WorldWideScience

Sample records for aluminum-inducible malate release

  1. Quercetin attenuates neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D R; Wani, W Y; Sunkaria, A; Kandimalla, R J; Sharma, R K; Verma, D; Bal, A; Gill, K D

    2016-06-02

    Aluminum is a light weight and toxic metal present ubiquitously on earth, which has gained considerable attention due to its neurotoxic effects. It also has been linked ecologically and epidemiologically to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Guamanian-Parkinsonian complex and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanism of aluminum neurotoxicity is poorly understood, but it is well documented that aluminum generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt-c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. Quercetin (a natural flavonoid) protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in aluminum-induced neurodegeneration, and then quercetin should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of quercetin (10 mg/kg body wt/day) reduced aluminum (10 mg/kg body wt/day)-induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity). In addition, quercetin also prevents aluminum-induced translocation of cyt-c, and up-regulates Bcl-2, down-regulates Bax, p53, caspase-3 activation and reduces DNA fragmentation. Quercetin also obstructs aluminum-induced neurodegenerative changes in aluminum-treated rats as seen by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that quercetin attenuates aluminum-induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that treatment with quercetin may represent a therapeutic strategy to attenuate the neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Aluminum-induced testosterone decrease results in physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A significant decrease in both serotonin and dopamine levels was simultaneously obtained with the decrease of testosterone level especially at the high dose of aluminum. In contrast, at the high dose, acetylcholine recorded significantly high value. In conclusion, aluminum-induced testosterone decrease resulted in a ...

  3. BoALMT1, an Al-Induced Malate Transporter in Cabbage, Enhances Aluminum Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al is present in approximately 50% of the arable land worldwide and is regarded as the main limiting factor of crop yield on acidic soil. Al-induced root malate efflux plays an important role in the Al tolerance of plants. Here, the aluminum induced malate transporter BoALMT1 (KF322104 was cloned from cabbage (Brassica oleracea. BoALMT1 showed higher expression in roots than in shoots. The expression of BoALMT1 was specifically induced by Al treatment, but not the trivalent cations lanthanum (La, cadmium (Cd, zinc (Zn, or copper (Cu. Subcellular localization studies were performed in onion epidermal cells and revealed that BoALMT1 was localized at the plasma membrane. Scanning Ion-selective Electrode Technique was used to analyze H+ flux. Xenopus oocytes and Arabidopsis thaliana expressing BoALMT1 excreted more H+ under Al treatment. Overexpressing BoALMT1 in transgenic Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced Al tolerance and increased malate secretion. The results suggested that BoALMT1 functions as an Al-resistant gene and encodes a malate transporter. Expressing BoALMT1 in Xenopus oocytes or A. thaliana indicated that BoALMT1 could increase malate secretion and H+ efflux to resist Al tolerance.

  4. Growth of poly-crystalline silicon–germanium on silicon by aluminum-induced crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jian-Yang; Chang, Pai-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The formation of poly-crystalline silicon–germanium films on single-crystalline silicon substrates by the method of aluminum-induced crystallization was investigated. The aluminum and germanium films were evaporated onto the single-crystalline silicon substrate to form an amorphous-germanium/aluminum/single-crystalline silicon structure that was annealed at 450 °C–550 °C for 0–3 h. The structural properties of the films were examined using x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. The x-ray diffraction patterns confirmed that the initial transition from an amorphous to a poly-crystalline structure occurs after 20 min of aluminum-induced crystallization annealing process at 450 °C. The micro-Raman spectral analysis showed that the aluminum-induced crystallization process yields a better poly-crystalline SiGe film when the film is annealed at 450 °C for 40 min. The growth mechanism of the poly-crystalline silicon–germanium by aluminum-induced crystallization was also studied and is discussed. - Highlights: ► Aluminum-induced poly-SiGe growth on Si substrates has been studied. ► Initial transition from a-SiGe to poly-SiGe occurs after 20-min AIC at 450 °C. ► Free Ge and Si atoms undergo inter-diffusion during AIC.

  5. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. (Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  6. Quininium Malates: Partial Chiral Discrimination via Diastereomeric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quinine was employed as a resolving agent for racemic malic acid. The resultant product was a quininium salt containing 75 % of the D-malate anion. Quinine was also crystallized with pure L- and D-malic acids and the structures of the resulting diastereomeric salts were elucidated. The crystal packings were analyzed in ...

  7. Quininium Malates: Partial Chiral Discrimination via Diastereomeric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Quinine was employed as a resolving agent for racemic malic acid. The resultant product was a quininium salt containing. 75 % of the D-malate anion. Quinine was also crystallized with pure L- and D-malic acids and the structures of the resulting diastereomeric salts were elucidated. The crystal packings were analyzed in ...

  8. la phosphoglucoisomerase et la malate deshydrogenase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    dimérique du cycle de Krebs qui catalyse la réaction suivante: Malate + NAD MDH Oxaloacétate +. NADH. Dans les cellules du maïs, les formes cytosoliques sont codées par deux loci, les formes mitochondriales par 3 loci (Newton et. Schwartz, 1980). L'acide ascorbique inhibe préférentiellement les formes du cytosol.

  9. Role of ethanol on aluminum induced biochemical changes on rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Parsunpriya; Kumar Das, Subir; Vasudevan, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum and alcohol, both are well-accepted neurotoxin. The plausible mechanisms for their neurotoxicity are also common. Therefore, the effect of ethanol on aluminum induced biochemical changes in rat brain is being studied. In the present study, ethanol exposure significantly affected the aluminum and protein content of brain. The activities of acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase were also changed. Aluminum exposure, on the other hand, contributed significantly in the alterations of ...

  10. [Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in trematodes and turbellarians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykhrestiuk, N P; Burenina, E A; Iarygina, G V

    1986-01-01

    Studies have been made on the activity and properties of malate and lactate dehydrogenases from the cattle rumen trematodes Eurytrema pancreaticum, Calicophoron ijimai and the turbellarian Phagocata sibirica which has a common free-living ancestor with the trematodes. All the species studied have a highly active malate dehydrogenase, its activity in the reaction of reducing oxaloacetate being 6-14 times higher than in the reaction of malate oxidation. The affinity of malate dehydrogenase to oxaloacetate was found to be higher than that to malate. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase (reducing the pyruvate) was lower than the activity of malate dehydrogenase, the difference being 50 times for C. ijimai, 4 times for E. pancreaticum and 10 times for P. sibirica.

  11. Arsenic mobilization by citrate and malate from a red mud-treated contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, Paola; Silvetti, Margherita; Mele, Elena; Garau, Giovanni; Deiana, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The mobility and bioavailability of As in the soil-plant system can be affected by a number of organic acids that originate from the activity of plants and microorganisms. In this study we evaluated the ability of citrate and malate anions to mobilize As in a polluted subacidic soil (UP soil) treated with red mud (RM soil). Both anions promoted the mobilization of As from UP and RM soils, with citrate being more effective than malate. The RM treatment induced a greater mobility of As. The amounts of As released in RM and UP soils treated with 3.0 mmol L citric acid solution were 2.78 and 1.83 μmol g respectively, whereas an amount equal to 1.73 and 1.06 μmol g was found after the treatment with a 3.0 mmol L malic acid solution. The release of As in both soils increased with increasing concentration of organic acids, and the co-release of Al and Fe in solution also increased. The sequential extraction showed that Fe/Al (oxi)hydroxides in RM were the main phases involved in As binding in RM soil. Two possible mechanisms could be responsible for As solubilization: (i) competition of the organic anions for As adsorption sites and (ii) partial dissolution of the adsorbents (e.g., dissolution of iron and aluminum oxi-hydroxides) induced by citrate or malate and formation of complexes between dissolved Fe and Al and organic anions. This is the first report on the effect of malate and citrate on the As mobility in a polluted soil treated with RM. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Malate and fumarate extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare B Edwards

    Full Text Available Malate, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle metabolite, increased lifespan and thermotolerance in the nematode C. elegans. Malate can be synthesized from fumarate by the enzyme fumarase and further oxidized to oxaloacetate by malate dehydrogenase with the accompanying reduction of NAD. Addition of fumarate also extended lifespan, but succinate addition did not, although all three intermediates activated nuclear translocation of the cytoprotective DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor and protected from paraquat-induced oxidative stress. The glyoxylate shunt, an anabolic pathway linked to lifespan extension in C. elegans, reversibly converts isocitrate and acetyl-CoA to succinate, malate, and CoA. The increased longevity provided by malate addition did not occur in fumarase (fum-1, glyoxylate shunt (gei-7, succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein (sdha-2, or soluble fumarate reductase F48E8.3 RNAi knockdown worms. Therefore, to increase lifespan, malate must be first converted to fumarate, then fumarate must be reduced to succinate by soluble fumarate reductase and the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex II. Reduction of fumarate to succinate is coupled with the oxidation of FADH2 to FAD. Lifespan extension induced by malate depended upon the longevity regulators DAF-16 and SIR-2.1. Malate supplementation did not extend the lifespan of long-lived eat-2 mutant worms, a model of dietary restriction. Malate and fumarate addition increased oxygen consumption, but decreased ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential suggesting a mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Malate also increased NADPH, NAD, and the NAD/NADH ratio. Fumarate reduction, glyoxylate shunt activity, and mild mitochondrial uncoupling likely contribute to the lifespan extension induced by malate and fumarate by increasing the amount of oxidized NAD and FAD cofactors.

  13. Action of sulphite on plant malate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, I.

    1974-01-01

    SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ acts on NAD- and NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase in several ways. Firstly, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ favours the appearance of low MW species (65000 and 39000 daltons) in Sephadex gel chromatography. Secondly, the enzyme from which is obtained by gel chromatography with dithioerythritol plus nucleotide cofactor is changed in the presence of SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/. This is indicated by the appearance of a linear reaction (instead of curvilinear), and by the abolition of the biphasic sigmoidal kinetics on varying substrate and cofactor concentrations. Thus the inhibition of initial velocity at high substrate or cofactor concentrations is even more marked than at lower ones. Thirdly, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ strongly reduces the activity in substrate saturating conditions.

  14. Soybean NADP-Malic Enzyme Functions in Malate and Citrate Metabolism and Contributes to Their Efflux under Al Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Yang, Zhenming; Xu, Yuezi; Sun, Haoran; Sun, Zhitao; Lin, Bao; Sun, Wenjing; You, Jiangfeng

    2017-01-01

    Malate accumulation has been suggested to balance Al-induced citrate synthesis and efflux in soybean roots. To test this hypothesis, characteristics of Al-induced accumulation and efflux of citrate and malate were compared between two soybean genotypes combining a functional analysis of GmME1 putatively encode a cytosolic NADP-malic enzyme. Similar amounts of citrate were released, and root elongation was equally inhibited before 8 h of Al treatment of Jiyu 70 and Jiyu 62 cultivars. Jiyu 70 began to secrete more citrate and exhibited higher Al resistance than did Jiyu 62 at 12 h. A sustained increase in internal malate and citrate concentrations was observed in Jiyu 70 at 24 h of Al treatment. However, Jiyu 62 decreased its malate concentration at 12 h and its citrate concentration at 24 h of Al treatment. GmME1 localized to the cytoplast and clustered closely with cytosolic malic enzymes AtME2 and SgME1 and was constitutively expressed in the roots. Al treatment induced higher NADP-malic enzyme activities and GmME1 expression levels in Jiyu 70 than in Jiyu 62 within 24 h. Compared with wild-type hairy roots, over-expressing GmME1 in hairy roots ( GmME1 -OE) produced higher expression levels of GmME1 but did not change the expression patterns of either of the putative citrate transporter genes GmAACT1 and GmFRDL or the malate transporter gene GmALMT1 , with or without Al treatment. GmME1 -OE showed a higher internal concentration and external efflux of both citrate and malate at 4 h of Al stress. Lighter hematoxylin staining and lower Al contents in root apices of GmME1 -OE hairy roots indicated greater Al resistance. Comprehensive experimental results suggest that sustaining Al-induced citrate efflux depends on the malate pool in soybean root apices. GmME1 encodes a cytosolic malic enzyme that contributes to increased internal malate and citrate concentrations and their external efflux to confer higher Al resistance.

  15. Soybean NADP-Malic Enzyme Functions in Malate and Citrate Metabolism and Contributes to Their Efflux under Al Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Malate accumulation has been suggested to balance Al-induced citrate synthesis and efflux in soybean roots. To test this hypothesis, characteristics of Al-induced accumulation and efflux of citrate and malate were compared between two soybean genotypes combining a functional analysis of GmME1 putatively encode a cytosolic NADP-malic enzyme. Similar amounts of citrate were released, and root elongation was equally inhibited before 8 h of Al treatment of Jiyu 70 and Jiyu 62 cultivars. Jiyu 70 began to secrete more citrate and exhibited higher Al resistance than did Jiyu 62 at 12 h. A sustained increase in internal malate and citrate concentrations was observed in Jiyu 70 at 24 h of Al treatment. However, Jiyu 62 decreased its malate concentration at 12 h and its citrate concentration at 24 h of Al treatment. GmME1 localized to the cytoplast and clustered closely with cytosolic malic enzymes AtME2 and SgME1 and was constitutively expressed in the roots. Al treatment induced higher NADP-malic enzyme activities and GmME1 expression levels in Jiyu 70 than in Jiyu 62 within 24 h. Compared with wild-type hairy roots, over-expressing GmME1 in hairy roots (GmME1-OE produced higher expression levels of GmME1 but did not change the expression patterns of either of the putative citrate transporter genes GmAACT1 and GmFRDL or the malate transporter gene GmALMT1, with or without Al treatment. GmME1-OE showed a higher internal concentration and external efflux of both citrate and malate at 4 h of Al stress. Lighter hematoxylin staining and lower Al contents in root apices of GmME1-OE hairy roots indicated greater Al resistance. Comprehensive experimental results suggest that sustaining Al-induced citrate efflux depends on the malate pool in soybean root apices. GmME1 encodes a cytosolic malic enzyme that contributes to increased internal malate and citrate concentrations and their external efflux to confer higher Al resistance.

  16. Fabrication of Si(111) crystalline thin film on graphene by aluminum-induced crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Høiaas, I. M. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kim, D. C., E-mail: dc.kim@crayonano.com, E-mail: helge.weman@ntnu.no; Weman, H., E-mail: dc.kim@crayonano.com, E-mail: helge.weman@ntnu.no [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); CrayoNano AS, Otto Nielsens vei 12, NO-7052 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-04-18

    We report the fabrication of a Si(111) crystalline thin film on graphene by the aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) process. The AIC process of Si(111) on graphene is shown to be enhanced compared to that on an amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrate, resulting in a more homogeneous Si(111) thin film structure as revealed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy measurements. Raman measurements confirm that the graphene is intact throughout the process, retaining its characteristic phonon spectrum without any appearance of the D peak. A red-shift of Raman peaks, which is more pronounced for the 2D peak, is observed in graphene after the crystallization process. It is found to correlate with the red-shift of the Si Raman peak, suggesting an epitaxial relationship between graphene and the adsorbed AIC Si(111) film with both the graphene and Si under tensile strain.

  17. Piezoresistive polysilicon film obtained by low-temperature aluminum-induced crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Suraj Kumar [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19031, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Nanotechnology Research and Teaching Facility, University of Texas at Arlington, 500 S. Cooper Street, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Celik-Butler, Zeynep, E-mail: zbutler@uta.ed [Nanotechnology Research and Teaching Facility, University of Texas at Arlington, 500 S. Cooper Street, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19072, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Butler, Donald P. [Nanotechnology Research and Teaching Facility, University of Texas at Arlington, 500 S. Cooper Street, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19072, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States)

    2010-10-29

    A low-temperature deposition process employing aluminum-induced crystallization has been developed for fabrication of piezoresistive polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) films on low cost and flexible polyimide substrates for force and pressure sensing applications. To test the piezoresistive properties of the polysilicon films, prototype pressure sensors were fabricated on surface-micromachined silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) diaphragms, in a half-Wheatstone bridge configuration. Characterization of the pressure sensor was performed using atomic force microscope in contact mode with a specially modified probe-tip. Low pressure values ranging from 5 kPa to 45 kPa were achieved by this method. The resistance change was found to be - 0.1% to 0.5% and 0.07% to 0.3% for polysilicon films obtained at 500 {sup o}C and 400 {sup o}C, respectively, for the applied pressure range.

  18. Immobilization of malate dehydrogenase on carbon nanotubes for development of malate biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhal, A; Rana, J S; Kumar, S; Kumar, A

    2012-12-22

    An amperometric malic acid biosensor was developed by immobilizing malate dehydrogenase on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) coated on screen printed carbon electrode. The screen printed carbon electrode is made up of three electrodes viz., carbon as working, platinum as counter and silver as reference electrode. Detection of L-malic acid concentration provides important information about the ripening and shelf life of the fruits. The NADP specific malate dehydrogenase was immobilized on carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes using cross linker EDC [1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide] on screen printed carbon electrode. An amperometric current was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) which increases with increasing concentrations of malic acid at fixed concentration of NADP. Enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The detection limit of malic acid by the sensor was 60 - 120 μM and sensitivity of the sensor was 60 μM with a response time of 60s. The usual detection methods of malic acid are nonspecific, time consuming and less sensitive. However, an amperometric malic acid nanosensor is quick, specific and more sensitive for detection of malic acid in test samples.

  19. Aluminum induced enzymatic disorder as an important eco biomarker in seedlings of lens culinaris medic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmat, R.; Qamar, N.; Naz, U.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the Al (Aluminum) induced disorder on the activities of nitrate and nitrite reductase (NR), protease (PA) and proline contents of seedlings of Lens culinaris as some important eco-biomarkers. The seedlings were cultured hydroponically in the nutrient solution with or without AlCl/sub 3/, 6H/sub 2/O (pH = 4.0) for 15 days. The relative toxicity of Al3+ was found to be directly related with Al concentration in the nutrient medium. The reduction in the seedlings growth may be attributed with the poor root growth which in turns related with an inhibition in the cell division. Al treatments for 15 days increased the nitrate reductase activities in the seedlings while protease activity was decreased. Increase in the proline contents may cause a substantial shield to the enzymes against the detrimental effects of the tense components Al. The essential electrolyte like sodium (Na) and potassium (K) contents were found to be decreased, accredited to the rupturing of cell membrane. These results suggest that inhibition of the root growth by Al, closely related to the metabolic changes including an increase in nitrate reductase activity and decline in proteases activity in of the seedlings. (author)

  20. Exogenous phosphatidylcholine supplementation retrieve aluminum-induced toxicity in male albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khafaga, Asmaa Fahmy

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the ameliorative potential of exogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) against aluminum-induced toxicity in male albino rats. Four groups of rats were used for this study (N = 8): group I served as the control, group II (PC treated) received L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg yolk-derived) 100 mg/kg bwt/day orally, group III (aluminum treated) received aluminum chloride 100 mg/kg bwt/day orally, and group VI (aluminum + PC treated) received similar oral dose of aluminum and PC (100 mg/kg bwt/day). Treatment was continued for 8 weeks. Results revealed that aluminum chloride treatment leading to a significant elevation in serum aspartate aminotransferase, serum alanine aminotransferase, urea, creatinine, malondialdehyde, serum cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6), and brain content of acetylcholine, as well as a significant reduction in serum-reduced glutathione, serum testosterone, and brain content of acetylcholinesterase. Moreover, aluminum administration caused significant histopathological alteration in liver, kidney, brain, testes, and epididymis. Co-treatment with exogenous PC resulted in significant improvement in intensity of histopathologic lesions, serum parameters, testosterone level, proinflammatory cytokines, and oxidative/antioxidative status. However, it does not affect the brain content of acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase. Conclusively, treatment with exogenous PC can retrieve the adverse effect of aluminum toxicities through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties.

  1. Optimal dose of zinc supplementation for preventing aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Hu, Jianyang; Li, Jing; Pang, Wei; Hu, Yandan; Yang, Hongpeng; Li, Wenjie; Huang, Chengyu; Zhang, Mingman; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-10-15

    Zinc supplementation can help maintain learning and memory function in rodents. In this study, we hypothesized that zinc supplementation could antagonize the neurotoxicity induced by aluminum in rats. Animals were fed a diet containing different doses of zinc (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) for 9 weeks, and orally administered aluminum chloride (300 mg/kg daily) from the third week for 7 consecutive weeks. Open-field behavioral test results showed that the number of rearings in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement was significantly increased compared with the group given the 50 mg/kg zinc supplement. Malondialdehyde content in the cerebrum was significantly decreased, while dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels were increased in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc, compared with the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc. The acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrum was significantly decreased in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed evident pathological damage in the hippocampus of rats in the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc, but the damage was attenuated in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc. Our findings suggest that zinc is a potential neuroprotective agent against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats, and the optimal dosages are 100 and 200 mg/kg.

  2. Naringin protects memory impairment and mitochondrial oxidative damage against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Atish; Shur, Bhargabi; Kumar, Anil

    2013-09-01

    Aluminum has been indicated in neurodegenerative disorders and naringin, a bioflavonoid has been used to reduce neurotoxic effects of aluminum against aluminum chloride-induced rats. Therefore, present study has been designed to explore the possible role of naringin against aluminum-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage in rats. Aluminum (100 mg/kg) and naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) drug treatment were administered orally for six weeks to male wistar rats. Various behavioral performance tasks, biochemical, mitochondrial oxidative parameters, and aluminum concentration in the brain were assessed. Aluminum chloride treatment significantly caused cognitive dysfunction and mitochondria oxidative damage as compared to vehicle treated control group. Besides, aluminum chloride treatment significantly increased acetyl cholinesterase activity and aluminum concentration in the brain as compared to sham. Chronic administration of naringin significantly improved cognitive performance and attenuated mitochondria oxidative damage, acetyl cholinesterase activity, and aluminum concentration in aluminum-treated rats as compared to control rats. Results of the study demonstrate neuroprotective potential of naringin against aluminum chloride-induced cognitive dysfunction and mitochondrial oxidative damage.

  3. [Informatics analysis of malate dehydrogenase from Taenia saginata asiatica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiang; Hu, Xu-Chu; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xin-Bing; Bao, Huai-En; Lang, Shu-Yuan; Liao, Xing-Jiang

    2008-06-30

    Tools from bioinformatics websites such as NCBI, ExPaSy were used for the analysis. The malate dehydrogenase full-length gene from Taenia saginata asiatica was 1 212 bp in length, with a coding region of 30-1 028 bp and coding 332 amino acids. It was a complete and full-length gene compared with the homologues in GenBank. The protein showed no transmembrane region, with stable physical-chemical characteristics. Three major linear epitopes located aa95-aa100, aa322-aa327 and aa117-aa122, with certain distance from each other on the surface of spatial structure of malate dehydrogenase (MDH). The last one was the linear epitope of Taenia. This cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene is a potential antigen for diagnosis.

  4. Enzymatic urea adaptation: lactate and malate dehydrogenase in elasmobranchs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lagana, G.; Bellocco, E.; Mannucci, C.; Leuzzi, U.; Tellone, E.; Kotyk, Arnošt; Galtieri, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2006), s. 675-688 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : elasmobranchs * lactate dehydrogenase * malate dehydrogenase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  5. An InDel in the Promoter ofAl-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER9Selected during Tomato Domestication Determines Fruit Malate Contents and Aluminum Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jie; Wang, Xin; Hu, Tixu; Zhang, Fengxia; Wang, Bing; Li, Changxin; Yang, Tianxia; Li, Hanxia; Lu, Yongen; Giovannoni, James J; Zhang, Yuyang; Ye, Zhibiao

    2017-09-01

    Deciphering the mechanism of malate accumulation in plants would contribute to a greater understanding of plant chemistry, which has implications for improving flavor quality in crop species and enhancing human health benefits. However, the regulation of malate metabolism is poorly understood in crops such as tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ). Here, we integrated a metabolite-based genome-wide association study with linkage mapping and gene functional studies to characterize the genetics of malate accumulation in a global collection of tomato accessions with broad genetic diversity. We report that TFM6 (tomato fruit malate 6), which corresponds to Al-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER9 (Sl -ALMT9 in tomato), is the major quantitative trait locus responsible for variation in fruit malate accumulation among tomato genotypes. A 3-bp indel in the promoter region of Sl -ALMT9 was linked to high fruit malate content. Further analysis indicated that this indel disrupts a W-box binding site in the Sl -ALMT9 promoter, which prevents binding of the WRKY transcription repressor Sl-WRKY42, thereby alleviating the repression of Sl -ALMT9 expression and promoting high fruit malate accumulation. Evolutionary analysis revealed that this highly expressed Sl -ALMT9 allele was selected for during tomato domestication. Furthermore, vacuole membrane-localized Sl-ALMT9 increases in abundance following Al treatment, thereby elevating malate transport and enhancing Al resistance. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  6. Malate as a key carbon source of leaf dark-respired CO2 across different environmental conditions in potato plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Rinne, Katja T.; Blessing, Carola; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Roland A.

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilation of carbon sources during plant respiration in support of metabolic processes results in the continuous release of CO2. The carbon isotopic composition of leaf dark-respired CO2 (i.e. δ 13 C R) shows daily enrichments up to 14.8‰ under different environmental conditions. However, the reasons for this 13C enrichment in leaf dark-respired CO2 are not fully understood, since daily changes in δ13C of putative leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ 13 C RS) are not yet clear. Thus, we exposed potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to different temperature and soil moisture treatments. We determined δ 13 C R with an in-tube incubation technique and δ 13 C RS with compound-specific isotope analysis during a daily cycle. The highest δ 13 C RS values were found in the organic acid malate under different environmental conditions, showing less negative values compared to δ 13 C R (up to 5.2‰) and compared to δ 13 C RS of soluble carbohydrates, citrate and starch (up to 8.8‰). Moreover, linear relationships between δ 13 C R and δ 13 C RS among different putative carbon sources were strongest for malate during daytime (r2=0.69, P≤0.001) and nighttime (r2=0.36, P≤0.001) under all environmental conditions. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed δ 13 C RS of malate as the most important carbon source influencing δ 13 C R. Thus, our results strongly indicate malate as a key carbon source of 13C enriched dark-respired CO2 in potato plants, probably driven by an anapleurotic flux replenishing intermediates of the Krebs cycle. PMID:26139821

  7. Metabolic fate of the carboxyl groups of malate and pyruvate and their influence on δ13C of leaf respired CO2 during light enhanced dark respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco M Lehmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR, is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ13CLEDR. The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ13CLEDR, we fed position-specific 13C-labelled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ13CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively. During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf 13CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the 13C allocation to metabolic fractions during light-dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ13CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the 13CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, 13C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ13CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ13CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate.

  8. An InDel in the promoter of Al-activated malate transporter 9 selected during tomato domestication determines fruit malate content and aluminum tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deciphering the mechanism of malate accumulation in plants would contribute to a greater understanding of plant chemistry, which has implications for improving flavor quality in crop species and enhancing human health benefits. However, the regulation of malate metabolism is poorly understood in cro...

  9. Directed evolution of thermotolerant malic enzyme for improved malate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yumi; Honda, Kohsuke; Ye, Xiaoting; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2014-02-01

    The directed evolution of the thermotolerant NADP(H)-dependent malic enzyme from Thermococcus kodakarensis was conducted to alter the cofactor preference of the enzyme from NADP(H) to NAD(H). The construction and screening of two generations of mutant libraries led to the isolation of a triple mutant that exhibited 6-fold higher kcat/Km with NAD(+) than the wild type. We serendipitously found that, in addition to the change in the cofactor preference, the reaction specificity of the mutant enzyme was altered. The reductive carboxylation of pyruvate to malate catalyzed by the wild type enzyme is accompanied by HCO(3)(-)-independent reduction of pyruvate and gives lactate as a byproduct. The reaction specificity of the triple mutant was significantly shifted to malate production and the mutant gave a less amount of the byproduct than the wild type. When the triple mutant enzyme was used as a catalyst for pyruvate carboxylation with NADH, the enzyme gave 1.2 times higher concentration of malate than the wild type with NADPH. Single-point mutation analysis revealed that the substitution of Arg221 with Gly is responsible for the shift in reaction specificity. This finding may shed light on the catalytic mechanisms of malic enzymes and other related CO2- and/or HCO(3)(-)-fixing enzymes. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. N-acetyl-L-tryptophan, a substance-P receptor antagonist attenuates aluminum-induced spatial memory deficit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Joylee; Mudgal, Jayesh; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Arora, Devinder; Basu Mallik, Sanchari; Pai, K S R; Nampoothiri, Madhavan

    2018-06-01

    Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Neurokinin substance P is a key mediator which modulates neuroinflammation through neurokinin receptor. Involvement of substance P in Alzheimer's disease is still plausible and various controversies exist in this hypothesis. Preventing the deleterious effects of substance P using N-acetyl-L-tryptophan, a substance P antagonist could be a promising therapeutic strategy. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan on aluminum induced spatial memory alterations in rats. Memory impairment was induced using aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 42 d. After induction of dementia, rats were exposed to 30 and 50 mg/kg of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan for 28 d. Spatial memory alterations were measured using Morris water maze. Acetylcholinesterase activity and antioxidant enzyme glutathione level were assessed in hippocampus, frontal cortex and striatum. The higher dose of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan (50 mg/kg) significantly improved the aluminum induced memory alterations. N-acetyl-L-tryptophan exposure resulted in significant increase in acetylcholinesterase activity and glutathione level in hippocampus. The neuroprotective effect of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan could be due to its ability to block substance P mediated neuroinflammation, reduction in oxidative stress and anti-apoptotic properties. To conclude, N-acetyl-L-tryptophan may be considered as a novel neuroprotective therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Multiple strategies to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis plants lacking the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbelmann, Inga; Selinski, Jennifer; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Goss, Tatjana; Voss, Ingo; Mulo, Paula; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Do, Phuc T.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Talla, Sai K.; Raghavendra, Agepati S.; Linke, Vera; Scheibe, Renate

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) is a key enzyme controlling the malate valve, to allow the indirect export of reducing equivalents. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. T-DNA insertion mutants of NADP-MDH were used to assess the role of the light-activated NADP-MDH in a typical C3 plant. Surprisingly, even when exposed to high-light conditions in short days, nadp-mdh knockout mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. The photosynthetic performance and typical antioxidative systems, such as the Beck–Halliwell–Asada pathway, were barely affected in the mutants in response to high-light treatment. The reactive oxygen species levels remained low, indicating the apparent absence of oxidative stress, in the mutants. Further analysis revealed a novel combination of compensatory mechanisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis in the nadp-mdh plants under high-light conditions, particularly an increase in the NTRC/2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) system in chloroplasts. There were indications of adjustments in extra-chloroplastic components of photorespiration and proline levels, which all could dissipate excess reducing equivalents, sustain photosynthesis, and prevent photoinhibition in nadp-mdh knockout plants. Such metabolic flexibility suggests that the malate valve acts in concert with other NADPH-consuming reactions to maintain a balanced redox state during photosynthesis under high-light stress in wild-type plants. PMID:22140244

  12. Altered Expression of the Malate-Permeable Anion Channel OsALMT4 Reduces the Growth of Rice Under Low Radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the function of OsALMT4 in rice (Oryza sativa L. which is a member of the aluminum-activated malate transporter family. Previous studies showed that OsALMT4 localizes to the plasma membrane and that expression in transgenic rice lines results in a constitutive release of malate from the roots. Here, we show that OsALMT4 is expressed widely in roots, shoots, flowers, and grain but not guard cells. Expression was also affected by ionic and osmotic stress, light and to the hormones ABA, IAA, and salicylic acid. Malate efflux from the transgenic plants over-expressing OsALMT4 was inhibited by niflumate and salicylic acid. Growth of transgenic lines with either increased OsALMT4 expression or reduced expression was measured in different environments. Light intensity caused significant differences in growth between the transgenic lines and controls. When day-time light was reduced from 700 to 300 μmol m-2s-1 independent transgenic lines with either increased or decreased OsALMT4 expression accumulated less biomass compared to their null controls. This response was not associated with differences in photosynthetic capacity, stomatal conductance or sugar concentrations in tissues. We propose that by disrupting malate fluxes across the plasma membrane carbon partitioning and perhaps signaling are affected which compromises growth under low light. We conclude that OsALMT4 is expressed widely in rice and facilitates malate efflux from different cell types. Altering OsALMT4 expression compromises growth in low-light environments.

  13. Reassessment of the transhydrogenase/malate shunt pathway in Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 through kinetic characterization of malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, M; Rydzak, T; Levin, D B; Oresnik, I J; Sparling, R

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum produces ethanol as one of its major end products from direct fermentation of cellulosic biomass. Therefore, it is viewed as an attractive model for the production of biofuels via consolidated bioprocessing. However, a better understanding of the metabolic pathways, along with their putative regulation, could lead to improved strategies for increasing the production of ethanol. In the absence of an annotated pyruvate kinase in the genome, alternate means of generating pyruvate have been sought. Previous proteomic and transcriptomic work detected high levels of a malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme, which may be used as part of a malate shunt for the generation of pyruvate from phosphoenolpyruvate. The purification and characterization of the malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme are described in order to elucidate their putative roles in malate shunt and their potential role in C. thermocellum metabolism. The malate dehydrogenase catalyzed the reduction of oxaloacetate to malate utilizing NADH or NADPH with a kcat of 45.8 s(-1) or 14.9 s(-1), respectively, resulting in a 12-fold increase in catalytic efficiency when using NADH over NADPH. The malic enzyme displayed reversible malate decarboxylation activity with a kcat of 520.8 s(-1). The malic enzyme used NADP(+) as a cofactor along with NH4 (+) and Mn(2+) as activators. Pyrophosphate was found to be a potent inhibitor of malic enzyme activity, with a Ki of 0.036 mM. We propose a putative regulatory mechanism of the malate shunt by pyrophosphate and NH4 (+) based on the characterization of the malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Safety Assessment of Dialkyl Malates as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 6 dialkyl malate compounds used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as skin-conditioning agents-emollients. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the ingredients along with a previous safety assessment of malic acid. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these dialkyl maleate compounds are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Ajay K

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alteration of glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Results Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and γ-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate α-decarboxylase and γ-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. Conclusion The alterations of regional brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders.

  16. Expression of six malate-related genes in pulp during the fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Partial cDNAs encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), cytosolic NAD-malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH), mitochondrial NAD-malate dehydrogenase (mNAD-MDH), tonoplast adenosinetriphosphatase subunit A (V-ATPase A) and tonoplast pyrophosphatase (V-PPiase) ...

  17. Development of antimigraine transdermal delivery systems of pizotifen malate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Jiménez, C E; del Rio-Sancho, S; Calatayud-Pascual, M A; Balaguer-Fernández, C; Femenía-Font, A; López-Castellano, A; Merino, V

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a transdermal delivery system of pizotifen malate. Pizotifen is frequently used in the preventive treatment of migraine, but is also indicated in eating disorders. In the course of the project, the effects of chemical enhancers such as ethanol, 1,8-cineole, limonene, azone and different fatty acids (decanoic, decenoic, dodecanoic, linoleic and oleic acids) were determined, first using a pizotifen solution. Steady state flux, diffusion and partition parameters were estimated by fitting the Scheuplein equation to the data obtained. Among the chemical enhancers studied, decenoic acid showed the highest enhancement activity, which seemed to be due to the length of its alkyl chain and unsaturation at the 9th carbon. The influence of iontophoresis and the involvement of electrotransport in said process was determined. The absorption profile obtained with iontophoresis was similar to that obtained with fatty acids and terpenes, though skin deposition of the drug was lower with the former. Transdermal delivery systems (TDS) of pizotifen were manufactured by including chemical enhancers, decenoic acid or oleic acid, and were subsequently characterized. When the results obtained with solutions were compared with those obtained with the TDS, a positive enhancement effect was observed with the latter with respect to the partitioning and diffusion of the drug across the skin. Our findings endorse the suitability of our TDS for delivering therapeutic amounts of pizotifen malate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 regulates endothelial cell function and vessel growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Katharina M; You, Xintian; Manavski, Yosif; Doddaballapur, Anuradha; Zörnig, Martin; Braun, Thomas; John, David; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Chen, Wei; Uchida, Shizuka; Boon, Reinier A; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2014-04-25

    The human genome harbors a large number of sequences encoding for RNAs that are not translated but control cellular functions by distinct mechanisms. The expression and function of the longer transcripts namely the long noncoding RNAs in the vasculature are largely unknown. Here, we characterized the expression of long noncoding RNAs in human endothelial cells and elucidated the function of the highly expressed metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1). Endothelial cells of different origin express relative high levels of the conserved long noncoding RNAs MALAT1, taurine upregulated gene 1 (TUG1), maternally expressed 3 (MEG3), linc00657, and linc00493. MALAT1 was significantly increased by hypoxia and controls a phenotypic switch in endothelial cells. Silencing of MALAT1 by small interfering RNAs or GapmeRs induced a promigratory response and increased basal sprouting and migration, whereas proliferation of endothelial cells was inhibited. When angiogenesis was further stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor, MALAT1 small interfering RNAs induced discontinuous sprouts indicative of defective proliferation of stalk cells. In vivo studies confirmed that genetic ablation of MALAT1 inhibited proliferation of endothelial cells and reduced neonatal retina vascularization. Pharmacological inhibition of MALAT1 by GapmeRs reduced blood flow recovery and capillary density after hindlimb ischemia. Gene expression profiling followed by confirmatory quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that silencing of MALAT1 impaired the expression of various cell cycle regulators. Silencing of MALAT1 tips the balance from a proliferative to a migratory endothelial cell phenotype in vitro, and its genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition reduces vascular growth in vivo.

  19. Improving the Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Aluminum Induced Polysilicon Thin Films Using Silicon Nitride Capping Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hang Weng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the capping layer effect of SiNx (silicon nitride on the microstructure, electrical, and optical properties of poly-Si (polycrystalline silicon prepared by aluminum induced crystallization (AIC. The primary multilayer structure comprised Al (30 nm/SiNx (20 nm/a-Si (amorphous silicon layer (100 nm/ITO coated glass and was then annealed in a low annealing temperature of 350°C with different annealing times, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. The crystallization properties were analyzed and verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectra. The grain growth was analyzed via optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The improved electrical properties such as Hall mobility, resistivity, and dark conductivity were investigated by using Hall and current-voltage (I-V measurements. The results show that the amorphous silicon film has been effectively induced even at a low temperature of 350°C and a short annealing time of 15 min and indicate that the SiNx capping layer can improve the grain growth and reduce the metal content in the induced poly-Si film. It is found that the large grain size is over 20 μm and the carrier mobility values are over 80 cm2/V-s.

  20. Effect of Malate-oligosaccharide Solution on Antioxidant Capacity of Endurance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Fu

    2015-01-01

    L-malate is an important intermediate on the process of metabolism; it plays an important role in generating mitochondria ATP both under aerobic and hypoxic condition. It is easy to be absorbed and come into mitochondrion through cell membrane and promote to produce energy in mitochondrion. The purpose of this investigation is to probe into the different influence malate ingestion on blood lactate and glucose kinetics during aerobic exercise athletes; at the same time, rats were used to study the effect of malate and oligosaccharide solution on the metabolism in muscle and liver. The supplement of malate-oligosaccharide solution may improve the level of antioxidants in vivo after exercise, and subsequently increase the total antioxidant capacity and decrease the level of lipid peroxidation. At the appropriate time sports drinks can add varying degrees of motion to extend time to fatigue enhance athletic ability, speed up the recovery process after exercise, reduce fatigue.

  1. Photosynthetic metabolism of malate and aspartate in Flaveria trinervia a C4 dicot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    C 4 species are known to vary in their apparent relative use of malate and aspartate to mediate carbon flux through the C 4 cycle. These studies investigate some of the adjustments in photosynthetic carbon metabolism that occur during a dark to light transition and during expansion of leaves of Flaveria trinervia, a C 4 dicot. Enzyme localization studies with isolated leaf mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts, indicated that both C 4 acids are formed in the mesophyll chloroplast, and that aspartate is metabolized to malate in the bundle sheath chloroplast prior to decaroxylation there. During photosynthetic induction, the partitioning of 14 CO 2 between malate and aspartate showed a single oscillation of increased aspartate labelling after 5 min of illumination. Turnover of [4-14C] (malate plus aspartate) was slow initially during illumination, prior to establishment of active pools of C 4 cycle metabolites

  2. Processes of malate catabolism during the anaerobic metabolism of grape berries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanzy, C.; Andre, P.; Buret, M.; Chambroy, Y.; Garcia, P.

    1976-01-01

    In order to precise malate fate during the anaerobic metabolism of grape, malate- 3 - 14 C was injected into Carignan berries kept in darkness at 35 0 C under carbon dioxide atmosphere. The injection of labelled malate was effected in presence or not of non-labelled oxalate which inhibits malic enzyme (EC I.I.I.40). The analyses of the samples fixed after 3 and 7 days anaerobiosis concerned the titration of various substrates, organic acids, amino-acids and glycolysis products, and the measuring of the NADP + -malic enzyme (EC I.I.I.40) and malate dehydrogenase (EC I.I.I.40). Radioactivity is mainly observed in ethanol, amino-butyrate the non-separated group glycerate-shikimate and succinate. Malic enzyme acts in the first sequence of a process leading from malate to ethanol. Alanin synthesis seems to be stimulated in presence of oxalate. The results obtained and some hypotheses presented in the literature induce to suggest a utilization scheme for malate in the anaerobic metabolism of grape [fr

  3. Prognostic value of long non-coding RNA MALAT1 in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yihua; Lu, Wei; Xu, Jinming; Shi, Yu; Zhang, Honghe; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) was identified to be the first long non-coding RNA as a biomarker of independent prognostic value for early stage non-small cell lung cancer patient survival. In recent years, the association between upregulated tissue MALAT1 level and incidence of various cancers including bladder cancer, colorectal cancer, and renal cancer has been widely discussed. The aim of our present study was to assess the potential prognostic value of MALAT1 in various human cancers. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched, and eligible studies evaluating the prognostic value of MALAT1 in various cancers were included. Finally, 11 studies encompassing 1216 participants reporting with sufficient data were enrolled in the current meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) was 2.05 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.64-2.55, p < 0.01) for overall survival (OS) and 2.66 (95 % CI 1.86-3.80, p < 0.01) for disease-free survival (DFS). In conclusion, high tissue MALAT1 level was associated with an inferior clinical outcome in various cancers, suggesting that MALAT1 might serve as a potential prognostic biomarker for various cancers.

  4. Multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Geophagus brasiliensis (Cichlidae, Perciformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino-Silva Maria Regina de

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent locus duplication hypothesis for sMDH-B* was proposed to explain the complex electrophoretic pattern of six bands detected for the soluble form of malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 in 84% of the Geophagus brasiliensis (Cichlidae, Perciformes analyzed (AB1B2 individuals. Klebe's serial dilutions were carried out in skeletal muscle extracts. B1 and B2 subunits had the same visual end-points, reflecting a nondivergent pattern for these B-duplicated genes. Since there is no evidence of polyploidy in the Cichlidae family, MDH-B* loci must have evolved from regional gene duplication. Tissue specificities, thermostability and kinetic tests resulted in similar responses from both B-isoforms, in both sMDH phenotypes, suggesting that these more recently duplicated loci underwent the same regulatory gene action. Similar results obtained with the two sMDH phenotypes did not show any indication of a six-banded specimen adaptive advantage in subtropical regions.

  5. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 as a potential novel biomarker in digestive system cancers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Run J; Zou, Shu B

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a newly discovered long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), has been reported to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, the clinical value of MALAT1 in digestive system cancers is unclear. This study was designed to investigate the potential value of MALAT1 as a prognostic biomarker in digestive system cancers. We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. All studies that explored the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors were selected. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed for the correlation between lncRNA MALAT1 expression and survival in digestive system tumors. Five studies were eligible for analysis, which included 547 patients. Meta-analysis showed that high expression of MALAT1 could predict poor overall survival (OS) in digestive system cancers (pooled HR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.41-2.43, Pdigestive system cancers.

  6. PHALLONOPTIC MALATE: A CRITICAL GAZE AT SPACE, VISUAL CULTURE AND PERFORMANCE IN THE STREETS OF OROSA AND BOCOBO, MALATE, MANILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clod Marlan Krister V. Yambao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phallonopticism comes from the confluence of the term “phallus” and “panopticon.” I define Phallonotpicism as the configuration of gaze, power and desires specific to but not limited to male performances. By utilizing the term phallonopticism as a heuristic category for analysis, this paper attempts to analyze how Malate’s urban spaces of consumption are gendered. It attempts to map the topography of male homosocial intersubjectivities and the production of desire, power and gaze through male performances, visual culture and structures. Orosa Street is known as the GLTB consumption district of Malate while just a block away, is Bocobo Street, where a “straight” and “heterosexual” male population dwell. The dominance of male homosociality along the said streets has been established through research findings from 2002 - 2009. Through the confluence of political- economic discourse and psychoanalysis this paper will argue that Malate’s urban spaces inform the male subject construction and formation. Furthermore, male homosocialities in both streets activate the production and consumption of gendered spatial politics through complex forms of surveillance, discipline, resistance, and subversion from its stakeholders such as state institutions, the market and Malate’s public.

  7. Knockdown of MALAT1 enhances chemosensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin through inhibiting the Notch1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lin; Wang, Aihua; Zhang, Yali; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiao

    2018-05-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are critical regulators in chemoresistance of various tumors including ovarian cancer. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) has been reported to be upregulated and contributed to ovarian cancer tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the roles of MALAT1 and the underlying molecular regulatory mechanism in the chemoresistance of ovarian cancer cells. Our data demonstrated that MALAT1 and Notch1 mRNA were upregulated in ovarian cancer tissues, as well as cisplatin (CDDP)-resistant ovarian cancer cells. A positive correlation between MALAT1 and Notch1 mRNA expression was observed. MALAT1 knockdown significantly attenuated CDDP resistance, and enhanced CDDP-induced apoptosis in CDDP-resistant ovarian cancer cells. MALAT1 knockdown enhanced CDDP-induced apoptosis in vivo, as indicated by upregulation of Bax protein expression and downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. Additionally, MALAT1 knockdown inhibited the Notch1 pathway and ABCC1 expression in CDDP-resistant ovarian cancer cells. MALAT1 was demonstrated to interact with Notch1. Notch1 knockdown attenuated CDDP resistance, and downregulated the protein expression of ABCC1 in ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, our findings suggested that knockdown of MALAT-1 enhanced chemosensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to CDDP through inhibiting Notch1 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transfer of label from aspartate to malate by the cell-free extract of Sedum mexicanum leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagasa, Tadashi; Yoshida, Seiichi

    1979-01-01

    The cell-free extract from the leaves of Sedum mexicanum, a typical CAM plant, formed 14 C-malate from 14 C-aspartate in the presence of NAD. No reduction of NAD was observed during the reaction. Analysis of this reaction revealed that the transfer of label from 14 C-aspartate to malate took place by the action of malate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase, and the reaction was reversible in the model experiment with commercial enzymes. The pitfalls in assessing the data on dark 14 CO 2 fixation in CAM are discussed with reference to the transfer of label between malate and aspartate without actual synthesis. (Kaihara, S.)

  9. Identification and Characterization of a Class of MALAT1-like Genomic Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The MALAT1 (Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 gene encodes a noncoding RNA that is processed into a long nuclear retained transcript (MALAT1 and a small cytoplasmic tRNA-like transcript (mascRNA. Using an RNA sequence- and structure-based covariance model, we identified more than 130 genomic loci in vertebrate genomes containing the MALAT1 3′ end triple-helix structure and its immediate downstream tRNA-like structure, including 44 in the green lizard Anolis carolinensis. Structural and computational analyses revealed a co-occurrence of components of the 3′ end module. MALAT1-like genes in Anolis carolinensis are highly expressed in adult testis, thus we named them testis-abundant long noncoding RNAs (tancRNAs. MALAT1-like loci also produce multiple small RNA species, including PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs, from the antisense strand. The 3′ ends of tancRNAs serve as potential targets for the PIWI-piRNA complex. Thus, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs with similar structural constraints, post-transcriptional processing, and subcellular localization and a distinct function in spermatocytes.

  10. Malate and Aspartate Increase L-Arginine and Nitric Oxide and Attenuate Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entai Hou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fumarase catalyzes the interconversion of fumarate and L-malate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Dahl salt-sensitive (SS rat, a model of salt-sensitive hypertension, exhibits fumarase insufficiencies. To investigate the mechanism mediating the effect of fumarase-related metabolites on hypertension, we considered the pathway in which L-malate can be converted to oxaloacetate, aspartate, argininosuccinate, and L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide (NO synthase. The levels of aspartate, citrulline, L-arginine, and NO were significantly decreased in the kidneys of SS rats compared to salt-insensitive consomic SS.13BN rats. Knockdown of fumarase in human kidney cells and vascular endothelial cells resulted in decreased levels of malate, aspartate, L-arginine, and NO. Supplementation of aspartate or malate increased renal levels of L-arginine and NO and attenuated hypertension in SS rats. These findings reveal a multi-step metabolic pathway important for hypertension in which malate and aspartate may modulate blood pressure by altering levels of L-arginine and NO.

