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Sample records for aluminous cement

  1. Possibilities of using aluminate cements in high-rise construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddo, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The article describes preferable ways of usage of alternative binders for high-rise construction based on aluminate cements. Possible areas of rational use of aluminate cements with the purpose of increasing the service life of materials and the adequacy of the durability of materials with the required durability of the building are analyzed. The results of the structure, shrinkage and physical and mechanical properties of concrete obtained from dry mixes on the base of aluminate cements for self-leveling floors are presented. To study the shrinkage mechanism of curing binders and to evaluate the role of evaporation of water in the development of shrinkage was undertaken experiment with simple unfilled systems: gypsum binder, portland cement and «corrosion resistant high alumina cement + gypsum». Principle possibility of binder with compensated shrinkage based on aluminate cement, gypsum and modern superplasticizers was defined, as well as cracking resistance and corrosion resistance provide durability of the composition.

  2. Carbonation of calcium aluminate cement pastes

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    Fernández-Carrasco, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses the results from accelerated tests intended to investigate the ways the different curing methods affect the carbonation of calcium aluminate cements pastes (CAC. The research was focused on the mineralogical composition of hydrated and carbonated samples. The compressive strengths and the porosity of the samples have been determined. Results point out that vaterite and aragonite are formed as a result of carbonation of both cubic and hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates. The polymorph of calcium carbonate formed does not depend on the curing process. Carbonation rates is higher in hexagonal than in cubic hydrates. Results obtained through this study evidence that, as a consequence of the carbonation process of CAC pastes, in test conditions, an increase of the mechanical strengths occurs.

    En el presente trabajo se discuten los resultados obtenidos en los ensayos acelerados llevados a cabo para investigar los efectos de diferentes métodos de curado sobre la carbonatacion de pastas del cemento de aluminato de calcio (CAC. Se estudió la composición mineralógica de las muestras hidratadas y carbonatadas. Además, se determinaron las resistencias mecánicas a compresión y la porosidad de las probetas. Los resultados indican que la vaterita y el aragonito son las polimorfías del CaCO3 que se forman al carbonatar los aluminatos cálcicos hidratos, tanto los de naturaleza hexagonal como cúbica. El polimorfo del carbonato cálcico formado no depende del proceso de curado. La velocidad de carbonatación de los hidratos hexagonales es mayor que la de los cúbicos. Los resultados obtenidos en el presente trabajo han evidenciado que como consecuencia del proceso de carbonatación sobre pastas de CAC, en las condiciones realizadas, se produce un incremento en las resistencias mecánicas.

  3. Halting of the calcium aluminate cement hydration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium aluminate cement reactions with water lead to the anhydrous phases dissolution resulting a saturated solution, followed by nucleation and crystal growth of the hydrate compounds. This is a dynamic process, therefore, it is necessary to use suitable methods to halt the hydration in order to study the phase transformations kinetics of such materials. In this work two methods are evaluated: use of acetone and microwave drying, aiming to withdraw the free water and inhibit further reactions. X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were used to quantify the phases generated in the cement samples which were kept at 37 deg C for 1 to 15 days. The advantages and disadvantages of those procedures are presented and discussed. The use of microwave to halt the hydration process seems to be effective to withdraw the cement free water, and it can further be used in researches of the refractory castables area, endodontic cements, etc. (author)

  4. Evaluation of bioactivity in vitro of endodontic calcium aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, I.R.; Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bioactivity is referred to as the capacity of a material to develop a stable bond with living tissue via the deposition of hydroxyapatite. Materials which exhibit this property can be used to repair diseased or damaged bone tissue and can be designed to remain in situ indefinitely. An indication of bioactivity can be obtained by the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of a substrate in simulated body fluids (SBF) in vitro. Therefore, set samples of calcium aluminate endodontic cement were maintained in contact with SBF solutions (Kokubo and Rigo) and their surfaces were later evaluated by means of SEM, EDX and DRX. Measurements of pH and ionic conductivity were also carried out for SBF solutions in contact with set samples of endodontic cement. The ideal conditions of precipitation were obtained in SBF Rigo been observed a surface layer with spherical morphology characteristic of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite.(author)

  5. New advances in the carbonation of aluminous cement. Alkaline hydrolisis

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    Fernández-Carrasco, L.

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The carbonation process of aluminous cement in presence of high alkali content is studied. In this work, the formation of a compound which formula is close to K4Al6(CO311-x(OH2x(H2Oy is shown for the studies samples. The aluminous cement carbonation in alkali presence take place, at least, in two stages. In a first stage the aluminium and potassium carbonate hydrate joint to CaCO3 is formed. Later, that aluminium potassium carbonate hydrate is developed toward the aluminium hydroxide formation.

    Se realiza un estudio del proceso de carbonatación del cemento aluminoso en presencia de una concentración elevada de álcalis. En el presente trabajo se demuestra la formación, en las muestras estudiadas, de un compuesto cuya fórmula es cercana a K4Al6(CO311-x(OH2x(H2Oy. La carbonatación del cemento aluminoso en presencia de álcalis tiene lugar, al menos, en dos etapas. La primera de ellas da lugar a la formación de un carbonato de aluminio y potasio hidratado junio a CaCO3 Posteriormente este carbonato de aluminio y potasio hidratado evoluciona hacia la formación de hidróxido de aluminio.

  6. Synthesis optimization of calcium aluminate cement phases for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Oliveira, I.R.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied as a potential material for applications in the areas of health such as, endodontics and bone reconstruction. These studies have been based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by investigating the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance for biomedical applications. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the CAC synthesis routes in the Al 2 O 3 -CaCO 3 and Al 2 O 3 -CaO systems, as well as the phase characterization attained by means of X ray analysis. The Al 2 O 3 -CaO route enabled the production of the target phases (CA, CA 2 , C 3 A and C 12 A 7 ) with a higher purity compared to the Al2O3-CaCO3 one. As a result the particular properties of these phases can be evaluated to define a more suitable composition that results in better properties for an endodontic cement and other applications. (author)

  7. Calcium aluminate cement hydration in a high alkalinity environment

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    Palomo, Á.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper forms part of a broader research project that aims primarily to devise new cementitious products via the alkali activation of silico-aluminous materials. This work addresses the possibility of using small percentages of calcium aluminate cement (CAC as a source of reactive aluminium. For this reason, a preliminary review was needed of the behaviour of CACs in highly alkaline media (2, 8 and 12M NaOH solutions. Two, 28- and 180-day mechanical strength was determined and the reaction products were characterized with XRD and FTIR. The water-hydrated CAC was used as the control.The results obtained showed that CAC hardening took place much more slowly in highly alkaline media than in water. Nonetheless, the 28-day compressive strength obtained, ≥80MPa. As main reaction products, to ambient temperature and from the two days of cured, cubic aluminate C3AH6, and AH3 polymorphs are formed, instead of the usual hexagonal aluminatos (CAH10 and C2AH8 that are formed in the normal hydrate with water.El presente trabajo forma parte de una amplia investigación cuyo objetivo principal es el de elaborar nuevos materiales con propiedades cementantes mediante la activación alcalina de materiales de naturaleza silito-aluminosa. En estos estudios se contempla la posibilidad de utilizar pequeños porcentajes de cemento de aluminato de calcio (CAC como fuente de aluminio reactivo. Por ello inicialmente se ha estudiado el comportamiento de los CAC en medios fuertemente alcalinos (disoluciones de NaOH 2M, 8M y 12M. Se determinaron las resistencias mecánicas a 2, 28 y 180 días y se realizó una caracterización de los productos de reacción formados por DRX, FTIR. Como sistema de referencia se consideró la hidratación del CAC con agua.Los resultados obtenidos muestran que en medios fuertemente alcalinos se retrasan los procesos de rápido endurecimiento de CAC con agua. No obstante a 28 días se obtienen valores de resistencia a compresión

  8. Quantitative phase determination by X-ray diffractometry in electrofused calcium aluminate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, S.M.; Franco, M.B.; Splettstoser Junior, J.; Placido, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    The knowledge of the percentual composition of phases in calcium aluminate cements and clinkers is of great importance to foresight the behaviour of the cement and refractory concretes made thereof. There are some analytical techniques for these determinations, optical and eletronic microscopy as well as selective chemical attacks, each technique presenting its own difficulties. Using pure phases of CA, CA 2 , C 2 AS and C 12 A 7 obtained by electrofusion in a laboratory electric are furnace, calibration curves were developed for X-ray diffratometric determination of phases. The method is very efficient for determination of CA, CA 2 , C 2 AS and ∝ - A1 2 O 3 . The determination of C 12 A 7 presents some variations due to its low concentration in electrofused clinkers. The method finds practical application in quality control of calcium aluminate cements [pt

  9. Hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement within EVA emulsion by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotera, Masaru; Matsuda, Ikuyo; Miyashita, Keiko; Adachi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hisayuki

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-modified mortars which consist of a polymer emulsion and cement materials have been widely developed in the construction materials fields. Forming process of the polymer-modified cement membrane simultaneously involves evaporation of water within the polymer emulsion and hydration of cement. It is important for the polymer-modified cement paste that the hydrate crystal of cement is generating by the hydration during the setting process under existence of the polymer emulsion. In this study, hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement under existence of poly (ethylene-vinyl acetate) (EVA) emulsion (polymer-cement ratio=100%) was investigated by X-ray diffraction method using synchrotron radiation (SPring-8). The diffraction peaks of calcium aluminate (CA) disappeared after the hardening, on the other hand, the peaks of hydrate crystals of calcium-aluminate cement (C 2 AH 8 and C 3 AH 6 ) could be observed. This polymer-modified cement paste hydrated using the water within the polymer emulsion. The hydration of C 2 AH 8 from CA started at around 300 min, and then C 3 AH 6 hydrate crystal increased after 700 min at ambient temperature. This implies that the conversion from C 2 AH 8 to C 3 AH 6 occurred to be more stable phase. The setting temperature affected the reaction rate. In case of hydration at 35degC, the start time of the hydration for calcium-aluminate cement was quicker than that in the ambient temperature four or more times. (author)

  10. Poly(carboxylate ether)-based superplasticizer achieves workability retention in calcium aluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Omid; Menceloglu, Yusuf Ziya; Akbulut, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) suffers from loss of workability in less than an hour (~15 minutes) after first touch of water. Current superplasticizers that are utilized to modify the viscosity of cement admixtures are designed to target ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The high affinity between these superplasticizers and cement particles were found to be detrimental in CAC systems. Utilization of a monomer that, instead, facilitates gradual adsorption of a superplasticizer provides workability retention. For the first time in literature, we report a superplasticizer that caters to the properties of CAC such as high rate of surface development and surface charge. While neat CAC was almost unworkable after 1 hour, with the addition of only 0.4% of the optimized superplasticizer, 90% fluidity retention was achieved.

  11. Evaluation of mechanical strength and hydrate products evolution of calcium aluminate cement, for endodontic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the most used retrograde filling cement in the endodontic area. Nevertheless, although its composition is similar to the conventional Portland cement, its high cost, long setting time and low mechanical strength have led to a continuous search for new alternative materials. Considering these aspects, the mechanical strength and crystalline phase evolution of a calcium aluminate cement (CAC), during its hydration process, have been evaluated in this work aiming to apply such material for endodontic treatments. Secar 71 cement samples were prepared and kept in contact with water or SBF (simulated body fluid) during 15 days at 37 deg C. Compressive strength, apparent porosity, X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were carried out for the samples evaluation after 1, 3, 7 and 15 days. The main identified phases were CAH 10 , C 2 AH 8 , C 3 AH 6 and AH 3 . Moreover, when in the presence of SBF, some changes in the amount of the hydrates in the CAC samples were observed, which affected the mechanical behavior of the cement. (author)

  12. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Composites Made with Aluminous Cement and Basalt Fibers Developed for High Temperature Application

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    Pavel Reiterman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present paper deals with the experimental study of the composition of refractory fiber-reinforced aluminous cement based composites and its response to gradual thermal loading. Basalt fibers were applied in doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0% in volume. Simultaneously, binder system based on the aluminous cement was modified by fine ground ceramic powder originated from the accurate ceramic blocks production. Ceramic powder was dosed as partial replacement of used cement of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25%. Influence of composition changes was evaluated by the results of physical and mechanical testing; compressive strength, flexural strength, bulk density, and fracture energy were determined on the different levels of temperature loading. Increased dose of basalt fibers allows reaching expected higher values of fracture energy, but with respect to results of compressive and flexural strength determination as an optimal rate of basalt fibers dose was considered 0.25% in volume. Fine ground ceramic powder application led to extensive increase of residual mechanical parameters just up to replacement of 10%. Higher replacement of aluminous cement reduced final values of bulk density but kept mechanical properties on the level of mixtures without aluminous cement replacement.

  13. Study of the ultrasonic waves action on the preparation of calcium aluminates cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenco, R.R.; Exposito, C.C.D.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium aluminates cements were prepared through a route that uses the sonochemical process. In this process, calcia and alumina in an aqueous suspension are put under an ultrasonic bath during some time. After that, the water is evaporated and the material is heat treated. In this work, the action of ultrasonic waves were studied on initials molar compositions calcia:alumina of 1:1. It was also verified the influence of the water on the reactivity of initial solids. SEM and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the obtained materials. In addition, mechanical strength of the products was evaluated through splitting tensile tests. The X-ray diffractograms showed that the presence of the water was enough to form hydrated compounds. However the material subjected to the sonochemical process presented the highest mechanical strength, indicating the potential of this route of synthesis. (author)

  14. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  15. Contribution to the study of wastes stabilization by sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, S.

    2005-02-01

    Calcium sulfo-aluminate cement is mainly composed of yeelimite known to be a precursor of ettringite formation. Ettringite is able to incorporate several heavy metals by isomorphous substitutions without altering its crystalline structure. The design of a binder required for immobilizing heavy metals was undertaken. The hydration study of clinker, and cement containing 4 amounts of gypsum has been carried out by means of XRD, DTA and IR spectrometry. It was pointed out that the addition of gypsum enhances hydration. Two binders were selected: 80/20 and 70/30. The immobilisation of 7 pollutants was very successful. Nevertheless, damages appeared with the binder 70/30 containing sodium chromate and dichromate: sodium caused activation of yeelimite reactivity and important dissolution of gypsum leading to important ettringite production. With a great amount of gypsum (30 %), dissolution led to secondary ettringite formation which damaged the hardened paste. Adding polyol enhances the retention of sodium chromate. On the other hand, the immobilisation of two types of weakly radioactive wastes supplied by CEA has been made. Results obtained in terms of setting time, compressive strength and leaching were excellent. (author)

  16. Quantitative determination of tricalcicum aluminate in portland cement by X-ray diffraction

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    Sagrera Moreno, José Luis

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Tricalcium aluminate (C3A is one of the constitutive phase of the cement-clinker. Its concentration influences the cement behaviour in sulphate aggressive soils. Therefore its quantification is very convenient and International standards fix its content when the concrete is used in contact with soils or liquids containing sulphate compounds. There are two possibilities in order to calculate the amount of C3A in clinker phases: one consist in a mathematical calculation from the results of the chemical analysis (Bogue formulae and the order is based in X-ray diffraction, using the height of the representative peak of the C3A phase. In the present note, the experimental procedure in order to determine the C3A content from X-ray test is presented.

    El aluminato tricáicico es una de las fases constitutivas del clinker de cemento portland. Su concentración en el cemento influye en el comportamiento de éste, en las obras sometidas a la posible agresividad de diferentes sulfatos cuando entran en contacto con las estructuras que se fabrican con él. Por ello la determinación de su concentración es un dato que puede invalidar su uso en una obra. De ahí que las normas internacionales fijen la cantidad de aluminato tricáicico según se clasifique la agresividad del entorno en el que una estructura será colocada. Existen fórmulas matemáticas para calcular la concentración de cada una de las fases del clinker a partir de las concentraciones de los elementos químicos de clinker expresados en forma de óxidos. Los posibles errores en los análisis químicos producen errores en los cálculos de las concentraciones de cada fase. Para determinar la concentración de dichas fases se puede emplear también la técnica de difracción de rayos X, basándose en la medida de la altura del pico representativo de la fase que se quiere determinar.

  17. Ternary Blends of High Aluminate Cement, Fly ash and Blast-furnace slag for Sewerage Lining Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, L. C.; Kuo, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    High aluminate cement (HAC), fly ash (FA) and blast-furnace slag (BFS) have been treated sustainable materials for the use of cement products for wastewater infrastructure due to their capabilities of corrosion resistance. The purpose of this study is to optimize a ternary blend of above mentioned materials for a special type of mortar for sewerage lining. By the using of Taguchi method, four control parameters including water/cementitious material ratio, mix water content, fly ash content and blast-furnace slag content were considered in nine trial mix designs in this study. By evaluating target properties including (1) maximization of compressive strength, (2) maximization of electricity resistance and (3) minimization of water absorption rate, the best possible levels for each control parameter were determined and the optimal mix proportions were verified. Through the implementation of the study, a practical and completed idea for designing corrosion resistive mortar comprising HAC, FA and BSF is provided.

  18. High-temperature Corrosion Resistance of Composite Coating Prepared by Micro-arc Oxidation Combined with Pack Cementation Aluminizing

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    HUANG Zu-jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 ceramic film was obtained by micro-arc oxidation (MAO process on Al/C103 specimen, which was prepared by pack cementation aluminizing technology on C103 niobium alloy. With the aid of XRD and SEM equipped with EDS, chemical compositions and microstructures of the composite coatings before and after high-temperature corrosion were analyzed. The behavior and mechanism of the composite coatings in high-temperature oxidation and hot corrosion were also investigated. The results indicate that oxidation mass gain at 1000℃ for 10h of the Al/C103 specimen is 6.98mg/cm2, and it is 2.89mg/cm2 of the MAO/Al/C103 specimen. However, the mass gain of MAO/Al/C103 specimen (57.52mg/cm2 is higher than that of Al/C103 specimen (28.08mg/cm2 after oxidation 20h. After hot corrosion in 75%Na2SO4 and 25%NaCl at 900℃ for 50h, the mass gain of Al/C103 and MAO/Al/C103 specimens are 70.54mg/cm2 and 55.71mg/cm2 respectively, Al2O3 and perovskite NaNbO3 phases are formed on the surface; the diffusion of molten salt is suppressed, due to part of NaNbO3 accumulated in the MAO micropores. Therefore, MAO/Al/C103 specimen exhibits better hot corrosion resistance.

  19. Effect of the strontium aluminate and hemihydrate contents on the properties of a calcium sulphoaluminate based cement

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    Velazco, G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of strontium aluminate (SrAl2O4 on the hydration process of a calcium sulphoaluminate (C4A3Ŝ cement was investigated. Cement pastes were prepared by mixing C4A3Ŝ , hemihydrate (CaSO4· ½H2O, CŜH0.5 and 0, 10 or 20wt% of SrAl2O4 (SrA. The amount of CŜH0.5 was 15, 20 or 25wt% based on the C4A3Ŝ quantity. The cement pastes were hydrated using water to cement ratios (w/c of 0.4 and 0.5. Samples were cured from 1 to 28 d. The compressive strength and setting time were evaluated and the hydration products were characterized. It was found that the setting time was delayed up to 42 min for the samples containing SrAl2O4 compared to samples without addition. The samples with 25wt% hemihydrate containing 20wt% SrAl2O4 developed the highest compressive strength (60 MPa after 28 d of curing. The main product after hydration was ettringite (C6AŜ3H32. The morphology of this phase consisted of thin needle-shaped crystals.Se investigó el efecto de la adición de aluminato de estroncio (SrAl2O4 sobre las propiedades de un cemento de sulfoaluminato de calcio (C4A3Ŝ. Se prepararon muestras mezclando C4A3Ŝ, hemihidrato (CaSO4· ½H2O, CŜH0.5 y 0, 10 o 20% e.p de SrAl2O4 (SrA. La cantidad de CŜH0.5 fue de 15, 20 o 25% e.p. basado en la cantidad de C4A3Ŝ. Las relaciones agua/cemento utilizadas fueron 0.4 y 0.5. Las muestras fueron curadas hasta 28 d. Se evaluó el tiempo de fraguado y la resistencia a la compresión. Los productos de hidratación se caracterizaron mediante DRX y MEB. El tiempo de fraguado se retardó hasta 42 minutos con la adición del SrAl2O4 comparado con las muestras sin adiciones. Las muestras con 25% e.p. de yeso y 20% e.p. de SrAl2O4 desarrollaron la mayor resistencia a la compresión alcanzando 60 MPa a 28 d de curado. Los análisis por MEB y DRX muestran como principal producto de hidratación a la etringita (C6AŜ3H32, cuya morfología se observa como cristales aciculares.

  20. Calcium aluminate cement concrete: durablllty and conversión. A fresh look at an old subject

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    George, C. M.

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper re-examines the relationship between durability and conversion of calcium aluminate cement concretes, CACC. Conversion is a natural and inevitable process whereby these materials reach a stable mature condition. Numerous structures built more than half a century ago remain serviceable and in service today. Some of these are illustrated. They are the best testament to the durability of converted concrete having survived far longer in the converted than the unconverted condition. The unique rapid hardening characteristics of CACC offer a valuable selfheating capability. Conversión is immediate and this leads to better long term strengths because more cement is hydrated. Moreover, recent work has shown that the thermodynamically stable hydrates of converted CAC are intrinsically more resistant to attack from such aggressive agents as sulphuric acid. This provides an explanation of the excellent long term performance of Fondu concretes, for example in many saewer applications. Our knowledge and understanding today of the durability of calcium alumínate bonded materials has been built on close to 100 years of accumulated experience and laboratory studies. We know how to use these materials and we know what to expect from them. We can be confident that they will serve us well in the century ahead.

