence, a central and controversial issue in translation, has been studied, discussed and disputed by many scholars. For this reason, they employed various approaches and have yielded fruitful and remarkable theories. Three representative equivalence theories are selected in the thesis to elaborate equivalence:Nida’s reader-response based dynamic equivalence, Catford’s textual equivalence, Qiu Maoru’s empirical formula on equivalence. Equivalence is an applicable tool to analyze and evaluate translation.

  13. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms; Desenvolvimento de um modelo computacional para calculo do equivalente de dose de neutrons em barreiras primarias laminadas de salas de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  14. Long-term intercomparison of Spanish environmental dosimetry services. Study of transit dose estimations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the layout and results of a three-year follow-up of a national intercomparison campaign organized on a voluntary basis among the Spanish Laboratories in charge of environmental monitoring at and in the vicinity of Spanish nuclear installations. The dosemeters were exposed in the field at an environmental reference station with a known ambient dose equivalent, and controlled meteorological parameters. The study aimed at verifying the consistency of the different laboratories in estimating the ambient dose equivalent in realistic fields and to evaluate the influence of two different procedures to estimate the transit dose during the transfer of the dosemeters both from and to the dosimetric laboratory and the monitored site. All the results were within 20% of the reference doses for all the dosemeters tested, and in most cases they were within 10%

  15. Det Ambiente

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Det ambiente er iscenesættelsen af en karakteristisk sanseoplevelse, der er kendetegnet ved fornemmelsen af at være omgivet. I dag bliver begrebet om det ambiente mest anvendt i forbindelse med musikgenren ’ambient musik’. Det ambiente er dog ikke essentielt knyttet til det musikalske, men må...... forstås som et betydeligt bredere fænomen i den moderne æstetiske kultur, der spiller en væsentlig rolle i oplevelsen af moderne transportformer, arkitektur, film, lydkunst, installationskunst og digitale multimedieiscenesættelser. En forståelse af det ambiente er derfor centralt for forståelsen af en...... moderne æstetiseret oplevelseskultur i almindelighed. Da det ambiente ikke hidtil har været gjort til genstand for en mere indgående teoretisk behandling, er der dog stor usikkerhed omkring, hvad fænomenet overhovedet indebærer. Hovedformålet med Det ambiente – Sansning, medialisering, omgivelse er derfor...

  16. Comparison of cough induced by equivalent doses of alfentanil and fentanyl%等效剂量阿芬太尼与芬太尼在全麻诱导时诱发咳嗽的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帅训军; 艾登斌; 曹玺

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of cough induced by equivalent doses of alfentanil and fentanyl. METHODS: Fifty patients under- going general anesthesia were randomly assigned to alfentanil group , and fentanyl group. Two groups were received equivalent doses of alfen- tanil 8 μg/kg, and fentanil 2 μg/kg, via Ⅳ push within 5 seconds respectively. To observe the starting time incidence and severity of cough, heart rate ( HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded immediately before injection (T1) and 2 min (T2) after injection. RESULTS: Alfentanil group had an earlier starting time than fentanyl group, alfentanil group had a significantly lower incidence of cough than fentanyl group(P<0. 05). Compared with T1 , the HR and MAP of alfentanil group and fentanyl group at T2 were significant lower(P<0. 05). Compared with fentanyl group, the extent of decrease in the HR and MAP of alfentanil group were significant higher ( P < 0. 05 ). CONCLUSION: Alfentanil induces a lower incidence of cough and more steadier circulation than equivalent doses of fentanyl.%目的:比较等效剂量阿芬太尼与芬太尼对患者咳嗽的影响.方法:50例全麻手术患者,随机分为阿芬太尼组、芬太尼组,每组25例,两组患者分别在5 s内静脉注射阿芬太尼8 μg/kg、芬太尼2 μg/kg,观察给药后2 min内两组患者的咳嗽起始时间、咳嗽发生率以及严重程度,并记录给药前(T1)和给药后2 min(T2)两个时点的心率(HR)、平均动脉压(MAP)变化.结果:阿芬太尼组患者咳嗽的起始时间明显早于芬太尼组,阿芬太尼组咳嗽的发生率显著低于芬太尼组(P<0.05).与T1时相比,T2时芬太尼组和阿芬太尼组的HR和MAP均显著下降(P<0.05),且阿芬太尼组HR和MAP下降程度显著低于芬太尼组(P<0.05).结论:与等效剂量芬太尼相比,阿芬太尼诱发咳嗽的发生率较低,循环更为平稳.

  17. Determinations of H(10) and its dose components onboard aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, L; Beck, P; Bottolier-Depois, J F; Latocha, M; Lillhök, J; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Roth, J; Schraube, H; Spurny, F; Stehno, G; Trompier, F; Wissmann, F

    2007-01-01

    Aircrew is in general receiving a higher average annual dose than other occupationally exposed personnel, and about half of the effective dose is deposited by high-LET neutron secondaries. A recent investigation of the cancer incidence following the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki has put forward the possibility that the relative biological efficiency for neutrons could be underestimated. If so, the effective dose to aircrew from this component would increase and the estimation of this component will become even more important. Different ambient dose equivalent measurement techniques and calculation methods have recently been compared on a dedicated flight. The experimental results are compared with calculations made with the codes EPCARD 3.2 and an updated version of FLUKA and different galactic proton spectra. The aircraft circulated within the target areas at two constant altitudes with a flight route variation of only about 1 degrees in longitude and latitude to reduce the influence from variations in atmospheric and geomagnetic shielding. The instrumentation consisted of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) and a silicon diode spectrometer. Measurements were performed for 2 h to reduce the statistical uncertainties in the results. The TEPCs were evaluated either according to single-event analysis techniques or the variance-covariance method. Besides the total ambient dose equivalent, the instruments can be evaluated to reveal the low- and high-LET components. The EPCARD and FLUKA simulations can determine the contribution from each type of particle directly. The ratio between the calculated and the measured average value of the ambient dose equivalent rate was 1.00 +/- 0.08 with all instruments included for EPCARD and 0.97 +/- 0.07 when FLUKA was used. The measured high-LET component and the calculated neutron component are not quite identical, but should be similar. The agreement was always within 20%. The high-LET component contributed with

  18. Ambient Gestures

    OpenAIRE

    Karam, Maria; Hare, Jonathon; Lewis, Paul; schraefel, m.c.

    2006-01-01

    We present Ambient Gestures, a novel gesture-based system designed to support ubiquitous ‘in the environment’ interactions with everyday computing technology. Hand gestures and audio feedback allow users to control computer applications without reliance on a graphical user interface, and without having to switch from the context of a non-computer task to the context of the computer. The Ambient Gestures system is composed of a vision recognition software application, a set of gestures to be p...

  19. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M Al-Aidaroos

    Full Text Available High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation. The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM 18.4±5.8% h(-1, five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM 12±5.6 h(-1% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  20. X Ray Spectrometry of Low Energy Photons for Determining Conversion Coefficients from Air Kerma, Ka, to Personal Dose Equivalent, Hp(10), for Radiation Qualities of the ISO Narrow Spectrum Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulse height spectra of the radiation qualities N-10 to N-120 of the ISO narrow spectrum series (N) were measured using a commercial Ge spectrometer and a specially designed lead collimator. For the unfolding of these spectra, three response matrices of the Ge spectrometer for different maximum energies and energy resolutions were calculated by the EGS4 (Electron Gamma Shower version 4) code incorporating the PRESTA and LSCAT options. Then, the pulse height spectra were unfolded with two different algorithms to check the correctness. To verify the measuring and unfolding method, the first half value layers (HVLs) were determined using small ionisation chambers and the fluence spectra. The mean photon energies were calculated, also on the basis of the fluence spectra, and compared with published values. For each radiation quality N-10 to N-120 the conversion coefficients hpK(10;N,α) from air kerma Ka to personal dose equivalent at 10mm depth, Hp (10,α), were calculated for angles of incidence α of 15, 30, 45, 60 deg. and 75 deg. between the unidirectional photon field and the normal to the slab phantom surface. Because the fluence spectra were influenced by the air density, in particular the low energy spectra, the hpK(10;N,α) values were normalised to reference conditions. Differences of up to about 88% between the hpK(10;N,α) values presented in this work and those given in ISO/FDIS 4037-3 were found. (author)

  1. Conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent H{sub p}(3) fir eye-lens dosimetry; Coeficients de conversion du kerma dans l'air a l'equivalent de dose individuel H{sub p}(3) pour la dosimetrie du cristalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daures, J.; Gouriou, J.; Bordy, J.M

    2009-07-01

    This work has been performed within the frame of the European Union ORAMED project (Optimization of Radiation protection for Medical staff). The main goal of the project is to improve standards of protection for medical staff for procedure resulting in potentially high exposures and to develop methodologies for better assessing and for reducing exposures to medical staff. The Work Package WP2 is involved in the development of practical eye lens dosimetry in interventional radiology. This study is complementary of the part of the ENEA report concerning the calculations with the MCNP code of the conversion factors related to the operational quantity H{sub p}(3). A set of energy and angular dependent conversion coefficients H{sub p}(3)/K{sub air} in the new proposed square cylindrical phantom of ICRU tissue, have been calculated with the Monte-Carlo code PENELOPE. The H{sub p}(3) values have been determined in terms of absorbed dose, according to the definition of this quantity, and also with the kerma approximation as formerly reported in ICRU reports. At low photon energy, up to 1 MeV, the two sets of conversion coefficients are consistent. Nevertheless, the differences increase at higher energy. This is mainly due to the lack of electronic equilibrium, especially for small angle incidences. The values of the conversion coefficients obtained with the code MCNP published by ENEA, agree with the kerma approximation calculations with PENELOPE. They are coherent with previous calculations in phantoms different in shape. But above 1 MeV, differences between conversion coefficient values calculated with the absorbed dose and with kerma approximation are significantly increasing, especially at low incidence angles. At those energies the electron transport has to be simulated. (author)

  2. Calibration of photographic dosemeters to evaluate the personal equivalent dose, Hp (10), irradiated by different radiation qualities and angles of incidence; Calibracao de dosimetros fotograficos para avaliar o equivalente de dose pessoal, Hp(10), irradiados por diferentes qualidades de radiacao e angulos de incidencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Christiana; Antonio Filho, Joao, E-mail: chsantoro@gmail.com, E-mail: jaf@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Marcus Aurelio P.; Goncalves Filho, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: masantos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: l.filho@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, Pe (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To use radiation detectors, should periodically perform tests and calibrations on instruments in order to verify its good functionality. One way to ascertain the quality of the instrument is to conduct a study of the angular dependence of the response of the radiation detectors. The photographic dosimetry has been used widely to quantify the radiation doses and to estimate levels of doses received by workers involved with X-and gamma radiation. Photographic dosimeters are used because provide wide range of exposure and good accuracy. One of the sources of error have been introduced by different irradiation geometries between calibration and measurement in radiation fields used in x-ray and gamma ray sources, therefore, there is a need for an evaluation of the sensitivity of dosimeters with variation of the angle of the incident beam. In this study were tested 190 photographic dosemeters in the Metrology Laboratory of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE) using the phantom H{sub p} (10), where the dosimeters are evaluated on the basis of the new operational magnitude for individual monitoring, the equivalent personal dose, H{sub p} (10). Angular dependence of these radiation detectors was studied in X radiation fields (in the range of 45 keV energy to 164 keV) and gamma radiation ({sup 137}Cs-662 keV e {sup 60}Co - 1250 keV)

  3. Determination of the dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of occupationally exposed personnel in the practice of proton emission tomography (PET/CT); Determinacion de la dosis equivalente Hp(0.07) en manos de trabajadores ocupacionalmente expuestos en la practica de Tomografia por Emision de Positrones (PET/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, D. [Servicio de Radiofisica Sanitaria, Unidad de Tecnologia Nuclear, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Km 11 Carretera Panamerican, Altos del Pipe, Caracas (Venezuela); Ruiz, N.; Esteves, L. [Centro Diagnostico Docente Las Mercedes, Calle Paris cruce con calle Caroni, Edif. CDD, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela)]. e-mail: dlea@ivic.ve

    2006-07-01

    In Venezuela recently it was implanted the Positron Emission Tomography technique (PET) with the perspective of implanting it at national level. Even when in our country practices it of nuclear medicine it exists from early of 70, there is not experience in the determination of the occupational doses by exposure to the external radiation in hands. By this reason, a concern exists in the workers of the centers of nuclear medicine where it is practiced the Positron Emission Tomography technique. In absence of the TLD dosimetry to measure dose in hands in our country, measurements of the dose equivalent of the workers of the PET national reference center were made, using a detector of hands type diode. It was determined the dose in hands in terms of dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in two work positions, that is: the corresponding to the transfer of the receiving vial of ({sup 18}F) FDG to the shield, quality control and uni doses division. The second work position corresponds the person in charge of administering, via intravenous, the ({sup 18}F) FDG. In this work it realizes the dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) measures in each one of the work positions before described by daily production. The informed doses correspond to a total average produced activity of 20.4 GBq (550 mCi). The results of the measurements in terms of dose equivalent in hands Hp(0.07) correspond to 2.1 {+-} 20% mSv in the work position of division and 0.4 {+-} 10% mSv in the position of injection of the radioactive material. At short term this foreseen until 4 productions per week, what means an annual dose equivalent Hp(0.07) in hands of 400 mSv approximately, without taking into account abnormal situations as its are spills of the ({sup 18}F) FDG in the work place. This work is the starting point so that the regulatory authority settles down, in Venezuela, dose restrictions in the PET practices and implant, in the centers of nuclear medicine, an optimization politics of this practice in conformity

  4. Índices agronômicos do meloeiro associados à dose adequada de nitrogênio, em ambiente protegido e no campo Muskmelon plant agronomical indice values associated with adequadenitrogen fertilizer rate, in unheated greenhouse and field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evando Luiz Coelho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho determinar a magnitude dos índices agronômicos da folha do meloeiro (Cucumis melo L., representados pela área (AFQ e massa da matéria seca da quinta folha à partir do ápice (MSQ, associados à dose de nitrogênio para a produção comercial máxima de frutos (PMF, em duas épocas de amostragens e em dois ambientes. Dois experimentos, ambiente protegido e campo, foram conduzidos adotando-se procedimentos similares. Cada experimento constou de quatro blocos ao acaso contendo cinco tratamentos que foram cinco doses de nitrogênio (0, 75, 150, 300 e 450 kg ha-1 de N, como uréia. Parte desse foi colocado nos sulcos (30%, antes do transplante e os 70% restantes foram aplicados via água de irrigação por gotejamento durante o ciclo da cultura. Inicialmente, aos 14 dias após o transplante (DAT, foi determinada a intensidade da clorose nas folhas por meio de notas de 0 (nenhuma clorose a 5 (clorose acentuada. Aos 25 e 53 DAT, no pegamento do primeiro e do segundo fruto, a AFQ e o MSQ foram determinados. Em ambos os experimentos, a intensidade da clorose diminuiu e AFQ e MSQ aumentaram com o aumento da dose de nitrogênio. Os valores da intensidade da clorose associados à PMF foram 0,22 e 1,11 no ambiente protegido e no campo, respectivamente. Na primeira e segunda amostragens, no ambiente protegido, os valores de AFQ associados à PMF foram 107 e 72 cm² e os de PSQ foram 0,36 e 0,26 g, respectivamente. No campo, os valores correspondentes foram 89 e 69 cm² e 0,39 e 0,30 g, respectivamente. Esses valores são propostos como índices do meloeiro indicadores da adequada dose do fertilizante nitrogenado.The objective of the experiments was to determine the values of the agronomical melon (Cucumis melo L. leaf indices, represented by both area (FLA and dry weight (FLW of the fifth leaf from the apex associated with the nitrogen rate for the maximum melon fruit yield (MFY, at two samples dates and two environmental

  5. Measurement of conversion coefficients between air Kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors for diagnostic X-ray beams; Determinacao experimental dos coeficientes de conversao de Kerma no ar para o equivalente de dose pessoal, Hp(d), e fatores de retroespalhamento em feixes de raios-x diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, Paulo Henrique Goncalves

    2008-07-01

    Two sets of quantities are import in radiological protection: the protection and operational quantities. Both sets can be related to basic physical quantities such as kerma through conversion coefficients. For diagnostic x-ray beams the conversion coefficients and backscatter factors have not been determined yet, those parameters are need for calibrating dosimeters that will be used to determine the personal dose equivalent or the entrance skin dose. Conversion coefficients between air kerma and personal dose equivalent and backscatter factors were experimentally determined for the diagnostic x-ray qualities RQR and RQA recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The air kerma in the phantom and the mean energy of the spectrum were measured for such purpose. Harshaw LiF-100H thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used for measurements after being calibrated against an 180 cm{sup 3} Radcal Corporation ionization chamber traceable to a reference laboratory. A 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab phantom was used for deep-dose measurements. Tl dosemeters were placed in the central axis of the x-ray beam at 5, 10, 15, 25 and 35 mm depth in the phantom upstream the beam direction Another required parameter for determining the conversion coefficients from was the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum. The spectroscopy of x-ray beams was done with a CdTe semiconductor detector that was calibrated with {sup 133} Ba, {sup 241} Am and {sup 57} Co radiation sources. Measurements of the x-ray spectra were carried out for all RQR and RQA IEC qualities. Corrections due to the detector intrinsic efficiency, total energy absorption, escape fraction of the characteristic x-rays, Compton effect and attenuation in the detector were done aiming an the accurate determination of the mean energy. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected with the stripping method by using these response functions. The typical combined standard uncertainties of

  6. Politico-economic equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime...... and a state are equivalent to another such pair if both pairs give rise to the same allocation in politico-economic equilibrium. The equivalence conditions help to identify factors that render institutional change non-neutral and to construct politico-economic equilibria in new policy regimes. We exemplify...... their use in the context of several applications, relating to social security reform, tax-smoothing policies and measures to correct externalities....

