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Sample records for aluminum alloy sheet

  1. Solid-state Bonding of Superplastic Aluminum Alloy 7475 Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, T. D. S.; Vastava, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental works were carried out to study the feasibility of solid state bonding of superplastic aluminum 7475 sheet. Amount of deformation, bonding time, surface cleaning method and intermediate layer were the process parameters investigated. Other parameters, held constant by the superplastic forming condition which is required to obtain a concurrent solid state bonding, are bonding temperature, bonding pressure and atmosphere. Bond integrity was evaluated through metallographic examination, X-ray line scan analysis, SEM fractographic analysis and lap shear tests. The early results of the development program indicated that sound solid state bonding was accomplished for this high strength 7475 alloy with significant amounts of deformation. A thin intermediate layer of the soft 5052 aluminum alloy aided in achieving a solid state bonding by reducing the required amount of plastic deformation at the interface. Bond strength was substantially increased by a post bond heat treatment.

  2. Finite Element Simulation of Plastic Joining Processes of Steel and Aluminum Alloy Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Kato, T.

    2007-05-01

    Various high tensile strength steel sheets and an aluminum alloy sheet were joined with a self-piercing rivet. It is not easy to weld the aluminum alloy sheet and high tensile strength sheets by means of conventional resistance welding because of very different melting points. To obtain optimum joining conditions, joining defects were categorized into separation of the sheets and an inner fracture. The joining range of ultra high tensile strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was extended by means of dies optimized by finite element simulation. The joint strength is greatly influenced by not only the strength of the sheets and rivets but also the ratio of the thickness of the lower sheet to the total thickness. In addition, mechanical clinching of high strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was simulated.

  3. Springback analysis on AA 6061 aluminum alloy sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramulu, Perumalla Janaki; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Yimer, Wassihun

    2016-10-01

    In automotive industry, sheet metal forming process play a key role with respect to economy and weight reduction ratio. In sheet metal forming, one of the operations is bending operation in which sheet will not go under sever deformation. The end components are made by applying the continuous load on the sheet in the bending process. In bending process, elastic limits of materials are exceeded, but flow limit thereof cannot be exceeded. Therefore, the material still keeps a portion of its original flexibility character. When the load is released, the material on forcing compress side tries to enlarge, whereas the material on tensile side tries to shrink. As a result, the material tries to spring back and the bended material by flexing slightly tries to open. Springback varies according to thickness of the material, material and process parameters, type of material, period when punch load stays on the material, dimensions of die, force applied, and bending radius. In order to make bending at a desired angle, springback amounts should be avoided. In the present work, experimentation on AA 6061 alloy sheet springback analysis has done with seven different rolling directions. Results are noted with respect to load, displacement, and die angle on the springback effect. It observed that springback affect is existed notably in the AA 6061 alloys with respect to die angle.

  4. Effect of Intermediate Annealing on Microstructure and Property of 5182 Aluminum Alloy Sheet for Automobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Effect of intermediate annealing on the microstructure and properties of 5182 aluminum alloy sheet with full annealed state (5182-O was investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and universal testing machine. The results indicate that compared with 5182-O sheet without intermediate annealing, 5182-O sheet with intermediate annealing possesses too fine grain size, intermetallic compounds not broken enough, larger size intermetallic particles, less dispersed phase. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, work hardening exponent and normal anisotropy of plastic strain ratio decrease but planner anisotropy of plastic strain ratio increases. The mechanical properties and forming ability of 5182-O aluminum alloy sheet and its microstructure are not improved significantly after intermediate annealing.

  5. Springback of aluminum alloy brazing sheet in warm forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu Bin; George, Ryan; Kurukuri, Srihari; Worswick, Michael J.; Winkler, Sooky

    2017-10-01

    The use of aluminum is increasing in the automotive industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, recyclability and corrosion resistance. However, aluminum is prone to significant springback due to its low elastic modulus coupled with its high strength. In this paper, a warm forming process is studied to improve the springback characteristics of 0.2 mm thick brazing sheet with an AA3003 core and AA4045 clad. Warm forming decreases springback by lowering the flow stress. The parts formed have complex features and geometries that are representative of automotive heat exchangers. The key objective is to utilize warm forming to control the springback to improve the part flatness which enables the use of harder temper material with improved strength. The experiments are performed by using heated dies at several different temperatures up to 350 °C and the blanks are pre-heated in the dies. The measured springback showed a reduction in curvature and improved flatness after forming at higher temperatures, particularly for the harder temper material conditions.

  6. Through-thickness texture gradient in continuous cast AA 5052 aluminum alloy sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.C. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 Anderson Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)], E-mail: wcliu@engr.uky.edu; Radhakrishnan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6140, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6140 (United States); Li, Z. [Aleris International Inc., 1505 Bull Lea Road, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); Morris, J.G. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 Anderson Hall, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The development of through-thickness texture gradient during continuous cast (CC) processing of AA 5052 aluminum alloy was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The CC slab and the hot bands after each of three rolling passes were obtained from an industrial CC processing operation. The results show that a through-thickness texture gradient exists near the surface after the first pass. The subsurface layer exhibits a very weak texture, while the center layer shows the {beta} fiber rolling texture. After the third pass, a strong {beta} fiber rolling texture is obtained at different through-thickness layers. The roll-gap geometry does not produce any shear deformation at the intermediate layer. After recrystallization annealing, the through-thickness texture gradient still exists in the AA 5052 aluminum alloy sheets. As the measured position moves towards the center from the surface, the cube recrystallization texture strengthens.

  7. Design of Helical Self-Piercing Rivet for Joining Aluminum Alloy and High-Strength Steel Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. Y.; Kim, D. B.; Park, J. G; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, I. H.; Cho, H. Y.

    2014-01-01

    A self-piercing rivet (SPR) is a mechanical component for joining dissimilar material sheets such as those of aluminum alloy and steel. Unlike conventional rivets, the SPR directly pierces sheets without the need for drilling them beforehand. However, the regular SPR can undergo buckling when it pierces a high-strength steel sheet, warranting the design of a helical SPR. In this study, the joining and forging processes using the helical SPR were simulated using the commercial FEM code, DEFORM-3D. High-tensile-strength steel sheets of different strengths were joined with aluminum alloy sheets using the designed helical SPR. The simulation results were found to agree with the experimental results, validating the optimal design of a helical SPR that can pierce high-strength steel sheets

  8. Analysis of Nugget Formation During Resistance Spot Welding on Dissimilar Metal Sheets of Aluminum and Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Li, Jinglong

    2014-10-01

    The nugget formation of resistance spot welding (RSW) on dissimilar material sheets of aluminum and magnesium alloys was studied, and the element distribution, microstructure, and microhardness distribution near the joint interface were analyzed. It was found that the staggered high regions at the contact interface of aluminum and magnesium alloy sheets, where the dissimilar metal melted together, tended to be the preferred nucleation regions of nugget. The main technical problem of RSW on dissimilar metal sheets of aluminum and magnesium alloys was the brittle-hard Al12Mg17 intermetallic compounds distributed in the nugget, with hardness much higher than either side of the base materials. Microcracks tended to generate at the interface of the nugget and base materials, which affected weld quality and strength.

  9. Development of Weldable Superplastic Forming Aluminum Alloy Sheet Final Report CRADA No. TC-1086-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, T. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Numerous applications could exist for superplastic formable, weldable aluminum alloys in the automotive, aerospace, architectural, and construction industries. In this project, LLNL and Kaiser worked with the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems to develop and evaluate weldable superplastic alloys.

  10. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  11. High Rotation Speed Friction Stir Welding for 2014 Aluminum Alloy Thin Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujin; Zhou, Yang; Xue, Junrong; Ni, Ruiyang; Guo, Yue; Dong, Jianghui

    2017-03-01

    In this study, 2014 aluminum alloy sheets with 1 mm thickness are welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) robot under the condition of high rotation speed. When the high rotation speed of 10,000-16,500 rpm is applied, the lower axial pressure (less than 200 N) is obtained, which reduces stiffness requirements for equipment. Welding deformation is inevitable because high rotation speed can easily result in rapid heating rate and uneven heat input. The welding distortion caused by two cooling methods is measured, respectively, by laser range finder. The experimental results show that the welding distortion is smaller under the condition of water cooling. When the rotation speed is up to 15,000 rpm and welding speed 50-170 mm/min, the whole welding process is controllable. Under the higher rotation speed condition, the welding defects disappear gradually and more stable mechanical properties can be obtained up to 75% of base metal (ω = 16,000 rpm, ν = 110 mm/min). The results of different welding parameters demonstrate that the high rotation speed can increase material mixing and reduce the axial force (z force), and it can benefit lightweight sheet welding by using FSW robot.

  12. Enhanced mechanical properties of ARB-processed aluminum alloy 6061 sheets by subsequent asymmetric cryorolling and ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hailiang; Su, Lihong; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Kiet; Li, Huijun; Li, Jintao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Grain size and precipitations affect the strength and ductility of ultrafine-grained materials. In this study, aluminum alloy 6061 sheets were fabricated using the accumulative roll bonding (ARB) technique. The ARB-processed sheets were subsequently subjected to cryorolling and asymmetric cryorolling. The sheets were further aged at 100 °C for 48 h. Mechanical tests show that a combination of asymmetric cryorolling and ageing results in significant improvement in both the ductility and the strength of the ARB-processed sheets. The microstructures of the sheets at different stages of the process were also analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction in order to correlate the mechanical properties with the microstructure.

  13. Microstructure evolution and modeling of 2024 aluminum alloy sheets during hot deformation under different stress states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Xinyun; Jin, Junsong; Zhao, Ting

    2018-01-01

    In this work, specimens of the 2024 aluminum alloy sheet were compressed and stretched along the original rolling direction at elevated temperatures. The microstructure evolution was investigated by characterizing the metallographic structures via electron backscattered diffraction technology before and after deformation. It was found that while recrystallization occurred in the compressed specimens, it was not observed to the same extent in the stretched specimens. This difference in the grain morphology has been attributed to the different movement behaviors of the grain boundaries, i.e., their significant migration in the compression deformation and the transformation from low-angle to high-angle boundaries observed mainly during tension deformation. The empirical model, which can describe the grain size evolution during compression, is not suitable in the case of tension, and therefore, a new model which ignores the detailed recrystallization process has been proposed. This model provides a description of the grain size change during hot deformation and can be used to predict the grain size in the plastic deformation process.

  14. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  15. STUDY THE EFFECTS OF PRESTRAINS IN UNIAXIAL TENSION ON THE FORMING LIMIT DIAGRAM OF ALUMINUM ALLOY SHEETS(2024 T3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed J. Ali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available           The strain path for sheet metal may be changed during forming , this may be affect the forming limit curve (FLC . In this work the FLC before and after prestraining was determined for aluminum alloy (2024 T3 to study the effect of this type of prestraining and in different values on the FLC. This alloy was chosen because it is used widely , specially in aircraft structures .It was shown that the using of uniaxial tension prestrain affects the FLC . The major strain in right side is increased with the increasing in the prestrain , while in the left side the effect is small .

  16. Monitoring of the hardness of heat-treated aluminum alloy sheets with x-ray position sensitive proportional counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Nobuyuki; Nosetani, Tadashi (Sumitomo Light Metal Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1983-04-01

    It is desirable to measure continuously the hardness of materials in operation and quality control in softening process such as continuous annealing furnaces. In X-ray hardness measurement as one of the continuous hardness measuring methods, it is not required to bring a sensor in contact with or in the vicinity of a material to be measured, and it has an advantage of making nondestructive measurement. It is especially important for aluminum alloy sheets, of which the surface quality is regarded as essential, that the measurement without contact is feasible. It is the fundamental of the accurate X-ray hardness measurement to detect exactly the profile of diffraction beam. For the material always running such as the case of continuous annealing furnaces, the shortening of the time for measurement and the simplification of the adjustment of sensor position were investigated, by using a position sensitive proportional counter. By this method, it is expected that the accuracy is improved since the amount of information is more. The method of experiment and the experimental results are reported. In the case of A 5052 sheets, the measurement can be made with the accuracy of +- 4 Vickers hardness.

  17. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  18. Aluminum battery alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  19. Comparative study of the microstructure of 5052 aluminum alloy sheets under quasi-static and high-velocity tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D.H., E-mail: liudahai.hit@gmail.com [School of Aeronautical Manufacturing Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Yu, H.P.; Li, C.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocation slip mechanism works during both quasi-static and dynamic deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic deformation induces denser dislocations and more cross-slip tendency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Existed prestrain has an accommodating effect on dislocation generation and motion. - Abstract: In order to reveal the high-velocity deformation mechanisms of 5052 aluminum alloy sheets, this work compares the dynamic plastic deformation behavior and the microstructure evolutions with those of the quasi-static case by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Results show that the dynamic process exhibits a very different macro fracture shape and a much similar micro deformation pattern as compared with the quasi-static case, and under both conditions, the dislocation-slip mechanism works during deformation. For the shock effect of high-velocity deformation, much denser dislocations are generated and the tendency of cross-slip of dislocations increases. The dislocation bands are more narrow and denser than those shown in the quasi-static case, and a much more uniform dislocation configuration is also exhibited after dynamic loadings. In addition, under dynamic conditions, the existing of pre-strain will introduce an accommodated effect on the dynamically induced dislocations, a slight reduction of density combining with a higher movement tendency. The characteristics of multi-slips and homogenization effect of dislocations under dynamic conditions will result in much higher plasticity and strength of materials over the quasi-static ones.

  20. Aluminum Welding: Out-of-Position Welding of 5000 Series Aluminum Alloys Using Pulse GMAW Power Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    ALUMINIUM ALLOY SHEET: .063 INCH THICKNESS; ER 5356 ALUMINUM...QQ-A-200/5 QQ-A-200/4 ALUMINUM ALLOY COMPOSITION 5083 5086 5052 5456 5454 5052 5456 5454 5086 5083 TYPE OF MATERIAL Plate & Sheet Plate & Sheet Plate...Shapes, Tube, Wire 4.2 Filler Metals Filler wire alloys with the following for welding aluminum shall be in accordance chart: Base Alloy 5052 5083

  1. Borated aluminum alloy manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, Jun; Taniuchi, Hiroaki; Kajihara, Katsura; Aruga, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Borated aluminum alloy is used as the basket material of cask because of its light weight, thermal conductivity and superior neutron absorbing abilities. Kobe Steel has developed a unique manufacturing process for borated aluminum alloy using a vacuum induction melting method. In this process, aluminum alloy is melted and agitated at higher temperatures than common aluminum alloy fabrication methods. It is then cast into a mold in a vacuum atmosphere. The result is a high quality aluminum alloy which has a uniform boron distribution and no impurities. (author)

  2. Dissimilar Joining of Stainless Steel and 5083 Aluminum Alloy Sheets by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-Brazing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheepu, Muralimohan; Srinivas, B.; Abhishek, Nalluri; Ramachandraiah, T.; Karna, Sivaji; Venkateswarlu, D.; Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong

    2018-03-01

    The dissimilar joining using gas tungsten arc welding - brazing of 304 stainless steel to 5083 Al alloy had been conducted with the addition of Al-Cu eutectic filler metal. The interface microstructure formation between filler metal and substrates, and spreading of the filler metal were studied. The interface microstructure between filler metal and aluminum alloy characterized that the formation of pores and elongated grains with the initiation of micro cracks. The spreading of the liquid braze filler on stainless steel side packed the edges and appeared as convex shape, whereas a concave shape has been formed on aluminum side. The major compounds formed at the fusion zone interface were determined by using X-ray diffraction techniques and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. The micro hardness at the weld interfaces found to be higher than the substrates owing to the presence of Fe2Al5 and CuAl2 intermetallic compounds. The maximum tensile strength of the weld joints was about 95 MPa, and the tensile fracture occurred at heat affected zone on weak material of the aluminum side and/or at stainless steel/weld seam interface along intermetallic layer. The interface formation and its effect on mechanical properties of the welds during gas tungsten arc welding-brazing has been discussed.

  3. Experimental investigation of the degree of weakening in structural notch area of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy sheet welded with the RFSSW method

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    Kubit Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology of the research determining the degree of weakening of the welded sheet obtained by the refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW method. The considered weakness is the effect of a structural notch resulting from penetration by the tool. RFSSW technology is a relatively new method of joining metals, which can successfully provide an alternative to resistance welding or riveting - traditionally used methods of joining thin-walled structures in the aerospace and automotive industries. The study presented in the paper focuses on the overlapping of sheet metal with 7075-T6 aluminum alloy combined in the configuration: 1.6 mm top sheet and 0.8 mm bottom sheet. Joints were assembled following the following process parameters: Welding time 1.5 s, the tool plunge depth in the range of 1.5 ÷ 1.9 mm, and the spindle speed of 2600 rpm. The analysis of the microstructure of joints revealed that along the edge of the tool path a structural notch is formed, the size and shape of which depend on the parameters applied. The paper describes the study consisting in punching the welded area along the formed notch in the upper sheet. The punching process was performed on a universal testing machine and the punching force was measured during the test. Based on the force value, the degree of sheet weakening in the notched area was determined. The smallest weakening was observed in joints made with the smallest tool depth, i.e. 1.5 mm, whereas the biggest weakening was obtained for tool depth of 1.9 mm. The load applied to the joints was equal to 5290N and 7585N respectively.

  4. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  5. Non-Heat Treatable Alloy Sheet Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, H.W.; Barthold, G.W.; Das, S.K.

    1999-08-01

    ALCAR is an innovative approach for conducting multi-company, pre-competitive research and development programs. ALCAR has been formed to crate a partnership of aluminum producers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Center for Research and Technology Development (ASME/CRTD), the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), three USDOE National Laboratories, and a Technical Advisory Committee for conducting cooperative, pre-competitive research on the development of flower-cost, non-heat treated (NHT) aluminum alloys for automotive sheet applications with strength, formability and surface appearance similar to current heat treated (HT) aluminum alloys under consideration. The effort has been supported by the USDOE, Office of Transportation Technology (OTT) through a three-year program with 50/50 cost share at a total program cost of $3 million. The program has led to the development of new and modified 5000 series aluminum ally compositions. Pilot production-size ingots have bee n melted, cast, hot rolled and cold rolled. Stamping trials on samples of rolled product for demonstrating production of typical automotive components have been successful.

  6. Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, E. Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

  7. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Dexter, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D 2 / = 1.9 x 10 -2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup -- 1 / 2 / s -1 cm -1 . The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  8. Aluminum Alloy 7050 Extrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    tooling used in the 25-inch diameter casting trials at the laboratory was transferred to Lafayette Works and installed at a ladle casting station. The...for the laboratory casting trials was transferred to Alcoa’s Lafayette Works and installed on a ladle pour casting unit. After some minor adjustments...Fatigue Alloy Compressive Modulus of Elasticity Crack Propagation Ingot Fabricating Stress-Strain Stress-Corrosion Casting Heat

  9. Aluminum alloy impact sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dudyk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cast machine parts are widely used in many branches of industry. A very important issue is gaining the appropriate knowledge relating to the application of castings in places of explosion risks including but not limited to mining, chemical industry and rescue works. A possibility of explosion risks occurrence following the impact sparkling of the cast metal parts is still not solved problem in scientific research. In relation to this issue, in this article, the results of the study are presented, and relating to the tendency to impact sparkling of the aluminium alloys used in machine building. On the grounds of the results obtained, it was demonstrated that the registered impact sparkles bunches of feathers from the analyzed alloys: AlSi7Mg, (AK7; AlSi9Mg, (AK9; AlSi6Cu4, (AK64 and AlSi11, (AK11 show significant differences between each other. The quantitative analysis of the temperature distribution and nuclei surface area performed on the example of the alloy AK9 (subjected to defined period of corrosion allows for the statement that they are dangerous in conditions of explosion risk. Following this fact, designers and users of machine parts made from these materials should not use them in conditions where the explosive mixtures occur.

  10. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  11. Spot welding of aluminium alloy sheets to coated steel sheets. Kakushu mekki koban to arumi gokin no spot yosetsusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, S.; Fukumura, K.; Soga, S. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-31

    Welding aluminum alloy sheets with coated steel sheets has become used frequently in association with weight reduction in automobiles. This paper describes investigations on the effects of spot welding aluminum alloy sheets with different kinds of coated steel sheets on optimal welding conditions and weld strength. An AC single-phase spot welding machine was used for an experiment using an aluminum alloy(5052)with a thickness of 1 mm(referred to as A)and different coated steel sheets with a thickness of 0.8 mm(referred to as B). The result may be summarized as follows: the weldable value of the electric current is closer to that for between the B steel sheets than the middle of that for between the As and between Bs; while the weldable current range is affected little by the coating materials when a CF electrode is used, it grows greater in aluminum coated steel sheets and hot-dip galvanized steel sheets than in alloyed hot-dip galvanized steel sheets and cold-rolled steel sheets when an R-type electrode is used; influence of the coating materials was observed in tensile shear strength and cross tensile shear strength; and any combination of metals shows fatigue strength lower than that in the A-A combination in a fatigue test of cross tensile system. 5 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  13. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  14. The development of 5XXX aluminum alloys for RCS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, J. K.; Sanders, R. E.; Reavis, H. G.

    1996-06-01

    The material characteristics necessary for making aluminum ends for beverage cans have changed dramatically as the industry has evolved over the past 30 years. This article traces the evolution of alloys used in end-stock applications from the 1950s to the present. Early experiences with H19 rigid-container sheet alloys that resulted in the development of alloy 5182 are reviewed, with emphasis on work-hardening and partial-annealing behavior. Changes in the industry, particularly coil coating and new end designs, that drove metallurgical changes to the product are discussed.

  15. An all aluminum alloy UHV components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugisaki, Kenzaburo

    1985-01-01

    An all aluminum components was developed for use with UHV system. Aluminum alloy whose advantage are little discharge gas, easy to bake out, light weight, little damage against radieactivity radiation is used. Therefore, as it is all aluminum alloy, baking is possible. Baking temperature is 150 deg C in case of not only ion pump, gate valve, angle valve but also aluminum components. Ion pump have to an ultrahigh vacuum of order 10 -9 torr can be obtained without baking, 10 -10 torr order can be obtained after 24 hour of baking. (author)

  16. Pitting corrosion of 5052 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, F.; Lee, S.; Faunce, J.; Green, J. A. S.; Ptashnick, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relative degree of pitting of 5052 aluminum alloy in a prepaint cleaning process is correlated with the proportion of MgO in the surface oxide of the alloy. Magnesium oxide, formed on the surface during process heat treatments of the alloy, is soluble in the acidic environment of the particular cleaning solutions, thus allowing easier access of corrosive ion to the aluminum metal. The pitting mechanism involves the: (1) formation of microscopic, localized galvanic cells between aluminum (anode) and iron-containing constituents (cathodic sites) normally found in the matrix of 5052 (and other 5xxx aluminum alloys), (2) aggravation of pit formation by chloride, and (3) enhancement of cathodic reactions and hence the overall corrosion process due to penetration of the oxide layer by cupric and ferric ions, and dissolved O 2 present in the cleaning solutions. Pitting was eliminated by adding 0.1% NaNO 3 to the cleaning bath.

  17. The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Pamela Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1998-05-01

    Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

  18. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  19. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T e and N e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T e and N e for aluminum in aluminum alloys as a marker for the correct alloying using an optical fiber probe.

  20. NASA-427: A New Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center researchers have developed a new, stronger aluminum alloy, ideal for cast aluminum products that have powder or paint-baked thermal coatings. With advanced mechanical properties, the NASA-427 alloy shows greater tensile strength and increased ductility, providing substantial improvement in impact toughness. In addition, this alloy improves the thermal coating process by decreasing the time required for heat treatment. With improvements in both strength and processing time, use of the alloy provides reduced materials and production costs, lower product weight, and better product performance. The superior properties of NASA-427 can benefit many industries, including automotive, where it is particularly well-suited for use in aluminum wheels.

  1. Fabrication And Mechanical Properties Of A Nanostructured Complex Aluminum Alloy By Three-Layer Stack Accumulative Roll-Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Lee S.-H.; Lee S.R.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-layered complex aluminum alloy was successfully fabricated by three-layer stack accumulative roll bonding(ARB) process. The ARB using AA1050 and AA5052 alloy sheets was performed up to 7 cycles at ambient temperature without lubrication. The specimen processed by the ARB showed a multi-layer aluminum alloy sheet in which two aluminum alloys are alternately stacked. The grain size of the specimen decreased with the number of ARB cycles, became about 350nm in diameter after 7cycles. The...

  2. The Examination of the Aluminum Alloy 7017 as a Replacement for the Aluminum Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor Systems by Tyrone L Jones and Brian E Placzankis Approved for public release...2016 US Army Research Laboratory The Examination of the Aluminum Alloy 7017 as a Replacement for the Aluminum Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor ...Aluminum Alloy 7017 as a Replacement for the Aluminum Alloy 7039 in Lightweight Armor Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  3. Precision forging technology for aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Wang, Xinyun; Jin, Junsong; Xia, Juchen

    2018-03-01

    Aluminum alloy is a preferred metal material for lightweight part manufacturing in aerospace, automobile, and weapon industries due to its good physical properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good corrosion resistance. However, during forging processes, underfilling, folding, broken streamline, crack, coarse grain, and other macro- or microdefects are easily generated because of the deformation characteristics of aluminum alloys, including narrow forgeable temperature region, fast heat dissipation to dies, strong adhesion, high strain rate sensitivity, and large flow resistance. Thus, it is seriously restricted for the forged part to obtain precision shape and enhanced property. In this paper, progresses in precision forging technologies of aluminum alloy parts were reviewed. Several advanced precision forging technologies have been developed, including closed die forging, isothermal die forging, local loading forging, metal flow forging with relief cavity, auxiliary force or vibration loading, casting-forging hybrid forming, and stamping-forging hybrid forming. High-precision aluminum alloy parts can be realized by controlling the forging processes and parameters or combining precision forging technologies with other forming technologies. The development of these technologies is beneficial to promote the application of aluminum alloys in manufacturing of lightweight parts.

  4. Fast LIBS Identification of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to analysis aluminum alloy targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a 300 mJ pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. Such plasma emission spectrum was collected using a one-meter length wide band fused-silica optical fiber connected to a portable Echelle spectrometer with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, electron density and electron temperature assuming the LTE and optically thin plasma conditions. The LIBS spectrum was optimized for high S/N ratio especially for trace elements. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of selected aluminum spectral lines. The values of these parameters were found to change with the aluminum alloy matrix, i.e. they could be used as a fingerprint character to distinguish between different aluminum alloy matrices using only one major element (aluminum without needing to analysis the rest of elements in the matrix. Moreover, It was found that the values of T(e and N(e decrease with increasing the trace elements concentrations in the aluminum alloy samples. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to improve the exploitation of LIBS in the remote on-line industrial monitoring application, by following up only the values of T(e and N(e for the aluminum in aluminum alloys using an optical fiber probe.

  5. Formability Prediction Of Aluminum Sheet In Automotive Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppin, Christian; Daniel, Dominique; Shahani, Ravi; Gese, Helmut; Dell, Harry

    2007-01-01

    In the following paper, a full mechanical characterization of the AA6016 T4 aluminum alloy car body sheet DR100 is presented. A comprehensive experimental program was performed to identify and model the orthotopic elasto-plastic deformation behavior of the material and its fracture characteristics including criteria for localized necking, ductile fracture and shear fracture. The commercial software package MF GenYld + CrachFEM in combination with the explicit finite element code Ls-Dyna is used to validate the quality of the material model with experiments, namely, prediction of the FLD, deep drawing with a cross-shaped punch and finally, analysis of a simplified hemming process using a solid discretization of the problem. The focus is on the correct prediction of the limits of the material in such processes

  6. Nondestructive determination of mechanical properties. [aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E.; Chu, S. L.; Salma, K.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys of types 1100, 3003, 5052, 6061, and 2024 were used to study the sensitivity of the acousto-elastic constant to changes in the microstructure. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the acousto-elastic constants and the yield strength and hardness. This relationship depends on whether the alloy is strain hardened or precipitation hardened. In strain hardened alloys, the constants increase as the amount of solid solution is decreased, while the behavior is the opposite in precipitation hardened alloys.

  7. Casting Characteristics of High Cerium Content Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D; Rios, O R; Sims, Z C; McCall, S K; Ott, R T

    2017-09-05

    This paper compares the castability of the near eutectic aluminum-cerium alloy system to the aluminum-silicon and aluminum-copper systems. The alloys are compared based on die filling capability, feeding characteristics and tendency to hot tear in both sand cast and permanent mold applications. The castability ranking of the binary Al–Ce systems is as good as the aluminum-silicon system with some deterioration as additional alloying elements are added. In alloy systems that use cerium in combination with common aluminum alloying elements such as silicon, magnesium and/or copper, the casting characteristics are generally better than the aluminum-copper system. In general, production systems for melting, de-gassing and other processing of aluminum-silicon or aluminum-copper alloys can be used without modification for conventional casting of aluminum-cerium alloys.

  8. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi 5 -phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified

  9. Welding the four most popular aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, B.

    1994-02-01

    The fact that business is good in aluminum welding is a sure sign that more manufacturers and fabricators are using GMA and GTA welding to build new products out of this lightweight nonferrous metal. Among the most widely specified weldable grades are Alloys 6061, 5083, 5052 and 5454. A rundown on these four alloys, including properties and selected applications, is provided. Any company working with aluminum for the first time needs to know something about these four alloys. Alloys of copper-magnesium-silicon combination, of which 6061 is one, are heat-treatable. The three 5XXX series alloys, on the other hand, are nonheat-treatable. According to P.B. Dickerson, consultant, Lower Burrell, Pa., 5083, because of its high magnesium content, is the easiest of the four alloys to arc weld. Dickerson put the cut-off point in weldability at 3.5% magnesium. To prevent cracking, he added, both 6061 and 5052 require much more filler metal than do the other two alloys. Alloy 6061 consists of 0.25Cu, 0.6Si, 1.0Mg, and 0.20Cr. The main applications for 6061 aluminum are structural, architectural, automotive, railway, marine and pipe. It has good formability, weldability, corrosion resistance and strength. Although the 6XXX series alloys are prone to hot cracking, this condition can be readily overcome by correct choice of joint design and electrode. The most popular temper for 6061 is T6, although the -T651, -T4, and -F temper are also popular. The -T651 temper is like a -T6 temper, only it has received some final stretch hardening. The -T4 temper has been solution heat-treated and quenched. The -F temper is in the as-fabricated condition.

  10. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 2618 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanical property tests were conducted over the temperature range from room temperature to 400 F on three sizes of hand forged 2618 aluminum alloy...2618 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the two transverse directions when stressed to 75% of its yeild strenght .

  11. Aluminum alloy nanosecond vs femtosecond laser marking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on the lack of consistent literature publications that analyse the effects of laser marking for traceability on various materials, the present paper proposes a study of the influence of such radiation processing on an aluminum alloy, a vastly used material base within several industry fields. For the novelty impact, ...

  12. Aluminum alloy nanosecond vs femtosecond laser marking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on the lack of consistent literature publications that analyse the effects of laser marking for trace- ability on various materials, the present paper proposes a study of the influence of such radiation processing on an aluminum alloy, a vastly used material base within several industry fields. For the novelty ...

  13. Laser surface alloying on aluminum and its alloys: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yiming; Gu, Guochao; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys have been widely used in aerospace, automotive and transportation industries owing to their excellent properties such as high specific strength, good ductility and light weight. Surface modification is of crucial importance to the surface properties of aluminum and its alloys since high coefficient of friction, wear characteristics and low hardness have limited their long term performance. Laser surface alloying is one of the most effective methods of producing proper microstructure by means of non-equilibrium solidification which results from rapid heating and cooling. In this paper, the influence of different processing parameters, such as laser power and scanning velocity is discussed. The developments of various material systems including ceramics, metals or alloys, and metal matrix composites (MMCs) are reviewed. The microstructure, hardness, wear properties and other behaviors of laser treated layer are analyzed. Besides, the existing problems during laser surface treatment and the corresponding solutions are elucidated and the future developments are predicted.

  14. Corrosion performance of mechanically fastened aluminum/steel joints: Influence of fastener type and aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunkel, R.W.; Moran, J.P. [Aluminum Co. of America, Alcoa Center, PA (United States). Alcoa Technical Center

    1995-11-01

    This paper discusses the corrosion test results for aluminum to steel lap-shear joints fabricated from three aluminum alloys using four different mechanical fasteners. The evaluations included exposure to alternate immersion (AI) and 100% relative humidity (RH) corrosion tests after phosphating and applying a 25 {micro}m E-Coat (i.e., electrolytic coating) to the completed assembly. Lap-shear test results showed that specimens fabricated using self-piercing rivets and solid rivets exhibited strengthening after 30--60 days exposure to AI or RH testing, which was subsequently followed by a decrease in tensile strength as aluminum base metal deterioration began to control the mechanical properties. Metallographic examination suggested the strengthening effect resulted from corrosion product buildup which produced compressive stresses on the joint members. The data indicated that stainless steel fasteners do not limit the corrosion performance of mechanically fastened aluminum to steel joints fabricated from bare sheets which are primed after assembly. The data also indicated that utilization of sealants in mechanically fastened aluminum/steel joints significantly improve corrosion performance of aluminum/steel joints.

  15. Magnesium diffusion in several aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, K. J.; Matienzo, L. J.

    Various surface quality defects or stains are sometimes observed on rolled aluminum. Two such defects, "white lacy" stain and "dirty" metal, appear to be caused by the formation of locally thicker films of hydrated aluminum and magnesium oxides, respectively. This paper examines the formation of these oxides, particularly MgO, on three aluminum alloys with varying bulk magnesium concentrations, namely 5052, 3004 and 3003, containing 2.64, 0.96 and 0.03% magnesium, respectively. Samples were prepared and heat treated in flowing air as a function of temperature and time. The surfaces were examined by Auger electron spectroscopy to determine the relative ratio of the magnesium and aluminum present on the oxide surfaces. Auger depth profiling was used to characterize the composition of the oxides. Surface morphologies, as observed by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy, also were compared. Alloys containing higher bulk magnesium contents, i.e., 5052 and 3004, showed more magnesium diffusion and magnesium oxide formation on the sample surface. At high temperatures, the surface of 5052 tends to be almost totally MgO. Only limited magnesium diffusion and MgO formation was observed on the 3003 alloy.

  16. Selection of basic position in Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of 2024-T3 and D16UTW aluminum alloy sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacki P.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the important parameters of Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding is the so-called basic position of the tool. This is the arrangement of the pin and sleeve which occurs when the tool is plunged into the material. The basic positions can be divided into two categories. In the first category, the sleeve and the pin are above the sheet surface or below sheet surface and in the second category the pin is retracted within the sleeve or protrudes from it.

  17. Superplastic Forming/Adhesive Bonding of Aluminum (SPF/AB) Multi-Sheet Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, John A. (Technical Monitor); Will, Jeff D.; Cotton, James D.

    2003-01-01

    A significant fraction of airframe structure consists of stiffened panels that are costly and difficult to fabricate. This program explored a potentially lower-cost processing route for producing such panels. The alternative process sought to apply concurrent superplastic forming and adhesive bonding of aluminum alloy sheets. Processing conditions were chosen to balance adequate superplasticity of the alloy with thermal stability of the adhesive. As a first objective, an air-quenchable, superplastic aluminum-lithium alloy and a low-volatile content, low-viscosity adhesive with compatible forming/curing cycles were identified. A four-sheet forming pack was assembled which consisted of a welded two-sheet core separated from the face sheets by a layer of adhesive. Despite some preliminary success, of over 30 forming trials none was completely successful. The main problem was inadequate superplasticity in the heat-affected zones of the rib welds, which generally fractured prior to completion of the forming cycle. The welds are a necessary component in producing internal ribs by the 'four-sheet' process. Other challenges, such as surface preparation and adhesive bonding, were adequately solved. But without the larger issue of tearing at the weld locations, complex panel fabrication by SPF/AB does not appear viable.

  18. The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han; Vinod Sikka

    2007-04-23

    database developed in this project, thermodynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of sodium on the HTE of Al-Mg alloys. The simulation results indicated that the liquid miscibility gap resulting from the dissolved sodium in the molten material plays an important role in HTE. A liquid phase forms from the solid face-centered cubic (fcc) phase (most likely at grain boundaries) during cooling, resulting in the occurrence of HTE. Comparison of the thermodynamic simulation results with experimental measurements on the high-temperature ductility of an Al-5Mg-Na alloy shows that HTE occurs in the temperature range at which the liquid phase exists. Based on this fundamental understanding of the HTE mechanism during processing of aluminum alloy, an HTE sensitive zone and a hot-rolling safe zone of the Al-Mg-Na alloys are defined as functions of processing temperature and alloy composition. The tendency of HTE was evaluated based on thermodynamic simulations of the fraction of the intergranular sodium-rich liquid phase. Methods of avoiding HTE during rolling/extrusion of Al-Mg-based alloys were suggested. Energy and environmental benefits from the results of this project could occur through a number of avenues: (1) energy benefits accruing from reduced rejection rates of the aluminum sheet and bar, (2) reduced dross formation during the remelting of the aluminum rejects, and (3) reduced CO2 emission related to the energy savings. The sheet and extruded bar quantities produced in the United States during 2000 were 10,822 and 4,546 million pounds, respectively. It is assumed that 50% of the sheet and 10% of the bar will be affected by implementing the results of this project. With the current process, the rejection rate of sheet and bar is estimated at 5%. Assuming that at least half of the 5% rejection of sheet and bar will be eliminated by using the results of this project and that 4% of the aluminum will be lost through dross (Al2O3) during remelting of the

  19. Lattice mismatch modeling of aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dongwon; Roy, Shibayan; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-10-01

    We present a theoretical framework to accurately predict the lattice mismatch between the fcc matrix and precipitates in the multi-component aluminum alloys as a function of temperature and composition. We use a computational thermodynamic approach to model the lattice parameters of the multi-component fcc solid solution and θ'-Al2Cu precipitate phase. Better agreement between the predicted lattice parameters of fcc aluminum in five commercial alloys (206, 319, 356, A356, and A356 + 0.5Cu) and experimental data from the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXD) has been obtained when simulating supersaturated rather than equilibrium solid solutions. We use the thermal expansion coefficient of thermodynamically stable θ-Al2Cu to describe temperature-dependent lattice parameters of meta-stable θ' and to show good agreement with the SXD data. Both coherent and semi-coherent interface mismatches between the fcc aluminum matrix and θ' in Al-Cu alloys are presented as a function of temperature. Our calculation results show that the concentration of solute atoms, particularly Cu, in the matrix greatly affects the lattice mismatch

  20. The manufacture of superplastic magnesium alloy sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, R.; Jackson, M.; Moorhouse, B.; Dashwood, R. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15

    Probably because of their propensity to dynamically recrystallise, superplastic behaviour can be obtained from magnesium alloys considerably more easily than from comparable aluminium alloys. In some cases even as cast magnesium alloys can exhibit reasonable superplasticity and there appears no need for the special alloying additions or complex thermal mechanical treatments required by aluminium alloys such as AA2004 or AA7475. The paper describes the superplastic behaviour (in uniaxial tension) and microstructure of sheet processed from strip cast AZ31 and AZ91. The material was tested in the as-cast condition and after warm rolling to a number of gauges. Industrially useful superplastic capability was demonstrated in strip cast AZ31 and AZ91 in the as cast condition. Furthermore good superplastic capability was also demonstrated in sheet rolled from the cast metal and the ductilities obtained were not significantly influenced by rolling strain. Twin roll strip casting represents a feasible and simple route for the production of superplastic material either for use in the as cast condition or after rolling to the required gauge. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Fatigue damage monitoring of structural aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С.Р. Ігнатович

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  Results of the experiments directed on creation of a new tool method of fatigue damage diagnostics and an estimation of a residual life of aviation designs are presented. It is shown, that the defo rmation relief formed on a surface of cladding  layer of sheets of constructional alloys Д-16АТ, 2024-Т3, 7075-Т6  can be considered as the metal damage indicator  under cyclically repeating loadings.

  2. Bismuth alloy potting seals aluminum connector in cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, J. F.; Stafford, R. L.

    1966-01-01

    Bismuth alloy potting seals feedthrough electrical connector for instrumentation within a pressurized vessel filled with cryogenic liquids. The seal combines the transformation of high-bismuth content alloys with the thermal contraction of an external aluminum tube.

  3. Accumulative Roll Bonding of Aluminum/Stainless Steel Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Mohammad Nejad Fard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An Al/Stainless Steel/Al lamellar composite was produced by roll bonding of the starting sheets at 400 °C. Afterward, the roll bonded sheet was cut in half and the accumulative roll bonding (ARB process at room temperature was applied seven times. As a result, the central steel layer fractured and distributed in the Al matrix among different layers introduced by the repetition of roll bonding process. The tensile results showed that the roll bonded sheet has much higher strength and strength to weight ratio compared with the initial aluminum sheet as a result of the presence of continuous steel core. However, poor ductility properties were observed during tensile test, which were ascribed to the increasing deformation resistance and localized thinning of the central stainless steel sheet during the roll bonding process. The ARBed sample exhibited lower strength compared with the roll bonded sheet due to the breakup of stainless steel layer into many small segments. Anyway, an ultrafine grained microstructure with average grain size of 400 nm in the aluminum matrix and 71% strain-induced martensite in the steel segments were detected by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD technique, which were found to be responsible for the enhancement of mechanical properties compared with the initial aluminum sheet.

  4. Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

    1998-10-01

    This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

  5. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  6. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  7. Evaluation and Characterization of In-Line Annealed Continuous Cast Aluminum Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Subodh K. Das

    2006-01-17

    This R&D program will develop optimized, energy-efficient thermo-mechanical processing procedures for in-line annealing of continuously cast hot bands of two 5000 series aluminum alloys (5754 and 5052). The implementation of the R&D will result in the production of sheet with improved formability at high levels of productivity consistency and quality. The proposed R&D involves the following efforts: (1) Design and build continuous in-line annealing equipment for plant-scale trials; (2) Carry out plant-scale trials at Commonwealth Aluminum Corp.'s (CAC) plant in Carson; (3) Optimize the processing variables utilizing a metallurgical model for the kinetics of microstructure and texture evolution during thermo-mechanical processing; (4) Determine the effects of processing variables on the microstructure, texture, mechanical properties, and formability of aluminum sheet; (5) Develop design parameters for commercial implementation; and (6) Conduct techno-economic studies of the recommended process equipment to identify impacts on production costs. The research and development is appropriate for the domestic industry as it will result in improved aluminum processing capabilities and thus lead to greater application of aluminum in various industries including the automotive market. A teaming approach is critical to the success of this effort as no single company alone possesses the breadth of technical and financial resources for successfully carrying out the effort. This program will enable more energy efficient aluminum sheet production technology, produce consistent high quality product, and have The proposal addresses the needs of the aluminum industry as stated in the aluminum industry roadmap by developing new and improved aluminum processes utilizing energy efficient techniques. The effort is primarily related to the subsection on Rolling and Extrusion with the R&D to address energy and environmental efficiencies in aluminum manufacturing and will provide

  8. strength and ductility of forged 1200 aluminum alloy reinforced

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: Aluminum alloy; annealing; ductility; strength; iron particle. 1. INTRODUCTION. INTRODUCTION. Structural components made from aluminum alloys are vital to the aerospace, automobile and building industries because of their light weight, high strength, good formability and high corrosion resistance. However ...

  9. Grain refinement of aluminum and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2001-01-01

    Grain refinement of aluminum and its alloys by the binary Al-Ti and Ternary Al-Ti-B master alloys is reviewed and discussed. The importance of grain refining to the cast industry and the parameters affecting it are presented and discussed. These include parameters related to the cast, parameters related to the grain refining alloy and parameters related to the process. The different mechanisms, suggested in the literature for the process of grain refining are presented and discussed, from which it is found that although the mechanism of refining by the binary Al-Ti is well established the mechanism of grain refining by the ternary Al-Ti-B is still a controversial matter and some research work is still needed in this area. The effect of the addition of other alloying elements in the presence of the grain refiner on the grain refining efficiency is also reviewed and discussed. It is found that some elements e.g. V, Mo, C improves the grain refining efficiency, whereas other elements e.g. Cr, Zr, Ta poisons the grain refinement. Based on the parameters affecting the grain refinement and its mechanism, a criterion for selection of the optimum grain refiner is forwarded and discussed. (author)

  10. Hot stamping of AA7075 aluminum sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiguren, J.; Saenz de Argandona, E.; Galdos, L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work the formability of a high strength aluminium alloy (AA7075-T6) for the stamping of an automotive component has been studied. Due to the low formability of the selected alloy, two different heat assisted forming strategies have been analysed. On the one hand, the W-temper process, where the thermal process is carried out prior to the forming operation. On the other hand, the hot stamping process, where the thermal process is carried out at the same time as the forming. The results showed that both technology were able to form the component avoiding any failure of the material. On the contrary, both processes reduced the final mechanical properties of the material compared to the as received material condition. However, the obtained mechanical properties doubled the strength of commonly used 5xxx and 6xxx aluminium alloys.

  11. Abating recrystallization inhomogeneity in twin-roll cast 3003 aluminum sheet by electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; You, Tao; Xu, Guangming

    2018-01-01

    Recrystallization inhomogeneity is a typical problem in twin-roll cast Al-Mn alloys. A compound field is applied during twin-roll casting of 3003 aluminum sheet to investigate its effects on the final recrystallization structure of the cold rolled and annealed sheet. Dendrite arms in the as-cast sheet are refined and become uniform after applying the field. The arm size range decreases from 5 to 15 μm to 5-8 μm. Two-step homogenization results in more nucleation particles and finer recrystallization structure than single-step routine does in both sheets. More nucleation particles are formed and evenly distributed in the field sheet under the same homogenization routine as a result of more uniformly distributed elements and grain size in the as-cast sheet. The recrystallization inhomogeneity is abated and eliminated by the compound field. Recrystallization grain size in the field sheet after 600 °C × 15 h + 500 °C × 15 h annealing is reduced to 30 μm × 60 μm and distributes evenly along sheet thickness.

  12. Liquid Film Migration in Warm Formed Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. J.; Whitney, M. A.; Wells, M. A.; Jin, H.; Winkler, S.

    2017-10-01

    Warm forming has previously proven to be a promising manufacturing route to improve formability of Al brazing sheets used in automotive heat exchanger production; however, the impact of warm forming on subsequent brazing has not previously been studied. In particular, the interaction between liquid clad and solid core alloys during brazing through the process of liquid film migration (LFM) requires further understanding. Al brazing sheet comprised of an AA3003 core and AA4045 clad alloy, supplied in O and H24 tempers, was stretched between 0 and 12 pct strain, at room temperature and 523K (250 °C), to simulate warm forming. Brazeability was predicted through thermal and microstructure analysis. The rate of solid-liquid interactions was quantified using thermal analysis, while microstructure analysis was used to investigate the opposing processes of LFM and core alloy recrystallization during brazing. In general, liquid clad was consumed relatively rapidly and LFM occurred in forming conditions where the core alloy did not recrystallize during brazing. The results showed that warm forming could potentially impair brazeability of O temper sheet by extending the regime over which LFM occurs during brazing. No change in microstructure or thermal data was found for H24 sheet when the forming temperature was increased, and thus warm forming was not predicted to adversely affect the brazing performance of H24 sheet.

  13. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles (∼30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller (∼ mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced ∼100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was ≥343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water

  14. [Comparison of texture distribution of cold rolled DC and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy at different positions through thickness direction by XRD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-biao; Ma, Min; Yang, Qing-xiang; Wang, Shan; Liu, Wen-chang; Zhao, Ying-mei

    2013-09-01

    To provide gist of DC AA 5052 and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy to industry production and application, the texture variation of cold rolled sheets through thickness direction was studied by X-ray diffraction method, and the difference in texture at surface, quarter and center layer was analyzed. The hot plates of direct chill cast (DC) AA 5052 and continuous cast (CC) AA 5052 aluminum alloy were annealed at 454 degrees C for 4 hours and then cold rolled to different reductions. The strength and volume fraction of the fiber in CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is larger than in DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy after same rolling reduction The volume fraction of the recrystallization texture cube in the CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is less than in the DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy, which result in that CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy needs less cold rolling reduction than DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for generating the texture with same intensity and volume fraction at surface layer, quarter layer and center layer. The manufacturability and performance of CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is superior to DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for use in stamping.

  15. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  16. Influences on the formability and mechanical properties of 7000-aluminum alloys in hot and warm forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Nürnberger, F.; Bonk, C.; Hübner, S.; Behrens, S.; Vogt, H.

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum alloys of the 7000 series possess high lightweight potential due to their high specific tensile strength combined with a good ultimate elongation. For this reason, hot-formed boron-manganese-steel parts can be substituted by these alloys. Therefore, the application of these aluminum alloys for structural car body components is desired to decrease the weight of the body in white and consequently CO2 emissions during vehicle operation. These days, the limited formability at room temperature limits an application in the automobile industry. By increasing the deformation temperature, formability can be improved. In this study, two different approaches to increase the formability of these alloys by means of higher temperatures were investigated. The first approach is a warm forming route to form sheets in T6 temper state with high tensile strength at temperatures between 150 °C and 300 °C. The second approach is a hot forming route. Here, the material is annealed at solution heat treatment temperature and formed directly after the annealing step. Additionally, a quench step is included in the forming stage. After the forming and quenching step, the sheets have to be artificially aged to achieve the high specific tensile strength. In this study, several parameters in the presented process routes, which influence the formability and the mechanical properties, have been investigated for the aluminum alloys EN AW7022 and EN AW7075.