  11. Malate and Aspartate Increase L-Arginine and Nitric Oxide and Attenuate Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Entai; Sun, Na; Zhang, Fuchang; Zhao, Chenyang; Usa, Kristie; Liang, Mingyu; Tian, Zhongmin

    2017-05-23

    Fumarase catalyzes the interconversion of fumarate and L-malate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat, a model of salt-sensitive hypertension, exhibits fumarase insufficiencies. To investigate the mechanism mediating the effect of fumarase-related metabolites on hypertension, we considered the pathway in which L-malate can be converted to oxaloacetate, aspartate, argininosuccinate, and L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide (NO) synthase. The levels of aspartate, citrulline, L-arginine, and NO were significantly decreased in the kidneys of SS rats compared to salt-insensitive consomic SS.13 BN rats. Knockdown of fumarase in human kidney cells and vascular endothelial cells resulted in decreased levels of malate, aspartate, L-arginine, and NO. Supplementation of aspartate or malate increased renal levels of L-arginine and NO and attenuated hypertension in SS rats. These findings reveal a multi-step metabolic pathway important for hypertension in which malate and aspartate may modulate blood pressure by altering levels of L-arginine and NO. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prognostic value of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 in digestive system malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hui; Li, Xiao-Mei; Maimaiti, Ailifeire; Chen, Qing-Jie; Liao, Wu; Lai, Hong-Mei; Liu, Fen; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2015-01-01

    MALAT1, a newly discovered long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), has been reported to be highly expressed in many types of cancers. This meta-analysis summarizes its potential prognostic value in digestive system malignancies. A quantitative meta-analysis was performed through a systematic search in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) for eligible papers on the prognostic impact of MALAT1 in digestive system malignancies from inception to Apr. 25, 2015. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated to summarize the effect. Five studies were included in the study, with a total of 527 patients. A significant association was observed between MALAT1 abundance and poor overall survival (OS) of patients with digestive system malignancies, with pooled hazard ratio (HR) of 7.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.32-13.66, Pdigestive system malignancies.

  13. Evaluating the potential role of pomegranate peel in aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological alterations in brain of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2012-12-01

    Studies have shown that pomegranate, Punica granatum Linn. (Lythraceae), has remarkable biological and medicinal properties. However, the effects of pomegranate peel methanolic extract (PPME) on the aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological change have not been reported yet. To determine the effect of PPME (200 mg/kg bwt) on the aluminum chloride (AlCl₃; 34 mg/kg bwt)-induced neurotoxicity, aluminum accumulation in brain and oxidant/antioxidant status were determined. The change of brain structure was investigated with hematoxylin and eosin, and anti-apoptosis effects of PPME were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The present study showed an indication of carcinogenicity in the AlCl₃-treated group representing an increase in tissue tumor markers such as tumor necrosis factor-α and angiogenin and inflammation by inducing an increase in prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2α. PPME protected brain through decreasing the aluminum accumulation and stimulating antioxidant activities and anti-apoptotic proteins namely Bcl-2. Therefore, these results indicated that pomegranate peel methanolic extract could inhibit aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological alternations in brain of female rats, and these effects may be related to anti-apoptotic and antioxidants activities.

  14. Permeabilization and lysis of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes cells by triton X-100 for efficient production of D-malate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, M.J. van der; Hartmans, S.; Tweel, W.J.J. van den

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes can only form d-malate from maleate after incubation of the cells with a solvent or a detergent. The effect of the detergent Triton X-100 on d-malate production was studied in more detail. The longer the cells were incubated with Triton X-100, the higher was the

  15. FUNCTIONAL-ANALYSIS OF THE N-TERMINAL PREPEPTIDES OF WATERMELON MITOCHONDRIAL AND GLYOXYSOMAL MALATE-DEHYDROGENASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEHNERER, M; KEIZERGUNNIK, [No Value; VEENHUIS, M; GIETL, C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial and glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; gMDH; L-malate : NAD(+) oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.37) of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) cotyledons are synthesized with N-terminal cleavable presequences which are shown to specify sorting of the two proteins. The two presequences differ in

  16. Mutational analysis of the N-terminal topogenic signal of watermelon glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase using the heterologous host Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietl, Christine; Faber, Klaas Nico; Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the significance of the N-terminal presequence of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase [gMDH; (S)-malate:NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.37] in microbody targeting. The yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as heterologous host for the in vivo expression of

  17. L-malate enhances the gene expression of carried proteins and antioxidant enzymes in liver of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X; Wu, J; Wu, Q; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory reported L-malate as a free radical scavenger in aged rats. To investigate the antioxidant mechanism of L-malate in the mitochondria, we analyzed the change in gene expression of two malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS)-related carried proteins (AGC, aspartate/glutamate carrier and OMC, oxoglutarate/malate carrier) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and three antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px) in the mitochondria. The changes in gene expression of these proteins and enzymes were examined by real-time RT-PCR in the heart and liver of aged rats treated with L-malate. L-malate was orally administered in rats continuously for 30 days using a feeding atraumatic needle. We found that the gene expression of OMC and GSH-Px mRNA in the liver increased by 39 % and 38 %, respectively, in the 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment group than that in the control group. The expression levels of SOD mRNA in the liver increased by 39 %, 56 %, and 78 % in the 0.105, 0.210, and 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment groups, respectively. No difference were observed in the expression levels of AGC, OMC, CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px mRNAs in the heart of rats between the L-malate treatment and control groups. These results predicted that L-malate may increase the antioxidant capacity of mitochondria by enhancing the expression of mRNAs involved in the MAS and the antioxidant enzymes.

  18. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  19. Utilization of L-aspartate, L-malate and fumarate by Pasteurella multocida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, M.; Flossmann, K.D. (Akademie der Landwirtschaftswissenschaften der DDR, Jena. Inst. fuer Bakterielle Tierseuchenforschung)

    1981-01-01

    Strains of Pasteurella multocida use L-aspartate, L-malate and furmarate, respectively, as substrates for production of succinic acid which accumulates in the medium. As was established by studies with /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labelled substrates, the degradation of these substances proceeds analogously via the citric acid cycle.

  20. Occurrence of the malate-aspartate shuttle in various tumor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1976-04-01

    The activity of the malate-aspartate shuttle for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by mitochondria was assessed in six lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, Krebs II carcinoma, Novikoff hepatoma, AS-30D hepatoma, and L1210 mouse leukemia). All the tumor cells examined showed mitochondrial reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH, as evidenced by the accumulation of pyruvate when the cells were incubated aerobically with L-lactate. Reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH thus generated was completely inhibited by the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate. The involvement of the respiratory chain in the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH was demonstrated by the action of cyanide, rotenone, and antimycin A, which strongly inhibited the formation of pyruvate from added L-lactate. Compounds that inhibit the carrier-mediated entry of malate into mitochondria, such as butylmalonate, benzenetricarboxylate, and iodobenzylmalonate, also inhibited the accumulation of pyruvate from added L-lactate by the tumor cells. The maximal rate of the malate-aspartate shuttle was established by addtion of arsenite to inhibit the mitochondrial oxidation of the pyruvate formed from added lactate. The capacity of the various tumor lines for the reoxidation of cytoplasmic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle approaches 20% of the total respiratory rate of the cells and thus appears to be sufficient to account for the mitochondrial reoxidation of that fraction of glycolytic NADH not reoxidized by pyruvate and lactate dehydrognenase in the cytoplasm.

  1. Watermelon glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase is sorted to peroxisomes of the methylotrophic yeast, Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, I.J. van der; Faber, K.N.; Keizer-Gunnink, I.; Gietl, C.; Harder, W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the fate of the watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad.) glyoxysomal enzyme, malate dehydrogenase (gMDH), after synthesis in the methylotrophic yeast, Hansenula polymorpha. The gene encoding the precursor form of gMDH (pre-gMDH) was cloned in an H. polymorpha expression vector

  2. Gastroblastoma harbors a recurrent somatic MALAT1-GLI1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rondell P; Nair, Asha A; Davila, Jaime I; Jin, Long; Jen, Jin; Sukov, William R; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Appelman, Henry D; Torres-Mora, Jorge; Perry, Kyle D; Zhang, Lizhi; Kloft-Nelson, Sara M; Knudson, Ryan A; Greipp, Patricia T; Folpe, Andrew L

    2017-10-01

    Gastroblastoma is a rare distinctive biphasic tumor of the stomach. The molecular biology of gastroblastoma has not been studied, and no affirmative diagnostic markers have been developed. We retrieved two gastroblastomas from the consultation practices of the authors and performed transcriptome sequencing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Recurrent predicted fusion genes were validated at genomic and RNA levels. The presence of the fusion gene was confirmed on two additional paraffin-embedded cases of gastroblastoma. Control cases of histologic mimics (biphasic synovial sarcoma, leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, desmoid-type fibromatosis, EWSR1-FLI1-positive Ewing sarcoma, Wilms' tumor, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, plexiform fibromyxoma, Sonic hedgehog-type medulloblastomas, and normal gastric mucosa and muscularis propria were also analyzed. The gastroblastomas affected two males and two females aged 9-56 years. Transcriptome sequencing identified recurrent somatic MALAT1-GLI1 fusion genes, which were predicted to retain the key domains of GLI1. The MALAT1-GLI1 fusion gene was validated by break-apart and dual-fusion FISH and RT-PCR. The additional two gastroblastomas were also positive for the MALAT1-GLI1 fusion gene. None of the other control cases harbored MALAT1-GLI1. Overexpression of GLI1 in the cases of gastroblastomas was confirmed at RNA and protein levels. Pathway analysis revealed activation of the Sonic hedgehog pathway in gastroblastoma and gene expression profiling showed that gastroblastomas grouped together and were most similar to Sonic hedgehog-type medulloblastomas. In summary, we have identified an oncogenic MALAT1-GLI1 fusion gene in all cases of gastroblastoma that may serve as a diagnostic biomarker. The fusion gene is predicted to encode a protein that includes the zinc finger domains of GLI1 and results in overexpression of GLI1 protein and activation of the Sonic hedgehog pathway.

  3. miR-200c suppresses endometriosis by targeting MALAT1 in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongwen Liang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endometriosis is a common, benign, and estrogen-dependent disease characterized by pelvic pain and infertility. To date, the pathogenesis of endometriosis remains unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated that noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, play important roles in the development of endometriosis. Methods Expression profiling of miRNAs in endometrial tissue was characterized using microarrays. The most differentially expressed miRNAs were confirmed using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis in additional ectopic endometrial (n = 27 and normal endometrial (n = 12 tissues. For in-vitro functional studies, 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation assay, Transwell assay, and dual-luciferase reporter assay were used to measure the proliferation, migration, and luciferase activity of miR-200c and the predicted targets of miR-200c in primary endometrial stromal cells (HESCs derived from human endometrial biopsies, respectively. For in-vivo therapeutic interventions, polymeric nanoparticles of polyethylenimine–polyethylene glycol–arginine–glycine–aspartic acid were used for delivery of miR-200c mimic and inhibitor to determine the therapeutic effect of miR-200c in a rat model of endometriosis. Results Exogenous overexpression of miR-200c inhibited the proliferation and migration of HESCs, which were mainly regulated by metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1. In contrast, inhibition of miR-200c promoted the proliferation and migration of HESCs, while the simultaneous silencing of MALAT1 expression exerted the opposite effects. We demonstrated that expression of MALAT1 in ectopic endometrial specimens was negatively correlated with that of miR-200c and that MALAT1 knockdown increased the level of miR-200c in HESCs. Moreover, the transfection of endometrial stromal cells with the miR-200c mimic or MALAT1 siRNAs decreased the protein

  4. Red Clover HCT2, a Hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A:Malate Hydroxycinnamoyl Transferase, Plays a Crucial Role in Biosynthesis of Phaselic Acid and Other Hydroxycinnamoyl-Malate Esters in Vivo1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael L.; Zarnowski, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves, phaselic acid (2-O-caffeoyl-l-malate) accumulates to several mmol kg−1 fresh weight and is a crucial component of a natural system that prevents protein breakdown during harvest and storage of this forage crop. Previously, we identified HCT2, a red clover gene encoding a hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) hydroxycinnamoyl transferase capable of transferring p-coumaroyl and caffeoyl moieties from their CoA derivatives to malic acid to form the corresponding hydroxycinnamoyl-malate esters in vitro. Here, we carried out a detailed kinetic analysis of the enzyme and examined its in vivo function in red clover via reverse genetics. The kinetic analysis indicates that in vitro, despite similar Km values for the tested hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA derivatives, HCT2 favors transfer to malate of p-coumaroyl and feruloyl moieties over caffeoyl moieties by greater than 5-fold. Reverse reaction (transfer of hydroxycinnamoyl moieties from malate to CoA) by HCT2 was observed with p-coumaroyl-malate but not phaselic acid. Analysis of red clover plants down-regulated for HCT2 expression via RNA interference showed a significant and substantial correlation between HCT2 mRNA levels and phaselic acid accumulation (P plants, phaselic acid and p-coumaroyl-malate levels were reduced to plants. PMID:21205620

  5. A pH Control System Based on Malate Decarboxylation for the Cultivation of Lactic Acid Bacteria †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeschel, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Most species of lactic acid bacteria decarboxylate l-malate to lactate and CO2 if an energy source such as glucose is present. A proton is taken up in the reaction, which prevents pH decreases in the growth medium caused by lactic acid production from glucose fermentation. MRS broth (pH 7.0) (Difco Laboratories) containing 10 mM glucose and various concentrations of l-malate (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mM) was used to cultivate Lactobacillus plantarum. After 72 h at 37°C, all malate was decarboxylated and all glucose was fermented, with resultant final pH values of 4.5, 6.3, 6.9, 7.3, and 7.5, respectively. When d-malate (which cannot be decarboxylated) was substituted for l-malate, the final pH values were 4.5, 5.2, 5.6, 5.8, and 5.9. By varying the ratios of glucose to l-malate in the growth medium, it was possible to obtain pH values which were lower, the same, or higher than the initial pH values. In contrast, buffers such as phosphate only retard decreases in pH. l-Malate, when compared with K2PO4 on an equal molar basis, provided greater resistance to decreases in pH. Higher specific growth rates were observed for L. plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides when l-malate rather than K2PO4 was incorporated into the growth medium. PMID:16347671

  6. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Post-irradiation inactivation, protection, and repair of the sulfhydryl enzyme malate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Zipper, P.

    1985-01-01

    Malate synthase from baker's yeast, a trimeric sulfhydryl enzyme with one essential sulfhydryl group per subunit, was inactivated by 2 kGy X-irradiation in air-saturated aqueous solution (enzyme concentration: 0.5 mg/ml). The radiation induced changes of enzymic activity were registered at about 0,30,60 h after irradiation. To elucidate the role of OH - , O 2 , and H 2 O 2 in the X-ray inactivation of the enzyme, experiments were performed in the absence of presence of different concentrations of specific additives (formate, superoxide dismutase, catalase). These additives were added to malate synthase solutions before or after X-irradiation. Moreover, repairs of inactivated malate synthase were initiated at about 0 or 30 h after irradiation by means of the sulfhydryl agent dithiothreitol. Experiments yielded the following results: 1. Irradiation of malate synthase in the absence of additives inactivated the enzyme immediately to a residual activity Asub(r)=3% (corresponding to a D 37 =0.6 kGy), and led to further slow inactivation in the post-irradiation phase. Repairs, initiated at different times after irradiation, restored enzymic activity considerably. The repair initiated at t=0 led to Asub(r)=21%; repairs started later on resulted in somewhat lower activities. The decay of reparability, however, was found to progress more slowly than post-irradiation inactivation itself. After completion of repair the activities of repaired samples did not decrease significantly. 2. The presence of specific additives during irradiation caused significant protective effects against primary inactivation. The protection by formate was very pronounced (e.g., Asub(r)=72% and D 37 =6 kGy for 100 mM formate). The presence of catalytic amounts of superoxide dismutase and/or catalase exhibited only minor effects, depending on the presence and concentration of formate. (orig.)

  8. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 promotes gastric cancer tumorigenicity and metastasis by regulating vasculogenic mimicry and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Wu, Zhenzhen; Yuan, Jia; Sun, Li; Lin, Li; Huang, Na; Bin, Jianping; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun

    2017-06-01

    MALAT1 is an oncogenic long non-coding RNA that has been found to promote the proliferation of many malignant cell types and non-malignant human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, the functions of MALAT1 in vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and angiogenesis and the potential mechanisms responsible have not yet been investigated in any malignancy. Here, in situ hybridization and CD31/periodic acid-Schiff double staining of 150 gastric cancer (GC) clinical specimens revealed that MALAT1 expression was tightly associated with densities of VM and endothelial vessels. MALAT1 knockdown markedly reduced GC cell migration, invasion, tumorigenicity, metastasis, and VM, while restricting HUVEC angiogenesis and increasing vascular permeability. Moreover, MALAT1 was found to regulate expression of VE-cadherin, β-catenin, MMPs 2 and 9, MT1-MMP, p-ERK, p-FAK, and p-paxillin, which have been established as classical markers of VM and angiogenesis and components of associated signaling pathways. Consistent with this, the p-ERK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 both effectively blocked GC cell VM. In conclusion, MALAT1 can promote tumorigenicity and metastasis in GC by facilitating VM and angiogenesis via the VE-cadherin/β-catenin complex and ERK/MMP and FAK/paxillin signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  10. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase regulates RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via AMPK/c-Fos/NFATc1 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Jeong [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Gu, Dong Ryun [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Su Hyun [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun Ha [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seoung Hoon, E-mail: leesh2@wku.ac.kr [Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of); Wonkwang Institute of Biomaterials and Implant, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-17

    Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (malate dehydrogenase 1, MDH1) plays pivotal roles in the malate/aspartate shuttle that might modulate metabolism between the cytosol and mitochondria. In this study, we investigated the role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation and formation. MDH1 expression was induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) treatment. Knockdown of MDH1 by infection with retrovirus containing MDH1-specific shRNA (shMDH1) reduced mature osteoclast formation and bone resorption activity. Moreover, the expression of marker genes associated with osteoclast differentiation was downregulated by shMDH1 treatment, suggesting a role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation. In addition, intracellular ATP production was reduced following the activation of adenosine 5′ monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor and negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, in shMDH1-infected osteoclasts compared to control cells. In addition, the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a critical transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, was decreased with MDH1 knockdown during RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings provide strong evidence that MDH1 plays a critical role in osteoclast differentiation and function via modulation of the intracellular energy status, which might affect AMPK activity and NFATc1 expression.

  11. Mitoprotective effect of Centella asiatica against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats: possible relevance to its anti-oxidant and anti-apoptosis mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Atish; Kumar, Anil

    2013-08-01

    Role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress has been well documented in various cognitive-related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Aluminum is a neurotoxic metal that may be involved in the progression of neurodegenerative processes. The antioxidant and memory enhancing effects of Centella asiatica (CA) are well known in the last few decades. Therefore, the present study has been designed to explore the neuroprotective effect of CA on chronic aluminum exposure induced mitochondrial enzyme alteration, oxidative stress, apoptosis and cognitive dysfunction in rat. Aluminum (100 mg/kg) and CA (150 and 300 mg/kg) were administered daily for a period of 6 weeks in male Wistar rats. Various behavioral, biochemical and cellular estimations and aluminum concentration were assessed. Chronic aluminum administration resulted in memory impairment and caused marked oxidative damage associated with mitochondria impairment. It also caused a significant increase in caspase-3 activity, acetylcholine esterase activity and aluminum concentration in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of rat brain. Chronic administration of CA significantly improved memory performance, oxidative defense decreased aluminum concentration, caspase-3, acetylcholinestrease activity and reversal of mitochondrial enzyme activity as compared to aluminum-treated animals. Results of the study demonstrate neuroprotective potential of CA against aluminum-induced cognitive dysfunction and mito- oxidative damage.

  12. Regulation of acetate metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum: transcriptional control of the isocitrate lyase and malate synthase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, V F; Spies, M; Reinscheid, D J; Schnicke, S; Sahm, H; Eikmanns, B J

    1997-10-01

    In the amino-acid-producing microorganism Corynebacterium glutamicum, the specific activities of the acetate-activating enzymes acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase and those of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes isocitrate lyase and malate synthase were found to be high when the cells were grown on acetate (0.8, 2.9, 2.1, and 1.8 U/mg protein, respectively). When the cells were grown on glucose or on other carbon sources such as lactate, succinate, or glutamate, the specific activities were two- to fourfold (acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase) and 45- to 100-fold (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase) lower, indicating that the synthesis of the four enzymes is regulated by acetate in the growth medium. A comparative Northern (RNA) analysis of the C. glutamicum isocitrate lyase and malate synthase genes (aceA and aceB) and transcriptional cat fusion experiments revealed that aceA and aceB are transcribed as 1.6- and 2.7-kb monocistronic messages, respectively, and that the regulation of isocitrate lyase and malate synthase synthesis is exerted at the level of transcription from the respective promoters. Surprisingly, C. glutamicum mutants defective in either acetate kinase or phosphotransacetylase showed low specific activities of the other three enzymes (phosphotransacetylase, isocitrate lyase, and malate synthase or acetate kinase, isocitrate lyase, and malate synthase, respectively) irrespective of the presence or absence of acetate in the medium. This result and a correlation of a high intracellular acetyl coenzyme A concentration with high specific activities of isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, acetate kinase, and phosphotransacetylase suggest that acetyl coenzyme A or a derivative thereof may be a physiological trigger for the genetic regulation of enzymes involved in acetate metabolism of C. glutamicum.

  13. Long Non-Coding RNA MALAT1 Mediates Transforming Growth Factor Beta1-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Yang

    Full Text Available To study the role of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA MALAT1 in transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells.ARPE-19 cells were cultured and exposed to TGF-β1. The EMT of APRE-19 cells is confirmed by morphological change, as well as the increased expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA and fibronectin, and the down-regulation of E-cadherin and Zona occludin-1(ZO-1 at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of lncRNA MALAT1 in RPE cells were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Knockdown of MALAT1 was achieved by transfecting a small interfering RNA (SiRNA. The effect of inhibition of MALAT1 on EMT, migration, proliferation, and TGFβ signalings were observed. MALAT1 expression was also detected in primary RPE cells incubated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR vitreous samples.The expression of MALAT1 is significantly increased in RPE cells incubated with TGFβ1. MALAT1 silencing attenuates TGFβ1-induced EMT, migration, and proliferation of RPE cells, at least partially through activating Smad2/3 signaling. MALAT1 is also significantly increased in primary RPE cells incubated with PVR vitreous samples.LncRNA MALAT1 is involved in TGFβ1-induced EMT of human RPE cells and provides new understandings for the pathogenesis of PVR.

  14. Hydrogen-rich water alleviates aluminum-induced inhibition of root elongation in alfalfa via decreasing nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Cui, Weiti; Zhu, Kaikai; Xie, Yanjie; Zhang, Chunhua; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-02-28

    One of the earliest and distinct symptoms of aluminum (Al) toxicity is the inhibition of root elongation. Although hydrogen gas (H2) is recently described as an important bio-regulator in plants, whether and how H2 regulates Al-induced inhibition of root elongation is largely unknown. To address these gaps, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to investigate a physiological role of H2 and its possible molecular mechanism. Individual or simultaneous (in particular) exposure of alfalfa seedlings to Al, or a fresh but not old nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP), not only increased NO production, but also led to a significant inhibition of root elongation. Above responses were differentially alleviated by pretreatment with 50% saturation of HRW. The addition of HRW also alleviated the appearance of Al toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of seedling growth and less accumulation of Al. Subsequent results revealed that the removal of NO by the NO scavenger, similar to HRW, could decrease NO production and alleviate Al- or SNP-induced inhibition of root growth. Thus, we proposed that HRW alleviated Al-induced inhibition of alfalfa root elongation by decreasing NO production. Such findings may be applicable to enhance crop yield and improve stress tolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation for antimicrobial resistance-modulating activity of diethyl malate and 1-methyl malate against beta-lactamase class A from Bacillus licheniformis by molecular dynamics, in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaie, Sako; Najafi, Kambiz; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Fathi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics in bacteria, is one of the major problems of mankind. Each year, a large number of patients due to infection, lose their lives. One of the main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance is beta-lactamase secretion. This enzyme hydrolyzes the amide bond of a lactam ring in beta-lactam antibiotics. Bacillus licheniformis is a mesophilic gram-positive bacterium, which has a high potential to produce beta-lactamase class A. In this study, the inhibitory effects of some malate analogous were studied by in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the effects of inhibitor binding on beta-lactamase were studied using MD simulations. Our results showed that diethyl malate and 1-methyl malate can decrease the MIC value of benzyl penicillin by sixteen and eight-fold, respectively. Data derived from in vitro studies revealed that decrease in MIC values is correlated with beta-lactamase inhibition. Molecular docking studies predicted the binding mode of inhibitors with the beta-lactamase active site. The structural analysis from MD simulations exhibits that binding of citrate and diethyl malate causes earlier equilibrium of beta-lactamase. After binding, the fluctuation of Ser 70 is also decreased. Based on our data, diethyl malate can be used to design the potent inhibitor against beta-lactamase class A.

  16. The protective effect of Rho-associated kinase inhibitor on aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsan-Ju; Hung, Hui-Shan; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Chen, Shun-Sheng

    2010-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxicant and is implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD brains, one of the pathological hallmarks is the extracellular deposition of senile plaques, which are mainly composed of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta). Endoproteolysis of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) by the beta-secretase and the gamma-secretase generates Abeta. AbetaPP can also be cleaved by the alpha-secretase within the Abeta region, which releases a soluble fragment sAPPalpha and precludes the formation of Abeta. Al has been reported to increase the level of Abeta, promote Abeta aggregation, and increase Abeta neurotoxicity. In contrast, small G protein Rho and its effector, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), are known to negatively regulate the amount of Abeta. Inhibition of the Rho-ROCK pathway may underlie the ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins to reduce Abeta production. Whether the Rho-ROCK pathway is involved in Al-induced elevation and aggregation of Abeta is unknown. In the present study, cultured rat cortical neurons were treated with Al(malt)(3) in the absence or presence of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. After the treatment of Al(malt)(3), the cell viability and the level of sAPPalpha were reduced, whereas the amyloid fibrils in the conditioned media were increased. Treatment with Y-27632 prevented these adverse effects of Al(malt)(3) and thus maintained neuronal survival. These results reveal that the activation of the Rho-ROCK signaling pathway was involved in Al-induced effects in terms of the cell viability, the production of sAPPalpha, and the formation of amyloid fibril, which provides a novel mechanism underlying Al-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Malate synthase: proof of a stepwise Claisen condensation using the double-isotope fractionation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.D.; O'Keefe, S.J.; Knowles, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Although aldolase-catalyzed condensations proceed by stepwise mechanisms via the intermediacy of nucleophilic enol(ate)s or enamines, the mechanisms of those enzymes that catalyze Claisen-type condensations are unclear. The reaction pathway followed by an enzyme from this second group, malate synthase, has been studied by the double-isotope fractionation method to determine whether the reaction is stepwise or concerted. In agreement with earlier work, a deuterium kinetic isotope effect /sup D/(V/K) of 1.3 +/- 0.1 has been found when [ 2 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA is the substrate. The 13 C isotope effect at the aldehydic carbon of glyoxylate has also been measured. For this determination, the malate product was quantitatively transformed into a new sample of malate having the carbon of interest at C-4. This material was decarboxylated by malic enzyme to produce the appropriate CO 2 for isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis. The 13 C isotope effect with [ 1 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA is 1.0037 +/- 0.0004. By use of the known values of the intermolecular and intramolecular deuterium effects and of 13 (V/K)/sub H/, the value of the 13 C isotope effect when deuteriated [ 2 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA is the substrate can be predicted for three possible mechanisms. The results show clearly that the two salient characteristics of enzymes that catalyze Claisen-like condensations, namely, the absence of enzyme-catalyzed proton exchange with solvent and the inversion of the configuration at the nucleophilic center, which had been suggestive of a concerted pathway, are not mechanistically diagnostic

  18. Growth and characterization of 2-methylquinolinium L-malate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M. Divya; Ahila, G.; Mohana, J.; Anbalagan, G.

    2017-05-01

    An organic nonlinear optical single crystal, 2-methylquinolinium L-malate (MLM) was grown from ethanol solvent using slow evaporation solution growth technique. The single crystal X-ray diffraction studies confirmed that the crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with the non-centrosymmetric space group P21. The crystal is transparent in the entire visible region. The second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal has been obtained by the Kurtz-Perry powder technique. The laser damage threshold value 5.58 GW/cm2 indicates that this crystal can be used for high-power laser applications.

  19. Metastatic hepatic epithelioid hemangio-endothelioma: long-term response to sunitinib malate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Esma; Saint Paul, Marie-Christine; Gugenheim, Jean; Follana, Philippe; François, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangio-endothelioma (EHE) is a rare malignant tumor of vascular origin that electively metastasizes to lungs and liver. We report the case of a 51-year-old woman with metastatic and progressive EHE of the liver. She was successfully treated with daily administration of sunitinib malate, an oral multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which particularly targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors. Stabilization has lasted 6 years. We discuss the rationale for using antiangiogenic treatment for EHE. This case adds to a growing body of evidence that suggests that antiangiogenic agents should be considered in patients who present with advanced EHE.

  20. Role of LncRNA MALAT-1 in hypoxia-induced PC12 cell injury via regulating p38MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Miao; Shang, Xiao-Ying; Xie, Xin; Fu, Tao; Li, Jian-Ping; Li, Hong-Lin

    2018-03-23

    To investigate the role of LncRNA MALAT-1 in hypoxia-induced cell injury. Pheochromocytoma-12 (PC12) cells were divided into seven groups: Control group, Hypoxia group (Cells treated with CoCl 2 ), MALAT-1 group (Hypoxic cells treated with MALAT-1), NC group (Hypoxic cells treated with empty plasmid), MALAT-1 siRNA group (Hypoxic cells treated with siRNA MALAT-1), SB203580 group (Hypoxic cells treated with p38MAPK inhibitor), and MALAT-1 + SB20358 group. The content of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), super oxide dismutase (SOD) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was determined. Cell viability was detected by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were observed by Hoechst 33258 and TUNEL staining assay. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was measured using JC1 vital dye. The decreased cell viability and increased expressions of MALAT-1 and p-p38 were observed in hypoxic PC12 cells time-dependently (P PC12 cells had an elevation in p-p38, ROS, MDA and LDH with the increased apoptotic cells, but a reduction in SOD and MMP, and these similar changes were more obvious in those hypoxic cells treated with MALAT-1 when compared with Controls (all P PC12 cells treated with SB203580 and MALAT-1 siRNA led to opposite results compared with MALAT-1 group (all P PC12 cells. MALAT-1 can promote the apoptosis and oxidative stress of PC12 cells by activating p38MAPK pathway, thus aggravating the damage of PC12 cells induced by chemical hypoxia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ab initio calculation of the Zn isotope effect in phosphates, citrates, and malates and applications to plants and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albarède, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pHphosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils.

  2. Nanomolar aluminum induces expression of the inflammatory systemic biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (hBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Peter N; Kruck, Theodore P A; Lukiw, Walter J

    2015-11-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP; also known as pentraxin 1, PTX1), a 224 amino acid soluble serum protein organized into a novel pentameric ring-shaped structure, is a highly sensitive pathogenic biomarker for systemic inflammation. High CRP levels are found in practically every known inflammatory state, and elevated CRP levels indicate an increased risk for several common age-related human degenerative disorders, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the majority of CRP is synthesized in the liver for secretion into the systemic circulation, it has recently been discovered that an appreciable amount of CRP is synthesized in highly specialized endothelial cells that line the vasculature of the brain and central nervous system (CNS). These highly specialized cells, the major cell type lining the human CNS vasculature, are known as human brain microvessel endothelial cells (hBMECs). In the current pilot study we examined (i) CRP levels in human serum obtained from AD and age-matched control patients; and (ii) analyzed the effects of nanomolar aluminum sulfate on CRP expression in primary hBMECs. The three major findings in this short communication are: (i) that CRP is up-regulated in AD serum; (ii) that CRP serum levels increased in parallel with AD progression; and (iii) for the first time show that nanomolar aluminum potently up-regulates CRP expression in hBMECs to many times its 'basal abundance'. The results suggest that aluminum-induced CRP may in part contribute to a pathophysiological state associated with a chronic systemic inflammation of the human vasculature. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Enhancement of malate-production and increase in sensitivity to dimethyl succinate by mutation of the VID24 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoro, Hiroaki; Kotaka, Atsushi; Matsumura, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Hata, Yoji

    2016-06-01

    Malate in sake (a Japanese alcoholic beverage) is an important component for taste that is produced by yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. To date, many researchers have developed methods for breeding high-malate-producing yeasts; however, genes responsible for the high-acidity phenotype are not known. We determined the mutated gene involved in high malate production in yeast, isolated as a sensitive mutant to dimethyl succinate. In the comparative whole genome analysis between high-malate-producing strain and its parent strain, one of the non-synonymous substitutions was identified in the VID24 gene. The mutation of VID24 resulted in enhancement of malate-productivity and sensitivity to dimethyl succinate. The mutation appeared to lead to a deficiency in Vid24p function. Furthermore, disruption of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (Mdh2p) gene in the VID24 mutant inhibited the high-malate-producing phenotype. Vid24p is known as a component of the multisubunit ubiquitin ligase and participates in the degradation of gluconeogenic enzymes such as Mdh2p. We suggest that the enhancement of malate-productivity results from an accumulation of Mdh2p due to the loss of Vid24p function. These findings propose a novel mechanism for the regulation of organic acid production in yeast cells by the component of ubiquitin ligase, Vid24p. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Serum long non coding RNA MALAT-1 protected by exosomes is up-regulated and promotes cell proliferation and migration in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Xia, Yuhong; Wang, Zhixin; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Yafei; Li, Xiaoli; Wang, Yu; Ming, Huaikun

    2017-08-19

    Circulating lncRNAs have been defined as a novel biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), MALAT-1 was first identified lncRNA that was related to lung cancer metastasis. However, the relationship between exosomal lncRNAs and the diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC was poorly understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of serum exosomal MALAT-1 as a biomarker in the metastasis of NSCLC. In this study, we firstly isolated the exosomes from healthy subjects and NSCLC patients. Then we measured the expression levels of MALAT-1 contained in exosomes, and found that exosomal MALAT-1 was highly expressed in NSCLC patients, more importantly, the levels of exosomal MALAT-1 were positively associated with tumor stage and lymphatic metastasis. In addition, we decreased MALAT-1 expression by short hairpin RNA and conducted a series of assays including MTT, cell cycle, colony formation, wound-healing scratch and Annexin/V PI by flow cytometry in human lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro studies demonstrated that serum exosome-derived long noncoding RNA MALAT-1 promoted the tumor growth and migration, and prevented tumor cells from apoptosis in lung cancer cell lines. Taken together, this study shed a light on utilizing MALAT-1 in exosomes as a non-invasive serum-based tumor biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phosphorylation of glyoxysomal malate synthase from castor oil seed endosperm and cucumber cotyledon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.P; Randall, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Glyoxysomal malate synthase (MS) was purified to apparent homogeneity from 3-d germinating castor oil seed endosperm by a relatively simple procedure including two sucrose density gradient centrifugations. Antibodies raised to the caster oil seed MS crossreacted with MS from cucumber cotyledon. MS was phosphorylated in both tissues in an MgATP dependent reaction. The phosphorylation pattern was similar for both enzymes and both enzymes were inhibited by NaF, NaMo, (NH 4 )SO 4 , glyoxylate and high concentration of MgCl 2 (60 mM), but was not inhibited by NaCl and malate. Further characterization of the phosphorylation of MS from castor oil seed endosperms showed that the 5S form of MS is the form which is labelled by 32 P. The addition of exogenous alkaline phosphatase to MS not only decreased enzyme activity, but could also dephosphorylate phospho-MS. The relationship between dephosphorylation of MS and the decrease of MS activity is currently under investigation

  6. A novel malate dehydrogenase from Ceratonia siliqua L. seeds with potential biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccio, Clelia; Guida, Vincenzo; Di Petrillo, Amalia; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo

    2012-12-01

    A novel malate dehydrogenase (MDH; EC 3.1.1.1.37), hereafter MDHCs, from Ceratonia siliqua seeds, commonly known as Carob tree, was purified by using ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on SteamLine SP and gel-filtration. The molecular mass of the native protein, obtained by analytical gel-filtration, was about 65 kDa, whereas, by using SDS-PAGE analysis, with and without reducing agent, was 34 kDa. The specific activity of purified MDHCs (0.25 mg/100 g seeds) was estimated to be 188 U/mg. The optimum activity of the enzyme is at pH 8.5, showing a decrease in the presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and NaCl. The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of MDHCs revealed 95 % identity with malate dehydrogenase from Medicago sativa L. Finally, the enzymatic activity of MDHCs was preserved even after absorption onto a PVDF membrane. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution to the characterization of an enzyme from Carob tree sources.

  7. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity helps support glycolysis in actively proliferating cells and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanse, E A; Ruan, C; Kachman, M; Wang, D; Lowman, X H; Kelekar, A

    2017-07-06

    Increased glucose consumption is a hallmark of cancer cells. The increased consumption and subsequent metabolism of glucose during proliferation creates the need for a constant supply of NAD, a co-factor in glycolysis. Regeneration of the NAD required to support enhanced glycolysis has been attributed to the terminal glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, loss of glucose carbons to biosynthetic pathways early in glycolysis reduces the carbon supply to LDH. Thus, alternative routes for NAD regeneration must exist to support the increased glycolytic rate while allowing for the diversion of glucose to generate biomass and support proliferation. Here we demonstrate, using a variety of cancer cell lines as well as activated primary T cells, that cytosolic malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1) is an alternative to LDH as a supplier of NAD. Moreover, our results indicate that MDH1 generates malate with carbons derived from glutamine, thus enabling utilization of glucose carbons for glycolysis and for biomass. Amplification of MDH1 occurs at an impressive frequency in human tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. Together, our findings suggest that proliferating cells rely on both MDH1 and LDH to replenish cytosolic NAD, and that therapies designed at targeting glycolysis must consider both dehydrogenases.

  8. Cognitive improvement following ischemia/reperfusion injury induced by voluntary running‑wheel exercise is associated with LncMALAT1‑mediated apoptosis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jin-Lin; Cheng, Qing; Duan, Sheng-Jie; Li, Lu; Jia, Li-Ya

    2018-05-01

    Previous human and animal studies demonstrated that voluntary exercise may improve cognitive function and facilitate neuronal plasticity in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models. However, the possible underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Metastasis‑associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), may be associated with the functions and dysfunctions of endothelial cells. The present study investigated whether spontaneous running‑wheel (RW) exercise‑induced MALAT1 expression changes may be associated with the cognitive improvement of mice following I/R injury. The expression of MALAT1 was evaluated using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Artificial MALAT1 and MALAT1 lentiviral mall interfering (siRNA) were used to alter MALAT1 expression levels in vivo. The Morris Water Maze test was performed to evaluate spatial learning and memory retention in the mice. Changes in the apoptotic rates of hippocampal neurons and levels of apoptosis‑associated proteins were also detected. The data revealed that MALAT1 increased in the hippocampus of mice in the RW‑treated I/R group and that this was associated with neurological, learning and memory improvement, reduced infarction volumes, decreased apoptosis and alterations to expression levels of apoptosis‑associated proteins. Following RW training in I/R‑injured mice, lentiviral MALAT1 siRNA conduction partially attenuated the protections induced by voluntary RW. However, exogenous MALAT1 treatment increased the protection. The current findings suggested that voluntary RW protected hippocampal neurons from I/R injury and promoted cognitive restoration, which was associated with lncRNA MALAT1‑mediated apoptosis inhibition.

  9. SIRT3-dependent GOT2 acetylation status affects the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle activity and pancreatic tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Lisha; Shi, Qian; Zhao, Yuzheng; Lin, Huaipeng; Zhang, Mengli; Zhao, Shimin; Yang, Yi; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue; Ye, Dan

    2015-04-15

    The malate-aspartate shuttle is indispensable for the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria to maintain a high rate of glycolysis and to support rapid tumor cell growth. The malate-aspartate shuttle is operated by two pairs of enzymes that localize to the mitochondria and cytoplasm, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases (GOT), and malate dehydrogenases (MDH). Here, we show that mitochondrial GOT2 is acetylated and that deacetylation depends on mitochondrial SIRT3. We have identified that acetylation occurs at three lysine residues, K159, K185, and K404 (3K), and enhances the association between GOT2 and MDH2. The GOT2 acetylation at these three residues promotes the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria and changes the mitochondrial NADH/NAD(+) redox state to support ATP production. Additionally, GOT2 3K acetylation stimulates NADPH production to suppress ROS and to protect cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, GOT2 3K acetylation promotes pancreatic cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Finally, we show that GOT2 K159 acetylation is increased in human pancreatic tumors, which correlates with reduced SIRT3 expression. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which GOT2 acetylation stimulates the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle activity and oxidative protection. © 2015 The Authors.

  10. 17β-Estradiol treatment inhibits breast cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MALAT-1 RNA level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ziyi [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Changjin [Department of Pediatrics, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Yu [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, Chuanfang, E-mail: 879413966@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2 affects not only estrogen-receptor α positive breast cells but also negative ones. • 100 nM E2 treatment affects breast cells proliferation, migration. • 100 nM E2 treatment functions in an estrogen-receptor α-independent way. • E2 treatment decreases MALAT-1 RNA level by post-transcriptional regulation. - Abstract: Breast cancer cells, which express estrogen receptor α (ERα), respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. But breast cancer cells without ERα show no effect on low concentration of estrogen treatment. Proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF10a, MCF7 and MB231 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified the effects of E2 on these breast cell lines, and looked for the difference in the presence and absence of ERα. Specifically, we looked for the changes of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1), which is found extensively and highly expressed in several kinds of tumor cells, including breast carcinoma. It was observed that proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells were greatly affected by high concentration E2 treatment and were not affected by low concentration E2 treatment in an ERα independent way. We found that the high concentration E2 treatment largely decreased MALAT-1 RNA level. Interestingly, MALAT-1 decreasing by knocking down showed similar effects on proliferation, migration and invasion. E2 treatment affects breast tumor or non-tumor cells proliferation, migration and invasion in an ERα -independent, but a dose-dependent way by decreasing the MALAT-1 RNA level.

  11. The vacuolar channel VvALMT9 mediates malate and tartrate accumulation in berries of Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angeli, Alexis; Baetz, Ulrike; Francisco, Rita; Zhang, Jingbo; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Regalado, Ana

    2013-08-01

    Vitis vinifera L. represents an economically important fruit species. Grape and wine flavour is made from a complex set of compounds. The acidity of berries is a major parameter in determining grape berry quality for wine making and fruit consumption. Despite the importance of malic and tartaric acid (TA) storage and transport for grape berry acidity, no vacuolar transporter for malate or tartrate has been identified so far. Some members of the aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) anion channel family from Arabidopsis thaliana have been shown to be involved in mediating malate fluxes across the tonoplast. Therefore, we hypothesised that a homologue of these channels could have a similar role in V. vinifera grape berries. We identified homologues of the Arabidopsis vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9 through a TBLASTX search on the V. vinifera genome database. We cloned the closest homologue of AtALMT9 from grape berry cDNA and designated it VvALMT9. The expression profile revealed that VvALMT9 is constitutively expressed in berry mesocarp tissue and that its transcription level increases during fruit maturation. Moreover, we found that VvALMT9 is targeted to the vacuolar membrane. Using patch-clamp analysis, we could show that, besides malate, VvALMT9 mediates tartrate currents which are higher than in its Arabidopsis homologue. In summary, in the present study we provide evidence that VvALMT9 is a vacuolar malate channel expressed in grape berries. Interestingly, in V. vinifera, a tartrate-producing plant, the permeability of the channel is apparently adjusted to TA.

  12. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  13. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Aquino-Silva

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  14. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino-Silva M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  15. Structure of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase at 1.45 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Jelena; Meneely, Kathleen M; Lamb, Audrey L

    2009-09-01

    The structure of apo malate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli has been determined to 1.45 A resolution. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 146.0, b = 52.0, c = 168.9 A, beta = 102.2 degrees. The structure was determined with the molecular-replacement pipeline program BALBES and was refined to a final R factor of 18.6% (R(free) = 21.4%). The final model has two dimers in the asymmetric unit. In each dimer one monomer contains the active-site loop in the open conformation, whereas in the opposing monomer the active-site loop is disordered.

  16. Primary structure of the light-dependent regulatory site of corn NADP-malate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decottignies, P.; Schmitter, J.M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Le Marechal, P.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.

    1988-01-01

    The light-activated NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) catalyzes the reduction of oxaloacetate to malate in higher plant chloroplasts. This enzyme is regulated in vivo by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system through redox reactions. NADP-MDH has been photoactivated in vitro in a chloroplast system reconstituted from the pure protein components and thylakoid membranes. Photoactivation was accompanied by the appearance of new thiol groups (followed by [14C]iodoacetate incorporation). 14C-Carboxymethylated NADP-MDH has been purified from the incubation mixture and its amino-terminal sequence analyzed. Two [14C]carboxymethylcysteines were identified at positions 10 and 15 after light activation, while they were not detected in the dark-treated protein. In addition, the analysis of the tryptic digest of light-activated [14C]carboxymethylated NADP-MDH revealed that the radioactive label was mostly incorporated in Cys10 and Cys15, indicating that these 2 residues play a major role in the light activation mechanism. Moreover, an activation model, in which photoreduced thio-redoxin was replaced by the dithiol reductant dithio-threitol, has been developed. When NADP-MDH was activated in this way, the same sulfhydryls were found to be labeled, and alternatively, they did not incorporate any radioactivity when dithiothreitol reduction was performed after carboxymethylation in denaturating conditions. These results indicate that activation (by light or by dithiothreitol) proceeds on each subunit by reduction of a disulfide bridge located at the amino terminus of the enzyme between Cys10 and Cys15

  17. Primary structure of the light-dependent regulatory site of corn NADP-malate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decottignies, P.; Schmitter, J.M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Le Marechal, P.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.

    1988-08-25

    The light-activated NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) catalyzes the reduction of oxaloacetate to malate in higher plant chloroplasts. This enzyme is regulated in vivo by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system through redox reactions. NADP-MDH has been photoactivated in vitro in a chloroplast system reconstituted from the pure protein components and thylakoid membranes. Photoactivation was accompanied by the appearance of new thiol groups (followed by (14C)iodoacetate incorporation). 14C-Carboxymethylated NADP-MDH has been purified from the incubation mixture and its amino-terminal sequence analyzed. Two (14C)carboxymethylcysteines were identified at positions 10 and 15 after light activation, while they were not detected in the dark-treated protein. In addition, the analysis of the tryptic digest of light-activated (14C)carboxymethylated NADP-MDH revealed that the radioactive label was mostly incorporated in Cys10 and Cys15, indicating that these 2 residues play a major role in the light activation mechanism. Moreover, an activation model, in which photoreduced thio-redoxin was replaced by the dithiol reductant dithio-threitol, has been developed. When NADP-MDH was activated in this way, the same sulfhydryls were found to be labeled, and alternatively, they did not incorporate any radioactivity when dithiothreitol reduction was performed after carboxymethylation in denaturating conditions. These results indicate that activation (by light or by dithiothreitol) proceeds on each subunit by reduction of a disulfide bridge located at the amino terminus of the enzyme between Cys10 and Cys15.

  18. Acute Citrulline-Malate Supplementation and High-Intensity Cycling Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Brian; Papageorgiou, Maria; OʼBrien, Barbara; Davies, Nathan A; Grimble, George K; Cardinale, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Cunniffe, B, Papageorgiou, M, O'Brien, B, Davies, NA, Grimble, GK, and Cardinale, M. Acute citrulline-malate supplementation and high-intensity cycling performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2638-2647, 2016-Dietary L-citrulline-malate (CM) consumption has been suggested to improve skeletal muscle metabolism and contractile efficiency, which would be expected to predispose exercising individuals to greater fatigue resistance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of CM supplementation on acid-base balance and high-intensity exercise performance. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 10 well-trained males consumed either 12 g of CM (in 400 ml) or lemon sugar-free cordial (placebo [PL]) 60 minutes before completion of 2 exercise trials. Each trial consisted of subjects performing 10 (×15 seconds) maximal cycle sprints (with 30-second rest intervals) followed by 5 minutes recovery before completing a cycle time-to-exhaustion test (TTE) at 100% of individual peak power (PP). Significant increases in plasma concentrations of citrulline (8.8-fold), ornithine (3.9-fold), and glutamine (1.3-fold) were observed 60 minutes after supplementation in the CM trial only (p ≤ 0.05) and none of the subjects experienced gastrointestinal side-effects during testing. Significantly higher exercise heart rates were observed in CM condition (vs. PL) although no between trial differences in performance related variables (TTE: [120 ± 61 seconds CM vs. 113 ± 50 seconds PL]), PP or mean power, ([power fatigue index: 36 ± 16% CM vs. 28 ± 18% PL]), subjective rating of perceived exertion or measures of acid-base balance (pH, lactate, bicarbonate, base-excess) were observed (p > 0.05). This study demonstrated that acute supplementation of 12 g CM does not provide acute ergogenic benefits using the protocol implemented in this study in well-trained males.