  7. Estimation of the contribution by neutrons to the equivalent dose for exposed occupationally personnel and people in medical use facilities: X rays of equal or superior energy to 10 MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega J, R.; Reyes S, M. A. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Moranchel y R, M., E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and occupationally staff exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents and estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  8. Estimation of the contribution of neutrons to the equivalent dose for personnel occupationally exposed and public in medical facilities: X-ray with energy equal or greater than 10MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alfonso Mayer; Jimenez, Roberto Ortega; Sanchez, Mario A. Reyes, E-mail: amgesfm@hotmail.com, E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Moranchel y Mejia, Mario, E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM/IPN), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas. Departamento de lngenieria Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and Occupationally Staff Exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents an estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  9. Analytical evaluation of dose measurement of critical accident at SILENE (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K

    2003-01-01

    Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) jointly organized SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise to intercompare the dose measurement systems of participating countries. Each participating country carried out dose measurements in the same irradiation field, and the measurement results were mutually compared. The participated in the exercise to measure the doses of gamma rays and neutron from SILENE by using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) and an alanine dosimeter. In this examination, the derived evaluation formulae for obtaining a tissue-absorbed dose from measured value (ambient dose equivalent) of TLD for neutron. We reported the tissue-absorbed dose computed using this evaluation formula to OECD/NEA. TLD's for neutron were irradiated in the TRACY facility to verify the evaluation formulae. The results of TLD's were compared with the calculations of MCNP and measurements with alanine dose meter. We found that the ratio of the dose b...

  10. Dose limit for external exposure of pregnant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ICRP publication 60 (The Recommendations of the commission-1990), the Commission has recommended that, once pregnancy has been declared, the equivalent dose limit to the pregnant worker should be 2 mSv for the surface of her abdomen during the remainder of the pregnancy. In addition, the commission has recommended that the fetus should be afforded the same broad level of protection as required for members of the public. The verifications of whether the commission's recommendations on the occupational exposure of pregnant women can be ensured under their working conditions are carried out. From the results, it seems to be unsuitable to accept the recommendations. It is proposed that external exposure for pregnant workers estimates ambient dose equivalent, H (10) on the surfaces of their abdomens and the dose limit to the pregnant women should be 1 mSv during the remainder of the pregnancy. (author)

  11. Equivalence in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李良杰

    2013-01-01

    There are many researches about translation theories and methods in western translation history. Equivalence in transla⁃tion has always been the central issue for discussion. This paper gives a general review and comment on equivalence in translation in terms of three representative translation theorists and their views about equivalence in translation.

  12. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  13. Identification of chemical constituents in traditional Chinese medicine formula using HPLC coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap MS from high doses of medicinal materials to equivalent doses of formula: Study on Xiang-Sha-Liu-Jun-Zi-Jia-Jian granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyun; Zhang, Qingqing; Lu, Zhiwei; Wang, Qing; Wang, Meiling; Liu, Yuehong; Fu, Shuang; Gao, Xiaoyan; Tang, Xudong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry has been a powerful tool for the research of chemical constituents in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas. However, the chromatographic peaks were difficult to discriminate clearly in data collection or analysis because of the complexity and the greatly different content of the constituents in TCM formula, which increased the difficulty of identification. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry based strategy focused on the comprehensive identification of TCM formula constituents was developed. Identification was carried out from a high dose of medicinal materials to equivalent dose of formula. Meanwhile, combined with mass spectrometry data, chromatographic behaviors, reference standards and previous reports, the identification of constituents in Xiang-Sha-Liu-Jun-Zi-Jia-Jian granules was described. 169 compounds were unambiguously or tentatively characterized, mainly including flavonoids, alkaloids, triterpenic acids, triterpene saponins, lactones, sesquiterpenoids and some other compounds. Among them, 11 compounds were unambiguously confirmed by comparing with reference standards. These results demonstrated that the method was effective and reliable for comprehensive identification of constituents of Xiang-Sha-Liu-Jun-Zi-Jia-Jian granules extracts and reveal the material basis of its therapeutic effects. This strategy might propose a research idea for the characterization of multi-constituents in TCM formula. PMID:26935761

  14. Radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis: Organ equivalent dose to partially in-field structures and second cancer risk estimates on the basis of a mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete 71003 (Greece); Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of the current study was to (a) calculate the organ equivalent dose (OED) and (b) estimate the associated second cancer risk to partially in-field critical structures from adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis on the basis of three different nonlinear risk models. Methods: Three-dimensional plans were created for twelve patients who underwent a treatment planning computed tomography of the abdomen. The plans for irradiation of seminoma consisted of para-aortic anteroposterior and posteroanterior fields giving 20 Gy to the target site with 6 MV photons. The OED of stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidneys, that were partially included in the treatment volume, was calculated using differential dose–volume histograms. The mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau models were employed for these calculations provided that organ-specific parameters were available for the subsequent assessment of the excess absolute risk (EAR) for second cancer development. The estimated organ-specific lifetime risks were compared with the respective nominal intrinsic probabilities for cancer induction. Results: The mean OED, which was calculated from the patients’ treatment plans, varied from 0.54 to 6.61 Gy by the partially in-field organ of interest and the model used for dosimetric calculations. The difference between the OED of liver derived from the mechanistic model with those from the bell-shaped and plateau models was less than 1.8%. An even smaller deviation of 1.0% was observed for colon. For the rest organs of interest, the differences between the OED values obtained by the examined models varied from 8.6% to 50.0%. The EAR for stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney cancer induction at an age of 70 yr because of treatment of a typical 39-yr-old individual was up to 4.24, 11.39, 0.91, 3.04, and 0.14 per 10 000 persons-yr, respectively. Patient’s irradiation was found to elevate the lifetime intrinsic risks by 8.3%–63.0% depending

  15. Study of the contribution of the different components of atmospheric cosmic radiation in dose received by the aircraft crew; Avaliacao da contribuicao dos diferentes componentes da radiacao cosmica atmosferica na dose em tripulacoes de aeronaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Marlon A.; Prado, Adriane C.M., E-mail: adriane.acm@hotmail.com, E-mail: marlon@ieav.cta.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The crews and aircraft passengers are exposed to atmospheric cosmic radiation. The flow of this radiation is modulated by the solar cycle and space weather, varying with the geomagnetic latitude and altitude. This paper presents a study of the contributions of radiation in total ambient dose equivalent of the crews depending on flight altitude up to 20 km, during maximum and minimum solar and in equatorial and polar regions. The results of calculations of the particle flows generated by the EXPACS and QARM codes are used. The particles evaluated that contributing significantly in the ambient dose equivalent are neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons, alphas, photons, muons and charged pions. This review allows us to characterize the origin of the dose received by crews and also support a project of a dosimetric system suitable for this ionizing radiation field in aircraft and on the ground.

  16. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.J.; Uetz, M.J.; R. Vohra

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds for any (possibly infinite) outcome space and many of the known results are immediate consequences. Moreover, revenue equivalence can be identified in cases where existing theor...

  17. Rice seedling and plant development as affected by increasing rates of penoxsulam under controlled environments Desenvolvimento de plântulas e plantas adultas de arroz em função de doses crescentes de penoxsulam em ambiente controlado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Concenço

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a major staple in many countries. Weed control is one of the factors limiting higher rice yield. ALS (acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides are desirable weed control herbicides because of their high efficacy, low toxicity to mammalians, and low rates used. An important herbicide characteristic is high selectivity to the crop, since it facilitates fast crop establishment and greater crop advantage over the weeds. The objectives of this work were to study the effects of increasing rates of the ALS-inhibiting herbicide penoxsulam on seed integrity and germination, and seedling and plant development of rice cv. BRS Pelota under controlled laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The results showed that penoxsulam affected rice germination and seedling and plant growth at rates above 54 g a.i. ha-1, and that penoxsulam is safe for rice seedling development at the currently recommended rates.O arroz é componente importante da dieta humana em vários países. Entre os fatores que limitam o aumento na sua produtividade está o controle de plantas daninhas. Os herbicidas inibidores da ALS (acetolactato sintase são preferidos em razão da alta eficiência no controle de plantas daninhas, da baixa toxicidade aos mamíferos e das baixas doses utilizadas. Uma característica importante que um herbicida deve possuir é a alta seletividade à cultura, pois ela implica estabelecimento mais rápido, com vantagem competitiva sobre as plantas daninhas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar os efeitos do herbicida inibidor da ALS penoxsulam em doses crescentes sobre a integridade e germinação das sementes, bem como sobre o desenvolvimento inicial das plântulas e da planta adulta do cultivar BRS Pelota, sob condições de ambiente controlado (laboratório e casa de vegetação. Os resultados mostraram que o penoxsulam afetou a germinação e o crescimento de plântulas e plantas adultas nas doses acima de 54 g i.a. ha-1 e que ele é seguro para o

  18. Assessment of doses due to secondary neutrons received by patient treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton therapy is a specific technique of radiotherapy which aims at destroying cancerous cells by irradiating them with a proton beam. Nuclear reactions in the device and in the patient himself induce secondary radiations involving mainly neutrons which contribute to an additional dose for the patient. The author reports a study aimed at the assessment of these doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of ophthalmological and intra-cranial treatments. He presents a Monte Carlo simulation of the room and of the apparatus, reports the experimental validation of the model (dose deposited by protons in a water phantom, ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons in the treatment room, absorbed dose due to secondary particles in an anthropomorphic phantom), and the assessment with a mathematical phantom of doses dues to secondary neutrons received by organs during an ophthalmological treatment. He finally evokes current works of calculation of doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of intra-cranial treatments

  19. Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d); Dosimetria personale esterna in termini di equivalente di dose personale, H{sub p}(d). Atti. Giornata di studio, Bologna, 28 febbraio 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantuzzi, E. [ENEA, Div. Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    The institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA - Bologna has organised a one day-workshop on the subject: Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d). The aim of the workshop was the discussion of the new implications and modifications to be expected in the routine individual monitoring of external radiation, due to the issue of the Decree 241/00 (G.U. 31/8/2000) in charge since 01/01/2001. The decree set up in Italian law the standards contained in the European Directive EURATOM 96/29-Basic Standards for the Protection of Health of Workers and the General Public against Dangers arising from Ionizing Radiation. Among others, the definition of the operational quantities for external radiation for personal and environmental monitoring, H{sub p}(d) e H{sup *}(d) respectively as defined by ICRU (International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurements), requires to update the methods of measurements and calibration of the personal dosemeters and environmental monitors. This report collects the papers presented at the workshop dealing with the Personal Dose Equivalent, H{sub p}(d), the conversion coefficients, H{sub p}(d)/K{sub a} e H{sub p}(d)/{sub ,} obtained through Monte Carlo calculations published by ICRU and ICRP (International Commission for Radiation Protection), the new calibration procedures and the practical implication in the routine of individual monitoring in terms of H{sub p}(d). Eventually, in the last chapter, the answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) are briefly reported. [Italian] L'Istituto per la Radioprotezione dell'ENEA di Bologna ha organizzato una giornata di studio Dosimetria personale esterna in termini di equivalente di dose personale, H{sub p}(d). Lo scopo della giornata e' stato quello di discutere le novita' e le modifiche da apportare alle pratiche di monitoraggio dell'esposizione esterna alle radiazioni ionizzanti, a seguito dell'entrata in vigore

  20. On translation equivalence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石雏凤

    2009-01-01

    Nida's translation theories, especially for his "Dynamic equivalence theory", are highly praised and adopted in Chinese translation circle. Howev-er, there are a lot of criticism and misunderstanding at the same time. This paper explores the issue on translation equivalence so as to benefit our translation studies on both theory and practice level.

  1. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.; Uetz, M.J.; Vohra, R.

    2009-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. We give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds f

  2. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, Birgit; Müller, Rudolf; Uetz, Marc; Vohra, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The cha

  3. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  4. 等效剂量地佐辛或芬太尼在鼻内窥镜手术中的疗效观察%Observation on Clinical Efifcacy of Equivalent Dose of Dezocine or Fentanyl During Nasal Endoscopic Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂晓舟; 邓恢伟; 潘道波; 陈安基; 周爱国; 黄芙蓉; 郭华静

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect the clinical efifcacy of equivalent dose of dezocine or fentanyl during nasal endoscopic surgery.Methods 60 elective nasal endoscopic surgery patients aged 20~60 years,weighted 45~70 kg,ASA I were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups with 30 in each,the dezocine group(group D) and the fentanyl group(group F).The 2 groups adopted intravenous inhalation anesthesia.Dezocine 0.2 mg/kg(group D) and fentanyl 4.0 μg/kg(group F) were given with intravenous injection before 5 min of inserting tracheal catheter, Propofol 2mg/kg,Benzene sulfonyl cisatracurium 0.2 mg/kg.Heart rate(HR)、mean arterial pressure(MAP)、pulse oxygen saturation(SpO2)、end tidal carbon dioxide patial pressure(PETCO2)、tidal volume(VT)、respiratory rate(RR) and situation of recovery period were recorded before induction(T0),1 min before inserting laryngeat mask(T1),immediately(T2)、5 min(T3) after inserting tracheal catheter and 1 min(T4)、5 min(T5)、15 min(T6) after pulting tracheal catheter. Results No significant difference was found between the 2 groups in anesthetic time,HR、MAP、SpO2(P>0.05). Compared with at T0,the levels of PETCO2 at T4-T5 were increased in group D and F(P<0.05),the levels of RR at T4 were decreased signiifcantly in group F(P<0.05);Compared with group F,the wake-up time was longer and the incidence of agitation at recovery period was lower in group D(P<0.05). Conclusion Dezocine was safety during nasal endoscopic surgery and it could relieve the incidence of adverse effect post-operation compared with fentanyl.%目的:观察等效剂量地佐辛或芬太尼在鼻内窥镜手术中的疗效。方法60例择期行鼻内窥镜手术患者,年龄20~60岁,体重45~70 kg,ASA I级,随机分为地佐辛组(D组)和芬太尼组(F组)(n=30),均实施静吸复合麻醉。在插管前5 min分别静脉注射地佐辛0.2 mg/kg(D组)、芬太尼4μg/kg(F组),其余诱导药相同,丙泊酚2 mg

  5. Efeito de doses de potássio e da freqüência de irrigação na produção da alface-americana em ambiente protegido Effect of potassium doses and irrigation frequency in the production of the american lettuce in greenhouse condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Koetz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A produção da alface tipo americana em ambiente protegido, aliada ao emprego de práticas de manejo de irrigação e adubação, pode contribuir para o aumento da produtividade e expansão da cultura na região de Lavras - MG. Em uma estufa modelo capela, foi realizado um experimento com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito de freqüências de irrigação e de doses de potássio sobre a produtividade da alface-americana e a eficiência do uso da água. O experimento foi composto pelos seguintes tratamentos de turnos de rega: (P1 - irrigação diária; (P2 - irrigação de dois em dois dias; (P3 - irrigação de três em três dias, e (P4 - irrigação de quatro em quatro dias. Nas parcelas subdivididas, foram aplicadas quatro doses de cloreto de potássio, via fertirrigação: (D1 - 100 kg de KCl ha-1; (D2 - 150 kg de KCl ha-1; (D3 - 200 kg de KCl ha-1, e (D4 - 250 kg de KCl ha-1. As variáveis avaliadas foram a produtividade de alface e a eficiência do uso da água, ou seja, a produtividade por milímetro de água aplicado. Concluiu-se que a maior produtividade (44,06 t ha-1 foi obtida com 119,36 kg ha-1 de K2O; o manejo de irrigação para a cultura da alface-americana em ambiente protegido poderá ser realizado com intervalo entre irrigações de quatro dias, e com o aumento dos intervalos houve aumento da eficiência de uso da água de irrigação.The production of the American lettuce type in greenhouse conditions using irrigation and fertilization, may contribute for the yield increase and expansion of the culture in the region of Lavras - MG, Brazil. In a greenhouse model chapel was carried out an experiment with the objective of evaluating the effects of irrigation frequencies and potassium doses on the yield of the American lettuce and the water use efficiency. The experiment was composed by the following treatments of irrigation frequency: (P1 - daily irrigation; (P2 _ every other day irrigation; (P3 - three in three days irrigation, and

  6. SECONDARY NEUTRON DOSES IN A PROTON THERAPY CENTRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Saint-Hubert, M; Saldarriaga Vargas, C; Van Hoey, O; Schoonjans, W; De Smet, V; Mathot, G; Stichelbaut, F; Manessi, G; Dinar, N; Aza, E; Cassell, C; Silari, M; Vanhavere, F

    2016-09-01

    The formation of secondary high-energy neutrons in proton therapy can be a concern for radiation protection of staff. In this joint intercomparative study (CERN, SCK•CEN and IBA/IRISIB/ULB), secondary neutron doses were assessed with different detectors in several positions in the Proton Therapy Centre, Essen (Germany). The ambient dose equivalent H(*)(10) was assessed with Berthold LB 6411, WENDI-2, tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and Bonner spheres (BS). The personal dose equivalent Hp(10) was measured with two types of active detectors and with bubble detectors. Using spectral and basic angular information, the reference Hp(10) was estimated. Results concerning staff exposure show H(*)(10) doses between 0.5 and 1 nSv/monitoring unit in a technical room. The LB 6411 showed an underestimation of H(*)(10), while WENDI-2 and TEPC showed good agreement with the BS data. A large overestimation for Hp(10) was observed for the active personal dosemeters, while the bubble detectors showed only a slight overestimation.

  7. On U-equivalence spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Omidi Farshad; Molaei MohammadReza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper induced U-equivalence spaces are introduced and discussed. Also the notion of U- equivalently open subsets of a U-equivalence space and U-equivalently open functions are studied. Finally, equivalently uniformisable topological spaces are considered.