  17. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  18. Hot forging of roll-cast high aluminum content magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Tomohiro; Watari, Hisaki; Suzuki, Mayumi; Haga, Toshio

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on hot forging of high aluminum content magnesium alloy sheets manufactured using horizontal twin-roll casting. AZ111 and AZ131 were applied for twin-roll casting, and a hot-forging test was performed to manufacture high-strength magnesium alloy components economically. For twin-roll casting, the casting conditions of a thick sheet for hot forging were investigated. It was found that twin-roll casting of a 10mm-thick magnesium alloy sheet was possible at a roll speed of 2.5m/min. The grain size of the cast strip was 50 to 70µm. In the hot-forging test, blank material was obtained from as-cast strip. A servo press machine with a servo die cushion was used to investigate appropriate forging conditions (e.g., temperature, forging load, and back pressure) for twin-roll casts (TRCs) AZ111 and AZ131. It was determined that high aluminum content magnesium alloy sheets manufactured using twin-roll casting could be forged with a forging load of 150t and a back pressure of 3t at 420 to 430°C. Applying back pressure during hot forging effectively forged a pin-shaped product.

  19. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  20. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  1. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  2. Evaluation of microstructure of A356 aluminum alloy casting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of vibrations (during solidification) on the metallurgical properties of A356 aluminum casting. Mechanical vibrations were applied to A356 aluminum alloy through set up. A356 melt has been subjected to mechanical vibration with the frequency range from 0 to 400 ...

  3. Corrosion protection of aluminum alloys in contact with other metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes the quality of chemical and galvanized protection afforded by anodized and aldozided coatings applied to test panels of various aluminum alloys. The test panels, placed in firm contact with panels of titanium alloys, were subjected to salt spray tests and visually examined for corrosion effect.

  4. Resources and recycling of secondary raw materials as basis for aluminum alloys production

    OpenAIRE

    Aćimović-Pavlović, Zagorka; Simović, Đuro; Andrić, Ljubiša

    2012-01-01

    Raw materials which represent basis for 'secondary' aluminum alloys are waste and scrap of pure aluminum and its alloys, as well as waste and scrap of various materials which contain aluminum or its alloys. Hence aluminum residues are numerous and they appear on various places, there is alerting open question considering necessity of collecting, preparing and processing, i.e. returning aluminum waste into the recycling process. Aluminum recycling can be considered from different point of view...

  5. Calcium metal as a scavenger for antimony from aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Daniels, E.J.; Wu, C.T.

    1994-10-04

    Previous work has shown that trace amounts of antimony (Sb) can affect the mechanical properties of strontium (Sr) modified aluminum castings. ANL has been investigating technology to remove or neutralize Sb to reduce its negative effect on the physical properties of those alloys. Review of past work on processing and recovery of scrap aluminum inferred that calcium (Ca) is an effective scavenger of Sb, bismuth, lead and cadmium. Following up on that lead, we have found that Ca is, indeed, effective for removing Sb from molten aluminum alloys although its effectiveness can be compromised by a wide range of processing conditions. A minimum ratio of about four to one, by weight, of Ca to Sb appears necessary to insure an effective scavenging of contained Sb.in 356 aluminum alloys.

  6. Analysis of the flow property of aluminum alloy AA6016 based on the fracture morphology using the hydroforming technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Lihui; Zhang, Quanda; Sun, Zhiying; Wang, Yao

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic bulging experiments were respectively carried out using AA6016-T4 aluminum alloy and AA6016-O aluminum alloy, and the deformation properties and fracture mechanism of aluminum alloy under the conditions of thermal and hydraulic were analyzed. Firstly, the aluminum alloy AA6016 was dealt with two kinds of heat treatment systems such as solid solution heat treatment adding natural ageing and full annealing, then the aluminum alloy such as AA6016-T4 and AA6016-O were obtained. In the same working environment, the two kinds of materials were used in the process of hydraulic bulging experiments, according to the observation and measurement of the deformation sizes of grid circles and material thicknesses near the fracture region, the flow properties and development trend of fracture defect of the materials were analyzed comprehensively from the perspective of qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis; Secondly, the two kinds of materials were sampled in different regions of the fracture area and the microstructure morphology of the fracture was observed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The influence laws of the heat treatment systems on the fracture defect of the aluminum alloy under the condition of the liquid pressure were studied preliminarily by observing the distribution characteristics of the fracture microstructure morphology of dimple. At the same time, the experimental research on the ordinary stamping forming process of AA6016-O was carried out and the influence law of different forming process on the fracture defect of the aluminum alloy material was studied by observing the distribution of the fracture microstructure morphology; Finally, the development process of the fracture defect of aluminum alloy sheet was described theoretically from the view of the stress state.

  7. Analysis of the flow property of aluminum alloy AA6016 based on the fracture morphology using the hydroforming technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Lang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the hydraulic bulging experiments were respectively carried out using AA6016-T4 aluminum alloy and AA6016-O aluminum alloy, and the deformation properties and fracture mechanism of aluminum alloy under the conditions of thermal and hydraulic were analyzed. Firstly, the aluminum alloy AA6016 was dealt with two kinds of heat treatment systems such as solid solution heat treatment adding natural ageing and full annealing, then the aluminum alloy such as AA6016-T4 and AA6016-O were obtained. In the same working environment, the two kinds of materials were used in the process of hydraulic bulging experiments, according to the observation and measurement of the deformation sizes of grid circles and material thicknesses near the fracture region, the flow properties and development trend of fracture defect of the materials were analyzed comprehensively from the perspective of qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis; Secondly, the two kinds of materials were sampled in different regions of the fracture area and the microstructure morphology of the fracture was observed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The influence laws of the heat treatment systems on the fracture defect of the aluminum alloy under the condition of the liquid pressure were studied preliminarily by observing the distribution characteristics of the fracture microstructure morphology of dimple. At the same time, the experimental research on the ordinary stamping forming process of AA6016-O was carried out and the influence law of different forming process on the fracture defect of the aluminum alloy material was studied by observing the distribution of the fracture microstructure morphology; Finally, the development process of the fracture defect of aluminum alloy sheet was described theoretically from the view of the stress state.

  8. Self-brazing Mechanism of Aluminum Alloy at Medium Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHENG Fang-jie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnCl2 and SnCl2 were added to the AlF3-CsF eutectic flux, which can be used for connecting aluminum alloy sheet by self-brazing at medium temperature. The influence of the amount of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 and the size of the T-joint area on the interface microstructure and the self-brazing joint mechanical properties was investigated. The interface microstructure, chemical compositions, defects and tensile fractography of the self-brazing joints were analyzed by metallographic microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the joints are soundly bonded when both the mass fractions of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 are about 4%; the replacement reactions between Zn2+, Sn2+ of flux and Al atoms of base metal occur during brazing, then the liquid metals of Sn and Zn appear, a great degree of Zn which has high solid solution with Al spreads rapidly to the base metal; Sn is distributed along the interface forming a low melting point metal layer with Zn and Al; the brazing of joints with small area can be realized easily; there are a lot of dimples on the fracture surface and the tensile strength of the brazing joint reaches (58±5MPa.

  9. An experimental study on superplastic behaviors of magnesium alloy sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Quanlin; Wu Huiying [Beijing Research Inst. of Mechanical and Electrical Technology (China)

    2005-07-01

    An experimental study on superplastic forming behaviors and microstructure characters of commercial magnesium alloy sheet AZ31B is presented in this paper. The main experimental results show that the commercial magnesium alloy AZ31B sheet has superplastic capability. For the received sheet without any pre-processing, the maximum elongation is 295%. The dynamic recrystallization and grain refinement can be found. The superplastic behaviors can be improved by controlling the dynamic recrystallization and grain refinement. Some experimental results of free superplastic bulging are presented in this paper. The results show that influence of temperature on forming capability is much less than the influences of temperature on elongation. (orig.)

  10. Superplasticity in powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.S.; Bieler, T.R.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    Superplasticity in powder metallurgy Al alloys and composites has been reviewed through a detailed analysis. The stress-strain curves can be put into 4 categories: classical well-behaved type, continuous strain hardening type, continuous strain softening type and complex type. The origin of these different types of is discussed. The microstructural features of the processed material and the role of strain have been reviewed. The role of increasing misorientation of low angle boundaries to high angle boundaries by lattice dislocation absorption is examined. Threshold stresses have been determined and analyzed. The parametric dependencies for superplastic flow in modified conventional aluminum alloys, mechanically alloyed alloys and Al alloy matrix composites is determined to elucidate the superplastic mechanism at high strain rates. The role of incipient melting has been analyzed. A stress exponent of 2, an activation energy equal to that for grain boundary diffusion and a grain size dependence of 2 generally describes superplastic flow in modified conventional Al alloys and mechanically alloyed alloys. The present results agree well with the predictions of grain boundary sliding models. This suggests that the mechanism of high strain rate superplasticity in the above-mentioned alloys is similar to conventional superplasticity. The shift of optimum superplastic strain rates to higher values is a consequence of microstructural refinement. The parametric dependencies for superplasticity in aluminum alloy matrix composites, however, is different. A true activation energy of superplasticity in aluminum alloy matrix composites, however, is different. A true activation energy of 313 kJ/mol best describes the composites having SiC reinforcements. The role of shape of the reinforcement (particle or whisker) and processing history is addressed. The analysis suggests that the mechanism for superplasticity in composites is interface diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding

  11. Experimental Characterization of Ultrastructure of Aviation Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Mingjun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the comprehensive performance of aluminium alloys for the aviation application, it is necessary to experimentally characterize the microstructure, and thus to build a bridge between the microstructure and macro-performance of aluminum alloys. This paper introduces the brief developing course of 2xxx, 6xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys and their microstructure evolution during artificial aging.The structural characteristics of significant phases like GP zones in Al-Cu alloys and GPB zones in Al-Cu-Mg alloys, and the precipitation behavior of S phase in Al-Cu-Mg alloys, etc, are thoroughly studied. The application of Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy, 3-Dimentional Atom Probe in the investigations of structure, morphology, composition, interface structures, intergranular corrosion resistance and so on has been reviewed, especially the Ω phase in Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys and β" phase in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys. Our group has finished the works such as the simulation and characterization of complex selected area electron diffraction patterns in Al alloys, as well as the measuring of the precipitates' volume fraction with high accuracy which is based on the convergent beam electron diffraction.

  12. Analysis of peel strength of consisting of an aluminum sheet, anodic aluminum oxide and a copper foil laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Won; Lee, Hyo-Soo; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2017-01-01

    Laminate composites consisting of an aluminum sheet, anodic aluminum oxide, and copper foil have been used as heat-spreader materials for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs). These composites are comparable to the conventional structure comprising an aluminum sheet, epoxy adhesives, and copper foil. The peel strength between the copper foil and anodic aluminum oxide should be more than 1.0 kgf/cm in order to be applied in high-power LED products. We investigated the effect of the anodic aluminum oxide morphology and heat-treatment conditions on the peel strength of the composites. We formed an anodic aluminum oxide layer on a 99.999% pure aluminum sheet using electrochemical anodization. A Ti/Cu seed layer was formed using the sputtering direct bonding copper process in order to form a copper circuit layer on the anodic aluminum oxide layer by electroplating. The developed heat spreader, composed of an aluminum layer, anodic aluminum oxide, and a copper circuit layer, showed peel strengths ranging from 1.05 to 3.45 kgf/cm, which is very suitable for high-power LED applications.

  13. Forming and bonding techniques for high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Horst E.

    1995-02-01

    This article highlights the continued preference for aluminum as a structural material for aircraft, where demands for high performance coupled with the need for weight reduction have led to the use of high-strength aluminum alloys. The ever-increasing demand for a high level of integration of complex structural components calls for the development of appropriate manufacturing processes. As an example, superplastic forming is discussed, combined with innovative bonding techniques such as diffusion bonding and adhesive spot welding.

  14. A Dislocation based Constitutive Model for Warm Forming of Aluminum Sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurukuri, S.; Ghosh, M.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2008-01-01

    The formability of aluminum sheet can be improved considerably by increasing the temperature. At elevated temperatures, the mechanical response of the material becomes strain rate dependent. To accurately simulate warm forming of aluminum sheet, a material model is required that incorporates the

  15. Change of Aluminum Alloys Structure by Sono-Solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnapowski S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment utilized five Aluminum alloys with silicon content percentages of 7, 10, 12.6, 14.5 and 17(wt%. Ultrasonic vibration was applied to improve the quality of aluminum alloys. Sono-solidification, in which ultrasound vibrations are applied to molten metal during its solidification, is expected to cause improved mechanical properties due to grain refinement. Observed by microstructure photographs was that grains became smaller and their shapes more regular. Using ultra sound solidification α Al appeared during ultrasound treatment the eutectic solidification time was longest around 10% compared with same condition experiment without ultrasound treatment.

  16. Evolution of strain-induced microstructure and texture in commercial aluminum sheet under balanced biaxial stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banovic, S. W.; Foecke, T.

    2003-03-01

    The evolution of surface topography and crystallographic texture was investigated under balanced biaxial stretching in sheets of the aluminum alloy 5052-H32. Two different lots of material, with an initial nominal thickness of 1 mm, were tested in the as-received condition. Samples with increasing levels of balanced biaxial strain were deformed using a modified Marciniak in-plane stretching test. In general, the sheet materials were microstructurally and crystallographically anisotropic. Between the two lots, the initial microstructure and mechanical properties were found to be equivalent; however, the sheet texture was appreciably different. This latter variation was observed to have an effect on the additional roughening of the surface subsequent to deformation. For a given lot of material, the surface roughness was found to be proportional to the magnitude of the strain. However, while the roughening rates for the two lots were comparable, the lot having a stronger initial {220} texture component was found to roughen to a higher degree. Corresponding changes in the sheet texture were observed to have two regimes as a function of the strain level. In the first regime, typically, for strains ( ɛ) up to 0.05, the orientations were found to rotate quickly away from the initial cube {001} orientation observed in the as-received sheet toward positions along the α fiber. Above a strain level of 0.05, the {220} texture component continued to increase with deformation, but at a decreasing rate up to failure of the sheet. The difference in the grain rotation rates observed did not appear to have an effect on the surface roughening, as the relative change of the crystallographic orientations with increasing plastic strain was similar for both heats of material. Instead, it is believed that localized grain or grain-grouping interactions may play a more important role in the surface roughening process.

  17. Plastic Deformation Characteristics Of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheets At Elevated Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jingee; Lee, Jongshin; You, Bongsun; Choi, Seogou; Kim, Youngsuk

    2007-01-01

    Using lightweight materials is the emerging need in order to reduce the vehicle's energy consumption and pollutant emissions. Being a lightweight material, magnesium alloys are increasingly employed in the fabrication of automotive and electronic parts. Presently, magnesium alloys used in automotive and electronic parts are mainly processed by die casting. The die casting technology allows the manufacturing of parts with complex geometry. However, the mechanical properties of these parts often do not meet the requirements concerning the mechanical properties (e.g. endurance strength and ductility). A promising alternative can be forming process. The parts manufactured by forming could have fine-grained structure without porosity and improved mechanical properties such as endurance strength and ductility. Because magnesium alloy has low formability resulted form its small slip system at room temperature it is usually formed at elevated temperature. Due to a rapid increase of usage of magnesium sheets in automotive and electronic industry it is necessary to assure database for sheet metal formability and plastic yielding properties in order to optimize its usage. Especially, plastic yielding criterion is a critical property to predict plastic deformation of sheet metal parts in optimizing process using CAE simulation. Von-Mises yield criterion generally well predicts plastic deformation of steel sheets and Hill'1979 yield criterion predicts plastic deformation of aluminum sheets. In this study, using biaxial tensile test machine yield loci of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet were obtained at elevated temperature. The yield loci ensured experimentally were compared with the theoretical predictions based on the Von-Mises, Hill, Logan-Hosford, and Barlat model

  18. Effect of tool rotational speed and penetration depth on dissimilar aluminum alloys friction stir spot welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín M. Piccini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the automotive industry is looking for the use of aluminum parts in replace of steel parts in order to reduce the vehicles weight. These parts have to be joined, for instance, by welding processes. The more common welding process in the automotive industry is the Resistance Spot Welding (RSW technique. However, RSW of aluminum alloys has many disadvantages. Regarding this situation, a variant of the Friction Stir Welding process called Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW has been developed, showing a strong impact in welding of aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials in thin sheets. Process parameters affect the characteristics of the welded joints. However, the information available on this topic is scarce, particularly for dissimilar joints and thin sheets. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the rotational speed and the tool penetration depth on the characteristics of dissimilar FSS welded joints. Defects free joints have been achieved with higher mechanical properties than the ones reported. The maximum fracture load was 5800 N. It was observed that the effective joint length of the welded spots increased with the tool penetration depth, meanwhile the fracture load increased and then decreased. Finally, welding at 1200 RPM produced welded joints with lower mechanical properties than the ones achieved at 680 and 903 RPM.

  19. Interpretation of aluminum-alloy weld radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, P. C.; Risch, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Report proposes radiographic terminology standardization which allows scientific interpretation of radiographic films to replace dependence on individual judgement and experience. Report includes over 50 photographic pages where radiographs of aluminum welds with defects are compared with prepared weld sections photomacrographs.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Die-casting Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of strontium addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloys 380 and 413 are researched. All samples are prepared through high pressure die-casting, and the effect of the sample’s thickness is also compared. The results indicate that the Sr addition can refine the metallographic microstructure of two alloys in different degrees, mainly to eutectic Si phase. The mechanical properties of the two alloys are improved slightly through Sr modification to the thin wall castings. The enhancement of mechanical properties is evident to the thick wall castings.

  1. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcements from pure Al–SiCp composite scrap by salt flux addi- tion has been theoretically predicted .... zero and the salt fluxes have only little solubility in the matrix metal, separation of the matrix ... aluminum melt with SiC at this temperature did not exceed. 30 min. In order to change the ...

  2. Treatment increases stress-corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A. J.

    1966-01-01

    Overaging during heat treatment of the aluminum alloys immediately followed by moderate plastic deformation, preferably by shock loading achieves near optimum values of both yield strength and resistance to stress corrosion. Similar results may be obtained by substituting a conventional deformation process for the shock loading step.

  3. Superplastic forming of aluminum alloy car body panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhipeng; Zhang Yanshu; Zhou Yi; Jin Quanlin [Beijing Research Inst. of Mechanical and Electrical Technology, Beijing, BJ (China)

    2005-07-01

    An experimental study on superplastic forming of a front fender of 5182 aluminum alloy is presented in this paper. Based on the shape characters of the front fender and the material experimental results, dies, heater and temperature controller for superplastic forming of the fender are designed and manufactured. The SPF results show the designed processing and dies are reasonable and feasible. (orig.)

  4. Quality Management and Control of Low Pressure Cast Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dianxi; Zhang, Yanbo; Yang, Xiufan; Chen, Zhaosong; Jiang, Zelan

    2018-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the history of low pressure casting and summarizes the major production processes of low pressure casting. It briefly introduces the quality management and control of low pressure cast aluminum alloy. The main processes include are: preparation of raw materials, Melting, refining, physical and chemical analysis, K-mode inspection, sand core, mold, heat treatment and so on.

  5. Characteristics of the aluminum alloy plasma produced by a 1064 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The plasma generated by 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation of aluminum alloy in air at atmospheric pressure was studied spectroscopically. The electron density inferred by measuring the Stark-broadened line profile of Si(I) 288.16 nm decreases with increasing distance from the target surface. The electron ...

  6. Characteristics of the aluminum alloy plasma produced by a 1064 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The plasma generated by 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation of aluminum alloy in air at atmospheric pressure was studied spectroscopically. The electron density inferred by measuring the Stark-broadened line profile of Si(I) 288.16 nm decreases with increasing distance from the target surface. The electron temperature ...

  7. Characteristics of aluminum alloy microplastic deformation in different structural states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seregin, G.V.; Efimenko, L.L.; Leonov, M.V. [Novosibirsk Pedagogical Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-01

    The solution to the problem of improving the mechanical properties (including cyclic strength) of structural materials is largely dependent on our knowledge of the laws governing the development of microplastic deformations in them. The effect of heat and mechanical treatment on the elastoplastic properties and fatigue resistance of the commercial aluminum alloys AK4-1 and D16 is analyzed.

  8. Strength and Ductility of Forged 1200 Aluminum Alloy Reinforced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With 50% reduction and fine-sized steel particles (512μm) in aluminum alloy, tensile strength dropped to 160MPa without significant decrease in ductility (1.7). Microstructure of cast samples show the presence of fine Fe particles at grain boundaries after annealing with most of the particles in solid solution. Al3Fe and AlFeSi ...

  9. Semi-solid rheocasting of grain refined aluminum alloy 7075

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Near-net shape rheocasting with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Rheo casting system(CSIR–RCS) and a high pressure die casting machine was successfully performed on Al–5Ti–1B grain refined aluminum alloy 7075. Grain refinement...

  10. Influence Of Lubricants On Wear Resistance Of Aluminum Alloy Strips Series 2XXX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żaba K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a properly planned and designed tests of the abrasive wear resistance 2024 aluminum alloy strips under friction conditions involving various lubricants. Test were focused on the selection of the best lubricant for use in industrial environment, especially for sheet metal forming. Three lubricants of the Orlen Oil Company and one used in the sheet metal forming industry, were selected for tests. Tests without the use of lubricant were performed for a comparison. The tester T-05 was used for testing resistance to wear. As the counter samples were used tool steel - NC6 and steel for hot working - WCL, which are typical materials used for tools for pressing. The results are presented in the form of the force friction, abrasion depth, weight loss and coefficient of friction depending on the lubricant used and the type of counter samples. The results allowed for predicting set lubricant-material for tools which can be applied to sheet metal made of aluminum alloy 2024.

  11. Laser Surface Alloying of Aluminum for Improving Acid Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay Gutu; Sankar, Mamilla Ravi; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, laser surface alloying of aluminum with magnesium, manganese, titanium and zinc, respectively, was carried out to improve acid corrosion resistance. Laser surface alloying was conducted using 1600 and 1800 W power source using CO2 laser. Acid corrosion resistance was tested by dipping the samples in a solution of 2.5% H2SO4 for 200 h. The weight loss due to acid corrosion was reduced by 55% for AlTi, 41% for AlMg alloy, 36% for AlZn and 22% for AlMn alloy. Laser surface alloyed samples offered greater corrosion resistance than the aluminum substrate. It was observed that localized pitting corrosion was the major factor to damage the surface when exposed for a long time. The hardness after laser surface alloying was increased by a factor of 8.7, 3.4, 2.7 and 2 by alloying with Mn, Mg, Ti and Zn, respectively. After corrosion test, hardness was reduced by 51% for AlTi sample, 40% for AlMg sample, 41.4% for AlMn sample and 33% for AlZn sample.

  12. Precipitation behavior of aluminum alloy 2139 fabricated using additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, Craig; Shenoy, Ravi; Kral, Milo; Buchannan, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is an emerging technology capable of producing near net shape structures in a variety of materials directly from a computer model. Standard metallic alloys that were developed for cast or wrought processing have largely been adopted for AM feedstock. In many applications, these legacy alloys are quite acceptable. In the aluminum alloy family, however, there is a significant performance gap between the casting alloys currently being used in AM processes and the high strength/toughness capability available in certain wrought alloys. The precipitation hardenable alloys, most often used in high performance structures, present challenges for processing by AM. The near net shape nature of AM processes does not allow for mechanical work prior to the heat treatment that is often necessary to develop a uniform distribution of precipitates and give peak mechanical performance. This paper examines the aluminum (Al) alloy 2139, a composition that is strengthened by homogeneous precipitation of Ω (Al 2 Cu) plates and thus ideally suited for near net shape processes like AM. Transmission electron microscopy, microhardness, and tensile testing determined that, with proper processing conditions, Al 2139 can be additively manufactured and subsequently heat treated to strength levels comparable to those of peak aged wrought Al 2139.

  13. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  14. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  15. Strain signatures associated to the formation of hot cracks during laser beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Christian; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The local surface displacement during the laser beam welding process of MgSi alloyed aluminum sheets (AA6014) in overlap configuration was optically determined near the weld seam by means of digital correlation of images recorded with a high-speed video camera. The analysis allowed the time- and space-resolved determination of the plane strain in the immediate vicinity of the solidification zone behind the weld pool. The observations revealed characteristic signatures in the temporal evolution of the strain that are related to the formation of centerline cracks in laser beam welding.

  16. Ultrasonic texture characterization of aluminum, zirconium and titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    This work attempts to show the feasibility of nondestructive characterization of non-ferrous alloys. Aluminum alloys have a small single crystal anisotropy which requires very precise ultrasonic velocity measurements for derivation of orientation distribution coefficients (ODCs); the precision in the ultrasonic velocity measurement required for aluminum alloys is much greater than is necessary for iron alloys or other alloys with a large single crystal anisotropy. To provide greater precision, some signal processing corrections need to be applied to account for the inherent, half-bandwidth offset in triggered pulses when using a zero-crossing technique for determining ultrasonic velocity. In addition, alloys with small single crystal anisotropy show a larger dependence on the single crystal elastic constants (SCECs) when predicting ODCs which require absolute velocity measurements. Attempts were made to independently determine these elastics constants in an effort to improve correlation between ultrasonically derived ODCs and diffraction derived ODCs. The greater precision required to accurately derive ODCs in aluminum alloys using ultrasonic nondestructive techniques is easily attainable. Ultrasonically derived ODCs show good correlation with derivations made by Bragg diffraction techniques, both neutron and X-ray. The best correlation was shown when relative velocity measurements could be used in the derivations of the ODCs. Calculation of ODCs in materials with hexagonal crystallites can also be done. Because of the crystallite symmetries, more information can be extracted using ultrasonic techniques, but at a cost of requiring more physical measurements. Some industries which use materials with hexagonal crystallites, e.g. zirconium alloys and titanium, have traditionally used texture parameters which provide some specialized measure of the texture. These texture parameters, called Kearns factors, can be directly related to ODCs

  17. Laser welding of 6xxx series aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zervaki, A.D.; Haidenmenopoulos, G.N. [Thessaly Univ., Volos (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2000-07-01

    Considerable interest has emerged recently in applying laser welding to aluminum alloys especially in the aerospace, automotive and shipbuilding industries. in the present work experimental results regarding CO{sub 2} laser welding of aluminum alloys 6063, 6061 and 6013 of 1.8 mm thickness are being presented. CO{sub 2} lasers with 1.5, 3 and 5 kW output power were employed. The effect of laser power, beam travel speed, focal depth shielding gas, surface preparation on weld geometrical characteristics (depth of penetration and width of HAZ) as well as weld quality (microhardness and internal defects) is discussed. Optimum welding conditions were determined for the alloy 6063 where for certain values of heat input weld defects such as pores, hot cracking and partial penetration were eliminated. Modeling work is underway to predict the microstructural evolution and resulting hardness profiles in the HAZ. (orig.)

  18. Corrosion of aluminum alloys in a reactor disassembly basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, J.P.; Zapp, P.E.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1992-12-01

    This document discusses storage of aluminum clad fuel and target tubes of the Mark 22 assembly takes place in the concrete-lined, light-water-filled, disassembly basins located within each reactor area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A corrosion test program has been conducted in the K-Reactor disassembly basin to assess the storage performance of the assemblies and other aluminum clad components in the current basin environment. Aluminum clad alloys cut from the ends of actual fuel and target tubes were originally placed in the disassembly water basin in December 1991. After time intervals varying from 45--182 days, the components were removed from the basin, photographed, and evaluated metallographically for corrosion performance. Results indicated that pitting of the 8001 aluminum fuel clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) cladding thickness within the 45-day exposure period. Pitting of the 1100 aluminum target clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) clad thickness in 107--182 days exposure. The existing basin water chemistry is within limits established during early site operations. Impurities such as Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} are controlled to the parts per million level and basin water conductivity is currently 170--190 {mu}mho/cm. The test program has demonstrated that the basin water is aggressive to the aluminum components at these levels. Other storage basins at SRS and around the US have successfully stored aluminum components for greater than ten years without pitting corrosion. These basins have impurity levels controlled to the parts per billion level (1000X lower) and conductivity less than 1.0 {mu}mho/cm.

  19. Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

    2006-03-17

    This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was

  20. Efficient tunable luminescence of SiGe alloy sheet polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogg, G.; Meyer, A. J.-P.; Miesner, C.; Brandt, M. S.; Stutzmann, M.

    2001-01-01

    Crystalline SiGe alloy sheet polymers were topotactically prepared from epitaxially grown calcium germanosilicide Ca(Si 1-x Ge x ) 2 precursor films in the whole composition range. These polygermanosilynes are found to be a well-defined mixture of the known siloxene and polygermyne sheet polymers with the OH groups exclusively bonded to silicon. The optical properties determined by photoluminescence and optical reflection measurements identify the mixed SiGe sheet polymers as direct semiconductors with efficient luminescence tunable in the energy range between 2.4 and 1.3 eV. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  1. A Model for Gas Microporosity in Aluminum and Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicelli, Sergio D.; Wang, Liang; Pita, Claudio M.; Escobar de Obaldia, Enrique

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative prediction of the amount of gas microporosity in aluminum and magnesium-alloy castings is performed with a continuum model of dendritic solidification. The distribution of the pore volume fraction and pore size is calculated from a set of conservation equations that solves the transport phenomena during solidification at the macroscale and the hydrogen diffusion into the pores at the microscale. A technique based on a pseudo-alloy solute that is transported by the melt is used to determine the potential sites of pore growth, subject to considerations of mechanical and thermodynamic equilibrium. The modeling results for aluminum alloy A356 are found to agree well with published studies. In view of the limited availability of experimental data for Mg-alloy gravity-poured castings, the formation of porosity in AZ91 is studied qualitatively, assuming that casting conditions are similar to A356. In particular, the minimum initial hydrogen content that leads to the formation of gas porosity was compared for both alloys. It is found that the initial hydrogen content necessary for forming porosity is much higher in AZ91 than in A356. This is attributed to significant differences in the solubility of the hydrogen in both alloys.

  2. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. R.; Kor, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Control of porosity in weld beads was major objective in development of aluminum welding program. Porosity, most difficult defect to control, is caused by hydrogen gas unable to escape during solidification. Hard tooling allows hotter bead than free-fall tooling so hydrogen bubbles can boil out instead of forming pores. Welding position, moisture, and cleanliness are other important factors in control of porosity.

  3. Nitrate reduction in water by aluminum alloys particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zunsheng; Hu, Qing; Qi, Weikang; Tang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Wan, Pingyu; Chao, Jingbo; Yang, Xiao Jin

    2017-07-01

    Nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles have been extensively investigated for nitrate reduction in water. However, the reduction by NZVI requires acidic pH conditions and the final product is exclusively ammonium, leading to secondary contamination. In addition, nanomaterials have potential threats to environment and the transport and storage of nanomaterials are of safety concerns. Aluminum, the most abundant metal element in the earth's crust, is able to reduce nitrate, but the passivation of aluminum limits its application. Here we report Al alloys (85% Al) with Fe, Cu or Si for aqueous nitrate reduction. The Al alloys particles of 0.85-0.08 mm were inactivate under ambient conditions and a simple treatment with warm water (45 °C) quickly activated the alloy particles for rapid reduction of nitrate. The Al-Fe alloy particles at a dosage of 5 g/L rapidly reduced 50 mg-N/L nitrate at a reaction rate constant (k) of 3.2 ± 0.1 (mg-N/L) 1.5 /min between pH 5-6 and at 4.0 ± 0.1 (mg-N/L) 1.5 /min between pH 9-11. Dopping Cu in the Al-Fe alloy enhanced the rates of reduction whereas dopping Si reduced the reactivity of the Al-Fe alloy. The Al alloys converted nitrate to 20% nitrogen and 80% ammonium. Al in the alloy particles provided electrons for the reduction and the intermetallic compounds in the alloys were likely to catalyze nitrate reduction to nitrogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Textures in Strip-Cast Aluminum Alloys: Their On-Line Monitoring and Quantitative Effects on Formability. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Chi-Sing

    2003-07-27

    Aluminum sheets produced by continuous casting (CC) provide energy and economic savings of at least 25 and 14 percent, respectively, over sheets made from conventional direct chill (DC) ingot casting and rolling. As a result of the much simpler production route in continuous casting, however, the formability of CC aluminum alloys is often somewhat inferior to that of their DC counterparts. The mechanical properties of CC alloys can be improved by controlling their microstructure through optimal thermomechanical processing. Suitable annealing is an important means to improve the formability of CC aluminum alloy sheets. Recrystallization of deformed grains occurs during annealing, and it changes the crystallographic texture of the aluminum sheet. Laboratory tests in this project showed that this texture change can be detected by either laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy or resonance EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) spectroscopy, and that monitoring this change allows the degree of recrystallization or the ''recrystallized fraction'' in an annealed sheet to be ascertained. Through a plant trial conducted in May 2002, this project further demonstrated that it is feasible to monitor the recrystallized state of a continuous-cast aluminum sheet in-situ on the production line by using a laser-ultrasound sensor. When used in conjunction with inline annealing, inline monitoring of the recrystallized fraction by laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy offers the possibility of feed-back control that helps optimize processing parameters (e.g., annealing temperature), detect production anomalies, ensure product quality, and further reduce production costs of continuous-cast aluminum alloys. Crystallographic texture strongly affects the mechanical anisotropy/formability of metallic sheets. Clarification of the quantitative relationship between texture and anisotropy/formability of an aluminum alloy will render monitoring and control of its

  5. Soft x-ray emission studies of several aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.L.; Zhang, C.H.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.; Ederer, D.L.; Biancaniello, F.; Curelaru, I.

    1986-01-01

    During the first few months of operation of our soft x-ray spectrometer at the NSLS, we have measured the L emission spectrum for three classes of aluminum alloys: dilute aluminum-magnesium alloys to extend the Al-Mg system to the impurity limit; a 50-50 alloy of aluminum-lithium to characterize the band structure of bulk samples of this potential battery electrolite; and the icosahedral and normal Al-Mn alloys to see if the two phases had measurably different density of states which have been predicted. All spectra shown are produced when core holes generated by energetic electrons or photons are filled by radiative transitions from conduction band states. Dipole selection rules govern the transitions. Thus, K spectra provide a measure of the p-symmetic partial density of states (DOS) near the atom. Similarly, L spectra produced by transitions to p-core holes map the s and d symmetric DOS in the vicinity of the atom with the core hole

  6. Soft x-ray emission studies of several aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, K.L.; Zhang, C.H.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.; Ederer, D.L.; Biancaniello, F.; Curelaru, I.

    1986-09-23

    During the first few months of operation of our soft x-ray spectrometer at the NSLS, we have measured the L emission spectrum for three classes of aluminum alloys: dilute aluminum-magnesium alloys to extend the Al-Mg system to the impurity limit; a 50-50 alloy of aluminum-lithium to characterize the band structure of bulk samples of this potential battery electrolite; and the icosahedral and normal Al-Mn alloys to see if the two phases had measurably different density of states which have been predicted. All spectra shown are produced when core holes generated by energetic electrons or photons are filled by radiative transitions from conduction band states. Dipole selection rules govern the transitions. Thus, K spectra provide a measure of the p-symmetic partial density of states (DOS) near the atom. Similarly, L spectra produced by transitions to p-core holes map the s and d symmetric DOS in the vicinity of the atom with the core hole.

  7. The Delayed Fracture of Aluminum Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    equipment. 3) The Mg-H complex formed but decomposed so rapidly in the vacuum that its PLE could not be measured. -39- Two magnesium hydrides are...Zn-Mg Alloys," Corros. Sci., 1976, vol. 16, no. 7, p. 443. 15. C.D.S. Tuck: "Evidence for the Formation of Magnesium Hydride on the Grain Boundaries...1977). 17. W. Pistulka and G. Lang: "Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Test Methods for Al-Zn-Mg Type Alloys," Aluminium , Duesseldorf, 1977, vol. 53, no. 6

  8. Formability of Annealed Ni-Ti Shape Memory Alloy Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, K. J.; Su, J. Y.; Chang, C. H.

    2018-03-01

    Ni-Ti shape memory alloy has two specific properties, superelasiticity and shape memory effect, and thus is widely applied in diverse industries. To extend its application, this study attempts to investigate the strength and cold formability of its sheet blank, which is annealed at various temperatures, by hardness test and by Erichsen-like cupping test. As a result, the higher the annealing temperature, the lower the hardness, the lower the maximum punch load as the sheet blank fractured, and the lower the Erichsen-like index or the lower the formability. In general, the Ni-Ti sheet after annealing has an Erichsen-like index between 8 mm and 9 mm. This study has also confirmed via DSC that the Ni-Ti shape memory alloy possesses the austenitic phase and shows the superelasticity at room temperature.

  9. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation in hypermonotectic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, M.; Ratke, L.; Kaban, I.; Hoyer, W.

    2012-01-01

    Simple casting experiments were set up to solve the question, if heterogeneous nucleation of the liquid-liquid decomposition in monotectic systems is possible. Al-Pb alloys with different inoculants were solidified, and the resulting microstructure was analysed by SEM and X-ray microtomography. Pronounced changes in the distribution of the lead precipitations indicate that it is possible to trigger the nucleation.

  12. Investigation of the Precipitation Behavior in Aluminum Based Alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna S.

    2015-11-30

    The transportation industries are constantly striving to achieve minimum weight to cut fuel consumption and improve overall performance. Different innovative design strategies have been placed and directed toward weight saving combined with good mechanical behavior. Among different materials, aluminum-based alloys play a key role in modern engineering and are widely used in construction components because of their light weight and superior mechanical properties. Introduction of different nano-structure features can improve the service and the physical properties of such alloys. For intelligent microstructure design in the complex Al-based alloy, it is important to gain a deep physical understanding of the correlation between the microstructure and macroscopic properties, and thus atom probe tomography with its exceptional capabilities of spatially resolution and quantitative chemical analyses is presented as a sophisticated analytical tool to elucidate the underlying process of precipitation phenomena in aluminum alloys. A complete study examining the influence of common industrial heat treatment on the precipitation kinetics and phase transformations of complex aluminum alloy is performed. The qualitative evaluation results of the precipitation kinetics and phase transformation as functions of the heat treatment conditions are translated to engineer a complex aluminum alloy. The study demonstrates the ability to construct a robust microstructure with an excellent hardness behavior by applying a low-energy-consumption, cost-effective method. The proposed strategy to engineer complex aluminum alloys is based on both mechanical strategy and intelligent microstructural design. An intelligent microstructural design requires an investigation of the different strengthen phases, such as T1 (Al2CuLi), θ′(Al2Cu), β′(Al3Zr) and δ′(Al3Li). Therefore, the early stage of phase decomposition is examined in different binary Al-Li and Al-Cu alloys together with different

  13. Long term immersion test of aluminum alloy AA 6061 used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, Evelina M.; Rodriguez, Sebastian; Haddad, Roberto; Lanzani, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present the results of long term immersion tests performed in the aluminum alloy AA 6061, used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors. The tests were performed at open circuit potential in high purity water (ρ = 18.2 MΩ.cm) and in 10 -3 M NaCl solution. Two kinds of assemblies were studied: simple sheets and artificial crevices, immersed during 6, 12 and 18 months at room temperature. In both media and both assemblies, the aluminum hydroxide phases crystalline bayerite and bohemite were identified. It was found that a kind of localized attack named alkaline attack occurs around the iron-rich intermetallics. These particles were confirmed to control the corrosion of the AA 6061 alloy in an aerated medium. Immersion times for up to 18 months did not increase the oxide growth or the alkaline attack on the AA 6061 alloy. (author)

  14. Cracking susceptibility of aluminum alloys during laser welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Abbaschian

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of laser parameters in welding aluminum alloys was studied in order to reduce hot cracking. The extension of cracks at the welding surface was used as a cracking susceptibility (CS index. It has been shown that the CS changes with changing welding velocity for binary Al-Cu alloys. In general, the CS index increased until a maximum velocity and then dropped to zero, generating a typical lambda-curve. This curve is due to two different mechanisms: 1 the refinement of porosities with increasing velocity and 2 the changes in the liquid fraction due to decreasing microsegregation with increasing velocities.

  15. Research of Plasma Spraying Process on Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricija Kavaliauskaitė

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article examines plasma sprayed 95Ni-5Al coatings on alu-minum-magnesium (Mg ≈ 2,6‒3,6 % alloy substrate. Alumi-num-magnesium samples prior spraying were prepared with mechanical treatment (blasting with Al2O3. 95Ni-5Al coatings on aluminum-magnesium alloys were sprayed with different parameters of process and coating‘s thickness, porosity, micro-hardness and microstructure were evaluated. Also numerical simulations in electric and magnetic phenomena of plasma spray-ing were carried out.

  16. Welding high-strength aluminum alloys at the Paton Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchuk, Yatsenko, S.I.; Cherednichok, V.T.; Semenov, L.A. (E.O. Paton Electric Welding Inst., Kiev (Ukraine))

    1993-07-01

    The choice of the flash method for welding aluminum-alloy sections was governed first of all by the possibility of producing homogeneous-structure joints with the minimum amount of possible discontinuities and an insignificant metal strength loss in the welding zone. The aluminum alloy welding technology under consideration relies on the method of flash welding without using any protective atmospheres. The reason is first of all that a complex cross-sectional shape of workpieces being joined, their configuration and considerable overall dimensions make it difficult to use chambers of any type. Besides, conducted studies ascertained that in flash welding, in contrast to various fusion welding processes, the use of protective atmospheres or a vacuum is of little benefit. Here are the results of studying the specifics of thermal and electric processes in flashing, the physical features of weld joint formation, the basics of the welding technology, and the characteristics of the equipment.

  17. Dynamic Mechanical Behaviors of 6082-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yibo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural components of high speed trains are usually made of aluminum alloys, for example, 6082. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the material is one of key factors considered in structural design and safety assessment. In this paper, dynamic mechanical experiments were conducted with strain rate ranging from 0.001 s−1 to 100 s−1 using Instron tensile testing machine. The true stress-strain curves were fitted based on experimental data. Johnson-Cook model of 6082-T6 aluminum alloy was built to investigate the effect of strain and strain rate on flow stress. It has shown that the flow stress was sensitive to the strain rate. Yield strength and tensile strength increased with a high strain rate, which showed strain rate effect to some extent. Fracture analysis was carried out by using Backscattered Electron imaging (BSE. As strain rate increased, more precipitates were generated in fracture.

  18. Yield and flow properties of aluminum alloy AA 8001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, J.S.; Johnson, H.W.; Han, E.G.

    1995-01-01

    Aluminum alloy AA 8001 is being used at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for nuclear reactor fuel and target components. The objective of this research was to determine parameters for predictive models of the compressive flow properties of AA 8001. Seventy-five true strain-rate, hot compression tests were performed. New, quantitative information about the yield and flow behavior of aluminum alloy AA 8001 was determined. Parameters were determined to use in a hyperbolic sine constitutive law so that the yield stress, the peak stress, and the peak strain can be predicted from the temperature-compensated strain-rate, Z. It was found that the onset of strain softening was more strongly dependent on Z than the onset of yielding was

  19. Stuy on Fatigue Life of Aluminum Alloy Considering Fretting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Maosheng; Zhao, Hongqiang; Wang, Yunxiang; Chen, Xiaofei; Fan, Jiali

    2018-01-01

    To study the influence of fretting on Aluminum Alloy, a global finite element model considering fretting was performed using the commercial code ABAQUS. With which a new model for predicting fretting fatigue life has been presented based on friction work. The rationality and effectiveness of the model were validated according to the contrast of experiment life and predicting life. At last influence factor on fretting fatigue life of aerial aluminum alloy was investigated with the model. The results revealed that fretting fatigue life decreased monotonously with the increasing of normal load and then became constant at higher pressures. At low normal load, fretting fatigue life was found to increase with increase in the pad radius. At high normal load, however, the fretting fatigue life remained almost unchanged with changes in the fretting pad radius. The bulk stress amplitude had the dominant effect on fretting fatigue life. The fretting fatigue life diminished as the bulk stress amplitude increased.

  20. First-principles surface interaction studies of aluminum-copper and aluminum-copper-magnesium secondary phases in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Thiago H.; Nelson, Eric B.; Williamson, Izaak; Efaw, Corey M.; Sapper, Erik; Hurley, Michael F.; Li, Lan

    2018-05-01

    First-principles density functional theory-based calculations were performed to study θ-phase Al2Cu, S-phase Al2CuMg surface stability, as well as their interactions with water molecules and chloride (Cl-) ions. These secondary phases are commonly found in aluminum-based alloys and are initiation points for localized corrosion. Density functional theory (DFT)-based simulations provide insight into the origins of localized (pitting) corrosion processes of aluminum-based alloys. For both phases studied, Cl- ions cause atomic distortions on the surface layers. The nature of the distortions could be a factor to weaken the interlayer bonds in the Al2Cu and Al2CuMg secondary phases, facilitating the corrosion process. Electronic structure calculations revealed not only electron charge transfer from Cl- ions to alloy surface but also electron sharing, suggesting ionic and covalent bonding features, respectively. The S-phase Al2CuMg structure has a more active surface than the θ-phase Al2Cu. We also found a higher tendency of formation of new species, such as Al3+, Al(OH)2+, HCl, AlCl2+, Al(OH)Cl+, and Cl2 on the S-phase Al2CuMg surface. Surface chemical reactions and resultant species present contribute to establishment of local surface chemistry that influences the corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys.

  1. Die Casting Mold Design for Aluminum Alloy Shell of Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuanyuan; Wang Meng; Guo Yuchao

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about die casting mold design for aluminum alloy shell of instrument. Three-dimensional model of the casting and mold are designed by using Pro/Engineer and AutoCad which can analyze forming quality. Digital design and theoretical calculation can greatly shorten product development cycle and mold design cycle, improve the accuracy of product design and mold design, and reduce the cost of mold design.

  2. Die Casting Mold Design for Aluminum Alloy Shell of Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about die casting mold design for aluminum alloy shell of instrument. Three-dimensional model of the casting and mold are designed by using Pro/Engineer and AutoCad which can analyze forming quality. Digital design and theoretical calculation can greatly shorten product development cycle and mold design cycle, improve the accuracy of product design and mold design, and reduce the cost of mold design.

  3. Corrosion Degradation of Coated Aluminum Alloy Systems through Galvanic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-19

    CLASSIFICATION ... steel  316  fasteners  when  coated  with  either  a  chromated  (chromate  conversion  coating,   chromate-­‐rich  primer...aluminum  alloy   substrates   and   stainless   steel   fasteners   in   the  presence  of  an   intentional

  4. Effect of Surface States on Joining Mechanisms and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy (A5052) and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) by Dissimilar Friction Spot Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Farazila Yusof; Mohd Ridha bin Muhamad; Raza Moshwan; Mohd Fadzil bin Jamaludin; Yukio Miyashita

    2016-01-01

    In this research, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), as a high-density thermoplastic sheet, and Aluminum A5052, as a metal with seven distinct surface roughnesses, were joined by friction spot welding (FSW). The effect of A5052’s various surface states on the welding joining mechanism and mechanical properties were investigated. Friction spot welding was successfully applied for the dissimilar joining of PET thermoplastics and aluminum alloy A5052. During FSW, the PET near the joining interfac...

  5. The electronic structure of anodized and etched aluminum alloy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, W. M.; Averbach, B. L.

    1988-11-01

    Specimens of 6061 and 5052 aluminum alloys which had been anodized and etched by several commonly used procedures were examined by means of bias-reference X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The spectra were compared with those obtained from single crystals of pure aluminum oxides. The chemical shifts observed from the A12p surface oxide lines were interpreted as differences in the Fermi energy levels relative to those in the bulk oxide crystals, and the Fermi energy levels of the surface oxides were thus determined. Using an earlier experimental correlation obtained for values of the point of zero charge (pzc) with Fermi energy levels in aluminum oxide powders, a value of the pzc of the surface oxide was then determined. The surface exhibited the maximum alkalinity, pzc = 8.9, after a caustic etch, and the maximum acidity, pzc = 3.6, after a phosphoric acid anodizing treatment. The significance of these pzc values in the adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys is discussed.

  6. Mechanical characterization and constitutive modeling of Mg alloy sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekonen, M. Nebebe; Steglich, D.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D.; Mosler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Material characterization of the Mg alloys AZ31 and ZE10 at elevated temperatures. ► Distortion of the yield locus does not depend on the strain rate. ► Novel constitutive model suitable for the analysis of sheet forming of magnesium. ► Strain-dependent r-values are included within the model. ► The model is thermodynamically consistent and accounts for distortional hardening. - Abstract: In this paper, an experimental mechanical characterization of the magnesium alloys ZE10 and AZ31 is performed and a suitable constitutive model is established. The mechanical characterization is based on uniaxial tensile tests. In order to avoid poor formability at room temperature, the tests were conducted at elevated temperature (200 °C). The uniaxial tensile tests reveal sufficient ductility allowing sheet forming processes at this temperature. The differences in yield stresses and plastic strain ratios (r-values) confirm the anisotropic response of the materials under study. The constitutive model is established so that the characteristic mechanical features observed in magnesium alloys such as anisotropy and compression-tension asymmetry can be accommodated. This model is thermodynamically consistent, incorporates rate effect, is formulated based on finite strain plasticity theory and is applicable in sheet forming simulations of magnesium alloys. More precisely, a model originally proposed by Cazacu and Barlat in 2004 and later modified to account for the evolution of the material anisotropy is rewritten in a thermodynamically consistent framework. The calibrated constitutive model is shown to capture the characteristic mechanical features observed in magnesium alloy sheets.

  7. Influence of a discrete additive of aluminum oxide on structure and properties of aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ю. А. Курганова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the literature review, there were identified the problem and the relevance of the development of the technology for introducing additives of nano-sized fillers into aluminum alloys in order to determine the mechanism for controlling the structurally dependent properties. As such an additive, alumina fibers of 10-20 nm in diameter were selected. The introduction of the additive into the liquid alloy is implemented by means of mechanical mixing. Technological features of the process allowed to solve the problem of overcoming the forces of surface tension and distribution of additives, which are quantitatively small and light in comparison with the main material. Experimental samples were obtained under laboratory conditions using the specially designed equipment. To perform the comparative analysis, samples of the base alloy of the composition AK6 and filled with a discrete additive of 1 % alloy of the same composition were obtained in identical modes. Investigations of the structure and properties of the base alloy and samples obtained by mixing in the base alloy of thin discrete alumina fibers in a volume of 1 % were performed using standard metallographic analysis techniques and a hardness measurement method. As a result of macro- and microscopic studies, a modifying effect was found from the addition of finely dispersed Al2O3 to an aluminum alloy, which manifested as grain refinement. The shape of the hardness distribution curves obtained as a result of the processing of statistical data is identical for the compared samples and has a pronounced shifted extremum, which indicates changes in the properties on the one hand and demonstrates a sufficient level of assimilation of the additives by the liquid alloy, on the other. Consequently, the expediency of using the suggested method of modification for obtaining materials of this group is obvious.