  19. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 regulates renal tubular epithelial pyroptosis by modulated miR-23c targeting of ELAVL1 in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Zeng, Li; Cao, Chuanwu; Lu, Chenhui; Lian, Weishuai; Han, Jianhong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Tao; Li, Maoquan

    2017-01-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is a common kidney condition in patients with diabetes mellitus, which can result in renal failure. Pyroptosis, the process of pro-inflammatory programmed cell death, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 has also been shown to be involved in diabetic nephropathy. Here, we investigated the role of MALAT1 and the microRNA miR-23c and its target gene ELAVL1 in renal tubular epithelial cells. Our data demonstrated that MALAT1 expression was substantially increased but miR-23c was decreased in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and in high-glucose-treated HK-2 cells. Downregulation of MALAT1 or upregulation the expression of miR-23c inhibited pyroptosis in HK-2 cells. In an effort to understand the signaling mechanisms underlying the pro-pyroptotic properties of MALAT1 and the anti-pyroptotic properties of miR-23c, we found that inhibiting the expression of MALAT1 downregulated the expression of ELAVL1, NLRP3, Caspase-1 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. These findings were replicated by upregulation of miR-23c. Moreover, luciferase assays showed that miR-23c, as a target of MALAT1, directly repressed ELAVL1 expression and then decreased the expression of its downstream protein NLRP3. The expression of MALAT1 antagonized the effect of miR-23c on the downregulation of its target ELAVL1 and inhibited hyperglycemia-induced cell pyroptosis. This mechanism may contribute to a better understanding of diabetic nephropathy pathogenesis and facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation of transcription of MALAT-1, a novel noncoding RNA, with deregulated expression of tumor suppressor p53 in small DNA tumor virus models

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffers, Liesl K.; Duan, Kaiwen; Ellies, Lesley G.; Seaman, William T.; Burger-Calderon, Raquel A.; Diatchenko, Luda B.; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Although metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript (MALAT)-1 is known to be consistently upregulated in several epithelial malignancies, little is known about its function or regulation. We therefore examined the relationship between MALAT-1 expression and candidate modulators such as DNA tumor virus oncoproteins human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E6 and E7, BK virus T antigen (BKVTAg), mouse polyoma virus middle T antigen (MPVmTAg) and tumor suppressor genes p53 and pRb. Using suppress...

  1. Long Non-Coding RNA Malat-1 Is Dispensable during Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Remodeling and Failure in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Peters

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a class of RNA molecules with diverse regulatory functions during embryonic development, normal life, and disease in higher organisms. However, research on the role of lncRNAs in cardiovascular diseases and in particular heart failure is still in its infancy. The exceptionally well conserved nuclear lncRNA Metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat-1 is a regulator of mRNA splicing and highly expressed in the heart. Malat-1 modulates hypoxia-induced vessel growth, activates ERK/MAPK signaling, and scavenges the anti-hypertrophic microRNA-133. We therefore hypothesized that Malat-1 may act as regulator of cardiac hypertrophy and failure during cardiac pressure overload induced by thoracic aortic constriction (TAC in mice.Absence of Malat-1 did not affect cardiac hypertrophy upon pressure overload: Heart weight to tibia length ratio significantly increased in WT mice (sham: 5.78±0.55, TAC 9.79±1.82 g/mm; p<0.001 but to a similar extend also in Malat-1 knockout (KO mice (sham: 6.21±1.12, TAC 8.91±1.74 g/mm; p<0.01 with no significant difference between genotypes. As expected, TAC significantly reduced left ventricular fractional shortening in WT (sham: 38.81±6.53%, TAC: 23.14±11.99%; p<0.01 but to a comparable degree also in KO mice (sham: 37.01±4.19%, TAC: 25.98±9.75%; p<0.05. Histological hallmarks of myocardial remodeling, such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, increased interstitial fibrosis, reduced capillary density, and immune cell infiltration, did not differ significantly between WT and KO mice after TAC. In line, the absence of Malat-1 did not significantly affect angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, and overall remodeling. Above that, pressure overload by TAC significantly induced mRNA levels of the hypertrophy marker genes Nppa, Nppb and Acta1, to a similar extend in both genotypes. Alternative splicing of Ndrg2 after TAC was apparent in WT (isoform ratio

  2. microRNA-9 targets the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 for degradation in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leucci, Eleonora; Patella, Francesca; Waage, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs regulate the expression of over 60% of protein coding genes by targeting their mRNAs to AGO2-containing complexes in the cytoplasm and promoting their translational inhibition and/or degradation. There is little evidence so far for microRNA-mediated regulation of other classes of non......-coding RNAs. Here we report that microRNA-9 (miR-9) regulates the expression of the Metastasis Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT-1), one of the most abundant and conserved long non-coding RNAs. Intriguingly, we find that miR-9 targets AGO2-mediated regulation of MALAT1 in the nucleus. Our...... findings reveal a novel direct regulatory link between two important classes of non-coding RNAs, miRs and lncRNAs, and advance our understanding of microRNA functions....

  3. Ab Initio Calculation of the Zn Isotope Effect in Phosphates, Citrates, and Malates and Applications to Plants and Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albar?de, Francis

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated t...

  4. Type 2 Diabetic Rats on Diet Supplemented With Chromium Malate Show Improved Glycometabolism, Glycometabolism-Related Enzyme Levels and Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Wang, Wei; Feng, Yun; Li, Fang; Zheng, Daheng; Wu, Huiyu; Jin, Dun; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Our results showed that fasting blood glucose, serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level in the high dose group had a significant downward trend when compared with the model group, chromium picolinate group and chromium trichloride group. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, Glut4, phosphor-AMPKβ1 and Akt levels in the high dose group were significantly higher than those of the model, chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride groups. Chromium malate in a high dose group can significantly increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol level while decreasing the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared with chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. The serum chromium content in chromium malate and chromium picolinate group is significantly higher than that of the chromium trichloride group. The results indicated that the curative effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism changes are better than those of chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. Chromium malate contributes to glucose uptake and transport in order to improved glycometabolism and glycometabolism-related enzymes. PMID:25942313

  5. The R2R3-MYB transcription factor MdMYB73 is involved in malate accumulation and vacuolar acidification in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Da-Gang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Quan-Yan; Li, Ming; Sun, Cui-Hui; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2017-08-01

    Malate, the predominant organic acid in many fruits, is a crucial component of the organoleptic quality of fruit, including taste and flavor. The genetic and environmental mechanisms affecting malate metabolism in fruit cells have been studied extensively. However, the transcriptional regulation of malate-metabolizing enzymes and vacuolar transporters remains poorly understood. Our previous studies demonstrated that MdMYB1 modulates anthocyanin accumulation and vacuolar acidification by directly activating vacuolar transporters, including MdVHA-B1, MdVHA-E, MdVHP1 and MdtDT. Interestingly, we isolated and identified a MYB transcription factor, MdMYB73, a distant relative of MdMYB1 in this study. It was subsequently found that MdMYB73 protein bound directly to the promoters of MdALMT9 (aluminum-activated malate transporter 9), MdVHA-A (vacuolar ATPase subunit A) and MdVHP1 (vacuolar pyrophosphatase 1), transcriptionally activating their expression and thereby enhancing their activities. Analyses of transgenic apple calli demonstrated that MdMYB73 influenced malate accumulation and vacuolar pH. Furthermore, MdCIbHLH1 interacted with MdMYB73 and enhanced its activity upon downstream target genes. These findings help to elucidate how MdMYB73 directly modulates the vacuolar transport system to affect malate accumulation and vacuolar pH in apple. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A Systems Chemical Biology Study of Malate Synthase and Isocitrate Lyase Inhibition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Active and NRP Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to survive in low oxygen environments enables the bacterium to persist in a latent state within host tissues. In vitro studies of Mtb growth have identified changes in isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS) that enable bacterial persistent under low oxygen and other environmentally limiting conditions. Systems chemical biology (SCB) enables us to evaluate the effects of small molecule inhibitors not only on the reaction catalyzed by malate synthase and isocitrate lyase, but the effect on the complete tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) by taking into account complex network relationships within that system. To study the kinetic consequences of inhibition on persistent bacilli, we implement a systems-chemical biology (SCB) platform and perform a chemistry-centric analysis of key metabolic pathways believed to impact Mtb latency. We explore consequences of disrupting the function of malate synthase (MS) and isocitrate lyase (ICL) during aerobic and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP) growth by using the SCB method to identify small molecules that inhibit the function of MS and ICL, and simulating the metabolic consequence of the disruption. Results indicate variations in target and non-target reaction steps, clear differences in the normal and low oxygen models, as well as dosage dependent response. Simulation results from singular and combined enzyme inhibition strategies suggest ICL may be the more effective target for chemotherapeutic treatment against Mtb growing in a microenvironment where oxygen is slowly depleted, which may favor persistence. PMID:24121675

  7. Malate secretion from the root system is an important reason for higher resistance of Miscanthus sacchariflorus to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haipeng; Feng, Xue; Hong, Chuntao; Chen, Houming; Zeng, Fanrong; Zheng, Bingsong; Jiang, Dean

    2017-03-01

    Miscanthus is a vigorous perennial Gramineae genus grown throughout the world as a promising bioenergy crop and generally regarded as heavy metal tolerant due to its ability to absorb heavy metals. However, little is known about the mechanism for heavy metal tolerance in Miscanthus. In this study, two Miscanthus species (Miscanthus sacchariflorus and Miscanthus floridulus) exhibiting different cadmium (Cd) sensitivity were used to address the mechanisms of Cd tolerance. Under the same Cd stress, M. sacchariflorus showed higher Cd tolerance with better growth and lower Cd accumulation in both shoots and roots than M. floridulus. The malate (MA) content significantly increased in root exudates of M. sacchariflorus following Cd treatment while it was almost unchanged in M. floridulus. Cellular Cd analysis and flux data showed that exogenous MA application markedly restricted Cd influx and accumulation while an anion-channel inhibitor (phenylglyoxal) effectively blocked Cd-induced MA secretion and increased Cd influx in M. sacchariflorus, indicating that MA secretion could alleviate Cd toxicity by reducing Cd uptake. The genes of malate dehydrogenases (MsMDHs) and Al-activated malate transporter 1 (MsALMT1) in M. sacchariflorus were highly upregulated under Cd stress, compared with that in M. floridulus. The results indicate that Cd-induced MA synthesis and secretion efficiently alleviate Cd toxicity by reducing Cd influx in M. sacchariflorus. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Tl+ induces the permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria energized by glutamate and malate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Emelyanova, Larisa V; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V

    2015-08-01

    It is known that Ca2+ and heavy metals more actively induce MPTP opening in mitochondria, energized by the I complex substrates. Thus, a rise in a Tl+-induced MPTP was proposed in experiments on isolated rat liver mitochondria energized by the complex I substrate (glutamate and malate). Expose of the mitochondria to Ca2+ into a medium containing TlNO3, glutamate, and malate as well as sucrose or KNO3 resulted in a decrease in state 3, state 4, or DNP-stimulated respiration as well as an increase of both mitochondrial swelling and ΔΨmito dissipation. The MPTP inhibitors, CsA and ADP, almost completely eliminated the effect of Ca2+, which was more pronounced in the presence of the complex I substrates than the complex II substrate (succinate) and rotenone (Korotkov and Saris, 2011). The present study concludes that Tl+-induced MPTP opening is more appreciable in mitochondria energized by glutamate and malate but not succinate in the presence of rotenone. We assume that the Tl+-induced MPTP opening along with followed swelling and possible structural deformations of the complex I in Ca2+-loaded mitochondria may be a part of the thallium toxicity mechanism on mitochondria in living organisms. At the same time, oxidation of Tl+ to Tl3+ by mitochondrial oxygen reactive species is proposed for the mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Decarboxylation of Malate in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi (Role of NAD-Malic Enzyme).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R. M.; Lindsay, J. G.; Wilkins, M. B.; Nimmo, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    The role of NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) fedtschenkoi was investigated using preparations of intact and solubilized mitochondria from fully expanded leaves. Intact, coupled mitochondria isolated during the day or night did not differ in their ability to take up [14C]malic acid from the surrounding medium or to respire using malate or succinate as substrate. However, intact mitochondria isolated from plants during the day decarboxylated added malate to pyruvate significantly faster than mitochondria isolated from plants at night. NAD-ME activity in solubilized mitochondrial extracts showed hysteretic kinetics and was stimulated by a number of activators, including acetyl-coenzyme A, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, and sulfate ions. In the absence of these effectors, reaction progress curves were nonlinear, with a pronounced acceleration phase. The lag period before a steady-state rate was reached in assays of mitochondrial extracts decreased during the photoperiod and increased slowly during the period of darkness. However, these changes in the kinetic properties of the enzyme could not account for the changes in the rate of decarboxylation of malate by intact mitochondria. Gel-filtration experiments showed that mitochondrial extracts contained three forms of NAD-ME with different molecular weights. The relative proportions of the three forms varied somewhat throughout the light/dark cycle, but this did not account for the changes in the kinetics behavior of the enzyme during the diurnal cycle. PMID:12228671

  10. Kinetic simulation of malate-aspartate and citrate-pyruvate shuttles in association with Krebs cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Kalyani; Vadlakonda, Lakshmipathi; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we have kinetically simulated two mitochondrial shuttles, malate-aspartate shuttle (used for transferring reducing equivalents) and citrate-pyruvate shuttle (used for transferring carbon skeletons). However, the functions of these shuttles are not limited to the points mentioned above, and they can be used in different arrangements to meet different cellular requirements. Both the shuttles are intricately associated with Krebs cycle through the metabolites involved. The study of this system of shuttles and Krebs cycle explores the response of the system in different metabolic environments. Here, we have simulated these subsets individually and then combined them to study the interactions among them and to bring out the dynamics of these pathways in focus. Four antiports and a pyruvate pump were modelled along with the metabolic reactions on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Michaelis-Menten approach was extended for deriving rate equations of every component of the system. Kinetic simulation was carried out using ordinary differential equation solver in GNU Octave. It was observed that all the components attained steady state, sooner or later, depending on the system conditions. Progress curves and phase plots were plotted to understand the steady state behaviour of the metabolites involved. A comparative analysis between experimental and simulated data show fair agreement thus validating the usefulness and applicability of the model.

  11. Regulation of human cerebrospinal fluid malate dehydrogenase 1 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Llorens, Franc; Pracht, Alexander; Thom, Tobias; Correia, Ângela; Zafar, Saima; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2016-11-14

    The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers in differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is an ongoing topic. A previous two-dimensional proteomic study on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed an elevated level of an enzyme, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Here, we could demonstrate the expression of MDH1 in neurons as well as in the neuropil. Its levels are lower in sCJD brains than in control brains. An examination of CSF-MDH1 in sCJD patients by ELISA revealed a significant elevation of CSF-MDH1 levels in sCJD patients (independently from the PRNP codon 129 MV genotype or the prion protein scrapie (PrP Sc ) type) in comparison to controls. In combination with total tau (tau), CSF-MDH1 detection exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for sCJD diagnosis with a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 95.6%. A correlation study of MDH1 level in CSF with other neurodegenerative marker proteins revealed a significant positive correlation between MDH1 concentration with tau, 14-3-3 and neuron specific enolase level. In conclusion, our study indicated the potential of MDH1 in combination with tau as an additional biomarker in sCJD improving diagnostic accuracy of tau markedly.

  12. Induction of Malate Synthase Gene Expression in Senescent and Detached Organs of Cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, IA; Leaver, CJ; Smith, SM

    1992-01-01

    Expression of the malate synthase (MS) gene is activated in cotyledons of cucumber seedlings during postgerminative growth and then repressed as the cotyledons become photosynthetic. MS gene expression is subsequently reactivated in the cotyledons as they senesce a few weeks later. In situ hybridization revealed that MS RNA is distributed throughout the organ during postgerminative growth and senescence, showing that the same cells express the gene at different stages of development. MS RNA also appears in senescing leaves and petals of cucumber plants. In addition, we found that MS RNA appears in mature expanded leaves and roots when they are removed from the plant and incubated in darkness for several days, thus providing a potential experimental system for the manipulation of MS gene expression. Leaves from transgenic Nicotiana plumbaginifolia containing the cucumber MS promoter fused to the [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene accumulated GUS activity when detached, demonstrating an activation of transcription from the MS promoter following leaf excision. These results are discussed in terms of the metabolic regulation of MS gene expression. PMID:12297649

  13. Regulation of human cerebrospinal fluid malate dehydrogenase 1 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Llorens, Franc; Pracht, Alexander; Thom, Tobias; Correia, Ângela; Zafar, Saima; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable diagnostic biomarkers in differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is an ongoing topic. A previous two-dimensional proteomic study on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed an elevated level of an enzyme, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Here, we could demonstrate the expression of MDH1 in neurons as well as in the neuropil. Its levels are lower in sCJD brains than in control brains. An examination of CSF-MDH1 in sCJD patients by ELISA revealed a significant elevation of CSF-MDH1 levels in sCJD patients (independently from the PRNP codon 129 MV genotype or the prion protein scrapie (PrPSc) type) in comparison to controls. In combination with total tau (tau), CSF-MDH1 detection exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for sCJD diagnosis with a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 95.6%. A correlation study of MDH1 level in CSF with other neurodegenerative marker proteins revealed a significant positive correlation between MDH1 concentration with tau, 14-3-3 and neuron specific enolase level. In conclusion, our study indicated the potential of MDH1 in combination with tau as an additional biomarker in sCJD improving diagnostic accuracy of tau markedly. PMID:27852982

  14. Alternative oxidase pathway optimizes photosynthesis during osmotic and temperature stress by regulating cellular ROS, malate valve and antioxidative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINAKAR eCHALLABATHULA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 µmoles m-2 s-1 at 25 oC under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 M to 1.0M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 oC to 10 oC to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25 OC, the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10 OC, while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Nevertheless, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, the observed changes in NaHCO3 dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(PH/NAD(P and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the

  15. Effects of MALAT1 on proliferation and apo- ptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo by modulating autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wu, Kaiming; Liu, Kuanzhi; Miao, Rong

    2018-01-29

    To explore the ability of MALAT1 to influence non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo by modulating autophagy. LncRNA MALAT-1 in normal HBE cells and human NSCLC cells was measured. A549 cells were treated with si-MALAT-1, negative control and si-MALAT-1 + rapamycin. The mRNA levels of MALAT-1, P62 and LC3 was determined by the qRT-PCR and the protein levels of autophagy-related proteins by the western blotting. The CCK8 assay was performed for cell proliferation, the scratch test for cell migration, the Transwell assay for cell invasion, and the flow cytometry for cell cycle and apoptosis. Tumor xenograft in nude mice is performed to test tumorigenesis of the transfected A549 cells. The expression level of MALAT-1 in A549, SPC-A-1 and NCI-H460 cells was increased compared to HBE cells. And A549 with a high expression level of MALAT-1 were selected for cell transfection. si-MALAT-1 decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, reduced cell cycle progression, and increased cell apoptosis and P62 protein expression. No significant difference was found between A549 cells and A549 cells transfected with si-MALAT-1 + RAPA, A549 cells transfected with NC and A549 cells transfected with si-MALAT-1 + RAPA. Nude mice injected with A549 cells transfected with si-MALAT-1 had smallest tumor on size and weight among other nude mice. Downregulation of MALAT1 may promote apoptosis and suppress proliferation, migration and invasion of human NSCLC A549 cells by inhibiting autophagy, thereby suppressing the development of NSCLC.

  16. Calcium absorption from apple and orange juice fortified with calcium citrate malate (CCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andon, M B; Peacock, M; Kanerva, R L; De Castro, J A

    1996-06-01

    Determine calcium (Ca) absorption from Ca fortified orange and apple juice. Absorbability was assessed by measuring 45Ca absorption in healthy women (mean age 57 years, n = 57/group) and whole body 47Ca retention in adult female beagle dogs (n = 6/group) and young adult male rats (n = 6/group). Women received 6.24 mmol (250 mg) Ca as calcium citrate malate fortified orange juice (CCM-OJ) or apple juice (CCM-AJ). Dogs received 3.12 mmol (125 mg) Ca as CCM-OJ or CCM-AJ. Rats were administered 0.15 mmol (6 mg) Ca as either milk, CCM-OJ, or CCM-AJ. Additional 47Ca whole body retention experiments in rats measured the effects of differences in the carbohydrate and organic acid contents of the juices on Ca absorption. Mean +/- SEM percent Ca fractional absorption was greater (p < 0.003) in women who consumed CCM-AJ (42 +/- 2%) than those who consumed CCM-OJ (36 +/- 1%). Ca retention in dogs was 15 +/- 1% for CCM-OJ and 29 +/- 2% for CCM-AJ (p < 0.001). Ca retention was significantly different (p < 0.05) in rats administered milk (42 +/- 2%), CCM-OJ (52 +/- 2%), or CCM-AJ (61 +/- 2%). By manipulating the carbohydrate and organic acid concentrations of test solutions to mimic the composition of Ca fortified juices, we found that the greater fructose and lower organic acid content of apple juice accounted for its greater Ca absorbability. CCM fortified versions of orange and apple juice have high Ca absorbability and are potentially important vehicles for increasing dietary Ca intake. The greater Ca absorption from CCM-AJ compared with CCM-OJ is accounted for by differences in the carbohydrate and organic acid content of the juices. These data suggest that by modifying common beverage ingredients, products with even greater Ca absorbability could be formulated.

  17. Sunitinib malate provides activity against murine bladder tumor growth and invasion in a preclinical orthotopic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie Shu-yin; Patel, Amit R; Hansel, Donna E; Larchian, William A; Heston, Warren D

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of sunitinib on localized bladder cancer in a mouse orthotopic bladder tumor model. We used an established orthotopic mouse bladder cancer model in syngeneic C3H/He mice. Treatment doses of 40 mg/kg of sunitinib or placebo sterile saline were administrated daily by oral gavage. Tumor volume, intratumoral perfusion, and in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression were measured using a targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging system. The findings were correlated with the total bladder weight, tumor stage, and survival. The effects of sunitinib malate on angiogenesis and cellular proliferation were measured by immunostaining of CD31 and Ki-67. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was seen after sunitinib treatment compared with the control. The incidence of extravesical extension of the bladder tumor and hydroureter in the sunitinib-treated group (30% and 20%, respectively) was lower than the incidence in the control group (66.7% and 55.6%, respectively). Sunitinib therapy prolonged the survival in mice, with statistical significance (log-rank test, P = .03). On targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging, in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression was reduced in the sunitinib group and correlated with a decrease in microvessel density. The results of our study have demonstrated the antitumor effects of sunitinib in the mouse localized bladder cancer model. Sunitinib inhibited the growth of bladder tumors and prolonged survival. Given that almost 30% of cases in our treatment arm developed extravesical disease, sunitinib might be suited as a part of a multimodal treatment regimen for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Malate synthase gene expression during fruit ripening of Cavendish banana (Musa acuminata cv. Williams).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pua, Eng-Chong; Chandramouli, Sumana; Han, Ping; Liu, Pei

    2003-01-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is a key enzyme responsible for malic acid synthesis in the glyoxylate cycle, which functions to convert stored lipids to carbohydrates, by catalysing the glyoxylate condensation reaction with acetyl-CoA in the peroxisome. In this study, the cloning of an MS cDNA, designated MaMS-1, from the banana fruit is reported. MaMS-1 was 1801 bp in length encoding a single polypeptide of 556 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis revealed that MaMS-1 possessed the conserved catalytic domain and a putative peroxisomal targeting signal SK(I/L) at the carboxyl terminal. MaMS-1 also shared an extensive sequence homology (79-81.3%) with other plant MS homologues. Southern analysis indicated that MS might be present as multiple members in the banana genome. In Northern analysis, MaMS-1 was expressed specifically in ripening fruit tissue and transcripts were not detected in other organs such as roots, pseudostem, leaves, ovary, male flower, and in fruit at different stages of development. However, the transcript abundance in fruit was affected by stage of ripening, during which transcript was barely detectable at the early stage of ripening (FG and TY), but the level increased markedly in MG and in other fruits at advanced ripening stages. Furthermore, MaMS-1 expression in FG fruit could be stimulated by treatment with 1 microl l(-1) exogenous ethylene, but the stimulatory effect was abolished by the application of an ethylene inhibitor, norbornadiene. Results of this study clearly show that MS expression in banana fruit is temporally regulated during ripening and is ethylene-inducible.

  19. Characterization of a bifunctional glyoxylate cycle enzyme, malate synthase/isocitrate lyase, of Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Nishimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle is a modified form of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which enables organisms to synthesize carbohydrates from C2 compounds. In the protozoan Euglena gracilis, the key enzyme activities of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), are conferred by a single bifunctional protein named glyoxylate cycle enzyme (Euglena gracilis glyoxylate cycle enzyme [EgGCE]). We analyzed the enzymatic properties of recombinant EgGCE to determine the functions of its different domains. The 62-kDa N-terminal domain of EgGCE was sufficient to provide the MS activity as expected from an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence. In contrast, expression of the 67-kDa C-terminal domain of EgGCE failed to yield ICL activity even though this domain was structurally similar to ICL family enzymes. Analyses of truncation mutants suggested that the N-terminal residues of EgGCE are critical for both the ICL and MS activities. The ICL activity of EgGCE increased in the presence of micro-molar concentrations of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA also increased the activity in a mutant type EgGCE with a mutation at the acetyl-CoA binding site in the MS domain of EgGCE. This suggests that acetyl-CoA regulates the ICL reaction by binding to a site other than the catalytic center of the MS reaction. © 2011 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology© 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  20. Characterization of the N-Acetyl-[alpha]-d-glucosaminyl l-Malate Synthase and Deacetylase Functions for Bacillithiol Biosynthesis in Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsonage, Derek; Newton, Gerald L.; Holder, Robert C.; Wallace, Bret D.; Paige, Carleitta; Hamilton, Chris J.; Dos Santos, Patricia C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Reid, Sean D.; Claiborne, Al (Wake Forest); (UNC); (East Anglia); (UCSD)

    2012-02-21

    Bacillithiol (Cys-GlcN-malate, BSH) has recently been identified as a novel low-molecular weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, and several other Gram-positive bacteria lacking glutathione and mycothiol. We have now characterized the first two enzymes for the BSH biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis, which combine to produce {alpha}-D-glucosaminyl L-malate (GlcN-malate) from UDP-GlcNAc and L-malate. The structure of the GlcNAc-malate intermediate has been determined, as have the kinetic parameters for the BaBshA glycosyltransferase ({yields}GlcNAc-malate) and the BaBshB deacetylase ({yields}GlcN-malate). BSH is one of only two natural products reported to contain a malyl glycoside, and the crystal structure of the BaBshA-UDP-malate ternary complex, determined in this work at 3.3 {angstrom} resolution, identifies several active-site interactions important for the specific recognition of L-malate, but not other {alpha}-hydroxy acids, as the acceptor substrate. In sharp contrast to the structures reported for the GlcNAc-1-D-myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MshA) apo and ternary complex forms, there is no major conformational change observed in the structures of the corresponding BaBshA forms. A mutant strain of B. anthracis deficient in the BshA glycosyltransferase fails to produce BSH, as predicted. This B. anthracis bshA locus (BA1558) has been identified in a transposon-site hybridization study as required for growth, sporulation, or germination [Day, W. A., Jr., Rasmussen, S. L., Carpenter, B. M., Peterson, S. N., and Friedlander, A. M. (2007) J. Bacteriol. 189, 3296-3301], suggesting that the biosynthesis of BSH could represent a target for the development of novel antimicrobials with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive pathogens like B. anthracis. The metabolites that function in thiol redox buffering and homeostasis in Bacillus are not well understood, and we present a composite picture based on this and other recent work.

  1. MdMYB1 Regulates Anthocyanin and Malate Accumulation by Directly Facilitating Their Transport into Vacuoles in Apples1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Da-Gang; Sun, Cui-Hui; Ma, Qi-Jun; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tonoplast transporters, including proton pumps and secondary transporters, are essential for plant cell function and for quality formation of fleshy fruits and ornamentals. Vacuolar transport of anthocyanins, malate, and other metabolites is directly or indirectly dependent on the H+-pumping activities of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA) and/or vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase, but how these proton pumps are regulated in modulating vacuolar transport is largely unknown. Here, we report a transcription factor, MdMYB1, in apples that binds to the promoters of two genes encoding the B subunits of VHA, MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2, to transcriptionally activate its expression, thereby enhancing VHA activity. A series of transgenic analyses in apples demonstrates that MdMYB1/10 controls cell pH and anthocyanin accumulation partially by regulating MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2. Furthermore, several other direct target genes of MdMYB10 are identified, including MdVHA-E2, MdVHP1, MdMATE-LIKE1, and MdtDT, which are involved in H+-pumping or in the transport of anthocyanins and malates into vacuoles. Finally, we show that the mechanism by which MYB controls malate and anthocyanin accumulation in apples also operates in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These findings provide novel insights into how MYB transcription factors directly modulate the vacuolar transport system in addition to anthocyanin biosynthesis, consequently controlling organ coloration and cell pH in plants. PMID:26637549

  2. Identification, cloning and expression analysis of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) mitochondrial citrate synthase and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetta, Pietro P. M.; Escobar, Nieves Medina; Ross, Heather A.; Souleyre, Edwige J. F.; Hancock, Robert D.; Witte, Claus-Peter; Davies, Howard V.

    2004-05-01

    Salt-extractable proteins from the cell walls of immature and ripe strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. cv. Elsanta) fruit were separated using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seven polypeptides (enzymes) were characterized from their N-terminal sequences: (1) glyceraldhyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.12); (2) triose phosphate isomerase (TPI; EC 5.3.1.1); (3) mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37); (4) NADH glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.3); (5) chalcone synthase (ChS; EC 2.3.1.74); (6) mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS; EC 4.1.3.7); and (7) UDP glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UDPG:FGT; EC 2.4.1.91). The sequenced polypeptides identified only cytosolic proteins, two of which (ChS and UDPG:FGT) had already been identified as being up-regulated in ripening (strawberry) fruit and important contributors to ripe fruit character. Our focus was therefore diverted to the enzymes mMDH and mCS for further molecular characterization as potentially important determinants of fruit flavour via regulation of the sugar : acid balance. Citrate synthase (CS) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) enzyme activities increased substantially during ripening, as did citrate and malate contents. The increase in CS activity is supported by western blot analysis. One strawberry mCS (Fa-mCS-I) and two mMDH (Fa-mMDH-I and -II) cDNAs were cloned that were 77, 82 and 53% identical (respectively) to sequences from other plant sources. Northern analysis showed that CS and MDH expression did not correlate with enzyme activities and these findings are discussed.

  3. MdMYB1 Regulates Anthocyanin and Malate Accumulation by Directly Facilitating Their Transport into Vacuoles in Apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Da-Gang; Sun, Cui-Hui; Ma, Qi-Jun; You, Chun-Xiang; Cheng, Lailiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-03-01

    Tonoplast transporters, including proton pumps and secondary transporters, are essential for plant cell function and for quality formation of fleshy fruits and ornamentals. Vacuolar transport of anthocyanins, malate, and other metabolites is directly or indirectly dependent on the H(+)-pumping activities of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (VHA) and/or vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase, but how these proton pumps are regulated in modulating vacuolar transport is largely unknown. Here, we report a transcription factor, MdMYB1, in apples that binds to the promoters of two genes encoding the B subunits of VHA, MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2, to transcriptionally activate its expression, thereby enhancing VHA activity. A series of transgenic analyses in apples demonstrates that MdMYB1/10 controls cell pH and anthocyanin accumulation partially by regulating MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2. Furthermore, several other direct target genes of MdMYB10 are identified, including MdVHA-E2, MdVHP1, MdMATE-LIKE1, and MdtDT, which are involved in H(+)-pumping or in the transport of anthocyanins and malates into vacuoles. Finally, we show that the mechanism by which MYB controls malate and anthocyanin accumulation in apples also operates in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These findings provide novel insights into how MYB transcription factors directly modulate the vacuolar transport system in addition to anthocyanin biosynthesis, consequently controlling organ coloration and cell pH in plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Plant sunscreens in the UV-B: ultraviolet spectroscopy of jet-cooled sinapoyl malate, sinapic acid, and sinapate ester derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Jacob C; Kusaka, Ryoji; Walsh, Patrick S; Allais, Florent; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-10-22

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy of sinapoyl malate, an essential UV-B screening agent in plants, was carried out in the cold, isolated environment of a supersonic expansion to explore its intrinsic UV spectral properties in detail. Despite these conditions, sinapoyl malate displays anomalous spectral broadening extending well over 1000 cm(-1) in the UV-B region, presenting the tantalizing prospect that nature's selection of UV-B sunscreen is based in part on the inherent quantum mechanical features of its excited states. Jet-cooling provides an ideal setting in which to explore this topic, where complications from intermolecular interactions are eliminated. In order to better understand the structural causes of this behavior, the UV spectroscopy of a series of sinapate esters was undertaken and compared with ab initio calculations, starting with the simplest sinapate chromophore sinapic acid, and building up the ester side chain to sinapoyl malate. This "deconstruction" approach provided insight into the active mechanism intrinsic to sinapoyl malate, which is tentatively attributed to mixing of the bright V ((1)ππ*) state with an adiabatically lower (1)nπ* state which, according to calculations, shows unique charge-transfer characteristics brought on by the electron-rich malate side chain. All members of the series absorb strongly in the UV-B region, but significant differences emerge in the appearance of the spectrum among the series, with derivatives most closely associated with sinapoyl malate showing characteristic broadening even under jet-cooled conditions. The long vibronic progressions, conformational distribution, and large oscillator strength of the V (ππ*) transition in sinapates makes them ideal candidates for their role as UV-B screening agents in plants.

  5. Superior aluminium (Al) tolerance of Stylosanthes is achieved mainly by malate synthesis through an Al-enhanced malic enzyme, SgME1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lili; Liang, Cuiyue; Chen, Zhijian; Liu, Pandao; Tian, Jiang; Liu, Guodao; Liao, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Stylosanthes (stylo) is a dominant leguminous forage in the tropics. Previous studies suggest that stylo has great potential for aluminium (Al) tolerance, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. A novel malic enzyme, SgME1, was identified from the Al-tolerant genotype TPRC2001-1 after 72 h Al exposure by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and the encoding gene was cloned and characterized via heterologous expression in yeast, Arabidopsis thaliana and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) hairy roots. Internal Al detoxification might be mainly responsible for the 72 h Al tolerance of TPRC2001-1, as indicated by 5.8-fold higher root malate concentrations and approximately two-fold higher Al concentrations in roots and root symplasts of TPRC2001-1 than those of the Al-sensitive genotype Fine-stem. An accompanying increase in malate secretion might also reduce a fraction of Al uptake in TPRC2001-1. Gene and protein expression of SgME1 was only enhanced in TPRC2001-1 after 72 h Al exposure. Overexpressing SgME1 enhanced malate synthesis and rescued yeast, A. thaliana and bean hairy roots from Al toxicity via increasing intracellular malate concentrations and/or accompanied malate exudation. These results provide strong evidence that superior Al tolerance of stylo is mainly conferred by Al-enhanced malate synthesis, functionally controlled by SgME1. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Metabolic regulation of phytoplasma malic enzyme and phosphotransacetylase supports the use of malate as an energy source in these plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigo, Mariana; Golic, Adrián; Alvarez, Clarisa E; Andreo, Carlos S; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Mussi, María A; Drincovich, María F

    2014-12-01

    Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma') are insect-vectored plant pathogens. The genomes of these bacteria are small with limited metabolic capacities making them dependent on their plant and insect hosts for survival. In contrast to mycoplasmas and other relatives in the class Mollicutes, phytoplasmas encode genes for malate transporters and malic enzyme (ME) for conversion of malate into pyruvate. It was hypothesized that malate is probably a major energy source for phytoplasmas as these bacteria are limited in the uptake and processing of carbohydrates. In this study, we investigated the metabolic capabilities of 'Candidatus (Ca.) phytoplasma' aster yellows witches'-broom (AYWB) malic enzyme (ME). We found that AYWB-ME has malate oxidative decarboxylation activity, being able to convert malate to pyruvate and CO2 with the reduction of either NAD or NADP, and displays distinctive kinetic mechanisms depending on the relative concentration of the substrates. AYWB-ME activity was strictly modulated by the ATP/ADP ratio, a feature which has not been found in other ME isoforms characterized to date. In addition, we found that the 'Ca. Phytoplasma' AYWB PduL-like enzyme (AYWB-PduL) harbours phosphotransacetylase activity, being able to convert acetyl-CoA to acetyl phosphate downstream of pyruvate. ATP also inhibited AYWB-PduL activity, as with AYWB-ME, and the product of the reaction catalysed by AYWB-PduL, acetyl phosphate, stimulated AYWB-ME activity. Overall, our data indicate that AYWB-ME and AYWB-PduL activities are finely coordinated by common metabolic signals, like ATP/ADP ratios and acetyl phosphate, which support their participation in energy (ATP) and reducing power [NAD(P)H] generation from malate in phytoplasmas. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Systematic replacement of lysine with glutamine and alanine in Escherichia coli malate synthase G: effect on crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstrom, David M.; Colip, Leslie; Moshofsky, Brian; Hatcher, Eric; Remington, S. James

    2005-01-01

    Alanine and glutamine mutations were made to the same 15 lysine positions on the surface of E. coli malate synthase G and the impact on crystallization observed. The results support lysine replacement for improvement of crystallization and provide insight into site selection and type of amino-acid replacement. Two proposals recommend substitution of surface lysine residues as a means to improve the quality of protein crystals. In proposal I, substitution of lysine by alanine has been suggested to improve crystallization by reducing the entropic cost of ordering flexible side chains at crystal contacts. In proposal II, substitution of lysine by residues more commonly found in crystal contacts, such as glutamine, has been proposed to improve crystallization. 15 lysine residues on the surface of Escherichia coli malate synthase G, distributed over a variety of secondary structures, were individually mutated to both alanine and glutamine. For 28 variants, detailed studies of the effect on enzymatic activity and crystallization were conducted. This has permitted direct comparison of the relative effects of the two types of mutations. While none of the variants produced crystals suitable for X-ray structural determination, small crystals were obtained in a wide variety of conditions, in support of the general approach. Glutamine substitutions were found to be more effective than alanine in producing crystals, in support of proposal II. Secondary structure at the site of mutation does not appear to play a major role in determining the rate of success

  8. Engineering Escherichia coli for malate production by integrating modular pathway characterization with CRISPRi-guided multiplexed metabolic tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Cong; Wang, Shihui; Hu, Guipeng; Guo, Liang; Chen, Xiulai; Xu, Peng; Liu, Liming

    2018-03-01

    The application of rational design in reallocating metabolic flux to overproduce desired chemicals is always restricted by the native regulatory network. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro modular pathway optimization combined with in vivo multiplexed combinatorial engineering enables effective characterization of the bottleneck of a complex biosynthetic cascade and improves the output of the engineered pathway. As a proof of concept, we systematically identified the rate-limiting step of a five-gene malate biosynthetic pathway by combinatorially tuning the enzyme loads of a reconstituted biocatalytic reaction in a cell-free system. Using multiplexed CRISPR interference, we subsequently eliminated the metabolic constraints by rationally assigning an optimal gene expression pattern for each pathway module. The present engineered strain Escherichia coli B0013-47 exhibited a 2.3-fold increase in malate titer compared with that of the parental strain, with a yield of 0.85 mol/mol glucose in shake-flask culture and titer of 269 mM (36 g/L) in fed-batch cultivation. The strategy reported herein represents a powerful method for improving the efficiency of multi-gene pathways and advancing the success of metabolic engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Small angle X-ray scattering studies on the X-ray induced aggregation of malate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, P.; Durchschlag, H.

    1980-01-01

    Malate synthase was investigated by the small-angle X-ray scattering technique in aqueous solution. Measurements extending for several hours revealed a continuous increase of the intensity in the innermost portion of the scattering curve. There is clear evidence that this increase was caused by an X-ray induced aggregation of enzyme particles during the performance of the small-angle X-ray scattering experiment. The monitoring of the aggregation process in situ by means of small-angle X-ray scattering led to a model of the way how the aggregation might proceed. The analysis of the scattering curves of malate synthase taken at various stages of aggregation established the retention of the thickness factor of the native enzyme and the occurrence of one and later on of two cross-section factors. The process of aggregation was also reflected by the increase of extension of the distance distribution function. Measurements of enzymic activity and small-angle X-ray scattering on samples, which had been X-irradiated with a defined dose prior to the measurements, established two different series of efficiency for the protection of the enzyme against aggregation and inactivation. The results showed that there is no direct relation between the extent of aggregation and the loss of enzymic activity. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Long noncoding RNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1: A molecular predictor of poor survival in glioblastoma multiforme in Egyptian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal S. Fawzy

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Taken together, we could postulate that MALAT1 might have a tumor-suppressive function in GBM in Egyptian population and this specific type of lncRNAs may be included in the lists of both potential prognostic biomarkers and the future therapeutic targets for glioblastomas.

  11. Functional, structural and phylogenetic analysis of domains underlying the Al-sensitivity of the aluminium-activated malate/anion transporter, TaALMT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    TaALMT1 (Triticum aestivum Aluminum Activated Malate Transporter) is the founding member of a novel gene family of anion transporters (ALMTs) that mediate the efflux of organic acids. A small subgroup of root-localized ALMTs, including TaALMT1, is physiologically associated with in planta aluminum (...

  12. Effect of Punica granatum fruit peel on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase in amphistome Gastrothylax indicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rama; Bagai, Upma

    2017-03-01

    Increasing anthelmintic resistance and the impact of conventional anthelmintics on the environment, it is important to look for alternative strategies against helminth parasite in sheep. Important lipogenic enzymes like glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) show subcellular distribution pattern. Activity of G-6-PDH was largely restricted to cytosolic fraction while MDH was found in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fraction in Gastrothylax indicus. Following in vitro treatment with ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Punica granatum fruit peel and commercial anthelmintic, albendazole G-6-PDH activity was decreased by 19-32 %, whereas MDH was suppressed by 24-41 %, compared to the respective control. Albendazole was quite effective when compared with negative control and both the extracts. The results indicate that phytochemicals of plant may act as potential vermifuge or vermicide.

  13. The contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism of ripening peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) flesh is negligible. Implications for the occurrence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiani, Franco; Farinelli, Daniela; Moscatello, Stefano; Battistelli, Alberto; Leegood, Richard C; Walker, Robert P

    2016-04-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism in the ripening flesh of the peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) cultivar Adriatica. In the flesh, stored malate accumulated before ripening could contribute little or nothing to the net substrate requirements of metabolism. This was because there was synthesis and not dissimilation of malate throughout ripening. Stored citrate could potentially contribute a very small amount (about 5.8%) of the substrate required by metabolism when the whole ripening period was considered, and a maximum of about 7.5% over the latter part of ripening. The second aim of this study was to investigate why phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) an enzyme utilised in gluconeogenesis from malate and citrate is present in peach flesh. The occurrence and localisation of enzymes utilised in the metabolism of malate, citrate and amino acids were determined in peach flesh throughout its development. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (essential for the synthesis of malate and citrate) was present in the same cells and at the same time as PEPCK and NADP-malic enzyme (both utilised in the dissimilation of malate and citrate). A hypothesis is presented to explain the presence of these enzymes and to account for the likely occurrence of gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Ln(III)-malate complexation studies using TRLFS and micro titration calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taube, F.; Drobot, B. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professorship Radiochemistry; Acker, M.; Taut, S. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Central Radionuclide Laboratory; Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    The complexation of trivalent lanthanides was studied using Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). Formation constants, complexation enthalpies and fluorescence lifetimes are determined over a wide pH range at I = 0.5 m NaCl. This subject has the following background: Concrete is widely used as engineering barrier and for waste conditioning in waste repositories. Its binding agent is cement. Organic cement additives, which are used to improve the workability of fresh concrete, are complexation agents for radionuclides after they have been released during the concretes degradation. Thus, these additives might have an impact on the aqueous geochemistry of actinides. Here, the α-hydroxydicarboxylic acid or malic acid is examined. It is used in water-reducers or retarders in cement.

  15. Short-lived long non-coding RNAs as surrogate indicators for chemical exposure and LINC00152 and MALAT1 modulate their neighboring genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Tani

    Full Text Available Whole transcriptome analyses have revealed a large number of novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs. Although accumulating evidence demonstrates that lncRNAs play important roles in regulating gene expression, the detailed mechanisms of action of most lncRNAs remain unclear. We previously reported that a novel class of lncRNAs with a short half-life (t1/2 < 4 h in HeLa cells, termed short-lived non-coding transcripts (SLiTs, are closely associated with physiological and pathological functions. In this study, we focused on 26 SLiTs and nuclear-enriched abundant lncRNA, MALAT1(t1/2 of 7.6 h in HeLa cells in neural stem cells (NSCs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, and identified four SLiTs (TUG1, GAS5, FAM222-AS1, and SNHG15 that were affected by the following typical chemical stresses (oxidative stress, heavy metal stress and protein synthesis stress. We also found the expression levels of LINC00152 (t1/2 of 2.1 h in NSCs, MALAT1 (t1/2 of 1.8 h in NSCs, and their neighboring genes were elevated proportionally to the chemical doses. Moreover, we confirmed that the overexpression of LINC00152 or MALAT1 upregulated the expressions of their neighboring genes even in the absence of chemical stress. These results reveal that LINC00152 and MALAT1 modulate their neighboring genes, and thus provide a deeper understanding of the functions of lncRNAs.

  16. Aberrant KDM5B expression promotes aggressive breast cancer through MALAT1 overexpression and downregulation of hsa-miR-448

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamodu, Oluwaseun Adebayo; Huang, Wen-Chien; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Wu, Alexander; Wang, Liang Shun; Hsiao, Michael; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chao, Tsu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) possess cell dedifferentiation characteristics, carry out activities connate to those of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and are associated with increased metastasis, as well as, poor clinical prognosis. The regulatory mechanism of this highly malignant phenotype is still poorly characterized. Accruing evidence support the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as potent regulators of CSC and metastatic gene expression, with their dysregulation implicated in tumorigenesis and disease progression. In this study, we investigated TNBC metastasis, metastasis-associated genes and potential inhibitory mechanisms using bioinformatics, tissue microarray analyses, immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction, loss and gain of gene function assays and comparative analyses of data obtained. Compared with other breast cancer types, the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells concurrently exhibited increased expression levels of Lysine-specific demethylase 5B protein (KDM5B) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), MALAT1, suggesting their functional association. KDM5B-silencing in the TNBC cells correlated with the upregulation of hsa-miR-448 and led to suppression of MALAT1 expression with decreased migration, invasion and clonogenic capacity in vitro, as well as, poor survival in vivo. This projects MALAT1 as a mediator of KDM5B oncogenic potential and highlights the critical role of this microRNA, lncRNA and histone demethylase in cancer cell motility and metastatic colonization. Increased expression of KDM5B correlating with disease progression and poor clinical outcome in breast cancer was reversed by hsa-miR-448. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of KDM5B and its negative regulator hsa-miR-448 in TNBC metastasis and progression. Hsa-miR-448 disrupting KDM5B-MALAT1 signalling axis and associated activities in TNBC cells, projects it as a putative therapeutic factor for selective eradication of TNBC cells

  17. Aluminum induced proteome changes in tomato cotyledons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotyledons of tomato seedlings that germinated in a 20 µM AlK(SO4)2 solution remained chlorotic while those germinated in an aluminum free medium were normal (green) in color. Previously, we have reported the effect of aluminum toxicity on root proteome in tomato seedlings (Zhou et al. J Exp Bot, 20...