  8. Measurement of extrapolation curves for the secondary pattern of beta radiation Nr. 86 calibrated in rapidity of absorbed dose for tissue equivalent by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt; Medicion de curvas de extrapolacion para el patron secundario de radiacion beta Nr. 86 calibrado en rapidez de dosis absorbida para tejido equivalente por el Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T

    1988-10-15

    The following report has as objective to present the obtained results of measuring - with a camera of extrapolation of variable electrodes (CE) - the dose speed absorbed in equivalent fabric given by the group of sources of the secondary pattern of radiation Beta Nr. 86, (PSB), and to compare this results with those presented by the calibration certificates that accompany the PSB extended by the primary laboratory Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), of the R.F.A. as well as the uncertainties associated to the measure process. (Author)

  9. Comparison of neutron doses measured by CR-39 via LET spectrometry and neutron rem meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron dose for proton induced reactions on the combination of 7Li and 181Ta target was measured using CR-39 detector and a neutron rem meter, at five different proton energies (8-24 MeV). In case of CR-39, the dose equivalent (HLET) was measured via linear energy transfer (LET) spectrometry method using the major, minor radii of each track and thickness of removed surface, whereas the rem meter provided the direct reading of ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)]. Both these quantities per incident proton were found to increase with the proton energy. The response ratio of HLET to [H*(10)] was found to be in the range of 0.15-0.3 with an average 0.20 ± 0.09. (author)

  10. Optimization of artificial neural networks for the reconstruction of the neutrons spectrum and their equivalent doses; Optimizacion de redes neuronales artificiales para la reconstruccion del espectro de neutrones y sus dosis equivalentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes A, A.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Reyes H, A.; Castaneda M, R.; Solis S, L. O.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: art8291@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Av. Lopez Velarde No. 801, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    In this work was used the robust design methodology of artificial neural networks to determine a good topology of net able to solve with efficiency the problems of neutrons spectrometry and dosimetry. For the design of the topology of optimized net 36 different net architectures based on an orthogonal arrangement with a configuration L{sub 9}(3{sup 4}), L{sub 4}(3{sup 2}) were trained. For the training of the neural networks, was used a computer code developed in the ambient of Mat lab programming, which automates the process and analysis of the information, reducing the time used in this activity considerably for the investigator. For the training of the propagation nets forward was utilized a neutrons spectrum compendium published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, where of the total 80% was used for the training and 20% for the test, it trained with an inverse propagation algorithm being the entrance data the count rates corresponding to the 7 spheres of the spectrometric system of Bonner spheres, as exit data, the neural network obtains the neutrons spectrum expressed in 60 energy groups and are calculated of simultaneous way 15 dosimetric quantities. (Author)

  11. Analysis of equivalent dose (H) starting from the exposition (X) received for patient families in myocardial perfusion study with {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi; Analisis de dosis equivalente (H) a partir de la exposicion (X) recibida por familiares de pacientes en estudio de perfusion miocardica con {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez H, I.; Vazquez E, R.; Jimenez A, L., E-mail: irmarinc@yahoo.com.m [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia Ignacio Chavez, Departamento de Cardiologia Nuclear, Juan Badiano No. 1, Colonia Seccion XVI, 14080 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The myocardial perfusion study with {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi has the major indication frequency for the coronary arterial illness diagnostic, due to its high sensibility and specificity. The patient families that are exposed to this study also receive the radiation of the injected radiopharmaceutical. The punctual source model (Psm) is generally used for the absorbed dose calculation of the radiation coming from patients under any procedure with radiopharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to compare the equivalent doses calculated theoretically (Dat) by means of Psm, regarding the measurements that routinely are made by means of a detector Geiger (Dam), as well as to quantify the maxim equivalent dose to which they are exposed the families of the subjected patients to this procedure. 30 voluntary patients were evaluated with clinical indication for myocardial perfusion study with {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi with acquisition protocol of 1 day: Rest-effort, with dose of 15-30 mCi (555-1110 mBq) respectively. Immediate to each injection of {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi was calculated the Dat, using the equation that the Psm describes, considering a distance of 1 meter; and the exposition speed was measured by means of a detector Geiger at a distance 1 meter to the heart height. The measurements comparison (Dat vs Dam) was realized by means of the test statistical t-student for independent samples, considering a significance level p{<=}0.05. For the data of the second injection, was realized a regression analysis to evaluate the lineal correlation among both measurements. Immediately after the injection of 15 mCi (555 mBq) of {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi, the values of the Dam (1.37{+-}0.43 mrem, 13.7{+-}4.3 {mu}Sv) they differ significantly of the Dat (1.04 mrem, p<0.05) (10.4 {mu}Sv). The second injection of 30 mCi (1110 mBq) of {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi was carried out in an average time of 2.57{+-}0.02 hr, having the patients group a calculated initial activity of 11.14{+-}0.76 m

  12. From equivalence to adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Borowczyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to illustrate in which cases the translators use the adaptation when they are confronted with a term related to sociocultural aspects. We will discuss the notions of equivalence and adaptation and their limits in the translation. Some samples from Arte TV news and from the American film Shrek translated into Polish, German and French will be provided as a support for this article.

  13. Equivalence Relations of -Algebra Extensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Changguo Wei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we consider equivalence relations of *-algebra extensions and describe the relationship between the isomorphism equivalence and the unitary equivalence. We also show that a certain group homomorphism is the obstruction for these equivalence relations to be the same.

  14. Compact Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter for Deep Space Human Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Braby, L A; Borak, T B; Lusby, T; Warner, D W; Perez-Nunez, D

    2015-10-01

    Effects on human health from the complex radiation environment in deep space have not been measured and can only be simulated here on Earth using experimental systems and beams of radiations produced by accelerators, usually one beam at a time. This makes it particularly important to develop instruments that can be used on deep-space missions to measure quantities that are known to be relatable to the biological effectiveness of space radiation. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are such instruments. Unfortunately, present TEPCs are too large and power intensive to be used beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Here, the authors describe a prototype of a compact TEPC designed for deep space applications with the capability to detect both ambient galactic cosmic rays and intense solar particle event radiation. The device employs an approach that permits real-time determination of yD (and thus quality factor) using a single detector. This was accomplished by assigning sequential sampling intervals as detectors “1” and “2” and requiring the intervals to be brief compared to the change in dose rate. Tests with g rays show that the prototype instrument maintains linear response over the wide dose-rate range expected in space with an accuracy of better than 5% for dose rates above 3 mGy h(-1). Measurements of yD for 200 MeV n(-1) carbon ions were better than 10%. Limited tests with fission spectrum neutrons show absorbed dose-rate accuracy better than 15%.

  15. Formal and finite order equivalences

    CERN Document Server

    Zaitsev, Dmitri

    2009-01-01

    We show that two families of germs of real-analytic subsets in $C^{n}$ are formally equivalent if and only if they are equivalent of any finite order. We further apply the same technique to obtain analogous statements for equivalences of real-analytic self-maps and vector fields under conjugations. On the other hand, we provide an example of two sets of germs of smooth curves that are equivalent of any finite order but not formally equivalent.

  16. Gradient equivalent crystal theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zypman, F R; Ferrante, J

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the formalism of equivalent crystal theory (ECT) by introducing an electron density gradient term so that the total model density becomes a more accurate representation of the real local density. Specifically, we allow for the electron density around a lattice site to have directionality, in addition to an average value, as assumed in ECT. We propose that an atom senses its neighbouring density as a weighted sum-the weights given by the its own electronic probability. As a benchmark, the method is used to compute vacancy migration energy curves of iron. These energies are in good agreement with previously published results. PMID:21690822

  17. Radon and environmental radioactivity in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory; Radon y radiacion ambiental en el Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfrac (LSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandac, I.; Bettini, A.; Borjabad, S.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Perez, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Sanchez, P.; Villar, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    The results of more than one year of measurements of Radon and environmental radioactivity in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are presented. Radon and atmospheric parameters have registered by an Alpha guard P30 equipment and the environmental radioactivity has been measured by means of UD-802A Panasonic thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) processed by an UD716 Panasonic unit. Series of results along with their possible correlations are presented. Both the Radon level and the ambient dose equivalent H (10) are much lower than the allowed ones so no radiological risk exists to persons working in the LSC. Also its excellent environmental radiological quality has been confirmed. (Author)

  18. Assessment of Pharmaceutical Equivalence: Difference Test or Equivalence Test?

    OpenAIRE

    Lourenço, Felipe R.; Pinto, Terezinha J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmaceutical equivalence is an important step towards the confirmation of similarity and interchangeability among pharmaceutical products, particularly regarding those that will not be tested for bioequivalence. The aim of this paper is to compare traditional difference testing to two one-side equivalence tests in the assessment of pharmaceutical equivalence, by means of equivalence studies between similar, generic and reference products of acyclovir cream, atropine sulfate injection, merop...

  19. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Rebecca D. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  20. Psicologia do Ambiente

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, Dalila; Bernardo, Fátima; Palma-Oliveira, José-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Na aplicação da Psicologia à área do AMBIENTE importa em primeiro lugar definir o que se entende, neste contexto, por ambiente. O conceito é entendido como toda a envolvente que rodeia o ser humano. Referimo-nos pois ao espaço físico e aos estímulos que nele existem (som, ar, paisagem…), dirigindo-se a Psicologia do Ambiente ao estudo e intervenção sobre a forma como o ambiente influencia o indivíduo ou grupos, e sobre o modo como o comportamento dos indivíduos e grupos influenciam o ambiente...

  1. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  2. Atmosphere and Ambient Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Atmosphere and Ambient Space This paper explores the relation between atmosphere and ambient space. Atmosphere and ambient space share many salient properties. They are both ontologically indeterminate, constantly varying and formally diffuse and they are both experienced as a subtle, non......-signifying property of a given space. But from a certain point of view, the two concepts also designate quite dissimilar experiences of space. To be ’ambient’ means to surround. Accordingly, ambient space is that space, which surrounds something or somebody. (Gibson 1987: 65) Since space is essentially...... of a surrounding character, all space can thus be described as having a fundamentally ambient character. So what precisely is an ambient space, then? As I will argue in my presentation, ambient space is a sensory effect of spatiality when a space is experienced as being particularly surrounding: a ‘space effect...

  3. Equivalent Linkages of Compressor Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Bukac, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Frequently, the dynamics of a compressor’s mechanism can be simplified and better understood by analyzing compressor’s equivalent linkage. Although the equivalent linkage of a reciprocating piston compressor is well known, the equivalent linkages of other types of compressors are not. For example, it is not well understood that the equivalent linkage of a rolling piston compressor is also the same slider-crank mechanism as the one of a reciprocating piston compressor. The difference between r...

  4. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,{theta}) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  5. First Italian intercomparison on methodologies for dose assessment from internal contamination. Results and perspectives; Primo interconfronto italiano sulle metodiche di valutazione di dose da contaminazione interna: risultati e prospettive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, C.M.; Battisti, P.; Tarroni [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1998-07-01

    In the frame of the MIDIA activities (coordination of whole body counters operating in Italy) an intercomparison on dose evaluation methods was promoted and carried out between October 1995 and March 1996 by 5 WBC centres. The main results related to the estimation of Intake and effective dose equivalent on the four case studies are reported. A comparison with European preliminary results is also presented. Finally perspectives related to the quality assurance of internal dosimetry estimates are indicated. [Italian] Vengono riportati i risultati delle valutazioni di Intake e di equivalente di dose nei centri MIDIA (coordinamento dei WBC operanti in Italia) per effettuare un interconfronto sui metodi di valutazione di dose da contaminazione interna utilizzando casi di studio reperiti in ambiente europeo. Vengono indicate le prospettive per la valutazione della qualita' della stima di dose in dosimetria interna.

  6. Formal and finite order equivalences

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitsev, Dmitri

    2009-01-01

    PUBLISHED We show that two families of germs of real-analytic subsets in Cn are formally equivalent if and only if they are equivalent of any finite order. We further apply the same technique to obtain analogous statements for equivalences of real-analytic self-maps and vector fields under conjugations. On the other hand, we provide an example of two sets of germs of smooth curves that are equivalent of any finite order but not formally equivalent. Supported in part by the Science Found...

  7. Why scalar-tensor equivalent theories are not physically equivalent?

    CERN Document Server

    Sk., Nayem

    2016-01-01

    Whether Jordan's and Einstein's frame descriptions of F(R) theory of gravity are physically equivalent, is a long standing debate. However, none questioned on true mathematical equivalence, since classical field equations may be translated from one frame to the other following a transformation relation. Nevertheless, true mathematical equivalence is only established, if all the mathematical results derived from one frame may be translated to the other. Here we show that, neither Noether equations, nor quantum equations may be translated from one frame to the other. The reason being the momenta can't be translated. This appears to be the cause for dynamical in-equivalence.

  8. Secondary neutron doses received by patients of different ages during intracranial proton therapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton therapy is an advanced radiation therapy technique that allows delivering high doses to the tumor while saving the healthy surrounding tissues due to the protons' ballistic properties. However, secondary particles, especially neutrons, are created during protons' nuclear reactions in the beam-line and the treatment room components, as well as inside the patient. Those secondary neutrons lead to unwanted dose deposition to the healthy tissues located at distance from the target, which may increase the secondary cancer risks to the patients, especially the pediatric ones. The aim of this work was to calculate the neutron secondary doses received by patients of different ages treated at the Institut Curie-centre de Protontherapie d'Orsay (ICPO) for intracranial tumors, using a 178 MeV proton beam. The treatments are undertaken at the new ICPO room equipped with an IBA gantry. The treatment room and the beam-line components, as well as the proton source were modeled using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The obtained model was then validated by a series of comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements. The comparisons concerned: a) depth and lateral proton dose distributions in a water phantom, b) neutron spectrometry at one position in the treatment room, c) ambient dose equivalents at different positions in the treatment room and d) secondary absorbed doses inside a physical anthropomorphic phantom. A general good agreement was found between calculations and measurements, thus our model was considered as validated. The University of Florida hybrid voxelized phantoms of different ages were introduced into the MCNPX validated model, and secondary neutron doses were calculated to many of these phantoms' organs. The calculated doses were found to decrease as the organ's distance to the treatment field increases and as the patient's age increases. The secondary doses received by a one year-old patient may be two times higher than the doses

  9. Testing statistical hypotheses of equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Wellek, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalence testing has grown significantly in importance over the last two decades, especially as its relevance to a variety of applications has become understood. Yet published work on the general methodology remains scattered in specialists' journals, and for the most part, it focuses on the relatively narrow topic of bioequivalence assessment.With a far broader perspective, Testing Statistical Hypotheses of Equivalence provides the first comprehensive treatment of statistical equivalence testing. The author addresses a spectrum of specific, two-sided equivalence testing problems, from the

  10. The ICRU dose equivalence quantities in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definitions and application of the new ICRU radiation protection quantities have been reviewed and studied in literature. Special emphasis was laid on the consequences of the use of the new quantities by personnel dosimetry services, and on the consequences of the use of the new quantities during an intercomparison programme for dosimetry services. The study shows that the recommendations of the ICRU are not yet complete and not fully realizable. This means that the dosimetry services always have to make certain approximations, when they use the new quantities. In literature, several approaches have been proposed. The feasibility of an approach depends on the characteristics of the dosimeters used. The use of different approaches by the dosimetry services is thought to be of possible influence on the results of an intercomparison programme. (author). 42 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Temporal evolution of the environmental dose remaining in a clinical irradiation bunker after the cessation of irradiation; Evolucion temporal de la Dosis ambiental remanente en un bunker de irradiacion clinica tras el cese de la irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Egea, E.; Sanchez Carrascal, M.; Torres Pozas, S.; Monja Ray, P. de la; Perez Molina, J. L.; Madan Rodriguez, C.; Luque Japon, L.; Morera Molina, A.; Hernandez Perez, A.; Barquero Bravo, Y.; Morengo Pedagna, I.; Oliva Gordillo, M. C.; Martin Olivar, R.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we try to quantify the dose emitted by different radioactive processes that occur in the head of a clinical linear accelerator and the patient is irradiated, or walls of the bunker, converted into tertiary sources of radiation trying to establish the origin of the came in different parts of the bunker.

  12. Reflections on Equivalence in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王皓

    2011-01-01

    The comparison of texts in different languages inevitably involves a theory of equivalence.To shed as much as possible light on theories and writings that have dealt with the notion of equivalence,this essay attempts to present a few in-depth reflections

  13. Saponification equivalent of dasamula taila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R B

    1994-07-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  14. Determination of 40K, 232Th and 238U activity concentrations in ambient PM2.5 aerosols and the associated inhalation effective dose to the public in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radioactivity of soil samples has been studied in many countries of the Arabian Peninsula, including Saudi Arabia. Radiological indices based on soil radioactivity have been widely used in these studies. However, there are no available data about natural radioactivity of fine aerosol particles in such countries. The objective of this study is to determine the activity concentrations of 40K, 232Th and 238U in airborne PM2.5 and the associated internal inhalation radiation dose to the public in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia. Twenty-four air samples in four locations throughout Jeddah were collected and analyzed for PM2.5 and the associated K, Th and U. The activity concentrations of the isotopes 40K, 232Th and 238U were calculated. High atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations (mean: 50.81 ± 34.02 μg/m3) were found. The natural radioactivity associated with PM2.5 due to the isotopes 40K, 232Th and 238U were 301.8 ± 76.1, 11.8 ± 4.2 and 10.8 ± 3.4 Bq/kg, respectively, and the Raeq was calculated as 44.9 ± 14.0 Bq/kg. The inhalation annual effective radiation dose to the public due to natural isotopes of the airborne PM2.5 was in the range 15.03–58.87 nSv/year, depending on the age group. Although these dose values were associated with the PM2.5 fraction only, they were higher than the world references values in air reported in the UNSCEAR, 2000 report. - Highlights: • High airborne PM2.5 concentrations over 4 months (24 samples) were found in Jeddah. • The mean activity concentrations of 40K, 232Th and 238U were assessed in PM2.5. • Effective inhalation dose due to 40K, 232Th and 238U was 59 nSv/year for adults. • Effective inhalation dose was higher than the world reference values in air. • Studying the inhalation dose due to other radioisotopes in PM2.5 is recommended

  15. Evaluation of the radiation doses to uranium mine employees exposed to external gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors to convert a personal monitor badge reading to an effective dose equivalent are given for several exposure geometries encountered in uranium mines. Factors are also given that relate a free air absorbed dose measurement to an effective dose equivalent. In addition, factors are reported which can be used to estimate the dose equivalent to the testes, ovaries and active bone marrow

  16. Compact Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter for Deep Space Human Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Braby, L A; Borak, T B; Lusby, T; Warner, D W; Perez-Nunez, D

    2015-10-01

    Effects on human health from the complex radiation environment in deep space have not been measured and can only be simulated here on Earth using experimental systems and beams of radiations produced by accelerators, usually one beam at a time. This makes it particularly important to develop instruments that can be used on deep-space missions to measure quantities that are known to be relatable to the biological effectiveness of space radiation. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are such instruments. Unfortunately, present TEPCs are too large and power intensive to be used beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Here, the authors describe a prototype of a compact TEPC designed for deep space applications with the capability to detect both ambient galactic cosmic rays and intense solar particle event radiation. The device employs an approach that permits real-time determination of yD (and thus quality factor) using a single detector. This was accomplished by assigning sequential sampling intervals as detectors “1” and “2” and requiring the intervals to be brief compared to the change in dose rate. Tests with g rays show that the prototype instrument maintains linear response over the wide dose-rate range expected in space with an accuracy of better than 5% for dose rates above 3 mGy h(-1). Measurements of yD for 200 MeV n(-1) carbon ions were better than 10%. Limited tests with fission spectrum neutrons show absorbed dose-rate accuracy better than 15%. PMID:26313585

  17. Workplace characterization using spectrometry for reliable neutron dose assessment in mixed neutron photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection for practices should be based on justification of exposure, optimization of protection and dose limitations. The 96/29 European Union directive clearly requires that operational protection of exposed workers shall be based on prior evaluation to identify the nature and magnitude of the radiological risk to exposed workers and implementation of optimization of radiation protection in all working conditions. Operational protection of exposed workers requires the implementation of measures at workplaces. The ICRP60 publication (1991) defines and recommends the use of the effective dose E for radiological protections purposes. This quantity can not be directly measured; the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent: H and personal dose equivalent: Hp as defined in the ICRU 51 report (1993) are recommended to estimate the effective dose E. These operational quantities are related, through calculated conversion coefficients hΦ, to the measurable function fluence Φ by: H = ∫ hΦ (E) ΦE dE (1a); Hp = ∫ hpΦ (E, Ω) ΦE,Ω dE dΩ (1b). ΦE (ΦE,Ω) is the distribution of the fluence with respect to energy (energy E and direction Ω); hΦ or hpΦ are the fluence to operational quantity conversion coefficients as defined by the ICRU 57 report (1998)

  18. Tissue Engineered Human Skin Equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Zhang; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B.