  8. A numerical simulation of thermodynamic processes for cryogenic metal forming of aluminum sheets and comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichl, Ch.; Schneider, R.; Hohenauer, W.; Grabner, F.; Grant, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic processes for cryogenic sheet metal forming tools were examined. • Static and transient temperature field simulations are evaluated on a Nakajima tool. • Differently arranged cooling loops lead to homogeneous temperature distribution. • Scaling of the geometry leads to significantly increased heat transfer times. • The temperature management of complex forming tools can be developed numerically. - Abstract: Forming at cryogenic temperatures provides a significant improvement in formability of aluminum sheets. This offers the potential for light, complex and highly integrated one-piece components to be produced out of aluminum alloys at sub-zero temperatures. This would allow weight reduction, environmental conservation and cost reduction of a car body to give one example in the automotive industry. For temperature supported processes special forming tools and cooling strategies are required to be able to reach and maintain process stability. Time dependent numerical simulations of the thermodynamic processes of cryogenic sheet metal forming covering all aspects of heat transfer through conduction, convection and radiation play a vital role in the design and development of future tools and are presented for several geometries. Cooling (and heating) strategies (including selection of the number of cooling loops and their relative positioning) in a Nakajima testing tool were evaluated using computational fluid dynamics. These simulations were performed with static and transient solvers to demonstrate the extraction of tool surface temperature distributions on different forming tool geometries. Comparisons of predicted temperature characteristics of an aluminum sheet and experimentally determined temperature distributions were made. The temperature distribution of the surface of an aluminum sheet could be predicted with high accuracy. Further, the influence of the tool size on the parameters temperature transfer times and

  9. Improved corrosion resistance of aluminum brazing sheet by a post-brazing heat treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Glenn, A. M.; Taheri, P.; Sababi, M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work studies the influence of the microstructure on the corrosion mechanism and susceptibility of as-brazed aluminum sheet. Various microstructures are obtained using postbrazing heat treatments developed to enhance the corrosion resistance of an AA4xxx/AA3xxx brazing sheet. The heat

  10. Electrochemical depth profiling of multilayer metallic structures: An aluminum brazing sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshar, F. Norouzi; Ambat, R.; Kwakernaak, C.

    2012-01-01

    , while lower sensitivity to these localized attacks were detected toward the brazing sheet core. The results highlight the successful application of the electrochemical depth profiling approach in prediction of the corrosion behavior of the aluminum brazing sheet and the importance of the electrochemical...

  11. Russian aluminum-lithium alloys for advanced reusable spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charette, Ray O.; Leonard, Bruce G.; Bozich, William F.; Deamer, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Cryotanks that are cost-affordable, robust, fuel-compatible, and lighter weight than current aluminum design are needed to support next-generation launch system performance and operability goals. The Boeing (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-MDA) and NASA's Delta Clipper-Experimental Program (DC-XA) flight demonstrator test bed vehicle provided the opportunity for technology transfer of Russia's extensive experience base with weight-efficient, highly weldable aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys for cryogenic tank usage. As part of NASA's overall reusable launch vehicle (RLV) program to help provide technology and operations data for use in advanced RLVs, MDA contracted with the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS/IMASH) for design, test, and delivery of 1460 Al-Li alloy liquid oxygen (LO 2 ) cryotanks: one for development, one for ground tests, and one for DC-XA flight tests. This paper describes the development of Al-Li 1460 alloy for reusable LO 2 tanks, including alloy composition tailoring, mechanical properties database, forming, welding, chemical milling, dissimilar metal joining, corrosion protection, completed tanks proof, and qualification testing. Mechanical properties of the parent and welded materials exceeded expectations, particularly the fracture toughness, which promise excellent reuse potential. The LO 2 cryotank was successfully demonstrated in DC-XA flight tests

  12. The characteristics of aluminum-scandium alloys processed by ECAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Rajinikanth, V.; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Xu Cheng; Langdon, Terence G.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum-scandium alloys were prepared having different scandium additions of 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0 wt.% and these alloys were processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 473 K. The results show the grain refinement of the aluminum matrix and the morphology of the Al 3 Sc precipitates depends strongly on the scandium concentration. The tensile properties were evaluated after ECAP by pulling to failure at initial strain rates from 1.0 x 10 -3 to 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . The Al-1% Sc alloy exhibited the highest tensile strength of ∼250 MPa at a strain rate of 1.0 x 10 -1 s -1 . This alloy also exhibited a superior grain refinement of ∼0.4 μm after ECAP where this is attributed to a smaller initial grain size and an optimum volume fraction of dispersed Al 3 Sc precipitates having both micrometer and nanometer sizes.

  13. Odontologic use of copper/aluminum alloys: mitochondrial respiration as sensitive parameter of biocompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues,Luiz Erlon A.; Carvalho,Antônio A.V.F.; Azevedo,Antônio L.M.; Cruz,Cecília B.B.V.; Maia,Antônio Wanderley C.

    2003-01-01

    Copper/aluminum alloys are largely utilized in odontological restorations because they are less expensive than gold or platinum. However, tarnishing and important corrosion in intrabuccal prostheses made with copper/aluminum alloys after 28 days of use have been reported. Several kinds of food and beverage may attack and corrode these alloys. Copper is an essential component of several important enzymes directly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Aluminum, in contrast, is very ...

  14. Influence of Tension-Compression Asymmetry on the Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheets in Bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Beeh, Elmar; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials for lightweight design in the automotive industry due to their high strength-to-mass ratio. This study aims to study the influence of tension-compression asymmetry on the radius of curvature and energy absorption capacity of AZ31B-O magnesium alloy sheets in bending. The mechanical properties were characterized using tension, compression, and three-point bending tests. The material exhibits significant tension-compression asymmetry in terms of strength and strain hardening rate due to extension twinning in compression. The compressive yield strength is much lower than the tensile yield strength, while the strain hardening rate is much higher in compression. Furthermore, the tension-compression asymmetry in terms of r value (Lankford value) was also observed. The r value in tension is much higher than that in compression. The bending results indicate that the AZ31B-O sheet can outperform steel and aluminum sheets in terms of specific energy absorption in bending mainly due to its low density. In addition, the AZ31B-O sheet was deformed with a larger radius of curvature than the steel and aluminum sheets, which brings a benefit to energy absorption capacity. Finally, finite element simulation for three-point bending was performed using LS-DYNA and the results confirmed that the larger radius of curvature of a magnesium specimen is mainly attributed to the high strain hardening rate in compression.

  15. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  16. Cold Forming of Ni-Ti Shape Memory Alloy Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, Kaung-Jau; Su, Jhe-Yung

    2018-03-01

    Ni-Ti shape memory alloy has two specific properties, superelasiticity and shape memory effect, and thus is widely applied in diverse industries. To extend its further application, this study attempts to investigate the feasibility of cold forming its sheet blank especially under a bi-axial tensile stress state. Not only experiments but also a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with DEFORM 2D was conducted in this study. The material data for FEA was accomplished by the tensile test. An Erichsen-like cupping test was performed as well to determine the process parameter for experiment setup. As a result of the study, the Ni-Ti shape memory alloy sheet has a low formability for cold forming and shows a relative large springback after releasing the forming load.

  17. Ultrasonic dissimilar joining of aluminum alloy and polymer with the composite material of ABS polymer doping carbonized rice husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chin-Pao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal housing is typically jointed with plastic fittings by conventional gluing method or embedding injection molding to produce this type of devices. We propose to improve this new technique with more practical approach. In plastic-aluminum substrate dissimilar joining, the 5052 aluminum plate coarsening process was performed to increase the porosity of the permeable dissimilar phase. The ABS polymer plus carbonized rice husk powder was later induced or deposited on the microstructure to improve the bonding effect. The plastic -aluminum substrate dissimilar joining is completed by the final step of ultrasonic welding. The finished substrate will be tested on the properties of tensile strength to ensure its quality. According to the simulation analysis and measuring results, the maximum temperature between the interface of ABS polymer and 5052 aluminum alloy is about 400~450 °C during ultrasonic welding, which can make the surface of ABS polymer to be melted. Furthermore, after drilling micro-hole array and covering ABS plus carbonized rice husk powder, the 5052 aluminum alloy shows better joining effect with ABS polymer sheet by ultrasonic welding. This improved approach does not require mold or injection molding machinery to produce the high quality plastic -aluminum bonding parts.

  18. Corrosion Resistance of 7475-T7351 Aluminum Alloy Plate for Aviation

    OpenAIRE

    LIU Ming; LI Hui-qu; CHEN Jun-zhou; LI Guo-ai; CHEN Gao-hong

    2017-01-01

    The intergranular corrosion and exfoliation corrosion properties of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy plate for aviation were investigated, and the corrosion behaviors of the alloy were analyzed by metallographic analysis(MA) and transmission electron microscope(TEM). The results show that no obvious intergranular corrosion is observed, but exfoliation corrosion grade of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy increases from EA on surface to EC in the core. The exfoliation corrosion of 7475 alloy plate is mainly b...

  19. Preparing rare earth-silicon-iron-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, J.D.; Morrice, E.; Herve, B.P.; Wong, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    As part of its mission to assure the maximum recovery and use of the Nation's mineral resources, the Bureau of Mines, investigated an improved procedure for producing rare earth-silicon alloys. For example, a charge consisting of 681 grams of mixed rare-earth oxides, 309 grams of ferrosilicon (75 wt-pct Si), and 182 grams of aluminum metal along with a flux consisting of 681 grams of CaO and 45 grams of MgO was reacted at 1500 0 C in an induction furnace. Good slag-metal separation was achieved. The alloy product contained, in weight-percent, 53 RE, 28 Si, 11 Fe, and 4 Al with a rare earth recovery of 80 pct. In current industrial practice rare earth recoveries are usually about 60 pct in alloy products that contain approximately 30 wt-pct each of rare earths and silicon. Metallurgical evaluations showed the alloys prepared in this investigation to be as effective in controlling the detrimental effect of sulfur in steel and cast iron as the commercial rare earth-silicon-iron alloys presently used in the steel industry

  20. Bearing Strengths of Some Wrought-aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R L; Wescoat, C

    1943-01-01

    Although a number of investigations of the bearing strength of aluminum alloys have been made, the problem remains one of considerable interest to the aircraft industry. For this reason it has seemed advisable to make additional tests of the commonly used aircraft alloys in an effort to establish a better basis for the selection of allowable bearing values. Current design practice does not recognize the effect of edge distance upon bearing strengths, and for this reason edge distance was one of the principal variables considered in this investigation. The increasing emphasis being placed upon permanent set limitations makes it essential that more information on bearing yield phenomena be obtained. The object of this investigation was to determine bearing yield and ultimate strengths of the following aluminum alloy products: 17S-T, 24S-T, Alclad 24S-T, 24S-RT, 52S-0, 52S-1/2H, 52S-H, 53S-T, and 61S-T extrusions. Ratios of these bearing properties to tensile properties were also determined.

  1. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mitiaev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of ark welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc welding by the electrode with a diameter of 3 mm of AK-5 alloy. Metal structure of the welded joint was examined under the light microscope at a magnification of 200 and under the scanning electronic microscope «JSM-6360 LA». The Rockwell hardness (HRF was used as a strength characteristic of alloy. Hardness measuring of the phase constituents (microhardness was carried out using the device PМТ-3, with the indenter loadings 5 and 10 g. The crystalline structure parameters of alloy (dislocation density, second kind of the crystalline grid distortion and the scale of coherent scattering regions were determined using the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Electric pulse treatment (ET was carried out on the special equipment in the conditions of the DS enterprise using two modes A and В. Findings. On the basis of researches the previously obtained microhardness redistribution effect in the area of welded connection after ET was confirmed. As a result of use of the indicated treatment it was determined not only the reduction of microhardness gradient but also the simultaneous hardening effect in the certain thermal affected areas near the welding seam. During study of chemical composition of phase constituents it was discovered, that the structural changes of alloy as a result of ET first of all are caused by the redistribution of chemical elements, which form the connections themselves. By the nature of the influence the indicated treatment can be

  2. Effect of water-cooling treatment times on properties of friction stir welded joints of 7N01-T4 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. H.; Wang, Y.; Fang, X. F.; Liang, P.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Y. H.; Liu, X. M.

    2018-02-01

    Due to the deformation caused by residual stress in the welding process, welded components need treatment to reduce welding distortion. In this paper, several different times of flame-heating and water-cooling treatment were subjected to the friction stir welding joints of 15mm thick 7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy sheets to study the microstructure variation of friction stir welding joints of 7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy, and to analyze the effect on micro-hardness, tensile and fracture mechanical properties. This investigation will be helpful to optimize treatment methods and provide instruction on industrial production.

  3. Textures, microstructures, anisotropy and formability of aluminum-manganese-magnesium and aluminum-magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiantao

    In this dissertation work, the microstructure and texture evolution of continuous cast (CC) and direct chill (DC) cast Al-Mn-Mg (AA 3105 and AA 3015) and Al-Mg (AA 5052) alloys during cold rolling and annealing are systematically investigated. Macrotexture analyses were based on three-dimensional orientation distribution functions (ODFs) calculated from incomplete pole figures from X-ray diffraction by using arbitrarily defined cell (ADC) and series expansion methods. A new technique, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), was adopted for microtexture and mesotexture investigation. The anisotropy and formability of Al-Mn-Mg and Al-Mg alloys are correlated to the texture results. For aluminum alloys studied in this work, a stronger Cube orientation is observed in DC hot band than in CC hot band after complete recrystallization. alpha and beta fibers become well developed beyond 50% cold rolling in both CC and DC aluminum alloys. The highest intensity along the beta fiber (skeleton line) is located between the Copper and the S orientations in both materials after high cold rolling reductions. In both CC and DC aluminum alloys, a cell structure develops with the indication of increasing CSL Sigma1 boundaries during the early stages of cold rolling. There is no evidence of the development of twin boundaries (Sigma3, Sigma9, Sigma27a & 27b) in either CC or DC aluminum alloys when the cold rolling reductions are less than 40%. The R and Cube textures are dominant recrystallization texture components in CC and DC AA 5052 alloys. The volume fraction of the Cube component is increased by increasing cold rolling reduction and annealing temperature but not by increasing annealing time while the volume fraction of the R component is only increased by increasing cold rolling reduction. Stronger Cube and R orientations are found at the surface layer than at half-thickness layer of cold rolled hot bands after annealing. The Cube and P textures are dominant recrystallization

  4. Chromate-free corrosion resistant conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Drewien, C.A.; Martinez, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stoner, G.E. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1995-03-01

    Inorganic polycrystalline hydrotalcite, Li{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O, coatings can be formed on aluminum and aluminum alloys by exposure to alkaline lithium carbonate solutions. This process is conducted using methods similar to traditional chromate conversion coating procedures, but does not use or produce toxic chemicals. The coating provides anodic protection and delays the onset of pitting during anodic polarization. Cathodic reactions are also inhibited which may also contribute to corrosion protection. Recent studies have shown that corrosion resistance can be increased by sealing hydrotalcite coated surfaces to transition metal salt solutions including Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. Results from these studies are also reported.

  5. Corrosion fatigue of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmillan, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue studies were conducted on bare, chemical conversion coated, and anodized 2219-T87 aluminum alloy. These tests were performed using a rotating beam machine running at a velocity of 2500 rpm. The corrosive environments tested were distilled water, 100 ppm NaCl, and 3.5 percent NaCl. Results were compared to the endurance limit in air. An evaluation of the effect of protective coatings on corrosion fatigue was made by comparing the fatigue properties of specimens with coatings to those without.

  6. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    51] in which the bimetal wires can be roll welded Al/ Steel strips and the welding is a kind of tricky process to have similar metals joined together...Al 1060) and steel (1Cr18Ni9Ti) were joined together using the vacuum furnace and A-Si alloy as the strip layer. The interface of the joints showed...also greatly appreciated. References [1] A. Kelkar, R. Roth, J. Clark, Automobile bodies: can aluminum be an economical alternative to steel ? , JOM

  7. Determination of the solidification curves of commercial aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sinn-Wen; Jeng, Shih-Chang

    1996-09-01

    The understanding of solidification curves is crucial for the control of many solidification processes. The solidification curves of seven commercial aluminum alloys (1050, 1070, 1100, 3003, 3004, 5052, and 7075) were determined by using a differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with a mathe-matical modeling method, which has advantages over the conventional quenching method or the solidification modeling method. With the proposed technique in this study, the whole spectrum of the solidification curve can be determined with high reliability, without requiring the knowledge of a number of thermophysical parameters, which are usually difficult to obtain.

  8. Developing high strain rate superplasticity in aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Cheng; Langdon, T.G. [Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States); Furukawa, M. [Dept. of Technology, Fukuoka Univ. of Education (Japan); Horita, Z. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The conventional materials used in superplastic forming operations generally have grain sizes of {proportional_to}2 {mu}m or larger and they exhibit superplasticity at relatively low strain rates. Processing by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) produces materials having ultrafine-grain sizes, usually in the submicrometer range. If these ultrafine grains show reasonable stability at elevated temperatures, the alloys may exhibit a capability for achieving superplastic elongations at high strain rates. This paper examines the development of ultrafine-grained structures and superplastic ductilities in a spray-cast aluminum 7034 alloys through ECAP. The results show that ECAP is a very effective procedure for achieving grain refinement and superplasticity at rapid strain rates. (orig.)

  9. High-strength and high-RRR Al-Ni alloy for aluminum-stabilized superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Wada, K; Sakamoto, H; Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y

    2000-01-01

    The precipitation type aluminum alloys have excellent performance as the increasing rate in electric resistivity with additives in the precipitation state is considerably low, compared to that of the aluminum alloy with additives in the solid-solution state. It is possible to enhance the mechanical strength without remarkable degradation in residual resistivity ratio (RRR) by increasing content of selected additive elements. Nickel is the suitable additive element because it has very low solubility in aluminum and low increasing rate in electric resistivity, and furthermore, nickel and aluminum form intermetallic compounds which effectively resist the motion of dislocations. First, Al-0.1wt%Ni alloy was developed for the ATLAS thin superconducting solenoid. This alloy achieved high yield strength of 79 MPa (R.T.) and 117 MPa (4.2 K) with high RRR of 490 after cold working of 21% in area reduction. These highly balanced properties could not be achieved with previously developed solid-solution aluminum alloys. ...

  10. Self-Pierce Riveting of Three Aluminium Alloy and Mild Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Kato, T.; Sakai, S.

    2010-06-01

    Three aluminium alloy and steel sheets were joined with a self-piercing rivet. Self-pierce riveting has the function of joining steel and aluminium alloys having very different melting points due to plastic joining. The requisites for joining the three sheets are the driving of the rivet leg through the middle sheet, the flaring of the rivet leg in the lower sheet and the prevention of the fracture of the lower sheet. The joinability for various combinations of the three sheets was determined. When the rivet leg is small, no driving through the middle sheet occurs, the lower sheet ruptures for a large rivet leg. In addition, 980 MPa high strength steel, mild steel and aluminium alloy sheets were joined by the self-pierce riveting.

  11. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  12. Helical Feed Milling with MQL for Boring of Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Makoto; Tsutsumi, Masaomi

    MQL is applied to the helical feed milling hole-making process of aluminum alloy. It is difficult to drill on aluminum alloy without cutting fluid because the adhesion to the tool leads to a chip jam, the tool breakage or low accuracy. By employing the helical feed milling, cutting temperature will decrease, each chip length will become short and a chip jam in a hole will be avoided, because the intermittent cutting is realized. As a result of employing the helical feed milling with MQL, it was shown that the shape error is decreased, a burr formation is decreased, machining temperature becomes low and the cutting force becomes small comparing with drilling process. Shape error by helical feed milling with MQL is comparable with that with flood coolant. In this case, small mist particle counts under 5μm, which affects working environment, are almost constant if the spindle speed varies. Scattered mist particle counts are less when MQL is employed over 20000 min-1 spindle speed comparing with the flood coolant.

  13. Thermal Decoating of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys for Aircraft Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz Lerma, Jose Alberto; Jung, In-Ho; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of aircraft aluminum alloys can be complex due to the presence of their corrosion protection coating that includes inorganic compounds containing Cr(VI). In this study, the characterization and thermal degradation behavior of the coating on aluminum substrates coming from an aircraft destined for recycling are presented. Elements such as Sr, Cr, Si, Ba, Ti, S, C, and O were found in three different layers by EDS elemental mapping corresponding to SrCrO4, Rutile-TiO2, SiO2, and BaSO4 with an overall particle size D 50 = 1.96 µm. The thermal degradation profile analyzed by TGA showed four different stages. The temperature of complete degradation at the fourth stage occurred at 753.15 K (480 °C) at lower heating rates. At higher heating rates and holding an isotherm at the same temperature, the residence time to fully decompose the aircraft coating has been estimated as 4.0 ± 0.2 minutes. The activation energy calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and the modified Coats-Redfern methods for multiple fraction of decomposition showed a non-constant behavior indicating the complexity of the reaction. Finally, the concentration of Cr(VI) released to the environment during thermal decoating was obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that 2.6 ± 0.1 µg of Cr(VI)/mm2 of aluminum substrate could be released unless adequate particle controls are used.

  14. Corrosion mechanisms of aluminum alloys in waters of low conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Roberto E; Lanazani, Liliana; Rodriguez, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    After completing their burn cycle, nuclear fuels in experimental reactors made with aluminum alloys have to remain for long periods in distilled water, in interim storage. While aluminum alloys are resistant to corrosion in pure water, severe deterioration occurs in elements that have been immersed for periods of up to 30 years. Pitting-like surface alterations can even occur in nuclear quality waters (conductivity below 5 μS/cm and dissolved ions content below detection thresholds) in time periods of less than one year. An important factor that could become a potential promoter of this phenomena is the presence of dust particles and others, that could settle on the metallic surface, generating a locally aggressive medium. A simple immersion experiment demonstrates that these points can become initiation sites for pitting with very low concentrations of chlorides (under 10 ppm), especially if the electrochemical potential is increased by contact with another metallic material, even staying below the pitting potential in this medium. There are several corrosion mechanisms acting simultaneously, depending on the nature of the deposits. Pitting under glass particles has been detected, which may be related to a simple crevice corrosion process. In the case of iron oxides, however, the results depend on the type of oxide. Pits more than 100 microns deep have been obtained in 7 day immersion tests, so in spent fuel storage sites these mechanisms could easily cause penetration of the 500 micron aluminum plates during the time covering the interim storage under water, which could be decades, with similar chemical conditions (CW)

  15. Physical Modeling of Plastic Working Conditions for Rods of 7xxx Series Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyja H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuing high level of demand for lightweight structural materials is the reason for the ever-growing interest in aluminum alloys. The main areas of application for aluminum alloys products are the aerospace and automotive industries. Production of profiles and structural elements from lightweight alloys gives possibility to reduce the curb weight of construction, which directly translates into among other reduction of fuel consumption and lower amount of generated exhaust gas.

  16. Microstructural features of intergranular brittle fracture and cold cracking in high strength aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; ten Brink, Gert; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Intergranular brittle fracture has been mainly observed and reported in steel alloys and precipitation hardened At-alloys where intergranular precipitates cover a major fraction of the grain boundary area. 7xxx series aluminum alloys suffer from this problem in the as-cast condition when brittle

  17. A Method for Welding Sheet Aluminum to SAE 4140 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1944-01-01

    a thin l~or of aluminum orido exists as a diffusion barrier and a piano of”woehoss. If”tho cadmium pl&to is thin or tho welding oloctrodc prmmure...higher currents and thus larger nuggets produco @cater strength. For various tin-plate thiclmossos, tho offoct of current on the spot sheer strength

  18. Microstructural and thermal properties of piston aluminum alloy reinforced by nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Mohammad; Safarloo, Sama; Loghman, Fatemeh; Rasouli, Roham

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum alloys have been widely utilized in engine pistons of automotive industries. Under such loading conditions, thermal stresses were applied to the piston material, due to the combustion process. Knowing the thermal behavior and microstructural properties of the material has an important rule for designers. Besides, the used material should withstand these thermal expansions and one way to increase this thermal strength is to add nano-particles for reinforcing the material. In the present article, the thermal behavior of piston aluminum alloys has been analyzed. This objective has been performed by thermal dilatometric measuring to find the thermal expansion coefficient. Then, the effect of adding nano-particles for reinforcing the aluminum alloy has been also investigated. In addition, the distribution of nano-particles in the aluminum matrix was also studied by the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Besides, the microstructure of the piston aluminum alloy, with and without SiO2 nano-particles, was investigated.

  19. Finite element simulation of aluminum sheet warm forming using alflow hardening model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurukuri, S.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Huetink, Han

    2007-01-01

    In order to accurately model the plastic deformation of Aluminum sheet at elevated temperatures, a model is required that incorporate the temperature and strain rate dependency of the material. In this article, two physically based models are compared: Bergstr¨om and Alflow model. Although both

  20. Improving resistance welding of aluminum sheets by addition of metal powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al-Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    2024 and AA7075) are investigated for the resistance spot welding of AA1050 aluminum sheets of three different thicknesses. Microstructural and mechanical analysis demonstrates that significant improvement in weld bead morphology and strength are obtained with the addition of metal powder...

  1. A modified Johnson–Cook model of dynamic tensile behaviors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ding-Ni; Shangguan, Qian-Qian; Xie, Can-Jun; Liu, Fu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic mechanical behaviors at various strain rates were measured. • The strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. • A new Johnson–Cook constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. • Numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates were conducted. • Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was proved. - Abstract: The dynamic mechanical behaviors of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy at various strain rates were measured by dynamic tensile tests using the electronic universal testing machine, high velocity testing system and split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). Stress–strain curves at different rates were obtained. The results show that the strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. By modifying the strain rate hardening term in the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, a new Johnson–Cook (JC) constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were conducted. According to tensile loading and stress–strain relation of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, calculation results were compared with experimental results. Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was further proved

  2. Optical Properties And Thermal Stability Of Single-Point Diamond-Machined Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogloza, A. A.; Decker, D. L.; Archibald, P. C.; O'Connor, D. A.; Bueltmann, E. R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of diamond-turned surfaces of a wide range of aluminum alloys. The alloys machined included a sand-cast A201 alloy manufactured by Specialty Aluminum Inc., conventionally extruded plate alloys 2024, 3003, 5052, 6061, 7075, and for comparison as a best and worst case possible a high-purity aluminum single crystal, and tooling plate. The surfaces were obtained by diamond single-point machining using an interferometrically controlled two-axis, air-bearing lathe. The effect of tool-rake angle and machining fluid on surface quality is examined. Surface characterization was performed by Nomarski microscopy and noncontact optical surface profilometry. The optical properties measured included absolute reflectance at 3.8 μm, total integrated scatter at 752.5 nm, and bidirectional reflection distribution function measurements at 632.8 nm. The dimensional stability of the aluminum alloys subject to thermal cycling is examined.

  3. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW, laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW, FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009, jointly funded by its member agencies.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloys 5083 and 5383

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Jeoom Kee

    2009-09-01

    The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW), laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW), FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base) alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009), jointly funded by its member agencies

  5. Applications of pattern recognition in aluminum alloy texture characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guizhong; Rehbein, D. K.; Foley, James C.; Thompson, R. B.

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology to extract texture information in Aluminum alloys using pattern recognition algorithm. The orientation of the samples can be obtained by the orientation Image Microscope (OIM) technique. The ISO DATA pattern recognition algorithm is implemented to classify the OIM data into different clusters. Based on the classification results, the probability density function (pdf) is estimated. Then, the pdf is expanded as a series of Legendre functions with coefficients, i.e., the orientation distribution coefficients (ODC) as texture parameters. Three of these ODC's are of special interests, namely W400, W420, and W440. This paper includes results from ultrasonic NDE and this novel algorithm.—Ames Laboratory is operated for U.S. Department of Energy by Iowa State University under Contract W-7405-ENG-82. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences as a part of the Center of Excellence of the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials.

  6. Standard guide for conducting exfoliation corrosion tests in aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This guide differs from the usual ASTM standard in that it does not address a specific test. Rather, it is an introductory guide for new users of other standard exfoliation test methods, (see Terminology G 15 for definition of exfoliation). 1.2 This guide covers aspects of specimen preparation, exposure, inspection, and evaluation for conducting exfoliation tests on aluminum alloys in both laboratory accelerated environments and in natural, outdoor atmospheres. The intent is to clarify any gaps in existent test methods. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  8. Investigation on some factors affecting crack formation in high resistance aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brotzu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloys having good mechanical properties are Al-ZnMg alloys (7xxx and Al-Cu-Li alloys (Weldalite. These alloys may be subjected to stress corrosion cracking. In order to overcome this problem the Al 7050 alloy has been developed and it is widely used for aerospace applications. Despite that, some components made of this alloy cracked during the manufacturing process including machining and chemical anodization. In a previous work cracked Al 7050 components have been analyzed in order to identify possible causes of crack formation. In this work the susceptibility of this alloy to intergranular corrosion has been analysed and compared with that of other high resistance aluminum alloys

  9. Water and oil wettability of anodized 6016 aluminum alloy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S. P.; Alves, C. F. Almeida; Cavaleiro, A.; Carvalho, S.

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on the control of wettability behaviour of a 6000 series aluminum (Al) alloy surface (Al6016-T4), which is widely used in the automotive and aerospace industries. In order to induce the surface micro-nanostructuring of the surface, a combination of prior mechanical polishing steps followed by anodization process with different conditions was used. The surface polishing with sandpaper grit size 1000 promoted aligned grooves on the surface leading to static water contact angle (WCA) of 91° and oil (α-bromonaphthalene) contact angle (OCA) of 32°, indicating a slightly hydrophobic and oleophilic character. H2SO4 and H3PO4 acid electrolytes were used to grow aluminum oxide layers (Al2O3) by anodization, working at 15 V/18° C and 100 V/0 °C, respectively, in one or two-steps configuration. Overall, the anodization results showed that the structured Al surfaces were hydrophilic and oleophilic-like with both WCA and OCA below 90°. The one-step configuration led to a dimple-shaped Al alloy surface with small diameter of around 31 nm, in case of H2SO4, and with larger diameters of around 223 nm in case of H3PO4. The larger dimples achieved with H3PO4 electrolyte allowed to reach a slight hydrophobic surface. The thicker porous Al oxide layers, produced by anodization in two-step configuration, revealed that the liquids can penetrate easily inside the non-ordered porous structures and, thus, the surface wettability tended to superhydrophilic and superoleophilic character (CA mechanisms of porous structures, was broken. Moreover, thicker oxide layers with narrow pores of about 29 nm diameter allowed to achieve WCA mechanical components or in water-oil separation process.

  10. Fatigue Crack-Growth Resistance of Aluminum Alloys Under Spectrum Loading. Volume 2. Aluminum Lithium Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    Bretz (Alcoa) 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT IYr . Mo.. Daye IS. PAGE COUNT Technical Report FROM 30Segt82 TO _1 Ma85 DECEMBER...alloy for both constant-amplitude loading and two F-18 load spectrums. One of the spectrums was dominated by tension loads ( TD ) and the other spectrum...indicating contact between the opposing fracture surfaces. Several observations can be made based on the TD and TC spectrum FCP test results: 1. The fatigue

  11. Long-term strategies for increased recycling of automotive aluminum and its alloying elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvik, Amund N; Modaresi, Roja; Müller, Daniel B

    2014-04-15

    Aluminum recycling currently occurs in a cascading fashion, where some alloys, used in a limited number of applications, absorb most of the end-of-life scrap. An expected increase in scrap supply in coming decades necessitates restructuring of the aluminum cycle to open up new recycling paths for alloys and avoid a potential scrap surplus. This paper explores various interventions in end-of-life management and recycling of automotive aluminum, using a dynamic substance flow analysis model of aluminum and its alloying elements with resolution on component and alloy level (vehicle-component-alloy-element model). It was found that increased component dismantling before vehicle shredding can be an effective, so far underestimated, intervention in the medium term, especially if combined with development of safety-relevant components such as wheels from secondary material. In the long term, automatic alloy sorting technologies are most likely required, but could at the same time reduce the need for magnesium removal in refining. Cooperation between the primary and secondary aluminum industries, the automotive industry, and end-of-life vehicle dismantlers is therefore essential to ensure continued recycling of automotive aluminum and its alloying elements.

  12. Study on Friction and Wear Characteristics of Aluminum Alloy Hydraulic Valve Body and Its Antiwear Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order for the working status of the aluminum alloyed hydraulic valve body to be controlled in actual conditions, a new friction and wear design device was designed for the cast iron and aluminum alloyed valve bodies comparison under the same conditions. The results displayed that: (1 The oil leakage of the aluminum alloyed hydraulic valve body was higher than the corresponding oil leakage of the iron body during the initial running stage. Besides during a later running stage, the oil leakage of the aluminum alloyed body was lower than corresponding oil leakage of the iron body; (2 The actual oil leakage of different materials consisted of two parts: the foundation leakage that was the leakage of the valve without wear and wear leakage that was caused by the worn valve body; (3 The aluminum alloyed valve could rely on the dust filling furrow and melting mechanism that led the body surface to retain dynamic balance, resulting in the valve leakage preservation at a low level. The aluminum alloy modified valve body can meet the requirements of hydraulic leakage under pressure, possibly constituting this alloy suitable for hydraulic valve body manufacturing.

  13. Microstructural evolution of nanostructure 7075 aluminum alloy during isothermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdian, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F., E-mail: karimzadeh_f@cc.iut.ac.i [Department of Materials Engineering, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tavoosi, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-18

    This work focuses on structural changes of nanostructure 7075 aluminum alloy (Al7075) during isothermal annealing. Nanostructured Al7075 was synthesized by mechanical alloying. The produced structure was isothermally heat-treated at 125-500 {sup o}C for 1-3 h under argon atmosphere. The as-milled and annealed powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that after 15 h of milling, an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu supersaturated solid solution with a grain size of 35 nm was obtained. By increasing the milling time up to 15 h, the MgZn phase precipitated from supersaturated solid solution. Large variety of precipitants including MgZn, MgZn{sub 2} (at temperatures range between 200 and 400 {sup o}C), AlCuMg and Al{sub 2}Cu (at temperatures range between 300 and 500 {sup o}C) were formed during isothermal annealing.

  14. Aerospace Patented High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Used in Commercial Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA structural materials engineer, Jonathan Lee, displays blocks and pistons as examples of some of the uses for NASA's patented high-strength aluminum alloy originally developed at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. NASA desired an alloy for aerospace applications with higher strength and wear-resistance at elevated temperatures. The alloy is a solution to reduce costs of aluminum engine pistons and lower engine emissions for the automobile industry. The Boats and Outboard Engines Division at Bombardier Recreational Products of Sturtevant, Wisconsin is using the alloy for pistons in its Evinrude E-Tec outboard engine line.

  15. Discharge behaviors during plasma electrolytic oxidation on aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Run; Wu, Jie; Xue, Wenbin; Qu, Yao; Yang, Chaolin; Wang, Bin; Wu, Xianying

    2014-01-01

    A plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was performed on the 2024 aluminum alloy in silicate electrolyte to fabricate ceramic coatings under a constant voltage. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was employed to evaluate the characteristics of plasma discharge during PEO process. The plasma electron temperature and density were obtained by analyzing the spectral lines of OES, and the atomic ionization degree in discharge zone was calculated in terms of Saha thermal ionization equation. The illumination intensity of plasma discharge and the temperature in the interior of alloy were measured. Combining the surface morphology and cross-sectional microstructure with the optical emission spectra and illumination at different discharge stage, a discharge model in the growth of PEO ceramic coatings was proposed. It is found that there are two discharge modes of type A with small spark size and type B with large spark size, and the latter only appears in the intermediate stage of PEO process. The illumination intensity has a maximum value in the initial stage of oxidation with many sparks of discharge type A. The electron temperature in plasma discharge zone is about 3000 K–7000 K and atomic ionization degree of Al is about 2.0 × 10 −5 –7.2 × 10 −3 , which depend on discharge stage. The discharge type B plays a key role on the electron temperature and atomic ionization degree. The electron density keeps stable in the range of about 8.5 × 10 21  m −3 –2.6 × 10 22  m −3 . - Highlights: • The characteristics of PEO plasma discharge was evaluated by OES. • Electron temperature, concentration, atomic ionization degree were calculated. • Discharge model for the growth of PEO coatings was proposed. • Temperature in the interior of alloy during PEO process was measured

  16. Minimum quantity lubrication machining of aluminum and magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Sukanta

    2011-12-01

    The use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) machining, i.e. drilling and tapping of aluminum and magnesium alloys using very low quantities of cutting fluids was studied and the MQL machining performance was compared to dry and conventional flooded conditions. An experimental drilling station with an MQL system was built to measure torque and thrust force responses. Uncoated and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated HSS drills were tested against 319 Al and AZ91 alloys using 10--50 ml/h of distilled water (H 2O-MQL) and a fatty acid based MQL agent (FA-MQL). The results indicated that H2O-MQL used in conjunction with non-hydrogenated DLC (NH-DLC) coatings reduced the average torque and thrust-force compared to dry cutting and achieved a performance comparable with conventional flooded drilling. At least 103 holes could be drilled using NH-DLC in H2O-MQL and uncoated HSS in FA-MQL in drilling of both 319 Al and AZ91. MQL drilling and tapping provided a stable machining performance, which was evident from the uniform torque and force patterns and also resulted in desirable hole surface, thread quality and chip segments. The maximum temperature generated in the workpiece during MQL machining was lower than that observed in dry drilling and tapping, and comparable to flooded conditions. The mechanical properties of the material adjacent to drilled holes, as evaluated through plastic strain and hardness measurements, revealed a notable softening in case of dry drilling, with magnesium alloys exhibiting a recrystallized grain zone, but not for MQL drilling. Softened aluminum and magnesium promoted adhesion to the tools resulted built-up edge formation and consequently high torques and thrust-forces were generated. NH-DLC coatings' low COF in H 2O-MQL against 319 Al (0.10) and AZ91 (0.12) compared to uncoated HSS (0.63 and 0.65) limited the temperature increase during NH-DLC in H2 O-MQL drilling and hence both torques and thrust forces were effectively reduced.

  17. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Demonstration of the Impact of Thermomagnetic Processing on Cast Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Murphy, Bart L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rios, Orlando [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kesler, Michael S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Henderson, Hunter B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This project builds on an earlier Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technical Collaboration phase 1 project to investigate application of high magnetic fields during solution heat treating and aging of three different cast aluminum alloys.

  19. Corrosion of Aluminum Alloys in the Presence of Fire-Retardant Aircraft Interior Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This research project was to evaluate the potential for fire-retardant materials used in aircraft interiors to cause corrosion of aluminum structural alloys. Service Difficulty Reports (SDR's) were reviewed for several aircraft types, and the most fr...

  20. Fatigue and Fracture Characterization of Aircraft Aluminum Alloys Damaged by Prior Corrosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldwin, J

    2002-01-01

    At the time of the initiation of this project, there was no comprehensive data describing corrosion's effect on the fatigue and fracture behavior of aluminum alloys typically found in aging aircraft...

  1. Outdoor Exposure Results for Pretreated and Topcoated Aluminum Armor Alloys 2519, 5083, 7039

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelly, John

    2004-01-01

    ...) are risks to both human health and the environment. One of the mainstays in corrosion prevention of aluminum alloys has been the use of chromate conversion coatings to promote adhesion and inhibit corrosion...

  2. Fretting Wear-Resistant, Micro-Arc Oxidation Coatings for Aluminum and Titanium Alloy Bearings (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choppy, K. J; Kovar, R. F; Cushman, B. M

    2007-01-01

    .... Aluminum and titanium alloys are used as replacements for steel in gear boxes of aircraft and helicopters in both military and commercial air vehicles, due to their low density, mechanical strength...

  3. Analysis of the Transition in Deformation Mechanisms in Superplastic 5083 Aluminum Alloys by Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harrell, James

    2001-01-01

    Recently developed Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) methods have been applied to the analysis of microstructure and microtexture of 5083 aluminum alloy materials that have been processed to enable superplasticity...

  4. The Bearing Strength and Fracture Behavior of Bolted Connections in Two Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinl, N.; Menzemer, C. C.; Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the bearing capacity, taken as a combination of strength, elongation, and failure by fracture characteristics of bolt holes in two aluminum alloys, 5052-H32 and 6061-T6, that were deformed in uniaxial tension is presented and discussed. The specific role played by bolt hole confinement on the bearing capacity of each aluminum alloy is highlighted. An increase in the bearing ratio caused plastic deformation around the holes to gradually increase. For both the chosen aluminum alloys the average bearing ratio at the time of failure of the test sample was found to vary with end distance. The experimentally determined strength was observably larger than the calculated bearing strength obtained using guaranteed minimum mechanical properties and recommended mathematical relationships. The nature of final fracture of each aluminum alloy is carefully examined and the intrinsic features present on the fracture surface are rationalized in concurrence with macroscopic mechanical response.

  5. Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2050 for Reduced-Weight, Increased-Stiffness Space Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Touchstone Research Laboratory, along with Alcan Rolled Products -- Ravenswood WV, has identified the Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2050 as a potentially game-changing...

  6. Wear resistance analysis of the aluminum 7075 alloy and the nanostructured aluminum 7075 - silver nanoparticles composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrada-Ruiz R.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured composites of the aluminum 7075 alloy and carbon-coated silver nanoparticles were synthetized by the mechanical milling technique using a high-energy mill SPEX 8000M; the powders generated were compacted, sintered and hot-extruded to produce 1 cm-diameter bars. The composites were then subjected to a wear test using a pin-on-disc device to validate the hypothesis that second phase-ductile nanometric particles homogenously distributed throughout the metalmatrix improve the wear resistance of the material. It was found that silver nanoparticles prevent the wear of the material by acting as an obstacle to dislocations movement during the plastic deformation of the contact surface, as well as a solid lubricant when these are separated from the metal-matrix.

  7. Fabrication of Aluminum Tubes Filled with Aluminum Alloy Foam by Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum foam is usually used as the core of composite materials by combining it with dense materials, such as in Al foam core sandwich panels and Al-foam-filled tubes, owing to its low tensile and bending strengths. In this study, all-Al foam-filled tubes consisting of ADC12 Al-Si-Cu die-cast aluminum alloy foam and a dense A1050 commercially pure Al tube with metal bonding were fabricated by friction welding. First, it was found that the ADC12 precursor was firmly bonded throughout the inner wall of the A1050 tube without a gap between the precursor and the tube by friction welding. No deformation of the tube or foaming of the precursor was observed during the friction welding. Next, it was shown that by heat treatment of an ADC12-precursor-bonded A1050 tube, gases generated by the decomposition of the blowing agent expand the softened ADC12 to produce the ADC12 foam interior of the dense A1050 tube. A holding time during the foaming process of approximately tH = 8.5 min with a holding temperature of 948 K was found to be suitable for obtaining a sound ADC12-foam-filled A1050 tube with sufficient foaming, almost uniform pore structures over the entire specimen, and no deformation or reduction in the thickness of the tube.

  8. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  9. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Ren, Daxin; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research. PMID:28788646

  10. A Review of Dissimilar Welding Techniques for Magnesium Alloys to Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar magnesium alloys and aluminum alloys is an important issue because of their increasing applications in industries. In this document, the research and progress of a variety of welding techniques for joining dissimilar Mg alloys and Al alloys are reviewed from different perspectives. Welding of dissimilar Mg and Al is challenging due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound (IMC such as Mg17Al12 and Mg2Al3. In order to increase the joint strength, three main research approaches were used to eliminate or reduce the Mg-Al intermetallic reaction layer. First, solid state welding techniques which have a low welding temperature were used to reduce the IMCs. Second, IMC variety and distribution were controlled to avoid the degradation of the joining strength in fusion welding. Third, techniques which have relatively controllable reaction time and energy were used to eliminate the IMCs. Some important processing parameters and their effects on weld quality are discussed, and the microstructure and metallurgical reaction are described. Mechanical properties of welds such as hardness, tensile, shear and fatigue strength are discussed. The aim of the report is to review the recent progress in the welding of dissimilar Mg and Al to provide a basis for follow-up research.

  11. Corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium alloys in glacial acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, L.V.; Romaniv, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Vessels for the storage and conveyance of glacial acetic acid are produced from ADO and AD1 aluminum, which are distinguished by corrosion resistance, weldability and workability in the hot and cold conditions but have low tensile strength. Aluminum-magnesium alloys are stronger materials close in corrosion resistance to technical purity aluminum. An investigation was made of the basic alloying components on the corrosion resistance of these alloys in glacial acetic acid. Both the base metal and the weld joints were tested. With an increase in temperature the corrosion rate of all of the tested materials increases by tens of times. The metals with higher magnesium content show more pitting damage. The relationship of the corrosion resistance of the alloys to magnesium content is confirmed by the similar intensity of failure of the joint metal of all of the investigated alloys and by electrochemical investigations. The data shows that AMg3 alloy is close to technically pure ADO aluminum. However, the susceptibility of even this material to local corrosion eliminates the possibility of the use of aluminum-magnesium alloys as reliable constructional materials in glacial acetic acid

  12. Microstructure and failure mechanisms of refill friction stir spot welded 7075-T6 aluminum alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Zhikang; Yang, Xinqi; Zhang, Zhaohua; Cui, Lei; Li, Tielong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► There is a correlation between the void in the weld and the joint strength. ► The preferable mechanical properties can be obtained by lowering rotational speed. ► The alclad has an adverse effect on the mechanical properties. -- Abstract: In this paper, the microstructure and mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy joints joined by refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) were investigated. The keyhole was refilled successfully, and the microstructure of the weld exhibited variations in the grain sizes in the width and the thickness directions. There existed defects (hook, voids, bonding ligament, etc.) associated to the material flow in the weld. Mechanical properties of the joint have been investigated in terms of hardness and tensile/shear and cross-tension test, and the fracture mechanisms were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope). The hardness profile of the weld exhibited a W-shaped appearance in the macroscopic level, which reached the minimum at the boundary of the sleeve and the clamping ring. The variation laws between tensile/shear and cross-tension strength and processing parameters were rather complicated. The void in the weld played an important role in determining the strength of the joint. On the whole, the preferable strength can be obtained at lower rotational speed. Shear fracture mode was observed under tensile–shear loadings, and nugget debonding, plug type fracture (on the upper sheet) and plug type fracture (on the lower sheet) modes were observed under cross-tension loadings. It was also observed that the main feature affecting the mechanical properties of the joint is the alclad between the upper and lower sheets and the connecting qualities between the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone.

  13. Selection Of Cutting Inserts For Aluminum Alloys Machining By Using MCDM Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madić, Miloš; Radovanović, Miroslav; Petković, Dušan; Nedić, Bogdan

    2015-07-01

    Machining of aluminum and its alloys requires the use of cutting tools with special geometry and material. Since there exists a number of cutting tools for aluminum machining, each with unique characteristics, selection of the most appropriate cutting tool for a given application is very complex task which can be viewed as a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problem. This paper is focused on multi-criteria analysis of VCGT cutting inserts for aluminum alloys turning by applying recently developed MCDM method, i.e. weighted aggregated sum product assessment (WASPAS) method. The MCDM model was defined using the available catalogue data from cutting tool manufacturers.

  14. Ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film fabricated by citric acid-assisted hot-water-treatment of aluminum-palladium alloy film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harumoto, Takashi; Tamura, Yohei; Ishiguro, Takashi, E-mail: ishiguro@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijyuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo, 125-8585 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Hot-water-treatment has been adapted to fabricate ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film from aluminum-palladium alloy film. Using citric acid as a chelating agent, a precipitation of boehmite (aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlOOH) on the nanoporous palladium-aluminum film was suppressed. According to cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy observations, the ligament/pore sizes of the prepared nanoporous film were considerably small (on the order of 10 nm). Since this fabrication method only requires aluminum alloy film and hot-water with chelating agent, the ultrafine nanoporous film can be prepared simply and environmentally friendly.

  15. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, V.K.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-08-24

    A wrought and annealed iron-aluminum alloy is described consisting essentially of 8 to 9.5% aluminum, an effective amount of chromium sufficient to promote resistance to aqueous corrosion of the alloy, and an alloying constituent selected from the group of elements consisting of an effective amount of molybdenum sufficient to promote solution hardening of the alloy and resistance of the alloy to pitting when exposed to solutions containing chloride, up to about 0.05% carbon with up to about 0.5% of a carbide former which combines with the carbon to form carbides for controlling grain growth at elevated temperatures, and mixtures thereof, and the balance iron, wherein said alloy has a single disordered [alpha] phase crystal structure, is substantially non-susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and has a room-temperature ductility of greater than 20%.

  16. A DLC-Punch Array to Fabricate the Micro-Textured Aluminum Sheet for Boiling Heat Transfer Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhio Aizawa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A diamond-like carbon (DLC film, coated on an SKD11 (alloy tool steel substrate, was shaped by plasma oxidation to form an assembly of DLC macro-pillars and to be used as a DLC-punch array that is micro-embossed into aluminum sheets. First, the SKD11 steel die substrate was prepared and DLC-coated to have a film thickness of 10 μm. This DLC coating worked as a punch material. The two-dimensional micro-patterns were printed onto this DLC film by maskless lithography. The unprinted DLC films were selectively removed by plasma oxidation to leave the three-dimensional DLC-punch array on the SKD11 substrate. Each DLC punch had a head of 3.5 μm × 3.5 μm and a height of 8 μm. This DLC-punch array was fixed into the cassette die set for a micro-embossing process using a table-top servo-stamper. Furthermore, through numerically controlled micro-embossing, an alignment of rectangular punches was transcribed into a micro-cavity array in the aluminum sheet. The single micro-cavity had a bottom surface of 3.2 μm × 3.2 μm and an average depth of 7.5 μm. A heat-transfer experiment in boiling water was also performed to investigate the effect of micro-cavity texture on bubbling behavior and the boiling curve.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of LD10 Aluminum Alloy in UDMH and N2O4 propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youhong; Chang, Xinlong; Liu, Wanlei

    2018-03-01

    The LD10 aluminum alloy double cantilever beam specimens were corroded under the conditions of Unsymmetric Uimethyl Hydrazine (UDMH), Dinitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4), and 3.5% NaCl environment. The crack propagation behavior of the aluminum alloy in different corrosion environment was analyzed. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of aluminum alloy in N2O4 is relatively slight and there are not evident stress corrosion phenomenons founded in UDMH.