  18. Structure of porcine heart cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase: combining x-ray diffraction and chemical sequence data in structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birktoft, J.J.; Bradshaw, R.A.; Banaszak, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (sMDH) has been determined by a combination of X-ray crystallographic and chemical sequencing methods. The initial molecular model incorporated an X-ray amino acid sequence that derived primarily from an evaluation of a multiple isomorphous replacement phased electron density map calculated at 2.5-A resolution. Following restrained least-squares crystallographic refinement, difference electron density maps were calculated from model phases, and attempts were made to upgrade the X-ray amino acid sequence. The method used to find the positions of peptides in the X-ray structure was similar to those used for studying protein homology and was shown to be successful for large fragments. For sMDH, X-ray methods by themselves were insufficient to derive a complete amino acid sequence, even with partial chemical sequence data. However, for this relatively large molecule at medium resolution, the electron density maps were of considerable help in determining the linear position of peptide fragments. The N-acetylated polypeptide chain of sMDH has 331 amino acids and has been crystallographically refined to an R factor of 19% for 2.5-A resolution diffraction data

  19. Improved production of propionic acid in Propionibacterium jensenii via combinational overexpression of glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Zhuge, Xin; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Microbial production of propionic acid (PA), an important chemical building block used as a preservative and chemical intermediate, has gained increasing attention for its environmental friendliness over traditional petrochemical processes. In previous studies, we constructed a shuttle vector as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, a potential candidate for efficient PA synthesis. In this study, we identified the key metabolites for PA synthesis in P. jensenii by examining the influence of metabolic intermediate addition on PA synthesis with glycerol as a carbon source under anaerobic conditions. We also further improved PA production via the overexpression of the identified corresponding enzymes, namely, glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarate hydratase (FUM). Compared to those in wild-type P. jensenii, the activities of these enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.91- ± 0.17- to 8.12- ± 0.37-fold higher. The transcription levels of the corresponding enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.85- ± 0.19- to 8.07- ± 0.63-fold higher than those in the wild type. The coexpression of GDH and MDH increased the PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g/liter in wild-type P. jensenii to 39.43 ± 1.90 g/liter in the engineered strains. This study identified the key metabolic nodes limiting PA overproduction in P. jensenii and further improved PA titers via the coexpression of GDH and MDH, making the engineered P. jensenii strain a potential industrial producer of PA. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Liao, James C [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to

  1. Th2-related immune responses by the Brucella abortus cellular antigens, malate dehydrogenase, elongation factor, and arginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Young Bin; Shim, Soojin; Park, Woo Bin; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2017-09-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Brucella species. The disease is difficult to control due to the intracellular survival of the bacterium and the lack of precise understanding of pathogenesis. Despite of continuous researches on the pathogenesis of Brucella spp. infection, there is still question on the pathogenesis, especially earlier immune response in the bacterial infection. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH), elongation factor (Tsf), and arginase (RocF), which showed serological reactivity, were purified after gene cloning, and their immune modulating activities were then analyzed in a murine model. Cytokine production profiles were investigated by stimulating RAW 264.7 cells and naïve splenocytes with the three recombinant proteins. Also, immune responses were analyzed by ELISA and an ELIspot assay after immunizing mice with the three proteins. Only TNF-α was produced in stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, whereas Th1-related cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-2, were induced in naïve splenocytes. In contrast, Th2-type immune response was more strongly induced in antigen-secreting cells in the splenocytes obtained 28 days after immunizing mice with the three proteins, as were IgM and IgG. The induction of Th2-related antibody, IgG1, was higher than the Th1-related antibody, IgG2a, in immunized mice. These results suggest that the three proteins strongly induce Th2-type immune response in vivo, even though Th1-related cytokines were produced in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon isotope composition of intermediates of the starch-malate sequence and level of the crassulacean acid metabolism in leaves of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Tom Thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleens, E; Garnier-Dardart, J; Queiroz, O

    1979-09-01

    Isotype analyses were performed on biochemical fractions isolated from leaves of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Tom Thumb. during aging under long days or short days. Irrespective of the age or photoperiodic conditions, the intermediates of the starch-malate sequence (starch, phosphorylated compounds and organic acids) have a level of (13)C higher than that of soluble sugars, cellulose and hemicellulose. In short days, the activity of the crassulacean acid metabolism pathway is predominant as compared to that of C3 pathway: leaves accumulate organic acids, rich in (13)C. In long days, the activity of the crassulacean acid metabolism pathway increases as the leaves age, remaining, however, relatively low as compared to that of C3 pathway: leaves accumulate soluble sugars, poor in (13)C. After photoperiodic change (long days→short days), isotopic modifications of starch and organic acids suggest evidence for a lag phase in the establishment of the crassulacean acid metabolism pathway specific to short days. The relative proportions of carbon from a C3-origin (RuBPC acitivity as strong discriminating step, isotope discrimination in vivo=20‰) or C4-origin (PEPC activity as weak discriminating step, isotope discrimination in vivo=4‰) present in the biochemical fractions were calculated from their δ(13)C values. Under long days, 30 to 70% versus 80 to 100% under short days, of the carbon of the intermediates linked to the starch-malate sequence, or CAM pathway (starch, phosphorylated compounds and organic acids), have a C4-origin. Products connected to the C3 pathway (free sugars, cellulose, hemicellulose) have 0 to 50% of their carbon, arising from reuptake of the C4 from malate, under long days versus 30 to 70% under short days.

  3. Acute citrulline malate supplementation improves upper- and lower-body submaximal weightlifting exercise performance in resistance-trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jordan M; Gray, Michelle; Wethington, Lauren N; Stone, Matthew S; Stewart, Rodger W; Moyen, Nicole E

    2017-03-01

    Citrulline malate (CM) is a nonessential amino acid that increases exercise performance in males. However, based on physiological differences between genders, these results cannot be extrapolated to females. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to evaluate effects of acute CM supplementation on upper- and lower-body weightlifting performance in resistance-trained females. Fifteen females (23 ± 3 years) completed two randomized, double-blind trials consuming either CM (8 g dextrose + 8 g CM) or a placebo (8 g dextrose). One hour after supplement consumption, participants performed six sets each of upper- (i.e., bench press) and lower-body (i.e., leg press) exercises to failure at 80 % of previously established one-repetition maximum. Immediately after each set, repetitions completed, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded. Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that subjects completed significantly (p = .045) more repetitions throughout upper-body exercise when consuming CM versus placebo (34.1 ± 5.7 vs. 32.9 ± 6.0, respectively). When consuming CM, similar significant (p = .03) improvements in total repetitions completed were observed for lower-body exercise (66.7 ± 30.5 vs. 55.13 ± 20.64, respectively). Overall RPE score was significantly lower (p = .02) in upper-body exercise when subjects consumed CM versus placebo (7.9 ± 0.3 and 8.6 ± 0.2, respectively). The supplement consumed exhibited no significant effects on heart rate at any time point. Acute CM supplementation in females increased upper- and lower-body resistance exercise performance and decreased RPE during upper-body exercise. These data indicate that athletes competing in sports with muscular endurance-based requirements may potentially improve performance by acutely supplementing CM.

  4. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu, E-mail: yuli_scu@163.com

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  5. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding domain of the Pseudomonas putida chemoreceptor McpS in complex with malate and succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavira, J. A.; Lacal, J.; Ramos, J. L.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Krell, T.; Pineda-Molina, E.

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization of the ligand-binding domain of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) are transmembrane proteins that sense changes in environmental signals, generating a chemotactic response and regulating other cellular processes. MCPs are composed of two main domains: a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a cytosolic signalling domain (CSD). Here, the crystallization of the LBD of the chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. McpS-LBD is responsible for sensing most of the TCA-cycle intermediates in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. McpS-LBD was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with two of its natural ligands (malate and succinate). Crystals were obtained by both the counter-diffusion and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion techniques after pre-incubation of McpS-LBD with the ligands. The crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group C2, with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at the ESRF synchrotron X-ray source to resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9 Å for the malate and succinate complexes, respectively

  6. Determination of malation, methidathion, and chlorpyrifos ethyl pesticides using acetylcholinesterase biosensor based on Nafion/Ag@rGO-NH2 nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guler, Muhammet; Turkoglu, Vedat; Basi, Zehra

    2017-01-01

    Herein, a facile electrochemical acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7; AChE) biosensor based on nafion (NA) and Ag nanoparticles supported on amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO-NH 2 ) was developed. The Ag@rGO-NH 2 nanocomposite was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). After being optimized, the biosensor exhibited excellent electrochemical response to the oxidation of thiocholine, the hydrolysis product of acetylthiocholine chloride (ATCl) catalyzed by AChE. An apparent Michealis-Menten value of 20.5 μM was obtained. Under optimized conductions, the biosensor detected malation, methidathion, and chlorpyrifos ethyl in the linear range from 0.0063 to 0.077 μg/mL, from 0.012 to 0.105 μg/mL, and from 0.021 to 0.122 μg/mL, respectively. The detection limit (LoD) was 4.5 ng/mL for malation, 9.5 ng/mL for methidathion, and 14 ng/mL for chlorpyrifos ethyl. Also, the NA/Ag@rGO-NH 2 /AChE/GCE biosensor showed god sensitivity, stability and repeatability, which provides a promising tool for the detection of organophosphate pesticides.

  7. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  8. Modification of a thiol at the active site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme results in changes in the rate-determining steps for oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. (Texas Coll. of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth (United States)); Weiss, P.M. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1991-06-11

    A thiol group at the malate-binding site of the NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum has been modified to thiocyanate. The modified enzyme generally exhibits slight increases in K{sub NAD} and K{sub i metal} and decreases in V{sub max} as the metal size increases from Mg{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 2+} to Cd{sup 2+}, indicative of crowding in the site. The K{sub malate} value increases 10- to 30-fold, suggesting that malate does not bind optimally to the modified enzyme. Deuterium isotope effects on V and V/K{sub malate} increase with all three metal ions compared to the native enzyme concomitant with a decrease in the {sup 13}C isotope effect, suggesting a switch in the rate limitation of the hydride transfer and decarboxylation steps with hydride transfer becoming more rate limiting. The {sup 13}C effect decreases only slightly when obtained with deuterated malate, suggestive of the presence of a secondary {sup 13}C effect in the hydride transfer step, similar to data obtained with non-nicotinamide-containing dinucleotide substrates for the native enzyme (see the preceding paper in this issue). The native enzyme is inactivated in a time-dependent manner by Cd{sup 2+}. This inactivation occurs whether the enzyme alone is present or whether the enzyme is turning over with Cd{sup 2+} as the divalent metal activator. Upon inactivation, only Cd{sup 2+} ions are bound at high stoichiometry to the enzyme, which eventually becomes denatured. Conversion of the active-site thiol to thiocyanate makes it more difficult to inactivate the enzyme by treatment with Cd{sup 2+}.

  9. Modification of a thiol at the active site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme results in changes in the rate-determining steps for oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.; Weiss, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    A thiol group at the malate-binding site of the NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum has been modified to thiocyanate. The modified enzyme generally exhibits slight increases in K NAD and K i metal and decreases in V max as the metal size increases from Mg 2+ to Mn 2+ to Cd 2+ , indicative of crowding in the site. The K malate value increases 10- to 30-fold, suggesting that malate does not bind optimally to the modified enzyme. Deuterium isotope effects on V and V/K malate increase with all three metal ions compared to the native enzyme concomitant with a decrease in the 13 C isotope effect, suggesting a switch in the rate limitation of the hydride transfer and decarboxylation steps with hydride transfer becoming more rate limiting. The 13 C effect decreases only slightly when obtained with deuterated malate, suggestive of the presence of a secondary 13 C effect in the hydride transfer step, similar to data obtained with non-nicotinamide-containing dinucleotide substrates for the native enzyme (see the preceding paper in this issue). The native enzyme is inactivated in a time-dependent manner by Cd 2+ . This inactivation occurs whether the enzyme alone is present or whether the enzyme is turning over with Cd 2+ as the divalent metal activator. Upon inactivation, only Cd 2+ ions are bound at high stoichiometry to the enzyme, which eventually becomes denatured. Conversion of the active-site thiol to thiocyanate makes it more difficult to inactivate the enzyme by treatment with Cd 2+

  10. Organohalogen compounds in human breast milk from mothers living in Payatas and Malate, the Philippines: Levels, accumulation kinetics and infant health risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malarvannan, Govindan; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Isobe, Tomohiko; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577, Ehime Prefecture (Japan); Prudente, Maricar [Science Education Department, De La Salle University, Manila (Philippines); Subramanian, Annamalai [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577, Ehime Prefecture (Japan); Tanabe, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinsuke@agr.ehime-u.ac.j [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577, Ehime Prefecture (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Human breast milk samples (n = 33) from primipara and multipara mothers from Payatas a waste dump site, and Malate a reference site in the Phillipines were collected in 2004 and analyzed for eight organohalogen compounds, viz., PCBs, DDTs, CHLs, HCHs, HCB, TCPMe, PBDEs and HBCDs. DDTs and PCBs were predominant in all the samples. Overall mean concentrations of PBDEs found in our study were higher (7.5 ng/g lipid wt.) than those reported for Japan and many other Asian countries. Primipara mothers had significantly higher levels of DDTs, CHLs and HCHs than multipara mothers, but not PBDEs and HBCDs. A few individuals accumulated CHLs close to or even higher than the tolerable daily intake guidelines proposed by Health Canada. - First comprehensive study on organohalogen contaminants in human breast milk from the Philippines.

  11. Synthesis, growth, structural and optical studies of a new organic three dimensional framework: 4-(aminocarbonyl)pyridine 4-(aminocarbonyl)pyridinium hydrogen L-malate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayalakshmi, A. [Department of Chemistry, RMK. Engineering College, Kavaraipettai 601206 (India); Vidyavathy, B., E-mail: vidyavathybalraj@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry,Velammal Engineering College, Chennai 600066 (India); Peramaiyan, G. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Vinitha, G. [Department of Physics, VIT University, Chennai 600127 (India)

    2017-02-15

    4-(aminocarbonyl)pyridine 4-(aminocarbonyl)pyridinium hydrogen L-malate [(4ACP)(4ACP).(LM)] a new organic nonlinear optical (NLO) crystal was grown by the slow evaporation method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the [(4ACP)(4ACP).(LM)] crystal belongs to monoclinic crystal system, space group P2{sub 1}/n, with a three dimensional network. Thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal (DT) analyses showed that [(4ACP)(4ACP).(LM)] is thermally stable up to 165 °C. The optical transmittance window and the lower cut-off wavelength of [(4ACP)(4ACP).(LM)] were found out by UV–vis–NIR spectral study. The molecular structure of [(4ACP)(4ACP).(LM)] was further confirmed by FTIR spectral studies. The relative dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss were determined as function of frequency and temperature. The third order nonlinear optical property of [(4ACP)(4ACP).(LM)] was studied by the Z-scan technique using a 532 nm diode pumped CW Nd:YAG laser. Nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear absorption coefficient and third order nonlinear susceptibility of the grown crystal were found to be 7.38×10{sup −8} cm{sup 2}/W, 0.08×10{sup −4} cm/W and 5.36×10{sup −6} esu, respectively. The laser damage threshold value is found to be 1.75 GW/cm{sup 2} - Graphical abstract: In the crystal structure of the title complex, the asymmetric unit contains one hydrogen L-malate anion, 4-(aminocarbonyl)pyridinium cation and a neutral isonicotinamide molecule. It is stabilized by intermolecular N-H…O, C-H…O and O-H…O hydrogen bonds which generate a three dimensional network.

  12. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  14. Fluoroelastomer Fouling Release Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malik, Aslam

    1998-01-01

    Our goal is to develop novel fluoroelastomers that exhibit fouling release capabilities and to understand the polymer characteristics that influence the adhesion of biofouling organisms to polymeric substrates...

  15. Compassionate release in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, J

    1997-01-01

    Several States have instituted compassionate release programs to allow terminally ill inmates to be released early. The programs are politically sensitive, and the California program is highlighted. Early release, called recall of sentence under the State penal code, is a lengthy and cumbersome process that has resulted in early release of nearly 100 prisoners in the past 5 years. Guidelines for community activists who are trying to establish similar programs are provided. The guidelines include contact and discussion with prisoners, outside support through influential organizations, support of State legislators and policy makers, and media involvement in building support for the initiative.

  16. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  17. Large scientific releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics

  18. The enhancement of tolerance to salt and cold stresses by modifying the redox state and salicylic acid content via the cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene in transgenic apple plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Jie; Sun, Hong; Dong, Qing-Long; Sun, Tian-Yu; Jin, Zhong-Xin; Hao, Yu-Jin; Yao, Yu-Xin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we characterized the role of an apple cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene (MdcyMDH) in the tolerance to salt and cold stresses and investigated its regulation mechanism in stress tolerance. The MdcyMDH transcript was induced by mild cold and salt treatments, and MdcyMDH-overexpressing apple plants possessed improved cold and salt tolerance compared to wild-type (WT) plants. A digital gene expression tag profiling analysis revealed that MdcyMDH overexpression largely altered some biological processes, including hormone signal transduction, photosynthesis, citrate cycle and oxidation-reduction. Further experiments verified that MdcyMDH overexpression modified the mitochondrial and chloroplast metabolisms and elevated the level of reducing power, primarily caused by increased ascorbate and glutathione, as well as the increased ratios of ascorbate/dehydroascorbate and glutathione/glutathione disulphide, under normal and especially stress conditions. Concurrently, the transgenic plants produced a high H2 O2 content, but a low O2·- production rate was observed compared to the WT plants. On the other hand, the transgenic plants accumulated more free and total salicylic acid (SA) than the WT plants under normal and stress conditions. Taken together, MdcyMDH conferred the transgenic apple plants a higher stress tolerance by producing more reductive redox states and increasing the SA level; MdcyMDH could serve as a target gene to genetically engineer salt- and cold-tolerant trees. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Türkiye’de İmalat Sanayinin İthalata Bağımlılığının Analizi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabriye KUNDAK

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışmada Türkiye’de imalat sanayi sektörü ve imalat sanayi alt sektörlerinin ithalata bağımlılığını etkileyen faktörlerin geçerliliği amprik olarak araştırılmıştır. İmalat sanayi sektörü ve imalat sanayi alt sektörlerinin ithalat bağımlılığını etkileyen faktörlerin uzun dönem, kısa dönem ve birim etkileri açısından TUİK verileri referans alınarak hazırlanan dinamik panel veri (panel havuzlanmış ortalama grup tahmincisi ve ortalama grup tahmincisi yöntemi kullanılarak analiz edilmiştir. Araştırma sonuçlara göre; uzun dönem parametrelerinde; döviz kurunda, sabit sermaye yatırımında, GSYH’da meydana gelen artışlar ithalat bağımlılığını arttırırken, ücretlerde meydana gelen artışların ithalat bağımlılığını azaltmakta olduğu saptanmıştır. Kısa dönem parametrelerinde ise; döviz kurunda ve GSYH meydana gelen artışların ithalat bağımlılığını azalttığı saptanmıştır.

  20. Miniature Release Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to design, build and functionally test a miniature release mechanism for CubeSats and other small satellites. The WFF 6U satellite structure will be...

  1. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report is a compliation of news releases from the Energy Information Administration. The september-october report includes articles on energy conservation, energy consumption in commercial buildings, and a short term energy model for a personal computer

  2. Why do cells release vesicles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwland, Rienk; Sturk, Augueste

    2010-01-01

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells release vesicles into their environment. To answer the question why eukaryotic cells release vesicles, we may learn from prokaryotes. Bacteria release outer membrane vesicles, resembling microparticles, which act as "multi-purpose carriers". They contain signalling

  3. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to citrulline-malate and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    to citrulline-malate and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise. Citrulline-malate is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect is “maintenance of ATP levels through reduction of lactates in excess for an improved recovery from muscle fatigue”. The target population proposed by the applicant...... is healthy children above six years of age and adults. The Panel considers that faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise contributing to the restoration of muscle function is a beneficial physiological effect. A total of 33 references were considered as pertinent to the claim by the applicant...... to the methodological limitations of the study. A number of mechanistic, animal and in vitro studies were submitted. In the absence of evidence for an effect of consumption of citrulline-malate on a faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise in humans, these studies cannot be used as a source of data...

  4. Seasonal and diel activity of Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) subpopulations in Denmark. Aspects of size, physiological age, and malate dehydrogenase genotype in a forest site without any undergrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, P M; Kaufmann, U

    2003-01-01

    The underlying population dynamics and the behavioural patterns of the vectors are key issues in understanding the transmission of vector borne pathogens. For the tick Ixodes ricinus both seasonal and diel activity have been described as bimodal patterns, which in seasonal aspect has been interpreted as representing two cohorts. However, recent studies have shown that this interpretation may be incorrect. The aim of this study was to obtain more detailed information on nymph host seeking by studying subpopulations of ticks during the day and season. The study was designed to allow for comparisons of the diel variation and seasonal variation in their dependency in a number of tick characteristics. The study took place in a forest with planted beech trees without any undergrowth. Ticks were collected by flagging the dead leaves on the forest floor. For each nymph, a number of visual observations were made. The size and physiological age was observed and the nymphs were genotyped in the malate dehydrogenase locus (MDH, E.C. 1.1.1.37). Briefly the main results can be given as: (i) There were significant differences in the composition of size classes during the season, but only limited trends in time. (ii) The proportion of the small nymphs was highly variable, with a variation from 3% to 24% in October and September, respectively. (iii) The diel variation in MDH genotypes was significant in May and August. (iv) Nymph size classes and physiological age appeared to interact. The non-random interaction was caused by a relatively even distribution of small nymphs in all four age classes, while large nymphs tended to fall into age class 2 and 3. The length by age interaction for the individual months was noted to be significant in May, July, August and September, but not in June. Similarly the interaction was significant in the morning and afternoon, but not at midday. The overall results describe the seasonal and diel activity patterns as changing systematically for

  5. Analysis of carbon source-regulated gene expression by the upstream region of the Candida tropicalis malate synthase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, K; Atomi, H; Izuta, M; Kanai, T; Takeshita, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    1997-01-03

    We investigated the regulation of expression of a gene encoding malate synthase (MS) of an n-alkane-utilizable yeast Candida tropicalis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where its expression is highly induced by acetate. By comparing levels of gene expression in cells grown on glucose, acetate, lactate, and oleic acid, we found that the increase in gene expression was due to a glucose repression-derepression mechanism. In order to obtain information concerning the regulation of the gene expression, a fusion gene which consists of the 5'-upstream region of MS-2 (UPR-MS-2) and the lacZ gene (encoding Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase), was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and beta-galactosidase activities were measured with cells grown on glucose or acetate. Deletion analysis of UPR-MS-2 revealed that the region between -777 and -448 (against the translation initiation codon) enhanced the level of gene expression in both glucose- and acetate-grown cells. In this region, sequences which resemble binding sites of Rap1p/Grf1p/Tufp, a global transcription activator, were found at seven locations and one was found for another pleiotropic activator Abf1p. The result also suggested the presence of multiple upstream repression sequences (URSs), which function specifically in glucose-grown cells, in the region between -368 and -126. In the repressing region, there were three tandem C(A/T)CTCCC sequences and also a putative binding site of Mig1p, a transcriptional repressor which mediates glucose repression of several other genes. When MIG1 gene of S. cerevisiae was disrupted, the expression of the UPR-MS-2-lacZ gene in glucose-grown cells increased approx. 10-fold. Furthermore, the effect of deletion of a putative Mig1p binding site was abolished in the MIG1-disrupted strain, suggesting Mig1p binds to this site and brings about glucose repression. When the SNF1 gene was disrupted, the high level gene expression observed in acetate-grown cells bearing UPR-MS-2 was

  6. RAVEN Beta Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-01-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  7. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  8. Papaya epicarp extract protects against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Mostafa I; Guizani, Nejib; Ali, Amanat; Rahman, Mohammad Shafiur

    2012-09-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated the ability of papaya epicarp extract (PEE) to protect against oxidative stress-induced insult in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells in a mechanism that appeared to be by means of PEE potent antioxidant properties. To further understand this relationship, we examined the effect of PEE intervention on aluminum (Al)-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The results indicated that PEE was effective in protecting against Al-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. PEE restored the Al-induced inhibition of folate-dependent methionine synthase activity and the antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidases and superoxide dismutase). PEE ameliorated the Al-induced impairment of intracellular glutathione and total antioxidant capacity. Together, these findings indicate that PEE supplementation can play a neuroprotective role in ameliorating the changes in redox status of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to Al, a well-known environmental toxin that is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  9. Aluminum induces lipid peroxidation and aggregation of human blood platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.J.C. Neiva

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al3+ intoxication is thought to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and in certain pathologic manifestations arising from long-term hemodialysis. Although the metal does not present redox capacity, it can stimulate tissue lipid peroxidation in animal models. Furthermore, in vitro studies have revealed that the fluoroaluminate complex induces diacylglycerol formation, 43-kDa protein phosphorylation and aggregation. Based on these observations, we postulated that Al3+-induced blood platelet aggregation was mediated by lipid peroxidation. Using chemiluminescence (CL of luminol as an index of total lipid peroxidation capacity, we established a correlation between lipid peroxidation capacity and platelet aggregation. Al3+ (20-100 µM stimulated CL production by human blood platelets as well as their aggregation. Incubation of the platelets with the antioxidants nor-dihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA (100 µM and n-propyl gallate (NPG (100 µM, inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway, completely prevented CL and platelet aggregation. Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA (100 µM, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase pathway, was a weaker inhibitor of both events. These findings suggest that Al3+ stimulates lipid peroxidation and the lipoxygenase pathway in human blood platelets thereby causing their aggregation

  10. Hydraulic release oil tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member

  11. NASTRAN: April 1982 Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugh, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Latest public release of NASTRAN, April 1982 most efficient and versatile to date. Intended range of applications of NASTRAN includes almost every kind of structure and construction. Users may develop their own analysis capabilities by using Direct Matrix Abstraction Programming (DMAP) language to direct NASTRAN in solution of general matrix problems.

  12. Release the Prisoners Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  13. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  14. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  15. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopi...... incision could be found. There were no serious complications in either group. The results indicate that the endoscopic procedure is safe and has the benefit of faster rehabilitation and return to work....

  16. Hydra Code Release

    OpenAIRE

    Couchman, H. M. P.; Pearce, F. R.; Thomas, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Comment: A new version of the AP3M-SPH code, Hydra, is now available as a tar file from the following sites; http://coho.astro.uwo.ca/pub/hydra/hydra.html , http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/~pat/hydra/hydra.html . The release now also contains a cosmological initial conditions generator, documentation, an installation guide and installation tests. A LaTex version of the documentation is included here

  17. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students

  18. Sudden releases of gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloupecká Hana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  19. Slow-release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  20. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  1. Protecting privacy in data release

    CERN Document Server

    Livraga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive approach to protecting sensitive information when large data collections are released by their owners. It addresses three key requirements of data privacy: the protection of data explicitly released, the protection of information not explicitly released but potentially vulnerable due to a release of other data, and the enforcement of owner-defined access restrictions to the released data. It is also the first book with a complete examination of how to enforce dynamic read and write access authorizations on released data, applicable to the emerging data outsou

  2. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  3. Riola release report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-08-04

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables.

  4. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  5. Stapes Release in Tympanosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedri, Es-Hak; Teferi, Nebiat; Redleaf, Miriam

    2018-02-01

    : Tympanosclerosis in the middle ear space is common in Ethiopia and often involves the ossicles and particularly the stapes. Ear operations in Ethiopia are relatively expensive in this country of limited medical resources and a low average living wage. In this setting, 2-stage operations using prostheses become prohibitively expensive. Therefore, the recommended 2-stage approach for tympanic membrane perforation with tympanosclerosis and stapes fixation is impractical for Ethiopia.We present a series of 67 patients who had a single stage tympanoplasty, removal of tympanosclerosis from the stapes suprastructure, and ossicular chain reconstruction using ossicular interposition. Crucial is the surgical technique employed for peeling the mound of tympanosclerotic plaque off of the stapes, which we term the stapes release. Controls were 67 patients with similar perforations and air-bone gap, but no tympanosclerosis. Most controls had ossciular discontinuity and were reconstructed with type III tympanoplasty.Air-bone gap improved in both groups: 18 dB (11 dB standard deviation) in the stapes release group, and 23 dB (11 dB standard deviation) in the control group. Paired t test found these improvements in each group significant at p < 0.001. Among the preoperative subjects there were 40 with air-bone gap greater than 45 dB, and none less than 20 dB. Among the postoperative subjects, none had air-bone gap worse than 45 dB, while 25/67 (37%) stapes release and 44/67 (66%) controls had air-bone gap better than 20 dB. Three patients in each group failed to close their perforations completely (96% closure rate).The only complications were two early cases of transient facial nerve weakness, which was avoided in subsequent cases by an alteration in technique. There was no deterioration of sensorineural hearing levels in either group's subjects postoperatively.In conclusion, stapes release with ossicular interposition can be performed at the same time as

  6. Dietary linseed oil with or without malate increases conjugated linoleic acid and oleic acid in milk fat and and gene expression in mammary gland and milk somatic cells of lactating goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X Z; Choi, S H; Yan, C G; Shin, J S; Smith, S B

    2016-08-01

    Supplementary dietary plant oils have the potential to alter milk fatty acid composition in ruminants as a result of changes in the amount and kind of fatty acid precursors. We hypothesized that linseed oil in combination with malate (a key propionate precursor in the rumen) would increase ∆9 unsaturated fatty acids and specific gene expression in somatic cells and mammary glands of lactating goats. Twelve lactating goats were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Treatments included the basal diet (CON), the CON plus 4% linseed oil (LO), and the CON plus 4% linseed oil and 2% -malate (LOM). Relative to CON, the LO and LOM supplements increased the daily intake of palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1-9), linoleic (18:2-6), α-linolenic (18:3-3), and γ-linolenic acids (18:2-6); α-linolenic acid intake was increased over 9-fold, from 6.77 to over 51 g/d ( fat yield, and milk fat percentage ( acid; -vaccenic acid (TVA; 18:1-11); -9, -11 CLA; -10 -12 CLA; and α-linolenic acid in rumen fluid and increased the concentrations of oleic acid; TVA; -9, -11 CLA; -10, -12 CLA; and α-linolenic acid in plasma lipids and milk fat ( acids, in plasma and milk fat ( acid promoted SCD gene expression in somatic cells and mammary tissue. Furthermore, milk somatic cells are a suitable substitute for documenting treatment effects of dietary oils on gene expression in goat mammary tissue.

  7. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  8. Underground water stress release models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Dang, Shenjun; Lü, Shaochuan

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of tectonic stress may cause earthquakes at some epochs. However, in most cases, it leads to crustal deformations. Underground water level is a sensitive indication of the crustal deformations. We incorporate the information of the underground water level into the stress release models (SRM), and obtain the underground water stress release model (USRM). We apply USRM to the earthquakes occurred at Tangshan region. The analysis shows that the underground water stress release model outperforms both Poisson model and stress release model. Monte Carlo simulation shows that the simulated seismicity by USRM is very close to the real seismicity.

  9. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future....... Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these...

  10. Flash release - an alternative for releasing complex mems devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Svetovoy, Vitaly; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  11. Flash release an alternative for releasing complex MEMS devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  12. Allosteric substrate inhibition of Arabidopsis NAD-dependent malic enzyme 1 is released by fumarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronconi, Marcos Ariel; Wheeler, Mariel Claudia Gerrard; Martinatto, Andrea; Zubimendi, Juan Pablo; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana

    2015-03-01

    Plant mitochondria can use L-malate and fumarate, which accumulate in large levels, as respiratory substrates. In part, this property is due to the presence of NAD-dependent malic enzymes (NAD-ME) with particular biochemical characteristics. Arabidopsis NAD-ME1 exhibits a non-hyperbolic behavior for the substrate L-malate, and its activity is strongly stimulated by fumarate. Here, the possible structural connection between these properties was explored through mutagenesis, kinetics, and fluorescence studies. The results indicated that NAD-ME1 has a regulatory site for L-malate that can also bind fumarate. L-Malate binding to this site elicits a sigmoidal and low substrate-affinity response, whereas fumarate binding turns NAD-ME1 into a hyperbolic and high substrate affinity enzyme. This effect was also observed when the allosteric site was either removed or altered. Hence, fumarate is not really an activator, but suppresses the inhibitory effect of l-malate. In addition, residues Arg50, Arg80 and Arg84 showed different roles in organic acid binding. These residues form a triad, which is the basis of the homo and heterotrophic effects that characterize NAD-ME1. The binding of L-malate and fumarate at the same allosteric site is herein reported for a malic enzyme and clearly indicates an important role of NAD-ME1 in processes that control flow of C4 organic acids in Arabidopsis mitochondrial metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sustained-release, extended-release, and other time-release formulations in neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-08-01

    Pills and capsules may release their contents within minutes of ingestion; these are immediate-release formulations. Pills and capsules may also release their contents after a time lag, or a little at a time, or in some other predetermined way; these are time-release formulations. Many drugs in psychiatry have been time-release formulated to reduce their local adverse effects in the gastrointestinal tract, to reduce adverse effects associated with peak blood levels, or to artificially extend their half-life. Time-release formulations are associated with the added advantages of convenience of dosing, improved compliance, and less fluctuation in blood levels across the course of the day. A disadvantage of time-release formulations is that they may be incompletely absorbed; this is a serious issue in patients with acute or chronic intestinal hurry disorders, such as gastroenteritis or irritable bowel syndrome. Time-release formulations may also be more expensive than immediate-release formulations. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.

    2004-01-01

    A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer of photo...

  15. Press Oil Final Release Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    There are forty-eight 55 gallon barrels filled with hydraulic oil that are candidates for release and recycle. This oil needs to be characterized prior to release. Principles of sampling as provided in MARSAME/MARSSIM approaches were used as guidance for sampling.

  16. Validação de método analítico e de extração do malation em água e solo após nebulização de combate ao Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Coleone, Ana Carla; Silva, Flavio Soares da; Machado, Angela Aparecida; Machado Neto, Joaquim Gonçalves; Paganini, Wanderley da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Resumo O mosquito Aedes aegypti é vetor de doenças de grande relevância para a saúde pública, como a dengue, febre amarela, zika e chikungunya. Em áreas urbanas, para o controle dos insetos adultos, é realizada a nebulização a ultrabaixo volume (UBV) do malation. A pulverização pode levar à contaminação ambiental do solo e da água com o inseticida. Objetivou-se ajustar e validar um método analítico para determinação de malation em cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência (CLAE) e determinar o...

  17. Validação de método analítico e de extração do malation em água e solo após nebulização de combate ao Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Carla Coleone; Flavio Soares da Silva; Angela Aparecida Machado; Joaquim Gonçalves Machado Neto; Wanderley da Silva Paganini

    2017-01-01

    O mosquito Aedes aegypti é vetor de doenças de grande relevância para a saúde pública, como a dengue, febre amarela, zika e chikungunya. Em áreas urbanas, para o controle dos insetos adultos, é realizada a nebulização a ultrabaixo volume (UBV) do malation. A pulverização pode levar à contaminação ambiental do solo e da água com o inseticida. Objetivou-se ajustar e validar um método analítico para determinação de malation em cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência (CLAE) e determinar o método...

  18. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to citrulline-malate and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to citrulline-malate and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise. The Panel considers that citrulline-malate is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed by the applicant is “improved recovery from muscle fatigue”. Faster recovery...... from muscle fatigue by contributing to the restoration of muscle function after exercise is a beneficial physiological effect. The applicant identified, as being pertinent to the health claim, a total of 35 references, all of which, except for one human study and one animal study, were submitted...... function. The evidence provided by the applicant did not establish that a faster reduction of blood lactate concentrations through a dietary intervention leads to faster recovery from muscle fatigue by contributing to the restoration of muscle function after exercise. No conclusions could be drawn from...

  19. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  20. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  1. Reaper Induced Cytochrome C Release

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    .... The interaction of reaper with scythe liberates a soluble factor (SCF) that induces apoptosis by effecting the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, a critical step in activating apoptosis in many systems...

  2. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007555.htm Birth control - slow release methods To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Certain birth control methods contain man-made forms of hormones. ...

  3. PCDD/PCDF release inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, H. [UNEP Chemicals, Chatelaine (Switzerland)

    2004-09-15

    The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) entered into force on 17 May 2004 with 50 Parties. In May 2004, 59 countries had ratified or acceded the Convention. The objective of the Convention is ''to protect human health and the environment from persistent organic pollutants''. For intentionally produced POPs, e.g., pesticides and industrial chemicals such as hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls, this will be achieved by stop of production and use. For unintentionally generated POPs, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-pdioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), measures have to be taken to ''reduce the total releases derived from anthropogenic sources''; the final goal is ultimate elimination, where feasible. Under the Convention, Parties have to establish and maintain release inventories to prove the continuous release reduction. Since many countries do not have the technical and financial capacity to measure all releases from all potential PCDD/PCDF sources, UNEP Chemicals has developed the ''Standardized Toolkit for the Identification of Quantification of Dioxin and Furan Releases'' (''Toolkit'' for short), a methodology to estimate annual releases from a number of sources. With this methodology, annual releases can be estimated by multiplying process-specific default emission factors provided in the Toolkit with national activity data. At the seventh session of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee, the Toolkit was recommended to be used by countries when reporting national release data to the Conference of the Parties. The Toolkit is especially used by developing countries and countries with economies in transition where no measured data are available. Results from Uruguay, Thailand, Jordan, Philippines, and Brunei Darussalam have been published.

  4. Predicting hydrocarbon release from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppendieck, D.; Loehr, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' The remediation of hazardous chemicals from soils can be a lengthy and costly process. As a result, recent regulatory initiatives have focused on risk-based corrective action (RBCA) approaches. Such approaches attempt to identify the amount of chemical that can be left at a site with contaminated soil and still be protective of human health and the environment. For hydrocarbons in soils to pose risk to human heath and the environment, the hydrocarbons must be released from the soil and accessible to microorganisms, earthworms, or other higher level organisms. The sorption of hydrocarbons to soil can reduce the availability of the hydrocarbon to receptors. Typically in soils and sediments, there is an initial fast release of a hydrocarbon from the soil to the aqueous phase followed by a slower release of the remaining hydrocarbon to the aqueous phase. The rate and extent of slow release can influence aqueous hydrocarbon concentrations and the fate and transport of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Once the fast fraction of the chemical has been removed from the soil, the remaining fraction of a chemical may desorb at a rate that natural mechanisms can attenuate the released hydrocarbon. Hence, active remediation may be needed only until the fast fraction has been removed. However, the fast fraction is a soil and chemical specific parameter. This presentation will present a tier I type protocol that has been developed to quickly estimate the fraction of hydrocarbons that are readily released from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Previous research in our laboratory and elsewhere has used long-term desorption (four months) studies to determine the readily released fraction. This research shows that a single short-term (less than two weeks) batch extraction procedure provides a good estimate of the fast released fraction derived from long-term experiments. This procedure can be used as a tool to rapidly evaluate the release and bioavailability of

  5. GEWEX SRB Shortwave Release 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. J.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Mikovitz, J. C.; Zhang, T.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The new Release 4 uses the newly processed ISCCP HXS product as its primary input for cloud and radiance data. The ninefold increase in pixel number compared to the previous ISCCP DX allows finer gradations in cloud fraction in each grid box. It will also allow higher spatial resolutions (0.5 degree) in future releases. In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made since Release 3. These include recalculated atmospheric transmissivities and reflectivities yielding a less transmissive atmosphere. The calculations also include variable aerosol composition, allowing for the use of a detailed aerosol history from the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC). Ocean albedo and snow/ice albedo are also improved from Release 3. Total solar irradiance is now variable, averaging 1361 Wm-2. Water vapor is taken from ISCCP's nnHIRS product. Results from GSW Release 4 are presented and analyzed. Early comparison to surface measurements show improved agreement.

  6. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  7. Training Materials for Release 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hansen, Cecilie; Debus, Kolja

    This document, D7.4 – training materials for release 3, provides an overview of the training material for version 3 of the NEXT-TELL tools and methods. Previous documents submitted as part of work package 7, which is about teacher training, are D7.1 – Training Concept, D7.2 – Training Materials...... for Release 1 and D7.3 – Training Materials for Release 2. D7.4 builds on D7.1 and D7.2 and D7.3. D7.4 contains further development of previous work within WP7, essentially a revised theoretical approach to the teacher training, and expansion of the notion of tool training. The media in use have been expanded...

  8. Nanostructured Diclofenac Sodium Releasing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Harlin, A.; Seppälä, J.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Various techniques have been developed to produce second generation biomaterials for tissue repair. These include extrusion, molding, salt leaching, spinning etc, but success in regenerating tissues has been limited. It is important to develop porous material, yet with a fibrous structure for it to be biomimetic. To mimic biological tissues, the extra-cellular matrix usually contains fibers in nano scale. To produce nanostructures, self-assembly or electrospinning can be used. Adding a drug release function to such a material may advance applications further for use in controlled tissue repair. This turns the resulting device into a multifunctional porous, fibrous structure to support cells and drug releasing properties in order to control tissue reactions. A bioabsorbable poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L lactide) 95/5 (PCL) was made into diluted solution using a solvent, to which was added 2w-% of diclofenac sodium (DS). Nano-fibers were made by electrospinning onto substrate. Microstructure of the resulting nanomat was studied using SEM and drug release profiles with UV/VIS spectroscopy. Thickness of the electrospun nanomat was about 2 mm. SEM analysis showed that polymeric nano-fibers containing drug particles form a highly interconnected porous nano structure. Average diameter of the nano-fibers was 130 nm. There was a high burst peak in drug release, which decreased to low levels after one day. The used polymer has slow a degradation rate and though the nanomat was highly porous with a large surface area, drug release rate is slow. It is feasible to develop a nano-fibrous porous structure of bioabsorbable polymer, which is loaded with test drug. Drug release is targeted at improving the properties of biomaterial for use in controlled tissue repair and regeneration.

  9. Limited Releases of Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznik, B.; Kovac, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Krsko Nuclear Power Plant is about 700 MW Pressurised Water Reactor plant located in Slovenia close to the border with Croatia. The authorised limit for the radioactive releases is basically set to 50 μSv effective dose per year to the members of the public. There is also additional limitation of total activities released in a year and concentration. The poster presents the effluents of the year 2000 and evaluated dose referring to the limits and to the natural and other sources of radiation around the plant. (author)

  10. Tobacco Xenobiotics Release Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam EWN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many xenobiotic compounds exert their actions through the release of free radicals and related oxidants 12, bringing about unwanted biological effects 3. Indeed, oxidative events may play a significant role in tobacco toxicity from cigarette smoke. Here, we demonstrate the direct in vitro release of the free radical nitric oxide (•NO from extracts and components of smokeless tobacco, including nicotine, nitrosonornicotine (NNN and 4-(methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK in phosphate buffered saline and human saliva using electron spin resonance and chemiluminescence detection. Our findings suggest that tobacco xenobiotics represent as yet unrecognized sources of •NO in the body.

  11. 78 FR 73083 - Compassionate Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... Release AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Interim rule. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Prisons (Bureau... in sentence, the General Counsel will solicit the opinion of the United States Attorney in the... and direction of the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General. DATES: This rule will be effective...

  12. 28 CFR 2.83 - Release planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release planning. 2.83 Section 2.83... Release planning. (a) All grants of parole shall be conditioned on the development of a suitable release... parole date for purposes of release planning for up to 120 days without a hearing. If efforts to...

  13. Formulation and characterization of modified release tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formulation with 35% polymer content exhibited zero order release profile and it released 35% of the drug in first hr, later on, controlled drug release was observed upto the 12th hour. Formulations with PVAc to Na-CMC ratio 20:80 exhibited zero order release pattern at levels of studied concentrations, which suggested that ...

  14. Massive radiological releases profoundly differ from controlled releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascucci-Cahen, Ludivine; Patrick, Momal

    2012-11-01

    Preparing for a nuclear accident implies understanding potential consequences. While many specialized experts have been working on different particular aspects, surprisingly little effort has been dedicated to establishing the big picture and providing a global and balanced image of all major consequences. IRSN has been working on the cost of nuclear accidents, an exercise which must strive to be as comprehensive as possible since any omission obviously underestimates the cost. It therefore provides (ideally) an estimate of all cost components, thus revealing the structure of accident costs, and hence sketching a global picture. On a French PWR, it appears that controlled releases would cause an 'economical' accident with limited radiological consequences when compared to other costs; in contrast, massive releases would trigger a major crisis with strong radiological consequences. The two types of crises would confront managers with different types of challenges. (authors)

  15. Microwave Activation of Drug Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónasson, Sævar Þór

    to verify the presence of creeping waves. Due to the inherent high wave attenuation in biological tissues, such as muscles at microwave frequencies, sensitive receiving structures are suggested to be integrated on a drug capsule. The capsules are meant to contain the pharmaceutical drugs and the receiving......Due to current limitations in control of pharmaceutical drug release in the body along with increasing medicine use, methods of externally-controlled drug release are of high interest. In this thesis, the use of microwaves is proposed as a technique with the purpose of externally activating...... setup, called the microwave activation system has been developed and tested on a body phantom that emulates the human torso. The system presented in this thesis, operates unobtrusively, i.e. without physically interfering with the target (patient). The torso phantom is a simple dual-layered cylindrical...

  16. Release from 'prison' in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Anita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In my study I introduce the Hungarian conditional release and presidential pardon and new compulsory presidential pardon system. This study is based on research carried out in the Ministry of Justice at the Pardon Department in which I analyzed several dozen petition pardons. In connection with the new compulsory presidential pardon I examined the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, which has condemned Hungary because of its adoption of real (whole life imprisonment.

  17. Pollutant Release and Transfer Register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Since 1974 a number of organisations have been working closely together in this pollutant register (PRTR) project to collect and formally establish the yearly releases of pollutants to air, water and soil in the Netherlands. Results of this project serve to underpin the national environmental policy. Data is in this way also provided for the many environmental reports to international organisations such as the European Union and the United Nations, e.g. the National Inventory Report for the Kyoto Protocol. This website shows the yearly releases (emissions) of the most important pollutants in the Netherlands. You can explore the emission data through various channels, such as maps, graphs and tables. But you can also download all the details into your own database. The data shown in this website is updated 2 to 3 times a year. The current release shows emissions for 1990, 1995, 2000, 2004, 2005 and 2006 The 2006 emissions are preliminary data and not yet shown in the maps. We expect to add an extra year in August 2008 [nl

  18. Massive radiological releases profoundly differ from controlled releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascucci-Cahen, Ludivine; Patrick, Momal

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors report identification and assessment of different types of costs associated with nuclear accidents. They first outline that these cost assessments must be as exhaustive or comprehensive as possible. While referring to past accidents, they define the different categories of costs: on-site costs (decontamination and dismantling, electricity not produced on the site), off-site costs (health costs, psychological costs, farming losses), image-related costs (impact on food and farm product exports, decrease of other exports), costs related to energy production, costs related to contaminated areas (refugees, lands). They give an assessment of a severe nuclear accident (i.e. an accident with important but controlled radiological releases) in France and outline that it would be a national catastrophe which could be however managed. They discuss the possible variations of the estimated costs. Then, they show that a major accident (i.e. an accident with massive radiological releases) in France would be an unmanageable European catastrophe because of the radiological consequences, of high economic costs, and of huge losses

  19. Oral hydromorphone extended-release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, David R P

    2010-12-01

    To review the chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, tolerability, dosing, and role of the Osmotic-controlled Release Oral delivery System (OROS) hydromorphone extended-release (ER) tablets. A MEDLINE/PUBMED search (1986-August 2010) was conducted to identify studies in the English language, with additional references being obtained from their bibliographies. All studies of hydromorphone ER were reviewed. This is the second long-acting hydromorphone formulation to receive approval by the Food and Drug Administration (a twice-daily formulation was approved in September 2004, but was subsequently withdrawn in July 2005). Hydromorphone is a semi-synthetic mu-opioid receptor agonist structurally similar to morphine, hydrocodone, and oxymorphone. OROS ER technology allows once-daily dosing. Clinical trials have focused on the convertibility of (an) other opioid(s) to hydromorphone ER in chronic malignant and nonmalignant pain. This product displays the expected opioid side effects, being comparable to oxycodone controlled-release. Coadministration with ethanol does not produce the degree of "dose-dumping" seen with the former hydromorphone twice-daily product or oxymorphone ER. Hydromorphone ER is indicated for the management of moderate-to-severe pain in opioidtolerant patients requiring continuous, around-the-clock opioid analgesia for an extended period of time. Dosage adjustment is recommended in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class B) and moderate renal impairment (creatinine clearance of 30-60 mL/min). Hydromorphone ER is the newest oral opioid to enter a crowded marketplace now totaling 15 different Schedule 2 opioids (including tapentadol), and tramadol, available in oral, parenteral, rectal, transdermal, transmucosal, and intranasal formulations. It does not appear to have any unique assets or liabilities and should be considered as one of many oral opioids available for the management of persistent pain of moderate

  20. Toxic Release Inventory Chemicals by Groupings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) makes available information for more than 600 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released...

  1. Reaper-Induced Cytochrome C Release

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    ...-interacting protein called Scythe that promoted cytochrome c release form the mitochondria. The goal of the proposed research has been to determine the mechanism whereby Reaper and Scythe cooperate to induce mitochondrial cytochrome c release and eventual cell death.

  2. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same reaction to the DMG test (negative result), which shows again its lack of sensitivity. In contrast, the HNO3 spot test distinguished AISI 303 from the non-resulfurized grades. Clinical patch tests again showed that some patients (4%) were intolerant to AISI 303, while none were

  3. Controlled Drug Release from Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jinhyun Hannah; Yeo, Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarriers providing spatiotemporal control of drug release contribute to reducing toxicity and improving therapeutic efficacy of a drug. On the other hand, nanocarriers face unique challenges in controlling drug release kinetics, due to the large surface area per volume ratio and the short diffusion distance. To develop nanocarriers with desirable release kinetics for target applications, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which a carrier retains and releases a drug, the effec...

  4. Individualized optimal release angles in discus throwing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Steve; Liu, Hui; Hubbard, Mont; Yu, Bing

    2010-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine individualized optimal release angles for elite discus throwers. Three-dimensional coordinate data were obtained for at least 10 competitive trials for each subject. Regression relationships between release speed and release angle, and between aerodynamic distance and release angle were determined for each subject. These relationships were linear with subject-specific characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between release speed and release angle may be due to subjects' technical and physical characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between aerodynamic distance and release angle may be due to interactions between the release angle, the angle of attack, and the aerodynamic distance. Optimal release angles were estimated for each subject using the regression relationships and equations of projectile motion. The estimated optimal release angle was different for different subjects, and ranged from 35 degrees to 44 degrees . The results of this study demonstrate that the optimal release angle for discus throwing is thrower-specific. The release angles used by elite discus throwers in competition are not necessarily optimal for all discus throwers, or even themselves. The results of this study provide significant information for understanding the biomechanics of discus throwing techniques. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases (BORA-Release)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklet, Snorre [Department of Production and Quality Engineering, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)]. E-mail: snorre.sklet@sintef.no; Vinnem, Jan Erik [University of Stavanger (UiS), NO-4036 Stavanger (Norway); Aven, Terje [University of Stavanger (UiS), NO-4036 Stavanger (Norway)

    2006-09-21

    This paper presents results from a case study carried out on an offshore oil and gas production platform with the purpose to apply and test BORA-Release, a method for barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases. A description of the BORA-Release method is given in Part I of the paper. BORA-Release is applied to express the platform specific hydrocarbon release frequencies for three release scenarios for selected systems and activities on the platform. The case study demonstrated that the BORA-Release method is a useful tool for analysing the effect on the release frequency of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and to study the effect on the barrier performance of platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors (RIFs). BORA-Release may also be used to analyse the effect on the release frequency of risk reducing measures.