    Este trabajo examina de nuevo la relación entre durabilidad y conversión de hormigones de cemento aluminoso, HAC (High Alumina Cement. La conversión es un proceso natural e inevitable a través del cual este material consigue una condición definitiva y estable. Numerosas estructuras que se edificaron hace más de medio siglo siguen utilizables y utilizadas hoy en día. Algunas de estas estructuras vienen ilustradas en este trabajo. Ellas sirven como mejor ejemplo de la durabilidad del hormigón convertido, ya que han sobrevivido mucho más tiempo en el estado convertido que en el no convertido. Las singulares caracter

  1. Effect of Tartaric Acid on Hydration of a Sodium-Metasilicate-Activated Blend of Calcium Aluminate Cement and Fly Ash F

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    Tatiana Pyatina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An alkali-activated blend of aluminum cement and class F fly ash is an attractive solution for geothermal wells where cement is exposed to significant thermal shocks and aggressive environments. Set-control additives enable the safe cement placement in a well but may compromise its mechanical properties. This work evaluates the effect of a tartaric-acid set retarder on phase composition, microstructure, and strength development of a sodium-metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate/fly ash class F blend after curing at 85 °C, 200 °C or 300 °C. The hardened materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray computed tomography, and combined scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and tested for mechanical strength. With increasing temperature, a higher number of phase transitions in non-retarded specimens was found as a result of fast cement hydration. The differences in the phase compositions were also attributed to tartaric acid interactions with metal ions released by the blend in retarded samples. The retarded samples showed higher total porosity but reduced percentage of large pores (above 500 µm and greater compressive strength after 300 °C curing. Mechanical properties of the set cements were not compromised by the retarder.

  2. Propriedades e bioatividade de um cimento endodôntico à base de aluminato de cálcio Properties and bioactivity of endodontic calcium aluminate cement

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    I. R. Oliveira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Desde sua introdução na endodontia como um material retro-obturador e selador de defeitos da raiz dental, o agregado de trióxido mineral (MTA tem sido considerado como um material endodôntico revolucionário. Apesar disso, este material apresenta algumas propriedades limitantes, necessitando alterações em sua composição bem como desenvolvimento de novos materiais. Assim, o objetivo desse trabalho foi mostrar a influência de aditivos no desenvolvimento de um cimento endodôntico à base de cimento de aluminato de cálcio (ECAC. Além disso, foram avaliadas as propriedades do ECAC em comparação com o MTA, quando em contato com solução de fluido corporal simulado (SBF. Testes de manipulação e medidas de resistência à compressão, porosidade aparente, tempo de endurecimento, pH e condutividade iônica, foram realizados para os materiais MTA puro e ECAC contendo aditivos. Considerando as propriedades apresentadas pelo ECAC, este material alternativo pode ser indicado para múltiplas aplicações em endodontia.The mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, a material primarily developed as a root-end filling has been extensively investigated as an innovative product for endodontic applications. However, changes in its formulation/composition involving its mineral aggregates and the development of alternatives of materials have been proposed in an attempt to overcome its negative physical-chemical characteristics. In this work, the influence of additives addition on the development of a novel endodontic cement based on calcium aluminate, has been evaluated. In addition, the properties of endodontic calcium aluminate cement (ECAC were compared with the gold standard mineral-trioxide-aggregate in contact with simulated body fluid (SBF. Manipulation tests and measurements of compressive strength, apparent porosity, setting time, pH and ionic conductivity were carried out on plain MTA and calcium aluminate cement with and without various additives

  3. Study of the ultrasonic waves action on the preparation of calcium aluminates cements; Estudo da acao das ondas ultrasonicas na sintese de cimentos de aluminatos de calcio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, R.R.; Exposito, C.C.D.; Rodrigues, J.A., E-mail: josear@ufscar.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/GEMM/UFScar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais. Grupo de Engenharia de Microestrutura de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    Calcium aluminates cements were prepared through a route that uses the sonochemical process. In this process, calcia and alumina in an aqueous suspension are put under an ultrasonic bath during some time. After that, the water is evaporated and the material is heat treated. In this work, the action of ultrasonic waves were studied on initials molar compositions calcia:alumina of 1:1. It was also verified the influence of the water on the reactivity of initial solids. SEM and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the obtained materials. In addition, mechanical strength of the products was evaluated through splitting tensile tests. The X-ray diffractograms showed that the presence of the water was enough to form hydrated compounds. However the material subjected to the sonochemical process presented the highest mechanical strength, indicating the potential of this route of synthesis. (author)

  4. Synthesis optimization of calcium aluminate cement phases for biomedical applications; Avaliacao da sintese das fases de cimento de aluminato de calcio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Oliveira, I.R. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pandolfelli, V.C. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied as a potential material for applications in the areas of health such as, endodontics and bone reconstruction. These studies have been based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by investigating the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance for biomedical applications. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the CAC synthesis routes in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaCO{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO systems, as well as the phase characterization attained by means of X ray analysis. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO route enabled the production of the target phases (CA, CA{sub 2}, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 12}A{sub 7}) with a higher purity compared to the Al2O3-CaCO3 one. As a result the particular properties of these phases can be evaluated to define a more suitable composition that results in better properties for an endodontic cement and other applications. (author)

  5. Synthesis and hydration behavior of calcium zirconium aluminate (Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18}) cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun-Hee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jun-Sang [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo-Hye; Choi, Sung-Woo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seong-Hyeon, E-mail: shhong@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Calcium zirconium aluminate (Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18}) cements were prepared by solid state reaction and polymeric precursor methods, and their phase evolution, morphology, and hydration behavior were investigated. In polymeric precursor method, a nearly single phase Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} was obtained at relatively lower temperature (1200 °C) whereas in solid state reaction, a small amount of CaZrO{sub 3} coexisted with Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} even at higher temperature (1400 °C). Unexpectedly, Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} synthesized by polymeric precursor process was the large-sized and rough-shaped powder. The planetary ball milling was employed to control the particle size and shape. The hydration behavior of Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} was similar to that of Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} (C3A), but the hydration products were Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}·6H{sub 2}O (C3AH6) and several intermediate products. Thus, Zr (or ZrO{sub 2}) stabilized the intermediate hydration products of C3A.

  6. Evaluation of pH, calcium ion release and antimicrobial activity of a new calcium aluminate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the pH, calcium ion release and antimicrobial activity of EndoBinder (EB, containing different radiopacifiers: bismuth oxide (Bi2O3, zinc oxide (ZnO or zirconium oxide (ZrO2, in comparison to MTA. For pH and calcium ion release tests, 5 specimens per group (n = 5 were immersed into 10 mL of distilled and deionized water at 37°C. After 2, 4, 12, 24, 48 h; 7, 14 and 28 days, the pH was measured and calcium ion release quantified in an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. For antimicrobial activity, the cements were tested against S. aureus, E. coli, E. faecalis and C. albicans, in triplicate. MTA presented higher values for pH and calcium ion release than the other groups, however, with no statistically significant difference after 28 days (p > 0.05; and the largest inhibition halos for all strains, with no significant difference (E. coli and E. faecalis for pure EB and EB + Bi2O3 (p > 0.05. EB presented similar performance to that of MTA as regards pH and calcium ion release; however, when ZnO and ZrO2 were used, EB did not present antimicrobial activity against some strains.

  7. Evaluation of mechanical strength and hydrate products evolution of calcium aluminate cement, for endodontic applications; Avaliacao da evolucao da resistencia mecanica e dos produtos de hidratacao de um cimento de aluminato de calcio, visando sua aplicacao em endodontia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z.; Pandolfelli, V.C., E-mail: anapaula.light@gmail.com, E-mail: vicpando@power.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2011-07-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the most used retrograde filling cement in the endodontic area. Nevertheless, although its composition is similar to the conventional Portland cement, its high cost, long setting time and low mechanical strength have led to a continuous search for new alternative materials. Considering these aspects, the mechanical strength and crystalline phase evolution of a calcium aluminate cement (CAC), during its hydration process, have been evaluated in this work aiming to apply such material for endodontic treatments. Secar 71 cement samples were prepared and kept in contact with water or SBF (simulated body fluid) during 15 days at 37 deg C. Compressive strength, apparent porosity, X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were carried out for the samples evaluation after 1, 3, 7 and 15 days. The main identified phases were CAH{sub 10}, C{sub 2}AH{sub 8}, C{sub 3}AH{sub 6} and AH{sub 3}. Moreover, when in the presence of SBF, some changes in the amount of the hydrates in the CAC samples were observed, which affected the mechanical behavior of the cement. (author)

  8. Hydration kinetics for the alite, belite, and calcium aluminate phase in Portland cements from 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is shown to be a valuable tool for obtaining the quantities of alite and belite in hydrated Portland cements. The hydration (1-180 days) of a white Portland cement with 10 wt.% silica fume added is investigated and the degrees of hydration for alite...... belite, and silica fume are determined. It is demonstrated that 27Al MAS NMR spectra of hydrated Portland cements can give quantitative information about the formation of ettringite and the conversion of this phase to monosulphate during hydration....

  9. Cimento aluminoso e seus efeitos em concretos refratários magnesianos espinelizados in situ Calcium aluminate cement and its effects on in-situ spinel containing magnesia refractory castables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H Milanez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O uso de concretos refratários alumina-magnésia ligados por cimento aluminoso (CAC apresenta vantagens decorrentes da presença de espinélio e de CA6 (CaO.6Al2O3, ambas formadas in-situ e acompanhadas de expansão. Estas fases possuem alta resistência a escórias básicas e ao choque térmico, propriedades estas imprescindíveis para aplicação em panelas siderúrgicas. Estudos anteriores mostraram que o teor de CAC utilizado em concretos alumina-magnésia influencia a expansão do material, principalmente devido à formação de CA6. Este trabalho visa estudar a influência do teor de cimento no sistema magnésia-alumina, utilizando-se a mesma matriz de um concreto alumina-magnésia tradicional. Os resultados indicaram que o CAC influencia na estabilidade volumétrica do sistema MgO-espinélio: quanto menor o teor de CAC, menor a retração das amostras. Isso refletiu na sinterização dos concretos e, assim, nas propriedades mecânicas após queima em temperaturas elevadas.Calcium aluminate cement (CAC bonded alumina-magnesia refractory castables present great advantages for steel ladle applications as a result of in-situ expansive formation of spinel and CA<6, which leads to high basic slag and thermal shock resistance. The CAC content in those castables strongly influences its expansive behavior mainly due to CA6 formation. In the present work, the effects of the CAC content in magnesia-alumina castables were analyzed. The results showed that calcium aluminate cement affects the volumetric stability of MgO-spinel system: the lower the CAC content, the lower the shrinkage. These effects on the sintering and in the mechanical properties after sintering at high temperatures are also presented and discussed.

  10. Analysis of the factors which have an influence on the reduction of residuary strengths due to alkaline solution in the interstitial mortars of concretes with aluminous cement Assessment of the risk limits in the case of roof beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goma Ginesta, Ferrán

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The scarce references which exist in the bibliography on this subject and their vagueness on the factors which have an influence on the reduction of the strength of aluminous cement concrete due to the effect of alkalinity, have not yet allowed the limits to be clearly seen which could give rise to a situation of risk in the structural elements due to this cause. A study is presented which endeavors to measure the quantitative influence of different parameters of the same or of a similar conditions to those presented in the usual types of concrete in existing beams with aluminous cement characteristic of our market. The parameters tested were: the influence of the concentration of free ions OH-, the class of alkaline ion, the temperature, the time, the presence or absence of CO2, the degree of conversion, the physical parameters, porosities, densities, etc., and the phases existing were determined by XRD, DTA and TG before and after the alkaline action. From the results obtained in numerous series of Rilem mortars and micro-mortars, it is possible to see the possibility of establishing the setting of parameters which define areas without risk.

    Las escasas referencias que existen en la bibliografía sobre este tema, y su identificación sobre los factores que tienen influencia sobre la disminución de resistencias en el hormigón de cemento aluminoso por efecto de la alcalinidad, no ha permitido aún ver claramente los limites que pueden dar lugar a una situación de riesgo en los elementos estructurales por esta causa. Se presenta un estudio que trata de medir la influencia cuantitativa de diferentes parámetros, con la misma o semejante magnitud que se presentan en los tipos usuales de hormigones de vigas existentes con cemento aluminoso propio de nuestro mercado. Los parámetros ensayados han sido: la influencia de la concentración de iones OH- libres, la clase de ion alcalino, la temperatura, el

  11. Reactive Air Aluminization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  12. Cinética de hidratação de ligantes à base de alumina hidratável ou aluminato de cálcio Kinetics of hydration of binders based on hydratable alumina or calcium aluminate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Oliveira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O estado de dispersão da matriz de um concreto refratário apresenta uma grande influência no comportamento reológico desse material, determinando as técnicas utilizadas para a sua aplicação. Tais métodos normalmente exigem a preparação de concretos com elevada fluidez, que possam ser bombeados com facilidade e sejam capazes de preencher moldes de formato complexo sem a necessidade de aplicação de vibração. Entretanto, embora tais requisitos favoreçam uma boa trabalhabilidade do concreto, tendem a aumentar o tempo requerido para efetuar a desmoldagem do corpo conformado. Uma vez que o desenvolvimento da resistência mecânica do concreto está intimamente relacionado ao processo de hidratação do ligante hidráulico, este necessita ser controlado quando se busca a redução do tempo para a desmoldagem. Tal controle depende de um profundo conhecimento das variáveis que determinam a cinética das reações. Neste contexto, o objetivo deste trabalho foi o de avaliar a influência do tipo de ligante hidráulico, da temperatura e da presença de finos (matriz ou de aditivos inorgânicos adicionados ao concreto sobre o processo de hidratação por meio de medidas de temperatura e ensaios reológicos oscilatórios em função do tempo.The dispersion of refractory castables matrix presents a great influence on their rheological behavior, which defines the most appropriate methods for placing these materials. The growing demand for automatically transported refractory castables has promoted the use of pumpable castables, usually specified as self flow compositions. Nevertheless, castables with higher fluidity present longer workability, leading to extended demoulding times. Because the strength development is intimately linked to the hydration process of calcium aluminate cement or hydratable alumina, it needs to be controlled in order to reach the minimum time for demoulding, contributing to reducing overall costs. The control of cement

  13. IMPACT OF INCREASED ALUMINATE CONCENTRATIONS ON PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE MIXES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Erich Hansen, E; Vickie Williams, V

    2007-01-01

    trends observed as the aluminate concentration increased in the salt solution were decreased Bingham Plastic yield stress and plastic viscosity, greater flowability of the grout, and reduced gel times and bleed volume for SWPF based mixes. On the other hand, the set times increased significantly with increasing aluminate concentration in the salt solutions. For the SWPF mixes, the set time increased from 1 to 4 days and for the Tank 11 mixes, the set time increased from 1 to 2 days. Heat of hydration measurements were consistent with the increased set times with extended induction periods (2 to 4 days) as aluminate concentration increased in the salt solution. This extended induction period of heat evolution observed with increasing aluminate concentrations must be addressed for Saltstone operations to avoid exceeding temperature limits. It is anticipated that the induction period will be temperature dependent and should be measured for future projections and included in the thermal modeling. The overall heat generation was greater in the mixes containing higher concentrations of aluminate. In fact, for the total heat release values calculated using curve fitting for longer times, the amount of heat was increased by 33% for SWPF based solutions and by 46% for Tank 11 based solutions. The larger amount of heat from mixes containing higher aluminate concentration must be accounted for in the modeling effort which determines the pour schedule for Saltstone. The increased induction periods were shown to be associated with hydration reactions of the blast furnace slag. The rate of heat generation with high aluminate solutions and Portland cement were only accelerated whereas high aluminate mixes containing blast furnace slag only showed the characteristic increase in induction time that was observed with mixes prepared using the premix blend of cementitious materials. It was shown that fly ash does not react significantly during the first seven days of curing but then

  14. Characterization and chemical activity of Portland cement and two experimental cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the chemical activity of Portland cement and two other cement types with similar chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate with the aim of developing these cements for further applications in dentistry. The chemical composition of the three cement types namely Portland cement, calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement was evaluated by elemental analysis using energy dispersive analysis with X-ray under the scanning electron microscope and by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to determine the phases. The constituents of the hydration reaction by-products were evaluated by XRD analysis of the set cements at 1, 7, 28 and 56 days and by analysis of the leachate by ion chromatography. The pH of both cements and leachate was determined at different time intervals. Cements admixed with micro-silica were also tested to determine the effect of micro-silica on the reaction by-products. All three cement types were composed of tricalcium silicate as the main constituent phase. The hydration reaction of Portland cement produced calcium hydroxide. However, this was not present in the other cements tested at all ages. Admixed micro-silica had little or no effect on the cements with regard to reaction by-products. The pH of all cements tested was alkaline. Both the experimental calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement had different hydration reactions to that of Portland cement even though calcium silicate was the major constituent element of both cement types. No calcium hydroxide was produced as a by-product to cement hydration. Micro-silica addition to the cement had no effect on the hydration reaction.

  15. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saoût, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  16. Method of processing aluminous ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Keller, Rudolf; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1981-01-01

    A method of producing aluminum chloride from aluminous materials containing compounds of iron, titanium and silicon comprising reacting the aluminous materials with carbon and a chlorine-containing gas at a temperature of about 900.degree. K. to form a gaseous mixture containing chlorides of aluminum, iron, titanium and silicon and oxides of carbon; cooling the gaseous mixture to a temperature of about 400.degree. K. or lower to condense the aluminum chlorides and iron chlorides while titanium chloride and silicon chloride remain in the gas phase to effect a separation thereof; heating the mixture of iron chlorides and aluminum chlorides to a temperature of about 800.degree. K. to form gaseous aluminum chlorides and iron chlorides; passing the heated gases into intimate contact with aluminum sulfide to precipitate solid iron sulfide and to form additional gaseous aluminum chlorides; and separating the gaseous aluminum chloride from the solid iron sulfide.

  17. Lithium aluminates and tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Palacios G, O.; Bosch G, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this work it is studied the crystalline structure of lithium aluminates prepared by three different methods, namely: solid state reaction, humid reaction and sol-gel reaction. The analysis methods are the X-ray diffractometry and the scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This study is realized as in original materials as in irradiated materials at the TRIGA Mark reactor, to correlate the synthesis method with response of these materials to the mixed irradiation of nuclear reactor. (Author)

  18. Optimization of a Strontium Aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bone, Alexandria N. [Maryville College, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Strontium aluminate with Eu2+ and Dy3+ has been at the forefront of emerging applications for storage phosphors since its discovery in 1996. In this study, the emission intensity and luminescence lifetime of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ were enhanced by partial substitution of Ca2+ into Sr2+ sites in the matrix.

  19. Stabilization of aqueous alkali metal aluminate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, S.J.

    1988-03-29

    A method of stabilizing an aqueous solution of alkali metal aluminate is described comprising: admixing an aqueous solution of alkali metal aluminate having a pH of at least 10 with a sufficient amount of vinyl polymer having pendant carboxylate groups to form a solution containing from 0.1 to 2.0 weight percent of an anionic vinyl polymer based on alkali metal aluminate solids. The anionic vinyl polymer has an average molecular weight of at least 500,000.

  20. A Force field for tricalcium aluminate to characterize surface properties, initial hydration, and organically modified interfaces in atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ratan K.; Fernández Carrasco, Lucía; Flatt, Robert J.; Heinz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium aluminate (C3A) is a major phase of Portland cement clinker and some dental root filling cements. An accurate all-atom force field is introduced to examine structural, surface, and hydration properties as well as organic interfaces to overcome challenges using current laboratory instrumentation. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates excellent agreement of computed structural, thermal, mechanical, and surface properties with available experimental data. The parameters are integ...

  1. Immobilisation of radwaste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Pointer, C.; Cowie, J.; Wilding, C.R.; Mattingley, N.J.; Evans, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The solubilities and influence on cement pH are reported for calcium aluminate and aluminosulphate hydrates. The solubility of Ca(OH) 2 is reported to 700 bars. Polymerization of C-S-H is investigated by NMR. Specific interactions of U 6+ and iodine (I - , IO 3 - ) with cement components are described. The impact of radiation on cements and the influence of higher temperature are documented. The role of dissolved Ca and CO 2 in groundwaters as dissolution media for cements are reported. (author)

  2. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  3. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  4. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe : [Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  5. The effect of chemically adjusting cement compositions on leachabilities of waste ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.W.; Scheetz, B.E.; Roy, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The chemical composition of both portland and aluminate cements was adjusted by adding amorphous silica. In the case of portland cement, the object was to react with excess portlandite and obtain an overall composition compatible with C-S-H gel or C-S-H gel + silica at low temperatures, and to obtain the tobermorite composition in order to be in equilibrium with this phase at temperatures above normal ambient. In the case of aluminate cement, the object was to be in equilibrium with more silica-rich phases. These silica-adjusted cements were used to make composites with nuclear waste forms. Leach tests showed that the silica-adjusted composites were chemically more stable than those made with as-received cement. Leach rates were lower in the case of the adjusted cements for Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Gd, Al, and Si. Only Na in the case of both portland and aluminate cements, and Mg and U in the case of aluminate cements, had greater leach rates in adjusted cements. Adjusting the composition of cements with silica is concluded to be beneficial when making composites to encapsulate nuclear waste forms

  6. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases...... in Portland cement, i.e. tricalcium silicate, dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium alumino ferrite. Details of the The process of solid state synthesis are is described in general including practical advice on equipment and techniques. Finally In addition, some exemplary mix compositions...