  18. Constitutive equation and microstructure evaluation of an extruded aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan L

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow-stress behavior of an extruded aluminum alloy has been studied by conducting a set of warm and hot compression tests. The compression tests were carried out in the temperature range of 373 K–773 K and strain rates of 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 s−1, up to a strain of 0.5. Based on the results obtained from these tests, a mathematical model was obtained to predict flow stress for a given strain. The effect of temperature and strain rate on deformation behavior was ascertained by determining the Zener–Hollomon parameter. The influence of strain has been incorporated by employing an Arrhenius-type constitutive equation, considering the related material constants as functions of strain. The comparison of results indicated good agreement between the predicted and measured flow-stress values in the relevant temperature range. The correlation coefficient and average absolute relative error of the model were found to be 0.9965 and 4.26% respectively confirming good accuracy.

  19. Bake hardening of nanograin AA7075 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghani, Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The bake hardening behavior of AA7075 was studied and compared with its coarse-grain counterpart. ► Nanograin AA7075 exhibited 88–100% increase in bake hardenability. ► Nanograin AA7075 exhibited 36–38% increase in final yield strength after baking. ► Maximum bake hardenability and final yield stress were about 185 MPa and 719 MPa. - Abstract: In the present work, the bake hardening of nanostructured AA7075 aluminum alloy was compared with that of its coarse-grain counterpart. Surface severe plastic deformation (SSPD) was used to produce nanograin layers on both surfaces of workpieces. The nanostructured layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The thickness of nanostructured layer, having the grains of 50–110 nm, was about 75 μm on each side of workpiece. The bake hardenability of nanograin and coarse-grain AA7075 was then compared by pre-straining to 2, 4 and 6% followed by baking at 100 °C and 200 °C for 20 min. Comparing to coarse-grain case, there was about 88–100% increase in bake hardenability and about 36–38% increase in yield strength after the bake hardening of present nanograin AA7075. Such an increase in bake hardenability and strength was achieved when the thickness of two nanograin layers was about only one-tenth of the whole thickness.

  20. Determination of strain localization in aluminum alloys using photoemission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen; Levine, Lyle; Dickinson, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    We report photoemission measurements during uniaxial tensile deformation of aluminum (1200), Al-Mn (3003), Al-Mg (5052), and Al-Mg-Si (6061) alloys during exposure to pulsed excimer laser radiation (248-nm). Photostimulated electron emission increases with strain as slip exposes fresh metal to the vacuum; strain localization alters the production rate of slip bands and hence can be monitored by this technique. All samples were annealed at 300 °C for three hours immediately after polishing to produce a relatively thick (typically 40-nm) surface oxide. This oxide reduces photoemission from undeformed material. Time-resolved electron emission measurements after each laser pulse show two or more photoemission peaks. The intensity of the late (slow) peaks changes little during deformation and apparently reflects electron emission from oxidized, undeformed portions of the sample and other nearby surfaces. The intensity of the first (fast) electron peak reflects emission from fresh metal along slip lines/bands generated by deformation. As strain proceeds, the intensity of the fast peak shows three stages of growth: a gradually increasing, incipient growth during the onset of deformation, followed by two linear increasing stages. We provide evidence that the transition between the two linear stages corresponds to the onset of strain localization.

  1. Influence of Shot Peening on Failure of an Aluminum Alloy Exposed to Aggressive Aqueous Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shengli; Cu, You; Zhang, Wei; Tong, Xiaoyan; Srivatsan, T. S.; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2013-06-01

    Pre-corrosion damage tests were performed on the high strength aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) that was subject to shot peening surface treatment. The tests were performed for different time levels and compared one-on-one with the performance and characteristics of the non-shot-peened alloy. The residual stress induced by the shot peening surface treatment for two different intensity levels was measured using the method of incremental drilling of holes. Based on an observation of morphology of corrosion experienced by the aluminum alloy the depth of corrosion was measured using a laser displacement sensor. The surface of the aluminum alloy that was shot peened revealed an overall better resistance to pitting while concurrently revealing evidence of partial degradation. The depth of degradation is related to the residual stress that is induced in the aluminum alloy sample by the shot peening treatment. The key mechanisms that control damage during corrosion of the shot-peened aluminum alloy can be divided into the distinct stages of (a) initial occurrence of uniform corrosion followed by (b) the generation of degradation, and (c) culminating in the initiation of pitting once the depth of degradation reaches a certain level.

  2. The investigation on the stratification phenomenon of aluminum rear alloyed layer in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, Xi; Chen, Xiaojing; Zhang, Song; Shi, Zhengrong; Li, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A stratification phenomenon of Al rear alloyed layer in solar cells is found. • The stratification phenomenon is related to the formula of the paste. • From the analyses, the stratification phenomenon is redundant and deleterious. • The highest cell's efficiency without stratification phenomenon is close to 20%. - Abstract: A stratification phenomenon of aluminum rear alloyed layer was found in the study of aluminum rear emitter N-type solar cells. It is related to the composition of the paste. The outer aluminum alloyed layer can be called as aluminum doped emitter, and it gives the contribution to the junction formation. The inner layer is only the Al/Si mixed layer. The aluminum atoms in this layer are not bonded with silicon atoms. This inner layer will ruin the quality of the rear junction. The shunt resistance, reverse current density and the junction electric leakage value are getting worse when the thickness of the inner layer increases. The thickness of the inner Al/Si mixed layer increases with the increasing of firing temperature, while the depth of the aluminum doped emitter almost does not change. From the analyses, the inner Al/Si mixed layer is redundant and deleterious. Only a single deep aluminum doped rear emitter is needed for N-type solar cells. The highest power conversion efficiency of 19.93% for aluminum rear emitter N-type cells without the stratification phenomenon has been obtained

  3. Pseudo-creep in Shape Memory Alloy Wires and Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russalian, V. R.; Bhattacharyya, A.

    2017-10-01

    Interruption of loading during reorientation and isothermal pseudoelasticity in shape memory alloys with a strain arrest ( i.e., holding strain constant) results in a time-dependent evolution in stress or with a stress arrest ( i.e., holding stress constant) results in a time-dependent evolution in strain. This phenomenon, which we term as pseudo-creep, is similar to what was reported in the literature three decades ago for some traditional metallic materials undergoing plastic deformation. In a previous communication, we reported strain arrest of isothermal pseudoelastic loading, isothermal pseudoelastic unloading, and reorientation in NiTi wires as well as a rate-independent phase diagram. In this paper, we provide experimental results of the pseudo-creep phenomenon during stress arrest of isothermal pseudoelasticity and reorientation in NiTi wires as well as strain arrest of isothermal pseudoelasticity and reorientation in NiTi sheets. Stress arrest in NiTi wires accompanied by strain accumulation or recovery is studied using the technique of multi-video extensometry. The experimental results were used to estimate the amount of mechanical energy needed to evolve the wire from one microstructural state to another during isothermal pseudoelastic deformation and the difference in energies between the initial and the final rest state between which the aforementioned evolution has occurred.

  4. The Effect of Alloying Elements on Thermal Conductivity and Casting Characteristic in High Pressure Die Casting of Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Ik; Choi, Se-Weon; Kim, Young-Chan; Kang, Chang-Seog

    Recently, demand of aluminum alloys for use in high thermal conductivity application is increases but the most aluminum die casting alloys exhibit very lower thermal properties because of their high concentrations of alloying elements. However, those alloying elements are essential to obtain sufficient fluidity and mechanical strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of alloying elements in die casting alloys, Si, Cu, Mg, Fe and Mn, in thermal conductivity, die casting characteristics and mechanical properties and find out the appropriate amount of each alloying element for development of heat sink component. The results showed that Mn had the most deleterious effect in thermal conductivity and Si and Fe contents were important to improve strength and limit casting defects, such as hot tearing and die soldering. The alloy with 0.2 1.0wt%Cu, 0.3 0.6wt%Fe and 1.0 2.0wt%Si showed very good combination of high thermal conductivity and good casting characteristics.

  5. Influence of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2009-01-01

    Surface contaminants as a result of thermo-mechanical processing of magnesium alloys, e.g. sheet rolling, can have a negative effect on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Especially contaminants such as Fe, Ni and Cu, left on the surface of magnesium alloys result in the formation...... of micro-galvanic couples and can therefore increase corrosion attack on these alloys. Due to this influence they should be removed to obtain good corrosion resistance. In this study, the effect of inorganic acid pickling on the corrosion behaviour of a commercial AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet...... the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The cleaning efficiency of the three acids used and the corrosion protection mechanisms were found to be remarkably different. Best corrosion results were obtained with nitric acid, followed closely by phosphoric acid. Only the sulphuric acid failed more or less when...

  6. Influence of Composition on the Environmental Impact of a Cast Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gómez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of alloy composition on the environmental impact of the production of six aluminum casting alloys (Al Si12Cu1(Fe, Al Si5Mg, Al Si9Cu3Zn3Fe, Al Si10Mg(Fe, Al Si9Cu3(Fe(Zn and Al Si9 has been analyzed. In order to perform a more precise environmental impact calculation, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA with ReCiPe Endpoint methodology has been used, with the EcoInvent v3 AlMg3 aluminum alloy dataset as a reference. This dataset has been updated with the material composition ranges of the mentioned alloys. The balanced, maximum and minimum environmental impact values have been obtained. In general, the overall impact of the studied aluminum alloys varies from 5.98 × 10−1 pts to 1.09 pts per kg, depending on the alloy composition. In the analysis of maximum and minimum environmental impact, the alloy that has the highest uncertainty is AlSi9Cu3(Fe(Zn, with a range of ±9%. The elements that contribute the most to increase its impact are Copper and Tin. The environmental impact of a specific case, an LED luminaire housing made out of an Al Si12Cu1(Fe cast alloy, has been studied, showing the importance of considering the composition. Significant differences with the standard datasets that are currently available in EcoInvent v3 have been found.

  7. Influence of Composition on the Environmental Impact of a Cast Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Patricia; Elduque, Daniel; Sarasa, Judith; Pina, Carmelo; Javierre, Carlos

    2016-05-25

    The influence of alloy composition on the environmental impact of the production of six aluminum casting alloys (Al Si12Cu1(Fe), Al Si5Mg, Al Si9Cu3Zn3Fe, Al Si10Mg(Fe), Al Si9Cu3(Fe)(Zn) and Al Si9) has been analyzed. In order to perform a more precise environmental impact calculation, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) with ReCiPe Endpoint methodology has been used, with the EcoInvent v3 AlMg3 aluminum alloy dataset as a reference. This dataset has been updated with the material composition ranges of the mentioned alloys. The balanced, maximum and minimum environmental impact values have been obtained. In general, the overall impact of the studied aluminum alloys varies from 5.98 × 10 -1 pts to 1.09 pts per kg, depending on the alloy composition. In the analysis of maximum and minimum environmental impact, the alloy that has the highest uncertainty is AlSi9Cu3(Fe)(Zn), with a range of ±9%. The elements that contribute the most to increase its impact are Copper and Tin. The environmental impact of a specific case, an LED luminaire housing made out of an Al Si12Cu1(Fe) cast alloy, has been studied, showing the importance of considering the composition. Significant differences with the standard datasets that are currently available in EcoInvent v3 have been found.

  8. Odontologic use of copper/aluminum alloys: mitochondrial respiration as sensitive parameter of biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Luiz Erlon A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper/aluminum alloys are largely utilized in odontological restorations because they are less expensive than gold or platinum. However, tarnishing and important corrosion in intrabuccal prostheses made with copper/aluminum alloys after 28 days of use have been reported. Several kinds of food and beverage may attack and corrode these alloys. Copper is an essential component of several important enzymes directly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Aluminum, in contrast, is very toxic and, when absorbed, plasma values as small as 1.65 to 21.55 mg/dl can cause severe lesions to the nervous system, kidneys, and bone marrow. Because mitochondria are extremely sensitive to minimal variation of cellular physiology, the direct relationship between the mitocondrial respiratory chain and cell lesions has been used as a sensitive parameter to evaluate cellular aggression by external agents. This work consisted in the polarographic study of mitochondrial respiratory metabolism of livers and kidneys of rabbits with femoral implants of titanium or copper/aluminum alloy screws. The experimental results obtained did not show physiological modifications of hepatic or renal mitochondria isolated from animals of the three experimental groups, which indicate good biocompatibility of copper/aluminum alloys and suggest their odontological use.

  9. An experimental investigation of fatigue damage in aluminum 2024-T3 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloys are finding increasing use in the aerospace and automobile industries due to their attractive low density-high modulus and low density-high strength characteristics. Unfortunately, cyclic stress-strain deformation alters the microstructure of the material. These structural changes can lead to fatigue damage and ultimately service failure. Therefore, in order to assess the integrity of the alloy, a correlation between fatigue damage and a measurable microstructural property is needed. Aluminum 2024-T3, a commonly used commercial alloy, contains many grains (individual crystals) of various orientations. The sizes and orientations of these grains are known to affect the strength, hardness, and magnetic permeability of polycrystalline alloys and metals; therefore, perhaps a relationship between a grain property and the fatigue state can be established. Tension-compression cycling in aluminum alloys can also induce changes in their dislocation densities. These changes can be studied from measurements of the electrical resistivities of the materials. Consequently, the goals of this investigation were: to study the grain orientation of aluminum 2024-T3 and to seek a correlation between the grain orientation and the fatigue state of the material; and to measure the electrical resistivities of fatigued samples of aluminum 2024-T3 and to interpret the findings.

  10. Microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S S; Lin, J Y; Lin, Y T

    1998-09-01

    To investigate the microbiologically induced corrosion of aluminum alloys in fuel-oil/aqueous system, aluminum alloys A356, AA 5052, AA 5083 and AA 6061 were chosen as the test alloys and Cladosporium and several fuel-oil contaminated microbes isolated in Taiwan were used as test organisms. Aluminum alloy AA 5083 in fuel-oil/aqueous system was the most susceptible material for microbial corrosion, then followed by aluminum alloys AA 5052 and A356, and AA 6061 was more resistant to microbial aggression. Mixed culture had high capability of corrosion, then followed by Penicillium sp. AM-F5, Fusarium sp. AM-F1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AM-B5, Ps. fluorescens AM-B9, C. resinae ATCC 22712, Penicillium sp. AM-F2, Candida sp. AM-Y1 and Ps. aeruginosa AM-B11. From energy dispersive spectrometer analysis, aluminum and magnesium contents decreased in the corrosion area, while chlorine and sulfur contents increased. The major organic acid produced in fuel-oil/aqueous system was acetic acid, and the total organic acids content had a positive correlation with the degree of microbial corrosion.

  11. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important

  12. Pore structure and mechanical properties of directionally solidified porous aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komissarchuk Olga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous aluminum alloys produced by the metal-gas eutectic method or GASAR process need to be performed under a certain pressure of hydrogen, and to carry over melt to a tailor-made apparatus that ensures directional solidification. Hydrogen is driven out of the melt, and then the quasi-cylindrical pores normal to the solidification front are usually formed. In the research, the effects of processing parameters (saturation pressure, solidification pressure, temperature, and holding time on the pore structure and porosity of porous aluminum alloys were analyzed. The mechanical properties of Al-Mg alloys were studied by the compressive tests, and the advantages of the porous structure were indicated. By using the GASAR method, pure aluminum, Al-3wt.%Mg, Al-6wt.%Mg and Al-35wt.%Mg alloys with oriented pores have been successfully produced under processing conditions of varying gas pressure, and the relationship between the final pore structure and the solidification pressure, as well as the influences of Mg quantity on the pore size, porosity and mechanical properties of Al-Mg alloy were investigated. The results show that a higher pressure of solidification tends to yield smaller pores in aluminum and its alloys. In the case of Al-Mg alloys, it was proved that with the increasing of Mg amount, the mechanical properties of the alloys sharply deteriorate. However, since Al-3%Mg and Al-6wt.%Mg alloys are ductile metals, their porous samples have greater compressive strength than that of the dense samples due to the existence of pores. It gives the opportunity to use them in industry at the same conditions as dense alloys with savings in weight and material consumption.

  13. A study of hydrogen permeation in aluminum alloy treated by various oxidation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wenhai; Long Bin

    1997-01-01

    A set of oxide coatings was formed on the surface of an Al alloy (wt%: Fe, 0.24; Si, 1.16; Cu, 0.05-0.2; Zn, 0.1; Al, residual) by means of various oxidation processes. The hydrogen permeability through the aluminum alloy and its coating materials was determined by a vapor phase permeation technique at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 C using high-purity H 2 (99.9999%) gas with an upstream hydrogen pressure of 10 4 -10 5 Pa. The experimental results show that the hydrogen permeability through aluminum oxide coating is 100-2000 times lower than that through the aluminum alloy substrate. This means that the aluminum oxide is a significant hydrogen permeation barrier. A high hydrogen permeation resistance was observed in an oxide layer prefilmed in 200 C water, while an anodized aluminum oxide film had a less obstructive effect, possibly caused by the porous structure of the anodic oxide. The hydrogen permeability through films of aluminum oxide was not a simple function of the aluminum-oxide phase configuration. (orig.)

  14. Superior light metals by texture engineering: Optimized aluminum and magnesium alloys for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.; Al-Samman, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum and magnesium are two highly important lightweight metals used in automotive applications to reduce vehicle weight. Crystallographic texture engineering through a combination of intelligent processing and alloying is a powerful and effective tool to obtain superior aluminum and magnesium alloys with optimized strength and ductility for automotive applications. In the present article the basic mechanisms of texture formation of aluminum and magnesium alloys during wrought processing are described and the major aspects and differences in deformation and recrystallization mechanisms are discussed. In addition to the crystal structure, the resulting properties can vary significantly, depending on the alloy composition and processing conditions, which can cause drastic texture and microstructure changes. The elementary mechanisms of plastic deformation and recrystallization comprising nucleation and growth and their orientation dependence, either within the homogeneously formed microstructure or due to inhomogeneous deformation, are described along with their impact on texture formation, and the resulting forming behavior. The typical face-centered cubic and hexagonal close-packed rolling and recrystallization textures, and related mechanical anisotropy and forming conditions are analyzed and compared for standard aluminum and magnesium alloys. New aspects for their modification and advanced strategies of alloy design and microstructure to improve material properties are derived

  15. Effect of Rare Earth Erbium on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiao-yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For conventional A356 aluminum alloy, the addition of rare earth elements is an effective way to modify its microstructures and improve its mechanical properties. The effect of rare earth Er on microstructures and properties of as-cast A356 aluminum alloy was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results indicate that rare earth element Er is a good modifier for A356 aluminum alloy, which is able to improve obviously the microstructure of as-cast alloy. The addition of Er refines the primary α-Al phase, decreases the secondary dendrite arm spacing and the dendrite arm diameter, and modifies the eutectic Si in as-cast structure simultaneously. When the amount of Er reaches 0.4% (mass fraction, the same below, the refinement effect is the most significant, secondary dendrite arm spacing decreases from 53.6μm to 17.5μm and the morphology of eutectic Si transforms from thick lath-shaped to short rod-like or round granular. Compared with A356 alloy, the tensile strength and elongation of A356 aluminum alloy with the addition of 0.4%Er increase by 15.1% and 29.8% respectively.

  16. Developing Processing Routes for the Equal-Channel Angular Pressing of Age-Hardenable Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhi Chao; Chinh, Nguyen Q.; Xu, Cheng; Langdon, Terence G.

    2010-04-01

    The processing of age-hardenable aluminum alloys by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) was investigated using three different Al-Zn-Mg alloys. The results show that it is relatively easy to conduct the ECAP at an elevated temperature of 473 K, but this leads to a weakening of the alloy rather than a strengthening. The processing by ECAP may be performed successfully at room temperature provided it is conducted fairly quickly (within ~10 minutes) after quenching from the solution treatment. It is necessary also to optimize the solution treatment conditions for each alloy composition. Under optimum conditions, good strengthening is achieved even after a single pass in ECAP.

  17. Improving of Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloys by Removing Intermetallic Compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seri, Osami

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that iron is one of the most common impurity elements sound in aluminum and its alloys. Iron in the aluminum forms an intermetallic compounds such as FeAl 3 . The FeAl 3 particles on the aluminum surface are one of the most detrimental phases to the corrosion process and anodizing procedure for aluminum and its alloys. Trial and error surface treatment will be carried out to find the preferential and effective removal of FeAl 3 particles on the surfaces without dissolution of aluminum matrix around the particles. One of the preferable surface treatments for the aim of getting FeAl 3 free surface was an electrochemical treatment such as cathodic current density of -2 kAm -2 in a 20-30 mass% HNO 3 solution for the period of 300s. The corrosion characteristics of aluminum surface with FeAl 3 free particles are examined in a 0.1 kmol/m 3 NaCl solution. It is found that aluminum with free FeAl 3 particles shows higher corrosion resistance than aluminum with FeAl 3 particles

  18. Effect of Multi-repair Welding on Fatigue Performance of Aluminum Alloy Profile Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, You-De; Shi, Chun-Yuan; Tian, Hong-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum alloy profile has been widely used in the manufacture of the rail vehicles. But it's necessary for the repair welding of the welded joints to be conducted because some defects exist in the weld such as porosity, inclusions and incomplete penetrations in the welding processes. In this paper, the influence of the multi-repair welding of 6005A aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints on the fatigue performance are investigated based on the results of fatigue tests. The parameters of curves and the fatigue strength of the welded joints are calculated, and Goodman fatigue limit diagram is also obtained. The results show that fatigue strength of aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints, in condition of 107 cycle life, meet the standard requirement for the as-welded, repair welded state one time or two times respectively.

  19. A Study on the Susceptibility to SCC of 7050 Aluminum Alloy by DCB Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Qi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC of different aging states for 7050 aluminum alloy in 3.5% sodium chloride aqueous solution has been studied by means of double cantilever beam (DCB specimens, cathodic polarization, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM and time-of-flying second ion mass spectrometer (ToF-SIMS. The results showed that the susceptibility to SCC (Iscc of 7050 aluminum alloy decreases with increasing the aging time. When a cathodic polarization potential of −1100 mV was applied to DCB specimens, the ion current intensity of hydrogen (IH+ near the crack tip and Iscc increased obviously, thus the degree of the diffusion of hydrogen into the grain boundary become more serious. The observation of microstructure indicated that the precipitates on the grain boundary become coarse and are sparsely distributed with increasing the aging time of 7050 aluminum alloy.

  20. On Residual Stresses in Resistance Spot-Welded Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6: Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, D.; Sedighi, M.; Karimi, M. R.; Barsoum, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, an electro-thermal-structural-coupled finite element (FE) model and x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements have been utilized to analyze distribution of residual stresses in an aluminum alloy 6061-T6 resistance spot-welded joint with 2-mm-thickness sheet. Increasing the aluminum sheet thickness to more than 1 mm leads to creating difficulty in spot-welding process and increases the complexity of the FE model. The electrical and thermal contact conductances, as mandatory factors are applied in contact areas of electrode-workpiece and workpiece-workpiece to resolve the complexity of the FE model. The physical and mechanical properties of the material are defined as thermal dependent to improve the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, the electrodes are removed after the holding cycle using the birth-and-death elements method. The results have a good agreement with experimental data obtained from x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements. However, the highest internal tensile residual stress occurs in the center of the nugget zone and decreases toward nugget edge; surface residual stress increases toward the edge of the welding zone and afterward, the area decreases slightly.

  1. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-12-02

    Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC) layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer's formation.

  2. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quoc Manh Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer’s formation.

  3. A comparison of corrosion inhibition of magnesium aluminum and zinc aluminum vanadate intercalated layered double hydroxides on magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lian; Zhang, Fen; Lu, Jun-Cai; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Shuo-Qi; Song, Liang; Zeng, Jian-Min

    2018-04-01

    The magnesium aluminum and zinc aluminum layered double hydroxides intercalated with NO3 -(MgAl-NO3-LDH and ZnAl-NO3-LDH) were prepared by the coprecipitation method, and the magnesium aluminum and the zinc aluminum layered double hydroxides intercalated with VO x -(MgAl-VO x -LDH and ZnAl-VO x -LDH) were prepared by the anion-exchange method. Morphologies, microstructures and chemical compositions of LDHs were investigated by SEM, EDS, XRD, FTIR, Raman and TG analyses. The immersion tests were carried to determine the corrosion inhibition properties of MgAl-VO x -LDH and ZnAl-VO x -LDH on AZ31 Mg alloys. The results showed that ZnAl-VO x -LDH possesses the best anion-exchange and inhibition abilities. The influence of treatment parameters on microstructures of LDHs were discussed. Additionally, an inhibition mechanism for ZnAl-VO x -LDH on the AZ31 magnesium alloy was proposed and discussed.

  4. Investigation on Formation Mechanism of Irregular Shape Porosity in Hypoeutectic Aluminum Alloy by X-Ray Real Time Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Yuna; Fan, Ran; Wang, Qigui; Pan, Ye

    2012-08-01

    The formation mechanism of irregular shape porosity in hypoeutectic aluminum silicon alloy (A356) was investigated by X-ray real time observation on porosity evolution during solidification and re-melting. Porosity in the hypoeutectic aluminum A356 alloy with high hydrogen content (>0.3 mL/100 g Al) first forms in the liquid as small spherical gas bubbles, then expands along with the pressure drop in the mushy zone due to shrinkage and lack of feeding, and finally deforms into irregular morphology by the impingement of aluminum dendrite network. Degassing is a key to eliminate porosity in aluminum alloy castings.

  5. Increased capacity of lines using aluminum alloy conductors; Recapacitacao de linhas utilizando condutores de aluminio liga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedmer, Ricardo Santos [COPEL Distribuicao, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Hoffmann, Joao N. [COPEL Transmissao, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Souza Junior, Oswaldo Honorato de; Silva, Vinicius P. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-05-15

    The increased ability to transport energy from three 138 kV lines in central region of Parana, totaling 153, 4 km, was obtained by the substitution of aluminum conductors with steel core 266.8 KCM Partridge for cable-aluminum alloy 6201 312.8 KCM Butte, and the elevation of temperature of the design of 55 deg C to 75 deg C. The initiative also involved testing to determine the optimal placement of dampers in LTs.

  6. Effect of temperature on corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol–water solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol–water solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques. The surface characterization was observed and determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The results demonstrate that the anodic aluminum dissolution and the cathodic oxygen reduction were accelerated by the increased temperature. However, as temperature was over 60 °C, the solubility and concentration of oxygen decreased, resulting in the inhibition of cathodic reaction. The cathodic reaction rate of 3003 aluminum alloy rose to the maximum at 60 °C. The Warburg impedance in Nyquist diagram diminished and then was replaced by a negative capacitance caused by the absorption of intermediate corrosion product on electrode. On the other hand, after potentiodynamic measurements, 3003 aluminum alloy suffered pitting corrosion. The dissolution of aluminum alloy around secondary phase particles expanded both horizontally and vertically.

  7. Microscopic analysis of effect of shot peening on corrosion fatigue behavior of aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Cheon; Cheong, Seong Kyun

    2012-01-01

    The object of this study considers corrosion fatigue improvement of 7075-T6 aluminum by using shot peening treatment on 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature. Aluminum alloy is generally used in aerospace structural components because of the light weight and high strength characteristics. Many studies have shown that an aluminum alloy can be approximately 50% lighter than other materials. Mostly, corrosion leads to earlier fatigue crack propagation under tensile conditions and severely reduces the life of structures. Therefore, the technique to improve material resistance to corrosion fatigue is required. Shot peening technology is widely used to improve fatigue life and other mechanical properties by induced compressive residual stress. Even the roughness of treated surface causes pitting corrosion, the compressive residual stress, which is induced under the surface layer of material by shot peening, suppersses the corrosion and increases the corrosion resistance. The experimental results for shot peened specimens were compared with previous work for non treated aluminum alloy. The results show that the shot peening treatment affects the corrosion fatigue improvement of aluminum alloys and the induced compressive residual stress by shot peening treatment improves the resistance to corrosion fatigue

  8. Pore formation during C.W.Nd: YAG laser welding of aluminum alloys for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, M.; Zhao, H.; DebRoy, T.

    2000-01-01

    Pore formation is an important concern in laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys. This paper investigates the influence of the laser beam defocusing on pore formation during continuous wave Nd:YAG laser welding of aluminum automotive alloys 5182 and 5754. It was found that the instability of the keyhole during welding was a dominant cause of pore formation while hydrogen rejection played an insignificant role. The defocusing of the laser beam greatly affected the stability of the keyhole. Finally, the mechanism of the collapse of the keyhole and pore formation is proposed. (Author) 45 refs

  9. An Economic Model and Experiments to Understand Aluminum-Cerium Alloy Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ananth V.; Lim, Heejong; Rios, Orlando; Sims, Zachary; Weiss, David

    2018-04-01

    We provide an economic model to understand the impact of adoption, sorting and pricing of scrap on the recycling of a new aluminum-cerium (AlCe) alloy for use in engine blocks in the automobile industry. The goal of the laboratory portion of this study is to investigate possible effects of cerium contamination on well-established aluminum recycling streams. Our methodology includes three components: (1) focused data gathering from industry supply chain participants, (2) experimental data through laboratory experiments to understand the impact of cerium on existing alloys and (3) an economic model to understand pricing incentives on a recycler's separation of AlCe engine blocks.

  10. Degradation assesment of aluminum alloy 6061-T6 using ultrasonic attenuation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Hee; Kang, To; Seo, Mu Kyung; Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Hak Joon; Kim, Kyung Cho; Kim, Young Bum [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Ultrasonic methods are widely used to degradation assesment. Remaining life cycle of metal can be estimated by ultrasonic parameters because ultrasonic velocity and attenuation are affected by change of material properties with accumulated fatigue in the metal. Therefore, in this study, we will estimate overall change of material properties by 2D C scan image. Fatigued aluminum alloy 6061-T6 samples from 0 to 85% were prepared for evaluating fatigue life cycle. Also, degraded image of materials using attenuation is proposed to estimate degree of material degradation for determining degraded area of fatigued samples. Finally, we will predicts process pf degradation with measured attenuation of fatigued aluminum alloy 6061-T6 samples.

  11. Thermal conductivity prediction of closed-cell aluminum alloy considering micropore effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of micro-scale pores are observed in the matrix of closed-cell aluminum alloy by scanning electron microscope, which indicates the dual-scale pore characteristics. Corresponding to this kind of special structural morphology, a new kind of dual-scale method is proposed to estimate its effective thermal conductivity. Comparing with the experimental results, the article puts forward the view that the prediction accuracy can be improved by the dual-scale method greatly. Different empirical formulas are also investigated in detail. It provides a new method for thermal properties estimation and makes preparation for more suitable empirical formula for closed-cell aluminum alloy.

  12. Joining of Aluminium Alloy Sheets by Rectangular Mechanical Clinching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.; Mori, K.; Kato, T.

    2011-01-01

    A mechanical clinching has the advantage of low running costs. However, the joint strength is not high. To improve the maximum load of the joined sheets by a mechanical clinching, square and rectangular mechanical clinching were introduced. In the mechanical clinching, the two sheets are mechanically joined by forming an interlock between the lower and upper sheets by the punch and die. The joined length with the interlock was increased by the rectangular punch and die. The deforming behaviours of the sheets in the mechanical clinching were investigated, and then the interlock in the sheets had distribution in the circumference of the projection. Although the interlocks were formed in both projection side and diagonal, the interlock in the diagonal was smaller because of the long contact length between the lower sheet and the die cavity surface. The maximum load of the joined sheets by the rectangular mechanical clinching was two times larger than the load by the round mechanical clinching.

  13. Corrosion and nanomechanical behaviors of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AA7020-T6 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, A., E-mail: arjun_venu@hotmail.com [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Srinath, J. [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Rama Krishna, L. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad 500005 (India); Ramesh Narayanan, P.; Sharma, S.C.; Venkitakrishnan, P.V. [Materials and Metallurgy Group, Materials and Mechanical Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2016-04-13

    Alumina coating was deposited on AA7020 aluminum alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and nano-mechanical behaviors were examined by means of potentiodynamic polarization, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and nano-indentation tests. Potentiodynamic polarization (PP) was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating and slow strain rate test (SSRT) was used for evaluating the environmental cracking resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution. The mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) were obtained from each indentation as a function of the penetration depth across the coating cross section. The above results were compared with similar PEO coated aluminum and magnesium alloys. Results indicated that PEO coating on AA7020 alloy significantly improved the corrosion resistance. However the environmental cracking resistance was found to be only marginal. The hardness and elastic modulus values were found to be much higher when compared to the base metal and similar PEO coated 7075 aluminum alloys. The fabricated coating also exhibited good adhesive strength with the substrate similar to other PEO coated aluminum alloys reported in the literature.

  14. Thermal analysis of aluminum alloys as a tool to evaluate the grain refiners efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariedy, M.M. [Aluminium Co. of Egypt, Nag Hammadi (Egypt); Niazi, A. [Assiut Univ. (Egypt); Nofal, A.A. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-10-01

    Al-5%Ti-1%B and Al-5%Ti-1C master alloys were used to grain refine some aluminum alloys. The factors that affect the efficiency of grain refiners (addition rate, holding time, pouring temperature and metal composition) were studied. Thermal analysis was used to evaluate the efficiency of the two grain refiners in parallel with a conventional method (KBI test). The characteristic parameters of the cooling curves have been correlated to the grain size of the castings. It was found that thermal analysis could be used as a tool to evaluate the efficiency of the grain refiners of aluminum alloys prior to casting. Also, it was found that Al-5%Ti-1%C master alloy is more efficient grain refiner than Al-5%Ti-1%B.

  15. Aerospace Patented High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Used in Commercial Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA structural materials engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama developed a high-strength aluminum alloy for aerospace applications with higher strength and wear-resistance at elevated temperatures. The alloy is a solution to reduce costs of aluminum engine pistons and lower engine emissions for the automobile industry. The Boats and Outboard Engines Division at Bombardier Recreational Products of Sturtevant, Wisconsin is using the alloy for pistons in its Evinrude E-Tec outboard, 40-90 horsepower, engine line. The alloy pistons make the outboard motor quieter and cleaner, while improving fuel mileage and increasing engine durability. The engines comply with California Air resources Board emissions standards, some of the most stringent in the United States. (photo credit: Bombardiier Recreational Products)

  16. Evaluation of Aluminum Alloy 2050-T84 Microstructure and Mechanical Properties at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.; Hales, Stephen J.; Shenoy, Ravi N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2050 is being considered for the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks to reduce the mass of future heavy-lift launch vehicles. The alloy is available in section thicknesses greater than that of the incumbent aluminum alloy, 2195, which will enable designs with greater structural efficiency. While ambient temperature design allowable properties are available for alloy 2050, cryogenic properties are not available. To determine its suitability for use in cryogenic propellant tanks, tensile, compression and fracture tests were conducted on 4 inch thick 2050-T84 plate at ambient temperature and at -320degF. Various metallurgical analyses were also performed in order to provide an understanding of the compositional homogeneity and microstructure of 2050.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of contamination by alloying elements in aluminum recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Takeda, Osamu; Miki, Takahiro; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2010-07-15

    In previous studies on the physical chemistry of pyrometallurgical processing of aluminum scrap, only a limited number of thermodynamic parameters, such as the Gibbs free energy change of impurity reactions and the variation of activity of an impurity in molten aluminum, were taken into account. In contrast, in this study we thermodynamically evaluated the quantitative removal limit of impurities during the remelting of aluminum scrap; all relevant parameters, such as the total pressure, the activity coefficient of the target impurity, the temperature, the oxygen partial pressure, and the activity coefficient of oxidation product, were considered. For 45 elements that usually occur in aluminum products, the distribution ratios among the metal, slag, and gas phases in the aluminum remelting process were obtained. Our results show that, except for elements such as Mg and Zn, most of the impurities occurred as troublesome tramp elements that are difficult to remove, and our results also indicate that the extent to which the process parameters such as oxygen partial pressure, temperature, and flux composition can be changed in aluminum production is quite limited compared to that for iron and copper production, owing to aluminum's relatively low melting point and strong affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the control of impurities in the disassembly process and the quality of scrap play important roles in suppressing contamination in aluminum recycling.

  18. Development of improved low-strain creep strength in Cabot alloy R-41 sheet. [nickel base sheet alloy for reentry shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of improving the low-strain creep properties of a thin gauge nickel base sheet alloy through modified heat treatment or through development of a preferred crystal-lographic texture was investigated. The basic approach taken to improve the creep strength of the material by heat treatment was to increase grain size by raising the solution treatment temperature for the alloy to the range of 1420 K to 1475 K (2100 F to 2200 F). The key technical issue involved was maintenance of adequate tensile ductility following the solutioning of M6C primary carbides during the higher temperature solution treatment. The approach to improve creep properties by developing a sheet texture involved varying both annealing temperatures and the amount of prior cold work. Results identified a heat treatment for alloy R-14 sheet which yields a substantial creep-life advantage at temperatures above 1090 K (1500 F) when compared with material given the standard heat treatment. At the same time, this treatment provides reasonable tensile ductility over the entire temperature range of interest. The mechanical properties of the material given the new heat treatment are compared with those for material given the standard heat treatment. Attempts to improve creep strength by developing a sheet texture were unsuccessful.

  19. Interactions between drops of a molten aluminum-lithium alloy and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.

    1994-01-01

    In certain hypothesized nuclear reactor accident scenarios, 1- to 10-g drops of molten aluminum-lithium alloys might contact liquid water. Because vigorous steam explosions have occurred when large amounts of molten aluminum-lithium alloys were released into water or other coolants, it becomes important to know whether there will be explosions if smaller amounts of these molten alloys similarly come into contact with water. Therefore, the authors released drops of molten Al-3.1 wt pct Li alloy into deionized water at room temperature. The experiments were performed at local atmospheric pressure (0.085 MPa) without pressure transient triggers applied to the water. The absence of these triggers allowed them to (a) investigate whether spontaneous initiation of steam explosions would occur with these drops and (b) study the alloy-water chemical reactions. The drop sizes and melt temperatures were chosen to simulate melt globules that might form during the hypothesized melting of the aluminum-lithium alloy components

  20. Texture analysis and accuracy of the measurement in cold rolled aluminum sheets using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, No Jin; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kim, Sung Jin; Seong, Baek Seok; Lee, Chang Hee; Shin, Eun Joo

    2000-01-01

    The neutron diffraction method is a powerful technique for the texture investigation owing to its high penetration capability, when compared with the X-ray diffraction method. The complete pole figures can be measured and the whole through-thickness texture can be analysed with the neutron diffraction method. Accordingly, the texture measured by means of the neutron diffraction is successfully applied to evaluate the anisotropic properties of the textured materials. Cold rolling of aluminum sheets was carried out with and without lubrication to investigate the formation of inhomogeneous textures as well as to compare the both measurement techniques (neutron and X-ray). The texture of the cold rolled aluminum sheets mainly resides along β-fiber. However, rolling without lubrication led to the formation of the (001)smaller than 110 greater than orientation at the surface layer which was clearly confirmed by X-ray diffraction. With neutron diffraction the whole through-thickness textures were measured. Accuracy of the measurement and texture analysis was estimated using such parameters as RP (hk1) , RP1 (hk1 )-value, PF (hk1) -dispersion and ΔC. It is proved that the texture analysis by the neutron diffraction is more accurate than that by the X-ray diffraction. (author)

  1. Portable Fiber Laser System and Method to Remove Pits and Cracks on Sensitized Surfaces of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    and Cracks on Sensitized Surfaces of Aluminum Alloys Prepared for DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Office of Naval Research For the period July 1, 2015...Cracks on Sensitized Surfaces of Aluminum Alloys 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...nanohardness, and elastic modulus of the 5052 Mg-Al alloy samples were experimentally investigated and analyzed. The phased objectives and specific

  2. Semi-solid twin-roll casting process of magnesium alloy sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, H.; Davey, K.; Rasgado, M.T. Alonso; Haga, T.; Koga, N.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental approach has been performed to ascertain the effectiveness of semi-solid strip casting using a horizontal twin roll caster. The demand for light-weight products with high strength has grown recently due to the rapid development of automobile and aircraft technology. One key to such development has been utilization of magnesium alloys, which can potentially reduce the total product weight. However, the problems of utilizing magnesium alloys are still mainly related to high manufacturing cost. One of the solutions to this problem is to develop magnesium casting-rolling technology in order to produce magnesium sheet products at competitive cost for commercial applications. In this experiment, magnesium alloy AZ31B was used to ascertain the effectiveness of semi-solid roll strip casting for producing magnesium alloy sheets. The temperature of the molten magnesium, and the roll speeds of the upper and lower rolls, (which could be changed independently), were varied to find an appropriate manufacturing condition. Rolling and heat treatment conditions were changed to examine which condition would be appropriate for producing wrought magnesium alloys with good formability. Microscopic observation of the crystals of the manufactured wrought magnesium alloys was performed. It has been found that a limiting drawing ratio of 2.7 was possible in a warm deep drawing test of the cast magnesium alloy sheets after being hot rolled

  3. Analysis of impact-sliding wear property of aluminum bronze against titanium alloy and 2Cr13 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongqiang; Wang, Liqin

    2009-07-01

    Impact-sliding wear of aluminum bronze against titanium alloy and 2Cr13 steel have been conducted using impactsliding wear test rig which was developed independently. Some non-destructive examinations have been performed on worn specimens, using weighing, 2D and 3D profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and EDS technology. Using laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), it has been found that the surface of aluminum bronze which wears against titanium alloy is much coarser than the surface which wears against 2Cr13 steel. Results of wear volume show clearly that although the hardness of titanium alloy has greater value than aluminum bronze, the wear volume of titanium alloy has much greater value compared with aluminum bronze. It has been found that there is remarkable material transferring from titanium alloy to aluminum bronze and little material transfer from aluminum bronze to titanium alloy. For the impact-sliding wear between aluminum bronze against 2Cr13 steel, the hardness of aluminum bronze has greater value than 2Cr13 steel, the wear volume of aluminum bronze has much greater value compared with 2Cr13 steel, whose wear volume can be ignored. Using EDS technology, it has been found that there is material transferring from aluminum bronze to 2Cr13 steel and material transferring from 2Cr13 steel to aluminum bronze can be ignored. Through the SEM pictures of worn surfaces and worn debris, flaking, particles and micro-cracks can be found on the worn surfaces. The wear mechanism of aluminum bronze against titanium alloy and 2Cr13 steel is delamination wear.

  4. Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition hybrid process on aluminum and titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Langping; Wang Yuhang; Wang Xiaofeng; Tang Baoyin; Dong Shen

    2007-01-01

    Because of their variety excellent properties, aluminum and titanium alloy are widely used in aerospace, airplane, ship manufacture, energy source and chemical engineering. However, both of them show a low wear resistance. In our research, plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition was utilized to improve their wear resistance. The method of ion implantation + transition layer deposition + wear resistance layer deposition was applied on these alloys. And by employing the wear testing method, the influences of the structure and thickness of the transition layer on wear resistance were obtained. The experimental results reveal that the wear resistance of these alloys can be improved significantly by optimizing the processing window. (authors)

  5. Nonlinear acoustic properties of the B95 aluminum alloy and the B95/nanodiamond composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobov, A. I.; Prokhorov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Research results for the nonlinear acoustic properties of the B95 polycrystalline aluminum alloy and the B95/nanodiamond composite have been described. The nonlinear properties of the alloys have been studied by the spectral method that measures the efficiency of generation of the second harmonic of a bulk acoustic wave at a frequency of 2 f = 10 MHz in the field of a finite-amplitude longitudinal acoustic wave at a frequency of f = 5 MHz. The results derived by this method have been compared with the results of studies of the nonlinear acoustic properties of the test alloys using the Thurston-Brugger quasi-static method.

  6. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  7. Deformation mechanism of aluminum-magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazantzis, A. V.; Chen, Z. G.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2013-01-01

    The study concentrates on the formulation of a reliable constitutive equation for plastic forming of Al-Mg-based alloys above 400 A degrees C and at strain rates above 10(-3) s(-1). The deformation mechanisms of two coarse-grained Al-Mg alloys, also known as AA5182, with grain sizes 21 and 37 mu m

  8. Atmospheric Corrosion of Aluminum Alloy 3105 in Coastal Environments: Interim Report After 15 Months Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, G.R.

    1996-04-19

    In May of 1994, racks of corrosion samples were installed along the Oregon coast. The aluminum alloy 3105 samples were mounted on utility poles in Astoria, Manzanita, Lincoln City, Gold Beach, Brookings, Portland, and Albany. At each coastal location, samples were placed on four different poles at various distances from the coast (from as near as 50 feet to as far as 5 miles). The inland sites (Portland and Albany) have only one pole per site and are used as control sites. Besides the 3105 alloys, 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys were placed at all sites. Since installation, one rack was lost due to the pole being taken down by the phone company (in Lincoln City), but the rest of the poles and racks are still in place.

    In August of 1995, the aluminum samples were visually inspected, and the remaining six 3105 aluminum samples in Lincoln City were removed for laboratory examination. Non-destructive x-ray analysis was used on the Lincoln City samples to obtain information a bout the nature of the corrosion products. Because the analysis was performed while the corrosion products remained on the surface, aluminum peaks dominated the diffraction pattern, and relative peak-heights were different from normal. Nevertheless, some minerals were identified as part of the corrosion products.

  9. Fatigue Strength Estimation Based on Local Mechanical Properties for Aluminum Alloy FSW Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittima Sillapasa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Overall fatigue strengths and hardness distributions of the aluminum alloy similar and dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW joints were determined. The local fatigue strengths as well as local tensile strengths were also obtained by using small round bar specimens extracted from specific locations, such as the stir zone, heat affected zone, and base metal. It was found from the results that fatigue fracture of the FSW joint plate specimen occurred at the location of the lowest local fatigue strength as well as the lowest hardness, regardless of microstructural evolution. To estimate the fatigue strengths of aluminum alloy FSW joints from the hardness measurements, the relationship between fatigue strength and hardness for aluminum alloys was investigated based on the present experimental results and the available wide range of data from the references. It was found as: σa (R = −1 = 1.68 HV (σa is in MPa and HV has no unit. It was also confirmed that the estimated fatigue strengths were in good agreement with the experimental results for aluminum alloy FSW joints.

  10. Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Strength of Three Aluminum Alloys Used in Light Poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig C. Menzemer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The conjoint influence of welding and artificial aging on mechanical properties were investigated for extrusions of aluminum alloy 6063, 6061, and 6005A. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on the aluminum alloys 6063-T4, 6061-T4, and 6005A-T1 in both the as-received (AR and as-welded (AW conditions. Tensile tests were also conducted on the AR and AW alloys, subsequent to artificial aging. The welding process used was gas metal arc (GMAW with spray transfer using 120–220 A of current at 22 V. The artificial aging used was a precipitation heat treatment for 6 h at 182 °C (360 °F. Tensile tests revealed the welded aluminum alloys to have lower strength, both for yield and ultimate tensile strength, when compared to the as-received un-welded counterpart. The beneficial influence of post weld heat treatment (PWHT on strength and ductility is presented and discussed in terms of current design provisions for welded aluminum light pole structures.

  11. Low alloy additions of iron, silicon, and aluminum to uranium: a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the literature has been made on the experimental results of small additions of iron, silicon, and aluminum to uranium. Information is also included on the constitution, mechanical properties, heat treatment, and deformation of various binary and ternary alloys. 42 references, 24 figures, 13 tables

  12. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  13. Laser surface alloying of aluminum (AA1200) with Ni and SiC Powders

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available . The dissociated C reacted with Al to form Al4C3. The addition of Ni resulted in the formation of the Al3Ni phase. A hardness increase of approximately four times that of aluminum AA1200 was achieved in the alloyed layer....

  14. Strain hardening and damage in 6xxx series aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simar, Aude; Nielsen, Kim Lau; de Meester, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    A friction stir weld in 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy has been prepared and analyzed by micro-hardness measurements, tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The locations of the various weld zones were determined by micro-hardness indentation measurements. The flow behavior of the vario...

  15. State of residual stress in laser-deposited ceramic composite coatings on aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadolkar, P. B.; Watkins, T. R.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Dahotre, N. B.

    The nature and magnitude of the residual stresses within laser-deposited titanium carbide (TiC) coatings on 2024 and 6061 aluminum (Al) alloys were investigated. Macro- and micro-stresses within the coatings were determined using an X-ray diffraction method. Owing to increased debonding between the

  16. Modeling and simulation of phase-transitions in multicomponent aluminum alloy casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Cate, A.; Geurts, B.J.; Muskulus, M.; Köster, D.; Muntean, A.; Van Opheusden, J.; Peschansky, A.; Vreman, B.; Zegeling, P.