  6. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    The chief purpose of ARAC data acquisition program is to provide site officials, who are responsible for ensuring maximum health protection for the endangered site personnel and public, with estimates of the effects of atmospheric releases of hazardous material as rapidly and accurately as possible. ARAC is in the initial stages of being implemented and is therefore susceptible to changes before it reaches its final form. However the concept of ARAC is fully developed and was successfully demonstrated during a feasibility study conducted in June 1974, as a joint effort between the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). Additional tests between SRL and LLL are scheduled for December 1975. While the immediate goal is the application of ARAC to assist a limited number of ERDA sites, the system is designed with sufficient flexibility to permit expanding the service to a large number of sites. Success in ARAC application should provide nuclear facilities with a means to handle better the urgent questions concerning the potential accidental hazards from atmospheric releases in addition to providing the sites with a capability to assess the effort of their normal operations

  7. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Souza, S.R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsang, M.B. [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U are around 0.7–0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  8. Colloid release from soil aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  9. Release of RANKERN 16A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird Adam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RANKERN 16 is the latest version of the point-kernel gamma radiation transport Monte Carlo code from AMEC Foster Wheeler’s ANSWERS Software Service. RANKERN is well established in the UK shielding community for radiation shielding and dosimetry assessments. Many important developments have been made available to users in this latest release of RANKERN. The existing general 3D geometry capability has been extended to include import of CAD files in the IGES format providing efficient full CAD modelling capability without geometric approximation. Import of tetrahedral mesh and polygon surface formats has also been provided. An efficient voxel geometry type has been added suitable for representing CT data. There have been numerous input syntax enhancements and an extended actinide gamma source library. This paper describes some of the new features and compares the performance of the new geometry capabilities.

  10. Release Data Package for Hanford Site Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert G.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Engel, David W.

    2006-07-01

    Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support a Hanford assessment. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 through 2005 to support the Release Module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) for the updated composite analysis. This work was completed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, part of the Remediation and Closure Science Project, the Hanford Assessments Project, and the Characterization of Systems Project managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Related characterization activities and data packages for the vadose zone and groundwater are being developed under the remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The Release Module applies release models to waste inventory data from the Inventory Module and accounts for site remediation activities as a function of time. The resulting releases to the vadose zone, expressed as time profiles of annual rates, become source terms for the Vadose Zone Module. Radioactive decay is accounted for in all inputs and outputs of the Release Module. The Release Module is implemented as the VADER (Vadose zone Environmental Release) computer code. Key components of the Release Module are numerical models (i.e., liquid, soil-debris, cement, saltcake, and reactor block) that simulate contaminant release from the different waste source types found at the Hanford Site. The Release Module also handles remediation transfers to onsite and offsite repositories.

  11. CO-releasing molecule (CORM) conjugate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Anna Christin; Kunz, Peter C; Janiak, Christoph

    2016-11-15

    The development of CORMs (CO-releasing molecules) as a prodrug for CO administration in living organisms has attracted significant attention. CORMs offer the promising possibility of a safe and controllable release of CO in low amounts triggered by light, ligands, enzymes, etc. For the targeting of specific tissues or diseases and to prevent possible side effects from metals and other residues after CO release, these CORMs are attached to biocompatible systems, like peptides, polymers, nanoparticles, dendrimers, protein cages, non-wovens, tablets, and metal-organic frameworks. We discuss in this review the known CORM carrier conjugates, in short CORM conjugates, with covalently-bound or incorporated CORMs for medicinal and therapeutic applications. Most conjugates are nontoxic, show increasing half-lives of CO release, and make use of the EPR-effect, but still show problems because of a continuous background of CO release and the absence of an on/off-switch for the CO release.

  12. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-07-31

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  13. Development of sustained release tablets containing solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sustained release of baclofen from the solid dispersion containing tablet was achieved for 2 h in gastric fluid (pH 1.2) and for up to 10 h in intestinal fluid (pH 6.8). A combination of solid dispersion techniques using adsorption and sustained release concepts is a promising approach to control the release rate of poorly ...

  14. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made

  15. IDSA releases updated coccidioidomycosis guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA has released updated Guidelines for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis, also known as cocci or Valley Fever (1. Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection endemic to the southwestern United States and a common cause of pneumonia and pulmonary nodules in this area. However, the infection can disseminate systemically especially in immunocompromised hosts and certain ethnic populations resulting in a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications. In addition to recommendations for these complications, the new guidelines address management of special at-risk populations, preemptive management strategies in at-risk populations and after unintentional laboratory exposure. The guidelines also suggest shorter courses of antibiotics for hospitalized patients and more ambulatory treatment for most individuals who have contracted Valley Fever. The panel was led by John N. Galgiani, MD, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona Health Sciences. Galgiani led a panel of 16 ...

  16. The JPL Release-06 Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, C. M.; Yuan, D. N.; Wiese, D. N.; Harvey, N.; Sakumura, C.; Bandikova, T.; Boening, C.; Kruizinga, G. L. H.

    2017-12-01

    The joint NASA/DLR GRACE mission has provided over 15 years of insights into the mass variability of the Earth system. Due to improvements in processing procedures, updates to background models, and to provide continuity with GRACE-FO, a new release of the monthly gravity field time series from JPL, dubbed Release-06 (RL06), will be released in the near future. Here, we present a detailed description and assessment of the RL06 time series, with an emphasis on characterization of errors throughout the flight system's lifetime and their comparison to the previous release, RL05.

  17. Effluent release limits, sources and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindell, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives of radiation protection in relation to releases. Environmental transfer models for radionuclides. Relationship between releases, environmental levels and doses to persons. Establishment of release limits: Limits based on critical population group concept critical pathway analysis and identification of critical group. Limits based on optimization of radiation protection individual dose limits, collective doses and dose commitments 1) differential cost benefit analysis 2) authorized and operational limits taking account of future exposures. Monitoring of releases to the environment: Objectives of effluent monitoring. Typical sources and composition of effluents; design and operation of monitoring programmes; recording and reporting of monitoring results; complementary environmental monitoring. (orig.) [de

  18. Modelling vesicular release at hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhita Nadkarni

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We study local calcium dynamics leading to a vesicle fusion in a stochastic, and spatially explicit, biophysical model of the CA3-CA1 presynaptic bouton. The kinetic model for vesicle release has two calcium sensors, a sensor for fast synchronous release that lasts a few tens of milliseconds and a separate sensor for slow asynchronous release that lasts a few hundred milliseconds. A wide range of data can be accounted for consistently only when a refractory period lasting a few milliseconds between releases is included. The inclusion of a second sensor for asynchronous release with a slow unbinding site, and thereby a long memory, affects short-term plasticity by facilitating release. Our simulations also reveal a third time scale of vesicle release that is correlated with the stimulus and is distinct from the fast and the slow releases. In these detailed Monte Carlo simulations all three time scales of vesicle release are insensitive to the spatial details of the synaptic ultrastructure. Furthermore, our simulations allow us to identify features of synaptic transmission that are universal and those that are modulated by structure.

  19. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  20. Environmental Treaty Status Data Set, 2012 Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Environmental Treaty Status Data Set, 2012 Release contains comprehensive information on country participation in multilateral environmental agreements through...

  1. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  2. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year and...

  3. 7 CFR 356.5 - Bonded release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bonded release. 356.5 Section 356.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FORFEITURE PROCEDURES § 356.5 Bonded release. (a) The Deputy Administrator may accept a bond or other security, in the amount of...

  4. Analysis of drug effects on neurotransmitter release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowell, P.; Garner, A.

    1986-01-01

    The release of neurotransmitter is routinely studied in a superfusion system in which serial samples are collected and the effects of drugs or other treatments on the amount of material in the superfusate is determined. With frequent sampling interval, this procedure provides a mechanism for dynamically characterizing the release process itself. Using automated data collection in conjunction with polyexponential computer analysis, the equation which describes the release process in each experiment is determined. Analysis of the data during the nontreated phase of the experiment allows an internal control to be used for accurately assessing any changes in neurotransmitter release which may occur during a subsequent treatment phase. The use of internal controls greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and allows determinations of very low concentrations of drugs on small amounts of tissue to be made. In this presentation, the effects of 10 μM nicotine on 3 H-dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens is described. The time course, potency and efficacy of the drug treatment is characterized using this system. Determinations of the exponential order of the release as well as the rate constants allow one to study the mechanism of the release process. A description of 3 H-dopamine release in normal as well as Ca ++ -free medium is presented

  5. Understanding Drug Release Data through Thermodynamic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Caroline Liberato Cavalcanti Freire

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors that can modify the drug release profile of a drug from a Drug-Delivery-System (DDS is a mandatory step to determine the effectiveness of new therapies. The aim of this study was to assess the Amphotericin-B (AmB kinetic release profiles from polymeric systems with different compositions and geometries and to correlate these profiles with the thermodynamic parameters through mathematical modeling. Film casting and electrospinning techniques were used to compare behavior of films and fibers, respectively. Release profiles from the DDSs were performed, and the mathematical modeling of the data was carried out. Activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of the drug release process were determined. AmB release profiles showed that the relationship to overcome the enthalpic barrier was PVA-fiber > PVA-film > PLA-fiber > PLA-film. Drug release kinetics from the fibers and the films were better fitted on the Peppas–Sahlin and Higuchi models, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters corroborate these findings, revealing that the AmB release from the evaluated systems was an endothermic and non-spontaneous process. Thermodynamic parameters can be used to explain the drug kinetic release profiles. Such an approach is of utmost importance for DDS containing insoluble compounds, such as AmB, which is associated with an erratic bioavailability.

  6. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  7. Serum release boosts sweetness intensity in gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Stieger, M.A.; Velde, van de F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of serum release on sweetness intensity in mixed whey protein isolate/gellan gum gels. The impact of gellan gum and sugar concentration on microstructure, permeability, serum release and large deformation properties of the gels was determined. With increasing gellan

  8. Understanding Drug Release Data through Thermodynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Marjorie Caroline Liberato Cavalcanti; Alexandrino, Francisco; Marcelino, Henrique Rodrigues; Picciani, Paulo Henrique de Souza; Silva, Kattya Gyselle de Holanda e; Genre, Julieta; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes; do Egito, Eryvaldo Sócrates Tabosa

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the factors that can modify the drug release profile of a drug from a Drug-Delivery-System (DDS) is a mandatory step to determine the effectiveness of new therapies. The aim of this study was to assess the Amphotericin-B (AmB) kinetic release profiles from polymeric systems with different compositions and geometries and to correlate these profiles with the thermodynamic parameters through mathematical modeling. Film casting and electrospinning techniques were used to compare behavior of films and fibers, respectively. Release profiles from the DDSs were performed, and the mathematical modeling of the data was carried out. Activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of the drug release process were determined. AmB release profiles showed that the relationship to overcome the enthalpic barrier was PVA-fiber > PVA-film > PLA-fiber > PLA-film. Drug release kinetics from the fibers and the films were better fitted on the Peppas–Sahlin and Higuchi models, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters corroborate these findings, revealing that the AmB release from the evaluated systems was an endothermic and non-spontaneous process. Thermodynamic parameters can be used to explain the drug kinetic release profiles. Such an approach is of utmost importance for DDS containing insoluble compounds, such as AmB, which is associated with an erratic bioavailability. PMID:28773009

  9. Decomposition and nutrient release patterns of Pueraria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decomposition and nutrient release patterns of Pueraria phaseoloides, Flemingia macrophylla and Chromolaena odorata leaf residues in tropical land use ... The slowest releases, irrespective of type of leaf residue, were in Ca and Mg. The study concluded that among the planted fallows, Pueraria phaseoloides had the ...

  10. Biofortified varieties released under HarvestPlus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chapter 5: Annex 1 - Biofortified varieties released under HarvestPlus (as of December 2016). Crop. Micronutrient. Country. Variety. Year of Release. Origin. Type. Baseline. (ppm). Target increment. (ppm). Increment. (ppm). % Target. Increment. (ppm). Micronutrient. Content. (ppm). 11940. BRRI dhan64. 2014. BRRI. Boro.

  11. Intense Terahertz Fields for Fast Energy Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-17-10 Intense Terahertz Fields for Fast Energy Release...customary unit. Grant #  HDTRA 1-12-1-0044 Intense Terahertz Fields for Fast Energy Release Final Report PI: Keith A. Nelson 617-253-1423 kanelson

  12. 21 CFR 181.28 - Release agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Release agents. Substances classified as release agents, when migrating from food-packaging material shall...). Linoleamide (linoleic acid amide). Oleamide (oleic acid amide). Palmitamide (palmitic acid amide). Stearamide (stearic acid amide). [42 FR 14638, Mar. 15, 1977; 42 FR 56728, Oct. 28, 1977] ...

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Sustained Release Matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate matrix type sustained-release (SR) tablets of tizanidine hydrochloride (TH) for prolonged drug release and improvement in motor activity after spinal injuries. Methods: Matrix tablets were prepared by the wet granulation method using four polymers (hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose [HPMC] K 100, ethyl ...

  14. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or previous...

  15. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) is a field instrument that provides an in-situ measurement of asbestos releasability from consistent and reproducible mechanical agitation of the source material such as soil. The RAFS was designed to measure concentration (asbestos st...

  16. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated. ...

  17. Ecological release in White Sands lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

    2011-12-01

    Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems.

  18. Insulin release by glucagon and secretin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Andreu, D; Thams, P

    1988-01-01

    Secretin and glucagon potentiate glucose-induced insulin release. We have compared the effects of secretin and glucagon with that of four hybrid molecules of the two hormones on insulin release and formation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in isolated mouse pancreatic islets. All six peptides potentiated...... the release of insulin at 10 mM D-glucose, and their effects were indistinguishable with respect to the dynamics of release, dose-response relationship, and glucose dependency. However, measurements of cAMP accumulation in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (10(-4) M...... potentiating effects of secretin and glucagon on glucose-induced insulin release, their modes of action may be different....

  19. Controlled drug release for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kunal J; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-10

    Tissue engineering is often referred to as a three-pronged discipline, with each prong corresponding to 1) a 3D material matrix (scaffold), 2) drugs that act on molecular signaling, and 3) regenerative living cells. Herein we focus on reviewing advances in controlled release of drugs from tissue engineering platforms. This review addresses advances in hydrogels and porous scaffolds that are synthesized from natural materials and synthetic polymers for the purposes of controlled release in tissue engineering. We pay special attention to efforts to reduce the burst release effect and to provide sustained and long-term release. Finally, novel approaches to controlled release are described, including devices that allow for pulsatile and sequential delivery. In addition to recent advances, limitations of current approaches and areas of further research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The vectorial release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, M J

    1971-03-01

    A microsomal preparation from a mouse plasmacytoma, MOPC 47A, that secretes immunoglobulin A was used to study the release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides in vitro. Nascent chains were released with puromycin and characterized with specific antiserum against the immunoglobulin product of the tumour. When the tissue had been prelabelled with [(3)H]leucine the experiments were complicated by the large background of completed radioactive polypeptides in the microsomal preparation. Up to one-third of the released radioactivity in the microsomal preparation could be recognized as immunoglobulin. With [(3)H]-puromycin as the radioactive label, however, the results are much easier to interpret, although the proportion of released radioactivity that can be identified as immunoglobulin is lower (up to one-tenth). Both types of experiment demonstrate that all of the recognizable nascent immunoglobulin chains remain in association with the microsomal vesicles after release from the ribosomes.

  1. Drug release from non-aqueous suspensions. II. The release of methylxanthines from paraffin suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaey, C.J. de; Fokkens, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The release of 3 methylxanthines, i.e. caffeine, theobromine and theophylline, from suspensions in liquid paraffin to an aqueous phase was determined in an in vitro apparatus. The release rates were determined as a function of the pH of the aqueous phase. It was proved that the release process was

  2. Thermoresponsive latexes for fragrance encapsulation and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadyuk, N; Popadyuk, A; Kohut, A; Voronov, A

    2016-04-01

    To synthesize cross-linked latex particles protecting the encapsulated fragrance at ambient temperatures and facilitating the release of cargo at the temperature of the surface of the skin that varies in different regions of the body between 33.5 and 36.9°C. Poly(stearyl acrylate) (PSA), a polymer with long crystallizable alkyl side chains (undergoes order-disorder transitions at 45°C), was chosen as the main component of the polymer particles. As a result, new thermoresponsive polymer particles for fragrance encapsulation were synthesized and characterized, including assessing the performance of particles in triggered release by elevated temperature. To obtain network domains of various crystallinity, stearyl acrylate was copolymerized with dipropylene glycol acrylate caprylate (DGAC) (comonomer) in the presence of a dipropylene glycol diacrylate sebacate (cross-linker) using the miniemulsion process. Comonomers and a cross-linker were mixed directly in a fragrance during polymerization. Fragrance release was evaluated at 25, 31, 35 and 39°C to demonstrate a new material potential in personal/health care skin-related applications. Particles protect the fragrance from evaporation at 25°C. The fragrance release rate gradually increases at 31, 35 and 39°C. Two slopes were found on release plots. The first slope corresponds to a rapid fragrance release. The second slope indicates a subsequent reduction in the release rate. Crystalline-to-amorphous transition of PSA triggers the release of fragrances from cross-linked latex particles at elevated temperatures. The presence of the encapsulated fragrance, as well as the inclusion of amorphous fragments in the polymer network, reduces the particle crystallinity and enhances the release. Release profiles can be tuned by temperature and controlled by the amount of loaded fragrance and the ratio of comonomers in the feed mixture. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. Sustained-release amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maincent, Julien; Williams, Robert O

    2018-03-01

    The use of amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) to overcome poor drug solubility has gained interest in the pharmaceutical industry over the past decade. ASDs are challenging to formulate because they are thermodynamically unstable, and the dispersed drugs tend to recrystallize. Until now, most research on ASDs has focused on immediate-release formulations, supersaturation, and stability; only a few studies have recently reported on the manufacturing of sustained-release ASDs. Sustained-release ASDs can minimize the frequency of administration and prevent high concentrations that can lead to toxicity. Sustained-release ASDs can also decrease the reprecipitation rate in the medium, which can lead to increased bioavailability. However, sustained-release ASDs also pose some significant challenges, such as intramatrix recrystallization, inhibition of drug release as a result of drug-polymer gelling, and low supersaturation due to a slow dissolution rate. This review details the challenges and the formulation approaches that have been investigated to manufacture sustained-release ASDs. In particular, the advantages and drawbacks of hydrophilic polymers, hydrophobic polymers, and lipid-based systems are discussed.

  4. Lubiprostone stimulates small intestinal mucin release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Lisle Robert C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lubiprostone is a synthetic bicyclic fatty acid derivative of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1 used for chronic constipation. The best known action of lubiprostone is simulation of Cl- dependent fluid secretion. In a mouse model of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis, we previously showed that in vivo administration of lubiprostone resulted in greater mucus accumulation in the small intestine. The aim of this study was to directly test whether lubiprostone stimulates intestinal mucin release. Methods Mucin release was measured by mounting segments (4-5 cm of mouse proximal-mid small intestine in an organ bath, allowing access to the perfusate (luminal and the bath (serosal solutions. Nifedipine (10-6 M and indomethacin (10-5 M were included in all solutions to inhibit smooth muscle activity and endogenous prostaglandin production, respectively. The tissue was equilibrated under flow for 30 min, using the perfusate collected during the final 10 min of the equilibration period to measure unstimulated release rate. Stimulus was then added to either the perfusate or the bath and the perfusate was collected for another 30 min to measure the stimulated mucin release rate. Mucin in perfusates was quantified by periodic acid-Schiff's base dot-blot assay, using purified pig gastric mucin as a standard. Results When applied luminally at 1 μM lubiprostone was ineffective at stimulating mucin release. When added to the serosal solution, 1 μM lubiprostone stimulated mucin release to ~300% of the unstimulated rate. As a positive control, serosal 1 μM prostaglandin E2 increased mucin release to ~400% of the unstimulated rate. Conclusions These results support the idea that lubiprostone has prostaglandin-like actions on the intestine, which includes stimulation of mucin release. Stimulation of mucin release by lubiprostone may be protective in gastrointestinal conditions where loss of mucus is believed to contribute to pathogenesis. Thus, in

  5. Feeding Releases Endogenous Opioids in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Tuominen, Lauri; de Boer, Femke E; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-08-23

    The endogenous opioid system supports a multitude of functions related to appetitive behavior in humans and animals, and it has been proposed to govern hedonic aspects of feeding thus contributing to the development of obesity. Here we used positron emission tomography to investigate whether feeding results in hedonia-dependent endogenous opioid release in humans. Ten healthy males were recruited for the study. They were scanned with the μ-opioid-specific ligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after a palatable meal, a nonpalatable meal, and after an overnight fast. Subjective mood, satiety, and circulating hormone levels were measured. Feeding induced significant endogenous opioid release throughout the brain. This response was more pronounced following a nonpalatable meal versus a palatable meal, and independent of the subjective hedonic responses to feeding. We conclude that feeding consistently triggers cerebral opioid release even in the absence of subjective pleasure associated with feeding, suggesting that metabolic and homeostatic rather than exclusively hedonic responses play a role in the feeding-triggered cerebral opioid release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The endogenous opioid system supports both hedonic and homeostatic functions. It has been proposed that overeating and concomitant opioid release could downregulate opioid receptors and promote the development of obesity. However, it remains unresolved whether feeding leads to endogenous opioid release in humans. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to test whether feeding triggers cerebral opioid release and whether this response is associated with pleasurable sensations. We scanned volunteers using the μ-opioid receptor-specific radioligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after an overnight fast, after consuming a palatable meal, and after consuming a nonpalatable meal. Feeding led to significant endogenous opioid release, and this occurred also in the absence of feeding

  6. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental concerns such as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in groundwater and the subsurface soil. Clay colloid release is resulted from physical alteration of subsurface sediments. Despite the potential importance of clay colloid activiti es, the detailed mechanisms of release and transport of clay colloidal particles with in natural sediments are poorly understood. Pore medium structure, properties and flow dynamics, etc. are factors that affect clay colloid generation, mobilization, and subse quent transport. Possible mechanisms of clay colloid generation in the sediments in clude precipitation, erosion and mobilization by changes in pore water chemistry and clay colloid release depends on a balance of applied hydrodynamic and resisting adhesive torques and forces. The coupled role of pore water chemistry and fluid hydrodynamics thus play key roles in controlling clay colloid release and transport in the sediment s. This paper investigated clay colloidal particle release and transport, especially th e colloidal particle release mechanisms as well as the process modeling in the sediments. In this research, colloidal particle release from intact sediment columns with variable length was examined and colloidal particle release curves were simulated using an im plicit, finite-difference scheme. Colloidal particle release rate coefficient was found to be an exponential function of the sediment depth. The simulated results demonstrated that transport parameters were

  7. Rechargeable calcium phosphate orthodontic cement with sustained ion release and re-release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Weir, Michael D.; Chow, Laurence C.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2016-11-01

    White spot lesions (WSL) due to enamel demineralization are major complications for orthodontic treatments. Calcium phosphate (CaP) dental resins with Ca and P ion releases are promising for remineralization. However, previous Ca and P releases lasted for only weeks. Experimental orthodontic cements were developed using pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM) and ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) at mass ratio of 1:1 (PE); and PE plus 10% of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 5% of bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) (PEHB). Particles of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were incorporated into PE and PEHB at 40% filler level. Specimens were tested for bracket-enamel shear bond strength, water sorption, CaP release, and ion recharge and re-release. PEHB+40ACP had higher bracket-enamel bond strength and ion release and rechargeability than PE+40ACP. ACP incorporation into the novel orthodontic cement did not adversely affect the bracket-enamel bond strength. Ion release and re-release from the novel ACP orthodontic cement indicated favorable release and re-release patterns. The recharged orthodontic cement could release CaP ions continuously for four weeks without further recharge. Novel rechargeable orthodontic cement containing ACP was developed with a high bracket-enamel bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly recharged to maintain long-term high levels of CaP ion releases.

  8. Human skeletal muscle releases leptin in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Grøndahl, Thomas Sahl; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is considered an adipokine, however, cultured myocytes have also been found to release leptin. Therefore, as proof-of-concept we investigated if human skeletal muscle synthesized leptin by measuring leptin in skeletal muscle biopsies. Following this, we quantified human skeletal muscle...... was unaltered. During saline infusion the adipose tissue release averaged 0.8 ± 0.3 ng min(-1) 100g tissue(-1) whereas skeletal muscle release was 0.5 ± 0.1 ng min(-1) 100g tissue(-1). In young healthy humans, skeletal muscle contribution to whole body leptin production could be substantial given the greater...

  9. Fission product release mechanisms and groupings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesia, F.C.; Brito, A.C.; Liu, Y.

    1995-01-01

    During CANDU postulated accidents the reactor fuel is estimated to be exposed to a variety of conditions. These conditions are dynamic and, during the course of an accident, the fuel may experience a wide range of temperatures and conditions from highly oxidizing to mildly reducing environments. The exposure of the reactor fuel to these environments and temperatures may affect its stoichiometry and release performance. In this paper a review of the important fission product release mechanisms is presented, the results of three out-of-pile experimental programs are summarized, and fission product release groups, for both oxidizing and reducing conditions are proposed. (author)

  10. Nuclear trafficking latest statistics released

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Countries reported 121 incidents to the IAEA in 2004 of illicit trafficking and other unauthorized activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials, newly released statistics from the Agency's Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB) show. The ITDB report also shows that one incident was reported since 2003 that involved fissile material - highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium - that is needed to make a nuclear weapon. It occurred in June 2003 when an individual was arrested in possession of 170 grams of HEU, attempting to illegally transport it across the border. During the two-year period 2003-2004, the number of incidents reported by States substantially increased compared with previous years. 'Improved reporting may in part account for it,' the report said. 'The majority of the incidents reported in 2003-2004 showed no evidence of criminal activity.' The Past Twelve Years: 1993 - 2004 Nuclear Weapons Grade Material. Since the database started in 1993, there have been eighteen confirmed incidents involving trafficking in HEU and plutonium. A few of these incidents involved seizures of kilogram quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material but most involved very small quantities. In some of the cases the seized material was allegedly a sample of larger quantities available for illegal sale or at risk of theft. More than two dozens incidents involved trace amounts of plutonium sources. Table can be viewed: Incidents involving HEU and Pu confirmed to the ITDB (1993-2004). Nuclear Materials. In the past twelve years, 220 incidents involved nuclear materials. The majority of confirmed cases with nuclear materials involved low-grade nuclear materials, mostly in the form of reactor fuel pellets, and natural uranium, depleted uranium and thorium. While the quantities of these materials have been rather small to be significant for nuclear proliferation or use in a terrorist nuclear explosive device, these cases are indicative of gaps in the control

  11. Autophagy Protects MC3T3-E1 Cells upon Aluminum-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Jian; Ji, Qiang; Wang, Fan; Song, Miao; Li, Yanfei

    2018-03-08

    Aluminum (Al) exposure has adverse effects on osteoblasts, and the effect might be through autophagy-associated apoptosis. In this study, we showed that aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3 ) could induce autophagy in MC3T3-E1 cells, as demonstrated by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and the expressions of the ATG3, ATG5, and ATG9 genes. We found AlCl 3 inhibited MC3T3-E1 cell survival rate and caused apoptosis, as evidenced by CCK-8 assay, Annexin V/PI double staining, and increased expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3 genes. In addition, increased autophagy induced by rapamycin further attenuated the MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis rate after AlCl 3 exposure. These results support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a protective role in impeding apoptosis caused by AlCl 3 . Activating autophagy may be a strategy for treatment of Al-induced bone disease.

  12. Aluminum-Induced Entropy in Biological Systems: Implications for Neurological Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Christopher A.; Seneff, Stephanie; Kette, Stephen D.; Tomljenovic, Lucija; Oller, John W.Jr.; Davidson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 200 years, mining, smelting, and refining of aluminum (Al) in various forms have increasingly exposed living species to this naturally abundant metal. Because of its prevalence in the earth’s crust, prior to its recent uses it was regarded as inert and therefore harmless. However, Al is invariably toxic to living systems and has no known beneficial role in any biological systems. Humans are increasingly exposed to Al from food, water, medicinals, vaccines, and cosmetics, as well...

  13. Single and double long pulse laser ablation of aluminum induced in air and water ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh; Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mahdm@iust.ac.ir

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Laser ablation of aluminum target by single and double pulse (∼ 5 ns delay) in ambient air and distilled water • Comparing with air, in ambient water, plasma confinement results in higher crater depth. • In comparison with single pulse laser ablation, the absorption of the laser pulse energy is higher for double pulse regime. • As a result of ablated material expansion, the crater depth is decreased if the target is placed at lower depth. - Abstract: In this paper, single pulse and double pulse laser ablation of an aluminum target in two interaction ambient was investigated experimentally. The interaction was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam in air and four depths (i.e. 9, 13, 17, and 21 mm) of distilled water ambient. The irradiation was carried out in single and collinear double pulse configurations in both air and liquid ambient. Crater geometry (depth and diameter) was measured by an optical microscope. The results indicated that the crater geometry strongly depends on both single pulse and double pulse configurations and interaction ambient. In single pulse regime, the crater diameter is higher for all water depths compared to that of air. However, the crater depth, depend on water depth, is higher or lower than the crater depth in air. In double pulse laser ablation, there are greater values for both crater diameters and crater depths in the water.

  14. Aluminum induced physiological and proteomic responses in tea (Camellia sinensis) roots and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingshan; Wang, Yu; Ding, Zhaotang; Fan, Kai; Ma, Dexin; Zhang, Yongliang; Yin, Qi

    2017-06-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze), is an aluminum (Al) hyperaccumulator and grows well in acid soils. Although Al-induced growth of tea plant has been studied, the proteomic profiles of tea plants in response to Al are unclear. In the present study, the proteomic profiles in tea roots and leaves under Al stress were investigated using iTRAQ proteomics approach. In total, 755 and 1059 differentially expressed proteins were identified in tea roots and leaves, respectively. KEGG enrichment analysis showed that the differentially expressed proteins in roots were mainly involved in 11 pathways whereas those from leaves were mainly involved in 9 pathways. Abundance of most protein functions in glycolytic metabolism were enhanced in tea roots, and proteins involved in photosynthesis were stimulated in tea leaves. The protein ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H) in lignin biosynthetic pathway was down-regulated in both roots and leaves. Furthermore, antioxidant enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione S-transferase) and citrate synthesis were accumulated in tea roots in response to Al. The results indicated that active photosynthesis and glycolysis as well as increased activities of antioxidant enzymes can be considered as a possible reason for the stimulatory effects of Al on the growth of tea plants. Additionally, the down-regulation of F5H and the binding of Al and phenolic acids may reduce the accumulation of lignin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-oxidative effect of resveratrol on aluminum induced toxicity in rat cerebral tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, M M H; Hajipour, B; Estakhri, R; Saleh, B M

    2017-01-01

    The direct protective effects of resveratrol against oxidative stress have been demonstrated in neuroglial cells, the mechanisms of these effects are not fully understood. The aim of this research was to study the effect of resveratrol on AL induced cerebral injury in rat. We divided the groups as follows with 10 animals each: a) Group I - served as control receiving normal drinking water and diet ad libitum. b) Group II - animals were administered aluminum at a dose level of 100 mg/kg body weight for a period of 6 weeks daily through oral gavage. c) Group III - animals were administered aluminum at a dose level of 100 mg/kg body weight and resveratrol at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally for a period of 6 weeks daily. After 6 weeks rats were anesthetized and decapitated. Brains were removed immediately and frozen in liquid nitrogenRESULTS: The levels of SOD and GPx antioxidant enzymes were decreased in all of the groups receiving aluminium, but it was less severe in resveratrol treated group. SOD and GPx levels in aluminium + resveratrol group were higher than in the aluminum group (p aluminum group and the difference was significant (p toxicity by reducing MDA production in cerebral tissue. Resveratrol also attenuated SOD and GPx suppression in cerebral tissue significantly. Our findings provide the rationale for further studies directed to understanding the mechanism of resveratrol in preventing neurodeterioration (Tab. 1, Ref. 35).

  16. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  17. Antioxidant potential properties of mushroom extract (Agaricus bisporus) against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Mostafa I; Guizani, Nejib

    2014-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) is an environmental toxin that induces oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Mushroom cultivar extract (MCE) acted as a potent antioxidant agent and protects against cellular oxidative stress in human cultured neuronal cells. This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of MCE against Al-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (10 rats per group), control group, MCE-fed group, Al-administered group and MCE/Al-treated group. Animals were continuously fed ad-libitum their specific diets for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiment, all rats were sacrificed and the brain tissues were homogenized and examined for biochemical measurements of neurocellular oxidative stress indices [glutathione (GSH), Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC), antioxidant enzymes and oxidized dichlorofluorescein (DCF)]. Al-administration caused inhibition of antioxidant enzymes and a significant decrease in GSH and TAC levels, meanwhile it positively increased cellular oxidized DCF level, as well as Al concentration in brain tissues. Feeding animals with MCE had completely offset the Al-induced oxidative stress and significantly restrict the Al accumulation in brain tissues of Al-administered rats. The results obtained suggest that MCE acted as a potent dietary antioxidant and protects against Al-mediated neurotoxicity, by abrogating neuronal oxidative stress.

  18. Aluminum-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in grass carp (Cyprinidae--Ctenopharingodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Dávila, María Lourdes; Razo-Estrada, Amparo Celene; García-Medina, Sandra; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Piñón-López, Manuel Jesús; Ibarra, Rocio Guzmán; Galar-Martínez, Marcela

    2012-02-01

    Aluminum is used in a large number of anthropogenic processes, leading to aquatic ecosystems pollution. Diverse studies show that in mammals this metal may produce oxidative stress, is neurotoxic, and is involved in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzhaimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nevertheless, there are only few studies with respect to Al-induced neurotoxicity on aquatic fauna, particularly on fishes of economical interest, such as the grass carp (Ctenopharingodon idella). This study evaluates Al-induced toxicity on the grass carp C. idella. Specimens were exposed to the maximum concentration allowed in order to protect aquatic life (0.1 mg L⁻¹), for 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. After the exposure time, lipid peroxidation degree, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, as well as dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline levels were evaluated. Al concentration in organisms and water was also measured, in order to determine the bioconcentration factor. Results show that Al bioconcentrates in grass carp inducing oxidative stress (increment of 300 and 455 percent on lipid peroxidation degree and SOD activity, and decrement of 49 percent on CAT activity) and neurotoxicity (increment of 55 and 155 percent on dopamine and adrenaline levels and decrement of 93 percent on noradrenaline level). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aluminum-induced molecular neurodegeneration: The protective role of genistein and chickpea extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahby, M M; Mohammed, D S; Newairy, A A; Abdou, H M; Zaky, A

    2017-09-01

    Neurotoxicity of Al is well established and linked to oxidative damage and neurodegeneration. This study investigated the protective role of genistein (Gen) and chickpea extract (CPE) against AlCl 3 -induced neurodegeneration. HPLC analysis revealed that biochanin A-7-O-β-D-glucoside and biochanin A are the major components of the CPE. Gene expression of TNF-α, APP, BACE1, PSEN-2 and ER-β were assessed in brain extract using RT-PCR. Also, NF-кB subunit P65 and COX-2 expression were evaluated by western blotting. The cholinergic function, histological examination and oxidative status were also estimated. The AlCl 3 significantly up regulated the expression of the NF-кB subunit P65, COX-2, TNF- α, BACE1and APP while it significantly down regulated PSEN-2 and ER-β expression. The activity of acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and the oxidative stress parameters as well as the histological examination confirmed the deleterious effect of AlCl 3 . The administration of either CPE or Gen attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, inhibited the amyloidogenesis and restored both the AChE activity and ER-β expression. Gen and CPE also inhibited the oxidative stress and ameliorated the histological alterations. Accordingly, the present study provides an insight on the molecular role of Gen and CPE as protective agents against neuronal injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aluminum-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative damage in rabbits: protective effect of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elghaffar, Sary Kh; El-Sokkary, Gamal H; Sharkawy, Ahmed A

    2005-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate: (1) the neurotoxic oxidative damage of orally administered aluminum chloride (AlCl3) in rabbits (Biochemical and morphopathological studies). (2) The effect of melatonin as an antioxidant and free radical scavenger on oxidative neuropathic changes. Thirty-five male rabbits were divided into 4 groups (A, B, C [10 animals each] and D [5 animals]). Group A received AlCl3 (20 mg/l via drinking water for 3 months). Group B received AlCl3 for 3 months then administered with melatonin (10 mg/kg b.w. sc daily for 15 days). Group C received AlCl3 plus melatonin for 3 months. Group D received the solvent and served as control. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HDA) as lipid peroxides as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) as an antioxidant enzyme were measured. Aluminum residue in the brain tissue was measured spectrophotometerically. The morphopathological changes were also examined by light and electron microscopes. MDA and 4-HAD were significantly increased in group A versus those of controls while significantly decreased in groups B and C compared with those of A group. SOD run in an opposite manner. Aluminum concentration was significantly increased in groups A, B and C when compared with group D while it significantly decreased in groups B and C when compared with that of group A. The neuropathlogical examination in the animals of group A revealed atrophy and apoptosis of the neurons in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. This was associated with neurofibrillary degeneration as well as argyrophilic inclusion. Schwan cell degeneration and nerve fiber demylination were also encountered. The elaboration of lipid peroxidation products, inhibition of antioxidant enzymes and the morphopathological changes were minimized in the Al/Mel treated groups and markedly improved in Al+Mel treated group Chronic aluminum exposure in rabbits had dramatic encephalopathic morphopathological lesions. It enhances the lipid peroxidation production and inhibits the SOD enzyme. Melatonin had a good prophylactic effect as an antioxidant in aluminum encephalopathy.

  1. Environmental Impact Analysis Process Chemical Release Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force proposes to conduct an experiment to identify the potential environmental consequences of an inadvertent release of hydrazine rocket propellant in space, during orbital or suborbital operations...

  2. Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2010 Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2011 Release is a composite index for 174 countries derived from the average of four proximity-to-target indicators for...

  3. EPA Releases Neonicotinoid Assessments for Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Release of preliminary ecological and human health risk assessments for the neonicotinoid insecticides clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, and a preliminary ecological risk assessment for imidacloprid, assessing risks to birds,mammals, non-target

  4. Formulation and Characterization of Sustained Release Floating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate sustained release gastroretentive microballoons of metformin hydrochloride with the objective of improving its bioavailability. Methods: Microballoons of metformin hydrochloride were formulated by solvent evaporation and diffusion method using varying mixtures of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ...

  5. Coherently Controlled Release of Drugs in Ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckup, Tiago; Möhring, Jens; Settels, Volker; Träger, Jens; Kim, Hee-Cheo; Hampp, Norbert; Motzkus, Marcus

    The photocleavage of a coumarin derivative dimer is a promising mechanism for laser controlled drug release in medical applications. We investigate the efficiency of the twophoton induced cleavage in open- and closed-loop control schemes.

  6. Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2009 Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2009 Release is a composite index for 171 countries derived from the average of four proximity-to-target indicators for...

  7. Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2011 Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2011 Release is a composite index for 174 countries derived from the average of four proximity-to-target indicators for...

  8. Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2010 Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Natural Resource Management Index (NRMI), 2010 Release is a composite index for 157 countries derived from the average of four proximity-to-target indicators for...

  9. Nickel may be released from laptop computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consumer nickel sensitization and dermatitis is caused by prolonged or repeated skin exposure to items that release nickel, for example jewellery, belts, buttons, watches, and mobile phones (1–3). We recently described a patient in whom primary nickel contact sensitization and dermatitis developed...... following the use of an Apple laptop computer (4). To estimate nickel release from Apple laptop computers, we investigated a random sample of 20 devices....

  10. An osprey is released at CCAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Angy Chambers, senior wildlife biologist for Environmental Support Contract/Dynamac, holds a juvenile osprey before releasing it at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. As a nestling, the osprey fell twice from its nest, located on a light pole in the ITL area of CCAFS. Chambers determined the bird might have a broken leg and gave it to the Florida Wildlife Hospital for treatment. The osprey was released the same day as the two great horned owls.

  11. Expansion of ARAC for chemical releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskett, R.L.; Blair, M.D.; Foster, C.S.; Taylor, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed an effort to expand its national emergency response modeling system for chemical releases. Key components of the new capability include the integration of (1) an extensive chemical property database, (2) source modeling for tanks and evaporating pools, (3) denser-than-air dispersion, (4) public exposure guidelines, and (5) an interactive graphical user interface (GUI). Recent use and the future of the new capability are also discussed

  12. Modelling fission gas release at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesoenen, Pekka

    1999-01-01

    High burn-up phenomena in LWR/HWR UO 2 fuel pellets important for fission gas release were modelled. The degradation of the thermal conductivity of UO 2 was accounted for 1) with a burnup -dependent factor in the phonon term of the corresponding equation and 2) with a correlation describing the increase in the porosity at the pellet rim as a function of local burnup and radial position. The model was tested against IFA-432 and IFA-429 data. It was found out that the degradation of the thermal conductivity in the phonon term is perhaps not a function of the local burnup only, but the irradiation temperature may play an important role, too. The burnup as a function of the pellet radius has to be known to determine the local thermal conductivity. A model for this was picked up from the literature, but a new estimation of a few empirical fitting parameters was performed with hundreds of data points from the OECD/NEA data base and from the literature. The model predicts reliably the radial burnup profile and the fission gas generation across the pellet in typical LWR and HWR fuels. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modelled separately. The model for the rim release is a function of the temperature history and the local burnup. The rim release and the thermal release can occur at the same radial position of the pellets simultaneously, which is accounted for in the calculation of the total release. The model for the rim release in in agreement with the latest experimental findings, but the tuning of the model parameters is yet to be done. However, the fraction of the rim structured fuel and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the burnup was predicted by using typical model parameters (author) (ml)

  13. Release of fission products in transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, H.; Lundqwist, R.

    1979-07-01

    A station for automatic sampling of coolant has been put in operation at the Oskarshamn-1 reactor. The release of 131 J and other fission products in spikes in connection with reactor trips and scheduled shutdowns has been measured. A model developed at General Electric has been used to predict the spike release in Oskarshamn-1 and the predicted values have been compared with experimental values. Literature data of iodine spikes in BWR and PWR have been reviewed. (author)

  14. Guidance for Evaluating the Safety of Experimental Releases of Mosquitoes, Emphasizing Mark-Release-Recapture Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Mark Q; Charlwood, J Derek; Harrington, Laura C; Lounibos, L Philip; Reisen, William K; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2018-01-01

    Experimental releases of mosquitoes are performed to understand characteristics of populations related to the biology, ability to transmit pathogens, and ultimately their control. In this article, we discuss considerations related to the safety of experimental releases of living mosquitoes, applying principles of good practice in vector biology that protect human health and comfort. We describe specific factors of experimental releases of mosquitoes that we believe are critical to inform institutional biosafety committees and similar review boards to which proposals to conduct mosquito release experiments have been submitted. In this study, "experimental releases" means those that do not significantly increase vector capacity or nuisance biting relative to the unperturbed natural baseline. This document specifically does not address releases of mosquitoes for ongoing control programs or trials of new control methods for which broader assessments of risk are required. It also does not address releases of transgenic or exotic (non-native) mosquito species, both of which require particular regulatory approval. Experimental releases may include females and males and evaluation must consider their effects based on the number released, their genotype and phenotype, the environment into which they are released, and postrelease collection activities. We consider whether increases of disease transmission and nuisance biting might result from proposed experimental releases against the backdrop of natural population size variation. We recommend that experimental releases be conducted in a manner that can be reasonably argued to have insignificant negative effects. Reviewers of proposals for experimental releases should expect applicants to provide such an argument based on evidence from similar studies and their planned activities. This document provides guidance for creating and evaluating such proposals.

  15. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  16. Electrosprayed nanoparticle delivery system for controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltayeb, Megdi, E-mail: megdi.eltayeb@sustech.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Sudan University of Science and Technology, PO Box 407, Khartoum (Sudan); Stride, Eleanor, E-mail: eleanor.stride@eng.ox.ac.uk [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Headington OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Edirisinghe, Mohan, E-mail: m.edirisinghe@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Harker, Anthony, E-mail: a.harker@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    This study utilises an electrohydrodynamic technique to prepare core-shell lipid nanoparticles with a tunable size and high active ingredient loading capacity, encapsulation efficiency and controlled release. Using stearic acid and ethylvanillin as model shell and active ingredients respectively, we identify the processing conditions and ratios of lipid:ethylvanillin required to form nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with a mean size ranging from 60 to 70 nm at the rate of 1.37 × 10{sup 9} nanoparticles per minute were prepared with different lipid:ethylvanillin ratios. The polydispersity index was ≈ 21% and the encapsulation efficiency ≈ 70%. It was found that the rate of ethylvanillin release was a function of the nanoparticle size, and lipid:ethylvanillin ratio. The internal structure of the lipid nanoparticles was studied by transmission electron microscopy which confirmed that the ethylvanillin was encapsulated within a stearic acid shell. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that the ethylvanillin had not been affected. Extensive analysis of the release of ethylvanillin was performed using several existing models and a new diffusive release model incorporating a tanh function. The results were consistent with a core-shell structure. - Highlights: • Electrohydrodynamic spraying is used to produce lipid-coated nanoparticles. • A new model is proposed for the release rates of active components from nanoparticles. • The technique has potential applications in food science and medicine. • Electrohydrodynamic processing controlled release lipid nanoparticles.

  17. Facilitation, augmentation, and potentiation of transmitter release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, K. L. [Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2008-06-02

    This chapter discusses facilitation, augmentation, and potentiation of transmitter release. The effect of repetitive stimulation on transmitter release has been studied to look for and characterize the processes in the nerve terminal that affect the transmitter release. During repetitive stimulation of a neuromuscular junction under conditions of low quantal content, end-plate potentials progressively increase in amplitude. This increase is due to an increase in the number of quanta of transmitter released by each nerve impulse. A kinetic analysis of the changes in transmitter release during and following repetitive stimulation suggests that, there are four processes that act to increase transmitter release: first and second components of facilitation that decay with time constants of about 50 and 30 msec, augmentation that decays with a time constant of about 7s, and potentiation that decays with a time constant, which ranges from about 30s to min. These processes are separable on the basis of their kinetic and pharmacological properties. As a result, the mechanisms of these processes are not yet known, but some possibilities are briefly discussed in terms of structural, chemical, and statistical factors.

  18. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbilla, S.; Langer, S.Z.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [ 3 H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01-1μM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.1-1 μM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1-10μM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1μM) of the stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective. (Auth.)

  19. Metalloprotease Dependent Release of Placenta Derived Fractalkine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Siwetz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine fractalkine is considered as unique since it exists both as membrane-bound adhesion molecule and as shed soluble chemoattractant. Here the hypothesis was tested whether placental fractalkine can be shed and released into the maternal circulation. Immunohistochemical staining of human first trimester and term placenta sections localized fractalkine at the apical microvillous plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast. Gene expression analysis revealed abundant upregulation in placental fractalkine at term, compared to first trimester. Fractalkine expression and release were detected in the trophoblast cell line BeWo, in primary term trophoblasts and placental explants. Incubation of BeWo cells and placental explants with metalloprotease inhibitor Batimastat inhibited the release of soluble fractalkine and at the same time increased the membrane-bound form. These results demonstrate that human placenta is a source for fractalkine, which is expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast and can be released into the maternal circulation by constitutive metalloprotease dependent shedding. Increased expression and release of placental fractalkine may contribute to low grade systemic inflammatory responses in third trimester of normal pregnancy. Aberrant placental metalloprotease activity may not only affect the release of placenta derived fractalkine but may at the same time affect the abundance of the membrane-bound form of the chemokine.

  20. Effect of Food Emulsifiers on Aroma Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Jia Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the influence of different emulsifiers or xanthan-emulsifier systems on the release of aroma compounds. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME and GC-MS were used to study the effects of varying concentrations of xanthan gum, sucrose fatty acid ester, Tween 80 and soybean lecithin on the release of seven aroma compounds. The effects of the emulsifier systems supplemented with xanthan gum on aroma release were also studied in the same way. The results showed varying degrees of influence of sucrose fatty acid ester, soybean lecithin, Tween 80 and xanthan gum on the release of aroma compounds. Compared with other aroma compounds, ethyl acetate was more likely to be conserved in the solution system, while the amount of limonene released was the highest among these seven aroma compounds. In conclusion, different emulsifiers and complexes showed different surface properties that tend to interact with different aroma molecules. The present studies showed that the composition and structure of emulsifiers and specific interactions between emulsifiers and aroma molecules have significant effects on aroma release.