    2012-01-01

    Human skin not only serves as an important barrier against the penetration of exogenous substances into the body, but also provides a potential avenue for the transport of functional active drugs/reagents/ingredients into the skin (topical delivery) and/or the body (transdermal delivery). In the past three decades, research and development in human skin equivalents have advanced in parallel with those in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The human skin equivalents are used commerc...

  19. Occupational radiation dose of staff and workplace assessment at service des radioimmunodosages in Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational radiation dose of staff handling 125 I and workplace assessment in nuclear medicine unit at Service des Radioimmunodosages (SeRiD) in Benin have been undertaken to determine levels of radiation safety. Firstly, three permanent workers and two students were provided with finger ring thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to wear at index finger base of both hands. Ring dosimeters were used for four month in two sequences of two months and were evaluated with HARSHAW 4500. Secondly, three permanent workers and three students were provided with TLD badge to wear at the chest level for skin and deep dose measurement. TLD badges were used for six months in six sequences of one month. The exposed TLDs were evaluated with HARSHAW 6600. Ambient equivalent dose rate (μSv/h) was measured using microsieverts model dose rate meter. Sixteen control points closed to the source or situated where staff are exposed to ionizing radiation were chosen. Fixed and removable contamination were surveyed at six and three controlled points respectively. Results from the study showed that permanent workers highest index finger base average equivalent dose was 142.75± 89.54μSv/2months, while that of students was 34.69 ± 29.23 µSv/2months. The maximum annual skin dose of Permanent workers represent 0.46% of dose limit (500mSv/yr), while that of the student represent 0.37%of dose limit (150mSv/yr). Average ambient equivalent dose rate from radiation survey was lower than 20μSv/h. It was noted that the freezer door plays an inportant role in shielding. The result in waste disposal room confirm the decay in storage of radioactive waste principle. Data on removable and fixed contamination value was below the limits of 0.33 dps/100cm2 and 8.33dps/100cm2 respectively. The study indicated that SeRiD staff are not exposed to ionizing radiation at work in safe working environment. (au)

  20. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  1. Measures against increased environmental radiation dose by the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident in some local governments in the tokyo metropolitan area: Focusing on examples of both Kashiwa and Nagareyama cities in Chiba prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant of Tokyo Electric Power Cooperation (TEPCO) after the great east Japan earthquake (11 March 2011) elevated the background level of environmental radiation in Eastern Japan. Around the Tokyo metropolitan area, especially around Kashiwa and Nagareyama cities, the ambient dose equivalent rate has been significantly increased after the accident. Responding to strong requests from citizens, the local governments started to monitor the ambient dose equivalent rate precisely and officially, about 3 months after the accident had occurred. The two cities in cooperation with each other also organised a local forum supported by three radiation specialists. In this article, the activities of the local governments are introduced, with main focus on radiation monitoring and measurements. Topics are standardisation of environmental radiation measurements for ambient dose rate, dose mapping activity, investigation of foodstuff and drinking water, lending survey meters to citizens, etc. Based on the data and facts mainly gained by radiation monitoring, risk management and relating activity have been organised. 'Small consultation meetings in kindergartens', 'health consultation service for citizens', 'education meeting on radiation protection for teachers, medical staffs, local government staffs, and leaders of active volunteer parties' and 'decontamination activity', etc. are present key activities of the risk management and restoration around the Tokyo metropolitan area. (authors)

  2. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joong Sung

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  3. Ionizing radiation population doses at Sao Paulo city, Brazil: open-pit gamma dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation to the human beings are well known for high and intermediate doses. As far as low level) radiation doses are concerned, there is no consensus. In order to get a better understanding of such effects it is necessary to assess the low doses with better accuracy. In this work, it was made an estimate of the annual ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) to which the people are exposed in the city of Sao Paulo. Until now there are no data about it available in the literature. For the purpose of this evaluation, a map with various routes covering the largest and more representative area of the city was designed. The choice of points for data collection was made taking into account mainly the occupancy of the region. A portable gamma spectrometry system was used. It furnishes the rate of H*(10) and the measured gamma spectrum (in the range from 50 to 1670 keV) in the place of interest. The measurements were performed in a short time interval, since the gamma radiation arrives from a great extent of soil. Each measurement was done 1 m above the soil during 300 s. The rates of H*(10) varied from 33.1 to 152.3 nSv.h-1, net values, obtained after subtraction of the cosmic rays contribution. The standard deviation was 22 n Sv.h-1 for an average for the city of Sao Paulo of 96.1(24) nSv.h-1. In addition, average values of H*(10) rates for the city Health Divisions were calculated. Those values are not statistically equivalent and the whole set of data could not be treated as one, as the statistical Student test indicated a non homogeneity of the group of data. Hence it is necessary the accomplishment of a more detailed survey in order to verify the origin of the discrepancy. The mean value of H*(10) rate obtained for the city of Sao Paulo as converted to effective dose. in order to be compared with other places results It could be noticed that the annual average of effective dose for the city of Sao Paulo, 0.522(13) mSv, is superior to the world

  4. Morita Equivalence for Factorisable Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qun CHEN; K. P. SHUM

    2001-01-01

    Recall that the semigroups S and R are said to be strongly Morita equivalent if there exists a unitary Morita context (S,R,S PR,RQs, <, []) with < and [] surjective. For a factorisable semigroup S, we denote s = {(s1, s2) ∈ S× S | ss1 =ss2,s ∈ S}, S' = S/s and US-FAct= {sM ∈S- Act|SM = M and SHoms(S, M) ≌ M}. We show that, for factorisable semigroups S and R, the categories US-FAct and UR-FAct are equivalent if and only if the semigroups S' and R' are strongly Morita equivalent. Some conditions for a factorisable semigroup to be strongly Morita equivalent to a sandwich semigroup, local units semigroup, monoid and group separately are also given. Moreover, we show that a semigroup S is completely simple if and only if S is strongly Morita equivalent to a group and for any index set I, S SHoms(S,Ⅱi∈ S)→Ⅱi∈S, s t·f→(st)f is an S-isomorphism.

  5. Mujer y medio ambiente

    OpenAIRE

    Zuluaga Sánchez, Gloria Patricia

    1998-01-01

    El debate sobre mujer y medio ambiente es bastante nuevo y, por lo tanto, aun no hay consenso sobre como abordarlo, ni análisis muy profundos sobre la interacción de estas dos problemáticas tan complejas y que además atraviesan las demás temáticas. Con ello no se quiere negar el importante aporte que se ha hecho en tal sentido, por parte de colectividades y de algunas personas. Selene Herculano y Jacqueline Pitanguy (1993), mencionan que el medio ambiente no es una categoría específica y que ...

  6. Teleparallel Equivalent of Lovelock Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, P A

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in modified gravity theories based on torsion due to these theories prove to exhibit interesting cosmological implications. In this work, inspired by the teleparallel formulation of General Relativity we present its extension to Lovelock Gravity known as the most natural extension of general relativity in higher-dimensional spacetimes. First, we review Teleparallel Equivalent of General Relativity and Teleparallel Equivalent of Gauss-Bonnet Gravity, and then we construct Teleparallel Equivalent of Lovelock Gravity. In order to achieve this goal we use the vielbein and the connection, without imposing the Weitzenb\\"ock connection. Then, we extract the teleparallel formulation of the theory by setting the curvature to be null.

  7. Teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing interest in modified gravity theories based on torsion, as these theories exhibit interesting cosmological implications. In this work inspired by the teleparallel formulation of general relativity, we present its extension to Lovelock gravity known as the most natural extension of general relativity in higher-dimensional space-times. First, we review the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and then we construct the teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity. In order to achieve this goal, we use the vielbein and the connection without imposing the Weitzenböck connection. Then, we extract the teleparallel formulation of the theory by setting the curvature to null.

  8. La radioactividad ambiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Núñez-Lagos Roglá

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se explican los conceptos fundamentales relacionados con la radiactividad y se utilizan para describir la radiactividad ambiental. Se explican también los isótopos de largo periodo y las principales familias radioactivas junto con la radiación cósmica y los radionucleidos cosmogénicos.

  9. Dynamic Wavelet and Equivalent Models

    OpenAIRE

    Boaghe, O.M.; Billings, S A

    1998-01-01

    The representation of nonlinear dynamic wavelet models in the form of an equivalent global model which is valid over the operating range of the system is investigated. The results are used to analyse and interpret the nonlinear wavelet models using non-linear frequency response functions.

  10. Mensuration of equivalent dose with personal dosemeters and instruments of radiological protection in the new operative quantities ICRU, for external fields of beta radiation. Part II. I study of the angular response of personal dosemeters TLD-100 in secondary patron fields of beta radiation (90Sr / 90Y)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to carry out one of the possible ones test type for personal dosemeters TLD, under the recomendations of the ICRU 39, ICRU 43 and the draft of the norm ISO 6980,(1992), with the purpose of verifying the capacity of these detectors to carry out the operative unit: H' (0.07;α). Since H' (O. 07;α) this defined one in an expanded field, one of these tests type consist on determining the angular response of these detectors. 20 personal dosemeters TLD-100 was used, (card marks: Harshaw, Model: G-1, with two glasses of TLD-100 absorbed in teflon; the portadosemeters has two windows, a free one and another with a filter of Pb of 171.0 mg cm-2); these dosemeters they were previously selected, [to see, Study of the Homogeneity of the response of Personal Dosemeters (Cards G-l, TLD-100) in Radiation of Countrysides of 60Co, J.T. Alvarez R. Technician Report GSR/IT/0001/94].The irradiations to effectued in secondary countryside of radiation beta of 90Sr/90Y. The study was undertaken by means of an experimental design of blocks random that contemplate the following variables: intensity of the radiation source, (1850 MBq and 74 MBq); position of irradiation, (four positions); incidence of angle of the radiation (0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 grades) and the absorbed dose in air, (0.005, 0.010, 0.020, 0.050 and 0.100 Gy). Then null hypothesis it was to suppose that there was not difference among the stockings of each treatment, to used the statistical of Duncan to carry out tests of stockings at a level of significance of 5%.These tests of stockings throw the following results in those variables of the experimental design: The irradiations carried out so much with the source pattern secondary of 90Sr/90Y of 1850 MBq and of 74 MBq, they are equivalent reason why they can be used indistinctly. The responses of each one of the glasses of the card are strongly anisotropic for each glass; four positions of irradiation is used: glass 1 (window of 171 mg cm-2

  11. EQUIVALENCE VERSUS NON-EQUIVALENCE IN ECONOMIC TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina, Chifane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at highlighting the fact that “equivalence” represents a concept worth revisiting and detailing upon when tackling the translation process of economic texts both from English into Romanian and from Romanian into English. Far from being exhaustive, our analysis will focus upon the problems arising from the lack of equivalence at the word level. Consequently, relevant examples from the economic field will be provided to account for the following types of non-equivalence at word level: culturespecific concepts; the source language concept is not lexicalised in the target language; the source language word is semantically complex; differences in physical and interpersonal perspective; differences in expressive meaning; differences in form; differences in frequency and purpose of using specific forms and the use of loan words in the source text. Likewise, we shall illustrate a number of translation strategies necessary to deal with the afore-mentioned cases of non-equivalence: translation by a more general word (superordinate; translation by a more neutral/less expressive word; translation by cultural substitution; translation using a loan word or loan word plus explanation; translation by paraphrase using a related word; translation by paraphrase using unrelated words; translation by omission and translation by illustration.

  12. Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Air and Radiation's (OAR) Ambient Air Quality Data (Current) contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, other federal agencies, as well as...

  13. Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Air and Radiation??s (OAR) Ambient Air Quality Data (Current) contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, other federal agencies, as well as...

  14. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  15. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B

  16. Estimate of neutron secondary doses received by patients in proton therapy: cases of ophthalmologic treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis aims at assessing doses due to secondary neutrons and received by the organs of a patient which are located outside of the treatment field. The study focused on ophthalmological treatments performed at the Orsay proton therapy centre. A 75 eV beam line model has first been developed with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Several experimental validations of this model have been performed: proton dose distribution in a water phantom, ambient equivalent dose due to secondary neutrons and neutron spectra in the treatment room, and doses deposited by secondary neutrons in an anthropomorphous phantom. Simulations and measurements are in correct agreement. Then, a numeric assessment of secondary doses received by the patient's organs has been performed by using a MIRD-type mathematical phantom. These doses have been computed for several organs: the non-treated eye, the brain, the thyroid, and other parts of the body situated either in the front part of the body (the one directly exposed to neutrons generated in the treatment line) or deeper and further from the treatment field

  17. Motor Equivalence in Speech Production

    OpenAIRE

    Perrier, Pascal; Fuchs, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    International audience The first section provides a description of the concepts of “motor equivalence” and “degrees of freedom”. It is illustrated with a few examples of motor tasks in general and of speech production tasks in particular. In the second section, the methodology used to investigate experimentally motor equivalence phenomena in speech production is presented. It is mainly based on paradigms that perturb the perception-action loop during on-going speech, either by limiting the...

  18. 等效剂量地佐辛或芬太尼在小儿扁桃体手术中的临床疗效观察%Observation on Clinical Efficacy of Equivalent Dose of Dezocine or Fentanyl During Child Droperidol Tonsillectomy Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄芙蓉; 邓恢伟; 陈伟; 潘道波

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the clinical ef icacy of equivalent dose of dezocine or fentanyl during child droperidol tonsillectomy surgery.Methods 60 elective droperidol tonsil ectomy surgery children patients aged 3~5 years,weighted 13~20 kg,ASAIwere selected and randomly divided into 2 groups with 30 in each,the dezocine group(group D)and the fentanyl group(group F).The 2 groups adopted intravenous inhalation anesthesia.Dezocine 0.1 mg/kg(group D)and fentanyl 2.0μg/kg(group F)were givrn with intravenous injection before 5 min of inserting tracheal catheter,Propofol 2.5mg/kg,Benzene sulfonyl cisatracurium 0.15mg/kg,and 8%Sevoflurane inhalation 2 min.Heart rate(HR)、mean arterial pressure(MAP)、pulse oxygen saturation(SpO2)、end tidal carbon dioxide patial pressure(ETCO2)、tidal volume(VT)、respiratory rate(RR)and situation of recovery period were recorded before induction(T0),1 min before inserting tracheal catheter(T1),immediately(T2)、5 min(T3)after inserting tracheal catheter and 1 min(T4)、5 min(T5)、15 min(T6)after pulting tracheal catheter.Results No significant dif erence was found between the 2 groups in operation time,anesthetic time, HR、MAP、SpO2 ( >0.05).Compared with at T0,the levels of ETCO2 at T4~T5 were increased in group D and F ( 0.05)。与T0比较,D和F组T4-T5 ETCO2均增高,F组T4 RR降低(<0.05)(<0.05)。D组术后苏醒时间较长,镇静满意率较高,术后躁动发生率较低(<0.05)。结论地佐辛可安全用于小儿扁桃体手术的麻醉,较芬太尼能降低术后不良反应的发生率。

  19. Effects of X-rays spectrum on the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray equipment for diagnosis comes in different sizes and shapes depending on the scan type to perform. The X-ray spectrum is the energy distribution of the beam photons and consists of a continuous spectrum of photons braking and discrete spectrum due to the characteristic photons. The knowledge of the X-rays spectrum is important to understand like they affect the voltage changes (k Vp), current (m A), time (s) and the type of filter in the interaction mechanisms between X-rays and patient's body, the image receptor or other material that gets in the beam. Across the spectrum can be estimated the absorbed dose in any point of the patient, the quality of the image and the scattered radiation (which is related to the dose received by the equipment operator). The Monte Carlo method was used by MCNP5 code to calculate the spectrum of X-rays that occurs when a monoenergetic electron beam of 250 keV interact with targets of Mo, Rh and W. The spectra were calculated with and without filter, and the values of ambient dose equivalent were estimated, as well as the air kerma. (Author)

  20. Conversion factors for estimating dose and dose equivalent from /sup 11/C activity

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, H A; Turner, J E

    1973-01-01

    Calculations have been made to determine the /sup 11/C activity resulting from irradiating plastic scintillators of various geometries with neutrons in the energy range from 50 MeV to 400 MeV. Calculations have also been made of the /sup 11/C activity in plastic scintillator disks placed at various depths in a water phantom irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy spectrum (maximum energy 400 MeV) similar to that used in an experiment at CERN. The results of the calculations have been found to be in good agreement with those of the experiment.