  7. Structure of liquid tricalcium aluminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewitt, James W. E.; Barnes, Adrian C.; Jahn, Sandro; Kohn, Simon C.; Walter, Michael J.; Novikov, Alexey N.; Neuville, Daniel R.; Fischer, Henry E.; Hennet, Louis

    2017-02-01

    The atomic-scale structure of aerodynamically levitated and laser-heated liquid tricalcium aluminate (Ca3Al2O6 ) was measured at 2073(30) K by using the method of neutron diffraction with Ca isotope substitution (NDIS). The results enable the detailed resolution of the local coordination environment around calcium and aluminum atoms, including the direct determination of the liquid partial structure factor, SCaCa(Q ) , and partial pair distribution function, gCaCa(r ) . Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) refinement methods were employed to obtain a detailed atomistic model of the liquid structure. The composition Ca3Al2O6 lies at the CaO-rich limit of the CaO:Al2O3 glass-forming system. Our results show that, although significantly depolymerized, liquid Ca3Al2O6 is largely composed of AlO4 tetrahedra forming an infinite network with a slightly higher fraction of bridging oxygen atoms than expected for the composition. Calcium-centered polyhedra exhibit a wide distribution of four- to sevenfold coordinated sites, with higher coordinated calcium preferentially bonding to bridging oxygens. Analysis of the MD configuration reveals the presence of ˜10 % unconnected AlO4 monomers and Al2O7 dimers in the liquid. As the CaO concentration increases, the number of these isolated units increases, such that the upper value for the glass-forming composition of CaO:Al2O3 liquids could be described in terms of a percolation threshold at which the glass can no longer support the formation of an infinitely connected AlO4 network.

  8. Defluoridation of water using calcium aluminate material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sakhare, N.; Lunge, S.; Rayalu, S.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Šubrt, Jan; Devotta, S.; Labhsetwar, N.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 203, SEPTEMBER (2012), s. 406-414 ISSN 1385-8947 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Defluoridation * Fluorosis * Adsorption * Fluoride removal * Calcium aluminate Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.473, year: 2012

  9. Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The importance of computed X-ray diffraction patterns of various polymorphs of alite (M3, T1, R), belite aluminate (cubic, orthorhombic), aluminoferrite, gypsum and hemihydrate in the quantitative phase ana- lysis of cement and its early stage hydration performance is highlighted in this work with three OPC ...

  10. Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The importance of computed X-ray diffraction patterns of various polymorphs of alite (3, 1, ), belite (, ), aluminate (cubic, orthorhombic), aluminoferrite, gypsum and hemihydrate in the quantitative phase analysis of cement and its early stage hydration performance is highlighted in this work with three OPC samples.

  11. The Investigation of Properties of Insulating Refractory Concrete with Portland Cement Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudžma, A.; Antonovič, V.; Stonys, R.; Škamat, J.

    2015-11-01

    The present work contains the results of experimental study on properties of insulating refractory concrete created on the basis of Portland cement (PC) binder and modified with microsilica (MS). The experimental compositions were made using Portland cement, lightweight aggregates (expanded clay and vermiculite) and microsilica additives. It was established that MS additives enable significant improvement of mechanical properties and thermal shock resistance of PC-based insulating concrete with values comparable to insulating refractory concrete based on calcium aluminate cement.

  12. Calcium aluminates potential for endodontics and orthopedics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.L. dos; Andrade, T.L.; Oliveira, I.R.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The mostly used material in the areas of endodontics (MTA, mineral trioxide aggregate) and bone reconstruction (PMMA, polymethyl methacrylate) present some limiting properties requiring thus changes in their compositions as well as the development of alternative materials. In this context, a novel biomaterial-based calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied in order to keep the positive properties and clinical applications of MTA and PMMA, overcoming some their disadvantages. Recent studies involving the use of CAC are based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by searching the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance in applications in the areas of health. By the optimization of the CAC phases production, this article aims to present their characterization based on hydration temperature; working time and setting time; pH, ions solubilization and dissolution in contact with water and different solutions of simulated body fluid. The results indicated the CA phase as the most suitable for application in the areas of health. (author)

  13. Extraction of tritium from lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunker, W.

    1976-09-01

    Complete data are presented for the extraction of tritium from neutron irradiated lithium aluminate pellets. Two methods were used: (a) thermal/vacuum extraction at temperatures up to 980 0 C and (b) dissolution of the pellets in sodium tetraborate at 850 0 C followed by vacuum extraction. Approximately 1 percent of the tritium was in a noncondensable (at -195 0 C and 10 -3 torr) form. Extraction efficiency was greater than 95 percent

  14. Extraction of tritium from lithium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunker, W [ed.

    1976-09-01

    Complete data are presented for the extraction of tritium from neutron irradiated lithium aluminate pellets. Two methods were used: (a) thermal/vacuum extraction at temperatures up to 980/sup 0/C and (b) dissolution of the pellets in sodium tetraborate at 850/sup 0/C followed by vacuum extraction. Approximately 1 percent of the tritium was in a noncondensable (at -195/sup 0/C and 10/sup -3/ torr) form. Extraction efficiency was greater than 95 percent.

  15. The aluminizing in powder technology of AISI 304 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Băitanu, D. B.; Găluşcă, D. G.; Achiţei, D. C.; Minciună, M. G.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a study about the aluminizing treatments applied to AISI 304 stainless steel, with the purpose to improve the corrosion resistance. The aluminizing is realized in a powder medium, composed by aluminium powder (with 99.95% purity), aluminium oxide Al2O3 and ammonium chloride NH4Cl. The structural characterization was made by scanning electronic microscopy to highlight the structure of layer after aluminizing, at different magnitudes.

  16. Destruction of filtration incrustations of aluminate clay solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyan, D.A.; Tarnavskii, A.P.; Lizogub, G.D.

    1977-05-01

    Research results are presented for determining the optimal hydrochemical action time of a buffer fluid (10% NaOH solution) that is needed to destroy filtration incrustations of aluminate clay solutions with respect to the effect of a buffer fluid and an aluminate clay solution on the properties of plugging solutions. Fundamental recommendations are made with respect to using 10% NaOH solutions for removing aluminate clay solution filtration incrustations. 1 table.

  17. A force field for tricalcium aluminate to characterize surface properties, initial hydration, and organically modified interfaces in atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ratan K; Fernández-Carrasco, Lucia; Flatt, Robert J; Heinz, Hendrik

    2014-07-21

    Tricalcium aluminate (C3A) is a major phase of Portland cement clinker and some dental root filling cements. An accurate all-atom force field is introduced to examine structural, surface, and hydration properties as well as organic interfaces to overcome challenges using current laboratory instrumentation. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates excellent agreement of computed structural, thermal, mechanical, and surface properties with available experimental data. The parameters are integrated into multiple potential energy expressions, including the PCFF, CVFF, CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS, and INTERFACE force fields. This choice enables the simulation of a wide range of inorganic-organic interfaces at the 1 to 100 nm scale at a million times lower computational cost than DFT methods. Molecular models of dry and partially hydrated surfaces are introduced to examine cleavage, agglomeration, and the role of adsorbed organic molecules. Cleavage of crystalline tricalcium aluminate requires approximately 1300 mJ m(-2) and superficial hydration introduces an amorphous calcium hydroxide surface layer that reduces the agglomeration energy from approximately 850 mJ m(-2) to 500 mJ m(-2), as well as to lower values upon surface displacement. The adsorption of several alcohols and amines was examined to understand their role as grinding aids and as hydration modifiers in cement. The molecules mitigate local electric fields through complexation of calcium ions, hydrogen bonds, and introduction of hydrophobicity upon binding. Molecularly thin layers of about 0.5 nm thickness reduce agglomeration energies to between 100 and 30 mJ m(-2). Molecule-specific trends were found to be similar for tricalcium aluminate and tricalcium silicate. The models allow quantitative predictions and are a starting point to provide fundamental understanding of the role of C3A and organic additives in cement. Extensions to impure phases and advanced hydration stages are feasible.

  18. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C 3 S, C 2 S) and aluminates (C 3 A, C 4 AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm -1 monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the 1 H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and wide

  19. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratini, Emiliano [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia 3-Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 Florence (Italy); Ridi, Francesca [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia 3-Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 Florence (Italy); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Baglioni, Piero [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia 3-Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 Florence (Italy)

    2006-09-13

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S) and aluminates (C{sub 3}A, C{sub 4}AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm{sup -1} monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the {sup 1}H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron

  20. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, D.; Angus, M.J.; Atkins, M.; Dept. of Chemistry)

    1985-01-01

    A solubility model of the system CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O is developed which takes account of the state of Si polymerization in the solid. Free energies of formations of its bonding hydrogel are tabulated. The internal redox conditions in cements have been measured; in particular, slags lower the Esub(eta) relative to OPC. The fate of Sr and U in cement systems has been determined; Sr is incorporated in the aluminate phases, while U 6+ is precipitated as Ca-U-O-H 2 O phases. Lowering the internal Esub(eta) reduces U solubility. Studies of the carbonation of slag-cement blends are reported. (author)

  1. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, D.; McCulloch, C.E.; Angus, M.J.

    1985-06-01

    The kinetics of reaction between cement and clinoptilolite are elucidated and rate equations containing temperature dependent constants derived for this reaction. Variations in clinoptilolite particle size and their consequences to reactivity are assessed. The presence of pozzolanic agents more reactive than clinoptilolite provides sacrificial agents which are partially effective in lowering the clinoptilolite reactivity. Blast furnace slag-cements have been evaluated and the background literature summarized. Experimental studies of the pore fluid in matured slag-cements show that they provide significantly more immobilization for Cs than Portland cement. The distribution of Sr in cemented waste forms has been examined, and it is shown that most of the chemical immobilization potential in the short term is likely to be associated with the aluminate phases. The chemical and structural nature of these are described. Carbonation studies on real cements are summarized. (author)

  2. THE MECHANISM OF BONDING PARTICLES DISTENSILIMANITA SODIUM ALUMINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the filler (distensillimanit or binder (sodium aluminate after mixing them to form a mold wash, drying the paint and removing water of crystallization. The conclusion of the sodium aluminate suitability as a foundry binder paints.

  3. A new aluminium-hydrate species in hydrated Portland cements characterized by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jorgen

    2006-01-01

    Recent 27 Al MAS NMR studies of hydrated Portland cements and calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phases have shown a resonance from Al in octahedral coordination, which cannot be assigned to the well-known aluminate species in hydrated Portland cements. This resonance, which exhibits the isotropic chemical shift δ iso = 5.0 ppm and the quadrupole product parameter P Q = 1.2 MHz, has been characterized in detail by 27 Al MAS and 27 Al{ 1 H} CP/MAS NMR for different hydrated white Portland cements and C-S-H phases. These experiments demonstrate that the resonance originates from an amorphous or disordered aluminate hydrate which contains Al(OH) 6 3- or O x Al(OH) 6-x (3+x)- units. The formation of the new aluminate hydrate is related to the formation of C-S-H at ambient temperatures, however, it decomposes by thermal treatment at temperatures of 70-90 o C. From the experiments in this work it is proposed that the new aluminate hydrate is either an amorphous/disordered aluminate hydroxide or a calcium aluminate hydrate, produced as a separate phase or as a nanostructured surface precipitate on the C-S-H phase. Finally, the possibilities of Al 3+ for Ca 2+ substitution in the principal layers and interlayers of the C-S-H structure are discussed

  4. Fine structures in Fe3Al alloy layer of a new hot dip aluminized steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    structure and performance in the coating can be improved and service life of the aluminized steel can significantly be enhanced. 2. Experimental. The base metal of the aluminized steel used in this inves- tigation was mild steel (0⋅18%C), which was aluminized by the hot dip aluminizing technology (HDA). In order to.

  5. Structural simulation of superlattices in lithium aluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Basurto S, R.

    1997-01-01

    Among the materials to be used on the tritium generator cover of the future fusion reactors the lithium aluminate (γ - LiAlO 2 ) is one of the more studied. In this work it is presented the superlattice structural simulation that presents to γ - LiAlO 2 as main phase and to α - LiAlO 2 as the secondary phase. The simulation is developed considering that as the two phases present different symmetry (γ - LiAlO 2 is tetrahedral and α - LiAlO 2 is hexahedral) it is had a superlattice LUCS type (Layered Ultrathin Coherent Structure) that is it presents an structure in coherent ultrathin layers since it is what implicates a lesser energy of formation. (Author)

  6. Recycling of red muds with the extraction of metals and special additions to cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinoveev, D. V.; Diubanov, V. G.; Shutova, A. V.; Ziniaeva, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    The liquid-phase reduction of iron oxides from red mud is experimentally studied. It is shown that, in addition to a metal, a slag suitable for utilization in the construction industry can be produced as a result of pyrometallurgical processing of red mud. Portland cement is shown to be produced from this slag with mineral additions and a high-aluminate expansion addition to cement.

  7. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  8. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabits, George [Trabits Group, LLC, Wasilla, AK (United States)

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  9. Actinide-aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David C.; Krot, Nikolai N.

    2000-01-01

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste tanks contain a number of transuranic species, in particular U, Np, Pu, and Am-the exact forms of which are currently unknown. Knowledge of actinide speciation under highly alkaline conditions is essential towards understanding and predicting their solubility and sorption behavior in tanks, determining whether chemical separations are needed for waste treatment, and designing separations processes. Baseline washing of tank sludges with NaOH solutions is being proposed to reduce the volume of HLW. Alkaline pretreatment of HLW will be needed to remove aluminum [as NaAl(OH)4] because it significantly reduces the HLW volume; however, the aluminate ion [Al(OH)4 -] enhances actinide solubility via an unknown mechanism. Thus, alkaline wash residues may require an additional treatment to remove actinides. The results of this research will determine the nature TRU (U, Np, Pu, Am) speciation with aluminate anions under alkaline, oxidizing tank-like conditions. Specific issues to be addressed include solubility of these actinides, speciation in aluminate-containing alkaline supernatants, the role of actinide redox states on solubility, and partitioning between supernatant and solid phases, including colloids. Studies will include thermodynamics, kinetics, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and surface science. We have already determined, for example, that certain high valent forms of Np and Pu are very soluble under alkaline conditions due to the formation of anionic hydroxo complexes, AnO2(OH)4 2- and AnO2(OH)5 3-. The presence of aluminate ions causes the actinide solubilities to increase, although the exact species are not known. We are currently characterizing the high valent TRU elements bound to oxo, water, OH-, and Al(OH)4 -, ligands under waste-like conditions. These waste-like conditions are in the range of 1-3 M excess hydroxide, ∼0.2 M carbonate, ∼0.5 M aluminate, for a total sodium of 2-4 M. Molecular structure-specific probes

  10. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    burden of proof because with few exceptions, much less is known about their ability chemically to immobilise waste species and their long- term durability relative to Portland cement in a range of natural environments. It is concluded that the most robust of these alternative formulations are based on calcium aluminate and sulfoaluminate cements, on magnesium phosphate and on geopolymers. (author)

  11. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orosco, Pablo; Barbosa, Lucía; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl 2 –N 2 flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al 2 O 3 (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl 2 atmosphere of the MgO–Al 2 O 3 mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C

  12. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Barbosa, Lucía [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Básicas (ICB), Universidad Nacional de Cuyo Parque General San Martín, Mendoza (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl{sub 2} atmosphere of the MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C.

  13. Evaluation of the slag attack resistance of high alumina refractory free cement castable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menegazzo, A.P.M.; Pandofelli, V.C.; Rodrigues, J.A.; Carvalho, Julio C.

    1997-01-01

    The slag attack resistance is a very important property when the life time of refractory castable needs to be improved. The substitution of calcium aluminate cement by a free calcium hydraulic blinder has show a viable way to enhance the thermomechanical performance presented by these materials. At the present very few information is found regarding the slag attack of these free cement castable. In this study the slag attack resistance of high alumina castable with and without cement was evaluated by static test. The corroded region was analyzed by SEM and EDS. (author)

  14. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal; Caracterizacao de cimentos experimentais com finalidade endodontica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia, E-mail: alana.mxd@hotmail [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba (UEPB), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  15. X-ray diffractometry of steam cured ordinary Portland and blast-furnace-slag cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarini, G.; Djanikian, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies some aspects of the phases produced by hydration of ordinary and blast-furnace-slag cements, at normal conditions and steam cured (60 and 95 0 C), using an X-ray diffraction technique. The blast-furnace-slag cement was a mixture of 50% of ordinary Portland cement and 50% of blast-furnace-slag (separately grinding). After curing the X-ray diffraction reveals that, in relation to ordinary Portland cement, the main phases in blast-furnace-slag cement are hydrated silicates and aluminates, hydro garnet, etringitte and mono sulphate. After steam curing the hydration of blast-furnace-slag cement proceeds. This is a result of the slag activation by the curing temperature. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  17. Chitosan-collagen biomembrane embedded with calcium-aluminate enhances dentinogenic potential of pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gabriela SOARES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of biomaterials capable of driving dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells able to secrete reparative dentin is the goal of current conservative dentistry. In the present investigation, a biomembrane (BM composed of a chitosan/collagen matrix embedded with calcium-aluminate microparticles was tested. The BM was produced by mixing collagen gel with a chitosan solution (2:1, and then adding bioactive calcium-aluminate cement as the mineral phase. An inert material (polystyrene was used as the negative control. Human dental pulp cells were seeded onto the surface of certain materials, and the cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell proliferation and cell morphology, assessed after 1, 7, 14 and 28 days in culture. The odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, total protein production, gene expression of DMP-1/DSPP and mineralized nodule deposition. The pulp cells were able to attach onto the BM surface and spread, displaying a faster proliferative rate at initial periods than that of the control cells. The BM also acted on the cells to induce more intense ALP activity, protein production at 14 days, and higher gene expression of DSPP and DMP-1 at 28 days, leading to the deposition of about five times more mineralized matrix than the cells in the control group. Therefore, the experimental biomembrane induced the differentiation of pulp cells into odontoblast-like cells featuring a highly secretory phenotype. This innovative bioactive material can drive other protocols for dental pulp exposure treatment by inducing the regeneration of dentin tissue mediated by resident cells.

  18. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF INTERACTION REACTIONS FOR SODIUM AND ALUMINUM SULPHATES WITH COMPONENTS OF HYDRATING PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Yukhnevskiy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical additives are widely used in the technology of concrete with the purpose to solve various problems and sulphate-containing additives-electrolytes are also used as accelerators for setting and hardening of cement. Action mechanism of additive accelerators for setting and hardening of cement is rather complicated and can not be considered as well-established. An influence of sulfate-containing additives such as sodium sulfate is reduced to acceleration of cement silicate phase hydration by increasing ionic strength of the solution. In addition to it, exchange reactions of anion additive with portlandite phase (Ca(OH2 and aluminate phases of hardening cement have a significant effect on hardening process that lead to formation of readily soluble hydroxides and hardly soluble calcium salts. The influence of sulfate-containing additives on properties of water cement paste and cement stone is quite diverse and depends on salt concentration and cation type. For example, the action of the aluminum sulphate additive becomes more complicated if the additive is subjected to hydrolysis in water, which is aggravated in an alkaline medium of the water cement paste. Formation of hydrolysis products and their reaction with aluminate phases and cement portlandite lead to a significant acceleration of setting. Thus, despite the similarity of additives ensuring participation of anions in the exchange reactions, the mechanism of their influence on cement setting and hardening varies rather significantly. The present paper considers peculiar features concerning the mechanism of interaction of sodium and aluminum sulfate additives in cement compositions from the viewpoint of thermochemistry. Thermochemical equations for reactions of sulfate-containing additives with phases of hydrated cement clinker have been given in the paper. The paper contains description how to calculate thermal effects of chemical reactions and determine an influence of the formed

  19. Physiological strains of wearing aluminized and non-aluminized firefighters' protective clothing during exercise in radiant heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chinmei; Tochihara, Yutaka; Ismail, Mohamed Saat; Lee, Joo-Young

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the influences of aluminized (Type A) and non-aluminized firefighters' protective clothing (Type B, C, D and CON) on physiological and subjective responses in radiant heat. Total clothing weight was 6.24, 6.38, 6.06, 5.76 and 3.82 kg for Type A, B, C, D and CON, respectively. Eight firefighters performed exercise at an air temperature of 30°C with 50%RH. Three bouts of 10 min-bicycle exercise in radiant heat (a globe temperature of 70°C) was spaced by a 10 min rest with no radiant heat. Results showed that rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, heart rate, and body weight loss were significantly greater in Type A than in other types (pradiant heat. Therefore, it is suggested that the safe upper limits while wearing aluminized firefighters' clothing should be distinguished from those for typical firefighters' protective clothing.

  20. Study of thermocycling effect on the bond strength between an aluminous ceramic and a resin cement Estudo do efeito da ciclagem térmica na resistência da união adesiva entre uma cerâmica aluminizada e um cimento resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta Filho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on the bond strength between Procera AllCeram (Nobel-Biocare and a resin cement (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nine ceramic blocks with dimensions of 5x6x6mm were conditioned at one face with Rocatec System (Espe. After, they were luted with Panavia F to composite resin blocks (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. The nine groups formed by ceramic, cement and composite resin were split up obtaining 75 samples with dimensions of 12x1x1mm and adhesive surface presenting 1mm²±0.1mm² of area. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=25: G1 - 14 days in distilled water at 37ºC; G2 - 6,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s; G3 - 12,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s. The samples were tested in a universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. The results indicated that mean values of rupture tension (MPa of G1 (10.71 ± 3.54 did not differ statistically (p Este trabalho avaliou o efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência adesiva entre a cerâmica aluminizada (Procera AllCeram, Nobel-Biocare e um cimento resinoso (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nove blocos de cerâmica, com dimensões de 5x6x6mm, foram condicionados em uma de suas faces com o Sistema Rocatec (ESPE. A seguir foram cimentados a blocos de resina composta (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. Os conjuntos cerâmica-cimento-resina foram cortados em 75 corpos-de-prova com formato retangular com dimensões de 12x1x1mm e superfície adesiva apresentando 1mm² ± 0,1mm². Os corpos-de-prova foram divididos em três grupos (n=25: G1 - 14 dias em água destilada a 37ºC, G2 - 6000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC e G3 - 12000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC. Os corpos-de-prova foram ensaiados sob velocidade de 1mm/min em máquina de ensaio universal (EMIC. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente com os testes de Anova e Tukey e indicaram que os valores médios de tensão de rupturas (MPa de G1 (10,71 ± 3

  1. The biocompatibility of modified experimental Portland cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the biocompatibility of a group of new potential dental materials and their eluants by assessing cell viability. Calcium sulpho-aluminate cement (CSA), calcium fluoro-aluminate cement (CFA) and glass-ionomer cement (GIC; Ketac Molar), used as the control, were tested for biocompatibility. Using a direct test method cell viability was measured quantitatively using alamarBluetrade mark dye, and an indirect test method where cells were grown on material elutions and cell viability was assessed using methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay as recommended by ISO 10 993-Part 5 for in vitro testing. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance and Tukey multi-comparison test method. Elution collected from the prototype cements and the GIC cured for 1 and 7 days allowed high cell activity after 24 h cell exposure, which reduced after 48 h when compared to the nontoxic glass-ionomer control, but increased significantly after 72 h cell contact. Elutions collected after 28 days revealed reduced cell activity at all cell exposure times. Cells placed in direct contact with the prototype materials showed reduced cell activity when compared with the control. Cell growth was poor when seeded in direct contact with the prototype cements. GIC encouraged cell growth after 1 day of contact. The eluted species for all the cements tested exhibited adequate cell viability in the early ages with reduced cell activity at 28 days. Changes in the production of calcium hydroxide as a by-product of cement hydration affect the material biocompatibility adversely.