  1. Atmospheric dispersion models of radioactivity releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oza, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    In view of the rapid industrialization in recent time, atmospheric dispersion models have become indispensible 'tools' to ensure that the effects of releases are well within the acceptable limits set by the regulatory authority. In the case of radioactive releases from the nuclear facility, though negligible in quantity and many a times not even measurable, it is required to demonstrate the compliance of these releases to the regulatory limits set by the regulatory authority by carrying out radiological impact assessment. During routine operations of nuclear facility, the releases are so low that environmental impact is usually assessed with the help of atmospheric dispersion models as it is difficult to distinguish negligible contribution of nuclear facility to relatively high natural background radiation. The accidental releases from nuclear facility, though with negligible probability of occurrence, cannot be ruled out. In such cases, the atmospheric dispersion models are of great help to emergency planners for deciding the intervention actions to minimize the consequences in public domain and also to workout strategies for the management of situation. In case of accidental conditions, the atmospheric dispersion models are also utilized for the estimation of probable quantities of radionuclides which might have got released to the atmosphere. Thus, atmospheric dispersion models are an essential tool for nuclear facility during routine operation as well as in the case of accidental conditions

  2. Tritium behavior intentionally released in the room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Iwai, Y.; Yamanishi, T.; Willms, R. S.; Carlson, R. V.

    2008-01-01

    To construct a fusion reactor with high safety and acceptability, it is necessary to establish and to ensure tritium safe handling technology. Tritium should be well-controlled not to be released to the environment excessively and to prevent workers from excess exposure. It is especially important to grasp tritium behavior in the final confinement area, such as the room and/or building. In order to obtain data for actual tritium behavior in a room and/or building, a series of intentional Tritium Release Experiments (TREs) were planned and carried out within a radiologically controlled area (main cell) at Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) in Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under US-JAPAN collaboration program. These experiments were carried out three times. In these experiments, influence of a difference in the tritium release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope for the initial tritium behavior in the room were suggested. Tritium was released into the main cell at TSTA/LANL. The released tritium reached a uniform concentration about 30 - 40 minutes in all the experiments. The influence of the release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope were not found to be important in these experiments. The experimental results for the initial tritium behavior in the room were also simulated well by the modified three-dimensional eddy flow analysis code FLOW-3D. (authors)

  3. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  4. The illustris simulation: Public data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D.; Pillepich, A.; Genel, S.; Vogelsberger, M.; Springel, V.; Torrey, P.; Rodriguez-Gomez, V.; Sijacki, D.; Snyder, G. F.; Griffen, B.; Marinacci, F.; Blecha, L.; Sales, L.; Xu, D.; Hernquist, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present the full public release of all data from the Illustris simulation project. Illustris is a suite of large volume, cosmological hydrodynamical simulations run with the moving-mesh code AREPO and including a comprehensive set of physical models critical for following the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Each simulates a volume of (106.5 Mpc)3 and self-consistently evolves five different types of resolution elements from a starting redshift of z = 127 to the present day, z = 0. These components are: dark matter particles, gas cells, passive gas tracers, stars and stellar wind particles, and supermassive black holes. This data release includes the snapshots at all 136 available redshifts, halo and subhalo catalogs at each snapshot, and two distinct merger trees. Six primary realizations of the Illustris volume are released, including the flagship Illustris-1 run. These include three resolution levels with the fiducial ;full; baryonic physics model, and a dark matter only analog for each. In addition, we provide four distinct, high time resolution, smaller volume ;subboxes;. The total data volume is ∼265 TB, including ∼800 full volume snapshots and ∼30,000 subbox snapshots. We describe the released data products as well as tools we have developed for their analysis. All data may be directly downloaded in its native HDF5 format. Additionally, we release a comprehensive, web-based API which allows programmatic access to search and data processing tasks. In both cases we provide example scripts and a getting-started guide in several languages: currently, IDL, Python, and Matlab. This paper addresses scientific issues relevant for the interpretation of the simulations, serves as a pointer to published and on-line documentation of the project, describes planned future additional data releases, and discusses technical aspects of the release.

  5. Sustained-release progesterone vaginal suppositories 1--development of sustained-release granule--.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Ayako; Sunada, Hisakazu; Okamoto, Hirokazu; Furuhashi, Kaoru; Ohno, Yukiko; Ito, Mikio

    2009-02-01

    Progesterone (P) is an important hormone for the establishment of pregnancy, and its administration is useful for luteal insufficiency. Considering the problems of commercially available oral and injection drugs, hospital-formulated vaginal suppositories are clinically used. However, since the half-life of P suppositories is short, it is difficult to maintain its constant blood concentration. To sustain drug efficacy and prevent side-effects, we are attempting to develop sustained-release suppositories by examining the degree of sustained-release of active ingredients. In this study, we examined the combinations of granulation methods and release systems for the preparation of sustained-release granules of P, and produced 13 types of sustained-release granules. We also examined the diameter, content, and dissolution of each type of granules, and confirmed that the sustained-release of all types of granules was satisfactory. Among the sustained-release granules, we selected granules with a content and a degree of sustained-release suitable for sustained-release suppositories.

  6. Barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases (BORA-Release)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aven, Terje [University of Stavanger (UiS), NO-4036 Stavanger (Norway); Sklet, Snorre [Department of Production and Quality Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)]. E-mail: snorre.sklet@sintef.no; Vinnem, Jan Erik [University of Stavanger (UiS), NO-4036 Stavanger (Norway)

    2006-09-21

    Investigations of major accidents show that technical, human, operational, as well as organisational factors influence the accident sequences. In spite of these facts, quantitative risk analyses of offshore oil and gas production platforms have focused on technical safety systems. This paper presents a method (called BORA-Release) for qualitative and quantitative risk analysis of the platform specific hydrocarbon release frequency. By using BORA-Release it is possible to analyse the effect of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and how platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors influence the barrier performance. BORA-Release comprises the following main steps: (1) development of a basic risk model including release scenarios, (2) modelling the performance of safety barriers, (3) assignment of industry average probabilities/frequencies and risk quantification based on these probabilities/frequencies, (4) development of risk influence diagrams, (5) scoring of risk influencing factors, (6) weighting of risk influencing factors, (7) adjustment of industry average probabilities/frequencies, and (8) recalculation of the risk in order to determine the platform specific risk related to hydrocarbon release. The various steps in BORA-Release are presented and discussed. Part II of the paper presents results from a case study where BORA-Release is applied.

  7. Barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases (BORA-Release). Part I. Method description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aven, Terje; Sklet, Snorre; Vinnem, Jan Erik

    2006-09-21

    Investigations of major accidents show that technical, human, operational, as well as organisational factors influence the accident sequences. In spite of these facts, quantitative risk analyses of offshore oil and gas production platforms have focused on technical safety systems. This paper presents a method (called BORA-Release) for qualitative and quantitative risk analysis of the platform specific hydrocarbon release frequency. By using BORA-Release it is possible to analyse the effect of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and how platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors influence the barrier performance. BORA-Release comprises the following main steps: (1) development of a basic risk model including release scenarios, (2) modelling the performance of safety barriers, (3) assignment of industry average probabilities/frequencies and risk quantification based on these probabilities/frequencies, (4) development of risk influence diagrams, (5) scoring of risk influencing factors, (6) weighting of risk influencing factors, (7) adjustment of industry average probabilities/frequencies, and (8) recalculation of the risk in order to determine the platform specific risk related to hydrocarbon release. The various steps in BORA-Release are presented and discussed. Part II of the paper presents results from a case study where BORA-Release is applied.

  8. Gas Release as a Deformation Signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Radiogenic noble gases are contained in crustal rock at inter and intra granular sites. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history, fluid phases, and the aging effect by decay of U, Th, and K. The isotopic signature of noble gases found in rocks is vastly different than that of the atmosphere which is contributed by a variety of sources. When rock is subjected to stress conditions exceeding about half its yield strength, micro-cracks begin to form. As rock deformation progresses a fracture network evolves, releasing trapped noble gases and changing the transport properties to gas migration. Thus, changes in gas emanation and noble gas composition from rocks could be used to infer changes in stress-state and deformation. The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the effect of deformation/strain rate upon noble gas release. Four triaxial experiments were attempted for a strain rate range of %7E10-8 /s (180,000s) to %7E 10-4/s (500s); the three fully successful experiments (at the faster strain rates) imply the following: (1) helium is measurably released for all strain rates during deformation, this release is in amounts 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that present in the air, and (2) helium gas release increases with decreasing strain rate.

  9. Histamine Release from Mast Cells and Basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells and basophils represent the most relevant source of histamine in the immune system. Histamine is stored in cytoplasmic granules along with other amines (e.g., serotonin), proteases, proteoglycans, cytokines/chemokines, and angiogenic factors and rapidly released upon triggering with a variety of stimuli. Moreover, mast cell and basophil histamine release is regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. The engagement of different receptors can trigger different modalities of histamine release and degranulation. Histamine released from mast cells and basophils exerts its biological activities by activating four G protein-coupled receptors, namely H1R, H2R, H3R (expressed mainly in the brain), and the recently identified H4R. While H1R and H2R activation accounts mainly for some mast cell- and basophil-mediated allergic disorders, the selective expression of H4R on immune cells is uncovering new roles for histamine (possibly derived from mast cells and basophils) in allergic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. Thus, the in-depth knowledge of mast cell and basophil histamine release and its biologic effects is poised to uncover new therapeutic avenues for a wide spectrum of disorders.

  10. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in 238 PuO 2 fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel

  11. Levetiracetam inhibits neurotransmitter release associated with CICR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Kouji; Tanahashi, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yamamura, Satoshi; Motomura, Eishi; Shiroyama, Takashi; Tanii, Hisashi; Okada, Motohiro

    2012-06-19

    To define the antiepileptic mechanisms of levetiracetam (LEV), the present study determined the concentration-dependent effects of locally perfused LEV on the releases of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, l-glutamate and GABA induced by 50 mMK(+)-evoked stimulation and agonists of ryanodine receptor (RyR) and inositol-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the median prefrontal cortex (mPFC) using in vivo microdialysis. Local perfusion with LEV (10, 30 and 100 μM) alone did not affect the extracellular levels of all neurotransmitters in the mPFC. The release of neurotransmitters induced by K(+)-evoked stimulation was inhibited by perfusion with LEV in a concentration-dependent manner, and those induced by agonists of RyR and IP3R were also inhibited by LEV. Specifically, the RyR-induced release was inhibited by 10 μM LEV, whereas the IP3R-induced release was inhibited by 100 μM LEV, but not by 10 or 30 μM LEV. The above results suggest that LEV has little effect on the components of normal synaptic transmission but selectively inhibits transmission induced by neuronal hyperactivation. Thus, the mechanisms of the antiepileptic and neuroprotective actions of LEV seem to be mediated, at least in part, through the combination of these two inhibitory effects on depolarization-induced and CICR-associated neurotransmitter releases. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  13. Thermal release of tritium from SS316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikai, Y.; Naoe, S.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Akaishi, K.; Watanabe, K.; Matsuyama, M.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to improve current understanding of the mechanisms controlling the long-term release of tritium incorporated thermally into stainless steel SS316 and to develop reliable as well as economically feasible techniques for the conditioning of tritium-containing metallic wastes, a systematic investigation is underway in Toyama under carefully controlled conditions. The release rate of tritium from SS316 at ambient pressure was determined experimentally in a flow system at several constant temperatures within the range 287-573 K for rather extended periods of time. Under these conditions HTO was found to constitute by far the most important tritium-containing species being released, i.e. approx. 99 %. Much data has accumulated in recent years with a variety of specimens, i.e. type of stainless steel and specimen dimension, loaded with tritium under different pressure and temperature conditions. Dynamic behavior of long-term tritium release has been successfully modeled using a onedimensional diffusion equation and assuming that the release rate is governed by the tritium flux at the metal surface boundary. The implications of the results for interim storage and thermal conditioning of stainless steel waste will be discussed. (orig.)

  14. Minimization of radioactive liquids released from PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hideo; Kohri, Masaharu.

    1981-01-01

    The quantity of radioactive substances in the liquids released into the environment from a PWR power station in normal operation was determined, following the path from the sources of generation, that is, the equipments in primary and secondary cooling systems, to the release into the environment after the radioactive substances were removed in treatment facilities. The quantity of radioactive substances released from primary and secondary systems was determined for each source of generation in a standard plant, and the results were examined. As the concrete example of reducing the release on the basis of ''As low as reasonably achievable'' concept, the increase of letdown flow rate and the installation of a condensate-desalting column are reported. As the sources of generation, the primary coolant formed by shim bleed and the drain from primary system equipments, the drain from an auxiliary building floor, radiochemistry waste solution and the drain from intermediate cooling system, the waste water of washing and shower bath, the drain from a turbine building floor, and the blow-down waste from steam generators are enumerated. The concentration of radioactive substances in primary and secondary coolants, the decontamination factor of waste treatment equipments and the measures for reducing the release are described. (Kako, I.)

  15. Environmental Releases for Calendar Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DYEKMAN, D L

    2002-08-01

    This report fulfills the annual reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. The report contains tabular data summaries on air emissions and liquid effluents released to the environment as well as nonroutine releases during calendar year (CY) 2001. These releases, bearing radioactive and hazardous substances, were from Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), and Fluor Hanford (FH) managed facilities and activities. These data were obtained from direct sampling and analysis and from estimates based upon approved release factors. This report further serves as a supplemental resource to the Hanford Site Environmental Report (HSER PNNL-13910), published by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. HSER includes a yearly accounting of the impacts on the surrounding populace and environment from major activities at the Hanford Site. HSER also summarizes the regulatory compliance status of the Hanford Site. Tables ES-1 through ES-5 display comprehensive data summaries of CY2001 air emission and liquid effluent releases. The data displayed in these tables compiles the following: Radionuclide air emissions; Nonradioactive air emissions; Radionuclides in liquid effluents discharged to ground; Total volumes and flow rates of radioactive liquid effluents discharged to ground; and Radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River.

  16. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

  17. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.L.; Shawver, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes is described. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet-type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel

  18. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.L.; Shawver, B.M.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes is described. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet-type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel

  19. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.L.; Shawver, B.M.

    1975-09-16

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes is described. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet- type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel. (auth)

  20. Tritium releases, birth defects and infant deaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The AECB has published a report 'Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and Birth Defects and Infant Mortality in Nearby Communities 1971-1988' (report number INFO-0401). This presents the results of a detailed analysis of deaths and birth defects occurring in infants born to mothers living in the area (25 Km radius) of the Pickering nuclear power plant, over an 18-year period. The analysis looked at the frequency of these defects and deaths in comparison to the general rate for Ontario, and also in relation to airborne and waterborne releases of tritium from the power plant. The overall conclusion was that the rates of infant death and birth defects were generally not higher in the study population than in all of Ontario. There was no prevalent relationship between these deaths and defects and tritium releases measured either at the power plant or by ground monitoring stations t some distance from the facility

  1. Dams release methane even in temperate zoned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarchand, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Wohlen lake (near Bern) is a retaining dam built 90 years ago that has undergone a campaign to measure the quantity of methane released. The campaign lasted 1 year and the result was unexpected: 0.15 g/m 2 *day which one of the highest release rates in temperate zones. This result is all the more stunning since water stays only 2 days in average in the reservoir and that the drowned area is not important. In fact the river Aar that feeds the lake is loaded with organic matter coming from humane activities: agriculture and 3 sewage plants. This organic matter decays in the lake releasing methane. (A.C.)

  2. Environmental releases for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-07-01

    This report fulfills the annual environmental release reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. This report provides supplemental information to the Hanford Site Environmental Report. The Hanford Site Environmental Report provides an update on the environmental status of the entire Hanford Site. The sitewide annual report summarizes the degree of compliance of the Hanford Site with applicable environmental regulations and informs the public about the impact of Hanford operations on the surrounding environment. Like the Hanford Site Environmental Report, this annual report presents a summary of the environmental releases from facilities managed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and monitored by Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). In addition to the summary data, this report also includes detailed data on air emissions, liquid effluents, and hazardous substances released to the environment during calendar year 1994 from these facilities

  3. Arct'Alg release from hydrogel membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Renata H.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Shihomatsu, Helena M.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogel properties make them attractive for a variety of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, primarily in drug delivery system. Synthetic hydrogels have been studied to develop new devices for drugs or cosmetic active agents release. Arct'Alg R is an extract derived from red algae biomass which has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and tissue regeneration stimulant properties. This extract was incorporated to poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel membranes obtained by gamma rays crosslinking technique. The ionizing radiation presents the advantage to occur polymerization and sterilization simultaneously in the same process. The aim of this work was the in vitro release kinetic study of Arct'Alg R from hydrogel membranes during 24 hours to verify the possibility of use in cosmetic and dermatological treatments. Results showed that about 50% and 30% of incorporated Arct'Alg R was released from PVP and PVA hydrogel membrane devices respectively. (author)

  4. Release of silver nanoparticles from outdoor facades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Zuleeg, Steffen; Hagendorfer, Harald; Mueller, Elisabeth; Vonbank, Roger; Boller, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigate the release of metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) from paints used for outdoor applications. A facade panel mounted on a model house was exposed to ambient weather conditions over a period of one year. The runoff volume of individual rain events was determined and the silver and titanium concentrations of 36 out of 65 runoff events were measured. Selected samples were prepared for electron microscopic analysis. A strong leaching of the Ag-NP was observed during the initial runoff events with a maximum concentration of 145 μ Ag/l. After a period of one year, more than 30% of the Ag-NP were released to the environment. Particles were mostly 2 S. - We provide direct evidence for the release of silver nanoparticles from exterior paints to the aquatic environment.

  5. Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamatey, A.; Arnett, M.

    1997-01-01

    During the history of SRS, continual improvements in facilities, process, and operations, and changes in the site''s mission have reduced the amount of radioactive liquid releases. In the early years of SRS (1958 to 1965), the amount of tritium discharged to the Savannah River averaged approximately 61,000 curies a year. During the mid-1980''s (1983 to 1988), liquid releases of tritium averaged 27,000 curies a year. By 1996, liquid releases of tritium are projected to be just 3000 curies for the year. This large projected decrease is the result of the planned shut-down of all reactors and the anticipated significant decline in the amount of tritium migrating from the site seepage basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility

  6. Nanotechnologies for noninvasive measurement of drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas; Chen, Hongyu; Morrison, Rachel; Wang, Fenglin; Anker, Jeffrey N; Alexis, Frank

    2014-01-06

    A wide variety of chemotherapy and radiotherapy agents are available for treating cancer, but a critical challenge is to deliver these agents locally to cancer cells and tumors while minimizing side effects from systemic delivery. Nanomedicine uses nanoparticles with diameters in the range of ∼1-100 nm to encapsulate drugs and target them to tumors. The nanoparticle enhances local drug delivery efficiency to the tumors via entrapment in leaky tumor vasculature, molecular targeting to cells expressing cancer biomarkers, and/or magnetic targeting. In addition, the localization can be enhanced using triggered release in tumors via chemical, thermal, or optical signals. In order to optimize these nanoparticle drug delivery strategies, it is important to be able to image where the nanoparticles distribute and how rapidly they release their drug payloads. This Review aims to evaluate the current state of nanotechnology platforms for cancer theranostics (therapeutic and diagnostic particles) that are capable of noninvasive measurement of release kinetics.

  7. Nanocomposites for controlled release of nitrogen fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Viviane J.M. da; Visconte, Leila L.Y.; Nascimento, Regina Sandra V.

    2009-01-01

    The study aimed at the development of nano structured materials capable of reducing the rate of release of nitrogen in the soil from an agricultural nitrogen fertilizer. Four different systems of polymer composites were prepared: (1) montmorillonite clay/fertilizer, (2) montmorillonite clay/thermoplastic starch and fertilizer, (3) montmorillonite clay/fertilizer, thermoplastic starch and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and also (4) montmorillonite clay/fertilizer, thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone. It was confirmed the formation of nano structured materials by elemental analysis (CHN) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The kinetics of nitrogen release was detected by enzymatic colorimetric analysis and spectroscopy in the ultraviolet/visible. The results showed that all materials evaluated were able to reduce the rate of release of nitrogen in the fertilizers. (author)

  8. Stimulatory effects of neuronally released norepinephrine on renin release in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Yasuo; Kawazoe, Shinka; Ichihara, Toshio; Shinyama, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Masaaki; Morimoto, Shiro (Osaka Univ. of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan))

    1988-10-01

    Extracellular high potassium inhibits renin release in vitro by increasing calcium concentrations in the juxtaglomerular cells. The authors found that the decreased response of renin release from rat kidney cortical slices in high potassium solution changed to a strikingly increased one in the presence of nifedipine at doses over 10{sup {minus}6} M. They then examined the stimulatory effect of extracellular high potassium in the presence of nifedipine on renin release. The enhancement of release was significantly suppressed either by propranolol or by metoprolol but not by prazosin. High potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release was markedly attenuated by renal denervation. The enhancing effect was not observed when the slices were incubated in calcium-free medium. Divalent cations such as Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} blocked this enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. High potassium elicited an increase in {sup 3}H efflux from the slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-norepinephrine. The increasing effect was not influenced by nifedipine but was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium or by the addition of divalent cations. These observations suggest to us that the high potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release from the slices is mediated by norepinephrine derived from renal sympathetic nerves and that this neuronally released norepinephrine stimulates renin release via activation of {beta}-adrenoceptors.

  9. Xyce parallel electronic simulator release notes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Hoekstra, Robert John; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. Specific requirements include, among others, the ability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms, improved numerical performance and object-oriented code design and implementation. The Xyce release notes describe: Hardware and software requirements New features and enhancements Any defects fixed since the last release Current known defects and defect workarounds For up-to-date information not available at the time these notes were produced, please visit the Xyce web page at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce.

  10. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  11. Silver release from coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.E.; Nabielek, H.

    1977-03-01

    The fission product Ag-110 m released from coated particles can be the dominant source of radioactivity from the core of a high temperature reactor in the early stages of the reactor life and possibly limits the accessability of primary circuit components. It can be shown that silver is retained in oxide fuel by a diffusion process (but not in carbide or carbon-diluted fuel) and that silver is released through all types of pyrocarbon layers. The retention in TRISO particles is variable and seems to be mainly connected with operating temperature and silicon carbide quality. (orig.) [de

  12. Sulphur release from alternative fuel firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Glarborg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The cement industry has long been dependent on the use of fossil fuels, although a recent trend in replacing fossil fuels with alternative fuels has arisen. 1, 2 However, when unconverted or partly converted alternative fuels are admitted directly in the rotary kiln inlet, the volatiles released...... from the fuels may react with sulphates present in the hot meal to form SO 2 . Here Maria del Mar Cortada Mut and associates describe pilot and industrial scale experiments focusing on the factors that affect SO 2 release in the cement kiln inlet....

  13. The offshore hydrocarbon releases (HCR) database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, R.A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Following Cullen Recommendation 39 which states that: ''The regulatory body should be responsible for maintaining a database with regard to hydrocarbon leaks, spills, and ignitions in the Industry and for the benefit of Industry'', HSE Offshore Safety Division (HSE-OSD) has now been operating the Hydrocarbon Releases (HCR) Database for approximately 3 years. This paper deals with the reporting of Offshore Hydrocarbon Releases, the setting up of the HCR Database, the collection of associated equipment population data, and the main features and benefits of the database, including discussion on the latest output information. (author)

  14. Biological processes influencing contaminant release from sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reible, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of biological processes, including bioturbation, on the mobility of contaminants in freshwater sediments is described. Effective mass coefficients are estimated for tubificid oligochaetes as a function of worm behavior and biomass density. The mass transfer coefficients were observed to be inversely proportional to water oxygen content and proportional to the square root of biomass density. The sediment reworking and contaminant release are contrasted with those of freshwater amphipods. The implications of these and other biological processes for contaminant release and i n-situ remediation of soils and sediments are summarized. 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Limitation of releases and filtration by sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schektman, N.

    1986-01-01

    In the highly hypothetic case of a severe reactor accident, it may lead to an increase of pressure within the containment and up to a value above the calculated pressure. A procedure is necessary in this case to maintain the integrity of the containment to prevent a release of radioactive products to the environment, while controlling in the best way releases. So, EDF and the CEA have developed a device of decompression-filtration of the containment atmosphere, using a free penetration of the containment and a sand box; the device and its operation constitute the U5 procedure [fr

  16. Bacteria‐Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen‐Chi; Tolker‐Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  17. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  18. EPICS release 3.11 specific documentation -- EPICS release notes for 3.11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    EPICS release 3.11 is now ready for user testing. A person who wants to set up a simplified application environment to boot an IOC and create databases using R3.11 should follow the directions in Appendix B, page 27, of the EPICS Source/Release Control Manual, Sept. 20, 1993. The R3.11 EPICS path at ANL/APS is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11 so the command to get the new release is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11/Unix/share/bin/getrel /net/phebos/epics/R3.11. An existing R3.8 short form report can be copied to this new directory and used to create a database. ANL/APS is currently testing an Application Developers Source/Release control system. It is not yet ready for general distribution. Attached are the EPICS R3.11 release notes

  19. EPICS release 3.11 specific documentation -- EPICS release notes for 3.11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-19

    EPICS release 3.11 is now ready for user testing. A person who wants to set up a simplified application environment to boot an IOC and create databases using R3.11 should follow the directions in Appendix B, page 27, of the EPICS Source/Release Control Manual, Sept. 20, 1993. The R3.11 EPICS path at ANL/APS is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11 so the command to get the new release is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11/Unix/share/bin/getrel /net/phebos/epics/R3.11. An existing R3.8 short form report can be copied to this new directory and used to create a database. ANL/APS is currently testing an Application Developers Source/Release control system. It is not yet ready for general distribution. Attached are the EPICS R3.11 release notes.

  20. Barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases (BORA-Release). Part II: Results from a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklet, Snorre; Vinnem, Jan Erik; Aven, Terje

    2006-09-21

    This paper presents results from a case study carried out on an offshore oil and gas production platform with the purpose to apply and test BORA-Release, a method for barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases. A description of the BORA-Release method is given in Part I of the paper. BORA-Release is applied to express the platform specific hydrocarbon release frequencies for three release scenarios for selected systems and activities on the platform. The case study demonstrated that the BORA-Release method is a useful tool for analysing the effect on the release frequency of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and to study the effect on the barrier performance of platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors (RIFs). BORA-Release may also be used to analyse the effect on the release frequency of risk reducing measures.

  1. Anticipation and Controversy Surround "Superman" Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Dakarai I.

    2010-01-01

    Well in advance of its official release, the education film "Waiting For Superman" has attracted a level of attention that could make it one of the year's most-watched documentaries--and one of the most controversial among educators, some of whom question its depictions of the American school system and how to improve it. Made by…

  2. Decomposition and Nutrient Release Patterns of Pueraria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report on a study to determine the decomposition and nutrient release patterns of Pueraria phaseoloides and Flemingia macrophylla leaf residues under two rainfall regimes in southern Cameroon. Fresh leaf material of the two legume species were put in litter bags and placed on the soil surface for 120 days at ...

  3. Based Indomethacin Sustained-Release Tablets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with prominent ... systemic toxic effects through the impairment of .... content spectrophotometrically at 298 nm. An equal volume of the withdrawn sample was replaced with fresh medium to maintain sink condition. The amount of drug released at each time.

  4. Trismus release in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Lee, Jing-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Trismus is a common problem among oral cancer patients. This report aimed to study the inciting factors of trismus and to find out the rationale of trismus release. Between 1996 and 2008, 61 oral cancer patients with retrievable records of interincisor distance (IID) were analyzed by retrospective chart review. The IID decreased from 31.4 (12.4) to 24.9 (12.0) mm in 36 patients undergoing cancer ablation only (P = 0.001). Other variables prompting trismus include buccal cancer (P = 0.017), radiotherapy (P = 0.008), and recurrence (P = 0.001). In contrast, the IID improved from 11.7 (7.1) to 22.7 (11.9) mm in 25 patients receiving cancer ablative and trismus releasing surgeries (P = 0.000). The improvement fared better in individuals with IID less than 15 mm than the others (P = 0.037). In conclusion, involvement of buccal region, ablative surgery, radiotherapy, and recurrence are provocative factors of trismus. Patients with IID less than 15 mm will benefit from releasing surgery significantly. Others may better be handled with conservative managements firstly, and enrolled as candidates of surgical release only until the patients entertained a 28-month period of disease-free interval, by which time the risk of recurrence would be markedly reduced.

  5. Physical and Release Properties of Metronidazole Suppositories ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: A study was made of the effects of some bases and adjuvants on the physical and release properties of metronidazole suppositories with a view to providing more information for the optimization of the rectal formulation of metronidazole. Method: Suppositories (1g) containing 200mg of metronidazole each were ...

  6. Controlled drug release from bifunctionalized mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wujun; Gao, Qiang; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong; Sun, Yuhan; Shen, Wanling; Deng, Feng

    2008-10-01

    Serial of trimethylsilyl-carboxyl bifunctionalized SBA-15 (TMS/COOH/SBA-15) have been studied as carriers for controlled release of drug famotidine (Famo). To load Famo with large capacity, SBA-15 with high content of carboxyl groups was successfully synthesized by one-pot synthesis under the assistance of KCl. The mesostructure of carboxyl functionalized SBA-15 (COOH/SBA-15) could still be kept even though the content of carboxyl groups was up to 57.2%. Increasing carboxyl content could effectively enhance the loading capacity of Famo. Compared with pure SBA-15, into which Famo could be hardly adsorbed, the largest drug loading capacity of COOH/SBA-15 could achieve 396.9 mg/g. The release of Famo from mesoporous silica was studied in simulated intestine fluid (SIF, pH=7.4). For COOH/SBA-15, the release rate of Famo decreased with narrowing pore size. After grafting TMS groups on the surface of COOH/SBA-15 with hexamethyldisilazane, the release of Famo was greatly delayed with the increasing content of TMS groups.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Sustained Release Matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tablet formulations showed a percent drug release ranging from 92.54 ± 1.02 to 98.56 ± 1.26 % at the end of 12 h. Using the spinal injury rat model, ... very common and significant problem. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ... animal studies, its mechanism of action involves depressing polysynaptic reflexes ...

  8. Released Time Religious Education: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Rex M.

    2017-01-01

    Released time religious education has a long history in the United States, but not all programs have been successful, and others have not even been legal! In this article, the legal history and cases involving religious education are explored with particular emphasis on the three prong Lemon test (named for one of the litigants). Practical…

  9. Amphiphilic copolymers for fouling-release coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noguer, Albert Camós; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Hvilsted, Søren

    of the coatings [9,10,11]. This work shows the effect of an amphiphilic copolymer that induces hydrophilicity on the surface of the silicone-based fouling release coatings. The behaviour of these copolymers within the coating upon immersion and the interaction of these surface-active additives with other...

  10. Renin release from isolated rat glomeruli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O; Baumbach, Lars Anders

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of calcium deprivation and D600 on the rate of renin release and seasonal variations in the response were studied on juxtaglomerular cells from a preparation of isolated rat glomeruli superfused in vitro. 2. Reduction of superfusate calcium concentration caused an increase in renin...

  11. Formulation and Characterization of Sustained Release Floating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rouge N, Cale ET, Doelker E, Buri P. Buoyancy and drug release patterns of floating minitablets containing piretanide and atenolol as model drugs. Pharm. Dev. Technol. 1998; 3: 73-84. 6. Lee JH, Park TG, Choi HK. Development of oral drug delivery system using floating microspheres. J. Microencapsul. 1999; 16: 715-729 ...

  12. Modelling biocide release based on coating properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erich, S.J.F.; Baukh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of micro-organisms on coated substrates is a common problem, since it reduces the performance of materials, in terms of durability as well as aesthetics. In order to prevent microbial growth biocides are frequently added to coatings. Unfortunately, early release of these biocides reduces the

  13. DETERMINATION OF METAL IONS RELEASED BY STAINLESS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amounts of cobalt, iron, manganese, nickel and chromium ions released from new and reused stainless steel arch bar used for maxillomandibular fixation was determined in Hank's solutions of different hydrogen and chloride ions concentrations, whole blood serum and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in vitro, over a ...

  14. Pan-STARRS Data Release 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Heather

    2018-01-01

    On December 19, 2016, Pan-STARRS released the stacked images, mean attributes catalogs, and static sky catalogs for the 3pi survey, in 5 filters (g,r,i,z,y), covering 3/4 of the sky, everything north of -30 in declination. This set of data is called Data Release 1 (DR1), and it is available to all at http://panstarrs.stsci.edu. It contains more than 10 billion objects, 3 billion of those objects have stack photometry. We give an update on the progress of the forthcoming Data Release (DR2) database, which will provide time domain catalogs and single exposures for the 3pi survey. This includes 3pi data taken between 2010 and 2014, covering approximately 60 epochs per patch of sky, and includes measurements detected in the single exposures as well as forced photometry measurements (photometry measured on single exposures using the positions from sources detected in the stacks). We also provide informations on futures releases (DR3 and beyond), which will contain the rest of the 3pi database (specifically, the data products related to difference imaging), as well as the data products for the Medium Deep (MD) survey.

  15. 77 FR 67733 - Release of Waybill Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Release of Waybill Data The Surface Transportation Board has received a request from Neville Peterson LLP on behalf of Trinity Industries, Inc. (WB605-9-- 11/02/12) for...

  16. 77 FR 551 - Release of Waybill Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Release of Waybill Data The Surface Transportation Board has received a request from Neville Peterson LLP on behalf of Trinity Industries, Inc. (WB605-8-12/ 20/11) for permission...

  17. Nanoformulation and antibiotic releasing property of cefotaxime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to design nano-antibiotic to enhance their release from biomaterial agents. Cefotaxime was used as a model antibiotic substance in this carrier system. These nanoparticles were preformulated using different concentrations of polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly (vinyl alcohol) as coating material ...

  18. Development of the Pintle Release Fork Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.; DALE, R.

    1999-01-01

    An improved method of attachment of the pintle to the piston in the universal sampler is being developed. The mechanism utilizes a forked release disk which captures two balls in a cavity formed by a hole in the piston and a groove in the pintle rod

  19. Enhancement of griseofulvin release from liquisolid compacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentzschel, C M; Alnaief, M; Smirnova, I; Sakmann, A; Leopold, C S

    2012-01-01

    The potential of hydrophilic aerogel formulations and liquisolid systems to improve the release of poorly soluble drugs was investigated using griseofulvin as model drug. The in vitro release rates of this drug formulated as directly compressed tablets containing crystalline griseofulvin were compared to aerogel tablets with the drug adsorbed onto hydrophilic silica aerogel and to liquisolid compacts containing the drug dissolved or suspended in PEG 300. Furthermore, the commonly used carrier and coating materials in liquisolid systems Avicel® and Aerosil® were replaced by Neusilin®, an amorphous magnesium aluminometasilicate with an extremely high specific surface area of 339 m²/g to improve the liquisolid approach. Both the liquisolid compacts containing the drug dissolved in PEG 300 and the aerogel tablets showed a considerably faster drug release than the directly compressed tablets. With liquisolid compacts containing the drug suspended in PEG 300, the release rate increased with rising fraction of dissolved drug in the liquid portion. It could be shown that Neusilin® with its sevenfold higher liquid adsorption capacity than the commonly used Avicel® and Aerosil® allows the production of liquisolid formulations with lower tablet weights. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Outcome of open carpal tunnel release surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Ali, H.; Muhammad, G.; Gul, N.; Zardan, K.K.; Mushtaq, M.; Ali, S.; Bhatti, S.N.; Ali, K.; Rashid, B.; Saboor, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carpel tunnel syndrome is a common compression neuropathy of the median nerve causing pain, numbness and functional dysfunction of the hand. Among the available treatments, surgical release of the nerve is the most effective and acceptable treatment option. The aim of this study was to see the outcomes of surgical release of carpel tunnel using open technique. Method: This descriptive case series was conducted at the Department of neurosurgery, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from April 2013 to March 2014. One hundred consecutive patients with carpel tunnel syndrome were included who underwent open carpel tunnel release surgery. They were followed up at 1, 3 and 6 months. Residual pain, numbness and functional improvement of the hand were the main outcome measures. Results: Out of 100 patients, 19 were males. The age ranged from 32 to 50 years with a mean of 39.29±3.99 years. The duration of symptoms was from 5 to 24 months. In the entire series patient functional outcome and satisfaction was 82 percentage at 1 month, 94 percentage at 3 months and 97 percentage at 6 months. 18 percentage patient had residual pain at 1 month post-operative follow-up, 6percentage at 3 months and 3 percentage at 6 month follow-up. Conclusion: Open carpel tunnel release surgery is an effective procedure for compression neuropathy of the median nerve. It should be offered to all patients with moderate to severe pain and functional disability related to carpel tunnel syndrome. (author)

  1. Bioadhesive Controlled Release Clotrimazole Vaginal Tablets | Bhat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study indicates the possible use of suitable mixtures of natural and semi-synthetic cellulosic polymers for the preparation of clotrimazole mucoadhesive tablets for application as a vaginal controlled delivery system. Keywords: Clotrimazole, Swelling, Cellulosic polymers, Guar gum, Bioadhesion, Release ...

  2. MCNP Version 6.2 Release Notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solomon, C. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McKinney, Gregg Walter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dixon, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martz, Roger Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hughes, Henry G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cox, Lawrence James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zukaitis, Anthony J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Armstrong, J. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Forster, Robert Arthur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Casswell, Laura [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-05

    Monte Carlo N-Particle or MCNP® is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. This MCNP Version 6.2 follows the MCNP6.1.1 beta version and has been released in order to provide the radiation transport community with the latest feature developments and bug fixes for MCNP. Since the last release of MCNP major work has been conducted to improve the code base, add features, and provide tools to facilitate ease of use of MCNP version 6.2 as well as the analysis of results. These release notes serve as a general guide for the new/improved physics, source, data, tallies, unstructured mesh, code enhancements and tools. For more detailed information on each of the topics, please refer to the appropriate references or the user manual which can be found at http://mcnp.lanl.gov. This release of MCNP version 6.2 contains 39 new features in addition to 172 bug fixes and code enhancements. There are still some 33 known issues the user should familiarize themselves with (see Appendix).

  3. Passivation of dental amalgams and mercury release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joska, Ludĕk; Marek, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    In this study the rate of dissolution of mercury from two dental amalgams with different compositions and structures was determined in vitro under different oxidation and abrasion conditions, and the results were correlated with the electrochemical characteristics. A spherical high copper and a lathe-cut very high-copper amalgam were tested in aerated and deaerated artificial saliva. The electrochemical characteristics were determined by potential-time, anodic polarization, polarization resistance and cathodic stripping measurements. Mercury release tests were performed after either stabilization in the solution, or abrasion using SiC papers or rotary toothbrush, with or without toothpaste. Dissolved mercury was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Both amalgams exhibited passivation, the amalgam with the higher copper content passivating spontaneously even when the oxygen content in the solution was minimized. At a higher oxygen content in the solution the rate of mercury release from the amalgams was lower than when the oxygen content was minimized, and decreased further after a pre-exposure. Brushing generally increased the release. The results show the importance of the oxidation conditions and passivation characteristics of dental amalgams for mercury release, especially in the transient state after abrasion by chewing or tooth brushing.

  4. Meticulous Overview on the Controlled Release Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the high demand for fertilizer formulations that will exhaust the possibilities of nutrient use efficiency (NUE, regulate fertilizer consumption, and lessen agrophysicochemical properties and environmental adverse effects instigated by conventional nutrient supply to crops, this review recapitulates controlled release fertilizers (CRFs as a cutting-edge and safe way to supply crops’ nutrients over the conventional ways. Essentially, CRFs entail fertilizer particles intercalated within excipients aiming at reducing the frequency of fertilizer application thereby abating potential adverse effects linked with conventional fertilizer use. Application of nanotechnology and materials engineering in agriculture particularly in the design of CRFs, the distinctions and classification of CRFs, and the economical, agronomical, and environmental aspects of CRFs has been revised putting into account the development and synthesis of CRFs, laboratory CRFs syntheses and testing, and both linear and sigmoid release features of CRF formulations. Methodical account on the mechanism of nutrient release centring on the empirical and mechanistic approaches of predicting nutrient release is given in view of selected mathematical models. Compositions and laboratory preparations of CRFs basing on in situ and graft polymerization are provided alongside the physical methods used in CRFs encapsulation, with an emphasis on the natural polymers, modified clays, and superabsorbent nanocomposite excipients.

  5. Impact of Industrial Releases on Inshas Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Messiry, A.M.; Aly, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two Egyptian research reactors are located within the nuclear research center at Inshas area, 30 km north east of Cairo. This area are crowded by different industrial plants. The releases from them has a hazardous and economical effects on the research center workers and the surrounding inhabitancy. In the present work we study these effects. A meteorological regional specific data is considered all over the year, including a wind rose characterization. The study considered both normal operating conditions and an accidental releases. The results shows that there are a considerable risk due to normal releases in some areas downwind direction of the major releases, and a highly risk in areas subjected to major exposure. Regional maps of emission distribution, economical damage , pollutant concentration are obtained. The study helps to identify solutions to problems of atmospheric protection. It can be used as a decision support for the environmental, economic, and innovation planning at the national levels taking into consideration the national pollution standards and variety of existing emission sources

  6. Features of the extended-release metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T O Yalochkina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по материалам статьи Ali S, Fonseca V. Overview of metformin: special focus on metformin extended release. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2012 Aug;13(12:1797-805.

  7. 76 FR 1507 - Release of Waybill Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... permission to use certain data from the Board's 2009 Carload Waybill Sample. A copy of this request may be... the Board's Office of Economics within 14 calendar days of the date of this notice. The rules for release of waybill data are codified at 49 CFR 1244.9. Contact: Scott Decker, (202) 245-0330. Andrea Pope...

  8. 76 FR 22449 - Release of Waybill Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... certain data from the Board's Carload Waybill Samples. A copy of this request may be obtained from the... the Board's Office of Economics within 14 calendar days of the date of this notice. The rules for release of waybill data are codified at 49 CFR 1244.9. Contact: Scott Decker, (202) 245-0330. Andrea Pope...

  9. Hydrogen retention and release from uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, D.F.

    1987-08-01

    The ceramic samples (UO 2 ) are exposed to high pressure hydrogen gas at a fixed temperature for a time sufficient to achieve equilibrium. After rapid quenching, the hydrogen-saturated sample is transferred to a vacuum-outgassing furnace. The sample is outgassed in a linear temperature ramp and the released hydrogen is detected by an in-situ mass spectrometer. This technique measures the rate of release of hydrogen with a sensitivity level of about 2 ng of hydrogen (as D 2 ) per hour. In this study, experiments were conducted on both polycrystalline and single-crystal UO 2 . Experimental variables included temperature (1000 to 1600 0 C) and infusion pressure (5 to 32 atm D 2 ), and for the polycrystalline specimen, stoichiometry. Dissolution of H 2 in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 was found to obey Seivert's law. The Sievert's law constant of deuterium in single-crystal UO 2 was determined to be: 3.0 x 10 7 exp(-235 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm and for polycrystalline UO 2 : 5.5 x 10 4 exp(-100 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm. The solubility of hydrogen in hypostoichiometric urania was found to be up to three orders of magnitude greater than in stoichiometric UO 2 depending on the O/U ratios, implying the anion vacancy is the primary solution site in the UO 2 lattice. The release-rate curves for the single crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 specimens exhibited multiple peaks, with most of the deuterium released between 600 and 1200 0 C for the polycrystalline samples, and between 700 and 1800 0 C in the single-crystal specimens. This release of hydrogen from UO 2 could not be adequately modeled as diffusion or diffusion with trapping and resolution. It was determined that release was governed by release from traps in both the polycrystalline and single crystal UO 2 specimens. 40 refs., 72 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Wax-based sustained release matrix pellets prepared by a novel freeze pelletization technique II. In vitro drug release studies and release mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheboyina, Sreekhar; Wyandt, Christy M

    2008-07-09

    A novel freeze pelletization technique was evaluated for the preparation of wax-based sustained release matrix pellets. Pellets containing water-soluble drugs were successfully prepared using a variety of waxes. The drug release significantly depended on the wax type used and the aqueous drug solubility. The drug release decreased as the hydrophobicity of wax increased and the drug release increased as the aqueous drug solubility increased. In glyceryl monostearate (GMS) pellets, drug release rate decreased as the loading of theophylline increased. On the contrary, the release rate increased as the drug loading of diltiazem HCl increased in Precirol pellets. Theophylline at low drug loads existed in a dissolved state in GMS pellets and the release followed desorption kinetics. At higher loads, theophylline existed in a crystalline state and the release followed dissolution-controlled constant release for all the waxes studied. However, with the addition of increasing amounts of Brij 76, theophylline release rate increased and the release mechanism shifted to diffusion-controlled square root time kinetics. But the release of diltiazem HCl from Precirol pellets at all drug loads, followed diffusion-controlled square root time kinetics. Therefore, pellets capable of providing a variety of release profiles for different drugs can be prepared using this freeze pelletization technique by suitably modifying the pellet forming matrix compositions.

  11. Preparation of temperature responsive fragrance release membranes by UV curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kaetsu, Isao; Uchida, Kumao; Okuda, Jyunya; Kitami, Toshiaki; Matsubara, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The authors have studied the preparation and the function of intelligent drug release membranes by UV curing. Temperature responsive fragrance release membranes were prepared by UV curing process and the release functions were investigated as the function of thickness and composition of membrane. Microscopic observations were used to prove the postulated release mechanism

  12. 27 CFR 24.159 - Release of collateral security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Release of collateral... § 24.159 Release of collateral security. Collateral security pledged and deposited will be released only in accordance with the provisions of 31 CFR part 225. The collateral security will not be released...

  13. 7 CFR 4287.113 - Release of collateral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Release of collateral. 4287.113 Section 4287.113... Loans § 4287.113 Release of collateral. (a) All releases of collateral with a value exceeding $100,000 must be supported by a current appraisal on the collateral released. The appraisal will be at the...

  14. Dissolved organic carbon release by marine macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrón, C.; Apostolaki, E. T.; Duarte, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds) were obtained experimentally using in situ benthic chambers. The effect of light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined in two communities both by comparing net DOC release under light and dark, and by examining the response of net DOC release to longer-term (days) experimental shading of the communities. All most 85% of the seagrass communities and almost all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. There was a weak tendency for higher DOC fluxes under light than under dark conditions in seagrass meadow. There is no relationship between net DOC fluxes and gross primary production (GPP) and net community production (NCP), however, this relationship is positive between net DOC fluxes and community respiration. Net DOC fluxes were not affected by shading of a T. testudinum community in Florida for 5 days, however, shading of a mixed seagrass meadow in the Philippines led to a significant reduction on the net DOC release when shading was maintained for 6 days compared to only 2 days of shading. Based on published and unpublished results we also estimate the global net DOC production by marine macrophytes. The estimated global net DOC flux, and hence export, from marine macrophyte is about 0.197 ± 0.015 Pg C yr-1 or 0.212 ± 0.016 Pg C yr-1 depending if net DOC flux by seagrass meadows was estimated by taking into account the low or high global seagrass area, respectively.

  15. Stored energy release behaviour of disordered carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, K.; Barat, P.; Sarkar, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2007-06-01

    The use of graphite as a moderator in a low temperature thermal nuclear reactor is restricted due to accumulation of energy caused by displacement of atoms by neutrons and high energetic particles. Thermal transients may lead to a release of stored energy that may raise the temperature of the fuel clad above the design limit. Disordered carbon is thought to be an alternative choice for this purpose. Two types of disordered carbon composites, namely, CB (made up of 15 wt. % carbon black dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin) and PAN (made up of 20 vol. % chopped polyacrylonitrile carbon fibre dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin matrix) have been irradiated with 145 MeV Ne6+ ions at three fluence levels of 1.0×1013, 5.0×1013 and 1.5×1014 Ne6+/cm2, respectively. The XRD patterns revealed that both the samples remained disordered even after irradiation. The maximum release of stored energy for CB was 212 J/g and that of PAN was 906 J/g. For CB, the release of stored energy was a first order reaction with activation energy of 2.79 eV and a frequency factor of 3.72×1028 per second. 13% of the defects got annealed by heating up to 700 °C. PAN showed a third-order release rate with activation energy of 1.69 eV and a frequency factor of 1.77×1014 per second. 56% of the total defects got annealed by heating it up to 700 °C. CB seems to be the better choice than PAN as it showed less energy release with a slower rate.