    2008-01-01

    The casting process of aluminum products involves the spatial distribution of alloying elements. It is essential that these elements are uniformly distributed in order to guarantee reliable and consistent products. This requires a good understanding of the main physical mechanisms that affect the

  17. Anti-icing/frosting and self-cleaning performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Libang; Yan, Zhongna; Shi, Xueting; Sultonzoda, Firdavs

    2018-02-01

    Ice formation and frost deposition on cryogenic equipment and systems can result in serious problems and huge economic loss. Hence, it is quite necessary to develop new materials to prevent icing and frosting on cold surfaces in engineering fields. Here, a superhydrophobic aluminum alloy with enhanced anti-frosting, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance has been developed by a facile one-step method. The anti-frosting/icing performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys is confirmed by frosting/icing time delay, consolidating and freezing temperature reduction, and lower amount of frost/ice adhesion. Meanwhile, the excellent self-cleaning performance is authenticated by the fact that simulated pollution particles can be cleaned out by rolling water droplets completely. Finally, based on the classical nucleation theory, anti-icing and anti-frosting mechanisms of the superhydrophobic aluminum alloys are deduced. Results show that grounded on "air cushion" and "heat insulation" effect, a larger nucleation barrier and a lower crystal growth rate can be observed, which, hence, inhibit ice formation and frost deposition. It can be concluded that preparing superhydrophobic surfaces would be an effective strategy for improving anti-icing, anti-frosting, and self-cleaning performance of aluminum alloys.

  18. Fretting Behavior of SPR Joining Dissimilar Sheets of Titanium and Copper Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaocong He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The fretting performance of self-piercing riveting joining dissimilar sheets in TA1 titanium alloy and H62 copper alloy was studied in this paper. Load-controlled cyclic fatigue tests were carried out using a sine waveform and in tension-tension mode. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray techniques were employed to analyze the fretting failure mechanisms of the joints. The experimental results showed that there was extremely severe fretting at the contact interfaces of rivet and sheet materials for the joints at relatively high loads levels. Moreover, the severe fretting in the region on the locked sheet in contact with the rivet was the major cause of the broken locked sheet for the joints at low load level.

  19. A crystallographic texture perspective formability investigation of aluminium 5052 alloy sheets at various annealing temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanasamy, R. [Department of Production Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli - 620015, Tamilnadu (India); Ravindran, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, VLB Janakiammal College of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore - 641042, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: mceravindran@yahoo.co.in; Manonmani, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Government College of Technology, Coimbatore - 641013, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: manokmani@yahoo.co.in; Satheesh, J. [Department of Production Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli - 620015, Tamilnadu (India)

    2009-05-15

    Formability, an important mechanical property of the sheet metal is strongly reliant on the crystallographic texture. Consequently deep drawability is also influenced. This paper deals with the perspective of crystallographic texture and its relevance with the formability of AA 5052 aluminium alloy sheet of 2 mm thickness annealed at four different temperatures namely 200 deg. C, 250 deg. C, 300 deg. C and 350 deg. C. Forming limit diagrams determined and plotted experimentally, their crystallographic textures obtained and their ODF plots prepared by X-ray diffraction were analyzed. The Forming limit diagrams (FLDs) of AA 5052 sheets annealed under different temperatures were examined with respect to the crystallographic texture point of view. The FLDs and crystallographic textures were then correlated with normal anisotropy of the sheet metal. It was found that the formability of aluminium alloy AA 5052 annealed at 350 deg. C possessed good formability, optimal texture and high normal anisotropy value.

  20. Fabrication of super-hydrophobic surfaces on aluminum alloy substrates by RF-sputtered polytetrafluoroethylene coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a method of fabricating super-hydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy substrate. The etching of aluminum surfaces has been performed using Beck's dislocation etchant for different time to create micrometer-sized irregular steps. An optimised etching time of 50 s is found to be essential before polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE coating, to obtain a highest water contact angle of 165±2° with a lowest contact angle hysteresis as low as 5±2°. The presence of patterned microstructure as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM together with the low surface energy ultrathin RF-sputtered PTFE films renders the aluminum alloy surfaces highly super-hydrophobic.

  1. Protection against Corrosion of Aluminum Alloy in Marine Environment by Lawsonia inermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Hajar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion performance of aluminum alloy 5083 (AA5083 was investigated in the splash zone area simulated in salt spray cabinet at ambient temperature. Three paint formulations were prepared in accordance with different percentages of henna extract. FTIR method was used to determine the constituent of henna while weight loss and electrochemical method were applied to investigate the inhibition behaviour. The findings show that corrosion rate of aluminum alloy decreased with the increases of henna extract in the coating formulation. The rise of charge transfer resistance (Rct value has contributed to the greater protection of the coated aluminum. The decrease in double layer capacitance value (Cdl is another indicator that a better protective barrier has been formed in the presence of henna in the coating matrix.

  2. Effects of organic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids were used to clean AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet and the effect of the cleaning processes on the surface condition and corrosion performance of the alloy was investigated. Organic acid cleanings reduced the surface impurities and enhanced the corrosion resistance. Removal of at least 4...... mu m of the contaminated surface was required to reach corrosion rates less than 1 mm/year in salt spray condition. Among the three organic acids examined, acetic acid is the best choice. Oxalic acid can be an alternative while citric acid is not suitable for cleaning AZ31 sheet, because...

  3. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  4. Development and evaluation of Al-Ti-C master alloys as grain refiner for aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadia, M.A. [Aluminum Co. of Egypt, Nag Hammadi (Egypt); Ghaneya, A.A.; Niazi, A. [Assiut Univ. (Egypt)

    1996-10-01

    A series of Al-Ti-C master alloys with different amounts of titanium and carbon (Al-3.5%Ti-0.5%C, Al-3.5%Ti-0.7%C and Al-5%Ti-1%C) has been developed by adding activated graphite to molten Al-Ti binary alloys. The micro-structures of the developed alloys were investigated. The efficiency of the produced alloys as aluminum grain refiner was evaluated. The effects of the following factors were investigated: addition rate of each master alloy, the pouring temperature of the refined metal and the holding time before pouring. Also, the contact time for each refiner was studied. The results were significant and the refiner Al-5%Ti-1%C was the most effective.

  5. Research on manufacturing aluminum - rare earth alloy with a high content of rare earth (> 20% RE) from total rare earth oxides by thermit reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Trong Hiep; Dam Van Tien; Tran Duy Hai; Ngo Xuan Hung and Ly Thanh Vu

    2004-01-01

    In this report, several theoretical principles of thermit reduction method used for metal oxides to obtain metals, ferroalloys and ligatua with technical purity are presented. Manufacture of aluminum-rare earth alloys by thermit reduction is also described in the report. Data that are generalized based on thermo-kinetic calculation of the thermit reduction and selection of technological flow-sheet based on thermal effect will partly clarify research results in investigating typical features of the process and identify measures to reduce metal loss in discharged slags. (author)

  6. Replacement of steel parts with extruded aluminum alloys in an automobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggula, Manikantha Reddy

    Over the past years, vehicle emissions have shown a negative impact on environment and human health. A new strategy has been used by automakers to reduce a vehicle's weight which significantly reduce fuel consumption and C02 emissions. A very light car consumes very less fuel as it needs to overcome less inertia, decreasing the required power to movie the vehicle. Reducing weight is the easiest way to increase fuel economy and making it by just 10% can increase its efficiency 6 to 8 percent. For a normal scale 80% of vehicles weight is shared among chassis, power train and other exterior components. Almost 60% of the vehicles weight is comprised of steel and the remaining is with cast and extruded aluminum and magnesium alloys. Our main aim is to look for the parts like Fuel tank holder, Fuel filler neck, Turbo inlet assembly, and Brake lines, Dash board frame which are made from steel and replace them with extruded aluminum alloys, to analyze a conventional rear wheel aluminum drive shaft and replace it with a new design and with a new aluminum alloy. The current project involves dismantling an automobile and looking for feasible steel parts and making samples, analyzing the hardness of the samples. These parts are optimally analyzed using Ansys Finite element analysis tool, these parts are subjected to the constraints such as three-point bending, tensile testing, hydrostatic pressure and also torsional stress action on the drive shaft, the deformation and stress are observed in these parts. The results show the current steel parts can be replaced with 3000 series aluminum alloy and the drive shaft can be replaced with new design with 6061-T6 Al-alloy which decreases 25% of the shaft weight.

  7. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, Brandon C., E-mail: terry13@purdue.edu [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Sippel, Travis R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Pfeil, Mark A. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Gunduz, I.Emre; Son, Steven F. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Al-Li alloy propellant has increased ideal specific impulse over neat aluminum. • Al-Li alloy propellant has a near complete reduction in HCl acid formation. • Reduction in HCl was verified with wet bomb experiments and DSC/TGA-MS/FTIR. - Abstract: Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (I{sub SP}). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal I{sub SP} by ∼7 s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5 ± 4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption.

  8. Wear behaviors of pure aluminum and extruded aluminum alloy (AA2024-T4) under variable vertical loads and linear speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jeki; Oak, Jeong-Jung; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Cho, Yi Je; Park, Yong Ho

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transition of wear behavior for pure aluminum and extruded aluminum alloy 2024-T4 (AA2024-T4). The wear test was carried using a ball-on-disc wear testing machine at various vertical loads and linear speeds. The transition of wear behaviors was analyzed based on the microstructure, wear tracks, wear cross-section, and wear debris. The critical wear rates for each material are occurred at lower linear speed for each vertical load. The transition of wear behavior was observed in which abrasion wears with the generation of an oxide layer, fracture of oxide layer, adhesion wear, severe adhesion wear, and the generation of seizure occurred in sequence. In case of the pure aluminum, the change of wear debris occurred in the order of blocky, flake, and needle-like debris. Cutting chip, flake-like, and coarse flake-like debris was occurred in sequence for the extruded AA2024-T4. The transition in the wear behavior of extruded AA2024-T4 occurred slower than in pure aluminum.

  9. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  10. Properties of aluminum alloys tensile, creep, and fatigue data at high and low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This book compiles more than 300 tables listing typical average properties of a wide range of aluminum alloys. The individual test results were compiled, plotted in various ways, and analyzed. The average values from the tensile and creep tests were then normalized to the published typical room-temperature tensile properties of the respective alloys for easy comparison. This extensive project was done by Alcoa Laboratories over a period of several years. The types of data presented include: Typical Mechanical Properties of Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys at Various Temperatures, including tensile properties at subzero temperatures, at temperature after various holding times at the test temperature, and at room temperature after exposure at various temperatures for various holding times; creep rupture strengths for various times at various temperatures; stresses required to generate various amounts of creep in various lengths of time; rotating-beam fatigue strengths; modulus of elasticity as a function of t...

  11. Filtration of aluminum alloys and its influence on mechanical properties and shape of eutectical silicium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brůna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Filtration during casting of high quality aluminum alloys belongs to main refining methods. Even when there are many years of experiences and experimental works on this subject, there are still some specific anomalies. While using ceramic filtration media during casting of aluminum alloys, almost in all experiments occurred increase of strength limit and atypical increase of extension. This anomaly was not explained with classical metallurgical methods, black-white contrast after surface etching neither with color surface etching. For that reason was used deep etching on REM. By using pressed ceramic filters, by studying morphology eutectical silicon was observed modification morphology of eutectical silicon, this explains increase extension after filtration. Pressed ceramic filters were used on experimental works. Casting was executed on hardenable alloy AlSi10MgMn.

  12. Modeling of plastic localization in aluminum and Al–Cu alloys under shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnikov, V.S.; Mayer, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the modeling of plastic deformation localization in pure aluminum and aluminum–copper alloys during the propagation of a plane shock wave. Modeling is carried out with the use of continual dislocation plasticity model in 2-D geometry. It is shown that the formation of localization bands occurs at an angle of 45° to the direction of propagation of the shock front. Effective initiators for plastic localization in pure aluminum are the perturbations of the initial dislocation density, in the alloys – perturbations of the dislocation density and the concentration of copper atoms. Perturbations of temperature field in a range of tens of kelvins are not so effective for plastic localization. In the alloy plastic localization intensity decreases with an increase of strain rate due to the thermally activated nature of the dislocation motion

  13. Effect and kinetic mechanism of ultrasonic vibration on solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripeng Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The work described in this paper dealt with the effect of ultrasonic vibration on the solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy. Two experiments were carried out through introducing ultrasound into the semi-continuous direct-chill (DC casting of aluminum alloy and into alloy solidifying in a crucible, respectively. Results show that ultrasonic vibration can refine grains in the whole cross-section of a billet in the first experiment and is able to increase the cooling rate within the temperature range from 625 °C to 590 °C in the other one. The mechanism of particle resonance caused by ultrasonic vibration was illustrated on the basis of theoretical analysis of the kinetics and energy conversion during the solidification. It is demonstrated that the kinetic energy of resonant particles are mainly from the latent heat energy of solidification, which can shorten the cooling time, inhibit the crystal growth and then lead to the grain refinement.

  14. Joining of dissimilar metals by diffusion bonding. Titanium alloy with aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akca, Enes [International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Research and Development Center; International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Gursel, Ali [International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a novel diffusion bonding process of commercially pure aluminum to Ti-6Al-4V alloy at 520, 560, 600 and 640 C for 30, 45 and 60 minutes under argon gas shielding without the use of interlayer. The approach is to overcome the difficulties in fusion welding of dissimilar alloys. Diffusion bonding is a dissimilar metal welding process which can be applied to the materials without causing any physical deformations. Processed samples were metallographically prepared, optically examined followed by Vickers microhardness test and subjected to tensile test in order to determine joint strength. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used in this work to investigate the compositional changes across the joint region. Elemental composition of the region has been successfully defined between titanium alloy and aluminum. The maximum tensile strength was obtained from the samples bonded at the highest temperatures of 600 and 640 C.

  15. Mechanical Properties of 7076-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    George, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    ... by the NAVAIRSYSCOM Engineering Specialties Divsion. The purpose was to determine the mechanical properties of the alloy to support the development of a fatigue allowables curve used for life assessment of 54H60 propeller blades...

  16. Process analysis of the co-extrusion of aluminum and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grittner, N.; Striewe, B.; Dietrich, D.; von Hehl, A.; Klose, C.; Schaper, M.; Zoch, H.-W.; Bach, Fr.-W.

    This document provides the results of the process analysis of the co-extrusion of aluminum and titanium alloys. The compound consists of the slave material aluminum and the core material titanium. The investigation determines the influence of the parameters billet temperature, press ratio and core length on the process. The material combinations used for the experiments were Al99,5 — Ti Grade 2, and EN AW — 6082 — TiAl6V4. The titanium core material was inserted in a drilled and machined aluminum billet. Furthermore, mechanical properties of the interface were determined by tensile tests. Additionally, the formation of the interface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro analysis and electron backscatter diffraction. The aim of the presented investigations is to show the technical feasibility of the co-extrusion of aluminum-titanium-compounds and to control the growth of intermetallic phases in the interface to increase the mechanical properties.

  17. Laser Overlap Welding of Zinc-coated Steel on Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Hamed Tasalloti; Kah, Paul; Martikainen, Jukka

    Local reinforcement of aluminum with laser welded patches of zinc-coated steel can effectively contribute to crashworthiness, durability and weight reduction of car body. However, the weld between Zn-coated steel and aluminum is commonly susceptible to defects such as spatter, cavity and crack. The vaporization of Zn is commonly known as the main source of instability in the weld pool and cavity formation, especially in a lap joint configuration. Cracks are mainly due to the brittle intermetallic compounds growing at the weld interface of aluminum and steel. This study provides a review on the main metallurgical and mechanical concerns regarding laser overlap welding of Zn-coated steel on Al-alloy and the methods used by researchers to avoid the weld defects related to the vaporization of Zn and the poor metallurgical compatibility between steel and aluminum.

  18. Evaluation of creep and relaxation data for hastelloy alloy x sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.

    1979-02-01

    Hastelloy alloy X has been a successful high-temperature structural material for more than two decades. Recently, Hastelloy alloy X sheet has been selected as a prime structural material for the proposed Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS). The material also sees extensive application in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Design of these systems requires a detailed consideration of the high-temperature creep properties of this material. Therefore, available creep, creep-rupture, and relaxation data for Hastelloy alloy X were collected and analyzed to yield mathematical representations of the behavior for design use

  19. Long-term thermal degradation and alloying constituent effects on five boron/aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal exposure effects on the properties of five boron/aluminum composite systems were experimentally investigated. The composite systems were 49 volume percent boron fibers (203 micron diameter) in aluminum-alloy matrices 1100 Al, 2024 Al, 3003 Al, 5052 Al, and 6061 Al. Specimens were thermally exposed up to 10,000 hours at 500 K and 590 K, up to 500 hours at 730 K, and up to 10,000 hours at 500 K and 590 K, up to 500 hours at 730 K, and up to 2000 thermal cycles between 200 K and 590 K. Composite longitudinal and transverse tensile strengths, longitudinal compression strength, and in-plane shear strength were determined. None of the systems was severely degraded by exposure at 590 K. The best performing system was B-2024 Al. Effects of matrix alloys on degradation mechanisms were experimentally investigated. Composite specimens and individual fibers were metallurgically analyzed with a scanning electron microscope and an electron microprobe to determine failure characteristics, chemical element distribution, and reaction layer morphology. Alloying constituents were found to be affect the composite degradation mechanisms as follows: alloys containing iron, but without manganese as a stabilizer, caused increased low-temperature degradation; alloys containing magnesium, iron, or manganese caused increased degradation; and alloys containing copper caused increased fiber strength.

  20. Study of Axes Rotation during Simple Shear Tests on Aluminum Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, L.; Diouf, B.; Lelotte, T.; Flores, P.; Habraken, A. M.; Bouvier, S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to model accurately the anisotropic material behavior during finite element simulations, a precise description of the material yield locus is required. Beside the shape (linked to the material model used), the size (related to the isotropic hardening) and the position (kinematic hardening) of the yield locus, its orientation is of particular interest when large rotations of the material are encountered during the simulations. This paper proposes three distinct methods for the determination of the material yield locus rotation: a method based on the Constant Symmetric Local Velocity Gradient (CSLVG), a corotational method and a method based on the Mandel spin. These methods are compared during simple shear tests of an aluminum sheet

  1. Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

    1999-08-02

    Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

  2. Characterization of Aluminum Magnesium Alloy Reverse Sensitized via Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    force at 150 RPM with a constant water flow as lubricant/ coolant . Polishing regimen: • 120 grit aluminum oxide paper for 10 minutes. • 220 grit...to the degree of intergranular corrosion susceptibility. Test specimens were contained in a beaker filled with 24 400 mL, 70 wt% nitric acid

  3. Thermal compatibility studies of unirradiated U-Mo alloys dispersed in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.B.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The thermal compatibility of centrifugally atomized U-Mo alloys with aluminium has been studied. The results of the investigations show that the U-2 wt% Mo/aluminum dispersions increase in volume by 26% at 400 C after 2000 h. This large volume change is mainly due to the formation of voids and cracks resulting from nearly complete interdiffusion of U-Mo and aluminum. No significant dimensional changes occur in the U-10 wt% Mo/aluminum dispersions. Interdiffusion between U-10 wt% Mo and aluminum is found to be minimal. The different diffusion behavior is primarily due to the fact that U-10 wt% Mo particles are much more supersaturated with substitutional molybdenum than U-2 wt% Mo particles. The aluminum diffuses into the U-2 wt% Mo particles relatively rapidly along grain boundary with nearly pure uranium, forming UAl 3 almost fully throughout the 2000 h anneal, whereas the molybdenum supersaturated in the U-10 wt% Mo particles inhibits the diffusion of aluminum atoms. U-10 wt% Mo displays superior thermal compatibility with aluminum compared to U-2 wt% Mo. (orig.)

  4. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-05

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Age hardening in rapidly solidified and hot isostatically pressed beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; McGeorge, A.C.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1995-01-01

    Three different alloys of beryllium, aluminum and silver were processed to powder by centrifugal atomization in a helium atmosphere. Alloy compositions were, by weight, 50% Be, 47.5% Al, 2.5% Ag, 50% Be, 47% Al, 3% Ag, and 50% Be, 46% Al, 4% Ag. Due to the low solubility of both aluminum and silver in beryllium, the silver was concentrated in the aluminum phase, which appeared to separate from the beryllium in the liquid phase. A fine, continuous composite beryllium-aluminum microstructure was formed, which did not significantly change after hot isostatically pressing at 550 C for one hour at 30,000 psi argon pressure. Samples of HIP material were solution treated at 550 C for one hour, followed by a water quench. Aging temperatures were 150, 175, 200 and 225 C for times ranging from one half hour to 65 hours. Hardness measurements were made using a diamond pyramid indenter with a load of 1 kg. Results indicate that peak hardness was reached in 36--40 hours at 175 C and 12--16 hours at 200 C aging temperature, relatively independent of alloy composition

  6. Experimental Investigation and FE Analysis on Constitutive Relationship of High Strength Aluminum Alloy under Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments of 17 high strength aluminum alloy (7A04 specimens were conducted to investigate the constitutive relationship under cyclic loading. The monotonic behavior and hysteretic behavior were focused on and the fracture surface was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM to investigate the microfailure modes. Based on Ramberg-Osgood model, stress-strain skeleton curves under cyclic loading were fitted. Parameters of combined hardening model including isotropic hardening and kinematic hardening were calibrated from test data according to Chaboche model. The cyclic tests were simulated in finite element software ABAQUS. The test results show that 7A04 aluminum alloy has obvious nonlinearity and ultra-high strength which is over 600 MPa, however, with relatively poor ductility. In the cyclic loading tests, 7A04 aluminum alloy showed cyclic hardening behavior and when the compressive strain was larger than 1%, the stiffness degradation and strength degradation occurred. The simulated curves derived by FE model fitted well with experimental curves which indicates that the parameters of this combined model can be used in accurate calculation of 7A04 high strength aluminum structures under cyclic loading.

  7. Effect of wire EDM conditions on generation of residual stresses in machining of aluminum 2014 T6 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujari Srinivasa Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wire electrical discharge machining (EDM possesses many advantages over the conventional manufacturing process. Hence, this process was used for machining of all conductive materials; especially, nowadays this is the most common process for machining of aerospace aluminum alloys. This process produces complex shapes in aluminum alloys with extremely tight tolerances in a single setup. But, for good surface integrity and longer service life, the residual stresses generated on the components should be as low as possible and it depends on the setting of process parameters and the material to be machined. In wire EDM, much of the work was concentrated on Titanium alloys, Inconel alloys and various types of steels and partly on aluminum alloys. The present investigation was a parametric analysis of wire EDM parameters on residual stresses in the machining of aluminum alloy using Taguchi method. The results obtained had shown a wide range of residual stresses from 8.2 to 405.6 MPa. It also influenced the formation of various intermetallics such as AlCu and AlCu3. Microscopic examination revealed absence of surface cracks on aluminum surface at all the machining conditions. Here, an attempt was made to compare the results of aluminum alloy with the available machined data for other metals.

  8. Formation and stability of aluminum-based metallic glasses in Al-Fe-Gd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y.; Poon, S.J.; Shiflet, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Metallic glasses, a class of amorphous alloys made by rapid solidification, have been studied quite extensively for almost thirty years. It has been recognized for a long time that metallic glasses are usually very strong and ductile, and exhibit high corrosion resistance relative to crystalline alloys with the same compositions. Recently, metallic glasses containing as much as 90 atomic percent aluminum have been discovered independently by two groups. This discovery has both scientific and technological implications. The formability of these new glasses have been found to be unusual. Studies of mechanical properties in these new metallic glasses show that many of them have tensile strengths over 800MPa, greatly exceeding the strongest commercial aluminum alloys. The high strengths of aluminum-rich metallic glasses can be of significant importance in obtaining high strength low density materials. Therefore, from both scientific and technological standpoints, it is important to understand the formation and thermal stability of these metallic glasses. Al-Fe-Gd alloys were chosen for a more detailed study since they exhibit high tensile strengths

  9. Mechanical Performance of Cold-Sprayed A357 Aluminum Alloy Coatings for Repair and Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petráčková, K.; Kondás, J.; Guagliano, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cold-sprayed coatings made of A357 aluminum alloy, a casting alloy widely used in aerospace, underwent set of standard tests as well as newly developed fatigue test to gain an information about potential of cold spray for repair and additive manufacturing of loaded parts. With optimal spray parameters, coating deposition on substrate with smooth surface resulted in relatively good bonding, which can be further improved by application of grit blasting on substrate's surface. However, no enhancement of adhesion was obtained for shot-peened surface. Process temperature, which was set either to 450 or 550 °C, was shown to have an effect on adhesion and cohesion strength, but it does not influence residual stress in the coating. To assess cold spray perspectives for additive manufacturing, flat tensile specimens were machined from coating and tested in as-sprayed and heat-treated (solution treatment and aging) condition. Tensile properties of the coating after the treatment correspond to properties of the cast A357-T61 aluminum alloy. Finally, fatigue specimen was proposed to test overall performance of the coating and coating's fatigue limit is compared to the results obtained on cast A357-T61 aluminum alloy.

  10. Compressive strength, plastic flow properties, and surface frictional effects of 1100, 3003 and 6061 aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkerton, Gary Wayne [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find aluminum alloys that are effective for use as wire vacuum seals in the 800MeV particle accelerator located at the Louis Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, NM. Three alloys, Al 1100, Al 3003, and Al 6061, are investigated under uniaxial compression to determine stresses for a given height reduction from 0 to 70 percent, and to find plastic flow and surface interaction effects. Right-circular cylindrical specimens are compressed on-end (cylindrically) and radially (for modeling as compressed wire). Aluminum 1100 and 3003 alloys are compared for length to diameter ratios of 1 and 2 for both compression types, and are then compared to results of radial compression of annealed small diameter Al 1100 wire currently used at LAMPE. The specimens are also compressed between three different platen surfaces, polished steel, etched steel, and aluminum 6061-T6, to determine effects of friction. The Al 3003 alloy exhibits 20 to 25% lower stresses at all height reductions than Al 1100 for both cylindrical and radial compression.

  11. Compressive strength, plastic flow properties, and surface frictional effects of 1100, 3003 and 6061 aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkerton, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find aluminum alloys that are effective for use as wire vacuum seals in the 800MeV particle accelerator located at the Louis Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, NM. Three alloys, Al 1100, Al 3003, and Al 6061, are investigated under uniaxial compression to determine stresses for a given height reduction from 0 to 70 percent, and to find plastic flow and surface interaction effects. Right-circular cylindrical specimens are compressed on-end (cylindrically) and radially (for modeling as compressed wire). Aluminum 1100 and 3003 alloys are compared for length to diameter ratios of 1 and 2 for both compression types, and are then compared to results of radial compression of annealed small diameter Al 1100 wire currently used at LAMPE. The specimens are also compressed between three different platen surfaces, polished steel, etched steel, and aluminum 6061-T6, to determine effects of friction. The Al 3003 alloy exhibits 20 to 25% lower stresses at all height reductions than Al 1100 for both cylindrical and radial compression

  12. Corrosion Electrochemistry of Aluminum Alloy for Aviation in Acid Salt Spray Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DU Juan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion processes of 2A12, 5A06 and 7A04 aluminium alloy in neutral and acid (pH≈5 continuous salt spray environment were studied with weight loss method and electrochemical method. The morphology and surface condition in the interface of metal phase was studied by metallographic microscope and contact angle surface analyzer, and the corrosion mechanism was analyzed. Weight loss method, polarization curves by Tafel extrapolation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show that the 3 kinds of aluminum alloy have the relationship of corrosion rate 7A04>2A12>5A06 in neutral salt spray as well as 7A04> 5A06>2A12 in acidic salt spray. The contact angles of the aluminum alloys surface with neutral and acidic salt solution conditions are 70.9ånd 52.6°respectively. The reason why the contact angle with acid salt solution is smaller than that with neutral salt solution is probably that the increase of the hydrogen ions may cause the cathodic reaction to move to the right, accelerate anodic dissolution and destroy the oxide film on the surface of the aluminum alloy.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Finite element modelling of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 under transverse impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Ahmad Sufian; Kuntjoro, Wahyu; Yamin, A. F. M.

    2017-12-01

    Fiber metal laminate named GLARE is a new aerospace material which has great potential to be widely used in future lightweight aircraft. It consists of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and glass-fiber reinforced laminate. In order to produce reliable finite element model of impact response or crashworthiness of structure made of GLARE, one can initially model and validate the finite element model of the impact response of its constituents separately. The objective of this study was to develop a reliable finite element model of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 under low velocity transverse impact loading using commercial software ABAQUS. Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage models were used to predict the alloy's material properties and impact behavior. The results of the finite element analysis were compared to the experiment that has similar material and impact conditions. Results showed good correlations in terms of impact forces, deformation and failure progressions which concluded that the finite element model of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under low velocity transverse impact condition using Johnson-Cook plastic and damage models was reliable.

  15. Continuous Severe Plastic Deformation Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan Srinivasan (PI); Prabir K. Chaudhury; Balakrishna Cherukuri; Qingyou Han; David Swenson; Percy Gros

    2006-06-30

    by SPD techniques. This combination of properties makes UFG metals produced by SPD very attractive as machining, forging or extrusion stock, both from the point of view of formability as well as energy and cost saving. However, prior to this work there had been no attempt to transfer these potential benefits observed in the laboratory scale to industrial shop floor. The primary reason for this was that the laboratory scale studies had been conducted to develop a scientific understanding of the processes that result in grain refinement during SPD. Samples that had been prepared in the laboratory scale were typically only about 10-mm diameter and 50-mm long (about 0.5-inch diameter and 2-inches long). The thrust of this project was three-fold: (i) to show that the ECAE/P process can be scaled up to produce long samples, i.e., a continuous severe plastic deformation (CSPD) process, (ii) show the process can be scaled up to produce large cross section samples that could be used as forging stock, and (iii) use the large cross-section samples to produce industrial size forgings and demonstrate the potential energy and cost savings that can be realized if SPD processed stock is adopted by the forging industry. Aluminum alloy AA-6061 was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach used. The CSPD process developed using the principles of chamber-less extrusion and drawing, and was demonstrated using rolling and wire drawing equipment that was available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a parallel effort, ECAE/P dies were developed for producing 100-mm square cross section SPD billets for subsequent forging. This work was carried out at Intercontinental Manufacturing Co. (IMCO), Garland TX. Forging studies conducted with the ECAE/P billets showed that many of the potential benefits of using UFG material can be realized. In particular, the material yield can be increased, and the amount of material that is lost as scrap can be reduced by as much as 50%. Forging

  16. Experimental determination of spring back and thinning effect of aluminum sheet metal during L-bending operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilip Kumar, K.; Appukuttan, K.K.; Neelakantha, V.L.; Naik, Padmayya S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The spring back and thinning effect during L-bending was determined on aluminum sheet. • Beyond a particular clearance, the above said effects are linearly increasing. • Below the critical clearance scratches will occur on the surface due to wear. • As the clearance reduces, the wear rate increases on the punching surface. - Abstract: In automotive industry, significant efforts are being put forth to replace steel sheets with aluminum sheets for various applications. Besides its higher cost, there are several technical hurdles for wide usage of aluminum sheets in forming. Major problems in aluminum sheet metal forming operations are deformation errors and spring back effect. These problems are dependent on the number of parameters such as die and tool geometry, friction condition, loading condition and anisotropic properties of the metal. To predict the exact shape, the geometry based punch contact program must be used. The shape changes once the punch is withdrawn, because of the materials elasticity. Prediction of such a spring back effect is a major challenging problem in industry involving sheet metal forming operations. It also needs applying appropriate back tension during the forming complex shapes. Slight deformation of the metal leads to non-axisymmetric loading. One can predict the residual stress by determining plastic and elastic deformation. Thus appropriate spring back effect can be investigated. The present investigation was carried out to determine the spring back and thinning effect of aluminum sheet metal during L-bending operation. Number of specimens with thickness varying from 0.5 mm to 3.5 mm were prepared. The experiments were conducted for different clearances between punch and die. It is observed that, beyond a particular clearance for each thickness of the sheet metal, the spring back and thinning effects were linearly increasing. However, below the critical clearance, scratches on the surface of the sheet metal were

  17. Classification of wrought aluminum alloys by Artificial Neural Networks evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy spectra from aluminum scrap samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, B.; Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pagnotta, S.; Sorrentino, F.; Palleschi, V.

    2017-08-01

    Every year throughout the world > 50 million vehicles reach the end of their life, producing millions of tons of automotive waste. The current strategies for the separation of the non-ferrous waste fraction, contain mainly aluminum, magnesium, zinc and copper alloys, involve high investment and operational costs, and pose environmental concerns. The European project SHREDDERSORT, in which our research group was actively involved, aimed to overcome this issue by developing a new dry sorting technology for the shredding of non-ferrous automotive wastes. This work represents one step of the complex SHREDDERSORT project, dedicated to the development of a strategy based on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for the sorting of light alloys. LIBS was here applied in laboratory for the analysis of stationary aluminum shredder samples. To process the LIBS spectra a methodological approach based on artificial neural networks was used. Although separation could in principle be based on simple emission line ratios, the neural networks approach enables more reproducible results, which can accommodate the unavoidable signal variations due to the low intrinsic reproducibility of the LIBS systems. The neural network separated samples into different clusters and estimates their elemental concentrations.

  18. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  19. Subthreshold displacement damage in copper--aluminum alloys during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosd, R.; Kosel, T.; Washburn, J.

    1976-12-01

    During electron irradiation at low energies which results in a negligible damage rate in a pure material, lighter solute atoms are displaced, which may in turn indirectly displace solvent atoms by a focussed replacement collision or an interstitial diffusion jump. The extent to which lighter solute atoms contribute to the subthreshold damage rate has been examined by irradiating copper--aluminum alloys at high temperatures in a high voltage electron microscope. The damage rate, as measured by monitoring the growth rate of dislocation loops, at 300 kV was found to increase linearly with the aluminum concentration

  20. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  1. ASTM B 117 Screening of Nonchromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075 Using DOD Paint Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Placzankis, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the corrosion resistance of eight nonchromate conversion coatings versus hexavalent chromium-based Alodine 1200S controls on scribed coated test panels of aluminum alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075...

  2. Effect of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. El-Morsy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of rotational and traverse speeds on the 1.5 mm butt joint performance of friction stir welded 2024-T4 aluminum alloy sheets have been investigated. Five rotational speeds ranging from 560 to 1800 rpm and five traverse speeds ranging from 11 to 45 mm/min have been employed. The characterization of microstructure and the mechanical properties (tensile, microhardness, and bending of the welded sheets have been studied. The results reveal that by varying the welding parameters, almost sound joints and high performance welded joints can be successfully produced at the rotational speeds of 900 rpm and 700 rpm and the traverse speed of 35 mm/min. The maximum welding performance of joints is found to be 86.3% with 900 rpm rotational speed and 35 mm/min traverse speed. The microhardness values along the cross-section of the joints show a dramatic drop in the stir zone where the lowest value reached is about 63% of the base metal due to the softening of the welded zone caused by the heat input during joining.

  3. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  4. Manufacture of a four-sheet complex component from different titanium alloys by superplastic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allazadeh, M. R.; Zuelli, N.

    2017-10-01

    A superplastic forming (SPF) technology process was deployed to form a complex component with eight-pocket from a four-sheet sandwich panel sheetstock. Six sheetstock packs were composed of two core sheets made of Ti-6Al-4V or Ti-5Al-4Cr-4Mo-2Sn-2Zr titanium alloy and two skin sheets made of Ti-6Al-4V or Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo titanium alloy in three different combinations. The sheets were welded with two subsequent welding patterns over the core and skin sheets to meet the required component's details. The applied welding methods were intermittent and continuous resistance seam welding for bonding the core sheets to each other and the skin sheets over the core panel, respectively. The final component configuration was predicted based on the die drawings and finite element method (FEM) simulations for the sandwich panels. An SPF system set-up with two inlet gas pipe feeding facilitated the trials to deliver two pressure-time load cycles acting simultaneously which were extracted from FEM analysis for specific forming temperature and strain rate. The SPF pressure-time cycles were optimized via GOM scanning and visually inspecting some sections of the packs in order to assess the levels of core panel formation during the inflation process of the sheetstock. Two sets of GOM scan results were compared via GOM software to inspect the surface and internal features of the inflated multisheet packs. The results highlighted the capability of the tested SPF process to form complex components from a flat multisheet pack made of different titanium alloys.

  5. Method of Heat Treating Aluminum-Lithium Alloy to Improve Formability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn Kurgan (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method is provided for heat treating aluminum-lithium alloys to improve their formability. The alloy is heated to a first temperature, maintained at the first temperature for a first time period, heated at the conclusion of the first time period to a second temperature, maintained at the second temperature for a second time period, actively cooled at the conclusion of the second time period to a third temperature, maintained at the third temperature for a third time period, and then passively cooled at the conclusion of the third time period to room temperature.

  6. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  7. Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior of 2A12 Aluminum Alloy in a Tropical Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyu Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion behavior of 2A12 aluminum alloy exposed to a tropical marine environment for 4 years was investigated. Weight loss of 2A12 alloy in the log-log coordinates can be well fitted with two linear segments, attributing to the evolution of the corrosion products. EIS results indicate that the corrosion product layer formed on the specimens exposed for 12 months or longer presents a good barrier effect. Corrosion morphology changes from pitting corrosion to severe intergranular corrosion with the extension of exposure time, resulting in the reduction of the mechanical properties.

  8. Metastable phase formation in ion-irradiated nickel-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eridon, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Phase transformations induced by ion beam mixing of nickel-aluminum alloys with 500-keV krypton ions were investigated over a range of temperatures (80 K to 300K), composition (NiAl 3 , NiAl, Ni 1 Al), initial structures (both nickel-aluminum layers and ordered intermetallic compounds), and doses (ranging from 2 x 10 14 cm -2 to 5 x 10 16 cm -2 ). Samples were formed by alternate evaporation of layers of nickel and aluminum in high vacuum onto copper grids. These samples were check for purity with energy dispersive-x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. A portion of these samples was annealed to form the intermetallic compounds appropriate to the given composition. Irradiations were performed at both room temperature (300 K) and 80 K using the 2-MV ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. Phase transformations were observed during both in-situ irradiations in the High Voltage Electron Microscopy at Argonne and also in subsequent electron-diffraction analysis of an array of samples irradiated in a target chamber. Metastable phases formed include disordered crystalline structures at composition s of 25% and 50% aluminum, an amorphous structure at 75% aluminum, and a hexagonal closed-packed structure formed at 25% aluminum. These metastable states were all converted to the stable intermetallic compounds through annealing treatments

  9. Microsegregation studies of rapidly solidified binary aluminum-copper alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Arvind

    Most of the materials that we use in our day-to-day activities undergo solidification at some stage of manufacturing. Normal solidification of alloys can result in chemical inhomogeneity (microsegregation) and coarse structure that can make the material weak. Rapid solidification has been known to reduce microsegregation and produce materials with improved properties. To control the microstructure obtained from rapid solidification, and thus attain desired properties, requires an understanding of microstructure evolution and the resulting microsegregation. We have studied microsegregation in rapidly solidified Al-Cu alloys using a combination of experiments and modeling. Rapidly solidified Al-Cu alloys were produced using Impulse Atomization. Microsegregation studies were performed on the droplets for different alloy chemistry (Al-4.3%Cu, Al-5%Cu, Al-10%Cu and Al-17%Cu), droplet sizes and gas type. The droplets produced were characterized using X-Ray Tomography, Neutron Diffraction, Electron Microscopy and Stereology. Using these techniques, nucleation and microstructure formation were studied and eutectic amount measured within the droplets. Modeling involved developing a microsegregation model for a droplet solidifying during Impulse Atomization. Rappaz-Thevoz microsegregation model was used coupled with LKT dendrite kinetic model with modification for off-center nucleation. The results from the experiment and model show that the droplets undergo a nucleation undercooling of approximately 20K with a single, off-center, nucleation event. Individual droplets showed gradation in microstructure believed to be caused due to recalescence. The observed trend in microsegregation showed that the segregation decreases as the alloy composition is increased. Microsegregation also showed a slight decrease with increasing cooling rate, but the trend was not very clear. Based on the alloy composition, droplet size ranges studied and type of gas used (He or N2) the estimated

  10. Experimental Study of Laser - enhanced 5A03 Aluminum Alloy and Its Stress Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guicheng; Chen, Jing; Pang, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Based on the study of improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy for ship, this paper mainly studied the tensile test, surface morphology and residual stress under laser shock, high temperature and stress corrosion. It is found that the residual compressive stress and the grain refinement on the surface of the material during the heat strengthening process increase the breaking strength of the sample in the stress corrosion environment. Appropriate high temperature maintenance helps to enhance the effect of deformation strengthening. In the 300°C environment insulation, due to recrystallization of the material, the performance decreased significantly. This study provides an experimental basis for effectively improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy.

  11. Specific Energy Absorbed Study Of Aluminum (2024-351T Tubes Alloy Under Lateral Crush

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad Arab Ghaidan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to find SEA (Specific Energy Absorber for lateral crushing (statically behavior for Aluminum (2024-T351 alloy with difference lengths (10, 20, and 30 mm. An experimental, finite element simulation, and theoretical models present to find force-deformation curves and then find SEA for difference lengths. Experimental results more agreements with finite elements simulation and theoretical when length of tubes is increase for load deformation curve, because when the length increases the plastic region increase with initial plastic collapse load (Pc. The experimental, ANSYS simulation and theoretical results have plotted and it has seen that the theory also underestimates the ANSYS results because in theoretical model, is customary to assume that the material is perfectly plastic, therefore, the finite element simulation might predict the experimental results better than the theoretical one. The results show that light density Aluminum alloy is suitable for SEA.

  12. Effects of Laser Energies on Wear and Tensile Properties of Biomimetic 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuhuan; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guoping; Gao, Yang; Tao, Lixi; Chen, Heng; Zhang, Jianlong; Zhou, Hong

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by the non-smooth surface of certain animals, a biomimetic coupling unit with various sizes, microstructure, and hardness was prepared on the surface of 7075 aluminum alloy. Following experimental studies were conducted to investigate the wear and tensile properties with various laser energy inputs. The results demonstrated that the non-smooth surface with biomimetic coupling units had a positive effect on both the wear resistance and tensile property of 7075 aluminum alloy. In addition, the sample with the unit fabricated by the laser energy of 420.1 J/cm2 exhibited the most significant improvement on the wear and tensile properties owing to the minimum grain size and the highest microhardness. Also, the weight loss of the sample was one-third of the untreated one's, and the yield strength, the ultimate tensile strength, and the elongation improved by 20, 20, and 34% respectively. Moreover, the mechanisms of wear and tensile properties improvement were also analyzed.

  13. Electrochemical Impedance Study of Zinc Yellow Polypropylene-Coated Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hua Sun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of zinc yellow polypropylene-coated aluminum alloy 7B04 during accelerated degradation test is studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. It has been found that the zinc yellow polypropylene paint has few flaw and acts as a pure capacitance before accelerated test. After 336-hour exposure to the test, the impedance spectroscopy shows two time constants, and water has reached to the aluminum alloy/paint interface and forms corrosive microcell. For the scratched samples, the reaction of metal corrosion and the hydrolysis of zinc yellow ion can occur simultaneously. The impedance spectroscopy indicates inductance after 1008-hour exposure to the test, but the inductance disappears after 1344-hour exposure and the passivation film has pitting corrosion.

  14. Tribological Properties of Aluminum Alloy treated by Fine Particle Peening/DLC Hybrid Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanbu H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the adhesiveness of the DLC coating, Fine Particle Peening (FPP treatment was employed as pre-treatment of the DLC coating process. FPP treatment was performed using SiC shot particles, and then AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy was DLC-coated. A SiC-rich layer was formed around the surface of the aluminum alloy by the FPP treatment because small chips of shot particles were embedded into the substrate surface. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted to measure the friction coefficients. While the DLC coated specimen without FPP treatment showed a sudden increase in friction coefficient at the early stage of the wear cycles, the FPP/DLC hybrid treated specimen maintained a low friction coefficient value during the test period. Further investigation revealed that the tribological properties of the substrate after the DLC coating were improved with an increase in the amount of Si at the surface.

  15. Manufacturing a durable superhydrophobic polypropylene coating on aluminum alloy substrate by adding nano-titania nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyun; Wu, Ruomei; Hu, Zhongliang; Yuan, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xuehui; Liu, Qilong

    2014-07-01

    A superhydrophobic polypropylene (PP) coating on the surface of aluminum alloy coupons is unstable because of the existence of metastable state in curing process. Nano-titania particles were added into PP solution to form hierarchical micro- and nano-structures of PP coatings on the surface of aluminum alloy coupons. The morphology of the coatings was observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and the corresponding structure and components were investigated with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), respectively. The results indicated that nano-TiO2 particles are the main nucleation cores in the curing of the coatings; PP in solution is enclosed in these cores and crystallizes gradually. The coatings can preserve the stable micro- and nano-structure on six months due to the nucleation action of nano-TiO2 particles, and its durable water contact angle (WCA) is about 164 +/- 1.5 degrees.

  16. The intermetallic bonding between a ring carrier and aluminum piston alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manasijevie, S.; Dolie, N.; Djurdjevic, M.; Misic, N.; Davitkov, N.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the results of investigating the formation of intermetallic bond between a ring carrier and aluminum piston alloy. The ring carrier is made of austenitic cast iron (Ni-Resist) in order to increase the wear resistance of the first ring groove and applied in highly loaded diesel engines. Metallographic examination of the quality of al fin bond was done. A metallographic investigation using an optical microscope in combination with the SEM/EDS analysis of the quality of the intermetallic bonding layer was done. The test results show that can be made successfully as well as the formation of metal connection (alfin bond) between the ring carrier and aluminum piston alloy. (Author)

  17. Laser fusion-brazing of aluminum alloy to galvanized steel with pure Al filler powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Jiang, Shichun; Shi, Yan; Kuang, Yulin; Huang, Genzhe; Zhang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    The fusion-brazing connection of the dissimilar metal 5052 aluminum alloy/ST07Z steel was achieved by using the Nd:YAG laser with pure Al filler powder, and the effects of the laser power and powder feeding speed on the formation and mechanical properties of the resultant joints were investigated. The experimental results show that melting-brazing connection of 5052 aluminum alloy/galvanized steel can be successfully achieved, and the zinc plating layer has played the role of flux, assuring the brazing properties. The intermetallic compound layer was generated on the welded brazing interface. The joint exhibited a shear strength of 174 N/mm if the thickness of the intermetallic layer at the interface is about 6-7 μm.

  18. Experimental analysis of Exfoliation rate on Aluminum alloy Al7010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Ankur; Gopakumar, Abhimanyu; Athul, K. P.; Adinath, D. R.; Prashanth, Mrudula

    2017-08-01

    Aluminium alloys are increasingly being used in the manufacture of structures of airplanes and automobiles due to their superior properties such as high strength to weight ratio and excellent mechanical properties. AA7010 Al alloy is a 7xxx series alloy that is mainly used in the aircraft industries. Al 7010 is said to have high tensile strength as well as high fatigue strength. It is also stress corrosion resistant. However due to exposure to extreme marine and industrial environments, the metal may be subjected to corrosion such as exfoliation corrosion. Exfoliation is a special form of intergranular corrosion that proceeds laterally from the sites of initiation along planes parallel to the surface, generally at grain boundaries, forming corrosion products that force metal away from the body of the material, giving rise to a layered appearance. Exfoliation corrosion may cause heavy damage to aircrafts in the long run. In the present work, the test has been conducted on Al7010 samples for the determination of rate and extent of exfoliation corrosion by subjecting them to artificial corrosive conditions that mimic the actual marine and industrial environments. The samples are heat treated to T6 and T7 tempers prior subjecting them to the corrosive environments, as most of the aircraft materials are subjected to T6 and T7 tempers to enhance the properties before being put to commercial use. Samples are tested according to ASTM G34 and rated by comparing them with standard photographs. Also electrical conductivity tests on the samples have been carried out which reveals that the electrical conductivity of the Al 7010 alloy increases upon heat treatment.

  19. Properties of Free-Machining Aluminum Alloys at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltus, Jiří; Karlík, Miroslav; Haušild, Petr

    In areas close to the cutting tool the workpieces being dry machined could be heated up to 350°C and they may be impact loaded. Therefore it is of interest to study mechanical properties of corresponding materials at elevated temperatures. Free-machining alloys of Al-Cu and Al-Mg-Si systems containing Pb, Bi and Sn additions (AA2011, AA2111B, AA6262, and AA6023) were subjected to Charpy U notch impact test at the temperatures ranging from 20 to 350°C. The tested alloys show a sharp drop in notch impact strength KU at different temperatures. This drop of KU is caused by liquid metal embrittlement due to the melting of low-melting point dispersed phases which is documented by differential scanning calorimetry. Fracture surfaces of the specimens were observed using a scanning electron microscope. At room temperature, the fractures of all studied alloys exhibited similar ductile dimple fracture micromorphology, at elevated temperatures, numerous secondary intergranular cracks were observed.

  20. Thixo forging process of wrought aluminum alloy fabricated by rotational helical shape stirrer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. M.; Han, S. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    The manufacture of rheology materials from wrought and casting aluminum alloys using controlling solid fraction and crystal grain is demonstrated in this paper. The equipment to form the rheology material was designed so that shear force and applied pressure could be carefully and simultaneously applied using a mechanical stirrer. The problems caused by using this method with the thixo forging process were studied by investigating the mechanical properties of a sample that had a controlled solid fraction of 45-50 %

  1. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE MACHINING OF TITANIUM ALLOY USING COPPER, BRASS AND ALUMINUM ELECTRODES

    OpenAIRE

    S. DHANABALAN; K. SIVAKUMAR; C. SATHIYA NARAYANAN

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, an evaluation has been done on Material Removal Rate (MRR), Surface Roughness (SR) and Electrode Wear Rate (EWR) during Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) of titanium alloy using copper, brass and aluminum electrodes. Analyzing previous work in this field, it is found that electrode wear and material removal rate increases with an increase current. It is also found that the electrode wear ratio increases with an increase in current. The higher wear ratio is found durin...