  2. Tailoring the particulate properties of aluminates prepared by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Tailoring the particulate properties of aluminates prepared by combustion method. T MIMANI and K C PATIL. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science,. Bangalore 560 012, India. Aluminium based spinels constitute an interesting class of oxide ceramics with technological applications such ...

  3. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MgO was added both as spinel (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investigations were conducted in the temperature range 1500–1600°C with 2 h soaking. Structural study of sintered pellets was carried out by extensive XRD analysis. Scanning electron mode ...

  4. On structural, optical and dielectric properties of zinc aluminate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with a normal spinel structure having all zinc cations in the tetrahedral and all aluminium cations in the octahedral ... rrite in the nano-regime show anomalous magnetic properties in that zinc ions instead of occupying ... (Roy et al 2006). Zinc aluminate can be con- sidered as the non-magnetic counterpart of zinc ferrite and.

  5. Tailoring the particulate properties of aluminates prepared by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Aluminium based spinels constitute an interesting class of oxide ceramics with technological applications such as abrasives, pigments, catalysts, phosphors etc. The nano-structured ceramics display improved properties over the bulk materials 1. Nano- crystalline aluminate spinels MAl2O4, M = Zn and Mn, have been ...

  6. Investigation of tritium release and retention in lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J.P.; Tistchenko, S.; Botter, F.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium release from lithium aluminate, although previously investigated by both in-reactor and ex-reactor experiments, remains poorly understood. Agreement between experiments is lacking, and the mechanisms responsible for tritium release from lithium aluminate are under debate. In an effort to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of tritium release from lithium ceramics, we have investigated tritium release from pure lithium aluminate and lithium aluminate doped with impurities. The results of these experiments on large grain size material indicate that after anneals at low temperature, a large fraction of the tritium present before the anneal remains in the sample. We have modeled this behavior based on first-order release from three types of sites. At the lowest temperature, the release is dominated by one site, while the tritium in the other sites is retained in the solid. Adding magnesium dopant to the ceramic appears to alter the distribution of tritium between the sites. This addition decreases the fraction of tritium released at 777 degree C, while increasing the fractions released at 538 and 950 degree C. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. On structural, optical and dielectric properties of zinc aluminate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Zinc aluminate nanoparticles with average particle size of 40 nm were synthesized using a sol–gel com- bustion method. X-ray diffractometry result was analysed by Rietveld refinement method to establish the phase purity of the material. Different stages of phase formation of the material during the synthesis were ...

  8. Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in masonry cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1987-03-01

    Portland cements are widely used as solidification agents for low-level radioactive wastes. However, it is known that boric acid wastes, as generated at pressurized water reactors (PWR's) are difficult to solidify using ordinary portland cements. Waste containing as little as 5 wt % boric acid inhibits the curing of the cement. For this purpose, the suitability of masonry cement was investigated. Masonry cement, in the US consists of 50 wt % slaked lime (CaOH 2 ) and 50 wt % of portland type I cement. Addition of boric acid in molar concentrations equal to or less than the molar concentration of the alkali in the cement eliminates any inhibiting effects. Accordingly, 15 wt % boric acid can be satisfactorily incorporated into masonry cement. The suitability of masonry cement for the solidification of sodium sulfate wastes produced at boiling water reactors (BWR's) was also investigated. It was observed that although sodium sulfate - masonry cement waste forms containing as much as 40 wt % Na 2 SO 4 can be prepared, waste forms with more than 7 wt % sodium sulfate undergo catastrophic failure when exposed to an aqueous environment. It was determined by x-ray diffraction that in the presence of water, the sulfate reacts with hydrated calcium aluminate to form calcium aluminum sulfate hydrate (ettringite). This reaction involves a volume increase resulting in failure of the waste form. Formulation data were identified to maximize volumetric efficiency for the solidification of boric acid and sodium sulfate wastes. Measurement of some of the waste form properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment included leachability, compression strengths and chemical interactions between the waste components and masonry cement. 15 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Natural cement and stone restoration of Bourges Cathedral (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gosselin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural cement, also called "Roman cement", was invented at the end of the 18th Century and played an important role in the development of civil engineering works until the 1860s. More surprisingly, it was also used to restore historic buildings, such as gothic cathedrals. This paper deals with the mineralogy and the durability of natural cement, in the particular case of the Bourges Cathedral in France. This study illustrates the interest of this material particularly adapted in stone repair or substitution. Contrary to traditional mortars, the present samples are made of neat cement paste, revealed by the absence of mineral additions as quartz or carbonate sand. Several combined techniques (SEM-EDS, TGA, XRD were carried out to determine the composition of the hydraulic binder rich in calcium aluminate hydrates. The raw marl at the origin of the cement production contains oxidized pyrites which consist in a potential source of sulphate pollution of the surrounding limestone. The exposition of the cement in urban environment leads to some weathering features as atmospheric sulphation. Finally a petrophysical approach, based on water porosity, capillary sorption and compressive strength, has been performed to demonstrate the durability and the compatibility of roman cement applied as a restoration mortar of historical building.

  10. SYNTHESIS OF EXPANDER TO PREVENT CONTRACTION OF CEMENT STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenova Aurika Almazovna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the results of studies of the use of additives containing crystallization components significantly affecting the curing of cement, improving the structure of cement stone and concrete. The crystalline component is obtained using the rotary-pulse unit, which provides not only the grinding of agents, but their interaction with each other as well in order to accelerate the hydration and structure formation in cement stone. The degree, and kinetics of hydration, the composition of hydrated phases, the structure of the additives and cement stone was studied using the following methods: x-ray diffraction (XRD, differential thermal analysis (DTA, scanning electron microscope (SEM. Mechanical properties of cement were determined by standard methods and techniques. The expander produced by means of hydrodynamic activation of the sulfoaluminate clinker (SAC consists of ettringite and hydrated calcium silicates, which are characterized by high dispersion rate (less than 10 µm and reactivity as the seed for the crystallization of hydrated compounds. The introduction of the ultrafine additives of the crystalline SAC (within 1-5% was discovered to cause expansion of the cement stone. Implementation of the additives increases cement hydration and contributes to the formation of active centers of crystallization that lead to the fast formation of ettringite, hydrated calcium aluminates and calcium silicates. The activated crystalline additive provides for significant reduction of porosity, initial curing, and high strength of cement stone. In addition, the additive is an expansive component, forming needle-like crystals of ettringite during hydration. These microcrystals grow in the capillaries of cement stone, filling them, and create conditions for improving the crack resistance of cement concrete.

  11. Effect of conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of phosphate monomer-based cement on zirconia ceramic in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Balducci, Ivan; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the durability of bond strength between a resin cement and aluminous ceramic submitted to various surface conditioning methods. Twenty-four blocks (5 X 5 X 4 mm 3) of a glass-in filtrated zirconia-alumina ceramic (inCeram Zirconia Classic) were randomly

  12. Characterization of films formed by the aluminizing of T91 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria Cala, J. A.; Conde Rodríguez, G. R.; Y Peña Ballesteros, D.; Laverde Cataño, D.; Quintero Rangel, L. S.

    2017-12-01

    The aluminizing of a T91 martensitic ferritic steel was carried out by a novel modification to the traditional technique of packed cementation, with the objective of producing a diffusion coating of aluminum in a shorter time and operating cost, from a technique that allows the reuse of powder packaging and which the coating of metal parts with complex shapes can be secured. As an aluminum source, commercial foil is used to wrap the piece to be coated, while the powder packaging contains aluminum oxide Al2O3 and an activating salt, ammonium chloride NH4Cl. During the deposition process of the coating, the NH4Cl is decomposed by reacting with foil, and thus, aluminum halides can be transferred to the metallic substrate, which deposit aluminum on the T91 steel surface while Al2O3 can be recycled for subsequent processes. The results of the diffractograms and micrographs indicated the strong influence of temperature, exposure time and ammonium chloride concentration in the formation and growth evolution of a stable coating of iron-aluminum and iron-aluminum-nickel on the T91 steel surface, which was effectively deposited at a temperature of 700°C and an exposure period of 9 hours. The coating formed on the T91 steel surface could play a protective role towards the material by acting as a physical barrier between the alloy and other corrosive species in high temperature operated systems.

  13. Determination of performance of non-ideal aluminized explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Mofrad, Reza Teimuri; Poor, Karim Esmail; Shokrollahi, Arash; Zali, Abbas; Yousefi, Mohammad Hassan

    2006-09-01

    Non-ideal explosives can have Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation pressure significantly different from those expected from existing thermodynamic computer codes, which usually allows finding the parameters of ideal detonation of individual high explosives with good accuracy. A simple method is introduced by which detonation pressure of non-ideal aluminized explosives with general formula C(a)H(b)N(c)O(d)Al(e) can be predicted only from a, b, c, d and e at any loading density without using any assumed detonation products and experimental data. Calculated detonation pressures show good agreement with experimental values with respect to computed results obtained by complicated computer code. It is shown here how loading density and atomic composition can be integrated into an empirical formula for predicting detonation pressure of proposed aluminized explosives.

  14. Phase transformations in lithium aluminates irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, L.M.; Delfin L, A.; Urena N, F.; Basurto, R.; Bosch, P.

    2003-01-01

    The lithium aluminate like candidate to be used in the coverings producers of tritium in the fusion nuclear reactors, presents high resistance to the corrosion to the one to be stuck to structural materials as special steels. However, the crystallographic changes that take place in the cover that is continually subjected to irradiation with neutrons, can alter its resistance to the corrosion. In this work the changes of crystalline structure are shown that they present two types of nano structures of lithium aluminates, subjected to an average total dose 7.81 x 10 8 Gy in the fixed irradiation system of capsules of the one TRIGA Mark lll nuclear reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The studied nano structures presented only phase transformations without formation of amorphous material. (Author)

  15. Age and geochemistry of Alumine's Ignimbrites, Neuquen province, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagorio, Silvia; Massaferro, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    Geochemical and geochronological data from Alumine riolitic welded tuffs are analysed. Minor elements show enrichment in Rb, Th and K and depletion in Nb, Ti, P and Sr. La/Yb ratios are low. The geochemical features are consistent with a volcanic arc genesis. The radiometric data obtained by K/Ar method point out a Paleocene age for these rocks, allowing to correlate them with the Ventana Formation or the equivalent Auca Pan Formation. (author)

  16. Titanium-Aluminum Oxide Coating on Aluminized Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Fuyan Sun; Guang Wang; Xueyuan Nie

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was used to form titanium-aluminum oxide coating on aluminized steel. The present work was mainly to study the effects of treatment time of PEO process on properties of the titanium coating. A potentiodynamic polarization corrosion test was employed to investigate the corrosion resistance of the coating. The friction coefficient and wear resistance of the coating were studied by using pin-on-disc test. The thermal transfer behaviors...

  17. Tritium extraction from neutron-irradiated lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, F.

    1995-01-01

    Lithium aluminate is being strongly considered as a breeder material because of its thermophysical, chemical and mechanical stability at high temperatures and its favorable irradiation behavior. Furthermore, it is compatible with other blanket and structural materials. In this work, the effects of calcination temperature during preparation, extraction temperature and sweep gas composition were observed. Lithium aluminate prepared by four different methods, was neutron irradiated for 30 minutes at a flux of 10 12 -10 13 n/cm 2 s in the TRIGA Mark III reactor at Salazar, Mexico; and the tritium extraction rate was measured. Calcination temperature do not affect the tritium extraction rate. However, using high calcination temperature, gamma lithium aluminate was formed. The tritium extraction at 600 Centigrade degrees was lower than at 800 Centigrade degrees and the tritium amount extracted by distillation of the solid sample was higher. The sweep gas composition showed that tritium extraction was less with Ar plus 0.5 % H 2 that with Ar plus 0.1 % H 2 . This result was contrary to expected, where the tritium extraction rate could be higher when hydrogen is added to the sweep gas. Probably this effect could be attributed to the gas purity. (Author)

  18. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  19. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark-Deaborg, David

    2001-01-01

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste tanks contain a number of transuranic species, in particular U, Np, Pu, and Am--the exact forms of which are currently unknown. Knowledge of actinide speciation under highly alkaline conditions is essential towards understanding and predicting their solubility and sorption behavior in tanks, determining whether chemical separations are needed for waste treatment, and designing separations processes. Baseline washing of tank sludges with NaOH solutions is being proposed to reduce the volume of HLW. Alkaline pretreatment of HLW will be needed to remove aluminum [as NaAl(OH) 4 ] because it significantly reduces the HLW volume; however, aluminate [Al(OH) 4 - ] enhances actinide solubility via an unknown mechanism. Thus, alkaline wash residues may require an additional treatment to remove actinides. The results of this research will determine the nature TRU (Np, Pu, Am) speciation with aluminate anions under alkaline, oxidizing tank-like conditions. Specific issues to be addressed include solubility of these actinides, speciation in aluminate-containing alkaline supernatants, the role of actinide redox states on solubility, and partitioning between supernatant and solid phases, including colloids. Studies will include thermodynamics, kinetics, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, etc. It is already known, for example, that certain high valent forms of NF and Pu are very soluble under alkaline conditions due to the formation of anionic hydroxo complexes, AnO 2 (OH) 4 2- and AnO 2 (OH) 5 3- . The presence of aluminate ions causes the actinide solubilities to increase, although the exact species have only been determined during this program. We are continuing to characterize high-valent TRU elements bound to oxo, water, OH - , under waste-like and sludge washing conditions. These conditions are in the range of 1-3 M excess hydroxide, ∼0.2 M carbonate, ∼0.5 M aluminate, for a total sodium of 2-4 mols/kg. Molecular structure-specific probes

  20. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  1. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  2. Study of damages by neutron irradiation in lithium aluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios G, O.

    1999-01-01

    Lithium aluminates proposed to the production of tritium in fusion nuclear reactors, due to the thermal stability that they present as well as the behavior of the aluminium to the irradiation. As a neutron flux with profile (≅ 14 Mev) of a fusion reactor is not available. A irradiation experiment was designed in order to know the micro and nano structure damages produced by fast and thermal neutrons in two irradiation positions of the fusion nuclear reactor Triga Mark III: CT (Thermal Column) and SIFCA (System of Irradiation Fixed of Capsules). In this work samples of lithium aluminate were characterized by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Two samples were prepared by two methods: a) coalition method and b) peroxide method. This characterization comprised original and irradiated samples. The irradiated sample amounted to 4 in total: one for each preparation method and one for each irradiation position. The object of this analysis was to correlate with the received neutron dose the damages suffered by the samples with the neutron irradiation during long periods (440 H), in their micro and nano structure aspects; in order to understand the changes as a function of the irradiation zone (with thermal and fast neutron flux) and the preparation methods of the samples and having as an antecedent the irradiation in SIFCA position by short times (2h). The obtained results are referred to the stability of γ -aluminate phase, under given conditions of irradiation and defined nano structure arrangement. They also refer to the proposals of growth mechanism and nucleation of new phases. The error associated with the measurement of neutron dose is also discussed. (Author)

  3. Aluminized film, seam sealing tests and observations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-16

    The purpose of this work was to investigate various seam sealing techniques, reinforcing methods, fitting installations, seam tolerances and geometric configurations pertinent to an aluminized plastic laminate. The program seeks a successful fabricating method for producing low-diffusion, cylindrical, spar liners to contain pressurized GH{sub 2} and GO{sub 2}. The test plan included: (1) seaming techniques on metallized Mylar film; (2) ``double patches`` for end fittings; (3) stainless steel bulkhead fitting assembly with seals; (4) minimum run tolerance on linear shear seam; (5) peel seam vs. inverted seal seam fabrication.

  4. System and process for aluminization of metal-containing substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2017-12-12

    A system and method are detailed for aluminizing surfaces of metallic substrates, parts, and components with a protective alumina layer in-situ. Aluminum (Al) foil sandwiched between the metallic components and a refractory material when heated in an oxidizing gas under a compression load at a selected temperature forms the protective alumina coating on the surface of the metallic components. The alumina coating minimizes evaporation of volatile metals from the metallic substrates, parts, and components in assembled devices that can degrade performance during operation at high temperature.

  5. Thermal Properties of Double-Aluminized Kapton at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, J.; DiPirro, M.; Canavan, E.; Hait, T.

    2007-01-01

    Double-aluminized kapton (DAK) is commonly used in multi-layer insulation blankets in cryogenic systems. NASA plans to use individual DAK sheets in lightweight deployable shields for satellites carrying instruments. A set of these shields will reflect away thermal radiation from the sun, the earth, and the instrument's warm side and allow the instrument's cold side to radiate its own heat to deep space. In order to optimally design such a shield system, it is important to understand the thermal characteristics of DAK down to low temperatures. We describe experiments which measured the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity down to 4 Kelvin and the emissivity down to 10 Kelvin.

  6. Impact of admixtures on the hydration kinetics of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, J.; Jeknavorian, A.; Roberts, L.; Silva, D.

    2011-01-01

    Most concrete produced today includes either chemical additions to the cement, chemical admixtures in the concrete, or both. These chemicals alter a number of properties of cementitious systems, including hydration behavior, and it has been long understood by practitioners that these systems can differ widely in response to such chemicals. In this paper the impact on hydration of several classes of chemicals is reviewed with an emphasis on the current understanding of interactions with cement chemistry. These include setting retarders, accelerators, and water reducing dispersants. The ability of the chemicals to alter the aluminate-sulfate balance of cementitious systems is discussed with a focus on the impact on silicate hydration. As a key example of this complex interaction, unusual behavior sometimes observed in systems containing high calcium fly ash is highlighted.

  7. Radiological impact of cement, concrete and admixtures in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinchon-Paya, S.; Piedecausa, B.; Hurtado, S.; Sanjuan, M.A.; Chinchon, S.

    2011-01-01

    It has been analyzed samples of portland cement (PC) with and without admixtures, samples of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) with different content of Al 2 O 3 and specimens of concrete made with PC and CAC using High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry. The activity concentration index (I) is much less than 0.5 mSv y -1 for all the concrete specimens according to the Radiation protection document 112 of the European Commission. The PC without admixtures (CEM I 52,5 R) and the PC with addition of limestone (CEM II/BL 32,5 N) also have an I value much lower than 0.5 and the PC with the addition of fly ash and blast furnace slag (CEM IV/B (V) 32,5 N and III/A 42.5 N/SR) have an I value close to 0.6. The I value of the CAC used in the manufacture of structural precast concrete is of the order of 1 mSv y -1 . Some of the CAC used in refractory concrete reaches a value close to 2 mSv y -1 . - Highlights: → The activity values (I) of spanish portland cement and admixtures studied are similar to those described by other authors. → For the first time in scientific publications we have shown results of several calcium aluminate cements (CAC). → CAC used in structural concrete has an approximate I value = 1 (similar to blast furnace slag and fly ash). → One type of CAC with Al 2 O 3 content of 51% used in refractory concretes has a value of I = 2.

  8. THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-09-21

    The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

  9. Systemic effect of mineral aggregate-based cements: histopathological analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas da Fonseca Roberti Garcia

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Several studies reported the local tissue reaction caused by mineral aggregate-based cements. However, few studies have investigated the systemic effects promoted by these cements on liver and kidney when directly applied to connective tissue. The purpose of this in vivo study was to investigate the systemic effect of mineral aggregate-based cements on the livers and kidneys of rats. Material and Methods: Samples of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and a calcium aluminate-based cement (EndoBinder containing different radiopacifiers were implanted into the dorsum of 40 rats. After 7 and 30 d, samples of subcutaneous, liver and kidney tissues were submitted to histopathological analysis. A score (0-3 was used to grade the inflammatory reaction. Blood samples were collected to evaluate changes in hepatic and renal functions of animals. Results: The moderate inflammatory reaction (2 observed for 7 d in the subcutaneous tissue decreased with time for all cements. The thickness of inflammatory capsules also presented a significant decrease with time (P<.05. Systemically, all cements caused adverse inflammatory reactions in the liver and kidney, being more evident for MTA, persisting until the end of the analysis. Liver functions increased significantly for MTA during 30 d (P<.05. Conclusion: The different cements induced to a locally limited inflammatory reaction. However, from the systemic point of view, the cements promoted significant inflammatory reactions in the liver and kidney. For MTA, the reactions were more accentuated.

  10. Aluminous Minerals for Caustic Processing of Scheelite Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Li, Zhao; Li, Xuewei; Qu, Jun; Zhang, Qiwu

    2017-06-01

    Dry milling of the mixture of scheelite concentrate and solid NaOH is conducted to develop a caustic process for tungsten (W) extraction. Aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) is further added to the milling to control the calcium dissolution of one reaction product, calcium hydroxide, in the next aqueous extraction of soluble tungstate to form an insoluble substance. For practical application, several aluminous minerals of kaolin, gibbsite, and diaspore with different alumina concentrations and water percentages are used to replace the pure chemical Al(OH)3, and the feasibility of using these minerals as calcium immobilization additives is confirmed to give rise to the formation of Na2WO4 and water-insoluble katoite (Ca3Al2(SiO4)3- x (OH)4 x ) in the form of powders. Tungsten recovery is found to depend on the compositions of the used mineral, and the conditions for improving W recovery are studied with respect to the compositions of aluminum hydroxide and water inside the minerals. The developed process allows the caustic extraction of W by applying the nearby available aluminous minerals.