  16. The ALICE Software Release Validation cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzano, D; Krzewicki, M

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important steps of software lifecycle is Quality Assurance: this process comprehends both automatic tests and manual reviews, and all of them must pass successfully before the software is approved for production. Some tests, such as source code static analysis, are executed on a single dedicated service: in High Energy Physics, a full simulation and reconstruction chain on a distributed computing environment, backed with a sample “golden” dataset, is also necessary for the quality sign off. The ALICE experiment uses dedicated and virtualized computing infrastructures for the Release Validation in order not to taint the production environment (i.e. CVMFS and the Grid) with non-validated software and validation jobs: the ALICE Release Validation cluster is a disposable virtual cluster appliance based on CernVM and the Virtual Analysis Facility, capable of deploying on demand, and with a single command, a dedicated virtual HTCondor cluster with an automatically scalable number of virtual workers on any cloud supporting the standard EC2 interface. Input and output data are externally stored on EOS, and a dedicated CVMFS service is used to provide the software to be validated. We will show how the Release Validation Cluster deployment and disposal are completely transparent for the Release Manager, who simply triggers the validation from the ALICE build system's web interface. CernVM 3, based entirely on CVMFS, permits to boot any snapshot of the operating system in time: we will show how this allows us to certify each ALICE software release for an exact CernVM snapshot, addressing the problem of Long Term Data Preservation by ensuring a consistent environment for software execution and data reprocessing in the future. (paper)

  17. The Dark Energy Survey First Data Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias

    2018-01-01

    In this talk I will announce and highlight the main components of the first public data release (DR1) coming from the Dark Energy Survey (DES).In January 2016, the DES survey made available, in a simple unofficial release to the astronomical community, the first set of products. This data was taken and studied during the DES Science Verification period consisting on roughly 250 sq. degrees and 25 million objects at a mean depth of i=23.7 that led to over 80 publications from DES scientist.The DR1 release is the first official release from the main survey and it consists on the observations taken during the first 3 seasons from August 2013 to February 2016 (about 100 nights each season) of the survey which cover the entire DES footprint. All of the Single Epoch Images and the Year 3 Coadded images distributed in 10223 tiles are available for download in this release. The catalogs provide astrometry, photometry and basic classification for near 400M objects in roughly 5000 sq. degrees on the southern hemisphere with a approximate mean depth of i=23.3. Complementary footprint, masking and depth information is also available. All of the software used during the generation of these products are open sourced and have been made available through the Github DES Organization. Images, data and other sub products have been possible through the international and collaborative effort of all 25 institutions involved in DES and are available for exploration and download through the interfaces provided by a partnership between NCSA, NOAO and LIneA.

  18. Officially released mutant varieties in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Van Zanten, L.; Shu, Q.Y.; Maluszynski, M.

    2004-01-01

    The use of mutation techniques for crop improvement in China has a long and well-established tradition of more than 50 years. As the result of intensive research in many institutes dealing with application of nuclear technologies more than 620 cultivars of 44 crop species have been released. Numerous mutant varieties have been grown on a large scale bringing significant economic impact, sustaining crop production and greatly contributing to increase of food production also in stress prone areas of the country. However, there is still missing information not only on the number of mutant varieties released in particular crop species but also on mutagens applied, selection approaches and on the use of mutants in cross breeding. Numerous Chinese scientists collected and systematized this information. Results of their work were often published in local scientific journals in the Chinese language and as such were unavailable to breeders from other countries. Having this in mind, we requested Dr. Liu Luxiang, the Director of the Department of Plant Mutation Breeding and Genetics, Institute for Application of Atomic Energy, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing to help us in finding as much information as possible on mutant varieties officially released in China. The data has been collected in close collaboration with his colleagues from various institutions all over the country and then evaluated, edited and prepared for publication by our team responsible for the FAO/IAEA Database of Officially Released Mutant Varieties. We would like to thank all Chinese colleagues who contributed to this list of Chinese mutant varieties. We hope that this publication will stimulate plant breeders in China to collect more information on released mutant varieties and especially on the use of mutated genes in cross breeding. (author)

  19. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy

  20. Resveratrol immobilization and release in polymeric hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momesso, Roberta Grazzielli Ramos Alves Passarelli

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (3, 4', 5-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenolic produced by a wide variety of plants in response to injury and found predominantly in grape skins. This active ingredient has been shown to possess benefits for the health, such as the antioxidant capacity which is related to the prevention of several types of cancer and skin aging. However, the oral bioavailability of resveratrol is poor and makes its topical application interesting. The purpose of this study was to immobilize resveratrol in polymeric hydrogels to obtain a release device for topical use. The polymeric matrices composed of poli(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP), poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) and agar or PVP and glycerol irradiated at 20 kGy dose were physical-chemically characterized by gel fraction and swelling tests and its preliminary biocompatibility by in vitro test of cytotoxicity using the technique of neutral red uptake. Due to low solubility of resveratrol in water, the addition of 2% ethanol to the matrices was verified. All matrices showed a high crosslinking degree, capacity of swelling and the preliminary cytotoxicity test showed nontoxicity effect. The devices were obtained by resveratrol immobilization in polymeric matrices, carried out in a one-or-two-steps process, that is, before or after irradiation, respectively. The one step resveratrol devices were characterized by gel fraction, swelling tests and preliminary biocompatibility, and their properties were maintained even after the resveratrol incorporation. The devices containing 0,05% of resveratrol obtained by one-step process and 0,1% of resveratrol obtained by two-steps process were submitted to the release test during 24 h. Resveratrol quantification was done by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results obtained in the kinetics of release showed that only the devices obtained by two-step process release the resveratrol, which demonstrate antioxidant capacity after the release. (author)

  1. Relative Release-to-Birth Indicators for Investigating TRISO Fuel Fission Gas Release Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2008-01-01

    TRISO microsphere fuel is the fundamental fuel unit for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). A single TRISO particle consists of an inner kernel of uranium dioxide or uranium oxycarbide surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. If the silicon carbide layer fails, fission products, especially the noble fission gases Kr and Xe, will begin to escape the failed particle. The release of fission gas is usually quantified by measuring the ratio of the released activity (R) to the original birth activity (B), which is designated as the R/B ratio. In this work, relative Release-to-Birth indicators (I) are proposed as a technique for interpreting the results of TRISO irradiation experiments. By implementing a relative metric, it is possible to reduce the sensitivity of the indicators to instrumental uncertainties and variations in experimental conditions. As an example, relative R/B indicators are applied to the interpretation of representative data from the Advanced Gas Reactor-1 TRISO fuel experiment that is currently taking place at the Advanced Test Reactor of Idaho National Laboratory. It is shown that the comparison of measured to predicted relative R/B indicators (I) gives insight into the physics of release and helps validate release models. Different trends displayed by the indicators are related to the mechanisms of fission gas release such as diffusion and recoil. The current analysis shows evidence for separate diffusion coefficients for Kr and Xe and supports the need to account for recoil release. (authors)

  2. Design, in vitro release characterization and pharmacokinetics of novel controlled release pellets containing levodropropizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing-Ri; Piao, Yong-Nan; Choi, Jae-Seung; Liu, Yan; Yang, Mingshi; Cui, Jing-Hao

    2014-05-01

    This study was performed to investigate the in vitro release characteristics of levodropropizine (LDP) from novel dual-coated sustained release (SR) pellets, and evaluate the pharmacokinetics of a novel controlled release (CR) preparation composed of the dual-coated SR pellets and immediate release (IR) LDP pellets. The dual-coated SR pellets composed of a drug-loaded nonpareil core, a sub-coating layer (HPMC 6cps) and an SR-coating layer (Aquacoat® ECD, Eudragit® RS 30D or Kollicoat® SR 30D) were prepared by a bottom-spray fluidized bed-coating method. The drug release from the dual-coated SR pellets coated with Aquacoat® ECD followed a zero-order profile in water, and the drug release was not affected by the coating level of the sub-coating layer and stable under the accelerated storage condition (40 °C, 75% RH) for 6 months. The CR preparation showed significantly decreased values of maximum drug concentration (Cmax) and elimination rate (K) than the reference product (LEVOTUS® SYR) but the similar bioavailability (F = 95.43%). The novel CR preparation presents promising delivery of LDP with an immediate and sustained release manner, with similar clinical effect as the commercial IR product.

  3. Analysis of in-pile tritium release experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J.P.; Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize tritium release behavior from lithium ceramics and develop insight into the underlying tritium release mechanisms. Analysis of tritium release data from recent laboratory experiments with lithium aluminate has identified physical processes which were previously unaccounted for in tritium release models. A new model that incorporates the recent data and provides for release from multiple sites rather than only one site was developed. Calculations of tritium release using this model are in excellent agreement with the tritium release behavior reported for the MOZART experiment

  4. The release of fission products from uranium metal: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.

    1989-03-01

    The literature on the release of fission products as gaseous species from irradiated uranium metal in oxidising atmospheres has been reviewed. Release of actinides and of fission products as spalled particulate were not considered. Data is given on the release in air, carbon dioxide, steam and mixtures of steam and air. The majority of data discussed lie between 800 and 1200 0 C though some results for xenon, krypton and iodine releases below 800 0 C are given. Two measures of fission product release are discussed: the release fraction, F(tot), which is the ratio of the total release to the initial inventory, and the fractional release, F(ox), which is the fraction released from the oxidised metal. The effect of burn-up, atmosphere and temperature on F(tot) and F(ox) is examined and the conditions under which the release fraction, F(tot) is proportional to the extent of oxidation discussed. (author)

  5. Field study of the long-term release of block copolymers from fouling-release coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noguer, Albert Camós; Olsen, A.; Hvilsted, Søren

    2017-01-01

    and providing fouling-resistance properties. Upon release, dissolution or degradation of copolymer molecules at the surface, new molecules can diffuse from the bulk of the coating and cover the surface. Therefore, the long-term performance of these coatings is dependent on the stability and release rate...... of an organic biocide (copper pyrithione). Conversely, biocide-containing coatings displayed larger copolymer retention values in long-term experiments. Opposite results were obtained for biocide-free coatings, suggesting that the addition of the organic biocide alters the release profile of copolymers from...

  6. Gas release from pressurized closed pores in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, P.; Donnelly, S.E.; Armour, D.G.; Matzke, H.

    1988-01-01

    Gas release from the nuclear fuels UO 2 and UN out of pressurized closed pores produced by autoclave anneals has been studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS). Investigation of gas release during heating and cooling has indicated stress related mechanical effects leading to gas release. This release occurred in a narrow temperature range between about 1000 and 1500 K for UO 2 , but it continued down to ambient temperature for UN. No burst release was observed above 1500 K for UO 2 . (orig.)

  7. Kinetic Analysis of Drug Release from Compounded Slow-release Capsules of Liothyronine Sodium (T3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhteyar, Hamid; Cassone, Clayton; Kohan, Hamed Gilzad; Sani, Shabnam N

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate extemporaneously compounded Liothyronine Sodium (T3) slow-release capsules and to evaluate their in vitro drug release performance. Twenty-one formulations containing T3 (7.5 µg) with various compositions of two different grades of Methocel E4M and K100M premium (30% to 90%), and/or SimpleCap/Lactose (10% to 70%) were examined. Quality assessment of the capsules was conducted by standard quality control criteria of the United States Pharmacopeia (i.e., weight variation, content uniformity) to ensure their compliance. The dissolution release profile of the formulations was evaluated using United States Pharmacopeia Apparatus type II (paddle method) at a speed of 50 rpm and temperature of 37°C in phosphate buffered saline media ( pH = 7.2 to 7.4). Aliquots from the media were taken periodically up to 24 hours and analyzed using a validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The cumulative percentage of drug release for each formulation was fitted to eleven major release kinetic equations to determine the best-fit model of drug release, as well as the mechanism of release. Assay sensitivity was as low as 1 ng/mL and the optimal calibration range was found to be between 0 ng/mL and 7.5 ng/mL, which corresponded well with the average physiological plasma concentrations of T3. Liothyronine sodium with either SimpleCap (100%) or Methocel E4M (100%) exhibited slowrelease kinetic patterns of Peppas and Zero Order, respectively. The formulation with SimpleCap (100%) had a higher percentage of drug release (as compared to 100% Methocel E4M) within the first four hours; this formulation released 80% of the drug within 12 hours when the release was plateaued thereafter. The formulation with 30% Methocel E4M and 70% SimpleCap released 100% of the drug within the initial 12 hours and exhibited a Zero Order slow-release kinetic pattern. In general, the release kinetic rate of the formulations containing Methocel K100M appeared to

  8. Release kinetics of tocopherol and quercetin from binary antioxidant controlled-release packaging films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Lee, Dong Sun; Zhu, Xuntao; Yam, Kit L

    2012-04-04

    This paper investigated the feasibility of manipulating packaging polymers with various degrees of hydrophobicity to release two antioxidants, tocopherol and quercetin, at rates suitable for long-term inhibition of lipid oxidation in food. For example, one antioxidant can be released at a fast rate to provide short-term/intermediate protection, whereas the other antioxidant can be released at a slower rate to provide intermediate/long-term protection of lipid oxidation. Controlled-release packaging films containing tocopherol and quercetin were produced using ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), and polypropylene (PP) polymers; the release of these antioxidants to 95% ethanol (a fatty food simulant) was measured using UV-vis spectrophotometry, and Fickian diffusion models with appropriate initial and boundary conditions were used to fit the data. For films containing only quercetin, the results show that the release of quercetin was much faster but lasted for a much shorter time for hydrophilic polymers (EVOH and EVA) than for hydrophobic polymers (LDPE and PP). For binary antioxidant films containing tocopherol and quercetin, the results show that tocopherol released more rapidly but for a shorter period of time than quercetin in LDPE and EVOH films, and the difference is more pronounced for LDPE films than EVOH films. The results also show the presence of tocopherol can accelerate the release of quercetin. Although none of the films produced is acceptable for long-term lipid oxidation inhibition, the study provides encouraging results suggesting that acceptable films may be produced in the future using polymer blend films.

  9. Metal impurity release in diverted tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenmaier, G.; Wampler, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma materials interaction at the wall of the main plasma chamber of the divertor tokamak ASDEX was investigated by a combined probe, allowing simultaneous measurements of the erosion rate by neutral particles, and the flux and average energy of neutrals. The erosion was measured by collecting part of the released material on a carbon strip. Subsequent surface analysis was performed by electron induced x-ray analysis. Flux and energy of the impinging neutral particles were measured after each single discharge with an energy resolving carbon resistance probe. Such combined measurements yield the erosion yield being characteristic for the erosion process. Data for ohmic discharges in deuterium and helium are compared. It turns out that the carbon resistance probe is a simple but powerful means to study the metal impurity release from the tokamak walls by charge exchange neutrals

  10. Iliopsoas Tendon Reformation after Psoas Tendon Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Garala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal snapping hip syndrome, or psoas tendonitis, is a recognised cause of nonarthritic hip pain. The majority of patients are treated conservatively; however, occasionally patients require surgical intervention. The two surgical options for iliopsoas tendinopathy are step lengthening of the iliopsoas tendon or releasing the tendon at the lesser trochanter. Although unusual, refractory snapping usually occurs soon after tenotomy. We report a case of a 47-year-old active female with internal snapping and pain following an open psoas tenotomy. Postoperatively she was symptom free for 13 years. An MRI arthrogram revealed reformation of a pseudo iliopsoas tendon reinserting into the lesser trochanter. The pain and snapping resolved after repeat iliopsoas tendon release. Reformation of tendons is an uncommon sequela of tenotomies. However the lack of long-term studies makes it difficult to calculate prevalence rates. Tendon reformation should be included in the differential diagnosis of failed tenotomy procedures after a period of symptom relief.

  11. Meltable magnetic biocomposites for controlled release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R.; Zhou, M.; Dellith, A.; Liebert, T.; Heinze, T.

    2017-06-01

    New biocompatible composites with adjustable melting point in the range of 30-140 °C, consisting of magnetite nanoparticles embedded into a matrix of meltable dextran fatty acid ester are presented which can be softened under an induced alternating magnetic field (AMF). The chosen thermoplastic magnetic composites have a melting range close to human body temperature and can be easily shaped into disk or coating film under melting. The composite disks were loaded with green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model protein. Controlled release of the protein was realized with high frequent alternating magnetic field of 20 kA/m at 400 kHz. These results showed that under an AMF the release of GFP from magnetic composite was accelerated compared to the control sample without exposure to AMF. Furthermore a texturing of particles in the polymer matrix by a static magnetic field was investigated.

  12. Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sams, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    Long Abstract. Full Text. The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, 'Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge'). The purpose of this technical

  13. EPICS application source/release control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieman, B.; Anderson, J.; Kraimer, M.

    1995-01-01

    This manual describes a set of Application Source/Release Control tools (appSR) that can be used to develop software for EPICS based control systems. The Application Source/Release Control System (appSR) has been unbundled from base EPICS and is now available as an EPICS extension. Due to this unbundling, two new directories must be added to a user's path (see section ''Environment'' on page 3 for more information) and a new command getapp must be issued after the getrel command to get a specific version of appSR (see section ''Creating The Initial Application System Area'' on page 7 for more information). It is now required that GNU make version 3.71 or later be used for makes instead of SUN make. Users should now type gmake instead of make

  14. Tritium release reduction and radiolysis gas formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batifol, G.; Douche, Ch.; Sejournant, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    At CEA Valduc, the usual tritiated waste container is the steel drum. It allows good release reduction performance for middle activity waste but in some cases tritium outgassing from the waste drums is too high. It was decided to over-package each drum in a tighter container called the over-drum. According to good safety practices it was also decided to measure gas composition evolution into the over-drum in order to defect hydrogen formation over time. After a few months, a significant release reduction was observed. Additionally there followed contamination reduction in the roof storage building rainwater. However hydrogen was also observed in some over-drums, in addition to other radiolysis products. Catalyst will be added to manage the hydrogen risk in the over-drums. (authors)

  15. Serpentine locomotion through elastic energy release

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Corso, Francesco; Misseroni, Diego; Pugno, Nicola; Movchan, A. B.; Movchan, N. V.; Bigoni, Davide

    2017-01-01

    A model for serpentine locomotion is derived from a novel perspective based on concepts from configurational mechanics. The motion is realized through the release of the elastic energy of a deformable rod, sliding inside a frictionless channel, which represents a snake moving against lateral restraints. A new formulation is presented, correcting previous results and including situations never analysed so far, as in the cases when the serpent's body lies only partially inside the restraining c...

  16. Herwig++ 2.2 Release Note

    CERN Document Server

    Bahr, M; Gigg, M; Grellscheid, D; Hamilton, K; Latunde-Dada, O; Platzer, S; Richardson, P; Seymour, M H; Sherstnev, AUniversity of Cambridge; Webber, Bryan R

    2008-01-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo program Herwig++ (version 2.2) is now available. This version includes a number of improvements including: matrix elements for the production of an electroweak gauge boson, W and Z, in association with a jet; several new processes for Higgs production in association with an electroweak gauge boson; and the matrix element correction for QCD radiation in Higgs production via gluon fusion.

  17. Herwig++ 2.5 release note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseke, S.; Roehr, C.A.; Siodmok, A.

    2011-02-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo program Herwig++ (version 2.5) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: new next-to-leading order matrix elements, including weak boson pair production; a colour reconnection model; diffractive processes; additional models of physics beyond the Standard Model; new leading-order matrix elements for hadron-hadron and lepton-lepton collisions as well as photon-initiated processes. (orig.)

  18. Environmental consequences of releases from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1990-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of a four-year Nordic cooperation program in the area of consequence assessment of nuclear accidents with large releases to the environment. This program was completed in 1989. Related information from other research programs has also been described, so that many chapters of the report reflect the current status in the respective areas, in addition to containing the results of the Nordic program. (author) 179 refs

  19. GENIE Production Release 2.10.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Physics; Andreopoulos, C. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Athar, M. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Physics; Bodek, A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Christy, E. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Coopersmith, B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dennis, S. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept .of Physics; Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Gallagher, H. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Geary, N. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Golan, T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hatcher, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hoshina, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics. Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center; Liu, J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Mahn, K. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Marshall, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Morrison, J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Nirkko, M. [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics. Lab. for High Energy Physics (LHEP); Nowak, J. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Perdue, G. N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yarba, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-12-25

    GENIE is a neutrino Monte Carlo event generator that simulates the primary interaction of a neutrino with a nuclear target, along with the subsequent propagation of the reaction products through the nuclear medium. It additionally contains libraries for fully-featured detector geometries and for managing various types of neutrino flux. This note details recent updates to GENIE, in particular, changes introduced into the newest production release, version 2.10.0.

  20. GENIE Production Release 2.10.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.; Athar, M.; Hatcher, R.; Hoshina, K.; Nowak, J.; Yarba, J.

    2015-01-01

    GENIE is a neutrino Monte Carlo event generator that simulates the primary interaction of a neutrino with a nuclear target, along with the subsequent propagation of the reaction products through the nuclear medium. It additionally contains libraries for fully-featured detector geometries and for managing various types of neutrino flux. This note details recent updates to GENIE, in particular, changes introduced into the newest production release, version 2.10.0.

  1. TOXRISK, Toxic Gas Release Accident Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.E.; Chanin, D.I.; Shiver, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: TOXRISK is an interactive program developed to aid in the evaluation of nuclear power plant control room habitability in the event of a nearby toxic material release. The program uses a model which is consistent with the approach described in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.78. Release of the gas is treated as an initial puff followed by a continuous plume. The relative proportions of these as well as the plume release rate are supplied by the user. Transport of the gas is modeled as a Gaussian distribution and occurs through the action of a constant velocity, constant direction wind. Great flexibility is afforded the user in specifying the release description, meteorological conditions, relative geometry of the accident and plant, and the plant ventilation system characteristics. Two types of simulation can be performed: multiple case (parametric) studies and probabilistic analyses. Upon execution, TOXRISK presents a menu, and the user chooses between the Data Base Manager, the Multiple Case program, and the Probabilistic Study Program. The Data Base Manager provides a convenient means of storing, retrieving, and modifying blocks of data required by the analysis programs. The Multiple Case program calculates resultant gas concentrations inside the control room and presents a summary of information that describes the event for each set of conditions given. Optimally, a time history profile of inside and outside concentrations can also be produced. The Probabilistic Study program provides a means for estimating the annual probability of operator incapacitation due to toxic gas accidents on surrounding transportation routes and storage sites. 2 - Method of solution: Dispersion or diffusion of the gas during transport is described by modified Pasquill-Gifford dispersion coefficients

  2. Offsite doses from SRP radioactive releases - 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marter, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This memorandum summarizes the offsite doses from releases of radioactive materials to the environment from SRP operations in 1985. These doses were calculated for inclusion in the environmental report for 1985 to be issued by the Health Protection Department (DPSPU-86-30-1). The environmental report is prepared annually for distribution to state environmental agencies, the news media, and interested members of the public. More detailed data on offsite exposures by radionuclide and exposure pathway will be included in the environmental report

  3. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  4. POLYURETHANE COMPOSITES AS DRUG CARRIERS:: RELEASE PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Grigoreva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable polyurethanes attract interest of those developing composite materials for biomedical applications. One of their features is their ability to serve as carriers, or matrixes, for medicines and other bioactive compounds to produce a therapeutic effect in body through targeted and/or prolonged delivery of these compounds in the process of their controlled release from matrix. The review presents polyurethane composites as matrices for a number of drugs. The relation between structure of the composites and their degradability both in vitro and in vivo and the dependence of drug release kinetics on physicochemical properties of polyurethane matrix are highlighted. The release of drugs (cefazolin, naltrexone and piroxicam from the composites based on cross-linked polyurethanes (synthesized from laprols, Mw between 1,500 and 2,000 Da and toluylene diisocyanate demonstrated more or less the same pattern (about 10 days in vitro and three to five days in vivo. In contrast, the composites with dioxydine based on a linear polyurethanes (synthesized from oligotetramethilene glycol, Mw 1,000 Da, diphenylmethane-4,4’-diisocyanate and 1,4-butanediol retained their antimicrobial activity at least 30 days. They also showed a significantly higher breaking strength as compared to that of the composites based on cross-linked polyurethanes.

  5. Methamphetamine induces the release of endothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Jones, Susan M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Iliff, Jeffrey J; West, G Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a potent psychostimulant drug of abuse that increases release and blocks reuptake of dopamine, producing intense euphoria, factors that may contribute to its widespread abuse. It also produces severe neurotoxicity resulting from oxidative stress, DNA damage, blood-brain barrier disruption, microgliosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Intracerebral hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke have been reported after intravenous and oral abuse of methamphetamine. Several studies have shown that methamphetamine causes vasoconstriction of vessels. This study investigates the effect of methamphetamine on endothelin-1 (ET-1) release in mouse brain endothelial cells by ELISA. ET-1 transcription as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and transcription were measured following methamphetamine treatment. We also examine the effect of methamphetamine on isolated cerebral arteriolar vessels from C57BL/6 mice. Penetrating middle cerebral arterioles were cannulated at both ends with a micropipette system. Methamphetamine was applied extraluminally, and the vascular response was investigated. Methamphetamine treatment of mouse brain endothelial cells resulted in ET-1 release and a transient increase in ET-1 message. The activity and transcription of eNOS were only slightly enhanced after 24 hr of treatment with methamphetamine. In addition, methamphetamine caused significant vasoconstriction of isolated mouse intracerebral arterioles. The vasoconstrictive effect of methamphetamine was attenuated by coapplication of the endothelin receptor antagonist PD145065. These findings suggest that vasoconstriction induced by methamphetamine is mediated through the endothelin receptor and may involve an endothelin-dependent pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Meltable magnetic biocomposites for controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, R., E-mail: robert.mueller@ipht-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT), P.O.B. 100239, Jena, D-07702 Germany (Germany); Zhou, M. [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Humboldtstrasse 10, Jena, D-07743 Germany (Germany); Dellith, A. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT), P.O.B. 100239, Jena, D-07702 Germany (Germany); Liebert, T.; Heinze, T. [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Humboldtstrasse 10, Jena, D-07743 Germany (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    New biocompatible composites with adjustable melting point in the range of 30–140 °C, consisting of magnetite nanoparticles embedded into a matrix of meltable dextran fatty acid ester are presented which can be softened under an induced alternating magnetic field (AMF). The chosen thermoplastic magnetic composites have a melting range close to human body temperature and can be easily shaped into disk or coating film under melting. The composite disks were loaded with green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model protein. Controlled release of the protein was realized with high frequent alternating magnetic field of 20 kA/m at 400 kHz. These results showed that under an AMF the release of GFP from magnetic composite was accelerated compared to the control sample without exposure to AMF. Furthermore a texturing of particles in the polymer matrix by a static magnetic field was investigated. - Highlights: • Thermoplastic biocomposite are prepared from dextran ester and magnetite particles. • The composite can be heated by an AC magnetic field above the melting temperature. • In molten state texturing of particles is possible and improves the heating ability. • The biopolymer could be used as a remote controlled matrix for protein release.

  7. Nuclear refugees after large radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascucci-Cahen, Ludivine; Groell, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    However improbable, large radioactive releases from a nuclear power plant would entail major consequences for the surrounding population. In Fukushima, 80,000 people had to evacuate the most contaminated areas around the NPP for a prolonged period of time. These people have been called “nuclear refugees”. The paper first argues that the number of nuclear refugees is a better measure of the severity of radiological consequences than the number of fatalities, although the latter is widely used to assess other catastrophic events such as earthquakes or tsunami. It is a valuable partial indicator in the context of comprehensive studies of overall consequences. Section 2 makes a clear distinction between long-term relocation and emergency evacuation and proposes a method to estimate the number of refugees. Section 3 examines the distribution of nuclear refugees with respect to weather and release site. The distribution is asymmetric and fat-tailed: unfavorable weather can lead to the contamination of large areas of land; large cities have in turn a higher probability of being contaminated. - Highlights: • Number of refugees is a good indicator of the severity of radiological consequences. • It is a better measure of the long-term consequences than the number of fatalities. • A representative meteorological sample should be sufficiently large. • The number of refugees highly depends on the release site in a country like France.

  8. Release of silver nanoparticles from outdoor facades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Zuleeg, Steffen; Hagendorfer, Harald; Mueller, Elisabeth; Vonbank, Roger; Boller, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael

    2010-09-01

    In this study we investigate the release of metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) from paints used for outdoor applications. A facade panel mounted on a model house was exposed to ambient weather conditions over a period of one year. The runoff volume of individual rain events was determined and the silver and titanium concentrations of 36 out of 65 runoff events were measured. Selected samples were prepared for electron microscopic analysis. A strong leaching of the Ag-NP was observed during the initial runoff events with a maximum concentration of 145 micro Ag/l. After a period of one year, more than 30% of the Ag-NP were released to the environment. Particles were mostly <15 nm and are released as composite colloids attached to the organic binders of the paint. Microscopic results indicate that the Ag-NP are likely transformed to considerably less toxic forms such as Ag2S. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Platelets contain releasable coagulation factor IX antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romp, K G; Monroe, D M; Hoffman, M

    1993-12-01

    Platelets take up plasma proteins into their alpha granules. Platelet activation releases the alpha granule contents. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that human platelets also contain some coagulation factor IX in their alpha granules. Platelets were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Activated and unactivated platelets were quick frozen on to slides and dehydrated in situ to preserve optimal morphology. The slides were stained by indirect immunofluorescence for factors V and IX. Unactivated platelets showed coarsely granular staining for factor V and finely granular staining for factor IX. Staining for factor V was diffuse after activation, while staining for factor IX disappeared. Thus, the results support the conclusion that platelets contain factor IX which can be released upon activation. Immunoelectron microscopic studies were conducted to more precisely localize the site of the platelet factor IX. As expected, factor V was primarily localized in the alpha granules of unactivated platelets. By contrast, factor IX was observed both in alpha granules and diffusely in the platelet cytoplasm and membrane-bounded vesicles. After activation, staining for both factors V and IX was primarily in the open canalicular system. The physiological importance of this small amount of factor IX is unknown. However, it may be significant since only a few percent of normal IX levels are required to support haemostasis in the absence of trauma, and platelet factor IX could be released at sites of active coagulation.

  10. Miniature Release Mechanism or Diminutive Assembly for Nanosatellite Deployables (DANY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Soto, Luis H. (Inventor); Hesh, Scott V. (Inventor); Hudeck, John D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Miniature release mechanisms constrain objects, such as deployables during the launch of space vehicles, such as small satellites and nanosatellites, and enable the release of the objects once a desired destination is reached by the space vehicle. Constraint and release of the objects are achieved by providing a secure threaded interface that may be released by the release mechanisms. The release mechanisms include a housing structure; a release block can include a threaded interface; one or more retracting pins; one or more release springs; a breakable link, such as a plastic link; a cable harness clamp; and a circuit board. The release mechanism can be 0.1875 inches (approximately 4.8 mm) thick.

  11. Percutaneous Tennis Elbow Release Under Local Anaesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, MA; Lipscombe, S; Morapudi, S; Tuvo, G; Kebrle, R; Marlow, W; Waseem, M

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: When the non-operative treatment of tennis elbow fails to improve the symptoms a surgical procedure can be performed. Many different techniques are available. The percutaneous release of the common extensor origin was first presented by Loose at a meeting in 1962. Despite the simplicity of the operation and its effectiveness in relieving pain with minimal scarring this procedure is still not widely accepted. This study presents the long-term results of percutaneous tennis elbow release in patients when conservative measures including local steroid injections have failed to relieve the symptoms. Patients and Methods: Percutaneous release of the extensor origin was performed in 24 consecutive patients (seven male and seventeen female), providing 30 elbows for this study. The age of the patients ranged from 26 to 71 years with mean age of 55 years. The technique involved a day case procedure in the operating theatre using local anaesthesia without the need for a tourniquet. The lateral elbow was infiltrated with 5mls 1% lignocaine and 5mls 0.5% bupivicaine with 1:200,000 adrenaline. All operations were performed by the senior author. The patients were assessed post operatively by using DASH (disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand) score and Oxford elbow scores. The mean follow up period was 36 months (1-71months). Results: Twenty one patients returned the DASH and Oxford elbow questionnaires. Four patients were lost in the follow up. The post operative outcome was good to excellent in most patients. Eighty seven percent of patients had complete pain relief. The mean post-op DASH score was 8.47 (range 0 to 42.9) and the mean Oxford elbow score was 42.8 (range 16 to 48). There were no complications reported. All the patients returned to their normal jobs, hobbies such as gardening, horse riding and playing musical instruments. Conclusion: In our experience Percutaneous release of the epicondylar muscles for humeral epicondylitis has a high rate of success

  12. Release-ability of nano fillers from different nanomaterials (toward the acceptability of nanoproduct)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golanski, L., E-mail: luana.golanski@cea.fr; Guiot, A. [CEA-Grenoble, LITEN (France); Pras, M. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Laboratoire des Materiaux Macromoleculaires (France); Malarde, M.; Tardif, F. [CEA-Grenoble, LITEN (France)

    2012-07-15

    It is of great interest to set up a reproducible and sensitive method able to qualify nanomaterials before their market introduction in terms of their constitutive nanoparticle release-ability in usage. Abrasion was performed on polycarbonate, epoxy, and PA11 polymers containing carbone nanotubes (CNT) up to 4 %wt. Using Taber linear standard tool and standard abrasion conditions no release from polymer coatings containing CNT was measured. In this study, new practical tools inducing non-standardized stresses able to compete with van der Waals forces were developed and tested on model polymers, showing controlled CNT dispersion. These stresses are still realistic, corresponding to scratching, instantaneous mechanical shocks, and abrasion of the surface. They offer an efficient way to quantify if release is possible from nanomaterials under different mechanical stresses and therefore give an idea about the mechanisms that favors it. Release under mechanical shocks and hard abrasion was obtained using these tools but only when nanomaterials present a bad dispersion of CNT within the epoxy matrix. Under the same conditions no release was obtained from the same material presenting a good dispersion. The CNT used in this study showed an external diameter Dext = 12 nm, an internal diameter Din = 5 nm, and a mean length of 1 {mu}m. Release from paints under hard abrasion using a standard rotative Taber tool was obtained from a intentionaly non-optimized paint containing SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles up to 35 %wt. The primary diameter of the SiO{sub 2} was estimated to be around 12 nm. A metallic rake was efficient to remove nanoparticles from a non-woven fabric nanomaterial.

  13. Evaluating Carbon Release Rate of Controlled-release Tablet and Its Applicability to Biological Nitrate Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeum, Y.; HAN, K.; Yoon, J.; Lee, J.; Song, K.; Kang, J. H.; Park, C. W.; Kim, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Generally, indigenous microbes in an aquifer have known to effectively degrade nitrate through heterotrophic denitrification in the presence of carbon source (CS). However, in case of continuous injection of excess amount of CS into an aquifer for complete denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, the injection of CS frequently results in biological clogging around the vicinity of an injection well. To overcome this problem, we developed a controlled-release CS tablet (CRCST) using fumarate as a CS. However, there is lack of study about CRCST release profile under field condition and its applicability to nitrate denitrification. Thus, we assessed CS release profile of CRCST in a continuous flowing cell (CFC) and its efficiency on biological denitrification in a soil column. During the CFC test, six different CRCSTs (3 for precipitating CRCSTs and 3 for floating CRCSTs) having different contents of polymer controlling CS release evaluated. CFC was operated under four different flowrates similar to groundwater velocities, and CRCST was added into the CFC before injecting test solution containing bromide (100 mg/L) as a tracer. During the soil column test, CFC and soil column was connected in sequence. Test solution containing nitrate (30 mg-N/L) and bromide was pumped into CFC, and its effluent was pumped into the column. Although the CRCSTs contain different amount of polymer, CS release rate and peak concentration of CS were highly proportional to flow rate. The ranges of CS release rate for precipitating and floating CRCSTs were 1.35-2.83 and 0.41-4.05 mmol/L/hr, respectively. The result suggests that groundwater velocity is a key parameter affecting CS release rate of CRCST. During the soil column test, one tablet addition of precipitating and floating CRCST maintained nitrate concentration less than 10mg-N/L (drinking water standard) for 4.3 and 3.7 days, respectively. These results suggest that CRCST may apply for the effective means of controlling high

  14. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Release-ability of nano fillers from different nanomaterials (toward the acceptability of nanoproduct)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanski, L.; Guiot, A.; Pras, M.; Malarde, M.; Tardif, F.

    2012-07-01

    It is of great interest to set up a reproducible and sensitive method able to qualify nanomaterials before their market introduction in terms of their constitutive nanoparticle release-ability in usage. Abrasion was performed on polycarbonate, epoxy, and PA11 polymers containing carbone nanotubes (CNT) up to 4 %wt. Using Taber linear standard tool and standard abrasion conditions no release from polymer coatings containing CNT was measured. In this study, new practical tools inducing non-standardized stresses able to compete with van der Waals forces were developed and tested on model polymers, showing controlled CNT dispersion. These stresses are still realistic, corresponding to scratching, instantaneous mechanical shocks, and abrasion of the surface. They offer an efficient way to quantify if release is possible from nanomaterials under different mechanical stresses and therefore give an idea about the mechanisms that favors it. Release under mechanical shocks and hard abrasion was obtained using these tools but only when nanomaterials present a bad dispersion of CNT within the epoxy matrix. Under the same conditions no release was obtained from the same material presenting a good dispersion. The CNT used in this study showed an external diameter Dext = 12 nm, an internal diameter Din = 5 nm, and a mean length of 1 μm. Release from paints under hard abrasion using a standard rotative Taber tool was obtained from a intentionaly non-optimized paint containing SiO2 nanoparticles up to 35 %wt. The primary diameter of the SiO2 was estimated to be around 12 nm. A metallic rake was efficient to remove nanoparticles from a non-woven fabric nanomaterial.

  16. Release-ability of nano fillers from different nanomaterials (toward the acceptability of nanoproduct)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golanski, L.; Guiot, A.; Pras, M.; Malarde, M.; Tardif, F.

    2012-01-01

    It is of great interest to set up a reproducible and sensitive method able to qualify nanomaterials before their market introduction in terms of their constitutive nanoparticle release-ability in usage. Abrasion was performed on polycarbonate, epoxy, and PA11 polymers containing carbone nanotubes (CNT) up to 4 %wt. Using Taber linear standard tool and standard abrasion conditions no release from polymer coatings containing CNT was measured. In this study, new practical tools inducing non-standardized stresses able to compete with van der Waals forces were developed and tested on model polymers, showing controlled CNT dispersion. These stresses are still realistic, corresponding to scratching, instantaneous mechanical shocks, and abrasion of the surface. They offer an efficient way to quantify if release is possible from nanomaterials under different mechanical stresses and therefore give an idea about the mechanisms that favors it. Release under mechanical shocks and hard abrasion was obtained using these tools but only when nanomaterials present a bad dispersion of CNT within the epoxy matrix. Under the same conditions no release was obtained from the same material presenting a good dispersion. The CNT used in this study showed an external diameter Dext = 12 nm, an internal diameter Din = 5 nm, and a mean length of 1 μm. Release from paints under hard abrasion using a standard rotative Taber tool was obtained from a intentionaly non-optimized paint containing SiO 2 nanoparticles up to 35 %wt. The primary diameter of the SiO 2 was estimated to be around 12 nm. A metallic rake was efficient to remove nanoparticles from a non-woven fabric nanomaterial.

  17. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  18. SRTM Data Release for Africa, Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This color shaded relief image shows the extent of digital elevation data for Africa recently released by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). This release includes data for all of the continent, plus the island of Madagascar and the Arabian Peninsula. SRTM flew on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour in February 2000 and used an interferometric radar system to map the topography of Earth's landmass between latitudes 56 degrees south and 60 degrees north. The data were processed into geographic 'tiles,' each of which represents one by one degree of latitude and longitude. A degree of latitude measures 111 kilometers (69 miles) north-south, and a degree of longitude measures 111 kilometers or less east-west, decreasing away from the equator. The data are being released to the public on a continent-by-continent basis. This Africa segment includes 3256 tiles, almost a quarter of the total data set. Previous releases covered North America, South America and Eurasia. Forthcoming releases will include Australia plus an 'Islands' release for those islands not included in the continental releases. Together these data releases constitute the world's first high-resolution, near-global elevation model. The resolution of the publicly released data is three arcseconds (1/1,200 of a degree of latitude and longitude), which is about 90 meters (295 feet). Coverage in the current data release extends from 35 degrees north latitude at the southern edge of the Mediterranean to the very tip of South Africa, encompassing a great diversity of landforms. The northern part of the continent consists of a system of basins and plateaus, with several volcanic uplands whose uplift has been matched by subsidence in the large surrounding basins. Many of these basins have been infilled with sand and gravel, creating the vast Saharan lands. The Atlas Mountains in the northwest were created by convergence of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates. The geography of the central latitudes of

  19. Post-release monitoring of Antillean manatees: an assessment of the Brazilian rehabilitation and release programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normande, Iran C.; Malhado, Ana C. M.; Reid, James P.; Viana Junior, P.C.; Savaget, P. V. S.; Correia, R. A.; Luna, F. O.; R. J. Ladle,

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian reintroduction programmes frequently aim to reconnect isolated sub-populations and restore population viability. However, these long-term objectives are rarely evaluated due to the inadequacy of post-release monitoring. Here, we report the results of a unique long term telemetry-based monitoring programme for rehabilitated Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) reintroduced into selected sites in northeast Brazil with the aim of reconnecting isolated relict populations. Twenty-one satellite-tagged rehabilitated manatees, 13 males and 8 females, were released into the wild from two sites between November 2008 and June 2013. Individual accumulation curves were plotted and home ranges were calculated through the fixed kernel method using 95% of the utilization distribution. The number and size of the Centres of Activity (COAs) were calculated using 50% of the utilization distribution. Manatees displayed a dichotomous pattern of movement, with individuals either characterized by sedentary habits or by much more extensive movements. Moreover, home range size was not significantly influenced by gender, age at release or release site. COAs were strongly associated with sheltered conditions within reefs and estuaries, and also by the presence of freshwater and feeding sites. Our data confirm that manatee reintroductions in Brazil have the potential to reconnect distant sub-populations. However, pre-release identification of potential long-distance migrants is currently unfeasible, and further analysis would be required to confirm genetic mixing of distant sub-populations.

  20. Polymeric nanoparticles containing diazepam: preparation, optimization, characterization, in-vitro drug release and release kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrey, Sarvesh; Chourasiya, Vibha; Pandey, Archna

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles formulated from biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) are being extensively investigated as drug delivery systems due to their two important properties such as biocompatibility and controlled drug release characteristics. The aim of this work to formulated diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles by using emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is used as stabilizing agent. Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative drug, and widely used as an anticonvulsant in the treatment of various types of epilepsy, insomnia and anxiety. This work investigates the effects of some preparation variables on the size and shape of nanoparticles prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. These nanoparticles were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Zeta potential study was also performed to understand the surface charge of nanoparticles. The drug release from drug loaded nanoparticles was studied by dialysis bag method and the in vitro drug release data was also studied by various kinetic models. The results show that sonication time, polymer content, surfactant concentration, ratio of organic to aqueous phase volume, and the amount of drug have an important effect on the size of nanoparticles. Hopefully we produced spherical shape Diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles with a size range under 250 nm with zeta potential -23.3 mV. The in vitro drug release analysis shows sustained release of drug from nanoparticles and follow Korsmeyer-Peppas model.

  1. Release characteristics of polyurethane tablets containing dicarboxylic acids as release modifiers - a case study with diprophylline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Bart; De Bruyn, Sander; Hansen, Laurent; De Beer, Thomas; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris

    2014-12-30

    The influence of several dicarboxylic acids on the release characteristics of polyurethane tablets with a high drug load was investigated. Mixtures of diprophylline (Dyph) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPUR) (ratio: 50/50, 65/35 and 75/25 wt.%) were hot-melt extruded and injection molded with the addition of 1, 2.5, 5 and 10% wt.% dicarboxylic acid as release modifier. Incorporating malonic, succinic, maleic and glutaric acid in the TPUR matrices enhanced drug release, proportional to the dicarboxylic acid concentration in the formulation. No correlation was found between the water solubility, melting point, logP and pKa of the acids and their drug release modifying capacity. Succinic and maleic acid had the highest drug release modifying capacity which was linked to more intense molecular interactions with Dyph. A structural fit between the primary and secondary alcohol of Dyph and both carboxylic groups of the acids was at the origin of this enhanced interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating the in vitro drug release kinetics from controlled release diclofenac potassium-ethocel matrix tablets and the influence of co-excipients on drug release patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shefaat Ullah; Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Rehman, Asimur; Khan, Gul Majid

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the study was to formulate and evaluate controlled release polymeric tablets of Diclofenac Potassium for the release rate, release patterns and the mechanism involved in the release process of the drug. Formulations with different types and grades of Ethyl Cellulose Ether derivatives in several drug-to-polymer ratios (D:P) were compressed into tablets using the direct compression method. In vitro drug release studies were performed in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) as dissolution medium by using USP Method-1 (Rotating Basket Method). Similarity factor f2 and dissimilarity factor f1 were applied for checking the similarities and dissimilarities of the release profiles of different formulations. For the determination of the release mechanism and drug release kinetics various mathematical/kinetic models were employed. It was found that all of the Ethocel polymers could significantly slow down the drug release rate with Ethocel FP polymers being the most efficient, especially at D:P ratios of 10:03 which lead towards the achievement of zero or near zero order release kinetics.

  3. Growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulates GH release while inhibiting ghrelin- and sGnRH-induced LH release from goldfish pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2013-06-01

    Goldfish GH-releasing hormone (gGHRH) has been recently identified and shown to stimulate GH release in goldfish. In goldfish, neuroendocrine regulation of GH release is multifactorial and known stimulators include goldfish ghrelin (gGRLN19) and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), factors that also enhance LH secretion. To further understand the complex regulation of pituitary hormone release in goldfish, we examined the interactions between gGHRH, gGRLN19, and sGnRH on GH and LH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells in perifusion. Treatment with 100nM gGHRH for 55min stimulated GH release. A 5-min pulse of either 1nM gGRLN19 or 100nM sGnRH induced GH release in naïve cells, and these were just as effective in cells receiving gGHRH. Interestingly, gGHRH abolished both gGRLN19- and sGnRH-induced LH release and reduced basal LH secretion levels. These results suggest that gGHRH does not interfere with sGnRH or gGRLN19 actions in the goldfish somatotropes and further reveal, for the first time, that GHRH may act as an inhibitor of stimulated and basal LH release by actions at the level of pituitary cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Statistical sampling method for releasing decontaminated vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lively, J.W.; Ware, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Earth moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method (MIL-STD-105E, open-quotes Sampling Procedures and Tables for Inspection by Attributesclose quotes) for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium mill site in Monticello, Utah (a CERCLA regulated clean-up site). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello Projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site

  5. Note on Strain Release Variation with Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. GALANOPOULOS

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper an attempt is made to approach
    the problem of the upper mantle structure by studying the strain relea.se
    variation with depth. If the method and data used in this paper are adequate,
    we may be allowed to say that although there is no strain release
    evidence for the depth of the upper boundary of the asthenospliere zone on
    account of lack of adequate accuracy in the determination of focal depths,
    nevertheless there is ample indication of a discontinuity at about 125 km
    depth. The abrupt change in the rate of decrease in the strain release
    with depth near this level clearly indicates that a sudden decrease in the
    yield strength of the material in the earth should occur at about this depth.
    I t might even be possible to think that the melting point of some kind of
    crystal grains or rocks in the earth is attained at that depth. However,
    this does not involve a completely molten state. This state should rather
    occur at depths where there is a complete lack of strain release. Regionally
    this state is attained at different depths, but in some regions the partially
    molten state, i. e. the heterogeneity of the mantle, probably recurs or increases
    due to the pressure increase or some other reason and reaches a minor
    maximum beyond which it might be possible to speculate that the heterogeneity
    of the mantle falls off rapidly and a continuous layer of material
    in molten state covers the whole earth. If data from other sources will
    confirm this structure, there will be good reasons to think of redefining
    the upper boundaries of surface and intermediate shocks at depths of 125
    and 425 km or thereabouts, respectively.

  6. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ . Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis.

  7. Arsenic release during managed aquifer recharge (MAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, T.; Lazareva, O.; Druschel, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mobilization and addition of geogenic trace metals to groundwater is typically caused by anthropogenic perturbations of the physicochemical conditions in the aquifer. This can add dangerously high levels of toxins to groundwater, thus compromising its use as a source of drinking water. In several regions world-wide, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), a form of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), faces the problem of arsenic release due to the injection of oxygenated storage water. To better understand this process we coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling to bench-scale leaching experiments to investigate and verify the mobilization of geogenic arsenic (As) under a range of redox conditions from an arsenic-rich pyrite bearing limestone aquifer in Central Florida. Modeling and experimental observations showed similar results and confirmed the following: (1) native groundwater and aquifer matrix, including pyrite, were in chemical equilibrium, thus preventing the release of As due to pyrite dissolution under ambient conditions; (2) mixing of oxygen-rich surface water with oxygen-depleted native groundwater changed the redox conditions and promoted the dissolution of pyrite, and (3) the behavior of As along a flow path was controlled by a complex series of interconnected reactions. This included the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and simultaneous sorption of As onto neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), followed by the reductive dissolution of HFO and secondary release of adsorbed As under reducing conditions. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in these systems is thus controlled by the re-equilibration of the system to more reducing conditions rather than a purely oxidative process.