  2. Spectrum Fatigue of 7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy under Overloading and Underloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    up. On the ground, the lower wing skin of the aircraft is under compression . During flight, variable loads due to gust are superimposed on a mean...underload, stress ratio , and environment on fatigue crack growth. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted with a 7075-T651 aluminum alloy under constant...amplitude, and over- and under-loading of two different stress ratios , 0.1 and 0.85, in vacuum, air and 1 percent NaCl solution. Under constant

  3. Modeling of Damage Evolution and Fracture in 5182 H111 Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelouahid, EL Amri; haddou, Mounir El Yakhloufi; Abdelatif, El Khamlichi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical modeling of ductile fracture and failure of elements made of 5182H111 aluminum alloys subjected to dynamic traction. The analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook model based on ABAQUS software. The aim of the research was to specify and test the mechanical properties during numerical simulations. The experimental test results for the mechanical properties of the studies for steel were presented with a large description of the testing facilities. The...

  4. Ultrasonic detection of ductile-to-brittle transitions in free-cutting aluminum alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejezchlebová, J.; Seiner, Hanuš; Ševčík, Martin; Landa, Michal; Karlík, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 69, January 2015 (2015), s. 40-47 ISSN 0963-8695 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : aluminum alloys * laser ultrasound * ductile-to-brittle * elastic constants * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.871, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963869514001200

  5. Misorientation characteristics of penetrating morphologies at the growth front of abnormally growing grains in aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Soo; Na, Tae-Wook; Park, Hyung-Ki; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Han, Chan-Hee; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2012-07-01

    The initial stage of abnormal grain growth of the aluminum alloy 5052 has been investigated using electron back-scattered diffraction to analyze the characteristic of misorientations of the penetrating morphology at the growth front. Among the 84 penetrating morphologies examined, none of the penetrated grain boundaries has low angles or coincidence site lattice (CSL) relations, whereas 66 penetrating grain boundaries have low angles or CSL relations. These results strongly suggest that the penetrating morphologies should result from triple-junction wetting.

  6. Evaluation of tensile properties of 5052 type aluminum-magnesium alloy at warm temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kilic; S. Toros; F. Ozturk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the tensile properties of 5052 type aluminum-manganese alloyin warm temperatures.Design/methodology/approach: In this research, uniaxial tensile deformation behavior of 5052-H32 typealuminum magnesium alloy was studied range between room to 300°C and in the strain rate range of 0.0083-0.16 s-1.Findings: It was observed that the uniaxial tensile elongation of the material increases with increasing temperaturesand decreases with increasing strain...

  7. Low temperature deformation behavior of an electromagnetically bulged 5052 aluminum alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Zu Li; Ning Li; Duzhen Wang; Di Ouyang; Lin Liu

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of the deformation behavior of electromagnetically formed metallic components under extreme conditions is important. Here, the effect of low temperature on the deformation behavior of an electromagnetically-bulged 5052 aluminum alloy was investigated through uniaxial tension. We found that the Portevin-Le Chatelier Effect, designated by the serrated characteristic in stress-strain curves, continuously decays until completely disappears with decreasing temperature...

  8. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    OpenAIRE

    NAKASHIMA, Hitoshi; UTSUNOMIYA, Akihiro; FUJII, Nobuyuki; OKUNO, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in...

  9. Pore structure and mechanical properties of directionally solidified porous aluminum alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Komissarchuk Olga; Xu Zhengbin; Hao Hai

    2014-01-01

    Porous aluminum alloys produced by the metal-gas eutectic method or GASAR process need to be performed under a certain pressure of hydrogen, and to carry over melt to a tailor-made apparatus that ensures directional solidification. Hydrogen is driven out of the melt, and then the quasi-cylindrical pores normal to the solidification front are usually formed. In the research, the effects of processing parameters (saturation pressure, solidification pressure, temperature, and holding time) on th...

  10. Studying the Super-cooled Solid Solution Breakdown of V-1341 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Puchkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformable alloys of the Al-Mg-Si system are widely used in aviation industry, rocket engineering, shipbuilding, as well as on railway and highway transport. These alloys are characterized by high stamping ability, weld-ability, and machinability with a comparatively high strength and corrosion resistance in a heat-strengthened state. A promising alloy of the Al-Mg-Si system with increased structural strength and manufacturability is on par with foreign analogues in properties is the V-1341 alloy [1, 2].The properties of heat-treatable aluminum alloys strongly depend on the cooling rate of the product during quenching [3-12], which determines the structure and level of residual stresses. Decrease in structural strength, tendency to pitting and inter-crystalline corrosion with slow cooling from the quenching temperature is caused by formation of coarse unequiaxed precipitate, precipitates-free zones, and also by decreasing proportion of inclusions of the strengthening phase [3-12].Thus, the relevant task is to study the effect of isothermal quenching modes on the structure of deformable V-1341 aluminum alloy thermally hardened.The paper studies the impact of isothermal time in quenching on the composition and morphology of breakdown products of the V-1341 alloy solid solution. It is shown that at isothermal time under the solid solution breakdown, at first on the dispersoid surface and then in the solid solution are formed and grow large needle-like crystals of the β'-phase which are structural concentrators of stresses. An increasing isothermal time leads to decreasing solid solution super-saturation by doping elements and vacancies. This leads to a decrease in the fraction of the coherent finely dispersed hardening β '' phase, and also to an increase in the width of the precipitates-free zone.

  11. Magnesium-Based Sacrificial Anode Cathodic Protection Coatings (Mg-Rich Primers for Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Blanton

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is electrochemically the most active metal employed in common structural alloys of iron and aluminum. Mg is widely used as a sacrificial anode to provide cathodic protection of underground and undersea metallic structures, ships, submarines, bridges, decks, aircraft and ground transportation systems. Following the same principle of utilizing Mg characteristics in engineering advantages in a decade-long successful R&D effort, Mg powder is now employed in organic coatings (termed as Mg-rich primers as a sacrificial anode pigment to protect aerospace grade aluminum alloys against corrosion. Mg-rich primers have performed very well on aluminum alloys when compared against the current chromate standard, but the carcinogenic chromate-based coatings/pretreatments are being widely used by the Department of Defense (DoD to protect its infrastructure and fleets against corrosion damage. Factors such as reactivity of Mg particles in the coating matrix during exposure to aggressive corrosion environments, interaction of atmospheric gases with Mg particles and the impact of Mg dissolution, increases in pH and hydrogen gas liberation at coating-metal interface, and primer adhesion need to be considered for further development of Mg-rich primer technology.

  12. The influence of Ti and Sr alloying elements on electrochemical properties of aluminum sacrificial anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saremi, M.; Sina, H.; Keyvani, A.; Emamy, M. [Metallurgy and Materials Department, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11365/4563, Tehran (Iran)

    2004-07-01

    Aluminum sacrificial anodes are widely used in cathodic protection of alloys in seawater. The interesting properties due to low specific weight, low electrode potential and high current capacity are often hindered by the presence of a passive oxide film which causes several difficulties in their practical application. In this investigation, the electrochemical behavior of Al- 5Zn-0.02In sacrificial anode is studied in 3 wt. % sodium chloride solution. The experiments focused on the influence of Ti and Sr as alloying elements on electrochemical behavior of aluminum sacrificial anode. Ti and Sr are used in different concentrations from 0.03 to 0.1 wt.% 0.01 to 0.05 wt.%, respectively. NACE efficiency and polarization tests are used in this case. It is shown that by using 0.03 wt.% Ti and 0.01 wt.% Sr as the alloying elements to investigate the anodic behavior of the anodes, homogeneous microstructures are obtained which results in improvement of electrochemical properties of aluminum sacrificial anode such as current capacity and anode efficiency. (authors)

  13. Pitting Corrosion Topography Characteristics and Evolution Laws of LC4 Aluminum Alloy in Service Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Zhiguo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft aluminum alloy is easy to initiate pitting corrosion in the service environment, the pitting corrosion topography characteristics could directly affect the fatigue mechanical property of structure material. In order to obtain the pitting corrosion topography characteristics of LC4 aluminum alloy in the service environment, the accelerated corrosion test was carried out along the accelerated corrosion test environment spectrum which imitated the service environment spectrum, and the corrosion topography characteristic parameters of corrosion pit depth H,corrosion pit surface length L and corrosion pit surface width W were defined respectively. During the corrosion test process,the three parameters of typical corrosion pit were successively measured in different equivalent corrosion years for obtaining the corrosion pit damage size data, then the data were analysed through the statistics method and fractal theory. Further more in order to gain the pit topography characteristics in the same equivalent corrosion year and the topography evolution laws during different equivalent corrosion years were gained. The analysis results indicate that LC4 aluminum alloy corrosion pit topography characteristics in the service environment include the following:firstly, the pit topography characteristic parameters conform to the lognormal distributions in the same equivalent corrosion years; secondly,the pit topography characteristic parameters gradually reflect the fractal feature in accordance with the equivalent corrosion year increment, and the pits tend to be shallow, long and moderate wide topography character.

  14. Perforation of thin aluminum alloy plates by blunt projectiles: An experimental and numerical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, G; Zhang, W

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the armor weight has become a research focus in terms of armored material. Due to high strength-to-density ratio, aluminum alloy has become a potential light armored material. In this study, both lab-scale ballistic test and finite element simulation were adopted to examine the ballistic resistance of aluminum alloy targets. Blunt high strength steel projectiles with 12.7 mm diameter were launched by light gas gun against 3.3 mm thickness 7A04 aluminum alloy plates at a velocity of 90∼170 m/s. The ballistic limit velocity was obtained. Plugging failure and obvious structure deformation of targets were observed. Corresponding 2D finite element simulations were conducted by ABAQUS/EXPLICIT combined with material performance testing. The validity of numerical simulations was verified by comparing with the experimental results. Detailed analysis of the failure modes and characters of the targets were carried out to reveal the target damage mechanism combined with the numerical simulation.

  15. Perforation of Thin Aluminum Alloy Plates by Blunt Projectiles - Experimental and Numerical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gang; Zhang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Reducing the armor weight has become a research focus in terms of armored material with the increasing requirement of the mobility and flexibility of tanks and armored vehicles in modern local wars. Due to high strength-to-density ratio, aluminum alloy has become a potential light armored material. In this study, both lab-scale ballistic test and finite element simulation were adopted to examine the ballistic resistance of aluminum alloy targets. Blunt high strength steel projectiles with 12.7 mm diameter were launched by light gas gun against 3.3 mm thick aluminum alloy plates at velocity of 90 ~ 170 m/s. The ballistic limit velocity was obtained. Plugging failure and obvious structure deformation of targets were observed, and with the impact velocity increasing, the target structure deformation decrease gradually. Corresponding 2D finite element simulations were conducted by ABAQUS/EXPLICIT combined with material performance testing. Good agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental results was found. National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.: 11072072).

  16. Perforation of thin aluminum alloy plates by blunt projectiles: An experimental and numerical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.; Zhang, W.

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the armor weight has become a research focus in terms of armored material. Due to high strength-to-density ratio, aluminum alloy has become a potential light armored material. In this study, both lab-scale ballistic test and finite element simulation were adopted to examine the ballistic resistance of aluminum alloy targets. Blunt high strength steel projectiles with 12.7 mm diameter were launched by light gas gun against 3.3 mm thickness 7A04 aluminum alloy plates at a velocity of 90~170 m/s. The ballistic limit velocity was obtained. Plugging failure and obvious structure deformation of targets were observed. Corresponding 2D finite element simulations were conducted by ABAQUS/EXPLICIT combined with material performance testing. The validity of numerical simulations was verified by comparing with the experimental results. Detailed analysis of the failure modes and characters of the targets were carried out to reveal the target damage mechanism combined with the numerical simulation.

  17. Optimizing cutting conditions on sustainable machining of aluminum alloy to minimize power consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Rusdi; Suyuti, Muhammad Arsyad; Susanto, Tri Agus

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum is widely utilized in the industrial sector. There are several advantages of aluminum, i.e. good flexibility and formability, high corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity, and high heat. Despite of these characteristics, however, pure aluminum is rarely used because of its lacks of strength. Thus, most of the aluminum used in the industrial sectors was in the form of alloy form. Sustainable machining can be considered to link with the transformation of input materials and energy/power demand into finished goods. Machining processes are responsible for environmental effects accepting to their power consumption. The cutting conditions have been optimized to minimize the cutting power, which is the power consumed for cutting. This paper presents an experimental study of sustainable machining of Al-11%Si base alloy that was operated without any cooling system to assess the capacity in reducing power consumption. The cutting force was measured and the cutting power was calculated. Both of cutting force and cutting power were analyzed and modeled by using the central composite design (CCD). The result of this study indicated that the cutting speed has an effect on machining performance and that optimum cutting conditions have to be determined, while sustainable machining can be followed in terms of minimizing power consumption and cutting force. The model developed from this study can be used for evaluation process and optimization to determine optimal cutting conditions for the performance of the whole process.

  18. Effect of material flow on joint strength in activation spot joining of Al alloy and steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Goro; Yogo, Yasuhiro; Takao, Hisaaki

    2014-08-01

    A new joining method for dissimilar metal sheets was developed where a rotated consumable rod of Al alloy is pressed onto an Al alloy sheet at the part overlapped with a mild steel sheet. The metal flow in the joining region is increased by the through-hole in the Al sheet and consumable Al rod. The rod creates the joint interface and pads out of the thinly joined parts through pressing. This produces a higher joint strength than that of conventional friction stir spot welding. Measurements of the joint interface showed the presence of a 5-10 nm thick amorphous layer consisting of Al and Mg oxides.

  19. Effect of material flow on joint strength in activation spot joining of Al alloy and steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Goro; Yogo, Yasuhiro; Takao, Hisaaki

    2014-01-01

    A new joining method for dissimilar metal sheets was developed where a rotated consumable rod of Al alloy is pressed onto an Al alloy sheet at the part overlapped with a mild steel sheet. The metal flow in the joining region is increased by the through-hole in the Al sheet and consumable Al rod. The rod creates the joint interface and pads out of the thinly joined parts through pressing. This produces a higher joint strength than that of conventional friction stir spot welding. Measurements of the joint interface showed the presence of a 5-10 nm thick amorphous layer consisting of Al and Mg oxides

  20. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirita, G.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S.; Stefanescu, I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting)

  1. Twinned feathery grains and related morphologies in aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, S. [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney, Centre de Recherches de Voreppe, 38 (France); Lab. de Metallurgie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Rappaz, M. [Lab. de Metallurgie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    Al-Cu, Al-Mg and Al-Si alloys without grain refiner addition have been directionally solidified under well-controlled thermal and convection conditions. For relatively high solidification rates, several changes in the dendrite growth morphology were observed. One of the most common structure that may appear under such conditions is called ''feathery grains'' : it was demonstrated recently that this lamellar structure is constituted of left angle 110 right angle dendrites whose trunks are cut through by {l_brace}111{r_brace} twin planes. These grains undergo a selection mechanism which is similar to that occurring for regular left angle 100 right angle dendritic grains. The transition between left angle 100 right angle and left angle 110 right angle dendrite forms is progressive and morphologies that develop arms in both type of crystallographic directions can be observed. Moreover, in the case of a 5182 Al-Mg alloy, regular left angle 110 right angle dendrites, without twins, could also be obtained. This dendritic growth along left angle 110 right angle crystallographic directions is supposed to be due to a change in the anisotropy of certain properties of the alloy, such as the solid/liquid interfacial energy and/or the atom attachment kinetics. The possibility of growth along other directions than the usual left angle 100 right angle was further demonstrated by the observation of dendrites developing in an Al-Cu-Mg solidified in a Bridgman device. In this case, left angle 112 right angle trunks form and progressively change their growth direction, thus showing curved shapes. (orig.)

  2. Influence of samarium content on microstructure and mechanical properties of recycled die-cast YL112 aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Hu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Sm (Samarium content on microstructure and mechanical properties of recycled die-cast YL112 aluminum alloys was investigated. The results show that many small Sm-rich particles form in the recycled die-cast YL112 alloys with Sm addition. At the same time, the secondary dendrite arm spacing in the YL112 alloys modified with Sm is smaller than that of the unmodified alloy. The eutectic Si of recycled die-cast YL112-xSm alloys transforms from coarse acicular morphology to fine fibres. Mechanical properties of the investigated recycled die-cast YL112 aluminum alloys are enhanced with Sm addition, and a maximal ultimate tensile strength value (276 MPa and elongation (3.76% are achieved at a Sm content of 0.6wt.%. Due to the modification of eutectic Si by Sm, numerous tearing ridges and tiny dimples on the fractures of tensile samples are observed.

  3. Investigation on local ductility of 6xxx-aluminium sheet alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, P.; Liewald, M.; Sindel, M.

    2017-09-01

    Within the scope of this paper influence of localization of loading conditions on the ductility of two different 6xxx-aluminium sheet alloys is investigated. In order to improve the prediction of sheet material crash performance, material parameters based on uniaxial tensile and notched tensile tests are determined with varying consolidation areas. Especially evaluation methods based on the localized necking behaviour in tensile tests are investigated. The potential of local ductility characterisation is validated with results of Edge-Compression Tests (ECT) which applies load conditions that occur in actual crash events.

  4. Lateral extrusion of tailor welded aluminum alloy pipes with a lost core of low temperature melting alloy

    OpenAIRE

    T. Ohashi; G. Liu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors employ tailor welded aluminum alloy pipes for lateral extrusion process with a lost core to perform a hollow light-weight-part.Design/methodology/approach: The pipe is welded longitudinally by YAG-laser. “The lateral extrusion process with a lost core (LELC)” consists of lateral extrusion of pipes with a soluble solid core, called the “lost core”, which serves as a plastic mandrel. The process proceeds as follows. First, the pipe cavity is filled with the l...

  5. Effect of porosity on the tensile properties of low ductility aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Waldemar Mugica

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature contains reports of several studies correlating the porosity and mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Most of these studies determine this correlation based on the parameter of global volumetric porosity. These reports, however, fail to separate the effects of microstructural features and porosity on alloys, though recognizing the influence of the latter on their mechanical properties. Thus, when the decrease in tensile strength due to the porosity effect is taken into account, the findings are highly contradictory. An analysis was made of the correlation between mechanical properties and global volumetric porosity and volumetric porosity in the fracture, as well as of the beta-Al5FeSi phase present in 380 aluminum alloy. Our findings indicate that mechanical properties in tension relating to global volumetric porosity lead to overestimations of the porosity effect in detriment to the mechanical properties. Moreover, the proposed models that take into account the effects of particles, both Si and beta-Al5FeSi, are unapplicable to low ductility alloys.

  6. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F Wallace; David Schwam; Wen Hong dxs11@po.cwru.edu

    2001-09-14

    A test that involves immersion of the potential mod materials for permanent molds has been developed that provides a thermal cycle that is similar to the experienced during casting of aluminum in permanent molds. This test has been employed to determine the relative thermal fatigue resistance of several different types of mold materials. Four commercial mold coatings have been evaluated for their insulating ability, wear resistance and roughness. The results indicate that composition and structure of the mold materials have considerable effect on their thermal fatigue cracking behavior. Irons with a gray iron structure are the most prone to thermal fatigue cracking followed by compacted graphite irons with the least thermal fatigue cracking of the cast irons experienced by ductile iron. The composition of these various irons affects their behavior.

  7. Microarc Oxidation of the High-Silicon Aluminum AK12D Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kiseleva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of work is to study how the high-silicon aluminum AK12D alloy microstructure and MAO-process modes influence on characteristics (microhardness, porosity and thickness of the oxide layer of formed surface layer.Experimental methods of study:1 MAO processing of AK12D alloy disc-shaped samples. MAO modes features are concentration of electrolyte components – soluble water glass Na2SiO3 and potassium hydroxide (KOH. The content of two components both the soluble water glass and the potassium hydroxide was changed at once, with their concentration ratio remaining constant;2 metallographic analysis of AK12D alloy structure using an optical microscope «Olympus GX51»;3 image analysis of the system "alloy AK12D - MAO - layer" using a scanning electron microscope «JEOL JSM 6490LV»;4 hardness evaluation of the MAO-layers using a micro-hardness tester «Struers Duramin».The porosity, microhardness and thickness of MAO-layer formed on samples with different initial structures are analyzed in detail. Attention is paid to the influence of MAO process modes on the quality layer.It has been proved that the MAO processing allows reaching quality coverage with high microhardness values of 1200-1300HV and thickness up to 114 μm on high-silicon aluminum alloy. It has been found that the initial microstructure of alloy greatly affects the thickness of the MAO - layer. The paper explains the observed effect using the physical principles of MAO process and the nature of silicon particles distribution in the billet volume.It has been shown that increasing concentration of sodium silicate and potassium hydroxide in the electrolyte results in thicker coating and high microhardness.It has been revealed that high microhardness is observed in the thicker MAO-layers.Conclusions:1 The microstructure of aluminum AK12D alloy and concentration of electrolyte components - liquid glass Na2SiO3 and potassium hydroxide affect the quality of coating resulted from MAO

  8. Aluminum alloy production for the reinforcement of the CMS conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Sequeira-Lopes-Tavares, S; Campi, D; Curé, B; Horváth, I L; Riboni, P; Sgobba, Stefano; Smith, R P

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. To reinforce the high-purity (99.998%) Al-stabilized conductor of the magnet against the magnetic loadings experienced during operation at 4.2 K, two continuous sections of Al-alloy (AA) reinforcement are Electron Beam (EB) welded to it. The reinforcements have a section of 24*18 mm and are produced in continuous 2.55 km lengths. The alloy EN AW-6082 has been selected for the reinforcement due to its excellent extrudability, high strength in the precipitation hardened states, high toughness and strength at cryogenic temperature and good EB weldability. Each of the continuous lengths of the reinforcement is extruded billet on billet and press quenched on-line from the extrusion temperature in an industrial extrusion plant. In order to insure the ready EB welda...

  9. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloy 7000 series after two-step aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of one step-and a new (short two-step aging on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy 7000 series was investigated, using slow strain rate test and fracture mechanics method. Aging level in the tested alloy was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and measurements of electrical resistivity. It was shown that the alloy after the new two-step aging is significantly more resistant to stress corrosion cracking. Values of tensile properties and fracture toughness are similar for both thermal states. Processes that take place at the crack tip have been considered. The effect of the testing solution temperature on the crack growth rate on the plateau was determined. Two values of the apparent activation energy were obtained. These values correspond to different processes that control crack growth rate on the plateau at higher and lower temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34028 i br. TR 34016

  10. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  11. Grain structure and solidification cracking in oscillated arc welds of 5052 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, S.; Le, Y.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of arc oscillation on grain structure and solidification cracking in GTA welds of 5052 aluminum alloy was investigated using a four-pole magnetic arc oscillator and a modified fish-bone crack test. Two different mechanisms of crack reduction were identified: one in the low frequency range of arc oscillation and the other in the high frequency range. The former was the alteration of the orientation of columnar grains, while the latter was grain refining. Neither mechanism was operative in the intermediate frequency range and solidification cracking was severe, especially when the amplitude of arc oscillation was small. Alteration of grain orientation was obtained in welds made with transverse and circular arc oscillations, but not longitudinal arc oscillation. Grain refining, on the other hand, was achieved in welds made with all three types of arc oscillation patterns. The differences between the response of alloy 5052 to arc oscillation and that of alloy 2014 observed previously were discussed.

  12. Influence of MAO Treatment on the Galvanic Corrosion Between Aluminum Alloy and 316L Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanhang; Gu, Yanhong; Zhang, Lei; Jiao, Xiangdong; Che, Juntie

    2017-12-01

    To slow down the galvanic corrosion of aluminum alloy and 316L stainless steel in subsea water, a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coating was prepared on the surface of the Al alloy, and no treatment was performed on the surface of the 316L. The surface morphology of MAO-coated Al alloy was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after corrosion. A micro-hardness tester was used to measure the micro-hardness. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated by open-circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests in a 3.5 g/L NaCl solution. The results of PDP testing show that the corrosion potential of the MAO-coated galvanic pair was more positive than that of the uncoated galvanic pair and that the corrosion current density was smaller than that of the uncoated galvanic pair. EIS results show that the impedance of the galvanic pair increased after MAO coating. SEM images show that the corrosion damage of the uncoated Al alloy was more severe than that of the MAO-coated one, and the post-corrosion images of the surface of the 316L connected with MAO-coated Al alloy were more compact than those of the 316L connected with uncoated Al alloy. A physical model was developed to discuss the influence of MAO treatment on the galvanic corrosion process and corrosion mechanism.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE MACHINING OF TITANIUM ALLOY USING COPPER, BRASS AND ALUMINUM ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. DHANABALAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an evaluation has been done on Material Removal Rate (MRR, Surface Roughness (SR and Electrode Wear Rate (EWR during Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM of titanium alloy using copper, brass and aluminum electrodes. Analyzing previous work in this field, it is found that electrode wear and material removal rate increases with an increase current. It is also found that the electrode wear ratio increases with an increase in current. The higher wear ratio is found during machining of titanium alloy using a brass electrode. An attempt has been made to correlate the thermal conductivity and melting point of electrode with the MRR and electrode wear. The MRR is found to be high while machining titanium alloy using brass electrode. During machining of titanium alloy using copper electrodes, a comparatively smaller quantity of heat is absorbed by the work material due to low thermal conductivity. Due to the above reason, the MRR becomes very low. Duringmachining of titanium alloy using aluminium electrodes, the material removal rate and electrode wear rate are only average value while machining of titanium alloy using brass and copper electrodes.

  14. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  15. X-ray studies of dynamic aging in an aluminum alloy subjected to severe plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitdikov, V.D., E-mail: svil@mail.rb.ru [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12K. Marx Str., Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Laboratory for Mechanics of Bulk Nanomaterials, Saint Petersburg State University, 28 Universitetsky pr., Saint Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Chizhov, P.S. [Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 1-3 Leninskiye Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Murashkin, M.Yu. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12K. Marx Str., Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Laboratory for Mechanics of Bulk Nanomaterials, Saint Petersburg State University, 28 Universitetsky pr., Saint Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Goidenko, A.A. [Laboratory for Mechanics of Bulk Nanomaterials, Saint Petersburg State University, 28 Universitetsky pr., Saint Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Valiev, R.Z. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12K. Marx Str., Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Laboratory for Mechanics of Bulk Nanomaterials, Saint Petersburg State University, 28 Universitetsky pr., Saint Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    In this work, X-ray scattering methods were applied for a quantitative characterization of the microstructure of an aluminum alloy of the Al–Mg–Si system during dynamic aging realized through the high pressure torsion technique. A qualitative and quantitative phase analysis of the alloy was performed, together with Al alloy lattice parameter determination. From the reflections broadening the effective size of the coherent scattering domains and the lattice microstrain were determined in the framework of the Halder–Wagner approach. Using the method of small-angle X-ray scattering, the quantitative characteristics of the size, shape and spatial distribution of the secondary phase particles formed in the Al alloy during dynamic aging were established. In order to validate the obtained results, the method of small-angle X-ray scattering was preliminarily tested on similar samples after artificial aging and compared with the results from small-angle neutron diffraction widely known in literature. - Highlights: • Spherical fcc β-Mg2Si precipitates formed in Al 6201 alloy during dynamic aging in the course of severe plastic deformation. • The size, shape and distribution of the precipitates due to artificial and dynamic aging were revealed by SAXS method. • Monoclinic needle-like β' precipitates and Al5FeSi intermetallic phase were detected in 6201 alloy after T6 treatment.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Solid-State Recycled 4xxx Aluminum Alloy Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    The direct production of aluminum from bauxite ores is known to be a very energetic-intensive operation compared to other metallurgical processes. Due to energy issues and the rapid increase in aluminum demand, new kinds of aluminum production processes are required. Aluminum waste recycling, which has an advantage of lowering the cost of electric power consumption, is considered to be an alternative route for material manufacturing. In this work, the way of reusing aluminum EN-AC 44000 alloy scraps by hot extrusion was presented. Metal chips of different sizes and morphology were cold compacted into billet form and then hot extruded. Mechanical properties investigations combined with microstructure observations were performed. Mechanical anisotropy behavior of material was evaluated on the base of tensile test experiments performed on samples machined at 0°, 45°, and 90°, respectively, to the extrusion direction. It was found that the initial size of the chips has an influence on the mechanical properties of the received profiles. Samples produced from fine chips revealed higher tensile strength in comparison to larger chips, which can be attributed to a refined microstructure containing fine, hard Si particles and Fe-rich intermetallic phases. Finally, it was found that anisotropic behavior of chip-based profiles is similar to conventionally cast and extruded materials which prove good bonding quality between chips.

  17. Fusion cutting of aluminum, magnesium, and titanium alloys using high-power fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scintilla, Leonardo Daniele; Tricarico, Luigi

    2013-07-01

    The effects of cutting speed and assist gas pressure on laser cutting of 1-mm thick Al 1050, AZ31, and Ti6Al4V lightweight alloys are experimentally investigated. Fiber laser cutting of these materials is not broadly investigated and the acquisition of a new level of knowledge is of fundamental importance for applications like sheet metal trimming in automotive industry. The main process outputs are in depth compared with results reported in literature and obtained by cutting with CO2 and Nd∶YAG lasers. The good cut quality, the high productivity, and the easy delivery of the beam obtained at the same time, corroborate the advantage of using fiber lasers for thin sheets lightweight alloys cutting.

  18. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  19. Nickel-aluminum alloy clusters -- structural and dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellinek, J.; Krissinel, E.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1997-08-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of mixed Ni{sub n}Al{sub m} alloy clusters mimicked by a many-body potential are studied computationally for all the possible compositions n and m such that n + m = 13. It is shown that the manifold of the usually very large number of the different possible structural forms can be systematized by introducing classes of structures corresponding to the same concentration of the components, geometry and type of the central atom. General definitions of mixing energy and mixing coefficient are introduced, and it is shown that the energy ordering of the structural forms within each class is governed by the mixing coefficient. The peculiarities of the solid-to-liquid-like transition are described as a function of the concentration of the two types of atoms. These peculiarities are correlated with and explained in terms of the energy spectra of the structural forms. Class-dependent features of the dynamics are described and analyzed.

  20. Multi-cycle rolled aluminum alloy 3103 sandwiches: mechanical properties and stamp ability

    OpenAIRE

    Nosova Ekaterina; Erisov Yaroslav; Grechnikov Fedor

    2017-01-01

    Constructional part producing by sheet stamping of multilayer composites requires the stamping ability data. The aim of a work is to estimate mechanical properties, stamping ratio and anisotropy indexes of 2, 4, 8 and 12 layer sandwiches produced from aluminium alloy AA3103. The pieces were received by the cold rolling. Interoperation annealing was at 500°C for 1 hour. Charts of tensile strength, yield stress, elongation depending on layer thickness were composed. It was found that cold strai...

  1. Robust biomimetic-structural superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingjie; Huang, Tao; Lei, Jinglei; He, Jianxin; Qu, Linfeng; Huang, Peiling; Zhou, Wei; Li, Nianbing; Pan, Fusheng

    2015-01-28

    The following facile approach has been developed to prepare a biomimetic-structural superhydrophobic surface with high stabilities and strong resistances on 2024 Al alloy that are robust to harsh environments. First, a simple hydrothermal treatment in a La(NO3)3 aqueous solution was used to fabricate ginkgo-leaf like nanostructures, resulting in a superhydrophilic surface on 2024 Al. Then a low-surface-energy compound, dodecafluoroheptyl-propyl-trimethoxylsilane (Actyflon-G502), was used to modify the superhydrophilic 2024 Al, changing the surface character from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. The water contact angle (WCA) of such a superhydrophobic surface reaches up to 160°, demonstrating excellent superhydrophobicity. Moreover, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface shows high stabilities in air-storage, chemical and thermal environments, and has strong resistances to UV irradiation, corrosion, and abrasion. The WCAs of such a surface almost remain unchanged (160°) after storage in air for 80 days, exposure in 250 °C atmosphere for 24 h, and being exposed under UV irradiation for 24 h, are more than 144° whether in acidic or alkali medium, and are more than 150° after 48 h corrosion and after abrasion under 0.98 kPa for 1000 mm length. The remarkable durability of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface can be attributed to its stable structure and composition, which are due to the existence of lanthanum (hydr)oxides in surface layer. The robustness of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface to harsh environments will open their much wider applications. The fabricating approach for such robust superhydrophobic surface can be easily extended to other metals and alloys.

  2. Dynamic Behavior of AA2519-T8 Aluminum Alloy Under High Strain Rate Loading in Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasumboye, A. T.; Owolabi, G. M.; Odeshi, A. G.; Yilmaz, N.; Zeytinci, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effects of strain rate on the dynamic behavior, microstructure evolution and hence, failure of the AA2519-T8 aluminum alloy were investigated under compression at strain rates ranging from 1000 to 3500 s-1. Cylindrical specimens of dimensions 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm (L/D = 1) were tested using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar integrated with a digital image correlation system. The microstructure of the alloy was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Results showed that the dynamic yield strength of the alloy is strain rate dependent, with the maximum yield strength attained by the material being 500 MPa. The peak flow stress of 562 MPa was attained by the material at 3500 s-1. The alloy also showed a significant rate of strain hardening that is typical of other Al-Cu alloys; the rate of strain hardening, however, decreased with increase in strain rate. It was determined that the strain rate sensitivity coefficient of the alloy within the range of high strain rates used in this study is approximately 0.05 at 0.12 plastic strain; a more significant value than what was reported in literature under quasi-static loading. Micrographs obtained showed potential sites for the evolution of adiabatic shear band at 3500 s-1, with a characteristic circular-shaped surface profile comprising partially dissolved second phase particles in the continuous phase across the incident plane of the deformed specimen. The regions surrounding the site showed little or no change in the size of particles. However, the constituent coarse particles were observed as agglomerations of fractured pieces, thus having a shape factor different from those contained in the as-received alloy. Since the investigated alloy is a choice material for military application where it can be exposed to massive deformation at high strain rates, this study provides information on its microstructural and mechanical responses to such extreme loading condition.

  3. Self-organization behaviors of shear bands in 7075 T73 and annealed aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Li, D.H.; Zheng, H.G.; Li, X.M.; Jiang, F.

    2009-01-01

    The self-organization behaviors of multiple adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) in the 7075 T73 aluminum alloy were investigated by means of the thick-walled cylinder (TWC) technique. Shear bands first nucleate at the inner boundary of the aluminum alloy tube and propagate along the maximum shear stress direction in the spiral trajectory. On the cross section of the specimen, shear bands distribute either in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction. The number of ASBs in the clockwise direction is roughly twice that in the anticlockwise direction. However, the 7075 annealed alloy does not generate any shear band under the same experimental conditions. Numerical simulation with coupled thermo-mechanical analysis was carried out to investigate the evolution mechanism of adiabatic shear bands. Both uniform and non-uniform finite element models were created. The simulation results of the non-uniform model are in better agreement with those of the experiment. In the non-uniform case, the spacing between ASBs is larger than that of the uniform model, and most of the ASBs prefer to propagate in the clockwise direction. For the first time, two types of particles (second phase), hard particles and soft particles, are separately introduced into the metal matrix in the non-uniform model to simulate their effects on the self-organization of ASBs. The soft particles reduce the time required for ASBs nucleation. Stress collapse first occurs at the region where the soft particles are located and most of the ASBs pass through these soft particles. However, ASBs propagate along the paths that are adjacent to the hard particles instead of passing through them. As experimental observations, there is no shear band nucleating in the annealed alloy in simulation. Under the same conditions, the energy barrier for the formation of ASBs in the annealed aluminum alloy is about 2.5 times larger than that in the T73 alloy, which means that the adiabatic shearing is less likely to nucleate in the

  4. Intergranular corrosion in AA5XXX aluminum alloys with discontinuous precipitation at the grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumiller, Elissa

    The US Navy currently uses AA5xxx aluminum alloys for structures exposed to a marine environment. These alloys demonstrate excellent corrosion resistance over other aluminum alloys (e.g., AA2xxx or AA7xxx) in this environment, filling a niche in the marine structures market when requiring a light-weight alternative to steel. However, these alloys are susceptible to localized corrosion; more specifically, intergranular corrosion (IGC) is of concern. IGC of AA5xxx alloys due to the precipitation of beta phase on the grain boundaries is a well-established phenomenon referred to as sensitization. At high degrees of sensitization, the IGC path is a continuous anodic path of beta phase particles. At lower degrees of sensitization, the beta phase coverage at the grain boundaries is not continuous. The traditional ranges of susceptibility to IGC as defined by ASTM B928 are in question due to recent studies. These studies showed that even at mid range degrees of sensitization where the beta phase is no longer continuous, IGC may still occur. Previous thoughts on IGC of these alloy systems were founded on the idea that once the grain boundary precipitate became discontinuous the susceptibility to IGC was greatly reduced. Additionally, IGC susceptibility has been defined metallurgically by compositional gradients at the grain boundaries. However, AA5xxx alloys show no compositional gradients at the grain boundaries, yet are still susceptible to IGC. The goal of this work is to establish criteria necessary for IGC to occur given no continuous beta phase path and no compositional gradient at the grain boundaries. IGC performance of the bulk alloy system AA5083 has been studied along with the primary phases present in the IGC system: alpha and beta phases using electrochemistry and modeling as the primary tools. Numerical modeling supports that at steady-state the fissure tip is likely saturated with Mg in excess of the 4% dissolved in the matrix. By combining these results

  5. Semi-solid metal forming of beryllium-reinforced aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haws, W.; Lane, L.; Marder, J.; Nicholas, N.

    1995-01-01

    A Powder Metallurgy (PM) based, Semi-Solid Metal (SSM) forming process has been developed to produce low cost near-net shapes of beryllium-reinforced aluminum alloys. Beryllium acts as a reinforcing additive to the aluminum, in which there is nearly no mutual solid solubility. The modulus of elasticity of the alloy dramatically increases, while the density and thermal expansion coefficient decrease with increasing beryllium content. The material is suitable for complex thermal management and vibration resistance applications, as well as for airborne components which are density and stiffness sensitive. The forming process involves heating a blank of the material to a temperature at which the aluminum is semi-solid and the beryllium is solid. The semi-solid blank is then injected without turbulence into a permanent mold. High quality, near net shape components can be produced which are functionally superior to those produced by other permanent mold processes. Dimensional accuracy is equivalent to or better than that obtained in high pressure die casting. Cost effectiveness is the primary advantage of this technique compared to other forming processes. The advantages and limitations of the process are described. Physical and mechanical property data are presented, as well as directions for future investigation

  6. Effect of creep-aging on precipitates of 7075 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y.C., E-mail: yclin@csu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jiang, Yu-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Min; Wen, Dong-Xu [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Changsha 410083 (China); Zhou, Hua-Min [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-12-20

    The creep-aging behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy are studied by uniaxial tensile creep experiments under elevated temperatures. The effects of creep-aging temperature and applied stress on the precipitates of 7075-T651 aluminum alloy are investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results show that (1) coarse insoluble precipitates (Al{sub 7}Cu{sub 2}Fe and Mg{sub 2}Si) and intermediate precipitates (Al{sub 18}Mg{sub 3}Cr{sub 2} and Al{sub 3}Zr) are found in the aluminum matrix, and the effects of creep-aging treatment on these precipitates are not obvious; (2) the main aging precipitates are η′ and η phases, and the amount of aging precipitates increase with the increase of creep-aging temperature and applied stress; (3) with the increase of creep-aging temperature and applied stress, the precipitates are discontinuously distributed on the grain boundary, and the width of precipitate free zone increases with the increase of creep-aging temperature and applied stress and (4) compared with the microstructure in the traditional stress-free aged sample, the creep-aging process can refine the precipitates and narrow the width of the precipitate free zone.

  7. The influence of thermal treatment on the cast structure of 6xxx aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Metin

    This study was performed to develop an understanding of the influence of thermal treatment on the cast and homogenized structure of 6xxx aluminum alloys prior to extrusion. The primary purpose of this investigation was to study the evolution of homogenized microstructure, with emphasis on Mg 2Si. The secondary purpose of this study was to understand the cast structure, since the evolution of Mg2Si should be considered in the larger context. Homogenization treatment characterization was performed on 6″-diameter logs at Keymark Corporation, Fonda, NY. A 6105 aluminum alloy which was already homogenized at Werner Company, Greenville, PA, also contained large globular undissolved Mg2Si. In 6063 aluminum alloy, homogenized samples were exposed to heat treatment at 590°C for over 1 week. An indication of dissolution for large Mg 2Si particles was observable, but it was not confirmed by further investigation which demonstrated the coarsening of Mg2Si in this alloy at 590°C for 1 week and 2 weeks, as well. The response of large particles to temperatures of 590, 600, 610, 620 and 630°C was investigated. It was found that large particles disappeared at 620 and 630°C for 6063 and 600, 610, 620 and 630°C for 6105. The appearance of extrema in the Mg concentration profile implies the variation in chemical composition in the matrix. This was verified by an electron probe line scan study showing areas of local high concentration of Mg and Si in the matrix. The coarsening of Mg2Si is a major element in "homogenizing" thermal treatment of 6xxx aluminum alloys. The particle coarsening kinetics agree with scaling laws suggested by Lifshitz, Slyozov and Wagner (LSW). That is, the linear relationship between R¯3-R¯ 3i and time fits the experimental measurements reasonably well, showing the kinetics to be diffusion controlled. The particle coarsening observations are inconsistent with the classical phase diagram, and the classical phase diagram appears to be in error. A small

  8. Divorced eutectic in a HPDC magnesium-aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbagallo, S.; Laukli, H.I.; Lohne, O.; Cerri, E.

    2004-01-01

    The morphology of the eutectic in a thin-wall high pressure die cast (HPDC) U-shape AM60 magnesium box was investigated by light microscope, SEM, TEM and EPMA. The extremely fast cooling rate taking place in the solidification process produces a highly segregated zone near the boundaries of small grains and a fine distribution of β particles, which is typical of a completely divorced eutectic. It was shown that the segregated zone is coherent with the primary α-Mg grain core even if the increased aluminium content produces a deformation of the hexagonal crystal lattice, which was estimated through diffraction patterns (SADP). The variation of the alloying elements content through the grain boundaries was shown by means of EPMA line scanning. The β particle composition was quantitatively investigated and the results show that, in comparison with the equilibrium phase diagram, the non-equilibrium phase boundary of the Mg 17 Al 12 region is moved some percent towards the lower aluminium content, at the high cooling rate that occurs in high pressure die castings. The cubic structure of the β phase was revealed by diffraction pattern. The presence of small Al-Mn particles both inside the grain and in the boundary region was also put in evidence by TEM

  9. Modeling of microporosity formation during solidification of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; An, D.; Zhang, Q.; Dai, T.; Zhu, M.

    2015-06-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) multi-phase cellular automaton (MCA) model is adopted to simulate the dendrite and microporosity formation during solidification of aluminium alloys. The model involves three phases of liquid, gas, and solid. The effect of liquid-solid phase transformation on the nucleation and growth of porosity, the redistribution and diffusion of solute and hydrogen, and the effects of surface tension and environmental pressure are taken into account. The growth of both dendrite and porosity is simulated using a CA approach. The diffusion of solute and hydrogen is calculated using the finite difference (FD) method. The simulations can reveal the interactive and competitive growth of dendrites and micropores, and the microsegregationof solute and hydrogen. The porosity nuclei with large size are able to grow preferentially, while the growth of the small porosity nuclei is inhibited. Gas pores grow spherically when it is enveloped by liquid. After touching with dendrites, the shapes of pores become irregular. An increased initial hydrogen concentration reduces the incubation time of porosity nucleation, but increases the final percentage of porosity and the average porosity size at the eutectic temperature. With cooling rate decreasing, the competitive growth between gas pores becomes more evident, leading to non-uniform porosity sizes, and more irregular morphology of the porosities with larger size. The simulation results are compared reasonably well with the experimental data reported in literature.

  10. Electrochemistry of vanadium(II and the electrodeposition of aluminum-vanadium alloys in the aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of vanadium(II was examined in the 66.7-33.3 mole percent aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt containing dissolved VCl2 at 353 K. Voltammetry experiments revealed that V(II could be electrochemically oxidized to V(III and V(IV. However at slow scan rates the V(II/V(III electrode reaction is complicated by the rapid precipitation of V(III as VCl3. The reduction of V(II occurs at potentials considerably negative of the Al(III/Al electrode reaction, and Al-V alloys cannot be electrodeposited from this melt. However electrodeposition experiments conducted in VCl2-saturated melt containing the additive, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, resulted in Al-V alloys. The vanadium content of these alloys increased with increasing cathodic current density or more negative applied potentials. X-ray analysis of Al-V alloys that were electrodeposited on a rotating copper wire substrate indicated that these alloys did not form or contain an intermetallic compound, but were non-equilibrium or metastable solid solutions. The chloride-pitting corrosion properties of these alloys were examined in aqueous NaCl by using potentiodynamic polarization techniques. Alloys containing ~10 a/o vanadium exhibited a pitting potential that was 0.3 V positive of that for pure aluminum.

  11. Surface alloying of aluminum with molybdenum by high-current pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Han; Zhang, Conglin; Lv, Peng; Cai, Jie; Jin, Yunxue; Guan, Qingfeng

    2018-02-01

    The surface alloying of pre-coated molybdenum (Mo) film on aluminum (Al) substrate by high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) was investigated. The microstructure and phase analysis were conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that Mo particles were dissolved into Al matrix to form alloying layer, which was composed of Mo, Al and acicular or equiaxed Al5Mo phases after surface alloying. Meanwhile, various structure defects such as dislocation loops, high-density dislocations and dislocation walls were observed in the alloying surface. The corrosion resistance was tested by using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). Electrochemical results indicate that all the alloying samples had better corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution compared to initial sample. The excellent corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to the combined effect of the structure defects and the addition of Mo element to form a more stable passive film.

  12. Effects of V addition on recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloy after simulative hot deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Jing; Shi, Cangji; Chen, X.-Grant, E-mail: xgrant_chen@uqac.ca

    2014-10-15

    The effects of different V contents (0.01 to 0.19 wt.%) on the recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloys during post-deformation heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural evolutions at as-cast, as-homogenized conditions and after post-deformation annealing were studied using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes and using the electron backscattered diffraction technique. The precipitation of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids was observed in alloys containing 0.11 to 0.19 wt.% V after homogenization. The dispersoids were mainly distributed in the dendrite cells, and the precipitate-free zones occurred in the interdendritic regions and near grain boundaries. V addition could significantly enhance the recrystallization resistance during post-deformation annealing, particularly in the presence of a great number of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids. Recrystallized grain growth was effectively restricted because of the dispersoid pinning effect. The alloy containing 0.15 wt.% V exhibited the highest recrystallization resistance amongst all V-containing alloys studied. - Highlights: • Investigated the effect of V level on microstructure and flow stress of 7150 alloys • Characterized microstructures using optical microscopy, SEM, TEM and EBSD • Described the precipitation behavior of V-dispersoids in the dendritic structure • Studied the V effect on recrystallization resistance during post heat treatment • V addition greatly enhanced the recrystallization resistance during annealing.

  13. Influence of Aging Conditions on Fatigue Fracture Behaviour of 6063 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiq Ahmed Siddiqui

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum - Magnesium - Silicon (Al-Mg-Si 6063 alloy was heat-treated using under aged, peak aged and overage temperatures. The numbers of cycles required to cause the fatigue fracture, at constant stress, was considered as criteria for the fatigue resistance. Moreover, the fractured surface of the alloy at different aging conditions was evaluated by optical microscopy and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The SEM micrographs confirmed the cleavage surfaces with well-defined fatigue striations. It has been observed that the various aging time and temperature of the 6063 Al-alloy, produces different modes of fractures. The most suitable age hardening time and temperature was found to be between 4 to 5 hours and to occur at 460 K. The increase in fatigue fracture property of the alloy due to aging could be attributed to a vacancy assisted diffusion mechanism or due to pinning of dislocations movement by the precipitates produced during aging. However, the decrease in the fatigue resistance, for the over aged alloys, might be due to the coalescence of precipitates into larger grains.

  14. Theoretical studies of aluminum and aluminide alloys using CALPHAD and first-principles approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao

    Heat-treatable aluminum alloys have been widely used in the automobile and aerospace industries as structural materials due to their light weight and high strength. To study the age-hardening process in heat-treatable aluminum alloys, the Gibbs energies of the strengthening metastable phases, e.g. theta ' and theta″, are critical. However, those data are not included in the existing thermodynamic databases for aluminum alloys due to the semi-empirical nature of the CALPHAD approach. In the present study, the thermodynamics of the Al-Cu system, the pivotal age-hardening system, is remodeled using a combined CALPHAD and first-principles approach. The formation enthalpies and vibrational formation entropies of the stable and metastable phases in the Al-Cu system are provided by first-principles calculations. Special Quasirandom Structures (SQS's) are applied to model the substitutionally random fee and bee alloys. SQS's for binary bee alloys are developed and tested in the present study. Finally, a self-consistent thermodynamic description of the Al-Cu system including the two metastable theta″ and theta' phases is obtained. During welding of heat-treatable aluminum alloys, a detrimental phenomenon called constitutional liquation, i.e. the local eutectic melting of second-phase particles in a matrix at temperatures above the eutectic temperature but below the solidus of the alloy, may occur in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the present study, diffusion code DICTRA coupled with realistic thermodynamic and kinetic databases is used to simulate the constitutional liquation in the model Al-Cu system. The simulated results are in quantitative agreement with experiments. The critical heating rate to avoid constitutional liquation is also determined through computer simulations. Besides the heat-treatable aluminum alloys, intermetallic compounds based on transition metal aluminides, e.g. NiAl and FeAl, are also promising candidates for the next-generation of high

  15. The Role of Friction Stir Processing (FSP Parameters on TiC Reinforced Surface Al7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe García-Vázquez

    Full Text Available Abstract: Aluminum alloys are very promising for structural applications in aerospace, military and transportation industries due to their light weight, high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent resistance to corrosion. In comparison to unreinforced aluminum alloys, aluminum/aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic phases exhibit higher strength and hardness, improved tribological characteristics. A novel surface modifying technique, friction stir processing (FSP, has been developed for fabrication of surface composite with an improved performance. The effect of FSP parameters such as number of passes, direction of each pass, sealed or unsealed groove on microstructure was investigated. In this work, nano-particles of TiC (2% in weight were added to aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 to produce a functional surface. Fixed parameters for this AA7075 alloy were used; rotation speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 300 mm/min and pin penetration of 2.8 mm. Optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of TiC particles and micro-hardness of the surface composites. Finally, in order to evaluate rate wear the pin on disk test was carried out.