  11. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  12. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutfy, R.O.; Keller, R.; Yao, N.P.

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (A1S) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  13. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  14. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  15. Cements research progress. 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This book reviews a survey of the literature on the science of cements published during 1988. The book focuses on an aspect of cement utilization of increasing importance, the immobilization of nuclear wastes

  16. [Study on the Influence of Mineralizer on the Preparation of Calcium Aluminates Based on Infrared Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Wang, Liang; Zheng, Huai-li; Chen, Wei; Tang, Xiao-min; Shang, Juan-fang; Qian, Li

    2015-05-01

    In this study, effect of mineralizer on the structure and spectraproperties of calcium aluminates formation was extensively studied. Medium or low-grade bauxite and calcium carbonate were used as raw material and mineralizer CaF2 as additive. Calcium aluminates can be obtained after mixing fully, calcination and grinding. The prepared calcium aluminates can be directly used for the production of polyaluminiumchloride (PAC), polymeric aluminum sulfate, sodium aluminate and some other water treatment agents. The calcium aluminates preparation technology was optimized by investigating the mass ratio of raw materials (bauxiteand calcium carbonate) and mineralizer CaF2 dosage. The structure and spectra properties of bauxite and calcium aluminates were characterized by Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy analysis and the mineralization mechanism of the mineralizer was studied. FTIR spectra indicated that the addition of mineralizer promoted the decomposition and transformation of the diaspore, gibbsite and kaolinite, the decomposition of calcium carbonate, and more adequately reaction between bauxite and calcium carbonate. In addition, not only Ca in calcium carbonate and Si in bauxite were more readily reacted, but also Si-O, Si-O-Al and Al-Si bonds in the bauxite were more fractured which contributed to the release of Al in bauxite, and therefore, the dissolution rate of Al2O3 could be improved. The dissolution rate of Al2O3 can be promoted effectively when the mineralizer CaF2 was added in a mass ratio amount of 3%. And the mineralizer CaF2 cannot be fully functioned, when its dosage was in a mass percent of 1. 5%. Low-grade bauxite was easier to sinter for the preparation of calcium aluminates comparing with the highgrade one. The optimum material ratio for the preparation of calcium aluminates calcium at 1 250 °C was the mass ratio between bauxite and calcium carbonate of 1 : 0. 6 and mineralizer CaF2 mass ratio percent of 3%.

  17. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  18. Calcium aluminates potential for endodontics and orthopedics applications; Aluminatos de calcio e seu potencial para aplicacao em endodontia e ortopedia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.L. dos; Andrade, T.L.; Oliveira, I.R., E-mail: ivonero@univap.br [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pandolfelli, V.C. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The mostly used material in the areas of endodontics (MTA, mineral trioxide aggregate) and bone reconstruction (PMMA, polymethyl methacrylate) present some limiting properties requiring thus changes in their compositions as well as the development of alternative materials. In this context, a novel biomaterial-based calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied in order to keep the positive properties and clinical applications of MTA and PMMA, overcoming some their disadvantages. Recent studies involving the use of CAC are based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by searching the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance in applications in the areas of health. By the optimization of the CAC phases production, this article aims to present their characterization based on hydration temperature; working time and setting time; pH, ions solubilization and dissolution in contact with water and different solutions of simulated body fluid. The results indicated the CA phase as the most suitable for application in the areas of health. (author)

  19. The Effect of Nano-Aluminumpowder on the Characteristic of RDX based Aluminized Explosives Underwater Close-Filed Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junting Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of nano-aluminum powder on the characteristic of RDX based aluminized explosives underwater closed-filed explosions, the scanning photographs along the radial of the charges were gained by a high speed scanning camera. The photographs of two different aluminized explosives underwater explosion have been analyzed, the shock wave curves and expand curves of detonation products were obtained, furthermore the change rules of shock waves propagation velocity, shock front pressure and expansion of detonation products of two aluminized explosives were investigated, and also the parameters of two aluminized explosives were contrasted. The results show that the aluminized explosive which with nano-aluminum whose initial shock waves pressure propagation velocity, shock front pressure are smaller than the aluminized explosive without nano-aluminum and has lower decrease rate attenuation of energy.

  20. CHH Cement Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwirzen, A.; Habermehl-Cwirzen, K.; Nasibulina, L. I.; Shandakov, S. D.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Mudimela, P. R.; Penttala, V.

    The compressive strength and electrical resistivity for hardened pastes produced from nanomodified Portland SR cement (CHH- Carbon Hedge Hog cement) were studied. The nanomodification included growing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the cement particles. Pastes having water to binder ratio of 0.5 were produced. The obtained hardened material was characterized by increased compressive strength in comparison with the reference specimens made from pristine SR cement, which was attributed to reinforcing action of the CNTs and CNFs. The electrical resistivity of CHH composite was lower by one order of magnitude in comparison with reference Portland cement paste.

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  2. Mineralogenic characteristics of osteogenic lineage-committed human dental pulp stem cells following their exposure to a discoloration-free calcium aluminosilicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Na; Pei, Dan-Dan; Morris, Matthew; Jiao, Kai; Huang, Xue-Qing; Primus, Carolyn M; Susin, Lisiane F; Bergeron, Brian E; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2016-10-01

    An experimental discoloration-free calcium aluminosilicate cement has been developed with the intention of maximizing the beneficial attributes of tricalcium silicate cements and calcium aluminate cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the mineralogenic characteristics of osteogenic lineage-committed human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), by comparing the cellular responses with a commercially available tricalcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot(®) MTA); WMTA). The osteogenic potential of hDPSCs exposed to the cements was examined using qRT-PCR for osteogenic gene expressions, Western blot for osteogenic-related protein expressions, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity, Alizarin red S staining, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy of extracellular calcium deposits. Results of the six assays indicated that osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs was significantly enhanced after exposure to the tricalcium silicate cement or the experimental calcium aluminosilicate cement, with the former demonstrating better mineralogenic stimulation capacity. The better osteogenic stimulating effect of the tricalcium silicate cement on hDPSCs may be due to its relatively higher silicate content, or higher OH(-) and Ca(2+) release. Further investigations with the use of in vivo animal models are required to validate the potential augmenting osteogenic effects of the experimental discoloration-free calcium aluminosilicate cement. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    performance of three locally manufactured cement samples and imported class G cement sample for oil and gas well ... cement. 2 Materials and Methods. 2.1 Materials. Three brands of cement available on the Ghanaian market and commonly used by Ghanaians for construction ..... Cement Slurry using Factorial Design”,.

  4. Mise en valeur de l'andalousite dans des betons a haute teneur en alumine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebouillat, Lionel

    alumina with silicon carbide, with and without calcium aluminate cement. For a weight amount of 0% or 4% of ultrafine andalusite, with a 25wt% of coarse andalusite grains base, the theoretical mullitization potential is very nearly reached. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Ignition threshold of aluminized HMX-based PBXs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher; Zhou, Min

    2017-06-01

    We report the results of micromechanical simulations of the ignition of aluminized HMX-based PBX under loading due to impact by thin flyers. The conditions analyzed concern loading pulses on the order of 20 nanoseconds to 0.8 microseconds in duration and impact piston velocities on the order of 300-1000 ms-1. The samples consist of a stochastically similar bimodal distribution of HMX grains, an Estane binder, and 50 μm aluminum particles. The computational model accounts for constituent elasto-vicoplasticity, viscoelasticity, bulk compressibility, fracture, interfacial debonding, fracture, internal contact, bulk and frictional heating, and heat conduction. The analysis focuses on the development of hotspots under different material settings and loading conditions. In particular, the ignition threshold in the form of the James relation and the corresponding ignition probability are calculated for the PBXs containing 0%, 6%, 10%, and 18% aluminum by volume. It is found that the addition of aluminum increases the ignition threshold, causing the materials to be less sensitive. Dissipation and heating mechanism changes responsible for this trend are delineated. Support by DOE NNSA SSGF is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Luminescent characteristics of praseodymium-doped zinc aluminate powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Perez, C.D.; Garcia-Hipolito, M.; Alvarez-Fregoso, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan, DF (Mexico); Alvarez-Perez, M.A. [Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan, DF (Mexico); Ramos-Brito, F. [Laboratorio de Materiales Optoelectronicos, DIDe, Centro de Ciencias de Sinaloa, Av. De las Americas No. 2771 Nte. Col. Villa Universidad, Culiacan, Sinaloa (Mexico); Falcony, C. [Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    In this research, we report the cathodoluminescence (CL) and preliminary photoluminescence (PL) properties of praseodymium-doped zinc aluminate powders. ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Pr powders were synthesized by a very simple chemical process. X-ray diffraction spectra indicated a cubic spinel crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 15 nm. CL properties of the powders were studied as a function of the praseodymium concentration and electron-accelerating potential. In this case, all the cathodoluminescent emission spectra showed main peaks located at 494, 535, 611, 646, and 733 nm, which were associated to the electronic transitions {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 4}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 5}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 6}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}F{sub 2}, and {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}F{sub 4} of the Pr{sup 3+} ions, respectively. A quenching of the CL, with increasing doping concentration, was observed. Also, an increment on cathodoluminescent emission intensity was observed as the accelerating voltage increased. The PL emission spectrum showed similar characteristics to those of the CL spectra. The chemical composition of the powders, as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy, is also reported. In addition, the surface morphology characteristics of the powders are shown. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Synthesis and optical property of zinc aluminate spinel cryogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifen Su

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc aluminate spinel cryogels with various molar ratio of Al/Zn are synthesized by sol–gel technology followed by vacuum freeze drying. The structures and optical properties are both found to be affected by the molar ratios of Al/Zn and annealed temperatures. The peaks of zinc oxide (ZnO and zinc dialuminum oxide (ZnAl2O4 are both obtained for the samples with more Zn content annealed at 750 °C or upward. The composites have a large surface area (137 m2/g with mesoporous structure after annealing at 750 °C. The SEM images reveal that the ZnAl2O4 crystals formed a multilayer structure with redundant ZnO particles which deposited on it. Furthermore, the maximum infrared reflectance is about 80% with an improvement of 35% in the infrared region after annealing at 950 °C compared with that of 450 °C, which indicates that these porous cryogels have a potential application as thermal insulating materials at a high temperature.

  8. Development of a Blue Emitting Calcium-Aluminate Phosphor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doory Kim

    Full Text Available We report methodological advances that enhance the phosphorescence efficiency of a blue-emitting calcium aluminate phosphor (CaAl2O4: Eu2+, Nd3+. The investigation of long-persistence blue-emitting phosphors is highly desirable due to their promising applications, such as white LEDs; however, the development of highly efficient blue-emitting phosphors is still challenging. Here, we have quantitatively characterized the phosphorescence properties of the blue-emitting phosphor CaAl2O4:Eu2+, Nd3+ with various compositions and directly related these properties to the quality of its luminescence. We optimized the composition of the activator Eu2+ and the co-activator Nd3+, the doping conditions with alkaline earth metals, alkali metals, and Si to create crystallographic distortions and, finally, the flux conditions to find the best parameters for bright and persistent blue-emitting phosphors. Our research has identified several doping compositions with good to excellent performance, with which we have demonstrated bright and persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors.

  9. Synchrotron Radiation Pair Distribution Function Analysis of Gels in Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cuesta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of atomic ordering in a nanocrystalline phase with small particle sizes, below 5 nm, is intrinsically complicated because of the lack of long-range order. Furthermore, the presence of additional crystalline phase(s may exacerbate the problem, as is the case in cement pastes. Here, we use the synchrotron pair distribution function (PDF chiefly to characterize the local atomic order of the nanocrystalline phases, gels, in cement pastes. We have used a multi r-range analysis approach, where the ~4–7 nm r-range allows determining the crystalline phase contents; the ~1–2.5 nm r-range is used to characterize the atomic ordering in the nanocrystalline component; and the ~0.2–1.0 nm r-range gives insights about additional amorphous components. Specifically, we have prepared four alite pastes with variable water contents, and the analyses showed that a defective tobermorite, Ca11Si9O28(OH2.8.5H2O, gave the best fit. Furthermore, the PDF analyses suggest that the calcium silicate hydrate gel is composed of this tobermorite and amorphous calcium hydroxide. Finally, this approach has been used to study alternative cements. The hydration of monocalcium aluminate and ye’elimite pastes yield aluminum hydroxide gels. PDF analyses show that these gels are constituted of nanocrystalline gibbsite, and the particle size can be as small as 2.5 nm.

  10. Manufacture Of Pozzolanic Cement From RFCC Spent Catalyst In Khartoum Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam E Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pozzolana is defined as Siliceous and aluminous material which reacts with calcium hydroxide in presence of water at room temperature to form strong slow-hardening cement. Pozzolana has the advantage of reduction of leachibility of calcium hydroxide liberated during the setting and hydration of cement. In Khartoum Refinery five to ten tons per week of spent catalyst are produced in fine powder this quantity is sent to dumping sites or landfills. In this study pilot experiments were successfully carried out at different ratios to produce cement. The RFCC spent catalyst samples were subjected to chemical analysis to determine the content of Al2O3 SiO3TiO3 CaO and V2O5 ..etc. These were found to be 49.5 41.1 0.32 1.4 and 0.09 percent respectively other compounds are Na2O MgO P2O5SO3 K2O MnOFe2O3Co3O4 and NiO2 with. It is found that the percentages of SiO2 Al2O3 and Fe2O3 amount up to 91.5 that is above the ASTM standard C6182003 which stipulated that the minimum of such compound is 70 . Physical properties of RFCC spent catalyst were also carried out including crystallinity and Pozzolanicity index. The cement produced was tested for compressive strength consistency and setting time .It is concluded that RFCC spent catalyst in Khartoum Refinery is a Pozzolanic material and up to 30 replacement from Portland cement blended cement complies with the Sudanese and European Standards No SSMO 39982011and EN-197-11992 respectively. The study shows that the compressive strength of blended Pozzolanic cements decreases with increasing Pozzolana content. From the foregoing it is recommended to use RFCC spent catalyst with Portland cement as blended cement to produce mortars for construction and concrete.

  11. Cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, M., E-mail: mathieu.antoni@epfl.ch [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rossen, J. [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Martirena, F. [CIDEM-UCLV, Universidad Las Villas, Santa Clara (Cuba); Scrivener, K. [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    This study investigates the coupled substitution of metakaolin and limestone in Portland cement (PC). The mechanical properties were studied in mortars and the microstructural development in pastes by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and isothermal calorimetry. We show that 45% of substitution by 30% of metakaolin and 15% of limestone gives better mechanical properties at 7 and 28 days than the 100% PC reference. Our results show that calcium carbonate reacts with alumina from the metakaolin, forming supplementary AFm phases and stabilizing ettringite. Using simple mass balance calculations derived from thermogravimetry results, we also present the thermodynamic simulation for the system, which agrees fairly well with the experimental observations. It is shown that gypsum addition should be carefully balanced when using calcined clays because it considerably influences the early age strength by controlling the very rapid reaction of aluminates.

  12. Study of the chemical species of fluorine 18 produced by neutron irradiation of lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Becerril, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the present work, the chemical form of fluorine-18 obtained by means of the neutron irradiated lithium aluminate was studied, in order to know its chemical behavior and to observe if it volatilizes and adheres to the walls of a tritium distillation system; for this matter paper chromatography and high voltage electrophoresis techniques were used. Lithium aluminate was synthetized, being characterized as LiAlO 2 which was irradiated with neutrons in order to produce fluorine-18. Lithium aluminate is a non-soluble solid, therefore fluorine produced may not be extracted, unless it is dissolved or extracted through the solid. So as not affect in a drastic way the chemical form, it was submitted to extraction processes, agitating the irradiated samples with different acids and basic solutions in order to analyze fluorine-18. The best extraction agent was found to be HCl, where two forms of fluorine-18 were found, one at the point of application, probably as a complex hexafluoride-aluminate and the other as a characteristic Rf of the fluorine ion. In the tritium distillation with helium as a carrier of a sample irradiated and heated up to 220-250 o C, no volatile types of fluorine-18 were found, thus it can be considered that in commercial production of tritium by means of neutron irradiation of lithium aluminate, fluorine-18 is not a damaging pollutant of the equipment pipe system. (Author)

  13. Retention of crowns cemented on implant abutments with temporary cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yuko; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This study was to examine the retentive force of crowns to implant abutments with commercial temporary cements. Six different temporary cements were investigated. Cast crowns were cemented to the abutments using each cement and their retentive forces to abutments were determined 7 or 28 days after cementing (n=10). The retentive force of the cements to abutments varied widely among the products [27-109 N (7-day), 18-80 N (28-days)]. The retentive force of all the cements was not reduced as the time elapsed, except for two products tested. The polycarboxylate cements and paste-mixing type eugenol-free cements revealed comparable retentive force after 28 days of storage. The powder-liquid type cements showed a positive correlation (pcement between the retentive force and compressive strength. Mechanical strength of temporary cements could not be a prominent predicting factor for retention of the crowns on the abutments.

  14. The Zintl-Klemm concept applied to cations in oxides. I. The structures of ternary aluminates

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaría Pérez, David; Vegas, Ángel

    2003-01-01

    The structures of 94 ternary aluminates are reinterpreted on the basis of the Zintl-Klemm concept and Pearson's generalized octet rule. In aluminates of highly electropositive metals such as alkali, alkaline-earth and rare-earth metals, the Al atoms form three-dimensional skeleta which can be interpreted as if the Al atoms were behaving as Zintl polyanions, adopting the structure of either main-group elements or Zintl polyanions showing the same connectivity. The O atoms are then located clos...

  15. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    are available all over the world. The cement is affected by excessive exposure to moisture, particularly at high temperatures. Use of various additives has been suggested to enhance the durability of this cement. (Bludnov et al 1974; Paul 1975; Mingfen and Wei 1989;. Misra and Mathur 1993; Chandrawat and Yadav 2000).

  16. Advanced cementation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  17. A review of binders used in cemented paste tailings for underground and surface disposal practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Amjad; Yanful, Ernest K

    2013-12-15

    Increased public awareness of environmental issues coupled with increasingly stringent environmental regulations pertaining to the disposal of sulphidic mine waste necessitates the mining industry to adopt more competent and efficient approaches to manage acid rock drainage. Cemented paste tailings (CPT) is an innovative form of amalgamated material currently available to the mining industry in developed countries. It is made usually from mill tailings mingled with a small amount of binder (customarily Portland cement) and water. The high cost associated with production and haulage of ordinary Portland cement and its alleged average performance as a sole binder in the long term (due to vulnerability to internal sulphate attack) have prompted users to appraise less expensive and technically efficient substitutes for mine tailings paste formulations. Generally, these binders include but are not limited to sulphate resistant cements, and/or as a partial replacement for Portland cement by artificial pozzolans, natural pozzolans, calcium sulphate substances and sodium silicates. The approach to designing environmentally efficient CPT is to ensure long-term stability and effective control over environmental contaminants through the use of composite binder systems with enhanced engineering properties to cater for inherit deficiencies in the individual constituents. The alkaline pore solution created by high free calcium rich cement kiln dust (CKD) (byproduct of cement manufacturing) is capable of disintegrating the solid glassy network of artificial pozzolans to produce reactive silicate and aluminate species when attacked by (OH(-)) ions. The augmented pozzolanic reactivity of CKD-slag and CKD-fly ash systems may produce resilient CPT. Since cemented paste comprising mine tailings and binders is a relatively new technology, a review of the binding materials used in such formulations and their performance evaluation in mechanical fill behaviour was considered pertinent in

  18. A bioactive dental luting cement--its retentive properties and 3-year clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Steven R; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Appleby, David C; Boston, Daniel; Lööf, Jesper

    2013-02-01

    A clinical validation study was conducted to determine the performance of a new bioactive dental cement (Ceramir C&B, Doxa Dental AB) for permanent cementation. The cement is a new formulation class, which is a hybrid material comprised of calcium aluminate and glass-ionomer components. A total of 38 crowns and bridges were cemented in 17 patients; 31 of the abutment teeth were vital and seven were non-vital. Six restorations were bridges with a total of 14 abutment teeth (12 vital/ two non-vital). One fixed splint comprising two abutment teeth was also included. Preparation parameters were recorded, as well as cement characteristics such as working time, setting time, seating characteristics, and ease of cement removal. Baseline data were recorded for the handling of the cement, gingival inflammation, and pre-cementation sensitivity. Post-cementation parameters included post-cementation sensitivity, gingival tissue reaction, marginal integrity, and discoloration. All patients were seen for recall examinations at 30 days and 6 months. Fifteen of 17 subjects and 13 of 17 patients were also available for subsequent comprehensive 1- and 2-year recall examination, and 13 patients were available for a 3-year recall examination. Restorations available for the 3-year recall examination included 14 single-unit full-coverage crown restorations, four three-unit bridges comprising eight abutments, and one two-unit splint. Three-year recall data yielded no loss of retention, no secondary caries, no marginal discolorations, and no subjective sensitivity. All restorations rated excellent for marginal integrity. Average visual analogue scale (VAS) score for tooth sensitivity decreased from 7.63 mm at baseline to 0.44 mm at 6-month recall, 0.20 mm at 1-year recall, and 0.00 mm at 2- and 3-year recall. Average gingival index (GI) score for gingival inflammation decreased from 0.56 at baseline to 0.11 at 6-month recall, 0.16 at 1-year recall, 0.21 at 2-year recall, and 0.07 at 3

  19. RECYCLED WASTE-BASED CEMENT COMPOSITE PATCH MATERIALS FOR RAPID/PERMANENT ROAD RESTORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2001-07-31

    Over the past year, KeySpan Energy sponsored a research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) aimed at recycling boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) byproducts generated from Keyspan's power stations into potentially useful materials, and at reducing concurrent costs for their disposal. Also, KeySpan has an interest in developing strategies to explicitly integrate industrial ecology and green chemistry. From our collaborative efforts with Keyspan (Diane Blankenhom Project Manager, and Kenneth Yager), we succeeded in recycling them into two viable products; Pb-exchange adsorbents (PEAs), and high-performance cements (HpCs). These products were made from chemically bonded cement and ceramic (CBC) materials that were synthesized through two-step chemical reaction pathways, acid-base and hydration. Using this synthesis technology, both the WWTS and BA served in acting as solid base reactants, and sodium polyphosphate, [-(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}], known as an intermediator of fertilizer, was employed as the acid solution reactant. In addition, two commercial cement additives, Secar No. 51 calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and Type I calcium silicate cement (CSC), were used to improve mechanical behavior and to promote the rate of acid-base reaction of the CBC materials.