  1. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and assessment of personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence is discussed in terms of the energy band structure of a crystalline solid and the trapping of charge carriers by point defects. Some general properties of thermoluminescent materials used for dosimetry are outlined, with thermoluminescence of CaSO4:Dy being described in detail. The energy response function and the modification of the energy response of a dosimeter by shielding are discussed. The final section covers the connection between exposure, as recorded by a TLD badge, and the absorbed dose to various organs from gamma radiation in a uranium mine; the conversion from absorbed dose to dose equivalent; and uncertainties in assessment of dose equivalent

  2. Equivalence in Bilingual Lexicography: Criticism and Suggestions*

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Ernst Wiegand

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: A reminder of general problems in the formation of terminology, as illustrated by theGerman Äquivalence (Eng. equivalence) and äquivalent (Eng. equivalent), is followed by a critical discussionof the concept of equivalence in contrastive lexicology. It is shown that especially the conceptof partial equivalence is contradictory in its different manifestations. Consequently attemptsare made to give a more precise indication of the concept of equivalence in the metalexicograph...

  3. On the Translation Equivalence of Literature Works

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴娟

    2013-01-01

    As for translation principle,people have different opinions.The principle of equivalent translation maybe is one of the most reasonable ones in today’s translation world in my eyes.This paper focuses on the possibility and the condition to be achieved the biggest equivalence of the semantic,pragmatic and culture in order to get the conclusion that the translation equivalence is the proper principle.Besides,this paper has also discussed the pragmatic equivalence and cultural equivalence.

  4. Blast Wave Characteristics and Equivalency

    OpenAIRE

    Sochet, Isabelle; Schneider, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of blast waves generated by detonation of gas clouds are studies theoretically and validated by both small-scale and large-scale experiments with ethylene-air mixtures of different equivalence ratio. The mixtures were confined in hemispherical or spherical balloons made from thin polyethylene foils of 0.75 m³ and 15 m³ in volume. The detonation of gas mixtures was initiated by a solid explosive. The characteristics of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and du...

  5. Equivalence Principle in Chameleon Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kraiselburd, Lucila; Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Most theories that predict time and/or space variation of fundamental constants also predict violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP). Khoury and Weltmann proposed the chameleon model in 2004 and claimed that this model avoids experimental bounds on WEP. We present a contrasting view based on an approximate calculation of the two body problem for the chameleon field and show that the force depends on the test body composition. Furthermore, we compare the prediction of the force on a test body with E\\"otv\\"os type experiments and find that the chameleon field effect cannot account for current bounds.

  6. Equivalence principle in Chameleon models .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiselburd, L.; Landau, S.; Salgado, M.; Sudarsky, D.

    Most theories that predict time and/or space variation of fundamental constants also predict violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP). Khoury and Weltmann proposed the chameleon model in 2004 and claimed that this model avoids experimental bounds on WEP. We present a contrasting view based on an approximate calculation of the two body problem for the chameleon field and show that the force depends on the test body composition. Furthermore, we compare the prediction of the force on a test body with Eötvös type experiments and find that the chameleon field effect cannot account for current bounds.

  7. Ambiente il nostro futuro

    OpenAIRE

    Canigiani, Franca

    2016-01-01

    L’ambiente è il quadro di vita, la casa comune, il patrimonio di base delle società umane – scriveva un indimenticabile maestro della geografia italiana: Giuseppe Barbieri. Due gli avvenimenti che nel 2015 hanno segnato il passo dell’umanità sulla strada di una più matura coscienza ambientale, fino a comprendere che è necessario e urgente prendersi cura della Terra: primo, la pubblicazione della lettera enciclica di papa Francesco, Laudato si’ sulla cura della casa comune, straordinario saggi...

  8. AOX y medio ambiente.

    OpenAIRE

    Riva Juan, Mª del Carmen; López Ribas, David

    1996-01-01

    Los productos organohalogenados son muy utilizados por la industria y su presencia en el medio ambiente está siendo controlada. En los últimos años se han desarrollado varias técnicas de detección, siendo desde finales de los 80 los AOX (adsorbable organic halogens) uno de los parámetros sobre los que se han realizado más estudios. En muchos paises de la Unión Europea y en E.E.U.U. de América, la presencia de compuestos organohalogenados en aguas continentales y suelos está legislada indicand...

  9. Arquitectura y medio ambiente

    OpenAIRE

    Saura Carulla, Magdalena

    2003-01-01

    La arquitectura y la planificación son el resultado de una integración ponderada de conocimientos técnicos y una multiplicidad de aspectos relacionados con el conocimiento natural y social. En este trabajo el autor propone, desde el ámbito de las ciencias del medio ambiente, diversos planteamientos teóricos y prácticos relacionados con la arquitectura y el urbanismo. El conocimiento de la naturaleza de los sistemas naturales y de los sistemas ecosociales permite al diseñador aplicar un marco ...

  10. Therapeutic equivalents in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, M D

    2001-01-01

    With increasing debate over the rising expenses of health care, a variety of cost-saving measures has been attempted over the years. Use of primary care physicians as "gate keepers," reduction in the length of hospital stays, and pushing women toward vaginal birth after Cesarean section have all been utilized despite on going issues with patient satisfaction and even safety. One remarkable success in stretching health-care dollars that has often been overlooked is the prescription of therapeutic equivalents, or generic drugs. Although available on a limited basis for decades, off-brand manufacture of pharmaceuticals with identical active ingredients as those of the branded drug received a large boost through Congressional legislation in 1984 with the Hatch-Waxman Act. "Fast-track" FDA approval was initiated by Congress to introduce competition into the marketplace for drugs whose patients had expired. While giving close scrutiny to the manufacturing process and requiring the same level of regulatory supervision for factors such as bioavailability and shelf life, the Hatch-Waxman Act removed the burden and expense from generic manufacturers of proving the safety and efficacy all over again of a previously FDA-approved drug. With less than a 20% market share of all prescribed drugs in 1984, the generic drug industry has captured roughly 44% of the market in recent years while accounting for only 8% of expenditures on prescription medication. The prescription of therapeutic equivalents is one method of keeping health care costs down without compromising patient satisfaction or safety. PMID:11374660

  11. Development of a Brachytherapy Software Nomogram Equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this project is developing a software nomogram equivalent. A nomogram is a graph typically comprised of three parallel lines. Each of the lines is graduated for a different variable, often in a non-linear scale. The lines are oriented in such a manner that if a straight line is drawn connecting two of the three variables, the value of the third variable is uniquely determined by the intersection of the connecting line and the graduated line of the third variable. The value of the third variable is determined by reading the graduated scale at the point of intersection. A nomogram as applied in brachytherapy is used for determining the required amount of radioactive material to be implanted in a diseased site. A typical brachytherapy nomogram relates the average dimension of a site, the air kerma strength per source and the number of sources required for yielding a therapeutic radiation dose to the site. More sophisticated nomograms also provide scales for recommending source and needle spacings. For decades the nomogram has been clinically employed as a brachytherapy treatment planning tool. Imaging modalities such as CT and ultrasound ushered in modern image-based brachytherapy treatment planning. These modern imaging techniques dramatically advanced the state of the art of brachytherapy, often obviating the use of nomograms. Although the routine use of nomograms has decreased, there are clinical situations where nomograms still prove useful for brachytherapy treatment planning. Often times the dimensions of a tumor or tumor bed are not known prior to surgery and delineated images of the site are not available. In such situations the tumor dimensions can be measured in the OR and a nomogram applied for rapid treatment planning. By definition a nomogram is a graphical tool, which is fixed and cannot be modified. Differences of opinion and treatment philosophies exist among physicians and institutions. These varying approaches can lead to

  12. Time-Dependent Neutron and Photon Dose-Field Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2005-08-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The Pandemonium code, originally designed to determine flux and dose-rates only, is improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. A primary benefit of this work has been an extensive analysis and improvement of the photon model that is not limited to the application described in this thesis. The photon model has been extended in energy range to 10 MeV to include photons from fission and new photon buildup factors have been included that account for the effects of photon buildup at slant-path thicknesses as a function of angle, where the mean free path thickness has been preserved. The overall system of codes is user-friendly and it is directly applicable to facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where high-intensity neutron and photon emitters are regularly used. The codes may be used to determine a priori doses for given work scenarios in an effort to supply dose information to process models which will in turn assist decision makers on ensuring as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) compliance. In addition, coupling the computational results of these tools with the process model visualization tools will help to increase worker safety and radiological safety awareness.

  13. Crisis ambiental y cristianismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cárdenas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En el artículo se identifican y reconocen algunas opciones que se pueden desarrollar en el cristianismo en relación con la problemática ambiental. Se aborda el dilema bíblico suscitado por interpretaciones antiecológicas y ecológicas. Con base en una lectura de la Biblia, de testimonios cristianos, y en una rememoria de estructuras institucionales, como la parroquia, se analiza el valor que tiene el mensaje cristiano en lo referido a la mitigación de la crisis ambiental.This article identifies and recognizes some options that can be developed in Christianity in relation to the environmental problem. It starts by analyzing the biblical dilemma provoked by both ecological and antiecological interpretations. Based on a reading of the Bible, testimonies from Christians and with a rememory of institutional structures, like the parish, the valué of the Christian message for mitigating the environmental crisis is analyzed.

  14. Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants have been described. Written descriptions of repetitive high dose jobs, their collective dose equivalent ranges and list of dose reduction techniques will aid in reducing collective dose equivalents from these dose-reduction targets. Knowing which components contribute to high maintenance or repair dose will aid in reducing routine maintenance collective dose equivalents. The radwaste dose reduction improvements will aid in reducing radwaste operations collective dose equivalent and reduce the number of radwaste workers who exceed their administrative dose limits. The identification and rating of managers' and workers' ALARA incentives will provide the basis for recommendations to improve dose reduction incentives. Lastly, the identification and rating of the key components of an ALARA program will aid in

  15. Savannah River Site dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits

  16. Types for BioAmbients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Capecchi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The BioAmbients calculus is a process algebra suitable for representing compartmentalization, molecular localization and movements between compartments. In this paper we enrich this calculus with a static type system classifying each ambient with group types specifying the kind of compartments in which the ambient can stay. The type system ensures that, in a well-typed process, ambients cannot be nested in a way that violates the type hierarchy. Exploiting the information given by the group types, we also extend the operational semantics of BioAmbients with rules signalling errors that may derive from undesired ambients' moves (i.e. merging incompatible tissues. Thus, the signal of errors can help the modeller to detect and locate unwanted situations that may arise in a biological system, and give practical hints on how to avoid the undesired behaviour.

  17. Types for BioAmbients

    CERN Document Server

    Capecchi, Sara; 10.4204/EPTCS.19.7

    2010-01-01

    The BioAmbients calculus is a process algebra suitable for representing compartmentalization, molecular localization and movements between compartments. In this paper we enrich this calculus with a static type system classifying each ambient with group types specifying the kind of compartments in which the ambient can stay. The type system ensures that, in a well-typed process, ambients cannot be nested in a way that violates the type hierarchy. Exploiting the information given by the group types, we also extend the operational semantics of BioAmbients with rules signalling errors that may derive from undesired ambients' moves (i.e. merging incompatible tissues). Thus, the signal of errors can help the modeller to detect and locate unwanted situations that may arise in a biological system, and give practical hints on how to avoid the undesired behaviour.

  18. Ensemble Equivalence for Distinguishable Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernández-Peralta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Statistics of distinguishable particles has become relevant in systems of colloidal particles and in the context of applications of statistical mechanics to complex networks. In this paper, we present evidence that a commonly used expression for the partition function of a system of distinguishable particles leads to huge fluctuations of the number of particles in the grand canonical ensemble and, consequently, to nonequivalence of statistical ensembles. We will show that the alternative definition of the partition function including, naturally, Boltzmann’s correct counting factor for distinguishable particles solves the problem and restores ensemble equivalence. Finally, we also show that this choice for the partition function does not produce any inconsistency for a system of distinguishable localized particles, where the monoparticular partition function is not extensive.

  19. Einstein's equivalence principle in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei M

    2013-01-01

    We study physical consequences of the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) for a Hubble observer in FLRW universe. We introduce the local inertial coordinates with the help of a special conformal transformation. The local inertial metric is Minkowski flat and materialized by a congruence of time-like geodesics of static observers. The static observers are equipped with the ideal clocks measuring the proper time that is synchronized with the clocks of the Hubble observer. The local inertial metric is used for physical measurements of spacetime intervals with the ideal clocks and rulers. The special conformal transformation preserves null geodesics but does not keep invariant time-like geodesics. Moreover, it makes the rate of the local time coordinate dependent on velocity of the particle which makes impossible to rich the uniform parameterization of the world lines of static observers and light geodesics with a single parameter - they differ by the conformal factor of FLRW metric. The most convenient way to s...

  20. Electroweak Vortices and Gauge Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Samuel W.; Törnkvist, Ola

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the Abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)×U(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  1. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner is present at a high level. This study sought to apply this theorem to the corporate sector, and to expand it to include other indicators of course effectiveness: satisfaction, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations. A large Mexican organisation participated in this research, with 146 learners, 30 teachers and 3 academic assistants. Three versions of an online course were designed, each emphasising a different type of interaction. Data were collected through surveys, exams, observations, activity logs, think aloud protocols and sales records. All course versions yielded high levels of effectiveness, in terms of satisfaction, learning and return on expectations. Yet, course design did not dictate the types of interactions in which students engaged within the courses. Findings suggest that the interaction equivalency theorem can be reformulated as follows: In corporate settings, an online course can be effective in terms of satisfaction, learning, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations, as long as (a at least one of three types of interaction (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner features prominently in the design of the course, and (b course delivery is consistent with the chosen type of interaction. Focusing on only one type of interaction carries a high risk of confusion, disengagement or missed learning opportunities, which can be managed by incorporating other forms of interactions.

  2. Behavioural equivalence for infinite systems - Partially decidable!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Kim; Nielsen, Mogens

    1996-01-01

    languages with two generalizations based on traditional approaches capturing non-interleaving behaviour, pomsets representing global causal dependency, and locality representing spatial distribution of events. We first study equivalences on Basic Parallel Processes, BPP, a process calculus equivalent...

  3. Ambient mass spectrometry imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janfelt, Christian; Nørgaard, Asger W

    2012-01-01

    Easy ambient sonic spray ionization (EASI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) were used for imaging of a number of samples, including sections of rat brain and imprints of plant material on porous Teflon. A novel approach termed Displaced Dual-mode Imaging was utilized for the direct...... comparison of the two methods: Images were recorded with the individual rows alternating between EASI and DESI, yielding a separate image for each technique recorded under perfectly similar conditions on the same sample. EASI works reliably for imaging of all samples, but the choice of spray solvent and flow...... rate is more critical in tissue imaging with EASI than with DESI. The overall sensitivity of EASI is, in general, slightly lower than that of DESI, and the representation of the dynamic range is different in images of the two techniques for some samples. However, for abundant compounds, EASI works well...

  4. MEIO AMBIENTE E DESENVOLVIMENTO

    OpenAIRE

    Suely Salgueiro Chacon; Daniel Rodriguez de Carvalho Pinheiro; Francisco Correia de Oliveira; Elizabeth Castelo Branco de Souza

    2009-01-01

    O objetivo deste artigo é resgatar elementos para subsidiar uma reflexão crítica sobre o modelo de desenvolvimento econômico prevalente na sociedade e as relações com o meio ambiente, sob a ameaça que ronda o destino da espécie humana, conforme afirmação de Lovelock (2006, p. 20) sobre o conceito de desenvolvimento sustentável: “uma ideia adorável se a tivéssemos aplicado 200 anos atrás, quando havia um bilhão de pessoas no mundo. Agora é tarde demais. Não há mais espaço para nenhum tipo de d...

  5. Reforma constitucional y ambiente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Bustamante

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available América Latina está atravesada por una ola de reformas constitucionales. Sus causas, las expectativas que ellas despiertan, los riesgos que se han asociado al proceso de lucha política en su entorno, son temas de un análisis fundamentalmente político; pero hay algunos aspectos en los cuales ese debate tiene una directa repercusión sobre el tema ambiental. En el caso del Ecuador, esto se refleja en el hecho de que una de las innovaciones que se proponen, se refieren a una nueva forma de abordar los temas ambientales, básicamente se establecen Derechos de la Naturaleza.

  6. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire;

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h(-1)) with the dos...

  7. Equivalence in Logic-Based Argumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Amgoud, Leila; Besnard, Philippe; Vesic, Srdjan

    2014-01-01

    International audience This paper investigates when two abstract logic-based argumentation systems are equivalent. It defines various equivalence criteria, investigates the links between them, and identifies cases where two systems are equivalent with respect to each of the proposed criteria. In particular, it shows that under some reasonable conditions on the logic underlying an argumentation system, the latter has an equivalent finite subsystem, called core. This core constitutes a thres...

  8. Metrics, Dose, and Dose Concept: The Need for a Proper Dose Concept in the Risk Assessment of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrtill Simkó

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate the dose for nanoparticles (NP, (i relevant information about the dose metrics and (ii a proper dose concept are crucial. Since the appropriate metrics for NP toxicity are yet to be elaborated, a general dose calculation model for nanomaterials is not available. Here we propose how to develop a dose assessment model for NP in analogy to the radiation protection dose calculation, introducing the so-called “deposited and the equivalent dose”. As a dose metric we propose the total deposited NP surface area (SA, which has been shown frequently to determine toxicological responses e.g. of lung tissue. The deposited NP dose is proportional to the total surface area of deposited NP per tissue mass, and takes into account primary and agglomerated NP. By using several weighting factors the equivalent dose additionally takes into account various physico-chemical properties of the NP which are influencing the biological responses. These weighting factors consider the specific surface area, the surface textures, the zeta-potential as a measure for surface charge, the particle morphology such as the shape and the length-to-diameter ratio (aspect ratio, the band gap energy levels of metal and metal oxide NP, and the particle dissolution rate. Furthermore, we discuss how these weighting factors influence the equivalent dose of the deposited NP.