  8. Environmental releases for calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-01-01

    This report fulfills the annual environmental release reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. This report provides supplemental information to the Hanford Site Environmental Report (PNNL-11795). The Hanford Site Environmental Report provides an update on the environmental status of the Hanford Site. The sitewide annual report summarizes the degree of compliance with applicable environmental regulations and informs the public concerning the impact of Hanford Site operations on the surrounding environment. Like the Hanford Site Environmental Report, this annual report presents a summary of the environmental releases from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (FDH), and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). In addition to the summary data, this report also includes detailed data on air emissions, liquid effluents, and hazardous substances released to the environment during calendar year 1997. Comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1997 are displayed in Tables ES-1 through ES-5. These tables represent the following: Table ES-1--Radionuclide air emissions data (detailed data on emissions are presented in Section 2.0); Table ES-2--Data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0); Table ES-3--Radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0); Table ES-4--Nonradioactive air emissions data (detailed data are presented in Section 2.0); Table ES-5--Total Volumes and Flow Rates of 200/600 Area Radioactive Liquid Effluents (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0)

  9. Dynamics of HIV-1 assembly and release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Ivanchenko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Assembly and release of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV occur at the plasma membrane of infected cells and are driven by the Gag polyprotein. Previous studies analyzed viral morphogenesis using biochemical methods and static images, while dynamic and kinetic information has been lacking until very recently. Using a combination of wide-field and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have investigated the assembly and release of fluorescently labeled HIV-1 at the plasma membrane of living cells with high time resolution. Gag assembled into discrete clusters corresponding to single virions. Formation of multiple particles from the same site was rarely observed. Using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein fused to Gag, we determined that assembly was nucleated preferentially by Gag molecules that had recently attached to the plasma membrane or arrived directly from the cytosol. Both membrane-bound and cytosol derived Gag polyproteins contributed to the growing bud. After their initial appearance, assembly sites accumulated at the plasma membrane of individual cells over 1-2 hours. Assembly kinetics were rapid: the number of Gag molecules at a budding site increased, following a saturating exponential with a rate constant of approximately 5 x 10(-3 s(-1, corresponding to 8-9 min for 90% completion of assembly for a single virion. Release of extracellular particles was observed at approximately 1,500+/-700 s after the onset of assembly. The ability of the virus to recruit components of the cellular ESCRT machinery or to undergo proteolytic maturation, or the absence of Vpu did not significantly alter the assembly kinetics.

  10. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  11. Development of stavudine sustained release tablets: In-vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Kambham

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: From all the evaluation studies, the release of SVD from its dosage from (F9 was sustained and thereby expected to provide patient compliance with reduced frequency of administration and side effects by avoiding the sudden burst release.

  12. 28 CFR 550.55 - Eligibility for early release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... early release. As an exercise of the Director's discretion, the following categories of inmates are not eligible for early release: (1) Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainees; (2) Pretrial inmates; (3...

  13. 32 CFR 635.10 - Release of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alcohol offices may be provided an extract of DA Form 3997 (Military Police Desk Blotter) for offenses... the release authorities for military police records under their control. They may release criminal...

  14. Compounding of slow-release niacinamide capsules: feasibility and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojkovic, Branko; Milić, Jela; Calija, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of extemporaneous compounding of slow-release oral dosage form of niacinamide and to evaluate its release kinetics. The model formulation (preparation) was developed in the form of powder-filled hard gelatin capsules. Two slow-release preparations with different ratios of hypromellose have been prepared and evaluated in comparison with an immediate-release preparation. The dissolution tests were performed as per United States Pharmacopoeia requirements: Type I Apparatus, over 7 hours. Both slow-release preparations, containing 40% and 60% v/v hypromellose, respectively, have showed slow release kinetics. The dissolution profiles were significantly different, with similarity factor f2niacinamide capsules can be successfully compounded using hypromellose as a sole release rate modifier, and that the release mechanism is comparable to hydrophilic polymer matrix-based systems.

  15. Herwig++ 2.6 Release Note

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, K; Gieseke, S; Grellscheid, D; Hamilton, K; Papaefstathiou, A; Platzer, S; Richardson, P; Rohr, C; Schofield, A; Siodmok, A; Stoll, M; Winn, D

    2012-01-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo event generator Herwig++ (version 2.6) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: a new structure for the implementation of next-to-leading order matrix elements; an improved treatment of wide-angle gluon radiation; new hard-coded next-to-leading order matrix elements for deep inelastic scattering and weak vector boson fusion; additional models of physics beyond the Standard Model, including the production of colour sextet particles; a statistical colour reconnection model; automated energy scaling of underlying-event tunes.

  16. Release and attenuation of fluorocarbons in landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    . The residual blowing agent remaining after the six-week period may be very slowly released if the integrity of the foam particles with respect to diffusional properties is kept after disposal of the foam waste in landfills. Laboratory experiments simulating attenuation processes in the landfilled waste...... and the landfill soil cover showed a substantial degradation of CFC-11 and to a lesser extent of HCFC- 141b which may lead to significant emission reduction of the blowing agents. HFC-134a and HFC-245fa were not degraded in the landfilled waste or the cover soil within the time frame of the experiments (210 days)....

  17. A tandem queue with delayed server release

    OpenAIRE

    Nawijn, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    We consider a tandem queue with two stations. The rst station is an s-server queue with Poisson arrivals and exponential service times. After terminating his service in the rst station, a customer enters the second station to require service at an exponential single server, while in the meantime he is blocking his server in station 1 until he completes service in station 2, whereupon the server in station 1 is released. An analysis of the generating function of the simultaneous probability di...

  18. Efficient reconstruction of contaminant release history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alezander, Francis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anghel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gulbahce, Natali [NON LANL; Tartakovsky, Daniel [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    We present a generalized hybrid Monte Carlo (GHMC) method for fast, statistically optimal reconstruction of release histories of reactive contaminants. The approach is applicable to large-scale, strongly nonlinear systems with parametric uncertainties and data corrupted by measurement errors. The use of discrete adjoint equations facilitates numerical implementation of GHMC, without putting any restrictions on the degree of nonlinearity of advection-dispersion-reaction equations that are used to described contaminant transport in the subsurface. To demonstrate the salient features of the proposed algorithm, we identify the spatial extent of a distributed source of contamination from concentration measurements of a reactive solute.

  19. Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marter, W.L.

    2001-03-28

    At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

  20. Dry release of all-polymer structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haefliger, D.; Nordstrøm, M.; Rasmussen, Peter Andreas

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple dry release technique which uses a thin fluorocarbon film for efficient removal of plastic microdevices from a mould or a handling substrate by reducing the adhesion between the two. This fluorocarbon film is deposited on the substrate in an advanced Si dry etch device utilisi...... 100% were demonstrated on wafer-scale. The fluorocarbon film showed excellent compatibility with metal etch processes and polymer baking and curing steps. It further facilitates demoulding of polydimethylsiloxane stamps suitable for soft-lithography....

  1. Environmental releases for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.P.; Curn, B.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1993 from facilities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. As part of this executive summary, comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1993 are displayed in tables. These tables represent the following: radionuclide air emissions data; data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil; radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River; nonradioactive air emissions data; total volumes and flow rates of 200/600 area liquid effluents. Both summary and detailed presentations of these data are given. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made

  2. Flavor release measurement from gum model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovejero-López, I.; Haahr, Anne-Mette; van den Berg, Frans W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Flavor release from a mint-flavored chewing gum model system was measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectroscopy (APCI-MS) and sensory time-intensity (TI). A data analysis method for handling the individual curves from both methods is presented. The APCI-MS data are ratio...... composition can be measured by both instrumental and sensory techniques, providing comparable information. The peppermint oil level (0.5-2% w/w) in the gum influenced both the retronasal concentration and the perceived peppermint flavor. The sweeteners' (sorbitol or xylitol) effect is less apparent. Sensory...

  3. Multivesicular release underlies short term synaptic potentiation independent of release probability change in the supraoptic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E Quinlan

    Full Text Available Magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus receive glutamatergic excitatory inputs that regulate the firing activity and hormone release from these neurons. A strong, brief activation of these excitatory inputs induces a lingering barrage of tetrodotoxin-resistant miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs that lasts for tens of minutes. This is known to accompany an immediate increase in large amplitude mEPSCs. However, it remains unknown how long this amplitude increase can last and whether it is simply a byproduct of greater release probability. Using in vitro patch clamp recording on acute rat brain slices, we found that a brief, high frequency stimulation (HFS of afferents induced a potentiation of mEPSC amplitude lasting up to 20 min. This amplitude potentiation did not correlate with changes in mEPSC frequency, suggesting that it does not reflect changes in presynaptic release probability. Nonetheless, neither postsynaptic calcium chelator nor the NMDA receptor antagonist blocked the potentiation. Together with the known calcium dependency of HFS-induced potentiation of mEPSCs, our results imply that mEPSC amplitude increase requires presynaptic calcium. Further analysis showed multimodal distribution of mEPSC amplitude, suggesting that large mEPSCs were due to multivesicular glutamate release, even at late post-HFS when the frequency is no longer elevated. In conclusion, high frequency activation of excitatory synapses induces lasting multivesicular release in the SON, which is independent of changes in release probability. This represents a novel form of synaptic plasticity that may contribute to prolonged excitatory tone necessary for generation of burst firing of magnocellular neurons.

  4. Electrochemically controlled release of anticancer drug methotrexate using nanostructured polypyrrole modified with cetylpyridinium: Release kinetics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Naader; Shamaeli, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    A new simple strategy for direct electrochemical incorporation of chemotherapeutic methotrexate (MTX) into conductive polypyrrole (PPy) has been suggested for an electrochemically controlled loading and release system. Electropolymerization of MTX doped polypyrrole yielded poor quality with low efficiency of doping, but a well-doped, nanostructure and increased capacity of drug loading (24.5 mg g −1 ) has been obtained in the presence of cetylpyridinium (CP) as a modifier. When CP was preloaded onto PPy, the hydrophobic surface of the PPy serves as a backbone to which the hydrophobic chain of the CP can be attached. Electrostatic interaction between cationic CP with anionic MTX and aromatic interaction between pyridinium head of CP with pyrimidine and pyrazine rings of MTX increases drug doping. Then release kinetics were investigated at various applied potentials and temperatures. Kinetics analysis based on Avrami's equation showed that the drug release was controlled and accelerated by increasing temperature and negative potential and sustained by increasing positive potential. At open circuit condition, the release parameter (n) represented a diffusive mechanism and at applying electrochemical potentials, a first-order mode. Activation energy parameters (E a , ΔG ≠ , ΔH ≠ and ΔS ≠ ) and half-life time (t 1/2 ) of drug release are also analyzed as a function of applied potential. The nanostructured polymer films (PPy/CP/MTX) were characterized by several techniques: scanning electron microscopy, Furrier transforms Infrared, UV-vis spectroscopy. Overall, our results demonstrate that the PPy/CP/MTX films, combined with electrical stimulation, permit a programmable release of MTX by altering the interaction strength between the PPy/CP and MTX

  5. Effect of glutamine on the mRNA level of key enzymes of malate-aspartate shuttle in the rat intestine subjected to ischemia reperfusion Efeito da glutamina sobre o nível de RNA Mensageiro das enzimas-chave do ciclo malato-aspartato no intestino de ratos submetidos à isquemia e reperfusão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Cavalcante de Vasconcelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the effects of oral L-glutamine (L-Gln and the dipeptide l-alanyl-glutamine (L-Ala-Gln upon the activity of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the rat distal small intestine following ischemia and reperfusion. METHODS: Seventy-two Wistar rats (350-400g, were randomized in 2 groups (n = 36: group S (Sham and Group T (Treatment and divided into 12 subgroups (n = 6: A-A6, and B1-B6. The subgroups A1-A3 were subjected to sham procedures at 30 and 60 minutes. Thirty minutes before the study, rats were treated with calcium caseinate, 0.5g/Kg (subgroups A1, A4, B1, B4, L-Gln, 0.5g / kg (subgroups A2, A5, B2 and B5 or L-Ala-Gln, 0.75g/Kg (subgroups A3, A6, B3, B6, administered by gavage. Ischemia was achieved by clamping the mesenteric vessels, delimiting a segment of bowel 5 cm long and 5 cm apart from the ileocecal valve. Samples were collected 30 and 60 minutes after start of the study for real-time PCR assay of malate dehydrogenases (MDH1-2 and aspartate-aminotransferases (GOT1-2 enzymes. RESULTS: Tissue MDH and GOT mRNA expression in intestinal samples from rats preconditioned with either L-Gln or L-Ala-Gln showed no significant differences both during ischemia and early reperfusion. CONCLUSION: Activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle system appears not to be the mechanism of glutamine-mediated elevation of glucose oxidation in rat intestine during ischemia/reperfusion injury.OBJETIVO: Determinar os efeitos da administração oral de L-glutamina (L-Gln e do dipeptídeo L-alanil-glutamina (L-Ala-Gln sobre a atividade do ciclo malato-aspartato no intestino delgado distal de ratos após isquemia/reperfusão. MÉTODOS: Setenta e dois ratos Wistar (350-400g foram randomizados em 2 grupos (n = 36: T grupo S (Sham e grupo (Tratamento e distribuídos em 12 subgrupos (n = 6: A-A6, e B1-B6. Os subgrupos A1-A3 foram submetidos a procedimentos "sham" aos 30 e 60 minutos. Trinta minutos antes do estudo, os ratos foram tratados com

  6. 50 CFR 600.425 - Release of statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Release of statistics. 600.425 Section 600... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Confidentiality of Statistics § 600.425 Release of statistics. (a) The Assistant Administrator will not release to the public any statistics...

  7. 40 CFR 721.90 - Release to water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release to water. 721.90 Section 721... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Certain Significant New Uses § 721.90 Release to water. Whenever a... predict the surface water concentration which will result from the intended release of the substance, if...

  8. 14 CFR 125.363 - Flight release over water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight release over water. 125.363 Section 125.363 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Flight release over water. (a) No person may release an airplane for a flight that involves extended...

  9. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  10. The release of iron by Sertoli cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauben-Penris, P. J.; Veldscholte, J.; van der Ende, A.; van der Donk, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    In seminiferous tubules, iron transport from the blood to the abluminal germinal cells must occur through the Sertoli cell cytoplasm. We investigated the release of previously accumulated iron by cultured Sertoli cells. We found that Sertoli cells contain easily releasable and less easily releasable

  11. 28 CFR 541.50 - Release from a control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release from a control unit. 541.50... INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Control Unit Programs § 541.50 Release from a control unit. (a) Only the Executive Panel may release an inmate from a control unit. The following factors are...

  12. Disestablishing Sex: The Case for Released-Time Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzer, Perry L.

    2011-01-01

    Allowing nonschool organizations to provide sex education in a released-time format would disestablish state-funded sex education and give families a choice in the sex education that would be provided for their children. Released-time programs, as originally conceived and currently practiced, allow students to be released for a period of time…

  13. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Headquarters offices of External Relations and Public Affairs. (b) NASA Centers and Headquarters offices will... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international...

  14. Sustained Release of a Watermgoluble tiring from Directly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okra grim was evaluated as a controlled-release agent in modified release matrices in comparison with sodium carboxyrncthylcellulose (NaCMC) using aspirin as the model drug. Tablets Were produced by direct compression and the in vitro drug release was assessed under conditions similar to those in the.

  15. Investigation of drug release from carnauba wax matrices: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to assess the effect of carnauba wax particle size on sustained release characteristics, the effect of drug loading on release and the kinetics of propranolol hydrochloride release from carnauba wax matrices. The results obtained showed that small particles (180 250 µ m) of carnauba wax had superior ...

  16. 27 CFR 40.236 - Release from customs custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Release from customs... on Tobacco Products § 40.236 Release from customs custody. The release of tobacco products from customs custody, in bond, for transfer to the premises of a tobacco products factory, shall be in...

  17. 7 CFR 1951.154 - Satisfaction and release of documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Satisfaction and release of documents. 1951.154... Loans § 1951.154 Satisfaction and release of documents. (a) Authorization. FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 is authorized to execute the necessary releases and satisfactions and return...

  18. 27 CFR 17.114 - Release of collateral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Release of collateral. 17... PRODUCTS Bonds and Consents of Sureties Termination of Bonds § 17.114 Release of collateral. The release of collateral security pledged and deposited to satisfy the bond requirement of this part is governed by the...

  19. Controlled release of 5-flurouracil from biomedical polyurethanes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The release of 5-FU through the microspheres was investigated in pH 7⋅4- phosphate buffer. An increase in release rate was observed with increasing molar ratio of PLF68 with respect to castor oil. Keywords. Biomedical polyurethane; controlled release; 5-flurouracil; drug delivery. 1. Introduction. Polyurethanes are one of ...

  20. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi G Bjaelde

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30, which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1 cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1 and vesicular transport (nocodazole. These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ∼90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50% or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8% and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells.

  1. Sustained Release of a Water-Soluble Drug from Directly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okra gum was evaluated as a controlled-release agent in modified release matrices in comparison with sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) using aspirin as the model drug. Tablets were produced by direct compression and the in vitro drug release was assessed under conditions similar to those in the gastrointestinal ...

  2. Modelling of drug release from ensembles of aspirin microcapsules ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: In order to determine the drug release profile of an ensemble of aspirin crystals or microcapsules from its particle distribution a mathematical model that considered the individual release characteristics of the component single particles was developed. The model assumed that under sink conditions the release ...

  3. 24 CFR 58.73 - Objections to release of funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Objections to release of funds. 58... Urban Development ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW PROCEDURES FOR ENTITIES ASSUMING HUD ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.73 Objections to release of funds. HUD (or the State...

  4. Parameters to be Considered in the Simulation of Drug Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Drug microparticles may be microencapsulated with water-insoluble polymers to obtain controlled release, which may be further determined by the particle distribution. The purpose of this study was to determine the drug release parameters needed for the theoretical prediction of the release profiles of single ...

  5. Gaseous release of radioactive iodine from decaying plants. I. Release following foliar and root uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, Arsene; Grauby, Andre

    1975-12-01

    Iodine uptake by plants is a significant link in the contamination of the food chain. Long half-live iodine was studied considering foliar and root uptake, loss by rain scavenging, residue decay or outgassing in order to assess two aspects of the problem: the importance of outgassing and the effect of the route of transfer on iodine losses. It appeared that iodine release was a function of the vegetal type, there were differences according to the pattern of absorption (via leaf or root) and the processes of iodine release were usually related to biochemical mechanisms [fr

  6. Release and toxicity comparison between industrial- and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many consumer products containing ZnO have raised concern for safety in regards toenvironmental impact and the public health. Widely used sunscreens for protectingagainst UV and avoiding sunburns represent a great exposure to nano-ZnO, one of theingredients commonly applied in sunscreens. Applying nano-products on beaches mayrelease nanoparticles unintentionally into the ocean. Despite the accumulation of suchnano-products in the ocean harming or being detrimental to critical marine organisms,few studies have investigated the release and potential toxicity of nanoparticlesextracted from products and compared them with those from industrial-typenanoparticles. Results show that the cytotoxicity of both industrial- and sunscreenderivednano-ZnO to the marine diatom algae, Thalassiosira pseudonana, increasedas exposure increases over time, as measured by growth inhibition (%) of the algae ata constant concentration of nano-ZnO (10 mg/L). The extent of toxicity appeared to behigher from industrial-type nano-ZnO compared to sunscreen-extracted nano-ZnO,though the extent becomes similar when concentrations increase to 50 mg/L. On theother hand, at a fixed exposure time of 48 hrs, the cytotoxicity increases asconcentrations increase with the higher toxicity shown from the industrial-typecompared to sunscreen-induced nano-ZnO. Results indicate that while industrial-typenano-ZnO shows higher toxicity than sunscreen-derived nano-ZnO, the release andextent of toxicity from n

  7. Metal impurity release in diverted tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenmaier, G.; Wampler, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma-materials interaction at the wall of the main plasma chamber of the divertor tokamak ASDEX was investigated by a combined probe, allowing simultaneous measurements of the erosion rate by neutral particles, and the flux and average energy of neutrals. The erosion was measured by collecting part of the released material which was analysed subsequently by electron induced X-ray analysis. The flux and energy of the impinging neutral particles were measured after each single discharge with an energy resolving carbon resistance probe. The carbon probe is an excellent detector not only for deuterium but also for energetic neutral helium atoms. Wall sputtering by CX neutrals is the dominant iron impurity source in ohmically heated deuterium discharges. However, during discharges in helium not only CX neutral sputtering but also sputtering by helium ions is an important impurity release mechanism. But during auxiliary heating by neutral beams and radio frequency in deuterium, impurity generation by CX neutrals was found to increase with heating power. (orig.)

  8. Intramuscular extended-release naltrexone: current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastfriend, David R

    2011-01-01

    Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol), developed to address poor adherence in addictive disorders, is approved for use in alcohol and opioid-dependence disorders. In alcohol-dependent adults with ≥ 4-day initial abstinence, XR-NTX increased initial and 6-month abstinence. An fMRI study found that XR-NTX attenuated the salience of alcohol visual and olfactory cues in the absence of alcohol, and post hoc analyses demonstrated efficacy even during high cue-exposure holiday periods. Safety and tolerability have generally been good, without adverse hepatic impact or intractable acute pain management. XR-NTX use appears feasible in primary care and public systems, and retrospective claims analyses have found cost savings and decreased intensive service utilization relative to oral agents. In opioid dependence, following detoxification, XR-NTX shows efficacy for maintaining abstinence, improving retention, decreasing craving, and preventing relapse. Trials are also exploring its use for the treatment of stimulant dependence. XR-NTX appears compatible with counseling and self-help attendance. While more research is needed, current findings suggest that a formulation of naltrexone that was sought beginning over three decades ago is fulfilling its promise as an extended-release pharmacotherapeutic. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Histamine release from cord blood basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent Windelborg; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg; Herlin, Troels

    1990-01-01

    The histamine release (HR) after challenge with anti-IgE, concanavalin A, N-formyl-met-leu-phe and the calcium ionophore A23187 from 97 cord blood samples was determined by a microfiber-based assay. Maximum HR with anti-IgE showed great inter-individual variation (median: 20.5; range: 1-104 ng/ml...... stimulated by the calcium ionophore A 23187 was found to be highly dependent on the storage time of the EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples, which should be carefully controlled.......The histamine release (HR) after challenge with anti-IgE, concanavalin A, N-formyl-met-leu-phe and the calcium ionophore A23187 from 97 cord blood samples was determined by a microfiber-based assay. Maximum HR with anti-IgE showed great inter-individual variation (median: 20.5; range: 1-104 ng....../ml blood), but was not significantly different from the results obtained in identically treated blood samples from 50 adults (median: 23; range: 1-93 ng/ml blood). Both the maximum HR and the sensitivity to anti-IgE were dependent on total plasma IgE content. Blood samples with plasma IgE greater than...

  10. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Hartmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.) [de

  11. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  12. Burnable absorber rod releasable latching structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Wilson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An elongated nuclear reactivity control member, a releasable latching structure useful for releasably attaching the control member at an end to a top nozzle adapter plate of a nuclear fuel assembly is described comprising: (a) a mounting body including an inner plug portion attached to the end of the control member and an outer end portion disposed axially outward from the inner plug portion and the end of the member; and (b) a spring latch disposed about the mounting body and being attached to the outer end portion. The spring latch has at least one latch finger extending toward the inner plug portion of the body and is movable toward and away from the body between an outer latching position in which the finger is adapted to engage a fuel assembly top nozzle adapter plate and retain the elongated member in a stationary relationship with respect to the adapter plate and an inner unlatching position in which the finger is adapted to disengage from the adapter plate and allow removal of the member from the adapter plate

  13. Lithium Release Experiment in the Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeto; Abe, Takumi; Habu, Hiroto; Nakamura, Masato; Ono, Takayuki; Otsuka, Yuichi; Saito, Akinori; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki

    Though the ionization rate is less than 1% in the region of thermosphere, the dynamics of neutral atmosphere is strongly controlled by the plasma. However, the direct observation is not yet performed in detail. JAXA/ISAS launched successfully S-520-23 sounding rocket from Kagoshima Space Center (KSC) in the evening of September 2, 2007. The rocket experiment is called WIND (Wind measurement for Ionized and Neutral atmospheric Dynamics study). The purpose is to investigate the neutral atmosphere - plasma coupling process in F-region through the measurements of atmospheric circulation and super rotation in the low latitude thermosphere, and a medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MS-TID) occurring in the mid-latitude ionosphere. The rocket installed Lithium Release Canisters as well as instruments for plasma drift velocity, plasma density and temperature and its fluctuations, and electric and magnetic fields. The Lithium gas was released at altitudes between 150km and 300km, and the Lithium scattered sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670nm. The neutral winds in the thermosphere were estimated from the movements of Lithium Clouds observed by CCD imagers on ground. From the diffusion of Lithium Clouds, we estimated neutral density and temperature in the thermosphere.

  14. Extended release formulations for local anaesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, C F; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Ickowicz, D

    2012-08-01

    Systemic toxicity through overdose of local anaesthetic agents is a real concern. By encapsulating local anaesthetics in biodegradable carriers to produce a system for prolonged release, their duration of action can be extended. This encapsulation should also improve the safety profile of the local anaesthetic as it is released at a slower rate. Work with naturally occurring local anaestheticss has also shown promise in the area of reducing systemic and neurotoxicity. Extended duration local anaesthetic formulations in current development or clinical use include liposomes, hydrophobic based polymer particles such as Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, pasty injectable and solid polymers like Poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid) P(SA:RA) and their combination with synthetic and natural local anaesthetic. Their duration of action, rationale and limitations are reviewed. Direct comparison of the different agents is limited by their chemical properties, the drug doses encapsulated and the details of in vivo models described. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. Release Notes for Whisper-1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alwin, Jennifer Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-27

    Whisper is a statistical analysis package developed in 2014 to support nuclear criticality safety (NCS) validation [1-3]. It uses the sensitivity profile data for an application as computed by MCNP6 [4-6] along with covariance files [7,8] for the nuclear data to determine a baseline upper-subcritical-limit (USL) for the application. Whisper version 1.0 was first developed and used at LANL in 2014 [3]. During 2015-2016, Whisper was updated to version 1.1 [9] and is to be included with the upcoming release of MCNP6.2. This document describes the Whisper-1.1 package that will be included with the MCNP6.2 release during 2017. Specific details are provided on the computer systems supported, the software quality assurance (SQA) procedures, installation, and testing. This document does not address other important topics, such as the importance of sensitivity-uncertainty (SU) methods to NCS validation, the theory underlying SU methodology, tutorials on the usage of MCNP-Whisper, practical approaches to using SU methodology to support and extend traditional validation, etc. There are over 50 documents included with Whisper-1.1 and available in the MCNP Reference Collection on the MCNP website (mcnp.lanl.gov) that address all of those topics and more. In this document, however, a complete bibliography of relevant MCNP-Whisper references is provided.

  16. Energy market review releases draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2002-01-01

    The Energy Market Review Releases draft report has made recommendations consistent with the Australian Gas Association (AGA)'s submissions in a number of areas. In particular, it has endorsed: 1. the need for an independent review of the gas access regime, to address the deficiencies with current access regulation identified by the Productivity Commission's Review of the National Access Regime; 2. the need for greater upstream gas market competition; 3. the principle that significant regulatory decisions should be subject to clear merits and judicial review; and 4. the need to avoid restrictions on retail energy prices. The report also endorses the need for a 'technology neutral' approach to greenhouse emissions abatement policy. It states that 'many of the current measures employed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are poorly targeted', and that they 'target technologies or fuel types rather than greenhouse gas abatement.' Additionally, it explicitly recognises the key conclusions of the AGA's recently-released Research Paper, Reducing Greenhouse Emissions from Water Heating: Natural Gas as a Cost-effective Option. The draft report recommends the development of an economy-wide emissions trading system, to achieve a more cost-effective approach to greenhouse abatement

  17. Particle Release Experiment (PRex) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keillor, Martin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Arrigo, Leah M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Detwiler, Rebecca S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kernan, Warnick J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kirkham, Randy R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacDougall, Matthew R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chipman, Veraun D. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Milbrath, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rishel, Jeremy P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Seifert, Allen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Seifert, Carolyn E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Emer, Dudley [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-09-30

    An experiment to release radioactive particles representative of small-scale venting from an underground nuclear test was conducted to gather data in support of treaty verification and monitoring activities. For this experiment, a CO2-driven “air cannon” was used to release La-140 at ambient temperatures. Lanthanum-140 was chosen to represent the fission fragments because of its short half-life and prominent gamma-ray emissions; the choice was also influenced by the successful production and use of La-140 with low levels of radioactive contaminants in a Defence Research and Development Canada Field Trial. The source was created through activation of high-purity natural lanthanum oxide at the reactor of Washington State University, Pullman, Washington. Multiple varieties of witness plates and air samplers were laid in an irregular grid covering the area over which the plume was modeled to deposit. Aerial survey, a NaI(Tl) mobile spectrometer, and handheld and backpack instruments ranging from polyvinyl toluene to high-purity germanium were used to survey the plume. Additionally, three varieties of soil sampling were investigated. The relative sensitivity and utility of sampling and survey methods are discussed in the context of On-Site Inspection. The measurements and samples show a high degree of correlation and form a valuable set of test data.

  18. Fast dispersible/slow releasing ibuprofen tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Adamo; Bergamante, Valentina; Ceschel, Gian Carlo; Ronchi, Celestino; de Moraes, Carlos Alberto Fonseca

    2008-05-01

    Eight formulations were developed containing ibuprofen in the form of orally disintegrating tablets. To prevent bitter taste and side effects of the drug, the drug was associated with Phospholipon 80H, a saturated lecithin, by wet granulation. The granules were then coated using different film forming agents (Kollicoat SR 30, Amprac 01, Kollidon 90F, Eudragit RD 100) obtaining four lots 1-4. Coated granules were then formulated with a sweetener (Aspartame), a mannitol-based diluent (Pearlitol SD 200) and Kollidon CL (1-4K) or Explotab (1-4E) were added as superdisintegrants and compacted under low compression force. The eight lots of tablets, 1-4K and 1-4E, were assessed if suitable as oral disintegrating tablets by determination of a range of technological parameters. Wetting and disintegregation time matched with the requirements of EP IV Ed., for almost all these formulations. Dissolution profiles suggested that the combined action of the hydrophobic lecithin and the coating delay the release of the drug from tablets with respect to when it is free or in the form of simple granules. By an appropriate combination of excipients it was thus possible to obtain orally disintegrating tablets and a delayed release of ibuprofen using simple and conventional techniques.

  19. Counterion condensation and release in micellar solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chin Chieh; Wang, Tzu-Yu; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2005-04-01

    Counterion condensation and release in micellar solutions are investigated by direct measurement of counterion concentration with ion-selective electrode. Monte Carlo simulations based on the cell model are also performed to analyze the experimental results. The degree of counterion condensation is indicated by the concentration ratio of counterions in the bulk to the total ionic surfactant added, α⩽1. The ionic surfactant is completely dissociated below the critical micelle concentration (cmc). However, as cmc is exceeded, the free counterion ratio α declines with increasing the surfactant concentration and approaches an asymptotic value owing to counterion condensation to the surface of the highly charged micelles. Micelle formation leads to much stronger electrostatic attraction between the counterion and the highly charged sphere in comparison to the attraction of single surfactant ion with its counterion. A simple model is developed to obtain the true degree of ionization, which agrees with our Monte Carlo results. Upon addition of neutral polymer or monovalent salts, some of the surfactant counterions are released to the bulk. The former is due to the decrease of the intrinsic charge (smaller aggregation number) and the degree of ionization is increased. The latter is attributed to competitive counterion condensation, which follows the Hefmeister series. This consequence indicates that the specific ion effect plays an important role next to the electrostatic attraction.

  20. Cytotoxicity and ion release of alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Anne [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V (Germany); Fuhlrott, Jutta; Loos, Anneke [Hannover Medical School, Biovertraeglichkeitslabor BioMedimplant (Germany); Barcikowski, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.barcikowski@uni-due.de [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    It is well-known that nanoparticles could cause toxic effects in cells. Alloy nanoparticles with yet unknown health risk may be released from cardiovascular implants made of Nickel-Titanium or Cobalt-Chromium due to abrasion or production failure. We show the bio-response of human primary endothelial and smooth muscle cells exposed to different concentrations of metal and alloy nanoparticles. Nanoparticles having primary particle sizes in the range of 5-250 nm were generated using laser ablation in three different solutions avoiding artificial chemical additives, and giving access to formulations containing nanoparticles only stabilized by biological ligands. Endothelial cells are found to be more sensitive to nanoparticle exposure than smooth muscle cells. Cobalt and Nickel nanoparticles caused the highest cytotoxicity. In contrast, Titanium, Nickel-Iron, and Nickel-Titanium nanoparticles had almost no influence on cells below a nanoparticle concentration of 10 {mu}M. Nanoparticles in cysteine dissolved almost completely, whereas less ions are released when nanoparticles were stabilized in water or citrate solution. Nanoparticles stabilized by cysteine caused less inhibitory effects on cells suggesting cysteine to form metal complexes with bioactive ions in media.

  1. Redesigning reservoir compensation releases for ecological beenfit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Carly

    2010-05-01

    River regulation is commonplace in England and much of the UK. Regulation for the purposes of public water supply causes flows downstream of a reservoir to be attenuated and the flow regime of the channel to be altered. The impact of channel impoundment on a small, upland UK river, has been assessed and methods for mitigation of ecological impacts explored. The method utilised a unique macroinvertebrate data set for pre- and post-impoundment periods to quantify the impact of Derwent Reservoir and the steady, continuous compensation release into the River Derwent, Northumberland. Impacts on the hydrological regime were also investigated and links drawn between changes in flow regime and changes in macroinvertebrate richness and diversity as a result of impoundment. In response to the claim that the impoundment has caused a change in flow regime and had deleterious effects on fish and macroinvertebrates, a compensation redesign tool (CRAB: Compensation Release Assessment at the Broad scale) was employed to design new compensation release regimes from the reservoir which account for the seasonal flow requirements of a number of key fish species. The impact of impoundment on the current flow regime was modelled and the impacts of predicted new regimes were predicted, using a 1D hydrodynamic model (HEC-RAS), as part of a modelling process known as CRAM (Compensation Release Assessment at the Meso-scale). Depth and velocity were the foci of the analysis as they are the two habitat requirements most well documented for the fish species in question, they could be modelled using HEC-RAS and they can act as surrogates for other habitat parameters such as temperature and substrate. The suitability of the depth and velocity combinations predicted using the HEC-RAS model were assessed using fuzzy-rule based modelling, which allowed the habitat quality of a given parameter combination to be quantified. Based on the results of the investigation it was concluded that there has

  2. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): THIRD DATA RELEASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Siviero, A.; Boeche, C.; Steinmetz, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Enke, H.; Anguiano, B.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Fulbright, J.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Munari, U.; Zwitter, T.; Watson, F. G.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russel, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the third data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) which is the first milestone of the RAVE project, releasing the full pilot survey. The catalog contains 83,072 radial velocity measurements for 77,461 stars in the southern celestial hemisphere, as well as stellar parameters for 39,833 stars. This paper describes the content of the new release, the new processing pipeline, as well as an updated calibration for the metallicity based upon the observation of additional standard stars. Spectra will be made available in a future release. The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  3. Tritium transport and release from lithium ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Kopasz, J.P.; Tam, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    In an operating fusion reactor,, the tritium breeding blanket will reach a condition in which the tritium release rate equals the production rate. The tritium release rate must be fast enough that the tritium inventory in the blanket does not become excessive. Slow tritium release will result in a large tritium inventory, which is unacceptable from both economic and safety viewpoints As a consequence, considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the tritium release mechanism from ceramic breeders and beryllium neutron multipliers through theoretical, laboratory, and in-reactor studies. This information is being applied to the development of models for predicting tritium release for various blanket operating conditions

  4. Should repository release criteria be based on collective dose, release limits, or individual doses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channell, J.K.; Neill, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using each of 3 alternative methods (collective dose, release limits, and individual dose) as release criteria for determining long-term high level or transuranic waste repository performance of naturally occurring releases or man-made intrusions are evaluated. Each of the alternative approaches have positive aspects and each has uncertainties that require some arbitrary assumptions. A comparison of the numerical results from evaluating the three alternatives at WIPP leads to the conclusion that a collective dose is preferable because it is more site specific and allows consideration of the full effects of human intrusion. The main objection to release limits is they do not use site specific criteria to determine the radiological effect on local and regional populations. Individual dose criteria used and recommended in the United States have ignored doses to drillers and the public from wastes brought to the surface by human intrusion because these doses can be greater than acceptable limits. Also, there is disagreement about defining the location and lifestyle of the individual

  5. Site release in the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revilla, Jose Luis; Sanz, Maria Teresa; Marugan, Inmaculada; Simon, Inmaculada; Martin, Manuel; Solis, Susana; Sterling, Agustina

    2008-01-01

    Spanish regulatory framework for the decommissioning process of a nuclear facility ends up with a decommission statement, which releases the licence-holder of the facility from its responsibilities as an operator. It also establishes -where a restricted site release applies- the appropriate future use restrictions, and the responsible of both maintaining such restrictions and ensuring their compliance. Releasing a site implies eliminating all radiological monitoring. The Regulations, however, did not specify either the radiological conditions to be met for the site to be released, or the possibility of a partial release -with or without restrictions-. In case of restricted site release, the Regulations did not specify either the required criteria for such a release. This paper presents the main features of the Safety Instruction IS-13 'Radiological criteria for the release of nuclear facilities sites' issued recently by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council as a new specific regulation. This Safety Instruction establishes the requirements and conditions for the release of nuclear facility sites, that is, radiological criteria on the effective dose to the public, partial release of nuclear facility sites and restricted release of nuclear facility sites. (author).

  6. Fission product core release model evaluation in MELCOR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y. M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    The fission product core release in the MELCOR code is based on the CORSOR models developed by Battelle Memorial Institute. Release of radionuclides can occur from the fuel-cladding gap when a failure temperature criterion exceeds or intact geometry is lost, and various CORSOR empirical release correlations based on fuel temperatures are used for the release. Released masses into the core may exist as aerosols and/or vapors, depending on the vapor pressure of the radionuclide class and the surrounding temperature. This paper shows a release analysis for selected representative volatile and non-volatile radionuclides during conservative high and low pressure sequences in the APR1400 plant. Three core release models (CORSOR, CORSOR-M, CORSOR-Booth) in the latest MELCOR 1.8.5 version are used. In the analysis, the option of the fuel component surface-to-volume ratio in the CORSOR and CORSOR-M models and the option of the high and low burn-up in the CORSOR-Booth model are considered together. As the results, the CORSOR-M release rate is high for volatile radionuclides, and the CORSOR release rate is high for non-volatile radionuclides with insufficient consistency. As the uncertainty range for the release rate expands from several times (volatile radionuclides) to more than maximum 10,000 times (non-volatile radionuclides), user's careful choice for core release models is needed

  7. Investigation on formaldehyde release from preservatives in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, C; Hou, J; Xie, W; Cheng, H

    2015-10-01

    To understand formaldehyde residue in cosmetics, an investigation on formaldehyde release from eight preservatives (methenamine - MA, paraformaldehyde - PF, poly(p-toluenesulfonamide-co-formaldehyde) -PTSAF, quaternium-15 - QU, imidazolidinyl urea - IU, diazolidinyl urea - DU, dimethyloldimethyl hydantoin - DMDM and bronopol - BP) under various conditions was performed. The concentration of released formaldehyde was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The amounts of formaldehyde release were in the order of PF > DU > DMDM ≈ QU ≈ IU > MA > BP > PTSAF. The releasing amounts of formaldehyde were the highest in the presence of aqueous matrices for the releasers except QU and IU, and the releasing effect was also relative to pH. More formaldehyde was released with longer storage time and higher temperature. Furthermore, all preservatives in cosmetic matrices released fewer amounts of formaldehyde than in pure aqueous or organic matrices, and the formaldehyde-releasing amounts were also cosmetic specific. Formaldehyde release was dependent on the matrix, pH, time and mainly temperature, and the releasing effect was also cosmetic specific. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  8. Measure your septa release ratios: pheromone release ratio variability affected by rubber septa and solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenen, L P S; Siegel, Joel P

    2015-03-01

    The type of solvent and the volume used to load pheromone components onto rubber septa had significant effects on pheromone release ratios, the variability of those release ratios, and the recoverability of the volatile components during subsequent extraction with hexane. Volatile release ratios of synthetic Oriental fruit moth (OFM) pheromone and additional volatile compounds were determined using a gas chromatograph column as a volatile trap for rapid (≤1 hr) analysis from individual rubber septa. Volatile compound solutions were prepared in hexane, pentane, CH2Cl2, and methyl tert-butyl ether, and a 10, 33, or 100 μl aliquot of each solution was applied to rubber septa. Septa loaded with 100 μl of CH2Cl2 emitted significantly (P < 0.05) higher alcohol: acetate (OH:Ac) ratios than septa loaded with the other solvents, which were all similar. Release ratios of the alcohol and acetate components of the OFM pheromone components were assessed over a 3 week period using septa loaded with each solvent. Regardless of loading solvent, the OFM OH:Ac ratios declined logarithmically over 3 weeks; however, the decay slope from septa loaded with CH2Cl2 solutions was different from those of the other three solvents, which were nearly all the same. A high variability in OH:Ac release ratios was measured overall, regardless of the solvent used or the volume it was applied in. Four compounds of near-equal mass: 1-dodecanol, 1-dodecanal, methyl decanoate, and tridecane emitted different release ratios dependent on the solvent, hexane or CH2Cl2, with which a septum was loaded. The more polar and the greater the mass of the test compound, the slower it was emitted from a septum regardless of solvent. These combined results plus comparisons to earlier reports, suggest that researchers should empirically assess the release ratios from septa to be used in bioassays rather than just reporting the type of septum, ratios of compounds applied and solvent used to prepare them.

  9. Factors controlling alkalisalt deposition in recovery boiler- release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kylloenen, H.; Kurkela, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1996-12-01

    As part of a cooperative effort to develop a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers, an experimental investigation of the release of sulphur during black liquor pyrolysis has been undertaken. Previous to these studies, the mechanisms of sulphur release and the reasons for the observed effects of process conditions on sulphur release were very poorly understood. On the basis of the experimental results, the main reactions leading to sulphur release have been elucidated with a fair degree of certainty. Logical explanations for the variations of sulphur release with temperature and with liquor solids content have been proposed. The influence of pressure has been investigated in order to gain insights into the effects of mass transfer on the sulphur-release rate. In the near future, the research will be aimed at generating the kinetic data necessary for modelling the release of sulphur in the recovery furnace. (author)

  10. Post-release survival and feeding in reared turbot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparrevohn, Claus Reedtz; Støttrup, Josianne

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Danish restocking program, an experiment was carried out with four groups of turbot Psetta maxima released on two different occasions at the same location in Arhus Bay, Denmark. One objective was to analyse the duration of post-release mortality and the magnitude of this mortality...... turbot suffered negligible post-release mortality, but for the Conditioned, Naive and Intermediate groups the loss varied between 34 and 66% d- 1. The mortality for the Conditioned group was found to be half that of the Naive turbot released simultaneously. The period of high post-release mortality...... containing food increased not only with time after release, but also with the size of the turbot. However, whether or not fish was included in the diet was not related to size but to time after release and to whether they had been conditioned or not....

  11. Tritium adsorption/release behaviour of advanced EU breeder pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Rolli, Rolf; Knitter, Regina

    2017-06-01

    The tritium loading of current grades of advanced ceramic breeder pebbles with three different lithium orthosilicate (LOS)/lithium metatitanate (LMT) compositions (20-30 mol% LMT in LOS) and pebbles of EU reference material, was performed in a consistent way. The temperature dependent release of the introduced tritium was subsequently investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to gain insight into the desorption characteristics. The obtained TPD data was decomposed into individual release mechanisms according to well-established desorption kinetics. The analysis showed that the pebble composition of the tested samples does not severely change the release behaviour. Yet, an increased content of lithium metatitanate leads to additional desorption peaks at medium temperatures. The majority of tritium is released by high temperature release mechanisms of chemisorbed tritium, while the release of physisorbed tritium is marginal in comparison. The results allow valuable projections for the tritium release behaviour in a fusion blanket.

  12. PREDICTING RECIDIVISM FOR RELEASED STATE PRISON OFFENDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, Gerald J.; Mennis, Jeremy; Belenko, Steven; Welsh, Wayne N.; Hiller, Matthew L.; Zajac, Gary

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of individual and neighborhood characteristics and spatial contagion in predicting reincarceration on a sample of 5,354 released Pennsylvania state prisoners. Independent variables included demographic characteristics, offense type, drug involvement, various neighborhood variables (e.g., concentrated disadvantage, residential mobility), and spatial contagion (i.e., proximity to others who become reincarcerated). Using geographic information systems (GIS) and logistic regression modeling, our results showed that the likelihood of reincarceration was increased with male gender, drug involvement, offense type, and living in areas with high rates of recidivism. Older offenders and those convicted of violent or drug offenses were less likely to be reincarcerated. For violent offenders, drug involvement, age, and spatial contagion were particular risk factors for reincarceration. None of the neighborhood environment variables were associated with increased risk of reincarceration. Reentry programs need to particularly address substance abuse issues of ex-offenders as well as take into consideration their residential locations. PMID:24443612

  13. Herwig++ 2.7 release note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Grellscheid, D. [IPPP, Durham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics] [and others

    2013-10-15

    A new release of the Monte Carlo event generator Herwig++ (version 2.7) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: an interface to the Universal FeynRules Output (UFO) format allowing the simulation of a wide range of new-physics models; developments of the Matchbox framework for next-to-leading order (NLO) simulations; better treatment of QCD radiation in heavy particle decays in new-physics models; a new tune of underlying event and colour connection parameters that allows a good simultaneous description of both Tevatron and LHC underlying event data and the effective cross-section parameter for double-parton scattering parameter {sigma}{sub eff}.

  14. Absorption of controlled-release iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.D.; Lipschitz, D.A.; Skikne, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple-dose double radioiron technic was used to compare absorption of iron administered as a controlled release (CR) capsule and as an elixir; both formulations contained 50 mg elemental iron as ferrous sulfate. When taken by normal subjects in the fasting state, mean absorption from the elixir and CR capsule averaged 4.92% and 4.38%, which gave a CR capsule:elixir ratio of 0.89. This difference was not significant, but when taken with meals that inhibit absorption of dietary iron by different degrees, absorption of the CR formulation was superior. CR capsule:elixir absorption ratios averaged 1.70 from a meal that is mildly inhibitory and 3.13 from a meal that causes more marked inhibition. It is concluded that CR iron formulations may offer a therapeutic advantage to patients who take oral iron with meals to avoid gastrointestinal side effects

  15. NASTRAN internal improvements for 1992 release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 NASTRAN release incorporates a number of improvements transparent to users. The NASTRAN executable was made smaller by 70 pct. for the RISC base Unix machines by linking NASTRAN into a single program, freeing some 33 megabytes of system disc space that can be used by NASTRAN for solving larger problems. Some basic matrix operations, such as forward-backward substitution (FBS), multiply-add (MPYAD), matrix transpose, and fast eigensolution extraction routine (FEER), have been made more efficient by including new methods, new logic, new I/O techniques, and, in some cases, new subroutines. Some of the improvements provide ground work ready for system vectorization. These are finite element basic operations, and are used repeatedly in a finite element program such as NASTRAN. Any improvements on these basic operations can be translated into substantial cost and cpu time savings. NASTRAN is also discussed in various computer platforms.

  16. Core degradation and fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Hagen, S.J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on core degradation and melt progression in severe LWR accidents have provided reasonable understanding of the principal processes involved in the early phase of melt progression that extends through core degradation and metallic material melting and relocation. A general but not a quantitative understanding of late phase melt progression that involves ceramic material melting and relocation has also been obtained, primarily from the TMI-2 core examination. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge on core degradation and melt progression obtained from these integral experiments and of the principal remaining significant uncertainties. A summary is also given of the principal results on in-vessel fission product release obtained from these experiments. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Organic chemistry. Strain-release amination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianatassio, Ryan; Lopchuk, Justin M; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Malins, Lara R; Prieto, Liher; Brandt, Thomas A; Collins, Michael R; Gallego, Gary M; Sach, Neal W; Spangler, Jillian E; Zhu, Huichin; Zhu, Jinjiang; Baran, Phil S

    2016-01-15

    To optimize drug candidates, modern medicinal chemists are increasingly turning to an unconventional structural motif: small, strained ring systems. However, the difficulty of introducing substituents such as bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes, azetidines, or cyclobutanes often outweighs the challenge of synthesizing the parent scaffold itself. Thus, there is an urgent need for general methods to rapidly and directly append such groups onto core scaffolds. Here we report a general strategy to harness the embedded potential energy of effectively spring-loaded C-C and C-N bonds with the most oft-encountered nucleophiles in pharmaceutical chemistry, amines. Strain-release amination can diversify a range of substrates with a multitude of desirable bioisosteres at both the early and late stages of a synthesis. The technique has also been applied to peptide labeling and bioconjugation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. LAPACK users` guide: Release 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance ``superscalar`` workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users` Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users` guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  19. IOM releases report on graduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. On July 29 the Institute of Medicine (IOM released a report on graduate medical education (GME (1. This is the residency training that doctors complete after finishing medical school. This training is funded by about $15 billion annually from the Federal government with most of the monies coming from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS. The report calls for an end to providing the money directly to the teaching hospitals and to dramatically alter the way the funds are paid. Instead payments would be made to community clinics phased in over about 10 years. To administer the program, the report recommends the formation of two committees: 1. A GME Policy Council in the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health; and 2. A GME Center within the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to manage the operational aspects of GME CMS funding. The later committee ...

  20. A Responsive Battery with Controlled Energy Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jian; Cheng, Zhihua; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-11-14

    A new type of responsive battery with the fascinating feature of pressure perceptibility has been developed, which can spontaneously, timely and reliably control the power outputs (e.g., current and voltage) in response to pressure changes. The device design is based on the structure of the Zn-air battery, in which graphene-coated sponge serves as pressure-sensitive air cathode that endows the whole system with the capability of self-controlled energy release. The responsive batteries exhibit superior battery performance with high open-circuit voltage (1.3 V), and competitive areal capacity of 1.25 mAh cm -2 . This work presents an important move towards next-generation intelligent energy storage devices with energy management function. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.