  16. Microstructure and tensile properties of heavily irradiated 5052-0 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.

    1980-01-01

    During neutron irradiation of an aluminum 2.2% magnesium solid solution alloy in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to fast and thermal fluences > 10 27 neutrons (n)m 2 at 328 0 K (0.35 T/sub m/) about seven percent insoluble, transmutant silicon was produced. Some of this silicon reacted with the dissolved magnesium to form a fine precipitate of Mg 2 Si. A tight dislocation structure was also created. The alloy showed good resistance to cavity formation. Tension tests at 323, 373, and 423 0 K (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 T/sub m/) showed pronounced irradiation-induced strengthening and an associated marked loss in ductility. These changes were greater than in magnesium-free aluminum and in alloys containing preexisting, thermally-aged Mg 2 Si precipitate. Increasing the thermal-to-fast flux ratio from 1.7 to 2.1 caused further strengthening beyond that expected from a simple increase in silicon level

  17. Analysis of the Chip Geometry in Dry Machining of Aeronautical Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Trujillo Vilches

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloys are widely used in the manufacturing of structural parts for aircraft, frequently in combination with other materials such as CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer, to form FML (Fiber Metal Laminates structures (CFRP/Al. The dry machining of these structures presents several problems, some of which are related to chip evacuation, either when machining aluminum alloys as an isotropic material, or during hybridization with composites. In this work, a study of the way in which cutting parameters influence the chip morphology in the dry machining of UNS A97075-T6 (Al-Zn and UNS A92024-T3 (Al-Cu alloys, is performed. Thus, different geometric parameters of the chip morphology have been obtained, and their evolution with feed has been analysed. Finally, the different relationships which occur between these geometric parameters and feed, have been obtained. These relationships allow a prediction of the evolution of some of the geometric parameters of the chip, as a function of feed.

  18. Aluminum nitride, Scandium nitride, and Aluminum-Scandium-Nitride ternary alloys : Structural, optical, and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ruopeng

    Al and Sc are iso-electric, both of which have three valence electrons. Their nitrides AlN and ScN both have high melting points, high hardness, and good chemical inertness. And their distinct properties find applications in different areas: AlN in piezoelectric acoustic-wave devices, and ScN as candidate for high-temperature thermoelectricity. While there are unsettled problems to solve for AlN and ScN alone, which are to obtain tilted c-axis texture in AlN for shear mode acoustic-wave devices to maximize performance, and to determine electronic band structure of ScN that has been long debated due to free carrier effect, the alloying between AlN and ScN is also intriguing in that the ternary alloy Al-Sc-N connects their similarity and opens even wider possibility and greater potential. The significantly enhanced piezoelectric coefficient in the alloy compared to pure AlN is one of the best examples that is little understood, and alternate bandgap engineering in LED fabrication would probably be another contribution from the alloy. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of AlN, ScN, and Al-Sc-N ternary alloys are thus studied in order to answer these questions, and to explore more fundamental physics characteristics within these nitride materials. For the purpose of achieving tilted c-axis texture in AlN, off-axis deposition is conducted with a variable deposition angle α = 0-84° in 5 mTorr pure N2 at room temperature. XRD pole figure analysis show that layers deposited from a normal angle (α = 0°) exhibit fiber texture, with the c-axis tilted by 42+/-2° off the substrate normal. However, as α is increased to 45°, two preferred in-plane grain orientations emerge, with populations I and II having the c-axis tilted towards and away from the deposition flux, by 53+/-2° and 47+/-1° off the substrate normal, respectively. Increasing alpha further to 65 and 84°, results in the development of a single population II with a 43+/-1° tilt. The observed tilt

  19. Microstructure of Friction Stir Welded AlSi9Mg Cast with 5083 and 2017A Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.; Kopyściański, M.; Dymek, S.; Węglowska, A.; Pietras, A.

    2018-03-01

    Wrought aluminum alloys 5083 and 2017A were each joined with cast aluminum alloy AlSi9Mg through friction stir welding in butt weld configurations. For each material system, the wrought and cast alloy positions, i.e., the advancing side or the retreating side, were exchanged between welding trials. The produced weldments were free from cracks and discontinuities. For each alloy configuration, a well-defined nugget comprised of alternating bands of the welded alloys characterized the microstructure. The degree of mixing, however, strongly depended on which wrought alloy was present and on its position during processing. In all cases, the cast AlSi9Mg alloy dominated the weld center regardless of its position during welding. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis showed that the grain size in both alloys (bands) constituting the nugget was similar and that the majority of grain boundaries exhibited a high angle character (20°-60°). Regardless of the alloy, however, all grains were elongated along the direction of the material plastic flow during welding. A numerical simulation of the joining process visualized the material flow patterns and temperature distribution and helped to rationalize the microstructural observations. The hardness profiles across the weld reflected the microstructure formed during welding and correlated well with the temperature changes predicted by the numerical model. Tensile specimens consistently fractured in the cast alloy near the weld nugget.

  20. Fabrication of the micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy by sulfuric acid anodizing and polypropylene coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruomei; Liang, Shuquan; Liu, Jun; Pan, Anqiang; Yu, Y; Tang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    The preparation of the superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy by anodizing and polypropylene (PP) coating was reported. Both the different anodizing process and different PP coatings of aluminum alloy were investigated. The effects of different anodizing conditions, such as electrolyte concentration, anodization time and current on the superhydrophobic surface were discussed. By PP coating after anodizing, a good superhydrophobic surface was facilely fabricated. The optimum conditions for anodizing were determined by orthogonal experiments. After the aluminium-alloy was grinded with 600# sandpaper, pretreated by 73 g/L hydrochloric acid solution at 1 min, when the concentration of sulfuric acid was 180 g/L, the concentration of oxalic acid was 5 g/L, the concentration of potassium dichromate was 10 g/L, the concentration of chloride sodium was 50 g/L and 63 g/L of glycerol, anodization time was 20 min, and anodization current was 1.2 A/dm2, anodization temperature was 30-35 degrees C, the best micro-nanostructure aluminum alloy films was obtained. On the other hand, the PP with different concentrations was used to the PP with different concentrations was used to coat the aluminum alloy surface after anodizing. The results showed that the best superhydrophobicity was achieved by coating PP, and the duration of the superhydrophobic surface was improved by modifying the coat the aluminum alloy surface after anodizing. The results showed that the best superhydrophobicity was surface with high concentration PP. The morphologies of micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic surface were further confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The material of PP with the low surface free energy combined with the micro/nano-structures of the surface resulted in the superhydrophobicity of the aluminum alloy surface.

  1. Effect of Sleeve Plunge Depth on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of 2198 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yumei; Shi, Yao; Ji, Shude; Wang, Yue; Li, Zhengwei

    2017-10-01

    Refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) is a new spot welding technology, by which spot joint without keyhole can be obtained. In this work, RFSSW was used to join 2-mm-thick 2198-T8 aluminum alloy sheets and effects of the sleeve plunge depth on microstructure and lap shear properties of the joints were mainly discussed. Results showed that when using small plunge depths of 2.4 and 2.6 mm, joints showed good formation and no defects were observed. Incomplete refilling defect was observed with increasing plunge depth due to material loss during welding. Size of the grains at sleeve-affected zone (SAZ) is smaller than that at the pin-affected zone, and the size becomes bigger with increasing the plunge depth. More secondary phase particles can be observed at SAZ with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The lap shear failure load firstly increased and then decreased with increasing the sleeve plunge depth. The maximum failure load of 9819 N was attained with plug fracture mode when using 2.6 mm. Fracture morphologies show ductile fracture mode.

  2. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of two powder metallurgy processed aluminum-lithium alloys were determined. Strength properties of 480 MPa yield and 550 MPa ultimate tensile strength with 5% strain to fracture were attained. Very little reduction in area was observed and fracture characteristics were brittle. The magnesium bearing alloy exhibited the highest strength and ductility, but fracture was intergranular. Recrystallization and grain growth, as well as coarse grain boundary precipitation, occurred in Alloy 2. The fracture morphology of the two alloys differed. Alloy 1 fractured along a plane of maximum shear stress, while Alloy 2 fractured along a plane of maximum tensile stress. It is found that a fixed orientation relationship exists between the shear fracture plane and the rolling direction which suggests that the PM alloys are strongly textured.

  3. Orientation Dependence of Cracking in Hot-Dip Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings on a Sheet Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. B.; Kim, I. G.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, T. C.; Oh, M. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating a basic cause of cracking in hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings on an extra deep drawing quality sheet steel. The electron backscattering diffraction technique was employed to examine the crystallographic planes of the cracks generated before and after bending deformation of the coated steel sheets. It was clarified that the occurrence of cracking in the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coatings absolutely depends on the orientation of the primary Zn and eutectic Zn alloy phases. Finally, a cracking mechanism was proposed on the basis of the anisotropy of thermal expansion and the Young's modulus in the phases constituting the coatings.

  4. Spectrochemical analysis of aluminum and its alloys, and S. A. P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1966-01-01

    Three different techniques have been employed for the spectrochemical analysis of aluminum, aluminum alloys, and S.A.P. :1) Point to plane with condensed spark and direct reading spectrometry; from the study on the instantaneous spectral-line intensities a long pre integration time has been established. 1) Powdered samples technique with direct current arc and also direct reading spectrometry; samples are transformed into Al 2 O 3 and mixed with graphite powder (1:1). A complete study on the different elements in aluminium oxide, aluminium sulfate and their mixtures with graphite, has been carried out. 3) Carrier distillation method with photographic recording for very low concentrations of boron and cadmium in S. A.P. (Author) 10 refs

  5. Comparison of SPS Processing Behavior between As Atomized and Cryomilled Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Frank; McWilliams, Brandon; Sietins, Jennifer; Giri, Anit; Cho, Kyu

    2017-11-01

    Aluminum 5083 powder, both as atomized and cryomilled, was consolidated via spark plasma sintering (SPS). This study quantified and compared the effects of heating an aluminum alloy powder directly through Joule heating vs indirectly through thermal conduction from the die during SPS processing. When consolidated under the same processing conditions, the cryomilled powders showed faster heating rates and densification than the as atomized powder. It was also possible to process the cryomilled powder in a non-conductive die but not the as atomized powder. This could be ascribed to an improvement in electrical conductivity of the powder due to the break up and redistribution of surface oxides after cryomilling. The changes in behavior as a result of cryomilling and/or changing die material led to samples with different fracture morphologies and increased hardness values.

  6. Process stabilization by dual focus laser welding of aluminum alloys for car body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kimihiro; Iwase, Takakuni; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Dausinger, Friedrich H.; Hohenberger, Bernd; Mueller, Matthias; Matsunawa, Akira; Seto, Naoki

    2003-09-01

    Aluminum alloys were welded using dual focus beams formed with two Nd:YAG lasers with the aim of obtaining a stable welding process. The relationship between the configuration of the spot beams and the quality of the weld beads was investigated using X-ray and high-speed camera observations. The number of pores was clearly related to the ratio of the keyhole depth to the keyhole opening. A larger keyhole opening and/or a shallower keyhole depth resulted in a smaller number of pores caused by instability of the weld pool. Based on the investigation, a car body component was welded with a dual focus beam system. The results show that aluminum car body panels can be welded stably at high speed with little distortion under optimum conditions.

  7. Blue-Light Hazard From Gas Metal Arc Welding of Aluminum Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2017-10-01

    The objective was to quantify the blue-light hazard from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminum alloys. The exposure level is expected to depend on the welding conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the blue-light hazard under various welding conditions. We experimentally conducted GMAW of aluminum alloys under various welding conditions and measured the spectral radiance of the arcs. The effective blue-light radiance, which the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists has defined to quantify the exposure level of blue light, was calculated from the measured spectral radiance. The maximum acceptable exposure duration per 10000 s for this effective blue-light radiance was calculated. The effective blue-light radiance measured in this study was in the range of 2.9-20.0 W cm-2·sr. The corresponding maximum acceptable exposure duration per 10000 s was only 5.0-34 s, so it is hazardous to view the welding arc. The effective blue-light radiance was higher at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents, when pulsed welding currents were used rather than steady welding currents, and when magnesium was included in the welding materials. It is very hazardous to view the arcs in GMAW of aluminum alloys. Welders and their helpers should use appropriate eye protection in arc-welding operations. They should also avoid direct light exposure when starting an arc-welding operation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  8. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - From Process to Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Shao, H; Kimchi, Menachem; Menachem Kimchi and Wanda Newman

    2004-05-11

    This paper summarizes work to date on resistance spot welding (RSW) of aluminum alloy to mild steel from process development to performance evaluation. A cold-rolled strip material is introduced as a transition material to aid the resistance welding process. The optimal welding parameters and electrode selections were established using a combination of experimental and analytical approaches. The mechanical behaviors of welded samples was evaluated using static and dynamic strength tests and cyclic fatigue tests. A statistical analysis was also performed to analyze the effect of different failure modes on the sample's peak load and energy absorption.

  9. Structural Phase Evolution in Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    The authors examined the structural and phase state of fixed joints produced by method of friction stir welding (FSW) and ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) from extruded profile of aluminum alloy AA2195. In order to identify the role of ultrasonic application in the course of welding, such characteristics, as volume fraction and average size of secondary particles are compared in the base material and stir zones of FSW and UAFSW joints. By applying the methods of SEM and TEM analysis, researchers established the complex character of phase transitions as a result of ultrasonic application.

  10. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy-SiC{sub p} composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baalasuburamaniam, R.; Cvetnic, C.; Ravindran, C. [Ryerson Univ., Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Industrial Engineering, Centre for the Near-Net-Shape Processing of Materials, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: rbalasub@ryerson.ca; ccvetnic@ryerson.ca; rravindr@ryerson.ca

    2002-07-01

    Metal matrix composites are a viable alternative to cast irons in automotive components with possible increase in strength-to-weight ratio. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy matrix composite containing 20 volume percent SiC was carried out at 690, 730, and 770{sup o}C with a view to determining the effects of cooling rate on microstructure, particle distribution, microporosity and mechanical properties. These results were compared with those for the matrix material cast under similar conditions. The results and the correlations are of particular interest as there is no published literature on lost foam casting of composite materials. (author)

  11. Pitting corrosion of friction stir welded aluminum alloy thick plate in alkaline chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weifeng; Liu Jinhe; Zhu Hongqiang

    2010-01-01

    The pitting corrosion of different positions (Top, Middle and Bottom) of weld nugget zone (WNZ) along thickness plate in friction stir welded 2219-O aluminum alloy in alkaline chloride solution was investigated by using open circuit potential, cyclic polarization, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The results indicate that the material presents significant passivation, the top has highest corrosion potential, pitting potential and re-passivation potential compared with the bottom and base material. With the increase of traverse speed from 60 to 100 mm/min or rotary speed from 500 to 600 rpm, the corrosion resistance decreases.

  12. Microhardness and wear resistance of PEO-coated 5754 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyaliy, I. E.; Egorkin, V. S.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Minaev, A. N.; Gnedenkov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    We present results of the study aimed at assessing the effect of duty cycle (D) during plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on protective properties of the coatings produced on 5754 aluminum alloy. It is shown that increasing the duty cycle of a microsecond current pulses leads to increased hardness and reduced abrasive wear of the PEO-layers, improving mechanical properties. The obtained data allowed confirming, that increasing the amount of energy consumed for coating growth leads to the formation of thicker PEO-layers with improved tribological properties. The effect of duty cycle during plasma electrolytic oxidation on protective properties of the produced coatings was assessed.

  13. Rare earth conversion coatings grown on AA6061 aluminum alloys. Corrosion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachetti S, S. B. [Instituto Tecnologico de Ciudad Madero, Av. 1o. de Mayo y Sor Juana I. de la Cruz, Col. Los Mangos, 89440 Ciudad Madero, Tanaulipas (Mexico); Dominguez C, M. A.; Torres H, A. M.; Onofre B, E. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada - Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira Km. 14.5, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); De la Cruz H, W., E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.mx [UNAM, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Apdo. Postal 2681, 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    The present work is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance of rare earth protective coatings deposited by spontaneous deposition on AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates. Coatings were deposited from water-based Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions by varing parameters such as rare earth solution concentration, bath temperature and immersion time. The values of the Tafel slopes indicate that the cathodic process is favored by concentration polarization rather than activation polarization. Chemical and morphological characterizations of the surface before and after electrochemical evaluations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (Author)

  14. Rare earth conversion coatings grown on AA6061 aluminum alloys. Corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachetti S, S. B.; Dominguez C, M. A.; Torres H, A. M.; Onofre B, E.; De la Cruz H, W.

    2014-01-01

    The present work is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance of rare earth protective coatings deposited by spontaneous deposition on AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates. Coatings were deposited from water-based Ce(NO 3 ) 3 and La(NO 3 ) 3 solutions by varing parameters such as rare earth solution concentration, bath temperature and immersion time. The values of the Tafel slopes indicate that the cathodic process is favored by concentration polarization rather than activation polarization. Chemical and morphological characterizations of the surface before and after electrochemical evaluations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (Author)

  15. Stress-Strain Compression of AA6082-T6 Aluminum Alloy at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre da Silva Scari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Short cylindrical specimens made of AA6082-T6 aluminum alloy were studied experimentally (compression tests, analytically (normalized Cockcroft-Latham criteria—nCL, and numerically (finite element analysis—FEA. The mechanical properties were determined with the stress-strain curves by the Hollomon equation. The elastic modulus obtained experimentally differs from the real value, as expected, and it is also explained. Finite element (FE analysis was carried out with satisfactory correlation to the experimental results, as it differs about 1,5% from the damage analysis by the nCL concerning the experimental data obtained by compression tests.

  16. Performance Comparison of Steam-Based and Chromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloy 6060

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oxide layers generated on aluminum alloy 6060(UNS A96060) using a steam-based process were compared with conventional chromate and chromate-phosphate conversion coatings. Chemical composition and microstructure of the conversion coatings were investigated and their corrosion...... performance was evaluated using potentio dynamic polarization, acetic acid salt spray, and filiform corrosion testing of powder coated specimens. The steam-based process resulted in homogenous growth of oxide layer and superior coverageover intermetallic particles when compared to chromate-based conversion...... coatings. The coating formed by steam showed improved corrosion resistance, while adhesion to powder coatingand filiform corrosion was comparable with chromate conversion coatings....

  17. Imaging and Information Processing of Pitting-Corroded Aluminum Alloy Panels with Surface Metrology Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Testing Preparation New aluminum alloy AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 samples were cut to dimension of 6’×3’×1’ and uniquely marked with stencil stamps ...panel image pre- processing, the rivet-hole areas and artifacts (e.g., stencil- stamp marked numbers) were manually whitened so they would not be... Aluminium by Digital Image Analysis. Materials Sciences & Applications, 3(5), pp. 287-293. Rao, K. S., & Rao, K. P. (2004). Pitting Corrosion of Heat

  18. State of residual stress in laser-deposited ceramic composite coatings on aluminum alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Kadolkar, P. B.; Watkins, T. R.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Dahotre, N. B.

    2007-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the residual stresses within laser-deposited titanium carbide (TiC) coatings on 2024 and 6061 aluminum (Al) alloys were investigated. Macro- and micro-stresses within the coatings were determined using an X-ray diffraction method. Owing to increased debonding between the coating and the substrate, the macro-stresses were found to be compressive and to decrease in magnitude with increasing processing speed. The origin of the macro- and micro-stresses is discussed. T...

  19. The NBS: Processing/Microstructure/Property Relationships in 2024 Aluminum Alloy Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, L. K.; Swartzendruber, W. J.; Boettinger, W. J.; Rosen, M.; Ridder, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    As received plates of 2024 aluminum alloy were examined. Topics covered include: solidification segregation studies; microsegregation and macrosegregation in laboratory and commercially cast ingots; C-curves and nondestructive evaluation; time-temperature precipitation diagrams and the relationships between mechanical properties and NDE measurements; transmission electron microscopy studies; the relationship between microstructure and properties; ultrasonic characterization; eddy-current conductivity characterization; the study of aging process by means of dynamic eddy current measurements; and Heat flow-property predictions, property degradations due to improve quench from the solution heat treatment temperature.

  20. Adhesion and corrosion studies of a lithium based conversion coating film on the 2024 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, M.R.S.; Nogueira, J.C.; Thim, G.P.; Oliveira, M.A.S.

    2004-01-01

    AA2024-T3-aluminum alloy surfaces were coated using non-chromate and chromate conversion coatings. All coatings were painted with the 10P4-2-primer epoxy resin. Independent on the film formation process, films passed on the substrate/conversion coating wet tape adhesion test. However, only the chromate conversion coating passed on the conversion coating/primer epoxy resin adhesion test. Electrochemical corrosion measurements showed that non-chromate conversion coated surfaces present lower corrosion current density, bigger polarization resistance and less negative corrosion potential than chromate conversion coated surfaces

  1. Microstructure and Salt Fog Corrosion Behavior of AA2219 Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, G.; Subba Rao, V. V.; Rao, S. R. K.

    2017-07-01

    Plates (8.1-mm-thick) from aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 are studied after friction stir welding. The plates are subjected to salt fog corrosion tests according to ASTM B117 at different pH values and different spraying times. The regions affected by corrosion are studied in different zones of welded joints by the methods of optical and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is determined in acid, basic and neutral solutions. The resistances of the base metal and of the zones of welded joints are compared.

  2. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  3. Densification behavior of aluminum alloy powder mixed with zirconia powder inclusion under cold compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Hyun Seok; Lee, Sung Chul; Kim, Ki Tae

    2002-01-01

    Densification behavior of composite powders was investigated during cold compaction. Experimental data were obtained for aluminum alloy powder mixed with zirconia powder inclusion under triaxial compression. The cap model with constraint factors was implemented into a finite element program(ABAQUS) to simulate compaction responses of composite powders during cold compaction. Finite element results were compared with experimental data for densification behavior of composite powders under cold isostatic pressing and die compaction. The agreements between experimental data and finite element calculations from the cap model with constraint factors were good

  4. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Grain refinement of AA5754 aluminum alloy by ultrasonic cavitation: Experimental study and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghayeghi, R.; Ezzatneshan, E.; Bahai, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation was carried out on the grain refinement of molten AA5754 Aluminum alloy through ultrasonic treatment. The cavitation induced heterogeneous nucleation was suggested as the major mechanism for grain refinement in the AA5754 aluminum alloy. A numerical simulation was performed to predict the formation, growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles in the molten AA5754 Aluminum alloy. Moreover, the acoustic pressure distribution and the induced acoustic streaming by ultrasonic horn reactor were investigated. It is suggested that the streaming by ultrasonic could transport the small bubbles formed in the ultrasonic cavitation zone into the bulk of melt rapidly. These micro-bubbles are collapsed due to acoustic vibrations where the resulting micro-jets are strong enough to break the oxide layer and to wet the impurities. These exogenous particles, intermetallics and oxides could contribute to the formation of fine, uniform and equiaxed microstructure across the treated melt. The experimental results confirmed the simulation predictions.

  5. Effects of aluminum and copper chill on mechanical properties and microstructures of Cu-Zn-Al alloys with sand casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhyananta, Hosta; Wibisono, Alvian Toto; Ramadhani, Mavindra; Widyastuti, Farid, Muhammad; Gumilang, Muhammad Shena

    2018-04-01

    Cu-Zn-Al alloy is one type of brass, which has high strength and high corrosion resistant. It has been applied on ship propellers and marine equipment. In this research, the addition of aluminum (Al) with variation of 1, 2, 3, 4% aluminum to know the effect on mechanical properties and micro structure at casting process using a copper chill and without copper chill. This alloy is melted using furnace in 1100°C without holding. Then, the molten metal is poured into the mold with copper chill and without copper chill. The speciment of Cu-Zn-Al alloy were chracterized by using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES), Metallography Test, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Hardness Test of Rockwell B and Charpy Impact Test. The result is the addition of aluminum and the use of copper chill on the molds can reduce the grain size, increases the value of hardness and impact.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of deformation bands in aluminum-magnesium alloy in the creep test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zheltov, M. A.; Gasanov, M. F.; Zolotov, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Various types of plastic instabilities that emerge in intermittent creep have been studied experimentally for AlMg6 aluminum-magnesium alloy. It has been shown that intermittent creep exhibits threshold dynamics. The deformation step on the creep curve of amplitude is 1-6% and begins when the rate of the preceding continuous creep attains a certain critical value. In the course of evolution of the step, the strain rate varies in the interval that spans more than two orders of magnitude, and transitions occur between different dynamic regimes of type A and B characterized by different stress drop regularity levels in the force response. Nonlinear aspects of the deformation behavior of the alloy in the intermittent creep conditions are considered.

  7. Metallurgical reactions in two industrially strip-cast aluminum-manganese alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, V.; Andersson, B.; Tibballs, J. E.; Gjønnes, J.

    1995-08-01

    Precipitation, phase transformation, subgrain growth, and recrystallization that occur during heat treatment of two strip-cast, cold-rolled, high manganese aluminum alloys have been studied mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The alloys differ in silicon content. The isothermal heat treatments have been performed in a salt bath at temperatures between 330 °C and 530 °C for times up to 1000 hours. Size distributions for each type of secondary particle have been determined. After short annealing times, small quasicrystals precipitated and subsequently transformed to α phase. The densities of these precipitates controlled dislocation movement and regulated subgrain sizes. Prolonged heating resulted in peritectoid reactions to Al6Mn or Al12Mn. Recrystallization, which is associated with the formation of Al12Mn, is advanced by increasing the silicon content; the nucleation and growth of Al12Mn occurs only at the expense of other phases that stabilize the subgrain network.

  8. Investigation of attenuation coefficients of some stainless steel and aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Zafer; Tufan, Mustafa ćaǧatay

    2018-02-01

    In this study, attenuation coefficients of two different stainless steel alloys (AISI 304 and AISI 310), which have a wide range of applications from home appliances to the automotive sector, and two different aluminum alloys (6013 and 5083), which have a high mechanical strength and a light weight structure and are used in many fields from aviation to military vehicles, has been determined. For this purpose, we used gamma spectrometer system with NaI(Tl) detector. In our measurements, we used Eu-152, Ra-226 and Co-60 as gamma ray sources. To narrow the beam of gamma rays, we designed the new steel based collimator. We also investigated the effect of using collimator. Obtained results were compared with the NIST XCOM values.

  9. Structural and electrical properties of copper-nickel-aluminum alloys obtained by conventional powder metallurgy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Waldemar A.; Carrio, Juan A.G.; Silveira, C.R. da; Pertile, H.K.S., E-mail: fisica.cch@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (UPM/CCH), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Humanidades. Dept. de Fisica; Silva, L.C.E. da; Buso, S.J., E-mail: jgcarrio@mackenzie.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work looked for to search out systematically, in scale of laboratory, copper-nickel-aluminum alloys (Cu-Ni-Al) with conventional powder metallurgy processing, in view of the maintenance of the electric and mechanical properties with the intention of getting electric connectors of high performance or high mechanical damping. After cold uniaxial pressing (1000 kPa), sintering (780 deg C) and convenient homogenization treatments (500 deg C for different times) under vacuum (powder metallurgy), the obtained Cu-Ni-Al alloys were characterized by optical microscopy, electrical conductivity, Vickers hardness. X rays powder diffraction data were collected for the sintered samples in order to a structural and microstructural analysis. The comparative analysis is based on the sintered density, hardness, macrostructures and microstructures of the samples. (author)

  10. Study on the surface constitute properties of high-speed end milling aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Li, Hongwei; Yumeng, Ma

    2017-09-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of the metal surface will change after the metal cutting processing. The comprehensive study of the influence of machining parameters on surface constitute properties are necessary. A high-speed milling experiment by means of orthogonal method with four factors was conducted for aluminum alloy7050-T7451. The surface constitutive properties of the Al-Alloy surface were measured using SSM-B4000TM stress-strain microprobe system. Based on all the load-depth curves obtained, the characteristics parameters such as strain hardening exponent n and yield strength σy of the milling surface are calculated. The effect of cutting speed, feed rate, and width and depth of cut on n and σy was investigated using the ANOVA techniques. The affecting degree of milling parameters on n and σy was v>fz> ap < ae. The influence of milling parameters on n and σ y was described and discussed.

  11. An Experimental Evaluation of Electron Beam Welded Thixoformed 7075 Aluminum Alloy Plate Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two plates of thixoformed 7075 aluminum alloy were joined using Electron Beam Welding (EBW. A post-welding-heat treatment (PWHT was performed within the semi-solid temperature range of this alloy at three temperatures, 610, 617 and 628 °C, for 3 min. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of EB welded plates, as well as the heat-treated specimens, were investigated in the Base Metal (BM, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, and Fusion Zone (FZ, using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, and Vickers hardness test. Results indicated that after EBW, the grain size substantially decreased from 67 µm in both BM and HAZ to 7 µm in the FZ, and a hardness increment was observed in the FZ as compared to the BM and HAZ. Furthermore, the PWHT led to grain coarsening throughout the material, along with a further increase in hardness in the FZ.

  12. Structural and electrical properties of copper-nickel-aluminum alloys obtained by conventional powder metallurgy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Waldemar A.; Carrio, Juan A.G.; Silveira, C.R. da; Pertile, H.K.S.

    2009-01-01

    This work looked for to search out systematically, in scale of laboratory, copper-nickel-aluminum alloys (Cu-Ni-Al) with conventional powder metallurgy processing, in view of the maintenance of the electric and mechanical properties with the intention of getting electric connectors of high performance or high mechanical damping. After cold uniaxial pressing (1000 kPa), sintering (780 deg C) and convenient homogenization treatments (500 deg C for different times) under vacuum (powder metallurgy), the obtained Cu-Ni-Al alloys were characterized by optical microscopy, electrical conductivity, Vickers hardness. X rays powder diffraction data were collected for the sintered samples in order to a structural and microstructural analysis. The comparative analysis is based on the sintered density, hardness, macrostructures and microstructures of the samples. (author)

  13. Near surface modification of aluminum alloy induced by laser shock processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saklakoglu, Nursen; Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Akman, Erhan; Demir, Arif

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the influences of near surface modification induced in 6061-T6 aluminum alloy by laser shock processing (LSP). The present study evaluates LSP with a Q-switched Nd:YAG low power laser using water confinement medium and absorbent overlay on the workpiece. The near surface microstructural change of 6061-T6 alloy after LSP was studied. The residual stress variation throughout the depth of the workpiece was determined. The results showed an improvement of the material resistance to pit formation. This improvement may be attributed to compressive residual stress and work-hardening. The size and number of pits revealed by immersion in an NaOH-HCl solution decreased in comparison with the untreated material.

  14. The column strength of aluminum alloy 75S-T extruded shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Marshall; Leary, J R

    1946-01-01

    Because the tensile strength and tensile yield strength of alloy 75S-T are appreciably higher than those of the materials used in the tests leading to the use of the straight-line column curve, it appeared advisable to establish the curve of column strength by test rather than by extrapolation of relations determined empirically in the earlier tests. The object of this investigation was to determine the curve of column strength for extruded aluminum alloy 75S-T. In addition to three extruded shapes, a rolled-and-drawn round rod was included. Specimens of various lengths covering the range of effective slenderness ratios up to about 100 were tested.

  15. Aluminum Gallium Nitride Alloys Grown via Metalorganic Vapor-Phase Epitaxy Using a Digital Growth Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-04-01

    This work investigates the use of a digital growth technique as a viable method for achieving high-quality aluminum gallium nitride (Al x Ga1- x N) films via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. Digital alloys are superlattice structures with period thicknesses of a few monolayers. Alloys with an AlN mole fraction ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 were grown by adjusting the thickness of the AlN layer in the superlattice. High-resolution x-ray diffraction was used to determine the superlattice period and c-lattice parameter of the structure, while reciprocal-space mapping was used to determine the a-lattice parameter and evaluate growth coherency. A comparison of the measured lattice parameter with both the nominal value and also the underlying buffer layer is discussed.

  16. Production of ceramic layers on aluminum alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation in alkaline silicate electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovskoy, Alex; Zinigrad, Michael; Kossenko, Aleksey; Kazanski, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of aluminum alloy 5052 in alkaline-silicate electrolytes having different SiO2/Na2O ratios (silicate indexes) was studied. For all the electrolytes 20-90 μm thick technological layer was obtained; composition, structure and properties of the oxidized layer were studied. For each sample, the oxidized layer consists of a denser internal and looser external sublayer. While for “n = 1 electrolytes” the oxidized layer is mainly formed by several kinds of alumina, the principal constituent of the oxidized layer for “n = 3 electrolytes” is mullite. Measurements of microhardness evidenced that it is apparently not influenced by the kind of silicate (n = 1 or n = 3) and by its concentration in the electrolyte. Electrolytes with silicate index n = 3 ensure better corrosion protection than those with n = 1. Corrosion protection parameters are significantly better for all PEO oxidized samples than for the untreated Al5052 alloy.

  17. An Investigation into the Effect of Aging on the Forming Limit Diagram of 6063 Aluminum Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, S. M.; Hosseimpour, S. J.; Nourouzi, S.; Gorji, A. H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effect of ageing on the forming limit diagram of a commercially available 6063 aluminum alloy has been investigated. For this purpose, initially the specimens have been aged at 200 deg. C and at various times. The hardness tests have been carried out and the hardness-aging time curve has been obtained for this alloy. Moreover, the mechanical properties were determined by tensile test. Then, the forming limit diagrams have been achieved by using the out-of-plane formability test method at four different conditions containing: annealed, under-aged, peak-aged, and over-aged. The results indicate that in comparing with the annealed condition the FLD 0 decreases significantly from the under-aged condition to the peak-aged condition and increases slightly from the peak-aged condition to the over-aged condition.

  18. Gas-pressure forming of an AlMg-alloy sheet at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, B.; Goesling, M.; Homberg, W.; Kleiner, M. [Dortmund Univ. (DE). Inst. of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL)

    2005-12-01

    Forming of automotive leightweight parts using aluminium offers numerous advantages. Compared to other wrought aluminium alloys, in particular AlMg-alloys generally show a good formability which is favourable for the production of complex parts. However, forming of Mg-containing alloys at room temperature leads to yielding patterns preventing their implementation for class-A-surface applications. Furthermore, the formability of steel still exceeds that of AlMg-alloys at room temperature. Thus, in the present study, sheet metal forming is applied at a temperature range that is typical for warm forming. It is supposed to profit from the advantages of warm forming like high achievable strains and improved surface quality of the formed part, while not having the disadvantages of long production times and high energy consumption, which is correlated with superplastic forming. Applying fluid-based sheet metal forming in this paper, nitrogen is used as fluid working medium to satisfy the demand on high temperature resistance. Concerning the blank material used, formability of Mg-containing aluminium alloys shows strong strain rate sensitivity at elevated temperatures. To figure out the optimal strain rates for this particular process, a control system for forming processes is developed within the scope of this paper. Additionally, FE-simulations are carried out and adapted to the experiment, based on the generated process data. FE-investigations include forming of domes (bulging) as well as shape-defined forming, having the objective to increase formability in critical form elements by applying optimal strain rates. Here, a closed-loop process control for gas-pressure forming at elevated temperatures is to be developed in the next stages of the project. (orig.)

  19. Effect of nanostructuring on the elastic properties of aluminum alloy AMg6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokhorov, V., E-mail: pvm@tisnum.ru; Perfilov, S. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials. Centralnaya 7a, Moscow, Troitsk, 142190 (Russian Federation); Korobov, A., E-mail: aikor42@mail.ru; Kokshaiskii, A.; Volkov, A. [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University. Leninskie gory 1, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    We experimentally investigated the nanostructuring effect on the elastic properties of aluminum alloy AMg6 (Al–Mg–Mn system). The n-AMg6 nanostuctured specimens were prepared from a commercial polycrystalline alloy by refining and homogenizing a mixture of small chips of the alloy in a planetary mill. The resulting product consists of 200-500-micron agglomerates of nanoparticles with average nanoparticle size ∼ 40–60 nanometer according to the X-ray analysis. The compacted nanopowder was extruded at a temperature of 300°C with a reduction of cross-sectional area at least 4 times to 90 mm diameter. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies confirmed the presence of the nanostructure with a grain size of ∼60 nanometers. For the experiments, nine parallelepiped shape specimens of 20×20×40 mm{sup 3} size were cut from the central and peripheral parts of the n-AMg6 rod. We measured of the second-order and third-order elastic coefficients of the obtained samples by ultrasonic method. The same measurements were made on specimens of the primary AMg6 alloy for comparison.

  20. Microstructural characterizations and mechanical properties in underwater friction stir welding of aluminum and magnesium dissimilar alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yong; Lu, Zhengping; Yan, Keng; Huang, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum and magnesium alloys were joined by underwater friction stir welding. • Underwater FSW was conducted to improve properties of joint with lower heat input. • Microstructures and mechanical properties of dissimilar joint were investigated. • Intermetallic compounds developed in the fracture interface were analyzed. • Fracture features of the tensile samples were analyzed. - Abstract: Formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of dissimilar welds affects the mechanical properties of the joints significantly. In order to reduce heat input and control the amount and morphological characteristics of brittle intermetallic compounds underwater friction stir welding of 6013 Al alloy and AZ31 Mg alloy was carried out. Microstructures, mechanical properties, elements distribution, and the fracture surface of the joints were analyzed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, etc. The result shows that sound dissimilar joint with good mechanical properties can be obtained by underwater friction stir welding. Al and Mg alloys were stirred together and undergone the process of recrystallization, forming complex intercalated flow patterns in the stir zone. Tensile strength of the dissimilar joint was up to 152.3 MPa. Maximum hardness (142HV) appeared in the middle of the centerline of the specimen. Intermetallic compounds layer consisting of Al 3 Mg 2 and Mg 17 Al 12 formed in the Al/Mg interface and resulted in the fracture of the joint

  1. DSC analyses of static and dynamic precipitation of an Al–Mg–Si–Cu aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manping Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, both static and dynamic precipitations of an Al–Mg–Si–Cu aluminum alloy after solid-solution treatment (SST were comparatively analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Dynamic aging was performed in the SST alloy through equal channel angular pressing (ECAP at different temperatures of room temperature, 110, 170, 191 and 300 °C. For comparison, static artificial aging was conducted in the SST alloy at 191 °C with two aging times of 4 and 10 h. The DSC analyses reveal that the dynamic precipitation has occurred in the ECAPed samples, while the activation energies associated with the strengthening precipitates in the dynamic samples are considerably higher than the energies in the SST and static aged samples. The higher activation energies are probably attributed to the smaller grains and higher dislocation density developed after ECAP. The results in the present investigation allow the prediction of the type of the dynamic precipitates to influence the strength of the ultrafine grained alloy during ECAP at various temperatures.

  2. Preparation of bimodal grain size 7075 aviation aluminum alloys and their corrosion properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming TIAN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The bimodal grain size metals show improved strength and ductility compared to traditional metals; however, their corrosion properties are unknown. In order to evaluate the corrosion properties of these metals, the bimodal grain size 7075 aviation aluminum alloys containing different ratios of coarse (100 μm in diameter and fine (10 μm in diameter grains were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS. The effects of grain size as well as the mixture degree of coarse and fine grains on general corrosion were estimated by immersion tests, electrochemical measurements and complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope-energy disperse spectroscopy (TEM-EDS. The results show that, compared to fine grains, the coarse grains have a faster dissolution rate in acidic NaCl solution due to the bigger size, higher alloying elements content and larger area fraction of second phases in them. In coarse grains, the hydrogen ions have a faster reduction rate on cathodic second phases, therefore promoting the corrosion propagation. The mixture of coarse and fine grains also increases the electrochemical heterogeneity of alloys in micro-scale, and thus the increased mixture degree of these grains in metal matrix accelerates the corrosion rate of alloys in acidic NaCl solution.

  3. EFFECT OF CASTING MOULD ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 6063 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WASIU AJIBOLA AYOOLA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern production methods for casting articles include the use of sand- mould, metal-mould, die, and centrifugal castings. Castings produced using sand mould is known to have peculiar microstructures depending on average size, distribution and shape of the moulding sand grains and the chemical composition of the alloy. These affect the surface finish, permeability and refractoriness of all the castings. In this paper, the effect of using CO2 process, metal mould, cement-bonded sand mould and naturally-bonded sand mould on the hardness, tensile and impact strengths of as-cast 6063 Aluminum alloy is presented. The results show that there is significant increase in hardness(33.7 HB of the alloy when naturally-bonded sand mould is used for its production over that of metal, CO2 and cement moulds. The stress-strain curves behaviour of the samples also indicated that sample from naturally bonded sand has highest tensile strength with superior ductility. The alloy shows highest impact strength when metal mould is used for sample preparation in comparison with other moulds.

  4. Wear and Friction Characteristics of AlN/Diamond-Like Carbon Hybrid Coatings on Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masashi; Kubota, Sadayuki; Suzuki, Hideto; Haraguchi, Tadao

    2015-10-01

    The use of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings has the potential to greatly improve the wear resistance and friction of aluminum alloys, but practical application has so far been limited by poor adhesion due to large difference in hardness and elasticity between the two materials. This study investigates the deposition of DLC onto an Al-alloy using an intermediate AlN layer with a graded hardness to create a hybrid coating. By controlling the hardness of the AlN film, it was found that the wear life of the DLC film could be improved 80-fold compared to a DLC film deposited directly onto Al-alloy. Furthermore, it was demonstrated through finite element simulation that creating a hardness gradient in the AlN intermediate layer reduces the distribution of stress in the DLC film, while also increasing the force of adhesion between the DLC and AlN layers. Given that both the DLC and AlN films were deposited using the same unbalanced magnetron sputtering method, this process is considered to represent a simple and effective means of improving the wear resistance of Al-alloy components commonly used within the aerospace and automotive industries.

  5. Crystallographic study of grain refinement in aluminum alloys using the edge-to-edge matching model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, M.-X.; Kelly, P.M.; Easton, M.A.; Taylor, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The edge-to-edge matching model for describing the interfacial crystallographic characteristics between two phases that are related by reproducible orientation relationships has been applied to the typical grain refiners in aluminum alloys. Excellent atomic matching between Al 3 Ti nucleating substrates, known to be effective nucleation sites for primary Al, and the Al matrix in both close packed directions and close packed planes containing these directions have been identified. The crystallographic features of the grain refiner and the Al matrix are very consistent with the edge-to-edge matching model. For three other typical grain refiners for Al alloys, TiC (when a = 0.4328 nm), TiB 2 and AlB 2 , the matching only occurs between the close packed directions in both phases and between the second close packed plane of the Al matrix and the second close packed plane of the refiners. According to the model, it is predicted that Al 3 Ti is a more powerful nucleating substrate for Al alloy than TiC, TiB 2 and AlB 2 . This agrees with the previous experimental results. The present work shows that the edge-to-edge matching model has the potential to be a powerful tool in discovering new and more powerful grain refiners for Al alloys

  6. Investigation of alloying effects in aluminum dispersion strengthened with Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, G.L.

    1975-10-01

    Two types of alloying elements were investigated to determine if the room-temperature strength could be improved and if, through lowering the oxide content, the high-temperature ductility could be improved. Mg was investigated for its solid solution strengthening in one type alloy. The other type alloy involved further dispersion strengthening through adding Fe, Mo, Zr, Cr, V, and Ti which form highly stable intermetallic compounds with Al. Fabrication techniques were developed which produced uniform and reproducible rods for testing. Prealloyed powders were produced by atomizing the molten alloys and collecting the powders in water. This procedure produced uniform powders with a very fine distribution of the intermetallic compounds. Fabrication into rods then included ball-milling, vacuum hot pressing, vacuum heat treating, and hot extrusion. Mg additions improved strengths up to 200 0 C with little effect above that temperature. Room-temperature tensile strengths up to 77,000 psi were obtained which are comparable to the strengths obtained in conventional aluminum alloys. The additional dispersion strengthening of the intermetallic compounds is additive to that of the oxide from room temperature to 450 0 C. No significant improvements in ductility are obtained by reducing the oxide content since even at very low ball-milling times (i.e., low oxide contents) the uniform elongation at 450 0 C is typically 0.5 percent. Good combinations of strength and ductility at 450 0 C were obtained in some of the alloys containing intermetallic compounds with no ball-milling. Typical properties at this temperature were tensile strengths of 7,000 psi, uniform elongation of 3 percent, and total elongation of 35 percent. (21 tables, 33 fig, 43 references) (auth)

  7. Effect of Eu addition on the microstructures and mechanical properties of A356 aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Feng; Yan, Guangyuan; Xuan, Zhenjing [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cao, Zhiqiang, E-mail: caozq@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Special Processing of Raw Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Tongmin, E-mail: tmwang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-11-25

    The effect of Eu additions (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08 and 0.1 wt.%) and T6 heat treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of A356 alloy have been investigated in the present work. Microstructures of the as-cast and T6 heat treated samples were examined by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that 0.1%Eu modified the eutectic Si from a coarse plate-like form to a fully modified and fine fibrous one with a better uniform distribution. T6 treatment encouraged the spheroidization of eutectic Si particles. Correlating with the as-cast samples, the 0.1%Eu modified A356 alloy achieved likewise full modification of eutectic Si particles with lowest mean area and aspect ratio. In addition, the coarse and small Eu-rich intermetallics were both found in the 0.1%Eu modified A356 alloy. The cooling curves of A356 alloys showed that increasing Eu addition resulted in increasing nucleation undercooling and increasing growth undercooling. However, the recalescence (T{sub G} − T{sub Min}) increased by the initial addition of Eu, while it remained relatively stable for increasing additions (above 0.06%). The quenching experiment indicated that a large number of eutectic grains were located at or close to the tips of the aluminum dendrites with a jagged solid–liquid interface in unmodified alloy, while very few eutectic grains were formed in the interdendritic region with a smooth solid–liquid interface in 0.1%Eu modified alloy. An optimal combination of UTS (265 MPa) and EI (14.7%) of A356 alloy was achieved by the 0.1%Eu addition combined with T6 heat treatment. - Highlights: • The rare earth Eu is firstly used to improve the mechanical property of A356 alloy. • A fully modified and fine fibrous eutectic Si is observed by addition of 0.1 wt% Eu. • A complete spheroidization of 0.1wt%Eu modified eutectic Si is observed after T6. • Three kinds of Eu-rich intermetallics are found in the 0.1%Eu modified A356 alloy

  8. Embedded Shape Memory Alloy Particles for the Self-Sensing of Fatigue Crack Growth in an Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, William Paul

    Future aerospace vehicles will be built using novel materials for mission conditions that are difficult to replicate in a laboratory. Structural health monitoring and condition-based maintenance will be critical to ensure the reliability of such vehicles. A multi-functional aluminum alloy containing embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) particles to detect fatigue crack growth is proposed. The regions of intensified strain near the tip of a growing fatigue crack cause the SMA particles to undergo a solid-to-solid phase transformation from austenite to martensite, releasing a detectable and identifiable acoustic emission (AE) signal that can be used to locate the crack in the affected component. This study investigates the AE response of two SMA systems, Ni-Ti, and Co-Ni-Al. Tensile (Ni-Ti) and compressive (Co-Ni-Al) tests were conducted to study the strain-induced transformation response in both of the alloy systems. It was found that the critical stress for transformation in both SMA systems was easily identified by a burst of AE activity during both transformation and reverse transformation. AE signals from these experiments were collected for use as training data for a Bayesian classifier to be used to identify transformation signals in a Al7050 matrix with embedded SMA particles. The Al/SMA composite was made by vacuum hot pressing SMA powder between aluminum plates. The effect of hot pressing temperature and subsequent heat treatments (solutionizing and peak aging) on the SMA particles was studied. It was found that, at the temperatures required, Co-Ni-Al developed a second phase that restricted the transformation from austenite to martensite, thus rendering it ineffective as a candidate for the embedded particles. Conversely, Ni-Ti did survive the embedding process and it was found that the solutionizing heat treatment applied after hot pressing was the main driver in determining the final transformation temperatures for the Ni-Ti particles. The effect of hot

  9. Improved corrosion protection of aluminum alloys by low-temperature plasma interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Chandra Mudupu

    The System Approach Interface Engineering (SAIE) concept was employed to develop corrosion protection processes for aluminum (Al) alloys by application of a low temperature plasma interface engineering technique with a cathodic electrocoat (E-coat) as the primary layer coating. The SAIE concept emphasizes that the corrosion protection property of the coated system for Al alloys depends on the total system rather than any good corrosion protection component of the system. The cathodic E-coated SAIE plasma pretreatments on Alclad 2024-T3, 2024-T3 bare and 7075-T6 bare alloys showed excellent corrosion resistance property when tested by SO2 and Prohesion salt spray tests. These systems out performed the conventional conversion coated controls, chromate conversion coated then Deft primer coated (CC Deft) and chromate conversion coated then cathodic E-coated (CC E-coat) in both the corrosion testes. The corrosion protection by SAIE systems depends on three major factors; (1) improved barrier characteristics of E-coat, (2) water insensitive adhesion of E-coat to plasma polymers deposited in a DC discharge and (3) creating a stable surface oxide layer by plasma treatment or chemical cleaning. Different chemical pretreatments were employed to create a stable barrier type aluminum oxide layer on the surfaces of the substrates prior to plasma polymer deposition. The surface analysis showed that these pretreatments depend on the type of alloy and surface chemistry. As received surfaces with acetone wipe and plasma cleaning of the organic contaminants was found to be best for Alclad 2024-T3 alloy. Chemical alkaline cleaning for 2024-T3 bare and alkaline cleaning followed by deoxidization for 7075-T6 bare alloy were necessary. The adhesion of the cathodic E-coat was improved by surface energy matching techniques by deposition of various plasma polymer films of trimethylsilane (TMS) and mixtures of TMS with O2, H2, and N2. The adhesion performance evaluated by the N

  10. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e. , no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  11. Multi-Track Friction Stir Lap Welding of 2024 Aluminum Alloy: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengke Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir lap welding (FSLW raises the possibility of fabricating high-performance aluminum components at low cost and high efficiency. In this study, we mainly applied FSLW to fabricate multi-track 2024 aluminum alloy without using tool tilt angle, which is important for obtaining defect-free joint but significantly increases equipment cost. Firstly, systematic single-track FSLW experiments were conducted to attain appropriate processing parameters, and we found that defect-free single-track could also be obtained by the application of two-pass processing at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm and a traverse speed of 300 mm/min. Then, multi-track FSLW experiments were conducted and full density multi-track samples were fabricated at an overlapping rate of 20%. Finally, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the full density multi-track samples were investigated. The results indicated that ultrafine equiaxed grains with the grain diameter about 9.4 μm could be obtained in FSLW samples due to the dynamic recrystallization during FSLW, which leads to a yield strength of 117.2 MPa (17.55% higher than the rolled 2024-O alloy substrate and an elongation rate of 31.05% (113.84% higher than the substrate.