  9. 29 CFR 825.215 - Equivalent position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... schedule. (3) The employee must have the same or an equivalent opportunity for bonuses, profit-sharing, and... equivalent job with the same or equivalent pay, benefits, and terms and conditions of employment does not extend to de minimis, intangible, or unmeasurable aspects of the job....

  10. Use of NPN bipolar transistors for silicon equivalent neutron damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the closing of the Northrop Triga Reactor, Northrop shifted its neutron irradiations to the several government Fast Burst Reactors. As a control, an inexpensive NPN bipolar transistor was chosen to monitor the silicon equivalent damage created by the differing neutron spectra. Noticeable biases occurred between the comparisons with 1 Mev silicon equivalent dosimetry reported by the several facilities and the damage observed in the monitor transistors and other semiconductors being irradiated. A special effort was committed to automate the measurement of the monitor transistors. Their behavior was then studied and quantified so that a more precise determination of the neutron fluence could be obtained. The techniques needed for accurate read-out of fluences from monitor transistors, with supporting data, is presented. The variabilities are mostly related to the choice of monitor transistor, test conditions, ambient and self-heating, and timing/annealing of the measurements. The occurrence of reverse annealing, varying with measurement current, is detailed. Also the monitoring of VBE as a thermometer to correct the damage factor to a standard temperature is noted. The electrical measurement errors have been made negligible. Some preliminary comparisons are given for the several facilities, using their historic 1 Mev (Si) sulfur/conversions. These comparisons do not include any adjustments for the biases developed by experiment positioning or recent changes in the silicon 1 Mev damage equivalence curve

  11. CCN activation of ambient and "synthetic ambient" urban aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Julia; Reischl, Georg; Steiner, Gerhard; Bauer, Heidi; Leder, Klaus; Kistler, Magda; Puxbaum, Hans; Hitzenberger, R.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) activation properties of the urban aerosol in Vienna, Austria, were investigated in a long term (11 month) field study. Filter samples of the aerosol below 100 nm were taken in parallel to these measurements, and later used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosols. Activation parameters of this "synthetic ambient" aerosol were also obtained. Hygroscopicity parameters κ [1] were calculated both for the urban and the "synthetic ambient" aerosol and also from the chemical composition. Average κ for the "synthetic ambient" aerosol ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 with an average value of 0.24, while the κ from the chemical composition of this "synthetic ambient" aerosol was significantly higher (average 0.43). The full results of the study are given elsewhere [2,3].

  12. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  13. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  14. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  15. Validating Firewalls in Mobile Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Hansen, René Rydhof;

    1999-01-01

    The ambient calculus is a calculus of computation that allows active processes (mobile ambients) to move between sites. A firewall is said to be protective whenever it denies entry to attackers not possessing the required passwords. We devise a polynomial time algorithm for rejecting proposed...

  16. Foro Ambiental : CEDENMA, Asamblea Constituyente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise Naizot

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen de la Mesa redonda: Orientaciones de la nueva Constitución ecuatoriana en materia ambiental: ¿avances o retrocesos en relación con el marco político y filosófico ambiental vigente en algunos países de la región?

  17. Violation of the gauge equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Khrapko, R I

    2001-01-01

    F. V. Gubarev et al. (``On the significance of the vector potential squared'', Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2220) have argued that the minimum value of the volume integral of the vector potential squared may have physical meaning, in defiance of the gauge equivalence of potentials. Earlier, R. I. Khrapko proposed a gauge noninvariant electrodynamics spin tensor (``Spin density of electromagnetic waves'', [1]). The standard electrodynamics spin tensor is zero. Here we point out that the Biot-Savarat formula uniquely results in a preferred, "true" vector potential field which is generated from a given magnetic field. A similar integral formula uniquely permits to find a "true" scalar potential field generated from a given electric field even in the case of a nonpotential electric field. We say that an exterior derivative of a differential form is the boundary of this form and the integration of a form results in a new form named the generation. Generating from a generation yields zero. A boundary is closed. A generatio...

  18. Equivalence Principle in Chameleon Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kraiselburd, Lucila; Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel; Vucetich, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Most theories that predict time and(or) space variation of fundamental constants also predict violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP). Khoury and Weltman proposed the chameleon model in 2004 and claimed that this model avoids experimental bounds on the WEP. In this paper we present a contrasting view based on the analysis of the force between two bodies induced by the chameleon field using a particular approach in which the field due to both the large and the small bodies is obtained by appropriate series expansions in the various regions of interest and the corresponding matching conditions. We found that resulting force depends on the test body\\'{}s composition even when the chameleon coupling constants $\\beta_{i}$ are universal. In particular, we compared the resulting differential acceleration of test bodies made of Be and Al with the corresponding bounds obtained from E\\"otv\\"os type experiments and find that the predictions of the chameleon model are, in general, various orders of magnitude a...

  19. Radiation Doses from some Egyptian industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual dose equivalent from exposures to radionuclides contained in some industrial ores and their waste products, were estimated using collective data from these industrial materials. This study takes in consideration industrial ores and their waste products. The materials studied were iron and steel products, cement manufacture, phosphate fertilizers, phosphoric acid production as well as ores used in ceramic production and waste. An integrated method was used in mathematical assumption form for the purpose of calculating the radiation dose equivalent. The calculated values of the annual radiation doses for workers were found to be significant. These results are discussed in the light of international exposure limits for workers

  20. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of Criteria Pollutants A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 53—Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and...

  1. Potential Offsite Radiological Doses Estimated for the Proposed Divine Strake Experiment, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Warren

    2006-12-01

    An assessment of the potential radiation dose that residents offsite of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) might receive from the proposed Divine Strake experiment was made to determine compliance with Subpart H of Part 61 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The Divine Strake experiment, proposed by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, consists of a detonation of 700 tons of heavy ammonium nitrate fuel oil-emulsion above the U16b Tunnel complex in Area 16 of the NTS. Both natural radionuclides suspended, and historic fallout radionuclides resuspended from the detonation, have potential to be transported outside the NTS boundary by wind. They may, therefore, contribute radiological dose to the public. Subpart H states ''Emissions of radionuclides to the ambient air from Department of Energy facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem/yr'' (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 61.92) where mrem/yr is millirem per year. Furthermore, application for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval of construction of a new source or modification of an existing source is required if the effective dose equivalent, caused by all emissions from the new construction or modification, is greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/yr (40 CFR 61.96). In accordance with Section 61.93, a dose assessment was conducted with the computer model CAP88-PC, Version 3.0. In addition to this model, a dose assessment was also conducted by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This modeling was conducted to obtain dose estimates from a model designed for acute releases and which addresses terrain effects and uses meteorology from multiple locations. Potential radiation dose to a

  2. Thermal analysis of laser diode module by an equivalent electrical network method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming-wei; XU Wen-hai; TANG Wen-yan

    2006-01-01

    An equivalent electrical network method is presented in this paper to analyze the cooling characteristics of a laser diode module (LDM).And a modified equivalent model of a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) with an adjunctive thermal resistance and a contact resistance is proposed.The performance of a commercial TEC has been simulated.The thermal analysis of a LDM incorporated with a TEC has been performed by using an equivalent circuit model of the LDM.In the analysis the change of LD current,TEC current,and the ambient temperature are all considered.It shows that the equivalent circuit approach is an effective tool for the qualitative analysis of TEC and LDM.

  3. Medical exposure and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of radiological diagnosis in Japan and individual population effective dose are reported. Questionnaire on radiological practice was delivered to selected medical facilities. The total number of X-ray diagnosis performed in 1991 was 180,000,000, being age-dependent in both men and women. The chest was the most common site to be examined. The number of X-ray films per examination was the highest for the stomach. The spread of ultrasound has decreased radiological practice in the obstetric field (approximately one sixth between 1979 and 1986). There was an 8-fold increase in the number of X-ray CT as of 1989 during the past decade. The total number of CT scanning in 1989 reached nearly 14,850,000 (about 16 times as much as that of 1979). The number of stomach X-ray screening increased to 7,800,000 which is twice as much as that in 1975. In the dental field, panoramic method brought about a 7-fold increase between 1974 and 1985. The frequency of nuclear medicine diagnosis has slightly increased, reaching 1,400,000 cases in 1992, and 99mTc was the most common nuclide. The total population effective dose of radiography and fluoroscopy was 179,000 mSv. The highest effective dose was associated with gastric X-ray. The effective dose equivalent per diagnosis was estimated to be 1.02 mSv (the total population/total number of radiological diagnosis). The population effective dose per person was 2.3 mSv (population effective dose equivalent/national population), which was equal to the world average of yearly effective dose equivalent of natural radiation. (S.Y.)

  4. Metabolic equivalents during scooter exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Akira; Arimoto, Morio; Muramatsu, Shigeru

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the metabolic equivalents (METs) for scooter exercise (riding a scooter, scootering) and to examine the energy expenditure and the heart rate response, so that the results can be used in health promotion activities. Eighteen young adults (10 males and 8 females) participated in scootering on a treadmill at three different speeds for six minutes each. Before, during, and after the exercise, pulmonary ventilation, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), carbon dioxide product, respiratory exchange ratio (R), and heart rate (HR) were measured. These measurements kept steady states from the 3rd to 6th minute of each different speed session. The MET values acquired during scootering at 80 m.min(-1), 110 m.min(-1), and 140 m.min(-1) were 3.9, 4.3, and 5.0, respectively. Calculated using VO(2) (ml.kg(-1).min(-1))x[4.0+R], the energy consumption for scootering at each speed was 67.0+/-10.6, 73.3+/-10.2, and 84.8+/-7.9 cal.kg(-1).min(-1), respectively. The regression equation between scootering speed (X, m.min(-1)) and VO(2) (Y, ml.kg(-1).min(-1)) is Y=0.062X+8.655, and the regression equation between HR (X, beats.min(-1)) and VO(2)reserve (Y, %) is Y=0.458X-11.264. These equations can be applied to both females and males. Thus, scootering at 80 to 140 m.min(-1) might not be sufficient to improve the cardiorespiratory fitness of young male adults similar to the participants, but it may contribute many healthy benefits to most female adults and even male adults, and improve their health and fitness at the faster speeds.

  5. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  6. Water equivalent phantom materials for (192)Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-21

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with (192)Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading (192)Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm.The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm.As suggested

  7. Radiological Programs- Ambient Radon at the Yucca Mountain Site (SCPB:NA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of the ambient radon monitoring activities conducted by the Radiological/Environmental Field Programs Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M and O), Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office. Overall, outdoor radon concentrations measured at the Yucca Mountain site were within the range of those reported for other areas in Nevada and the continental United States. Though there was some evidence of trends with time at some monitoring sites, regional atmospheric radon concentrations to date, do not appear to have changed significantly since the inception of site characterization activities. A preliminary dose assessment yielded an estimated annual effective dose equivalent of 134 mrem based on a continuous exposure to the average ambient radon concentration measured at the Yucca Mountain site. Concentrations were measured using two types of systems, passive electret ion chambers (EIC) and continuous radon monitors (CRM). The EICs produced time-averaged radon concentration data and the CRMs were used to study radon fluctuations over time. Between 1991 and 1995, the mean radon concentration at the site, as measured by EICs placed one meter above ground level, was 0.32 ± 0.15 pCi L-1. Radon concentrations varied between monitoring locations and between years. Station NF38, located near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), exhibited the highest overall average radon concentration at 0.55 pCi L-1 (1992 to 1995). Concentrations appear to cycle diurnally, generally peaking in the early morning hours and being lowest in the afternoon. The data also suggested that radon concentrations may fluctuate seasonally. The work accomplished between 1991 and 1995, established radon levels in the general area surrounding Yucca Mountain. It is recommended that further work focus directly on those locations that have the greatest potential for influencing ambient radon levels

  8. Controllable dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  9. Aspectos computacionais do ambiente IMAGUS

    OpenAIRE

    Raabe, André Luís Alice; Giraffa, Lúcia Maria Martins

    2000-01-01

    Este artigo apresenta a descrição do ambiente IMAGUS enfatizando aspectos da implementação do protótipo do ambiente. O IMAGUS permite a construção de materiais com fins pedagógicos que se utilizam de vídeos acessado via Internet. O protótipo foi desenvolvido para validar a arquitetura proposta para o ambiente. São apresentadas as soluções a nível de modelagem e a implementação do protótipo baseada na utilização da interface Java Media Framework

  10. INVARIANTS UNDER STABLE EQUIVALENCES OF MORITA TYPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang; Sun Longgang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study some invariants of associative algebras under stable equivalences of Morita type.First of all,we show that,if two finite-dimensional selfinjective k-algebras are stably equivalent of Morita type,then their orbit algebras are isomorphic.Secondly,it is verified that the quasitilted property of an algebra is invariant under stable equivalences of Morita type.As an application of this result,it is obtained that if an algebra is of finite representation type,then its tilted property is invariant under stable equivalences of Morita type; the other application to partial tilting modules is given in Section 4. Finally,we prove that when two finite-dimensional k-algebras are stably equivalent of Morita type,their repetitive algebras are also stably equivalent of Morita type under certain conditions.

  11. The effective theory of Borel equivalence relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokina, E.B.; Friedman, S.-D.; Törnquist, Asger Dag

    2010-01-01

    The study of Borel equivalence relations under Borel reducibility has developed into an important area of descriptive set theory. The dichotomies of Silver [20] and Harrington, Kechris and Louveau [6] show that with respect to Borel reducibility, any Borel equivalence relation strictly above...... equality on ω is above equality on P (ω), the power set of ω, and any Borel equivalence relation strictly above equality on the reals is above equality modulo finite on P (ω). In this article we examine the effective content of these and related results by studying effectively Borel equivalence relations...... under effectively Borel reducibility. The resulting structure is complex, even for equivalence relations with finitely many equivalence classes. However use of Kleene's O as a parameter is sufficient to restore the picture from the noneffective setting. A key lemma is that of the existence of two...

  12. The Complexity of Identifying Large Equivalence Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven; Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Miltersen, Peter Bro;

    1999-01-01

    We prove that at least 3k−4/k(2k−3)(n/2) – O(k)equivalence tests and no more than 2/k (n/2) + O(n) equivalence tests are needed in the worst case to identify the equivalence classes with at least k members in set of n elements. The upper bound is an improvement by a factor 2 compared to known res...

  13. Equivalence in Bilingual Lexicography: Criticism and Suggestions*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Ernst Wiegand

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: A reminder of general problems in the formation of terminology, as illustrated by theGerman Äquivalence (Eng. equivalence and äquivalent (Eng. equivalent, is followed by a critical discussionof the concept of equivalence in contrastive lexicology. It is shown that especially the conceptof partial equivalence is contradictory in its different manifestations. Consequently attemptsare made to give a more precise indication of the concept of equivalence in the metalexicography,with regard to the domain of the nominal lexicon. The problems of especially the metalexicographicconcept of partial equivalence as well as that of divergence are fundamentally expounded.In conclusion the direction is indicated to find more appropriate metalexicographic versions of theconcept of equivalence.

    Keywords: EQUIVALENCE, LEXICOGRAPHIC EQUIVALENT, PARTIAL EQUIVALENCE,CONGRUENCE, DIVERGENCE, CONVERGENCE, POLYDIVERGENCE, SYNTAGM-EQUIVALENCE,ZERO EQUIVALENCE, CORRESPONDENCE

    Abstrakt: Äquivalenz in der zweisprachigen Lexikographie: Kritik und Vorschläge.Nachdem an allgemeine Probleme der Begriffsbildung am Beispiel von dt. Äquivalenzund dt. äquivalent erinnert wurde, wird zunächst auf Äquivalenzbegriffe in der kontrastiven Lexikologiekritisch eingegangen. Es wird gezeigt, dass insbesondere der Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenzin seinen verschiedenen Ausprägungen widersprüchlich ist. Sodann werden Präzisierungenzu den Äquivalenzbegriffen in der Metalexikographie versucht, die sich auf den Bereich der Nennlexikbeziehen. Insbesondere der metalexikographische Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenz sowie derder Divergenz werden grundsätzlich problematisiert. In welche Richtung man gehen kann, umangemessenere metalexikographische Fassungen des Äquivalenzbegriffs zu finden, wird abschließendangedeutet.

    Stichwörter: ÄQUIVALENZ, LEXIKOGRAPHISCHES ÄQUIVALENT, PARTIELLE ÄQUIVALENZ,KONGRUENZ, DIVERGENZ, KONVERGENZ, POLYDIVERGENZ

  14. Homogeneous Dielectric Equivalents of Composite Material Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the methodology of replacing complicated parts of an airplane skin by simple homogeneous equivalents, which can exhibit similar shielding efficiency. On one hand, the airplane built from the virtual homogeneous equivalents can be analyzed with significantly reduced CPU-time demands and memory requirements. On the other hand, the equivalent model can estimate the internal fields satisfactory enough to evaluate the electromagnetic immunity of the airplane.

  15. 21 CFR 26.6 - Equivalence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.6 Equivalence...

  16. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence...

  17. Approximate equivalence in von Neumann algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Huiru; Don Hadwin

    2005-01-01

    One formulation of D. Voiculescu's theorem on approximate unitary equivalence is that two unital representations π and ρ of a separable C*-algebra are approximately unitarily equivalent if and only if rank o π = rank o ρ. We study the analog when the ranges of π and ρ are contained in a von Neumann algebra R, the unitaries inducing the approximate equivalence must come from R, and "rank" is replaced with "R-rank" (defined as the Murray-von Neumann equivalence of the range projection).