  20. Characterization of cement-based ancient building materials in support of repository seal materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    Ancient mortars and plasters collected from Greek and Cypriot structures dating to about 5500 BC have been investigated because of their remarkable durability. The characteristics and performance of these and other ancient cementitious materials have been considered in the light of providing information on longevity of concrete materials for sealing nuclear waste geological repositories. The matrices of these composite materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) gypsum cements; (2) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated-lime cements; (3) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated-lime cements (+- siliceous components); and (4) pozzolana/hydrated-lime cements. Most of the materials investigated, including linings of ore-washing basins and cisterns used to hold water, are in categories (2) and (3). The aggregates used included carbonates, sandstones, shales, schists, volcanic and pyroclastic rocks, and ore minerals, many of which represent host rock types of stratigraphic components of a salt repository. Numerous methods were used to characterize the materials chemically, mineralogically, and microstructurally and to elucidate aspects of both the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical (mineralogical) and microstructural factors. Durability was found to be affected by matrix mineralogy, particle size and porosity, and aggregate type, grading, and proportioning, as well as method of placement and exposure conditions. Similar factors govern the potential for durability of modern portland cement-containing materials, which are candidates for repository sealing. 29 references, 29 figures, 6 tables

  1. High-Temperature Self-Healing and Re-Adhering Geothermal Well Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatina, T.; Sugama, T.; Boodhan, Y.; Nazarov, L.

    2017-12-01

    Self-healing cementitious materials are particularly attractive for the cases where damaged areas are difficult to locate and reach. High-temperature geothermal wells with aggressive environments impose most difficult conditions on cements that must ensure durable zonal isolation under repeated thermal, chemical and mechanical stresses. The present work evaluates matrix and carbon steel (CS) - cement interface self-healing and re-adhering properties of various inorganic cementitious composites under steam, alkali carbonate or brine environments at 270-300oC applicable to geothermal wells. The composite materials included blends based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and natural zeolites and alkali or phosphate activated composites of Calcium Aluminate Cement (CAC) with fly ash, class F. Class G cement blend with crystalline silica was used as a baseline. Compressive-strength and bond-strength recoveries were examined to evaluate self-healing and re-adhering properties of the composites after repeated crush tests followed by 5-day healing periods in these environments. The optical and scanning electron microscopes, X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy and EDX measurements were used to identify phases participating in the strengths recoveries and cracks filling processes. Amorphous silica-rich- and small-size crystalline phases played an important role in the healing of the tested composites in all environments. Possible ways to enhance self-healing properties of cementitious composites under conditions of geothermal wells were identified.

  2. Mössbauer, XRD, and Complex Thermal Analysis of the Hydration of Cement with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vili Lilkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration of cement with and without fly ash is studied with Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, and thermal analysis. Iron in cement is present as Fe3+-ions and occupies two octahedral positions, with close isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings. Iron in fly ash is present as Fe2+ and Fe3+, and the Mössbauer spectra display three doublets—two for Fe3+ in octahedral coordination and one for Fe2+. A third doublet was registered in the hydrating plain cement pastes after the 5th day, due to Fe3+ in tetrahedral coordination in the structure of the newly formed monosulphate aluminate. In cement pastes with fly ash, the doublet of tetrahedral iron is formed earlier because the quantity of ettringite and portlandite is low and more monosulphate crystallizes. No Fe(OH3 phase forms during hydration of C4AF. The fly ash displays pozzolanic properties, which lead to lowering of the portlandite quantity in the cement mixtures and increasing of the high temperature products.

  3. Recovering uranium and/or aluminium from refractory silico-aluminous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey-Goldblatt, E.; Nagy, I.F.; Tunley, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium and/or aluminium from a refractory silico-aluminous material comprises leaching the material in one or more stages, obtaining a pregnant solution which contains little or no acid and recovering the desired metal from the solution

  4. Effect of aluminized fabrics on radiant protective performance of fire proximity suit materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Park, Pyoung Kyu; Hong, Kyoung A; Yoon, Kee Jong

    2015-03-01

    Radiant heat may be a significant component of heat exposure in the case of proximity firefighting. To combat high levels of radiant heat, fire proximity suits made of aluminized fabrics (Al-Fb) are commonly used due to their proven radiant protective performance (RPP). In this study RPP of various Al-Fb prepared using different aluminized films (Al-Fl) such as double-sided aluminized film and single-sided aluminized film and different base fabrics such as woven, knit, and nonwoven fabrics are compared. The effect of flexing on RPP and flame protective performance (FPP) of Al-Fb is also examined. The results show that RPP of Al-Fl is affected by the protective film to protect against mechanical or physical damages, and also by their structure such as whether the second reflective aluminum layer is present or not. In addition RPP of Al-Fb is also influenced by the base fabric, especially its surface roughness. The increased surface roughness combined with the damage caused to the aluminum layer after flexing result in reduction of RPP of Al-Fb. The contribution of Al-Fl to FPP of Al-Fb is not as significant as to RPP. Finally, based on the results, some points that may be important in developing and designing fire proximity suits are recommended. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  5. Phase transformation of alumina coating by plasma assisted tempering of aluminized P91 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamnapara, N.I.; Mukherjee, S.; Khanna, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel plasma assisted heat treatment process for aluminized P91 steels is reported. • Plasma plays a vital role in phase transformation of Al 2 O 3 from θ to α phase. • Presence of O ∗ species in plasma facilitates θ to α transformation. - Abstract: α-Al 2 O 3 coating on aluminized surfaces are considered candidate coatings for blanket applications in fusion reactor. In order to generate α-Al 2 O 3 , aluminized P91 steel samples were subjected to normalizing and tempering treatments at 980 °C and 750 °C respectively. Oxygen plasma has been used during tempering treatment of aluminized P91 steel samples at 750 °C for 1 h. The resulting alumina coating on plasma tempered samples were compared with those of thermally tempered samples. The alumina films were characterized using XRD, XPS, and SEM–EDS techniques. Results indicate that the thermally tempered samples had θ-Al 2 O 3 coating while the plasma tempered samples had α-Al 2 O 3 coating after heat treatment. Such transformation of alumina phase was not visible without plasma. A hypothesis of θ to α-Al 2 O 3 transformation in plasma is proposed. This paper emphasizes the role of plasma processing on generation of an improved insulation coating for TBM applications in fusion reactors

  6. Lithium aluminate/zirconium material useful in the production of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

    A composition is described useful in the production of tritium in a nuclear reactor. Lithium aluminate particles are dispersed in a matrix of zirconium. Tritium produced by the reactor of neutrons with the lithium are absorbed by the zirconium, thereby decreasing gas pressure within capsules carrying the material.

  7. Data and properties of lithium aluminate γ LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denuziere, C.; Roux, N.

    1988-01-01

    In this report are gathered and analysed the literature data until july 1st, 1984, concerning the properties of lithium aluminate γ LiAlO 2 relevant for the investigation of this compound as a tritum breeding material for a fusion reactor blanket. A french version of this report exists

  8. Characterizing AISI 1045 steel surface duplex-treated by alternating current field enhanced pack aluminizing and nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Zhang, Ge; Pan, Jianwei

    2018-02-01

    Thin cases and long treating time are shortcomings of conventional duplex treatment of aluminizing followed by nitriding (DTAN). Alternating current field (ACF) enhanced DTAN was carried out on AISI 1045 steel by applying an ACF to treated samples and treating agents with a pair of electrodes for overcoming those shortcomings. By investigating cases' structures, phases, composition and hardness distributions of differently treated samples, preliminary studies were made on characterizations of the ACF enhanced duplex treatment to AISI 1045 steel. The results show that, with the help of the ACF, the surface Al-rich phase Al5Fe2 formed in conventional pack aluminizing can be easily avoided and the aluminizing process is dramatically promoted. The aluminizing case can be nitrided either with conventional pack nitriding or ACF enhanced pack nitriding. By applying ACF to pack nitriding, the diffusion of nitrogen into the aluminizing case is promoted. AlN, Fe2∼3N and solid solution of N in iron are efficiently formed as a result of reactions of N with the aluminizing case. A duplex treated case with an effective thickness of more than 170 μm can be obtained by the alternating current field enhanced 4 h pack aluminizing plus 4 h pack nitriding.

  9. Cement composite delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, F R; Devine, S D; Hollis, J M; Woo, S L

    1986-09-01

    Several new and innovative techniques have recently been introduced that purport to increase the strength of polymethyl methacrylate bone cement. One of these concepts is the use of carbon and polymer fibers to form a cement composite. Bone cement composites usually 1% fiber, are very difficult to use clinically. The composite is very sticky and viscous, which precludes effective hand packing or the use of conventional delivery systems. A new delivery system for very viscous materials is presented and examples of in vitro application are shown.

  10. Mineralogy and microstructure of two Mexican Portland cements for the confinement of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, E.; Badillo A, V. E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Nava E, N.

    2014-10-01

    The cementitious materials are involved in the different stages of radioactive waste management because they are used for the waste immobilization in the container, as well as filling in the spaces between containers vaults and also as engineering barrier and construction material in civil construction site. Therefore, is necessary to have a study of commercial cement available nationwide involving solid timely analysis in order to identify which phases are responsible for confinement of radionuclides, if considered the most reactive phase -CSH- or called secondary phases. In this research the hydration products of cement are presented as well as its importance in the nuclear industry. The analysis and observation of the cement clinker and the hydration products on the manufactured pulps with two commercial cements resistant to sulphates was realized using the observation technique of solid X-ray diffraction and nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Fluorescence. The results show the presence of calcium silicate hydrates in the amorphous phase and the presence of ettringite crystals and portlandite sheets is appreciated. The abundant iron phase called tetra calcium ferro aluminate has been identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (Author)

  11. The Effect of Nano-Aluminumpowder on the Characteristic of RDX based Aluminized Explosives Underwater Close-Filed Explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Junting Yin; Baohui Yuan; Tao Zhou; Gang Li; Xinlian Ren

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nano-aluminum powder on the characteristic of RDX based aluminized explosives underwater closed-filed explosions, the scanning photographs along the radial of the charges were gained by a high speed scanning camera. The photographs of two different aluminized explosives underwater explosion have been analyzed, the shock wave curves and expand curves of detonation products were obtained, furthermore the change rules of shock waves propagation velocity, sho...

  12. Superplasticizer function and sorption in high performance cement based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.N.; Roe, L.H.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes laboratory studies undertaken to determine interactions between the main components of high-performance cement-based grout. These interactions were studied with the grouts in both their unset and hardened states with the specific intention of determining the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer; the phase of residence of the superplasticizer in hardened materials; and the permanence of the superplasticizer in hardened grouts. In unset pastes attempts were made to extract superplasticizer by mechanical processes. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was leached from the grouts. A microautoradiographic method was developed to investigate the phases of residence of superplasticizer in hardened grouts and confirm the inferences from the leaching studies. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was located on the hydrated phases formed during the early stages of cement hydration. These include tricalcium aluminate hydrates and tricalcium silicate phases. There is some tendency for the superplasticizer to sorb on ettringite. The presence of superplasticizer did not coincide with the locations of unreacted silica fume and high silica content phases such as C 2 S-H. The observations explain the findings of the studies of unset pastes which also showed that the sorption of superplasticizer is likely to be enhanced with increased mixing water content and, hence, distribution in and exposure to the hydration reaction surfaces in the grout. Superplasticizer can be leached in very small quantities from the hardened grouts. Rapid release takes place from the unsorbed superplasticizer contained in the accessible pore space. Subsequent release likely occurs with dissolution of the cement phases and the exposure of isolated pores to groundwater. (au) (37 refs.)

  13. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  14. High toughness alumina/aluminate: The role of hetero-interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, M.E.; Yasuoka, M.; Kanzaki, S.

    1996-01-01

    Silica doped alumina/aluminate materials present a combination of high strength and high toughness not achieved before in other alumina systems, except for transformation toughened alumina. The authors have associated the increase in toughness to crack bridging by anisotropically grown alumina grains with concurrent interfacial debonding of these grains. A HREM study of grain boundaries and hetero-interface structures in this material shows the absence of amorphous phases at grain boundaries. Local Auger electron analysis of fractured surfaces revealed the coexistence of Si and La at the grain facets exposed by the noticeable intergranular fracture mode of this material. It is concluded that a certain and important degree of boundaries weakness is related to both presence of Si at the interfaces and existence of alumina/aluminate hetero-interfaces

  15. The aluminization of 600k WLS fibers for the TileCal/ATLAS/LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Saraiva, J G; Maneira, M J P; Patriarca, J; Wemans, A

    2003-01-01

    The TILE CALorimeter, the hadronic sampling calorimeter of ATLAS/LHC /CERN, is made of iron and polystyrene scintillating tiles. The light produced in scintillating tiles is absorbed and guided to the photomultipliers (PMTs) through Wave Length Shifter (WLS) optical fibers. To optimize the detection of jets and muons, the top of the fibers away of the PMTs is coated with an aluminum mirror, that increases the light output in asymptotically equal to 75% and enhances the uniformity light output by asymptotically equal to 10%. The aluminum mirror is produced by Magnetron Sputtering, that adds to an excellent reproducibility a minimal thermal aggression important for proper film adhesion to the plastic surface. A dedicated machine for mass production of the ATLAS WLS aluminized fibers has been designed and constructed fulfilling the critical production optical and time requirements. The aluminization of the fibers and their quality control started in August 1999 and went on continuously until May 2002. The qualit...

  16. Effect of X-Rays on the Mechanical Properties of Aluminized FEP Teflon(trademark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Brinkmeier, Michael R.; Gaier, Elizabeth M.

    1999-01-01

    Pieces of the multilayer insulation (MLI) that is integral to the thermal control of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have been returned by two servicing missions after 3.6 and 6.8 years in orbit. They reveal that the outer layer, which is made from 5 mil (0.13 mm) thick aluminized fluorinated ethylenepropylene (FEP) Teflon. has become severely embrittled. Although possible agents of this embrittlement include electromagnetic radiation across the entire solar spectrum, trapped particle radiation, atomic oxygen, and thermal cycling, intensive investigations have not yielded unambiguous causes. Previous studies utilizing monoenergetic photons in the 69-1900 eV range did not cause significant embrittlement, even at much higher doses than were experienced by the HST MLI. Neither did x-rays in the 3 to 10 keV range generated in a modified electron bean evaporator. An antidotal aluminized FEP sample that was exposed to an intensive dose from unfiltered Mo x-ray radiation from a rotating anode generator, however, did show the requisite embrittlement. Thus, a study was undertaken to determine the effects of x-ray exposure on the embrittlement of aluminized FEP in hopes that it might elucidate the HST MLI degradation mechanism. Tensile specimens of aluminized 5 mil thick FEP were exposed to a constant fluence of unfiltered x-ray radiation from a Mo target whose maximum energy ranged from 20-60 kV. Other samples were annealed, thermally cycled (100x) between 77-333 K, or cycled and irradiated. Tensile tests and density measurements were then performed on the samples. Only the samples which had been irradiated had the drastically reduced elongation-to-break, characteristic of the HST samples. Thermal cycling may accelerate the embrittlement, but the effect was near the scatter in the measurements. Annealing and thermal cycling had no apparent effect. Only the samples which had been irradiated and annealed showed significant density increases, likely implicating polymer chain

  17. Sodium leak detection on large pipes. Heat insulating shells made of silico-aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonakas, D.; Blanc, R.; Casselman, C.; Malet, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents an equipment installed on the large secondary pipes of fast reactors, ensuring several functions: support and equilibrium of static and dynamic loads, heat insulator, preheating, and the detection of possible sodium leaks. The research programs associated to the development of the shells are briefly evoked; then, the report deals no longer with the studies on silico-aluminate aging and the detection performance [fr

  18. Lithium aluminates and tritium production; Aluminatos de litio y produccion de tritio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Palacios G, O.; Bosch G, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    In this work it is studied the crystalline structure of lithium aluminates prepared by three different methods, namely: solid state reaction, humid reaction and sol-gel reaction. The analysis methods are the X-ray diffractometry and the scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This study is realized as in original materials as in irradiated materials at the TRIGA Mark reactor, to correlate the synthesis method with response of these materials to the mixed irradiation of nuclear reactor. (Author)

  19. Modelling of chemical evolution of low pH cements at long term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitouri, Y.; Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A.; Bourbon, X.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the underground radioactive waste repository, low-pH cements were developed to reduce interactions between concrete and clay barrier. These cements contain high proportions of mineral additions like silica fume, fly ash or blast furnace slag for example. The high ratio of cement replacement by pozzolanic additions allows to reduce the pH by a global reduction of Ca/Si ratio of the hydrates (according to the one observed on CEM I pastes). In order to predict the short term development of the hydration for each component of this cement, a multiphasic hydration model, previously developed, is used. The model predicts the evolution of hydration degree of each anhydrous phase and consequently the quantity of each hydrate in paste (CH, aluminates, CSH with different Ca/Si ratios). However, this model is not suitable to determine the long term mineralogical and chemical evolution of the material, due to the internal change induced by chemical imbalance between initial hydrates. In order to evaluate the chemical characteristics of low pH cement based materials, and thus assess its chemical stability in the context of radioactive waste storage, a complementary model of chemical evolution at long term is proposed. This original model is based on 'solid-solution' principles. It assumes that the microdiffusion of calcium plays a major role to explain how the different Ca/Si ratio of initial C-S-H tends together toward a medium stabilized value. The main mechanisms and full development of the model equations are presented first. Next, a comparison of the model with experimental data issue from EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) analysis on low pH cement allows to test the model. (authors)

  20. One-Dimension Nonisentropic Model for the Flow of Aluminized Explosive Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Duan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytic model of aluminized explosive products based on the method of characteristics for planar isentropic flow is proposed herein. The contribution of Al oxidation in the explosion products is investigated analytically. The flow behind the detonation front cannot be treated as isentropic due to the Al oxidation in the products. To solve the nonisentropic flow field of aluminized explosives products analytically, the assumption of local isentropic process is proposed. Based on this assumption, the flow field behind the detonation front of aluminized explosive is a function of only the reacted aluminum mass fraction in each time range. The metal plate test was conducted with the metal plate driven by RDX/Al/wax (76/20/4 and RDX/LiF/wax (76/20/4. The reacted aluminum mass can be obtained indirectly from the experiment results. The reacted aluminum mass was then applied to the analytic model, and the velocity of metal plate driven by RDX/Al/wax (76/20/4 and RDX/LiF/wax (76/20/4 was calculated. The final velocity of the metal plate driven by RDX/Al/wax was 7.8% higher than that driven by RDX/LiF/wax.

  1. High-resolution 27Al NMR study of calcium aluminate catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakerson, V.I.; Nissenbaum, V.D.; Golosman, E.Z.; Mastikhin, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    The high-resolution 27 Al NMR spectra of calcium aluminates, calcium hydroaluminates, and calcium alumina supports and catalysts have been studied. The structures of the anhydrous calcium aluminates (CaAl 2 O 3 , CaAl 4 O 7 , 3CaO x Al 2 O 3 , 12CaO x 7Al 2 O 3 , talyum) consist of aluminum-oxygen tetrahedra and contain various types of aluminum atoms, the nonequivalence of which increases in going from strongly basic to weakly basic aluminates. In the NMR spectrum the signal of octahedrally coordinated aluminum is due to disordered aluminum-oxygen structures. During the forming of the calcium-alumina catalysts and supports the process [AlO 4 ] → [AlO 6 ] takes place during hydration, and [AlO 6 ] → [AlO 4 ] during thermolysis; the nonequivalence of the tetrahedrally coordinated aluminum atoms decreases, while the [AlO 4 ]:[AlO 6 ] ratio decreases as the degree of hydration increases

  2. Driving Ability of HMX based Aluminized Explosive Affected by the Reaction Degree of Aluminum Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yingliang

    2017-06-01

    Due to the time scale of aluminum reaction, the detonation process of the aluminized explosive becomes very complex, and there is less agreement on the reaction mechanism of aluminum powder. If the reaction of aluminum occurs in the reaction zone, the energy released will further strengthen the work ability of detonation wave. So it is very important for characterizing the detonation parameters and detonation driving ability to accurately understand the role of aluminum powder in the reaction zone. In this paper, detonation driving process of HMX based aluminized explosive was studied by cylinder test, obtaining the expansion track of cylinder wall. In order to further research the reaction degree (λ) of aluminum in the reaction zone, the thermodynamic program VHL was used to calculate the detonation process at different reaction degrees, obtaining the parameters of detonation products thermodynamic state. Using the dynamic software LS-DYNA and the JWL equation of state by fitting the pressure and relative volume relationship, the cylinder test was simulated. Compared with the experimental results, when the reaction degree is 20%, the driving ability is found to be in agreement with measured ones. It is concluded that the driving ability of HMX based aluminized explosive can be more accurately characterized by considering the reaction degree of aluminum powder in the reaction zone.

  3. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO/sub 2/) and lithium silicate (Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/) by the reaction: Li/sup 6/ + n ..-->.. /sup 4/He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100/sup 0/C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T/sub 2/), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300/sup 0/C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T/sub 2/O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, NO, SO/sub 2/, SiF/sub 4/ and traces of hydrocarbons.