  12. The investigation of typical welding defects for 5456 aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabin; Yan Keng; Lin Tao; Chen Shanben; Jiang Chengyu; Zhao Yong

    2006-01-01

    The external factors on the friction stir welding defects are so abundant that the experiments of friction stir welding were conducted for 5456 aluminum alloy. With the changes of the tool tilt angle and material condition, defects can be generated. These defects can be conventional ones (lack of penetration or voids), or lazy S, which are unique to friction stir welding. However, the origin of the defects remains an area of uncertainty. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the formation of these defects. The typical welding defects of friction stir welding joint for 5456 aluminum alloy were analyzed and discussed, respectively, by using optical microscopy (OM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microscopic examination of the nugget zone and fracture location of the weld confirms that the tilt angle can change the plastic material flow patterns in the stir zone and accordingly control the weld properties. In addition, the oxide layer from the initial butt surface during FSW is dispersed at the grain boundary. These A1 2 O 3 particles are actually the major cause of failure of the joint

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints of AA6105 aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minerva Dorta-Almenara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW is one of the most used methods to weld aluminum. This work investigates the influence of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTAW welded AA6105 aluminum alloy joints. AA6105 alloy plates with different percent values of cold work were joined by GTAW, using various combinations of welding current and speed. The fusion zone, in which the effects of cold work have disappeared, and the heat affected zone of the welded samples were examined under optical and scanning electron microscopes, additionally, mechanical tests and measures of Vickers microhardness were performed. Results showed dendritic morphology with solute micro- and macrosegregation in the fusion zone, which is favored by the constitutional supercooling when heat input increases. When heat input increased and welding speed increased or remained constant, greater segregation was obtained, whereas welding speed decrease produced a coarser microstructure. In the heat affected zone recrystallization, dissolution, and coarsening of precipitates occurred, which led to variations in hardness and strength.

  14. Semisolid slurry of 7A04 aluminum alloy prepared by electromagnetic stirring and Sc, Zr additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-wen Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Slurry preparation is one of the most critical steps for semisolid casting, and its primary goal is to prepare slurry with uniformly distributed fine globules. In this work, electromagnetic stirring (EMS and the addition of Sc and Zr elements were used to prepare semisolid slurry of 7A04 aluminum alloy in a large diameter slurry maker. The effects of different treatments on the microstructure, composition and their radial homogeneity were investigated. The results show that, compared to the slurry without any treatment, large volume slurry with finer and more uniform microstructure can be obtained when treated by EMS, Sc, or Zr additions individually. EMS is more competent in the microstructural and chemical homogenization of the slurry while Sc and Zr additions are more excellent in its microstructural refinement. The combined treatment of EMS, Sc and Zr produces premium 7A04 aluminum alloy slurry with uniformly distributed fine α-Al globules and composition. The interaction mechanism between EMS and Sc and Zr additions was also discussed.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Electric Current-Aided Laser Stake Welding of Aluminum Alloy T-Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinge Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, aluminum alloy T-joints were welded using the laser stake-welding process. In order to improve the welding quality of the T-joints, an external electric current was used to aid the laser stake-welding process. The effects of the process parameters on the weld morphology, mechanical properties, and microstructure of the welded joints were analyzed and discussed in detail. The results indicate that the aided electric current should be no greater than a certain maximum value. Upon increasing the aided electric current, the weld width at the skin and stringer faying surface obviously increased, but there was an insignificant change in the penetration depth. Furthermore, the electric current and pressing force should be chosen to produce an expected weld width at the faying surface, whereas the laser power and welding speed should be primarily considered to obtain an optimal penetration depth. The tensile shear specimens failed across the faying surface or failed in the weld zone of the skin. The specimens that failed in the weld of the skin could resist a higher tensile shear load compared with specimens that failed across the faying surface. The microstructural observations and microhardness results demonstrated that the tensile shear load capacity of the aluminum alloy welded T-joint was mainly determined by the weld width at the faying surface.

  16. Ultrasonic irradiation and its application for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Minqi; Wang, Chao; Zhong, Qingdong; Wei, Yinyin; Wang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic irradiation was utilized for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys. The chemical composition and morphology of the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings was investigated by polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Various effects of the addition of Nd(2)O(3) in phosphating bath on the performance of the coatings were also investigated. Results show that the composition of phosphate coating were Zn(3)(PO(4))(2).4H(2)O(hopeite) and Zn crystals. The phosphate coatings became denser with fewer microscopic holes by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment. The addition of Nd(2)O(3) reduced the crystallinity of the coatings, with the additional result that the crystallites were increasingly nubby and spherical. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was also significantly improved by ultrasonic irradiation treatment; both the anodic and cathodic processes of corrosion taking place on the aluminum alloy substrate were suppressed consequently. In addition, the electrochemical impedance of the coatings was also increased by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment compared with traditional treatment.

  17. Secondary Solidification Behavior of A356 Aluminum Alloy Prepared by the Self-Inoculation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Semisolid slurry of A356 aluminum alloy was prepared by Self-Inoculation Method, and the secondary solidification behavior during rheo-diecasting forming process was researched. The results indicate that the component with non-dendritic and uniformly distributed microstructures can be produced by Rheo-Diecasting (RDC process (combining Self-inoculation Method (SIM with High Pressure Die Casting (HPDC. The isothermal holding time of the slurry has large effect on primary particles, but has little effect on secondary particles. Growth rate of the primary particles in the isothermal holding process conforms to the dynamic equation of Dt3 − D03 = Kt. The suitable holding time for rheo-diecasting of A356 aluminum alloy is 3 min. During filling process, the nucleation occurs throughout the entire remaining liquid, and nuclei grow stably into globular particles with the limited grain size of 6.5μm firstly, then both α1 and α2 particles appear unstable growth phenomenon due to the existence of constitutional undercooling. The average particle sizes and shape factors of both α1 and α2 are decreasing with the increase of filling distance due to different cooling rate in different positions. The growth rate of the eutectic in RDC is 4 times faster than HPDC, which is mainly due to the limitation of α2 particles in RDC process. The average eutectic spacings are decreasing with the increase of filling distance.

  18. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  19. Residual stress distribution of a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy under shear deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Ruiz, C.; Figueroa, I.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior S/N, Cd. Universitaria, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacán C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Braham, C. [Laboratoire Procédés et Ingénierie Mécanique et Matériaux, CNRS UMR 8006, ENSAM-CNAM, 151, Bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, ETSEIB-Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña, Av Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundació CTM Centre Tecnológic, Pl. de la Ciencia 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Zanellato, O.; Baiz, S. [Laboratoire Procédés et Ingénierie Mécanique et Matériaux, CNRS UMR 8006, ENSAM-CNAM, 151, Bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Gonzalez, G., E-mail: joseggr@unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior S/N, Cd. Universitaria, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacán C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2016-07-18

    There is a lack of information with regards to the friction effect in ECAPed aluminum alloys, even though it might substantially modify the deformation at the surface. In this work, the friction effect at the surface and the deformation heterogeneity in the ECAPed aluminum alloy 6061-T6 were characterized. X-Ray diffraction was used to determine residual stresses (RS) on the sample surface. The volumetric sections were characterized by Synchrotron diffraction at ESRF beamline ID15B (Grenoble, France). It was found that the microhardness mapping and residual stress results showed a good agreement with the finite element analysis for the first layer studied. Minor strain variation, Δd/d as a function of (hkl) planes, for the different analyzed sections was found. The study also showed that there was an incomplete symmetry in the residual stress near the surface, even at up to a depth of 400 µm. The regions with higher deformation were found to be at the top and bottom parts of the sample, while the central region showed stress variations of up to 50 MPa.

  20. Manufacturing of an aluminum alloy mold for micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, N K; Lam, Y C; Yue, C Y; Tan, M J

    2010-01-01

    In micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices, e.g. microfluidic devices, the quality of the mold plays an important role in determining not only the product quality but also the overall production cost. Often the mold is made of silicon, which is brittle and fails after producing a limited number of parts. Metallic molds produced by micro-machining have a much longer life; however, the surface finish of the mold is not ideal for producing polymeric devices that require good surface finish. The metallic glass mold produced by micro-hot embossing with a silicon master is a recent development, which could produce high quality and high strength molds with long life span. However, metallic glasses are rather costly. In an attempt to reduce the production cost of the mold with acceptable quality, strength and life span, we explore here the manufacture of an aluminum alloy (AA6061-T6) mold by hot embossing using a silicon master. Using a set of channels to be produced on the aluminum alloy as the benchmark, we examine the orientation effect of the channels on the AA6061-T6 mold produced by hot embossing. Finally, to examine the effectiveness of the AA6061-T6 mold, it is employed for the hot embossing of polymeric (TOPAS 8007) substrates.

  1. Correlation between ultrasonic nonlinearity and elastic nonlinearity in heat-treated aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Beom; Jhang, Kyung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The nonlinear ultrasonic technique is a potential nondestructive method to evaluate material degradation, in which the ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter is usually measured. The ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter is defined by the elastic nonlinearity coefficients of the nonlinear Hooke’s equation. Therefore, even though the ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter is not equal to the elastic nonlinearity parameter, they have a close relationship. However, there has been no experimental verification of the relationship between the ultrasonic and elastic nonlinearity parameters. In this study, the relationship is experimentally verified for a heat-treated aluminum alloy. Specimens of the aluminum alloy were heat-treated at 300°C for different periods of time (0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 h). The relative ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter of each specimen was then measured, and the elastic nonlinearity parameter was determined by fitting the stress-strain curve obtained from a tensile test to the 5th-order-polynomial nonlinear Hooke’s equation. The results showed that the variations in these parameters were in good agreement with each other.

  2. Investigation of Material Performance Degradation for High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Using Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Ai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural materials damages are always in the form of micro-defects or cracks. Traditional or conventional methods such as micro and macro examination, tensile, bend, impact and hardness tests can be used to detect the micro damage or defects. However, these tests are destructive in nature and not in real-time, thus a non-destructive and real-time monitoring and characterization of the material damage is needed. This study is focused on the application of a non-destructive and real-time acoustic emission (AE method to study material performance degradation of a high-strength aluminum alloy of high-speed train gearbox shell. By applying data relative analysis and interpretation of AE signals, the characteristic parameters of materials performance were achieved and the failure criteria of the characteristic parameters for the material tensile damage process were established. The results show that the AE method and signal analysis can be used to accomplish the non-destructive and real-time detection of the material performance degradation process of the high-strength aluminum alloy. This technique can be extended to other engineering materials.

  3. Surface Roughening Behavior of 6063 Aluminum Alloy during Bulging by Spun Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe surface roughening during the hydroforming of aluminum alloy parts can produce surface defects that severely restrict their application in the automobile and aerospace industry. To understand the relation between strain, grain size and surface roughness under biaxial stress conditions, hydro-bulging tests of aluminum alloy tubes were carried out, and the tubes with different grain sizes were prepared by a spinning and annealing process. The surface roughness was measured by a laser scanning confocal microscope to evaluate the surface roughening macroscopical behavior, and the corresponding microstructures were observed using electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD to reveal the roughening microscopic behavior. The results obtained show that the surface roughness increased with both strain and grain size under biaxial stress. No surface defects were observed on the surface when the grain size was less than 105 μm if the strain was less than 18%, or when the grain size was between 130 and 175 μm if the strain was less than 15.88% and 7.15%, respectively. The surface roughening microscopic behavior was identified as an inhomogeneous grain size distribution, which became more pronounced with increasing grain size and resulted in greater local deformation. Concentrated grain orientation also results in severe inhomogeneous deformation during plastics deformation, and serious surface roughening.

  4. Quantitative Correlation of 7B04 Aluminum Alloys Pitting Corrosion Morphology Characteristics with Stress Concentration Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Yan, Guangyao; Mu, Zhitao; Li, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    The accelerated pitting corrosion test of 7B04 aluminum alloy specimen was carried out according to the spectrum which simulated airport environment, and the corresponding pitting corrosion damage was obtained and was defined through three parameters A and B and C which respectively denoted the corrosion pit surface length and width and corrosion pit depth. The ratio between three parameters could determine the morphology characteristics of corrosion pits. On this basis the stress concentration factor of typical corrosion pit morphology under certain load conditions was quantitatively analyzed. The research shows that the corrosion pits gradually incline to be ellipse in surface and moderate in depth, and most value of B/A and C/A lies in 1 between 4 and few maximum exceeds 4; The stress concentration factor Kf of corrosion pits is obviously affected by the its morphology, the value of Kf increases with corrosion pits depth increasement under certain corrosion pits surface geometry. Also, the value of Kf decreases with surface width increasement under certain corrosion pits depth. The research conclusion can set theory basis for corrosion fatigue life analysis of aircraft aluminum alloy structure.

  5. Surface topographic characterization for polyamide composite injection molds made of aluminum and copper alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A; Hernández, P; Martinez, J; Pérez, J A; Mathia, T G

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure flexibility and rapid new product development, the mold industry made use of soft materials for cavity inserts in injection molds. However, materials of this kind are prone to wear. This article analyzes the topographic characterization of the surface and wear processes in injection molds cavities. Two materials have been used to produce the cavities: aluminum alloy EN AW‐6082 T4 and copper alloy Cu Zn39 Pb3. The surface topography was measured with the use of optical interferometry profiling technology; roughness and surface parameters were determined according to ISO 4287, ISO 25178, and EUR 15178N. In order to complete this research, an experimental part with different thicknesses and shapes was designed, and cavity inserts of aluminum and copper were made. Polyamide PA6, with 30% fiberglass reinforcement, was employed in the experimental procedure. Measurements of cavity mold surfaces were performed after 9,200 cycles on each mold and at different locations on the mold. The surface measurement was made with a white light vertical scanning interferometry, also known as coherence scanning interferometry (ISO DIS 25178‐604). The results are analyzed and differences between the two types of cavity inserts materials are discussed. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc.

  7. Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface of high adhesion fabricated with micronano binary structure on aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Jindan; Li, Shuyi; Liu, Jiaan; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2013-09-25

    Triggered by the microstructure characteristics of the surfaces of typical plant leaves such as the petals of red roses, a biomimetic superhydrophobic surface with high adhesion is successfully fabricated on aluminum alloy. The essential procedure is that samples were processed by a laser, then immersed and etched in nitric acid and copper nitrate, and finally modified by DTS (CH3(CH2)11Si(OCH3)3). The obtained surfaces exhibit a binary structure consisting of microscale crater-like pits and nanoscale reticula. The superhydrophobicity can be simultaneously affected by the micronano binary structure and chemical composition of the surface. The contact angle of the superhydrophobic surface reaches up to 158.8 ± 2°. Especially, the surface with micronano binary structure is revealed to be an excellent adhesive property with petal-effect. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surfaces show excellent stability in aqueous solution with a large pH range and after being exposed long-term in air. In this way, the multifunctional biomimetic structural surface of the aluminum alloy is fabricated. Furthermore, the preparation technology in this article provides a new route for other metal materials.

  8. Constitutive Behavior and Deep Drawability of Three Aluminum Alloys Under Different Temperatures and Deformation Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicker, Sudhy S.; Prasad, K. Sajun; Basak, Shamik; Panda, Sushanta Kumar

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, uniaxial tensile tests were carried out to evaluate the stress-strain response of AA2014, AA5052 and AA6082 aluminum alloys at four temperatures: 303, 423, 523 and 623 K, and three strain rates: 0.0022, 0.022 and 0.22 s-1. It was found that the Cowper-Symonds model was not a robust constitutive model, and it failed to predict the flow behavior, particularly the thermal softening at higher temperatures. Subsequently, a comparative study was made on the capability of Johnson-Cook (JC), modified Zerilli-Armstrong (m-ZA), modified Arrhenius (m-ARR) and artificial neural network (ANN) for modeling the constitutive behavior of all the three aluminum alloys under the mentioned strain rates and temperatures. Also, the improvement in formability of the materials was evaluated at an elevated temperature of 623 K in terms of cup height and maximum safe strains by conducting cylindrical cup deep drawing experiments under two different punch speeds of 4 and 400 mm/min. The cup heights increased during warm deep drawing due to thermal softening and increase in failure strains. Also, a small reduction in cup height was observed when the punch speed increased from 4 to 400 mm/min at 623 K. Hence, it was suggested to use high-speed deformation at elevated temperature to reduce both punch load and cycle time during the deep drawing process.

  9. Initial bacterial deposition on bare and zeolite-coated aluminum alloy and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gexin; Beving, Derek E; Bedi, Rajwant S; Yan, Yushan S; Walker, Sharon L

    2009-02-03

    In this study, the impact of zeolite thin film coatings on bacterial deposition and "biofouling" of surfaces has been investigated in an aqueous environment. The synthesis of two types of zeolite coatings, ZSM-5 coated on aluminum alloy and zeolite A coated on stainless steel, and the characterization of the coated and bare metal surfaces are described. The extent of cell deposition onto the bare and zeolite-coated aluminum alloy and stainless steel surfaces is investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber system under a laminar flow conditions. The initial rates of bacterial transfer to the various surfaces are compared by utilizing a marine bacterium, Halomonas pacifica g, under a range of ionic strength conditions. H. pacifica g deposited onto bare metal surfaces to a greater extent as compared with cells deposited onto the zeolite coatings. The surface properties found to have the most notable effect on attachment are the electrokinetic and hydrophobicity properties of the metal and zeolite-coated surfaces. These results suggest that a combination of two chemical mechanisms-hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions-contribute to the antifouling nature of the zeolite surface. Additional observations on the relative role of the hydrodynamic and physical phenomena are also discussed.

  10. Effect of temperature on the anodizing process of aluminum alloy AA 5052

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theohari, S.; Kontogeorgou, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of temperature (10-40 °C) during the anodizing process of AA 5052 for 40 min in 175 g/L sulfuric acid solution at constant voltage (15 V) was studied in comparison with pure aluminum. The incorporated magnesium species in the barrier layer result in the further increase of the minimum current density passed during anodizing, as the temperature increases, by about 42% up to 30 °C and then by 12% up to 40 °C. Then during the anodizing process for 40 min a blocking effect on oxide film growth was gradually observed as the temperature increased until 30 °C. The results of EDAX analysis on thick films reveal that the mean amount of the magnesium species inside the film is about 50-70% less than that in the bulk alloy, while it is higher at certain locations adjacent to the film surface at 30 °C. The increase of anodizing temperature does not influence the porosity of thin films (formed for short times) on pure aluminum, while it reduces it on the alloy. At 40 °C the above mentioned blocking effects disappear. It means that the presence of magnesium species causes an impediment to the effect of temperature on iss, on the film thickness and on the porosity of thin films, only under conditions where film growth takes place without significant loss of the anodizing charge to side reactions.

  11. Research on the welding process of aluminum alloy based on high power fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Xiaoming; Huang, Shanshi; Liu, Wenwen

    2017-08-01

    To research the formation and variation principle of the weld seam and molten pool for aluminum alloy high power fiber laser welding, the welding experiments for 5052 aluminum alloy were carried out. The influences of laser power, scanning velocity and protection gas on the welding process were systematically researched. The results show that with the increase of power and scanning velocity, the depth to width ratio first increases and then decreases. The ratio reaches the maximum value at 2.6 KW and 30 mm/s, respectively. When the power located at 2.6 KW to 2.8 KW or the velocity located at 25 mm/s to 30 mm/s, stable deep penetration welding can be obtained. The weld seam shows relative flat appearance and the molten pool presents typical "T shape" topography. Moreover, the protection gas also influences the appearance of the weld seam. Using the independently designed fixture, the quality of the weld seam can be well improved.

  12. X-Ray Microtomographic Characterization of Porosity in Aluminum Alloy A356

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Omid; Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Maijer, Daan

    2009-04-01

    The presence of microporosity can, in certain circumstances, lead to a significant reduction in the mechanical properties of cast aluminum alloys. The size of the microporosity is especially crucial to the performance of castings in fatigue applications. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of cooling rate and degassing time on the formation and evolution of microporosity in aluminum alloy A356 (Al-7Si-0.3Mg) castings using traditional metallography and X-ray microtomography (XMT) methods. The final results clearly confirm that increasing the cooling rate and degassing time yield lower microporosity within the microstructure. The XMT analysis enabled the calculation of the volume fraction and size distribution of microporosity. The XMT analysis revealed a bimodel distribution of pores with one population of small pores and a second population of large pores. The large population has been attributed to hydrogen gas solubility, whereas the smaller population is proposed to be linked to the localized entrapment of liquid metal occurring at the end of mass feeding.

  13. Modeling the Effect of Finite-Rate Hydrogen Diffusion on Porosity Formation in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Lin, Zhiping; Beckermann, Christoph

    2007-08-01

    A volume-averaged model for finite-rate diffusion of hydrogen in the melt is developed to predict pore formation during the solidification of aluminum alloys. The calculation of the micro-/macro-scale gas species transport in the melt is coupled with a model for the feeding flow and pressure field. The rate of pore growth is shown to be proportional to the local level of gas supersaturation in the melt, as well as various microstructural parameters. Parametric studies of one-dimensional solidification under an imposed temperature gradient and cooling rate illustrate that the model captures important phenomena observed in porosity formation in aluminum alloys. The transition from gas to shrinkage dominated porosity and the effects of different solubilities of hydrogen in the eutectic solid, capillary pressures at pore nucleation, and pore number densities are investigated in detail. Comparisons between predicted porosity percentages and previous experimental measurements show good correspondence, although some uncertainties remain regarding the extent of impingement of solid on the pores.

  14. Evaluation of Ultrasonic Nonlinear Characteristics in Heat-Treated Aluminum Alloy (Al-Mg-Si-Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongBeom Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear ultrasonic technique has been known to be more sensitive to minute variation of elastic properties in material than the conventional linear ultrasonic method. In this study, the ultrasonic nonlinear characteristics in the heat-treated aluminum alloy (Al-Mg-Si-Cu have been evaluated. For this, the specimens were heat treated for various heating period up to 50 hours at three different heating temperatures: 250°C, 300°C, and 350°C. The ultrasonic nonlinear characteristics of each specimen were evaluated by measuring the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter β from the amplitudes of fundamental and second harmonic frequency components in the transmitted ultrasonic wave. After the ultrasonic test, tensile strengths and elongations were obtained by the tensile test to compare with the parameter β. The heating time showing a peak in the parameter β was identical to that showing critical change in the tensile strength and elongation, and such peak appeared at the earlier heating time in the higher heating temperature. These results suggest that the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter β can be used for monitoring the variations in elastic properties of aluminum alloys according to the heat treatment.

  15. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, David C. [Eck Industreis, Inc.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  16. Punchless Drawing of Magnesium Alloy Sheet under Cold Condition and its Computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Minoru; Hattori, Toshio; Sato, Joji

    2011-01-01

    The punchless drawing with Maslennikov's technique was applied to the circular cup drawing of magnesium alloy AZ31B sheet under cold condition. The elastic rubber ring was used instead of the 'hard' punch, where the compressed ring dragged the sheet inward the die cavity. Attainable circumferential strain of the blank was increased by this technique with repetitive drawing operation. Thickness of the rubber pad affected little the attainable strain. The shape appearance became better when a harder rubber was used. The cup forming by single drawing operation was also tested using a small die shoulder radius. The LDR of 1.250 was obtained with the straight cup wall. Further, the computation of the punchless drawing was also conducted for the single drawing operation. The computed deformation pattern was well consistent with the corresponding experimental result.

  17. Finite element modelling of deformation behaviour in incremental sheet forming of aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tsung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the finite element method (FEM is used to study the incremental sheet forming process of pyramidal shape. The material used is aluminium alloy 5052. The tool, a hemispherical ball-head with a diameter (d = 4 mm made of HSS tool steel, is used to press down on the sheet metal causing locally plastic deformation. The comparison between spiral tool path, spiral-step tool path and z-level tool path is carried out. Moreover, the final thickness distribution is investigated. The results indicate that the minimal thickness can be found on the corner of wall angle in SPIF process. Under the same step over, spiral-step tool path can obtain the deepest depth for pyramidal shape. The maximum formability for successful forming of the pyramidal shape with depth 60 mm is wall angles 65∘.

  18. Chitosan coatings crosslinked with genipin for corrosion protection of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Y Pozzo, Ludmila; da Conceição, Thiago F; Spinelli, Almir; Scharnagl, Nico; Pires, Alfredo T N

    2018-02-01

    In this study, coatings of chitosan crosslinked with genipin were prepared on sheets of AZ31 magnesium alloy and their corrosion protection properties were characterized by means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The coatings were also characterized by means of FTIR and XPS. It was observed that the crosslinking process decreases the corrosion current and shifts the corrosion potential of the alloy to less negative values. The EIS analysis demonstrated that the crosslinking process increases the maximum impedance after short and long exposure times. The superior performance of the crosslinked coatings is related to a lower degree of swelling, as observed in the swelling tests carried out on free-standing films. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterising ductility of 6xxx-series aluminium sheet alloys at combined loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Philipp; Liewald, Mathias; Sindel, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a new approach to characterise material ductility when combined, three dimensional loading conditions occurring during vehicle crash are applied. So called "axial crush test" of closed hat sections is simplified by reducing it down to a two-dimensional testing procedure. This newly developed edge-compression test (ECT) provides the opportunity to investigate a defined characteristic axial folding behaviour of a profile edge. The potential to quantify and to differentiate crashworthiness of material by use of new edge-compression test is investigated by carrying out experimental studies with two different 6xxx-aluminium sheet alloys.

  20. Experimental and FE simulation validation of sheet thickness optimization in superplastic forming of Al alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaresan, G.; Jothilingam, A. [Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2016-07-15

    Superplasticity is the ability of a polycrystalline materials to exhibit very large elongations without necking prior to failure. In this paper, the superplastic forming potential of fine grained 7075 aluminium alloy was studied. The process parameters like pressure, forming time and initial sheet thickness were selected, using the design of experiments technique. The same condition of formation process was attempted in the finite element simulation using ABAQUS software. The deviation of the thickness distribution between the simulation and experiment was made and the variation lies within 8%.

  1. The provement of the conditions of end mill operation in external panels of the aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Grubyy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The external panels from the aluminum alloys are widely spread as components in aeronautical and rocket-and-space equipment. Due to their function, these components have their own design features. In case, the external panels can be of overall sizes and can contain the large amount of pockets for weight-saving. These pockets’ processing is held on multiaxes machines with the help of all-in-one hardmetal or assemblage end-milling cutters. The deformation of the pockets bottom and sides may happen within the high-speed of the external panels mill operation. So the different technological procedures for reducing deformation are being suggested and processed. These procedures include the force cutting control in the process of mill operation and it is also set the connection between the mill operation force, tool durability and processing final figures.The purpose of our research is the development of the calculation procedure that is aimed at theoretical definition of forces, contact pressures, that has an effect from the tooth tool on the processing pocket side surface and bottom with the following evaluation of strained state and deformation using the finite element analysis.As a research method, it has been accepted to simulate the cutting process of the aluminum alloy component with end-milling cutter. The created techniques and recommendations have been tested in manufacturing environment while mill operating the rocket-and-space components from the aluminum alloys.The main results are the created techniques as a consequence of interconnected formulas and the calculation program and also the correlations that characterize forces and contact pressures as mill operation functions, the aluminum alloy make, cutting angle and other characteristics.This article is an essential addition to the earliest papers on the force calculation techniques in mill operation. The fundamental difference of this calculation technique is the absence in carrying

  2. Phase transformations in nickel-aluminum alloys during ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eridon, J.; Rehn, L.; Was, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of ion beam mixing of nickel-aluminum alloys with 500 keV krypton ions has been investigated over a range of temperature, composition, ion dose, and post-irradiation thermal treatments. Samples were formed by alternate evaporation of layers of aluminum and nickel. A portion of these samples was subsequently annealed to form intermetallic compounds. Irradiations were performed at both room temperature and 80 0 K using the 2MV ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. Phase transformations were observed during both in situ irradiations in the High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) at Argonne, and also in subsequent analysis of an array of irradiated samples. Electron diffraction indicates the presence of metastable crystalline structures not present in the conventional nickel-aluminum phase diagram. Transformations occur at doses as low as 5 x 10 14 cm -2 and continue to develop as the irradiation progresses up to 2 x 10 16 cm -2 . Layer mixing is followed through Rutherford Backscattering analysis. Samples are also checked with x-rays and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). A thermodynamic argument is presented to explain the phase transformations in terms of movements on a free energy diagram. This analysis explains the interesting paradox concerning the radiation hardness of the NiAl phase and the amorphous structure of mixed Ni-50% Al layers

  3. Microstructural and hardness behavior of graphene-nanoplatelets/aluminum composites synthesized by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Bustamante, R.; Bolaños-Morales, D.; Bonilla-Martínez, J.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Martínez-Sánchez, R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pure aluminum was reinforced with graphene-platelets by using mechanical milling. • The composites were studied after sintering condition. • Milling time and graphene-platelet enhance the mechanical behavior of the composites. - Abstract: Graphene can be considered as an ideal reinforcement for the production of composites due to its outstanding mechanical properties. These characteristics offer an increased opportunity for their study in the production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In this research, the studied composites were produced by mechanical alloying (MA). The employed milling times were of 1, 3 and 5 h. GNPs were added in 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 wt% into an aluminum powder matrix. Milled powders were cold consolidated and subsequently sintered. Composites were microstructurally characterized with Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hardness behavior in composites was evaluated with a Vickers micro-hardness test. A homogeneous dispersion of graphene during MA and the proper selection of sintering conditions were considered to produce optimized composites. The obtained results with electron microscopy indicate a homogeneous dispersion of GNPs into the aluminum matrix. Analyses showed GNPs edges where the structure of the graphene layers conserved after MA is observed

  4. Effect of alkaline cleaning and activation on aluminum alloy 7075-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Simon; Fahrenholtz, William G.; O'Keefe, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of alkaline cleaning and activation on the composition and thickness of the oxide layer on aluminum alloy 7075-T6 was studied. E-pH diagrams were developed to predict the effect of alkaline cleaning and activation solutions on the stability of the oxide surface layers. The thickness of the native oxide layer was determined to be ∼30 nm by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis. The outer ∼20 nm was rich in magnesium while the remaining ∼10 nm was rich in aluminum. Cleaning in a 9.1 pH alkaline solution was found to remove the magnesium-rich layer and leave behind an aluminum-rich oxide layer ∼10 nm thick. Activation in alkaline solutions of NaOH (pH > 12.9) or Na 2 CO 3 (pH > 11.5) produced an oxide that was ∼20 to 60 nm thick and rich in magnesium. Alkaline cleaning and activation altered the oxide composition and thickness making it possible for deposition of thicker cerium-based conversion coatings (∼100 to 250 nm) compared to only alkaline cleaning (∼30 nm), with application of one spray cycle of deposition solution.

  5. Microstructural and hardness behavior of graphene-nanoplatelets/aluminum composites synthesized by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Bustamante, R. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Bolaños-Morales, D.; Bonilla-Martínez, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH), Facultad de Ingeniería, Circuito No. 1 Nuevo Campus Universitario, C.P. 31125 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Estrada-Guel, I. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Martínez-Sánchez, R., E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Pure aluminum was reinforced with graphene-platelets by using mechanical milling. • The composites were studied after sintering condition. • Milling time and graphene-platelet enhance the mechanical behavior of the composites. - Abstract: Graphene can be considered as an ideal reinforcement for the production of composites due to its outstanding mechanical properties. These characteristics offer an increased opportunity for their study in the production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In this research, the studied composites were produced by mechanical alloying (MA). The employed milling times were of 1, 3 and 5 h. GNPs were added in 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 wt% into an aluminum powder matrix. Milled powders were cold consolidated and subsequently sintered. Composites were microstructurally characterized with Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hardness behavior in composites was evaluated with a Vickers micro-hardness test. A homogeneous dispersion of graphene during MA and the proper selection of sintering conditions were considered to produce optimized composites. The obtained results with electron microscopy indicate a homogeneous dispersion of GNPs into the aluminum matrix. Analyses showed GNPs edges where the structure of the graphene layers conserved after MA is observed.

  6. Microstructure, mechanical analysis and optimal selection of 7075 aluminum alloy based composite reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezatpour, H.R.; Torabi Parizi, M.; Sajjadi, S.A.; Ebrahimi, G.R.; Chaichi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum metal-matrix nanocomposites (AMMNCs) fabricated by conventional stir-casting process usually show high porosity and poor distribution of nanoparticles within the matrix. In the current study, for the improvement of nanoparticles distribution in the aluminum matrix and enhancement of the mechanical properties, a mixture of Al/nano-Al 2 O 3 powders were injected by pure argon gas into the molten 7075 aluminum alloy and this mixture was extruded at high temperature. Mechanical behavior of the final product was investigated by tensile and compression tests, hardness measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Optical Microscopy. This nanocomposite exhibited some superior properties such as a fine grain microstructure and a reasonable uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the matrix. Mechanical experiments results confirmed that the addition of Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles and the extrusion process effectively improved ultimate tensile strength, compression strength and hardness. In next step, we used a Preference Selection Index (PSI) materials selection method to select best combination of strength and workability of Al7075−Al 2 O 3 nanocomposites. By this method, extruded Al7075/0.4 and 0.8 wt % Al 2 O 3 has best combination of strength and workability. - Highlights: • Injection Al/Al 2 O 3 powder is benefit way for improving nanoparticles distribution. • Nanocomposites present superior mechanical properties. • Extrusion process improved significantly mechanical properties of nanocomposites. • Preference Selection Index is a simple and benefit method in material selection.

  7. Refractory metal superalloys: Design of yttrium aluminum garnet passivating niobium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, David

    A systems-based approach, integrating computational modeling with experimental techniques to approach engineering problems in a time and cost efficient manner, was employed to design a Nb-based refractory superalloy for use at 1300°C. Ashby-type selection criteria for both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were employed to identify a suitable protective oxide for Nb alloys. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) was selected as the most promising candidate for its excellent combination of desirable properties. The alloy microstructural concept was based upon the gamma - gamma' nickel-based superalloys in which the multifunctional gamma' phase serves as both a creep strengthening dispersion and a source of reactive elements for oxide passivation. Candidate ternary Pd-Y-Al and Pt-Y-Al compounds were fabricated and characterized by XRD and DTA. Of the intermetallics studied, only PtYAl had a high enough melting point (1580°C) for use in an alloy operating at 1300°C. The alloy matrix design was based upon Wahl's extension of Wagner's criterion for protective oxidation, requiring a reduction of the product N ODO/DAl by 5 orders of magnitude relative to binary Nb-Al. A thermodynamic and kinetic analysis identified elements with large oxygen affinities as the most beneficial for reducing the magnitude of the quantity NOD O. Construction of a combined thermodynamic and mobility database identified increased Al solubility as the best approach for increasing D Al. Utilizing the thermodynamic and mobility databases, obtained from a combination of model alloys, oxidation experiments, and first principles calculations, theoretical designs predicted the large changes in solubility and transport parameters were achievable. Several prototype alloys were then fabricated and evaluated via oxidation tests at both 1300°C and 1100°C. YAG formation was demonstrated as part of multicomponent oxide scales in the alloys that exhibited the greatest reduction in oxidation rates. The oxidation

  8. Dynamic and Thermal Properties of Aluminum Alloy A356/Silicon Carbide Hollow Particle Syntactic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cox

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy A356 matrix syntactic foams filled with SiC hollow particles (SiCHP are studied in the present work. Two compositions of syntactic foams are studied for quasi-static and high strain rate compression. In addition, dynamic mechanical analysis is conducted to study the temperature dependent energy dissipation and damping capabilities of these materials. The thermal characterization includes study of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE. A356/SiCHP syntactic foams are not strain rate sensitive as the compressive strength displayed little variation between the tested strain rates of 0.001–2100 s−1. Microscopic analysis of the high strain rate compression tested specimens showed that the fracture is initiated by the failure of hollow particles at the onset of the plastic deformation region. This is followed by plastic deformation of the matrix material and further crushing of particles. The syntactic foams showed decrease in storage modulus with increasing temperature and the trend was nearly linear up to 500 °C. The alloy shows a similar behavior at low temperature but the decrease in storage modulus increases sharply over 375 °C. The loss modulus is very small for the tested materials because of lack of viscoelasticity in metallic materials. The trend in the loss modulus is opposite, where the matrix alloy has lower loss modulus than syntactic foams at low temperature. However, over 250 °C the matrix loss modulus starts to increase rapidly and attains a peak around 460 °C. Syntactic foams have higher damping parameter at low temperatures than the matrix alloy. Incorporation of SiCHP helps in decreasing CTE. Compared to the CTE of the matrix alloy, 23.4 × 10−6 °C−1, syntactic foams showed CTE values as low as 11.67 × 10−6 °C−1.

  9. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  10. Characteristics and treatability of oil-bearing wastes from aluminum alloy machining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luke; Hsieh, Chueh-Chen; Wetherbee, John; Yang, Chen-Lu

    2008-04-15

    Enomoto Industry Co., exclusively uses water-based cutting fluids in its aluminum alloy machining operations. Since the cost of disposal can be much greater than the cost of purchase, the treatability of spent cutting fluids is becoming a major criterion for cutting fluid selection. Samples were collected from the machining lines at Enomoto's facility to determine their characteristics and evaluate their treatability with centrifugation, chemical coagulation and electrochemical coagulation. As expected, oil and grease (O&G) and total suspended solids (TSS) are the main reasons that spent cutting fluids are prohibited from being discharged into local swage systems. The average O&G found in the spent cutting fluids is 87,354 mg/L with TSS of more than 70,000 mg/L. Both O&G and TSS are the major contributors to the high turbidity of these waste effluents. A centrifuge with a relative centrifugal force of 1318 x g, was able to reduce 60% of the turbidity. By adding the coagulant aluminum chloride, the oil-water emulsion was destabilized, and the turbidity was reduced from 3249 Formazin Attenuation Units (FAU) to around 314 FAU. With freshly generated aluminum ions in the spent cutting fluid, the electrochemical process destabilized the oil-water emulsion system. The coalesced oil droplets were adsorbed onto the highly dispersed aluminum coagulant. The oil-rich sludge that was generated in the operation was then floated to the surface, forming a blanket that was removed by skimming. The electrochemical treatment was able to reduce the turbidity to less than 14 FAU, which is the detection limit of the Hach DR/4000 UV-vis spectrophotometer.

  11. Iron-chrome-aluminum alloy cladding for increasing safety in nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebak Raul B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a tsunami caused plant black out at Fukushima, followed by hydrogen explosions, the US Department of Energy partnered with fuel vendors to study safer alternatives to the current UO2-zirconium alloy system. This accident tolerant fuel alternative should better tolerate loss of cooling in the core for a considerably longer time while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. General electric, Oak ridge national laboratory, and their partners are proposing to replace zirconium alloy cladding in current commercial light water power reactors with an iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl cladding such as APMT or C26M. Extensive testing and evaluation is being conducted to determine the suitability of FeCrAl under normal operation conditions and under severe accident conditions. Results show that FeCrAl has excellent corrosion resistance under normal operation conditions and FeCrAl is several orders of magnitude more resistant than zirconium alloys to degradation by superheated steam under accident conditions, generating less heat of oxidation and lower amount of combustible hydrogen gas. Higher neutron absorption and tritium release effects can be minimized by design changes. The implementation of FeCrAl cladding is a near term solution to enhance the safety of the current fleet of commercial light water power reactors.

  12. Iron-chrome-aluminum alloy cladding for increasing safety in nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2017-12-01

    After a tsunami caused plant black out at Fukushima, followed by hydrogen explosions, the US Department of Energy partnered with fuel vendors to study safer alternatives to the current UO2-zirconium alloy system. This accident tolerant fuel alternative should better tolerate loss of cooling in the core for a considerably longer time while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. General electric, Oak ridge national laboratory, and their partners are proposing to replace zirconium alloy cladding in current commercial light water power reactors with an iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding such as APMT or C26M. Extensive testing and evaluation is being conducted to determine the suitability of FeCrAl under normal operation conditions and under severe accident conditions. Results show that FeCrAl has excellent corrosion resistance under normal operation conditions and FeCrAl is several orders of magnitude more resistant than zirconium alloys to degradation by superheated steam under accident conditions, generating less heat of oxidation and lower amount of combustible hydrogen gas. Higher neutron absorption and tritium release effects can be minimized by design changes. The implementation of FeCrAl cladding is a near term solution to enhance the safety of the current fleet of commercial light water power reactors.

  13. Effect of Aluminum Alloying on the Hot Deformation Behavior of Nano-bainite Bearing Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z. N.; Dai, L. Q.; Chu, C. H.; Zhang, F. C.; Wang, L. W.; Xiao, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    Interest in using aluminum in nano-bainite steel, especially for high-carbon bearing steel, is gradually growing. In this study, GCr15SiMo and GCr15SiMoAl steels are introduced to investigate the effect of Al alloying on the hot deformation behavior of bearing steel. Results show that the addition of Al not only notably increases the flow stress of steel due to the strong strengthening effect of Al on austenite phase, but also accelerates the strain-softening rates for its increasing effect on stacking fault energy. Al alloying also increases the activation energy of deformation. Two constitutive equations with an accuracy of higher than 0.99 are proposed. The constructed processing maps show the expanded instability regions for GCr15SiMoAl steel as compared with GCr15SiMo steel. This finding is consistent with the occurrence of cracking on the GCr15SiMoAl specimens, revealing that Al alloying reduces the high-temperature plasticity of the bearing steel. On the contrary, GCr15SiMoAl steel possesses smaller grain size than GCr15SiMo steel, manifesting the positive effect of Al on bearing steel. Attention should be focused on the hot working process of bearing steel with Al.

  14. Effects of heat pipe cooling on permanent mold castings of aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.; Mucciardi, F.; Gruzleski, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature distribution within molds is a critical parameter in determining the ultimate casting quality in permanent mold casting processes, so there is a considerable incentive to develop a more effective method of mold cooling. Based on this consideration, a novel, effective and controllable heat pipe has been successfully developed and used as a new method of permanent mold cooling. Symmetric step casting of A356 alloy have been produced in an experimental permanent mold made of H13 tool steel, which is cooled by such heat pipes. The experimental results show that heat pipes can provide extremely high cooling rates in permanent mold castings of aluminum. The dendrite arm spacing of A356 alloy is refined considerably, and porosity and shrinkage of the castings are redistributed by the heat pipe cooling. Moreover, the heat pipe can be used to determine the time when the air gap forms at the interface between the mold and the casting. The effect of heat pipe cooling on solidification time of castings of A356 alloy with different coating types is also discussed in this paper. (author)

  15. Grain size effect on yield strength of titanium alloy implanted with aluminum ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurev, Ivan, E-mail: yiywork@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, Mark, E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kurzina, Irina, E-mail: kurzina99@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the microstructure and phase state of commercially pure titanium VT1-0 implanted by aluminum ions. This study has been carried out before and after the ion implantation for different grain size, i.e. 0.3 µm (ultra-fine grain condition), 1.5 µm (fine grain condition), and 17 µm (polycrystalline condition). This paper presents details of calculations and analysis of strength components of the yield stress. It is shown that the ion implantation results in a considerable hardening of the entire thickness of the implanted layer in the both grain types. The grain size has, however, a different effect on the yield stress. So, both before and after the ion implantation, the increase of the grain size leads to the decrease of the alloy hardening. Thus, hardening in ultra-fine and fine grain alloys increased by four times, while in polycrystalline alloy it increased by over six times.

  16. Microstructure and tensile properties of heavily irradiated 5052-0 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, K.

    1981-03-01

    During neutron irradiation of an Al-2.2% Mg solid solution alloy in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to fast and thermal fluences μ10 27neutrons( n)/ m2at 328 K (0.35 Tm) about seven percent insoluble, transmutant silicon was produced. Some of this silicon reacted with the dissolved magnesium to form a fine precipitate of Mg 2Si. A tight dislocation structure was also created. The alloy showed good resistance to cavity formation. These microstructural features are responsible for pronounced strengthening and an associated marked loss in ductility as revealed by tensile tests at 323, 373, and 423 K (0.35, 0.40 and 0.45 Tm). These changes were greater than in magnesium-free aluminum and in alloys containing preexisting, thermally-aged Mg 2Si precipitate. Increasing the thermal-to-fast flux ratio from 1.7 to 2.1 caused further strengthening beyond that expected from a simple increase in silicon level.

  17. Investigation of the effect of aluminum on the phase composition of Ti-Al-Nb-Mo gamma alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlikbaeva, A. Zh.; Alimzhanova, A. M.; Shayakhmetova, R. A.; Smagulov, D. U.; Osipov, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    A quantitative analysis of the influence of aluminum concentration on the phase composition of TNM-type Ti-Al-Nb-Mo γ-alloys has been carried out using the Thermo-Calc software and experimental methods. Isothermal and polythermal sections of the corresponding phase diagram have been calculated; the critical temperatures of phase transformations in the alloys of the system, and the chemical compositions of phases formed in them (β, α, α2, γ) have been determined. The influence of the annealing temperature on the microstructure and phase composition of the alloys containing 43 and 40% Al has been studied.

  18. Effect of Cu content on exfoliation corrosion and electrochemical corrosion of A7N01 aluminum alloy in EXCO solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaling; Wang, Xiaomin; Hu, Jie; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-01

    The exfoliation corrosion (EXCO) sensitivities and electrochemical corrosions of A7N01 aluminum (Al) alloys with 0.074% and 0.136% Cu contents were investigated in EXCO solution. The exfoliation corrosion developed more rapidly for the alloy with 0.136% Cu by expressing higher exfoliation rate and deeper corrosion pits as observed by SEM and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM). In EXCO solution, the alloy with 0.136% Cu content showed lower open-circuit potential (OCP) than the alloy with 0.074% Cu content. The alloy with 0.136% Cu content had bigger “hysteresis loop” in cyclic polarization curve which meant lower self-passivation ability. In electrochemical impedance spectroscopy plot, its curvature radius and capacitance index were lower. The electrochemical test results revealed that the alloy with 0.136% Cu content showed more severe electrochemical corrosion than the alloy with 0.074% Cu content, consistent with the exfoliation corrosion results. The microstructures of two alloys were observed through optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The continuous distribution of the equilibrium precipitate η-MgZn2 on grain boundaries, the decreasing of the width of precipitate-free zone (PFZ) and the coarse Cu-Fe-Si-rich phase were responsible for the higher corrosion sensitivity of the Al alloy with 0.136% Cu than that of Al alloy with 0.074% Cu content in EXCO solution.

  19. The codeposition of chromium and aluminum on nickel-based alloys by pack cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinner, Charles Paul

    Several variables of the pack cementation process were studied to determine their effect on the codeposition of chromium and aluminum on Ni270 and PWA1484. Specifically, the amount and composition of the master alloy (95Cr 5Al and 90Cr 10Al) and activator (NHsb4Cl and CrClsb2) were varied to determine their effect on the composition of the coatings produced. It was found that for coatings on Ni270, three deposition regimes exist, aluminizing, chromizing, and codepositing, which are produced by specific combinations of these variables. The conditions used to produce these coatings are summarized in the form of deposition maps. Corresponding coatings were also produced using PWA1484 as the substrate. In order to elucidate the effect of the amount of master alloy and the composition of the activator, several pack compositions were studied as a function of time. The pack composition as a function of coating time and pack position relative to the sample surface was studied by vacuum impregnating the pack and sample in epoxy resin and analyzing individual particles by microprobe analysis. It was found that decreasing the amount of master alloy increases the overall rate of depletion of aluminum from the pack, which leads to an increase in chromium deposition. An aluminum depletion zone was formed adjacent to the sample at short times for all conditions studied, and was thus not a function of the pack variables studied. Use of CrClsb2 as the activator led to a decrease in the depletion of aluminum relative to NHsb4Cl activated packs containing the same amount of master alloy, which was found to be due to the condensed nature of the CrClsb2 activator. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations were used to support the claims of this study. Three types of coatings on PWA1484, an aluminide, chromide, and codeposited, were developed and evaluated for oxidation and corrosion resistance. Two industrial coatings, PWA73 and PWA70/73, were also evaluated for comparison. The conditions

  20. Effect of aging time and aging temperature on fatigue and fracture behavior of 6063 aluminum alloy under seawater influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, R.A.; Abdul-Wahab, S.A.; Pervez, T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes experimentally the effect of seawater corrosion, aging time, and aging temperature on the fatigue resistance property of 6063 aluminum alloy. The 6063 aluminum alloy that was used for the study was heat treated and soaked in seawater for different intervals of time between 2 and 30 weeks. It was found that the maximum fatigue resistance property in the 6063 aluminum alloy was observed when aged between 7 and 9 h and heat treated at temperatures between 160 o C and 200 o C. Generally at constant load, the results indicated that the number of cycles to fail the 6063 aluminum alloy decreased with increasing the soaking time in seawater. Moreover, fracture surfaces were considered and studied under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that the brittle fracture pattern tended to occur with the increase in aging time and temperature. The fatigue striations were observed very clearly at low and peak aging temperature. The increase in the fatigue resistance property with aging time was linked with the vacancies assisted diffusion mechanism and also by the hindering of dislocation movement by impure atoms