  18. Comparison of neutron dose quantities and instrument and dosemeter readings at representative locations in an MOX fuel fabrication plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. T.; Hager, L. G.; Tanner, R. J.; Haley, R. M.; Cooper, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The relationships between operational and protection quantities, and values of personal dosemeter and instrument readings have been determined for a recently designed MOX fuel fabrication plant. The relationships between the quantities, and the readings of personal dosemeters are sensitive to both the energy and direction distribution of neutron fluence. The energy distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The direction distribution was addressed by calculating independently, spectral components for which the direction distribution could be reasonably assumed. At representative locations, and for assumed worker orientations, the radiation field is analysed as having, in general, three components—a direct, unidirectional component from the nearest identified discrete source, which is considered incident A-P, several unidirectional components from other such sources which are treated as a rotational component and a scattered isotropic component. The calculated spectra were folded with conversion coefficients for personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) slab (A-P, ROT and ISO), effective dose, E, (A-P, ROT and ISO), ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), personal dosemeter (AP, ROT and ISO) and survey instrument response characteristics.

  19. The Concept of Equivalent Radon Concentration for Practical Consideration of Indoor Exposure to Thoron

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Moir; Jing Chen

    2012-01-01

    To consider the total exposure to indoor radon and thoron, a concept of equivalent radon concentration for thoron is introduced, defined as the radon concentration that delivers the same annual effective dose as that resulting from the thoron concentration. The total indoor exposure to radon and thoron is then the sum of the radon concentration and the equivalent radon concentration for thoron. The total exposure should be compared to the radon guideline value, and if it exceeds the guideline...

  20. Pooling Morphometric Estimates: A Statistical Equivalence Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardoe, Heath R; Cutter, Gary R; Alter, Rachel; Hiess, Rebecca Kucharsky; Semmelroch, Mira; Parker, Donna; Farquharson, Shawna; Jackson, Graeme D; Kuzniecky, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Changes in hardware or image-processing settings are a common issue for large multicenter studies. To pool MRI data acquired under these changed conditions, it is necessary to demonstrate that the changes do not affect MRI-based measurements. In these circumstances, classical inference testing is inappropriate because it is designed to detect differences, not prove similarity. We used a method known as statistical equivalence testing to address this limitation. Equivalence testing was carried out on 3 datasets: (1) cortical thickness and automated hippocampal volume estimates obtained from healthy individuals imaged using different multichannel head coils; (2) manual hippocampal volumetry obtained using two readers; and (3) corpus callosum area estimates obtained using an automated method with manual cleanup carried out by two readers. Equivalence testing was carried out using the "two one-sided tests" (TOST) approach. Power analyses of the TOST were used to estimate sample sizes required for well-powered equivalence testing analyses. Mean and standard deviation estimates from the automated hippocampal volume dataset were used to carry out an example power analysis. Cortical thickness values were found to be equivalent over 61% of the cortex when different head coils were used (q coils were statistically equivalent (TOST P = 4.28 × 10(-15) ). Manual hippocampal volume estimates obtained using two readers were not statistically equivalent (TOST P = .97). The use of different readers to carry out limited correction of automated corpus callosum segmentations yielded equivalent area estimates (TOST P = 1.28 × 10(-14) ). Power analysis of simulated and automated hippocampal volume data demonstrated that the equivalence margin affects the number of subjects required for well-powered equivalence tests. We have presented a statistical method for determining if morphometric measures obtained under variable conditions can be pooled. The equivalence testing technique is

  1. Calculation of dose conversion factors for thoron decay products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Nemeth, Csaba [Pannon University, 10 Egyetem St, 8201 Veszprem (Hungary)

    2007-12-15

    The dose conversion factors for short-lived thoron decay products were calculated using a dosimetric approach. The calculations were based on a computer program LUDEP, which implements the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model. The dose per equilibrium equivalent concentration for thoron (EETC) was calculated with respect to (1) equivalent dose to each region of the lung tissues (bronchial, bronchiolar and alveolar), (2) weighted equivalent dose to organs other than lung, and (3) effective dose. The calculations indicated that (1) the most exposed region of the lung tissues was the bronchial for the unattached fraction and the bronchiolar for the attached fraction, (2) the effective dose is dominated by the contribution of lung dose, and (3) the effective dose per EETC was about four times larger than the effective dose per equilibrium equivalent concentration for radon (EERC). The calculated dose conversion factors were applied to the comparative dosimetry for some thoron-enhanced areas where the EERC and EETC have been measured. In the case of a spa in Japan, the dose from thoron decay products was larger than the dose from radon decay products.

  2. Calculation of dose conversion factors for thoron decay products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Nemeth, Csaba

    2007-12-01

    The dose conversion factors for short-lived thoron decay products were calculated using a dosimetric approach. The calculations were based on a computer program LUDEP, which implements the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model. The dose per equilibrium equivalent concentration for thoron (EETC) was calculated with respect to (1) equivalent dose to each region of the lung tissues (bronchial, bronchiolar and alveolar), (2) weighted equivalent dose to organs other than lung, and (3) effective dose. The calculations indicated that (1) the most exposed region of the lung tissues was the bronchial for the unattached fraction and the bronchiolar for the attached fraction, (2) the effective dose is dominated by the contribution of lung dose, and (3) the effective dose per EETC was about four times larger than the effective dose per equilibrium equivalent concentration for radon (EERC). The calculated dose conversion factors were applied to the comparative dosimetry for some thoron-enhanced areas where the EERC and EETC have been measured. In the case of a spa in Japan, the dose from thoron decay products was larger than the dose from radon decay products.

  3. 46 CFR 175.540 - Equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corporate structure of a vessel's company when determining the acceptability of an equivalent system... lifesaving appliance or arrangement as an equivalent if it has performance characteristics at least... IMO Resolution A. 520(13) (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600); or (2) Has...

  4. The therapeutic equivalence of complex drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, H.; Klinger, E.; Muehlebach, S.; Brin, J-F.; Storm, G.; Crommelin, D.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    When the patent of a small molecule drug expires generics may be introduced. They are considered therapeutically equivalent once pharmaceutical equivalence (i.e. identical active substances) and bioequivalence (i.e. comparable pharmacokinetics) have been established in a cross-over volunteer study.

  5. Beyond Language Equivalence on Visibly Pushdown Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Srba, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    We study (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds for a number of studied preorders and equivalences like simulation, completed simulation, ready simulation, 2-nested simulation preorders/equivalences and bisimulation equivalence. Our main results are that all the mentioned equivalences and preorders are EXPTIME-complete on visibly pushdown automata, PSPACE-complete on visibly one-counter automata and P-complete on visibly BPA. Our PSPACE lower bound for visibly one-counter automata improves also the previously known DP-hardness results for ordinary one-counter automata and one-counter nets. Finally, we study regularity checking problems for visibly pushdown automata and show that they can be decided in polynomial time.

  6. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  7. Arithmetic Operand Ordering for Equivalence Checking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Yanling; GE Haitong; YAN Xiaolang; Ren Kun

    2007-01-01

    An information extraction-based technique is proposed for RTL-to-gate equivalence checking. Distances are calculated on directed acyclic graph (AIG). Multiplier and multiplicand are distinguished on multiplications with different coding methods, with which the operand ordering/grouping information could be extracted from a given implementation gate netlist, helping the RTL synthesis engine generate a gate netlist with great similarity. This technique has been implemented in an internal equivalence checking tool, ZD_VIS. Compared with the simple equivalence checking, the speed is accelerated by at least 40% in its application to a class of arithmetic designs, addition and multiplication trees. The method can be easily incorporated into existing RTL-to-gate equivalence checking frameworks, increasing the robustness of equivalence checking for arithmetic circuits.

  8. External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Internal dose conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains 50-year committed dose equivalent factors, in tabular form. The document is intended to be used as the primary reference by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors for calculating radiation dose equivalents for members of the public, resulting from ingestion or inhalation of radioactive materials. Its application is intended specifically for such materials released to the environment during routine DOE operations, except in those instances where compliance with 40 CFR 61 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) requires otherwise. However, the calculated values may be equally applicable to unusual releases or to occupational exposures. The use of these committed dose equivalent tables should ensure that doses to members of the public from internal exposures are calculated in a consistent manner at all DOE facilities

  10. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137Cs, 241Am and 109Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10-2 to 103 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  11. High Mortality of Red Sea Zooplankton under Ambient Solar Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M. O.; Sathianeson Satheesh; Gopikrishna Mantha; Susana Agustī; Beatriz Carreja; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiatio...

  12. On Equivalence and Non-equivalence of Words and Phrases In Different Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高新霞

    2008-01-01

    This paper is mainly focused on the study of the relationship among three concepts, namely, culture,psychological association and equivalence or non-equivalence of words and phrases with combination of Problems posed by my students and discuss three patterns of the relationship with an attempt to describe the importance of culture to equivalence.

  13. Equivalence-Equivalence Responding: Training Conditions Involved in Obtaining a Stable Baseline Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Andres; Bohorquez, Cristobal; Perez, Vicente; Gutierrez, Maria Teresa; Gomez, Jesus; Luciano, Carmen; Wilson, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the variables associated with equivalence-equivalence responding, in which participants match pairs of equivalent or nonequivalent stimuli. One such variable is the presence of response competition from nonarbitrary (physical) relational response options. In the current analysis, the experimenters examined the effect…

  14. Ambiente juvenil: discurso ambiental entre jóvenes universitarios

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn-Anderson, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Esta tesis pretende hacer una aportación al conocimiento del medio ambiente del occidente de México, específicamente de la zona metropolitana de Guadalajara, a partir del estudio de la cultura ambiental manifestada en el discurso de los jóvenes universitarios del ITESO. La apuesta es que puede ser provechoso considerar dentro del concepto de “medio ambiente” no solamente componentes bióticos y abióticos, sino también elementos socioculturales como cultura y significado. Es evidente que hay in...

  15. Analysis of affinely equivalent Boolean functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG QingShu; ZHANG HuanGuo; YANG Min; WANG ZhangYi

    2007-01-01

    By some basic transforms and invariant theory, we give two results: 1) an algorithm,which can be used to judge if two Boolean functions are affinely equivalent and to obtain the equivalence relationship if they are equivalent. This is useful in studying Boolean functions and in engineering. For example, we classify all 8-variable homogeneous bent functions of degree 3 into two classes; 2) Reed-Muller codes R(4,6)/R(1,6), R(3,7)/R(1,7) are classified efficiently.

  16. Studies on the Neutron Radiation Damage Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOU De-hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish a unified standard of the evaluation of different sources of radiation damage, the neutron radiation damage equivalent standard source was determined both at home and abroad, and a lot of equivalence research work was done for making weapons anti neutron radiation performance examination and acceptance basis. The theoretical research progress was combed according to the relationship between the displacement damage function and the radiation source spectra ,and the experimental research progress was combed from the basic experimental methods, the controlling trend of effect parameters and field parameters. The experiment method to reduce the uncertainty was discussed, and present the research directions of radiation damage equivalence.

  17. Improvements in the estimation of doses to patients from 'complex' conventional X ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzado, A.; Vano, E.; Moran, P.; Gonzalez, L.; Ruiz Sanz, S. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). School of Medicine)

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method to estimate organ doses and effective dose equivalent for patients undergoing three 'complex' examinations -barium meal, barium enema and intraveneous urography - has been used. The separation of radiological procedures into a set of standard calculation views is based on the use of Monte Carlo conversion factors and measurements within a Remab phantom. The in-phantom measured radiation doses from such examinations were compared with predictions of the numerical method. Organ doses and effective dose equivalents have been estimated from dosimetric measurements with thermoluminescence dosemeters along with measurements of dose x area product during examination performance. Mean values of dose to organs and effective dose equivalent in the area of Madrid are reported. Application of the method is discussed when the values of dose x area product are the only information available from examinations. Estimated organ doses and effective dose equivalents are compared for different levels of simplicity in data recording. (author).

  18. Conhecimento, interdisciplinaridade e Psicologia Ambiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ombretta Romice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Responde às questões - como os métodos da Psicologia Ambiental devem ser discutidos em um enquadramento interdisciplinar; a Psicologia Ambiental pede alguma abordagem metodológica especial; como a intervenção ambiental é determinada pela interdisciplinaridade; quais são estas disciplinas e como elas se relacionam entre si - baseando-se em experiências profissionais como orientador em um projeto com comunidade, com habitação popular e exclusão social em vários países da Europa, e como consultora. Conclui que as abordagens usadas pelas diferentes profissões são muito separadas, e que apenas metas comuns não são suficientes, sendo também necessários um treino conjunto e identidade de valores.

  19. Equivalent circuit with complex physical constants and equivalent-parameters-expressed dissipation factors of piezoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wen, Yu-Mei; Li, Ping

    2006-06-01

    The equivalent circuit with complex physical constants for a piezoelectric ceramic in thickness mode is established. In the equivalent circuit, electric components (equivalent circuit parameters) are connected to real and imaginary parts of complex physical coefficients of piezoelectric materials. Based on definitions of dissipation factors, three of them (dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric dissipation factors) are represented by equivalent circuit parameters. Since the equivalent circuit parameters are detectable, the dissipation factors can be easily obtained. In the experiments, the temperature and the stress responses of the three dissipation factors are measured.

  20. Equivalent circuit with complex physical constants and equivalent-parameters-expressed dissipation factors of piezoelectric materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yu; Wen Yu-Mei; Li Ping

    2006-01-01

    The equivalent circuit with complex physical constants for a piezoelectric ceramic in thickness mode is established.In the equivalent circuit, electric components (equivalent circuit parameters) are connected to real and imaginary parts of complex physical coefficients of piezoelectric materials. Based on definitions of dissipation factors, three of them (dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric dissipation factors) are represented by equivalent circuit parameters. Since the equivalent circuit parameters are detectable, the dissipation factors can be easily obtained. In the experiments, the temperature and the stress responses of the three dissipation factors are measured.

  1. Ambient cosmology and spacetime singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to the issues of spacetime singularities and cosmic censorship in general relativity. This is based on the idea that standard 4-dimensional spacetime is the conformal infinity of an ambient metric for the 5-dimensional Einstein equations with fluid sources. We then find that the existence of spacetime singularities in four dimensions is constrained by asymptotic properties of the ambient 5-metric, while the non-degeneracy of the latter crucially depends on cosmic censorship holding on the boundary.

  2. Ambient cosmology and spacetime singularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios [Bern University, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Cotsakis, Spiros [CERN, Theory Division, Department of Physics, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); National Technical University, School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Athens (Greece)

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to the issues of spacetime singularities and cosmic censorship in general relativity. This is based on the idea that standard 4-dimensional spacetime is the conformal infinity of an ambient metric for the 5-dimensional Einstein equations with fluid sources. We then find that the existence of spacetime singularities in four dimensions is constrained by asymptotic properties of the ambient 5-metric, while the non-degeneracy of the latter crucially depends on cosmic censorship holding on the boundary. (orig.)

  3. Medio ambiente y responsabilidad social

    OpenAIRE

    Roa Buitrago, Rosa Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Las organizaciones, dentro de los procesos de responsabilidad social y con el fin de mejorar la calidad de vida de las comunidades que impactan, han optado por proteger y preservar el medio ambiente de acuerdo a ciertos protocolos y normas internacionales que generan una cultura al respecto. Este cuaderno de investigación aborda la norma ISO 26000, la cual asume el tema de la Responsabilidad Social Empresarial (RSE) en materia de medio ambiente y es una guía para ser implementada en las orga...

  4. Los estudios sobre el ambiente y la ciencia ambiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Nancy Giannuzzo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La existencia de la ciencia ambiental es reconocida en libros, revistas de publicación científica y carreras de grado y posgrado. Sin embargo, se desconoce su existencia en forma literal o indirecta, al no ser considerado su aporte, por ejemplo, en los planteos referidos sobre la ciencia y la tecnología de la sustentabilidad. En este trabajo se presentan estos antecedentes, relacionándolos con el objetivo del mismo, que es el de aportar a la dilucidación de la existencia y conformación de la ciencia ambiental. Para esto, se analiza la relación de las disciplinas con la dimensión compleja del ambiente como objeto de estudio y aspectos metodológicos derivados. A los fines de aportar al esclarecimiento conceptual, se identifican las distintas acepciones de ambiente comúnmente referidas en la bibliografía. Además, se discuten aspectos relacionados de multidisciplinariedad, interdisciplinariedad y transdisciplinariedad, y sobre el status epistémico de la ciencia ambiental. Se concluye que una mayor precisión conceptual embasada en un marco compartido por las disciplinas que estudian el ambiente, incluida la ciencia ambiental, y los distintos actores involucrados en las problemáticas ambientales, favorecerá el refinamiento de las metodologías tendientes a disminuir la fragmentación de las investigaciones concernientes y las aplicaciones para su resolución.The existence of an environmental science is recognized in books, journals of science as well as in undergraduate and graduate studies. Its existence, however, is unknown either literally or indirectly when, for instance, its contribution to topics connected to the science and technology of sustainability is not considered. This background is presented in this paper and connected to its objective, which is to elucidate the existence and structure of the environmental science. To this goal, I analyse the relationship of the disciplines with the complex dimension of the environment

  5. ON THE EQUIVALENCE OF THE ABEL EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article uses the reflecting function of Mironenko to study some complicated differential equations which are equivalent to the Abel equation. The results are applied to discuss the behavior of solutions of these complicated differential equations.

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission equivalency evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1995-10-01

    This paper provides the basis for concluding that using the seismic design criteria, defined in DOE order 4580.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and its implementing standards provides safety equivalent to NRC criteria.

  7. Lexical Equivalence in Business English Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淼

    2009-01-01

    Business English is English used in business contexts.It is a combination of knowledge in both business and language.Being faithful is ofprimary importance in business English Iranslation,but a translation only faithful to the original is far from adequate if it is not appropriate to the original in style.Therefore,in doing business translation,the translators should always keep in mind the specific purposes and functions ofthe original texts and make attempts to render the closet natural equivalent in the target language.This atticle focuses on equivalence at lexical level in this chapter.Several major tendencies toward word choice arc put forward and stylistic equivalence in each case is analyzed at some length.Three criteria are proposed here for choosing suitable words:preciseness,concise-ness and gracefulness.1fthe three criteria are satisfied,stylistic equivalence will also be established.