  4. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO 2 ) and lithium silicate (Li 2 SiO 3 ) by the reaction: Li 6 + n → 4 He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100 0 C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T 2 ), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300 0 C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T 2 O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H 2 O, CO 2 , CO, O 2 , H 2 , NO, SO 2 , SiF 4 and traces of hydrocarbons

  5. Zinc-aluminates for an in situ sulfur reduction in cracked gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana-Solorzano, R.; Valente, J.S.; Hernandez-Beltran, F.J.; Castillo-Araiza, C.O. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152 C.P., 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-05-30

    Using additives remains as an attractive alternative for an in situ sulfur reduction in cracked gasoline since it is a practical, flexible and economical option. Zinc-aluminates prepared by the sol-gel method are used as additives for reducing sulfur in gasoline from the cracking of a high-sulfur feed in a fixed-bed bench reactor. Products distribution and feed conversion are not dramatically altered after incorporating the additive to the base catalyst with some effect on gasoline and its octane number and coke. A decrease in the gasoline sulfur content of up to 35 wt% including benzothiophene, and up to 50% excluding benzothiophene, is observed when blending the zinc-aluminates to the base catalyst, which is caused by lowering the C{sub 1} to C{sub 4} alkyl-thiophenes content. The zinc content of the zinc-aluminates has a positive effect on the gasoline sulfur reduction. It is suggested that together with the direct cracking of adsorbed thiophenic species on the additive, a further gasoline sulfur decrease is possible through cracking of saturated thiophenic species formed by hydrogenation of adsorbed thiophenic species with hydrogen produced in situ in the additive. The obtained results also demonstrate that solids with higher Lewis acidity are not unfailingly the most effective for gasoline sulfur reduction. (author)

  6. Mechanical properties of aluminized CoCrAlY coatings in advanced gas turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameda, J.; Bloomer, T.E. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)]|[Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Center for Advanced Technology Dept.; Sugita, Y.; Ito, A. [Chuba Electric Power Co., Nagoya (Japan). Electric Power R and D Center; Sakurai, S. [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan). Mechanical Engineering Research Lab.

    1997-07-01

    The microstructure/composition and mechanical properties (22-950 C) in aluminized CoCrAlY coatings of advanced gas turbine blades have been examined using scanning Auger microprobe and a small punch (SP) testing method. Aluminized coatings were made of layered structure divided into four regimes: (1) Al enriched and Cr depleted region, (2) Al and Cr graded region, (3) fine grained microstructure with a mixture of Al and Cr enriched phases and (4) Ni/Co interdiffusion zone adjacent to the interface SP tests demonstrated strong dependence of the deformation and fracture behavior on the various coatings regimes. Coatings 1 and 2 showed higher microhardness and easier formation of brittle cracks in a wide temperature range, compared to coatings 3 and 4. The coating 3 had lower room temperature ductility and conversely higher elevated temperature ductility than the coating 4 due to a precipitous ductility increase above 730 C. The integrity of aluminized coatings while in-service is discussed in light of the variation in the low cycle fatigue life as well as the ductility in the layered structure.

  7. Microstructural characterization of dental zinc phosphate cements using combined small angle neutron scattering and microfocus X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Kumpová, Ivana; Mancini, Lucia; Appavou, Marie-Sousai

    2017-04-01

    To characterize the microstructure of two zinc phosphate cement formulations in order to investigate the role of liquid/solid ratio and composition of powder component, on the developed porosity and, consequently, on compressive strength. X-ray powder diffraction with the Rietveld method was used to study the phase composition of zinc oxide powder and cements. Powder component and cement microstructure were investigated with scanning electron microscopy. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and microfocus X-ray computed tomography (XmCT) were together employed to characterize porosity and microstructure of dental cements. Compressive strength tests were performed to evaluate their mechanical performance. The beneficial effects obtained by the addition of Al, Mg and B to modulate powder reactivity were mitigated by the crystallization of a Zn aluminate phase not involved in the cement setting reaction. Both cements showed spherical pores with a bimodal distribution at the micro/nano-scale. Pores, containing a low density gel-like phase, developed through segregation of liquid during setting. Increasing liquid/solid ratio from 0.378 to 0.571, increased both SANS and XmCT-derived specific surface area (by 56% and 22%, respectively), porosity (XmCT-derived porosity increased from 3.8% to 5.2%), the relative fraction of large pores ≥50μm, decreased compressive strength from 50±3MPa to 39±3MPa, and favored microstructural and compositional inhomogeneities. Explain aspects of powder design affecting the setting reaction and, in turn, cement performance, to help in optimizing cement formulation. The mechanism behind development of porosity and specific surface area explains mechanical performance, and processes such as erosion and fluoride release/uptake. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. The Uses of Copper and Zinc Aluminates to Capture and Convert Carbon dioxide to Syn-gas at Higher Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Y. Raskar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The uses of copper and zinc aluminates to capture and convert the CO2 to syn-gas were studied at higher temperatures. The samples of copper and zinc aluminates were prepared by solid-solid fusion method by calcining in air at 900 oC for 3 h. Those samples were characterized by acidity/alkalinity, surface area, XRD pattern, IR, SEM images and screening to capture CO2 at the different temperatures. The phases Cu2O, CuO, ZnO, CuAl2O4 and ZnAl2O4 were found to be in the samples of zinc and copper aluminates. Acidity and surface area of the samples of copper and zinc aluminates were found to be in the ranges from 0.063 to 9.37 mmol g-1 and 3.04 to 11.8 m2 g-1, respectively. The captured CO2 by the samples of copper and zinc aluminates was found to be 19.92 to 31.52 wt% for the temperature range 40 to 850 oC. The captured CO2 at 550 oC by variable Zn/Al and Cu/Al mol ratio from 0.5 to 6 of the samples of copper and zinc aluminates was found to be 12.81 to 18.04 wt%. The reduction of carbon dioxide by zinc and copper aluminates was observed. The conversion of CO2 by methane over variable mol ratio of Cu/Al and Zn/Al in copper and zinc aluminates, respectively, at 500 oC showed the production of syn-gas by using the gas hourly space velocities (GHSV 12000, 12000 and 6000 ml. h-1. g-1 of helium, CO2 and methane. The conversions of CO2 by methane over the samples of zinc and copper aluminates were studied at different mol ratios of CO2 to methane.  © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 13rd May 2013; Revised: 8th November 2013; Accepted: 8th November 2013[How to Cite: Raskar, R.Y., Gaikwad, A.G. (2014. The Uses of Copper and Zinc Aluminates to Cap-ture and Convert Carbon Dioxide to Syn-gas at Higher Temperature. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (1: 1-15. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.1.4899.1-15[Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.1.4899.1-15

  9. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  10. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  11. Center for Cement Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-31

    DSP cement pastes were prepared using white Portland cement (PC), amorphous silica fume, and a superplasticizer . The fume/cement ratios varied from... superplasticized PC pastes without silica fume. This is due to a reduction in the amount and size of porosity formed in DSP. Specific: surface areas measured

  12. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  13. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  14. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  15. Interaction between cements with different composition and superplasticizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorab, H. Y.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The slump behavior of ordinary Portland-, pozzolanic (red brick powder-, sulfate resistant-, and limestone cement pastes caused by ≤ 1% additions of polycondensates and polycarboxylates superplasticizers are monitored for up to 90 minutes. With the plolycondensates, Portland- and pozzolanic cements gain fluidity at higher dosages than sulfate resistant and limestone cements. Limestone cement shows the best slump retention. The aluminate and sulfate phases play a major role in the fluidity. With the polycarboxylates, all cements gain fluidity with dosages of ≤ 0.3%. A polycarboxylate with no resonance of methyl methylene proton in the main chain identified in the NMR spectra creates good slump retention. This is explained by a low mobility of the structure and the predominance of the steric effect. The polycarboxylate shows also strong ether bands relative to the ester groups in the IR spectra and a low polydispersity observed in the elution of few low molecular weight species in the HPLC chromatogram.Se ha estudiado el efecto fluidificante (hasta 90 minutos ejercido por la incorporación de entre 0-1% de aditivos policondensados y policarboxilatos en pastas de cemento Portland, puzolánico, resistente a sulfatos y con adición de caliza. Con la incorporación de los aditivos policondensados, se produjo un incremento de la fluidez de los cementos Portland y puzolánico a mayores dosificaciones que las necesarias en los cementos resistente a sulfatos y con adición de caliza. Éste último presentó la mejor retención de la fluidez. Las fases aluminatos y sulfatos juegan un importante papel en la fluidez inducida. Todos los cementos incrementaron su fluidez con la incorporación de aditivos policarboxilatos a dosificaciones menores del 0,3%. El policarboxilato que no presenta en los espectros de RMN, resonancia asignada al protón de los grupos metil metileno, presenta buena retención de la fluidez. Esto es debido a la baja flexibilidad de

  16. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  17. Retention, marginal leakage, and cement solubility of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cement containing stannous fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Fuhrer, Nitzan; Gelfand, Katerina; Cardash, Harold; Pilo, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the (1) retention and microleakage of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cements to which stannous fluoride (SnF2) was added, and (2) solubility of these cements. Provisional crowns were constructed of acrylic resin with shoulder preparations for 12 molars. The crowns were luted with Tempbond, Tempbond NE, and Freegenol temporary cements, and also with SnF2 added to these cements. Specimens were thermocycled 100 times, stored for 6 days, and immersed in 0.5% basic fuschin. Seven days after cementation, crown removal (retention) tests were conducted. Marginal leakage was assessed using a five-level scale to score dye penetration. Solubility in water of the cements with and without SnF2 was assessed using cement disks. Freegenol was more retentive than the other cements. The incorporation of SnF2 significantly increased the retention capacity of Freegenol and Tempbond NE but had no effect on Tempbond. Tempbond showed significantly higher dye penetration than Freegenol. The addition of SnF2 did not alter the dye penetration of the cements. There were no significant differences in the solubility of the cements. However, the incorporation of SnF2 increased the solubility of Freegenol and Tempbond NE (P crowns cemented with Tempbond NE and Freegenol but did not affect the retention of those cemented with Tempbond. The marginal leakage of crowns cemented with the tested temporary cements with and without the incorporation of SnF2 was similar. However, the addition of SnF2 increased the solubility of the cements.

  18. Influence of the mineralogical composition of cement in the diffusion of chemical species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, E.

    2015-01-01

    , color and others. Portland cements commonly used in the construction industry, they are based primarily on the mineral phases of limestone and silica. In conventional cement admixtures the chemical reactivity depends on the ratio of tricalcium and dicalcium silicate (C 3 S/C 2 S), the tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A) influences in the setting time and tetra calcium ferro aluminate (C 4 AF) gives a different color to the cement. In this research the mineralogical composition of two commercial cements is studied and its influence on the phenomenon of radionuclides retention. For this particular concrete discs were manufactured with water, sand and two commercial cements: Tolteca Extra CPC 30-RRS and Cruz Azul CPC Type II 30-R. The solid observation techniques used for analysis of the cement paste and concrete they are: X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy, as well as the nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer and X-ray Fluorescence. (Author)

  19. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    ting. It is used in industrial floorings, ship decks, railway passenger coach floorings, hospital floors, ammunition factory floors, missile silos and underground armament factories and bunkers. Recently, concrete of high compres- sive and tensile strength prepared with magnesium oxy- chloride cement and recycled rubber ...

  20. Sulfate resistance of nanosilica contained Portland cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batilov, Iani B.

    Soils, sea water and ground water high in sulfates are commonly encountered hostile environments that can attack the structure of concrete via chemical and physical mechanisms which can lead to costly repairs or replacement. Sulfate attack is a slow acting deteriorative phenomenon that can result in cracking, spalling, expansion, increased permeability, paste-to-aggregate bond loss, paste softening, strength loss, and ultimately, progressive failure of concrete. In the presented research study, Portland cement (PC) mortars containing 1.5% to 6.0% nanosilica (nS) cement replacement by weight were tested for sulfate resistance through full submersion in sodium sulfate to simulate external sulfate attack. Mortars with comparable levels of cement replacement were also prepared with microsilica (mS). Three cement types were chosen to explore nS' effectiveness to reduce sulfate expansion, when paired with cements of varying tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and Blaine fineness, and compare it to that of mS. Mortars were also made with combined cement replacement of equal parts nS and mS to identify if they were mutually compatible and beneficial towards sulfate resistance. Besides sulfate attack expansion of mortar bars, the testing program included investigations into transport and microstructure properties via water absorption, sulfate ion permeability, porosimetry, SEM with EDS, laser diffraction, compressive strength, and heat of hydration. Expansion measurements indicated that mS replacement mortars outperformed both powder form nS, and nS/mS combined replacement mixtures. A negative effect of the dry nS powder replacement attributed to agglomeration of its nanoparticles during mixing negated the expected superior filler, paste densification, and pozzolanic activity of the nanomaterial. Agglomerated nS was identified as the root cause behind poor performance of nS in comparison to mS for all cement types, and the control when paired with a low C3A sulfate resistant

  1. Cementing of low pressure formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownlie, D. [Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Coupland, M. [Baytex Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposed a solution to the notorious problem of squeeze cementing low pressure formations. It is a well known fact within the petroleum industry that it is difficult to squeeze cement low pressure formations in certain areas. Short of fracturing, most geological formations will not allow cement to penetrate the actual rock. In standard cement squeezing, cement slurries are placed across perforations and then pressure is applied to force the cement into perforation tunnels against the formation causing partial dehydration of the slurry. The cement left in the perforation tunnels makes a seal between the formation and the wellbore that has high compressive strength and low permeability. However, experience has shown that some wells are not capable of holding the hydrostatic pressure of a water column. This paper presented case studies that examined formations with modified geology, a highly unconsolidated sandstone where large volumes of sand were extracted during the production process. In particular, the paper refers to a low pressure field in Western Canada, the remedial cementing in Lloydminster. Within a 3 year period 18 zones were cement squeezed and drilled out. Nine of the zones were cement squeezed using a retainer with thixotropic cement followed by a 0:1:0 Class G cement. Only 11 per cent of the 9 zones was successful on the first attempt. The other 9 zones were cement squeezed using the bullhead technique in which a fluid is shot into the well casing before the downhole equipment. This latter technique proved to be more successful on the first attempt. 2 refs.

  2. Reliability estimate of unconfined compressive strength of black cotton soil stabilized with cement and quarry dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayo Oluwatoyin AKANBI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reliability estimates of unconfined compressive strength values from laboratory results for specimens compacted at British Standard Light (BSLfor compacted quarry dust treated black cotton soil using cement for road sub – base material was developed by incorporating data obtained from Unconfined compressive strength (UCS test gotten from the laboratory test to produce a predictive model. Data obtained were incorporated into a FORTRAN-based first-order reliability program to obtain reliability index values. Variable factors such as water content relative to optimum (WRO, hydraulic modulus (HM, quarry dust (QD, cement (C, Tri-Calcium silicate (C3S, Di-calcium silicate (C2S, Tri-Calcium Aluminate (C3A, and maximum dry density (MDD produced acceptable safety index value of1.0and they were achieved at coefficient of variation (COV ranges of 10-100%. Observed trends indicate that WRO, C3S, C2S and MDD are greatly influenced by the COV and therefore must be strictly controlled in QD/C treated black cotton soil for use as sub-base material in road pavements. Stochastically, British Standard light (BSL can be used to model the 7 days unconfined compressive strength of compacted quarry dust/cement treated black cotton soil as a sub-base material for road pavement at all coefficient of variation (COV range 10 – 100% because the safety index obtained are higher than the acceptable 1.0 value.

  3. The impact of zirconium oxide radiopacifier on the early hydration behaviour of white Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Nichola J; Li, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide has been identified as a candidate radiopacifying agent for use in Portland cement-based biomaterials. During this study, the impact of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide on the hydration and setting reactions of white Portland cement (WPC) was monitored by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), (29)Si and (27)Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vicat apparatus. The presence of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide particles in the size-range of 0.2 to 5 μm was found to reduce the initial and final setting times of WPC from 172 to 147 min and 213 to 191 min, respectively. Zirconium oxide did not formally participate in the chemical reactions of the hydrating cement; however, the surface of the zirconium oxide particles presented heterogeneous nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products which accelerated the initial setting reactions. The presence of zirconium oxide was found to have little impact on the development of the calcium (sulpho)aluminate hydrate phases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of the cement type on compatibility with carboxylate super plasticisers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundyra-Oracz, G.; Kurdowski, W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical study was conducted to gain a fuller understanding of the interactions taking place in cement superplasticiser systems. To this end, two clinkers of clinkers of known chemical and phase composition were prepared in this study to gain insight into such interactions. One contained no tricalcium aluminate (C1), while the other had a 9% C 3 A content (C2). These clinkers were ground to approximately 340 m 2 /kg and blended with gypsum only or gypsum and Klein compound (3CaOx3Al 2 O 3 xCaSO 4 ) (1, 2). Sufficient compound was added to C1 to ensure the formation of about the same amount of ettringite after 0.5 and 1 h of hydration as found in cement C2 + gypsum. The admixture used was a carboxylate superplasticiser. Rheology measurements showed that while paste yield stress was correlated to ettringite formation, no such simple relationship was observed for plastic viscosity. Plastic viscosity depended on the total hydrates formed, i.e., not only as ettringite but also as C-S-H gel. The findings revealed that in clinkers with very low sulfate and potassium contents, the rheology of carboxylate-containing cement paste is primarily controlled by ettringite formation. (Author) 15 refs.

  5. The impact of zirconium oxide radiopacifier on the early hydration behaviour of white Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Nichola J.; Li, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide has been identified as a candidate radiopacifying agent for use in Portland cement-based biomaterials. During this study, the impact of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide on the hydration and setting reactions of white Portland cement (WPC) was monitored by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), 29 Si and 27 Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vicat apparatus. The presence of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide particles in the size-range of 0.2 to 5 μm was found to reduce the initial and final setting times of WPC from 172 to 147 min and 213 to 191 min, respectively. Zirconium oxide did not formally participate in the chemical reactions of the hydrating cement; however, the surface of the zirconium oxide particles presented heterogeneous nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products which accelerated the initial setting reactions. The presence of zirconium oxide was found to have little impact on the development of the calcium (sulpho)aluminate hydrate phases. - Highlights: ► This is the first study of Portland cement-based biomaterials by 27 Al and 29 Si NMR. ► 20 wt.% ZrO 2 radiopacifier accelerates the early cement hydration reactions. ► Extent of hydration after 6 h is increased from 5.7% to 15% in the presence of ZrO 2 . ► Initial and final setting times are reduced by 25 and 22 min, respectively. ► ZrO 2 provides nucleation sites for the precipitation of early hydration products.

  6. The impact of zirconium oxide radiopacifier on the early hydration behaviour of white Portland cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Nichola J., E-mail: nj_coleman@yahoo.co.uk [School of Science, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent, ME4 4TB (United Kingdom); Li, Qiu [School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide has been identified as a candidate radiopacifying agent for use in Portland cement-based biomaterials. During this study, the impact of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide on the hydration and setting reactions of white Portland cement (WPC) was monitored by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vicat apparatus. The presence of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide particles in the size-range of 0.2 to 5 {mu}m was found to reduce the initial and final setting times of WPC from 172 to 147 min and 213 to 191 min, respectively. Zirconium oxide did not formally participate in the chemical reactions of the hydrating cement; however, the surface of the zirconium oxide particles presented heterogeneous nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products which accelerated the initial setting reactions. The presence of zirconium oxide was found to have little impact on the development of the calcium (sulpho)aluminate hydrate phases. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study of Portland cement-based biomaterials by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 20 wt.% ZrO{sub 2} radiopacifier accelerates the early cement hydration reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extent of hydration after 6 h is increased from 5.7% to 15% in the presence of ZrO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial and final setting times are reduced by 25 and 22 min, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZrO{sub 2} provides nucleation sites for the precipitation of early hydration products.

  7. INORGANIC CEMENT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Clay Rios Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a Geopolymeric Cement Concrete (GCC was developed through adequate portions of geopolymer components. Its characteristics were compared with Portland Cement Concrete (PCC, through of the establishment of some parameters of design, as consumption of binders, water/aggregates ratio and mortar content. The concrete mechanical performance was evaluated with emphasis to the fatigue behavior. Were tested the effects of different tensile strength maximum (increasing and decreasing. The results of fatigue tests had shown that GCC presents a better performance when compared to PCC. Its fatigue strength was 15% higher than that of PCC, when 70% of rupture tension of the concrete in static bending (SR, was applied. Tensions of about 80% SR resulted in 96% of increase, when compared to GCC. The SEM microstructural analysis showed that the GCC has a matrix/aggregate bonding very strong, when compared to PCC, probably due to the massive nature of the geopolymeric matrix.

  8. Ca stabilized zirconia based composites by wet consolidation of zirconia and high alumina cement mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, Y.L.; Garrido, L.B.; Aglietti, E.F., E-mail: lgarrido@cetmic.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Tecnologia de Recursos Minerales y Ceramica (CETMIC/CIC-CONICET La Plata), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    Composites of the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} system are widely used in many industrial applications. In this study, porous Ca stabilized ZrO{sub 2} composites were developed from a starting mixture of m-ZrO{sub 2} and calcium aluminate cement. Ceramics were produced by wet consolidation of aqueous suspensions with and without corn starch as pore former agent and sintering at 1000-1500 °C. The influence of processing parameters on crystalline phases, sintering behavior and textural characteristics was examined. Stabilized c-ZrO{sub 2} formed with the composition of Ca{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 1.85}. The sintering of the mixtures lead to porous composites materials. Textural properties were analyzed considering the initial composition and the present crystalline phases. (author)

  9. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  10. The Zintl-Klemm concept applied to cations in oxides. I. The structures of ternary aluminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Pérez, David; Vegas, Angel

    2003-06-01

    The structures of 94 ternary aluminates are reinterpreted on the basis of the Zintl-Klemm concept and Pearson's generalized octet rule. In aluminates of highly electropositive metals such as alkali, alkaline-earth and rare-earth metals, the Al atoms form three-dimensional skeleta which can be interpreted as if the Al atoms were behaving as Zintl polyanions, adopting the structure of either main-group elements or Zintl polyanions showing the same connectivity. The O atoms are then located close to both the hypothetical two-electron bonds and the lone pairs, giving rise to a tetrahedral coordination. When more electronegative elements, such as W or Si, are present in the compound, the electron transfer towards the Al atoms does not take place. In this case, aluminium behaves as a base, transferring its electrons to the more electronegative atoms and the coordination sphere of aluminium becomes octahedral. In some compounds the Al atoms clearly show amphoteric character so that some Al atoms act as donors (bases) and hence are octahedrally coordinated, whereas others behave as acceptors (acids), adopting a tetrahedral coordination. From this it is concluded that the coordination sphere of aluminium is not a function of the ionic radius of the Al(3+) cations, but it depends on the nature of the other cations accompanying them in the structure. The networks formed by these aluminates are, in many instances, similar to those of the binary oxides of the main-group elements. For this reason, a systematic survey of these oxides is also reported. Compounds such as stuffed cristobalites and trydimites and also perovskites are examples of this new interpretation. Perovskites are then reinterpreted as a stuffed pseudo-TeO(3) structure. Other families of compounds such as silicates and phosphates are susceptible to a similar interpretation. This study provides additional examples of how cations recognize themselves in spite of being embedded in an oxygen matrix.