  8. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  9. Lexical Equivalence in Business English Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淼

    2009-01-01

    Business English is English used in business contexts.It is a combination of knowledge in both business and language.Being faithful is of primary importance in business English translation,but a translation only faithful to the original is far from adequate if it is not appropriate to the original in style.Therefore,in doing business translation,the translators should always keep in mind the specific purposes and functions of the original texts and make attempts to render the closet natural equivalent in the target language.This article focuses on equivalence at lexical level in this chapter.Several major tendencies toward word choice are put forward and stylistic equivalence in each case is analyzed at some length.Three criteria are proposed here for choosing suitable words:preciseness,conciseness and gracefulness.If the three criteria are satisfied,stylistic equivalence will also be established.

  10. Equivalence Principle, Higgs Boson and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Francaviglia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss here possible tests for Palatini f(R-theories together with their implications for different formulations of the Equivalence Principle. We shall show that Palatini f(R-theories obey the Weak Equivalence Principle and violate the Strong Equivalence Principle. The violations of the Strong Equivalence Principle vanish in vacuum (and purely electromagnetic solutions as well as on short time scales with respect to the age of the universe. However, we suggest that a framework based on Palatini f(R-theories is more general than standard General Relativity (GR and it sheds light on the interpretation of data and results in a way which is more model independent than standard GR itself.

  11. Agency Full Time Equivalency Reporting System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — AFTERS provides an automated means for the Agency to report its full time equivalency work years to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Office of...

  12. Quantum equivalence principle without mass superselection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Coronado, H., E-mail: hcoronado@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad, Del. Coyoacán, México (Mexico); Okon, E., E-mail: eokon@filosoficas.unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Filosóficas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad, Del. Coyoacán, México (Mexico)

    2013-11-08

    The standard argument for the validity of Einstein's equivalence principle in a non-relativistic quantum context involves the application of a mass superselection rule. The objective of this work is to show that, contrary to widespread opinion, the compatibility between the equivalence principle and quantum mechanics does not depend on the introduction of such a restriction. For this purpose, we develop a formalism based on the extended Galileo group, which allows for a consistent handling of superpositions of different masses, and show that, within such scheme, mass superpositions behave as they should in order to obey the equivalence principle. - Highlights: • We propose a formalism for consistently handling, within a non-relativistic quantum context, superpositions of states with different masses. • The formalism utilizes the extended Galileo group, in which mass is a generator. • The proposed formalism allows for the equivalence principle to be satisfied without the need of imposing a mass superselection rule.

  13. Distinguishing Provenance Equivalence of Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Ye; Halem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reproducibility of scientific research relies on accurate and precise citation of data and the provenance of that data. Earth science data are often the result of applying complex data transformation and analysis workflows to vast quantities of data. Provenance information of data processing is used for a variety of purposes, including understanding the process and auditing as well as reproducibility. Certain provenance information is essential for producing scientifically equivalent data. Capturing and representing that provenance information and assigning identifiers suitable for precisely distinguishing data granules and datasets is needed for accurate comparisons. This paper discusses scientific equivalence and essential provenance for scientific reproducibility. We use the example of an operational earth science data processing system to illustrate the application of the technique of cascading digital signatures or hash chains to precisely identify sets of granules and as provenance equivalence identifiers to distinguish data made in an an equivalent manner.

  14. The Nonequivalence of High School Equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen V. Cameron; Heckman, James J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper analyzes the causes and consequences of the growing proportion of high-school-certified persons who achieve that status by exam certification rather than through high school graduation. Exam-certified high school equivalents are statistically indistinguishable from high school dropouts. Both dropouts and exam-certified equivalents have comparably poor wages, earnings, hours of work, unemployment experiences and job tenure. This is so whether or not ability measures are used to cont...

  15. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  16. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    OpenAIRE

    Sidman, M

    2000-01-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that...

  17. Fucoidan Promotes the Reconstruction of Skin Equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yu Seok; Li, Hailan; Balcos, Marie Carmel; Yun, Hye-Young; Baek, Kwang Jin; Kwon, Nyoun Soo; Choi, Hye-Ryung; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of fucoidan on the proliferation of fibroblasts and the reconstruction of a skin equivalent (SE). Fucoidan significantly stimulated the proliferation of CCD-25Sk human fibroblasts and Western blot analysis demonstrated that fucoidan markedly increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expression of p27. Fucoidan was used to reconstruct SE. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the addition of fucoidan to dermal equivalents increased exp...

  18. The equivalence principle and spatial curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination is made of the connection between the equivalence principle of general relativity and the non-Euclidean properties of space. The arguments commonly advanced to suggest a necessary connection between these two features of general relativity are reviewed and critically discussed. It is shown that although gravitational time dilation is an immediate consequence of the equivalence principle the corresponding effects on space are not such immediate or logically necessary consequences of this principle. (author)

  19. TERCEIRO SETOR E MEIO AMBIENTE

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Marina Félix de

    2012-01-01

    Objetivamos discutir, brevemente, como têm se dado as discussões sobre o Terceiro Setor brasileiro e, particularmente, sobre as ONGs que atuam em defesa do meio ambiente, levantando questionamentos acerca das limitações enfrentadas pelo Terceiro Setor neste contexto

  20. Shape analysis for mobile ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2001-01-01

    The ambient calculus is a calculus of computation that allows active processes to move between sites. We present an analysis inspired by state-of-the-art pointer analyses that safely and accurately predicts which processes may turn up at what sites during the execution of a composite system...

  1. Abstract Interpretation of Mobile Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, René Rydhof; Jensen, J. G.; Nielson, Flemming;

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate that abstract interpretation is useful for analysing calculi of computation such as the ambient calculus (which is based on the p-calculus); more importantly, we show that the entire development can be expressed in a constraint-based formalism that is becoming exceedingly popular...

  2. Shape analysis for Mobile Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2000-01-01

    The ambient calculus is a calculus of computation that allows active processes to move between sites. We present an analysis inspired by state-of-the-art pointer analyses that safety and accurately predicts which processes may turn up at what sites during the execution of a composite system...

  3. La crisis del medio ambiente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Quintero Vélez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo, introducción al tema del medio ambiente, pretende proporcionar conceptos básicos para analizar y dimensionar el impacto que genera el hombre sobre los sistemas que soportan la vida. Para entender estos problemas, es indispensable partir de un análisis básico de la relación entre el hombre actual, su medio ambiente, sus necesidades y sus actividades. El autor revisa los antecedentes, las causas y las consecuencias de la crisis ambiental internacional, e intenta dar explicación a la problemática nacionalen este campo, y establecer los puntos más críticos en Colombia. Finalmente, con base en los parámetros establecidos por el gobierno, se presenta el concepto de“desarrollo sostenible" como modelo que interrelaciona los procesos económicos, sociales y tecnológicos con el medio ambiente.

  4. Digital identity in ambient environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Ben; Ambekar, Onkar

    2006-01-01

    Embedded systems and ambient technology enable users to interact at any time and anywhere. In the BASIS project for identity management, CWI investigates transparent biometrics in home environments. Possible application areas are user profiling for shopping , listening to one's favourite music and o

  5. Patient Dosimetry in Arteriography of the Lower Limbs. Part II: Dose Conversion Coefficients, Organ Doses and Effective Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X ray projection data (see Part I) and GSF phantoms ADAM and EVA were used as input for the GSF Monte Carlo transport code to calculate hitherto unavailable dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) for common projections in arteriography of the lower limbs. These DCCs served to estimate organ equivalent doses and effective dose in a study of 455 patients. The effective dose caused by percutaneous needle puncture arteriography of one leg was on average 1 mSv, by Seldinger catherisation for arteriography of both legs 4 mSv, and by intravenous digital subtraction arteriography (DSA) 5 mSv. For needle puncture and Seldinger arteriography the effective dose attributable to fluoroscopy was about 50% for male and 60% for female patients. The contribution of DSA was between 15 and 35%, that of cut films between 17 to 28%, depending on gender and procedure. The effective dose in intravenous arteriography was mainly due to DSA (91-93%). (author)

  6. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies. PMID:26313586

  7. Deriving bio-equivalents from in vitro bioassays: assessment of existing uncertainties and strategies to improve accuracy and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Buchinger, Sebastian; Behr, Maximilian; Magdeburg, Axel; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Bio-equivalents (e.g., 17β-estradiol or dioxin equivalents) are commonly employed to quantify the in vitro effects of complex human or environmental samples. However, there is no generally accepted data analysis strategy for estimating and reporting bio-equivalents. Therefore, the aims of the present study are to 1) identify common mathematical models for the derivation of bio-equivalents from the literature, 2) assess the ability of those models to correctly predict bio-equivalents, and 3) propose measures to reduce uncertainty in their calculation and reporting. We compiled a database of 234 publications that report bio-equivalents. From the database, we extracted 3 data analysis strategies commonly used to estimate bio-equivalents. These models are based on linear or nonlinear interpolation, and the comparison of effect concentrations (ECX ). To assess their accuracy, we employed simulated data sets in different scenarios. The results indicate that all models lead to a considerable misestimation of bio-equivalents if certain mathematical assumptions (e.g., goodness of fit, parallelism of dose-response curves) are violated. However, nonlinear interpolation is most suitable to predict bio-equivalents from single-point estimates. Regardless of the model, subsequent linear extrapolation of bio-equivalents generates additional inaccuracy if the prerequisite of parallel dose-response curves is not met. When all these factors are taken into consideration, it becomes clear that data analysis introduces considerable uncertainty in the derived bio-equivalents. To improve accuracy and transparency of bio-equivalents, we propose a novel data analysis strategy and a checklist for reporting Minimum Information about Bio-equivalent ESTimates (MIBEST).

  8. Pressure equivalents in industrial gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metel' kov, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure equivalence is a mathematical concept used to explain action and load parameters for pipelines. These two parameters are congruent to pressures encountered in pipelines. The research examined pressure equivalence in 820 by 8 millimeter pipelines in the Samotlor region and took into account the influence of support jams during first and second category jamming. It was determined that the absolute dimensions to pressure pulsations were significantly larger than plus or minus ten percent from (Prab) and even exceeded (Prab) in certain instances. The ratios at which (Prab) can be exceeded vary with relation to the jam supports and the maximum variations stem from yield in the metal pipelines themselves. The above concepts can be used to study the effects of pressure equivalence upon loads and pressures of Samotlor field pipelines and to select appropriate pipeline planning and construction methods. The conclusions drawn are valid for industrial surface pipelines used at below limit pressures. Annular and daily temperature variations in the outside air are considered with regard to their effect upon the pressure equivalence within the lower sections of the pipeline. Deviations here have been noted to exceed (formula). It was observed that in the case of underground pipelines, operated at below limit pressures, pressure equivalence occured in the upper section of the pipeline.

  9. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the air monitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  10. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the airmonitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  11. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, W. Tyler, E-mail: watkinswt@virginia.edu; Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Moore, Joseph A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Gordon, James [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  12. The understanding of exposure dose report for film badge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawarada, Akira; Kuramochi, Yoshio; Uchiyama, Katsuhiro [Teikyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Ichihara Hospital

    1999-09-01

    This is a report of results of questionnaire done for 205 personnel involving medical doctors (66%), nurses (16%) radiation technologists (11%) and others related (7%) in authors' facility concerning the understanding of personal exposure dose report for their film badges. Answers were gotten in 65% (52% from doctors, 79% from nurses and 100% from remaining). Major results were: The report reached to 87%; 35% confirmed the report result; only 40% understood how to see the result and no nurses understood it; effective dose equivalent and tissue dose equivalent were understood only by 32% and dose equivalent limit, by 31%; 53% relied on the result; 36% had no concern due to low dose; 52% had uneasiness even if they wore the protector; 45% always wore the badge; and 26% had an lesson how to use and wear the badge. (K.H.)

  13. Equivalent magnetization over the World Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, J.; Hamoudi, M.; Choi, Y.; Thebault, E.; Quesnel, Y.; Roest, W. R.; Lesur, V.

    2012-12-01

    In another presentation (Hamoudi et al., this meeting), we present the construction of a new candidate for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM) over oceanic areas. This map is based on: (a) a more realistic forward modeling of the marine magnetic anomalies which includes remanent magnetization vectors taking into account the age and motion of the oceanic lithosphere; (b) evaluation of the equivalent magnetization by comparison of the synthetic and observed anomalies along ship tracks; and (c) adjustment of the synthetic anomaly maps using this equivalent magnetization prior to merging with the observed anomalies. A by-product of this approach is a global distribution of equivalent magnetization over the World's Ocean. Note that, because no global basement map exists for the oceanic areas, we assume a uniform, 5 km-deep and 1 km-thick magnetized layer for the forward model. The resulting equivalent magnetization is therefore relative to this over-simplistic magnetic source. A first observation is that, within the hypotheses of the forward model, the average equivalent magnetization is about 3 A/m, a value which compares well with the Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) measured on ancient basalt samples. As expected, the mid-ocean ridges are marked by stronger equivalent magnetizations, an observation which reflects both the stronger NRM measured at ridge axes and their shallower bathymetry (not taken into account in our forward model). More interesting is the observation of significant along-axis variations. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the Kolbeinsey and Reykjanes ridges around Iceland are marked by a very strong equivalent magnetization and the Azores Plateau by a strong one as well.. Again this may reflect the combined effect of shallower seafloor, thicker and/or more magnetized basaltic layer at hotspots. In contrast, the areas between 45 and 55°N and between 0 and 10°N (Equatorial FZ) correspond to a weak equivalent magnetization. Further south

  14. Quantum mechanics and the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum particle moving in a gravitational field may penetrate the classically forbidden region of the gravitational potential. This raises the question of whether the time of flight of a quantum particle in a gravitational field might deviate systematically from that of a classical particle due to tunnelling delay, representing a violation of the weak equivalence principle. I investigate this using a model quantum clock to measure the time of flight of a quantum particle in a uniform gravitational field, and show that a violation of the equivalence principle does not occur when the measurement is made far from the turning point of the classical trajectory. The results are then confirmed using the so-called dwell time definition of quantum tunnelling. I conclude with some remarks about the strong equivalence principle in quantum mechanics

  15. On the Equivalence of Quadratic APN Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Eimear; McGuire, Gary; Nebe, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Establishing the CCZ-equivalence of a pair of APN functions is generally quite difficult. In some cases, when seeking to show that a putative new infinite family of APN functions is CCZ inequivalent to an already known family, we rely on computer calculation for small values of n. In this paper we present a method to prove the inequivalence of quadratic APN functions with the Gold functions. Our main result is that a quadratic function is CCZ-equivalent to an APN Gold function if and only if it is EA-equivalent to that Gold function. As an application of this result, we prove that a trinomial family of APN functions that exist on finite fields of order 2^n where n = 2 mod 4 are CCZ inequivalent to the Gold functions. The proof relies on some knowledge of the automorphism group of a code associated with such a function.

  16. Water equivalence of polymer gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the water equivalence and radiation transport properties of polymer gel dosimeters over the wide range of photon and electron energies 14 different types of polymer gels were considered. Their water equivalence was evaluated in terms of effective atomic number (Zeff), electron density (ρe), photon mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), photon mass energy absorption coefficient (μen/ρ) and total stopping power (S/ρ)tot of electrons using the XCOM and the ESTAR database. The study showed that the effective atomic number of polymer gels were very close (en/ρ for all polymer gels were in close agreement (tot of electrons in polymer gel dosimeters were within 1% agreement with that of water. From the study we conclude that at lower energy (<80keV) the polymer gel dosimeters cannot be considered water equivalent and study has to be carried out before using the polymer gel for clinical application

  17. Determination of equivalent breast phantoms for different age groups of Taiwanese women: An experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shang-Lung; Chu, Tieh-Chi; Lin, Yung-Chien; Lan, Gong-Yau; Yeh, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Sharon; Chuang, Keh-Shih [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, 45 Cheng Hsin Street, Pai-Tou District, Taipei 11220, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slab is one of the mostly used phantoms for studying breast dosimetry in mammography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalence between exposure factors acquired from PMMA slabs and patient cases of different age groups of Taiwanese women in mammography. Methods: This study included 3910 craniocaudal screen/film mammograms on Taiwanese women acquired on one mammographic unit. The tube loading, compressed breast thickness (CBT), compression force, tube voltage, and target/filter combination for each mammogram were collected for all patients. The glandularity and the equivalent thickness of PMMA were determined for each breast using the exposure factors of the breast in combination with experimental measurements from breast-tissue-equivalent attenuation slabs. Equivalent thicknesses of PMMA to the breasts of Taiwanese women were then estimated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation CBT and breast glandularity in this study were 4.2 {+-} 1.0 cm and 54% {+-} 23%, respectively. The average equivalent PMMA thickness was 4.0 {+-} 0.7 cm. PMMA slabs producing equivalent exposure factors as in the breasts of Taiwanese women were determined for the age groups 30-49 yr and 50-69 yr. For the 4-cm PMMA slab, the CBT and glandularity values of the equivalent breast were 4.1 cm and 65%, respectively, for the age group 30-49 yr and 4.4 cm and 44%, respectively, for the age group 50-69 yr. Conclusions: The average thickness of PMMA slabs producing the same exposure factors as observed in a large group of Taiwanese women is less than that reported for American women. The results from this study can provide useful information for determining a suitable thickness of PMMA for mammographic dose survey in Taiwan. The equivalence of PMMA slabs and the breasts of Taiwanese women is provided to allow average glandular dose assessment in clinical practice.

  18. Dose-response of acute urinary toxicity of long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    radiation dose to the bladder were related to graded toxicity using multivariate ordinal logistic regression. Three models were optimized, each containing all available clinical variables and one of three dose metrics: Mean dose (Dmean), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), or relative volume given x Gy or above...

  19. Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory contains measured and estimated data on ambient air pollution for use in assessing air quality, assisting in...

  20. Atom interferometry and the Einstein equivalence principle

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Bordé, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Clande

    2011-01-01

    The computation of the phase shift in a symmetric atom interferometer in the presence of a gravitational field is reviewed. The difference of action-phase integrals between the two paths of the interferometer is zero for any Lagrangian which is at most quadratic in position and velocity. We emphasize that in a large class of theories of gravity the atom interferometer permits a test of the weak version of the equivalence principle (or universality of free fall) by comparing the acceleration of atoms with that of ordinary bodies, but is insensitive to that aspect of the equivalence principle known as the gravitational redshift or universality of clock rates.