  11. Calcium Hex aluminate reaction sintering by Spark Plasma Sintering; Sinterizacion reactiva de Hexaluminato de Calcio mediante Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesia, P. G. de la; Garcia-Moreno, O.; Torrecillas, R.; Menendez, J. L.

    2012-11-01

    Calcium hex aluminate (CaAl{sub 1}2O{sub 1}9) is the most alumina-rich intermediate compound of the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The formation of this aluminate is produced by the reaction between calcium oxide and alumina with the consequent formation of intermediates compounds with lower alumina content with increasing temperature (CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CaAl4O{sub 7}). In this study we studied the variation of sintering parameters for obtaining dense and pure calcium hex aluminate by reaction sintering by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). A mixing of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} were used as reactive. Final densities close to the theoretical and phase transformation over 93% were achieved by this method. (Author) 22 refs.

  12. Methods of use of calcium hexa aluminate refractory linings and/or chemical barriers in high alkali or alkaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Kenneth A; Cullen, Robert M; Keiser, James R; Hemrick, James G; Meisner, Roberta A

    2013-10-22

    A method for improving the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of a liner in contact with at least one of an alkali and/or alkaline environments is provided. The method comprises lining a surface that is subject to wear by an alkali environment and/or an alkaline environment with a refractory composition comprising a refractory aggregate consisting essentially of a calcium hexa aluminate clinker having the formula CA.sub.6, wherein C is equal to calcium oxide, wherein A is equal to aluminum oxide, and wherein the hexa aluminate clinker has from zero to less than about fifty weight percent C.sub.12A.sub.7, and wherein greater than 98 weight percent of the calcium hexa aluminate clinker having a particle size ranging from -20 microns to +3 millimeters, for forming a liner of the surface. This method improves the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of the liner.

  13. Effect of X-Rays on the Mechanical Properties of Aluminized FEP Teflon(R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Brinkmeier, Michael R.; Gaier, Elizabeth M.

    1998-01-01

    Pieces of the multilayer insulation (MLI) that is integral to the thermal control of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have been returned by two servicing missions after 3.6 and 6.8 years in orbit. They reveal that the outer layer, which is made from 5 mil (0.13 mm)thick aluminized fluorinated ethylene propylene(FEP) Teflon(R), has become severely embrittled. Although possible agents of this embrittlement include electromagnetic radiation across the entire solar spectrum, trapped particle radiation, atomic oxygen, and thermal cycling, intensive investigations have not yielded unambiguous causes. Previous studies utilizing monoenergetic photons in the 69-1900 eV range did not cause significant embrittlement, even at much higher doses than were experienced by the HST MLI. Neither did x-rays in the 3 to 10 keV range generated in a modified electron beam evaporator. An antidotal aluminized FEP sample that was exposed to an intensive dose from unfiltered Mo x-ray radiation from a rotating anode generator, however, did show the requisite embrittlement. Thus, a study was undertaken to determine the effects of x-ray exposure on the embrittlement of aluminized FEP in hopes that it might elucidate the HST MLI degradation mechanism. Tensile specimens of aluminized 5 mil thick FEP were exposed to a constant fluence of unfiltered x-ray radiation from a Mo target whose maximum energy ranged from 20-60 kV. Other samples were annealed, thermally cycled (100x) between 77-333 K, or cycled and irradiated. Tensile tests and density measurements were then performed on the samples. Only the samples which had been irradiated had the drastically reduced elongation-to-break, characteristic of the HST samples. Thermal cycling may accelerate the embrittlement, but the effect was near the scatter in the measurements. Annealing and thermal cycling had no apparent effect. Only the samples which had been irradiated and annealed showed significant density increases, likely implicating polymer

  14. Novel synthesis of gibbsite by laser-stimulated nucleation in supersaturated sodium aluminate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, K. A.

    2000-12-01

    Laser-induced localized density fluctuations are shown to stimulate primary nucleation of nano-sized aluminum trihydroxide seed crystals in flowing supersaturated industrial sodium aluminate solutions (Bayer liquor). The post-nucleation mass deposition rate is greatly increased over rates attainable through more traditional seeding methods. Near-ideal single-crystal gibbsite is formed under diffusion-limited growth conditions. Laser-stimulated nucleation represents an in situ method for the active local modulation of the supersaturation state, so that the stimulated nucleation occurs under macroscopic solution conditions that are unfavorable for spontaneous nucleation.

  15. Evaluation of Bayer process gibbsite reactivity in magnesium aluminate spinel formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, A.; Gutierrez-Campos, D.; Lavelle, C.; Rodriguez, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Stoichiometric magnesium aluminate spinel was synthesized by solid-state reaction of calcined magnesia with tabular alumina, calcined alumina and industrial gibbsite at 1100, 1300 and 1500 deg. C for 2 h. The pellets made from both types of alumina and magnesia expanded after the heat treatment, whereas pellets made from industrial gibbsite and magnesia contracted. It was found that shrinkage could be produced by phase transformations in gibbsite and magnesia densification process in unreacted magnesia during the sintering. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicated a minor reactivity for industrial gibbsite in comparison with the calcined alumina and tabular alumina at all firing temperatures

  16. Method of growing yttrium aluminate and/or lanthanide single crystals with perovskite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvapil, Jiri; Perner, B.; Kvapil, Josef; Blazek, K.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystals of yttrium aluminate and/or lanthanide with perovskite structure are grown from melt in a vacuum at a pressure of gas residues of max. 0.01 Pa. The melt contains 1±0.05 gram-ions of aluminium per gram-ion of yttrium and/or lanthanides. The single crystals are then heated in a vacuum (0.01 Pa) at temperatures of 1,450 to 1,800 degC for 2 to 3 hours. (B.S.)

  17. The effect of Y2O3 addition on thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pošarac Milica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of yttria additive on the thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel has been investigated. As a starting material we used spinel (MgAl2O4 obtained by the modified glycine nitrate procedure (MGNP. Sintered products were characterized in terms of phase analysis, densities, thermal shock, monitoring the damaged surface area in the refractory specimen during thermal shock and ultrasonic determination of the Dynamic Young modulus of elasticity. It was found that a new phase between yttria and alumina is formed, which improved thermal shock properties of the spinel refractories. Also densification of samples is enhanced by yttria addition.

  18. Metamorphic history and age of aluminous gneisses of the Belomorian belt of the Baltic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibikova, E.V.; Borisova, E.Yu.; Makarov, V.A.; Drugova, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    Metamorphic conditions and age are determined for the early metamorphic stage of aluminous gneisses in the Chupa nappe in the Belomorian Mobile Belt. The granulite-facies metamorphic conditions during Late Archean time are determined based on the composition of garnet and biotie from the metapelites. The early metamorphic stage was dated at 2860 ± 30 Ma based on the U-Pb systematics of granulitic zircon from the metapelites. The U-Pb isotopic system of the zircon was strongly affected by Svecogennian metamorphism (at 1750 Ma). The geodynamic evolution of the Belomorian Mobile Belt is discussed in light of the data of this work

  19. Evaluation of Bayer process gibbsite reactivity in magnesium aluminate spinel formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, A. [Department of Materials Science, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela)], E-mail: abrahanmora@hotmail.com; Gutierrez-Campos, D. [Department of Materials Science, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela)], E-mail: dgutierr@usb.ve; Lavelle, C. [Department of Materials Science, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela)], E-mail: clavelle@wanadoo.fr; Rodriguez, R.M. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Metropolitana, Edif. Corimon, Terrazas del Avila, Distribuidor Autopista, Dto. Sucre, Caracas 1070 (Venezuela)], E-mail: rrodriguez@unimet.edu.ve

    2007-04-25

    Stoichiometric magnesium aluminate spinel was synthesized by solid-state reaction of calcined magnesia with tabular alumina, calcined alumina and industrial gibbsite at 1100, 1300 and 1500 deg. C for 2 h. The pellets made from both types of alumina and magnesia expanded after the heat treatment, whereas pellets made from industrial gibbsite and magnesia contracted. It was found that shrinkage could be produced by phase transformations in gibbsite and magnesia densification process in unreacted magnesia during the sintering. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicated a minor reactivity for industrial gibbsite in comparison with the calcined alumina and tabular alumina at all firing temperatures.

  20. Rheology of acrylic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Greener, E H

    1981-01-01

    The rheological properties of setting acrylic bone cements were examined with a rotational cone and plate viscometer. The cements were tested over two orders of magnitude of shear rate to determine the nature of any non-Newtonian flow behavior. All three cements behaved with moderate pseudoplasticity (i.e., shear thinning) during setting, suggesting the use of higher pressures during administration for better flow and penetration. The low viscosity brand was found to be nearly one-half as viscous as the conventional cements during the working time (i.e., 2-5 minutes). A series of sieving experiments were performed to determine the particle size distributions of the powder components. Statistical analysis (chi square) showed the cements to have different distributions, with the low viscosity brand containing a larger proportion of smaller polymer particles. This difference is thought to contribute to the lower viscosity of this cement.

  1. Criterion for selection the optimal physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate powder used in investment casting process

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zielińska; J. Sieniawski; B. Gajecka

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4) modifiers produced by different companies and the influence of different types of modifiers on the grain size of high temperature creep resisting superalloys: Inconel 713C, René 77 and MAR-M 509.The first stage of the research work took over the investigations of physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate manufactured by three different companies: Remet, Mason Color and Permedia Lubl...

  2. Investigation of the hydration and bioactivity of radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and MTA Angelus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Sorrentino, François; Damidot, Denis

    2013-05-01

    Novel root-end filling materials are composed of tricalcium silicate (TCS) and radiopacifier as opposed to the traditional mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) which is made up of clinker derived from Portland cement and bismuth oxide. The aim of this research was to characterize and investigate the hydration of a tricalcium silicate-based proprietary brand cement (Biodentine™) and a laboratory manufactured cement made with a mixture of tricalcium silicate and zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z) and compare their properties to MTA Angelus™. The materials investigated included a cement containing 80% of TCS and 20% zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z), Biodentine™ and MTA Angelus™. The specific surface area and the particle size distribution of the un-hydrated cements and zirconium oxide were investigated using a gas adsorption method and scanning electron microscopy. Un-hydrated cements and set materials were tested for mineralogy and microstructure, assessment of bioactivity and hydration. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refined X-ray diffraction and calorimetry were employed. The radiopacity of the materials was investigated using ISO 6876 methods. The un-hydrated cements were composed of tricalcium silicate and a radiopacifier phase; zirconium oxide for both Biodentine™ and TCS-20-Z whereas bismuth oxide for MTA Angelus™. In addition Biodentine™ contained calcium carbonate particles and MTA Angelus™ exhibited the presence of dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate, calcium, aluminum and silicon oxides. TCS and MTA Angelus™ exhibited similar specific surface area while Biodentine™ had a greater specific surface area. The cements hydrated and produced some hydrates located either as reaction rim around the tricalcium silicate grain or in between the grains at the expense of volume containing the water initially present in the mixture. The rate of reaction of tricalcium

  3. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Constitutive Relation of an Aluminized Polymer Bonded Explosive at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer bonded explosives (PBXs are widely used as energetic fillings in various warheads, which maybe are utilized under extreme environments, such as low or high temperatures. In this paper, the dynamic response of an aluminized polymer bonded explosive was tested at a range of temperatures from −55°C to −2°C and a fixed loading strain rate (~700 s−1 with the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB. The PBX tested is aluminized, which contains 76 wt% RDX, 20 wt% aluminum powder, and 4 wt% polymer binder, respectively. The results show that the effect of temperature on the strength of the PBX is obvious at the tested strain rates. Based on the experimental results and prophase studies, a constitutive model was obtained, in which the effect of temperature and strain rate were considered. The modeling curves fit well with the experimental results, not only at low temperature under 0°C, but also at room temperature (20°C. The model may be used to predict the dynamic performances of the PBXs in various environments.

  4. Effect Of Heat Treatment On The Corrosion Resistance Of Aluminized Steel Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żaba K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of corrosion resistance of heat treated aluminized steel strips. Products coated by Al-10Si alloy are used among others in a manufacturing process of welded pipes as the elements of the car exhaust systems, working in high temperatures and different environments (eg. wet, salty. The strips and tubes high performance requirements are applied to stability, thickness and roughness of Al-Si coating, adhesion and corrosion resistance. Tubes working in elements of exhaust systems in a wide range of temperatures are exposed to the effects of many aggressive factors, such as salty snow mud. It was therefore decided to carry out research on the impact of corrosion on the environmental influence on heat treated aluminized steel strips. The heat treatment was carried out temperatures in the range 250-700°C for 30, 180, 1440 minutes. Then the coatings was subjected to cyclic impact of snow mud. Total duration of treatment was 12 months and it was divided into three stages of four months and at the end of each stage was made the assessment of factor of corrosion. The results are presented in the form of macroscopic, microscopic (using a scanning electron microscope observations and the degree and type of rusty coating.

  5. Using Underwater Explosion and Cylinder Expansion Tests to Calibrate Afterburn Models for Aluminized Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedberg, Rasmus

    2017-06-01

    The study explores the combined use of underwater performance tests and cylinder expansion tests in order to parameterize detonation models for aluminized explosives which exhibit afterburning. The approach is suggested to be used in conjunction with thermochemical computation. A formulation containing RDX and aluminum powder is considered and several charges with varying masses are submerged and detonated. Pressure gauges are employed at horizontal distances scaling with the charge diameter, and the specific shock wave energy is shown to increase with charge mass. This is attributed to the combustion of aluminum particles after the Chapman-Jouguet plane. Cylinder expansion tests are carried out using Photon Doppler Velocimetry to register the wall expansion velocity. The tests are modeled using a multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with the Guirguis-Miller model describing detonation with afterburning. The equation of state and afterburn rate law parameters are adjusted such that the model reproduces the results from the cylinder expansion and underwater tests. The approach seems promising, and might be valuable for aluminized explosive formulations intended to be used in a variety of confinement conditions. Swedish Armed Forces.

  6. A two-phase model for aluminized explosives on the ballistic and brisance performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wuhyun; Gwak, Min-cheol; Lee, Young-hun; Yoh, Jack J.

    2018-02-01

    The performance of aluminized high explosives is considered by varying the aluminum (Al) mass fraction in a heterogeneous mixture model. Since the time scales of the characteristic induction and combustion of high explosives and Al particles differ, the process of energy release behind the leading detonation wave front occurs over an extended period of time. For simulating the performance of aluminized explosives with varying Al mass fraction, HMX (1,3,5,7-tetrahexmine-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane) is considered as a base explosive when formulating the multiphase conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy exchanges between the HMX product gases and Al particles. In the current study, a two-phase model is utilized in order to determine the effects of the Al mass fraction in a condensed phase explosive. First, two types of confined rate stick tests are considered to investigate the detonation velocity and the acceleration ability, which refers to the radial expansion velocity of the confinement shell. The simulation results of the confined rate stick test are compared with the experimental data for the Al mass fraction range of 0%-25%, and the optimal Al mass fraction is provided, which is consistent with the experimental observations. Additionally, a series of plate dent test simulations are conducted, the results of which show the same tendency as those of the experimental tests with varying Al mass fractions.

  7. Physical chemistry of Portland-cement hydrate, radioactive-waste hosts. Progress report, June 15, 1984-January 15, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Phase relations in the system 3CaO.A1 2 O 3 -CaSO 4 -CaI 2 -H 2 O in equilibrium with excess water were established by means of room temperature bottle hydration of various bulk chemistries in the system. Starting with end members ettringite (3CaO.A1 2 O 3 .3CaSO 4 .32H 2 O) and tetracalcium aluminate monosulfate-12-hydrate (3CaO.A1 2 O 3 .CaSO 4 .12H 2 O), iodine-substituted analogue phases were synthesized which contained increasingly greater percentages of iodine. The iodine-substituted ettringite was found to be unstable whereas the iodine-substituted monosulfate formed readily. SEM, wet chemistry, ir, and x-ray diffraction characterization of the latter phase suggest that its formula is 3CaO.A1 2 O 3 .Ca(IO 3 ) 2 .12H 2 O. Cement pellets containing this AFm iodine-substituted phase were subjected to a modified MCC-1 static leach test. Although the normalized iodine leach rate was relatively high when compared with AgI encapsulated in Portland Type III cement, this same leach rate was approximately equal to the rates that have been reported for Ba(IO 3 ) 2 ,Ca(IO 3 ) 2 , and Hg(IO 3 ) 2 in Portland cement. The normalized iodine leach rate obtained also was found to be roughly comparable to that given for I-sodalite in cement. Diffusion is indicated as the primary leach mechanism, becoming dominant after the first three days of leaching. A study of phase relations of compositions in the vicinity of Stratling's compound (2CaO.A1 2 O 3 .SiO 2 .8H 2 O) has shown that the addition of finely divided silica or calcium aluminates to Portland cement enhance the immobilization of cesium in the cementitious-waste form. The leachability of cesium from such adjusted cements show a near linear relationship. If the calcium to silica ration is held constant, the cesium concentration of the leachate falls with increasing alumina content. Potential phases responsible for this behavior may be Stratling's compound and/or a zeolite phase

  8. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  9. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  10. Investigation of barium-calcium aluminate process to manufacture and characterize impregnated thermionic cathode for power microwave devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Cristiane

    2006-01-01

    In the present work it is described the barium calcium aluminate manufacture processes employed to produce impregnated cathodes to be used in a traveling-wave tube (TWT). The cathodes were developed using a tungsten body impregnated with barium and calcium aluminate with a 5:3:2 proportion (molar). Three different processes were investigated to obtain this material: solid-state reaction, precipitation and crystallization. Thermal analysis, thermogravimetry specifically, supported to determine an adequate preparation procedure (taking into account temperature, time and pyrolysis atmosphere). It was verified that the crystallization showed a better result when compared to those investigated (solid-state reaction and precipitation techniques - formation temperature is about 1000 deg C in hydrogen atmosphere), whereas it presented the lower formation temperature (800 deg C) in oxidizing atmosphere (O 2 ). It was used the practical work function distribution theory (PWFD) of Miram to characterize thermionic impregnated cathode. The PWFD curves were used to characterize the barium-calcium aluminate cathode. PWFD curves shown that the aluminate cathode work function is about 2,00 eV. (author)

  11. Thermochemical properties of gibbsite, bayerite, boehmite, diaspore, and the aluminate ion between 0 and 350/degree/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apps, J.A.; Neil, J.M.; Jun, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    A requirement for modelling the chemical behavior of groundwater in a nuclear waste repository is accurate thermodynamic data pertaining to the participating minerals and aqueous species. In particular, it is important that the thermodynamic properties of the aluminate ion be accurately determined, because most rock forming minerals in the earth's crust are aluminosilicates, and most groundwaters are neutral to slightly alkaline, where the aluminate ion is the predominant aluminum species in solution. Without a precise knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of the aluminate ion aluminosilicate mineral solubilities cannot be determined. The thermochemical properties of the aluminate ion have been determined from the solubilities of the aluminum hydroxides and oxyhydroxides in alkaline solutions between 20 and 350/degree/C. An internally consistent set of thermodynamic properties have been determined for gibbsite, boehmite, diaspore and corundum. The thermodynamic properties of bayerite have been provisionally estimated and a preliminary value for ΔG/sub f, 298/ 0 of nordstrandite has been determined. 205 refs., 17 figs., 25 tabs

  12. Thermochemical properties of gibbsite, bayerite, boehmite, diaspore, and the aluminate ion between 0 and 350/degree/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.A.; Neil, J.M.; Jun, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    A requirement for modelling the chemical behavior of groundwater in a nuclear waste repository is accurate thermodynamic data pertaining to the participating minerals and aqueous species. In particular, it is important that the thermodynamic properties of the aluminate ion be accurately determined, because most rock forming minerals in the earth's crust are aluminosilicates, and most groundwaters are neutral to slightly alkaline, where the aluminate ion is the predominant aluminum species in solution. Without a precise knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of the aluminate ion aluminosilicate mineral solubilities cannot be determined. The thermochemical properties of the aluminate ion have been determined from the solubilities of the aluminum hydroxides and oxyhydroxides in alkaline solutions between 20 and 350/degree/C. An internally consistent set of thermodynamic properties have been determined for gibbsite, boehmite, diaspore and corundum. The thermodynamic properties of bayerite have been provisionally estimated and a preliminary value for ..delta..G/sub f, 298//sup 0/ of nordstrandite has been determined. 205 refs., 17 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. A study of radioactivity level of the cements containing fly ash of Soma power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, A.; Oezer, N.; Suener, U.

    2009-01-01

    Cement is a product that is formed by grinding gypsum with clinkers resulted by burning the mixture that is obtained after mixing and grinding mainly silicium, calcium, alumina and iron oxides containing raw materials in certain proportions, to sintered degrees. When combined with water it posses binding properties. For portland cements, % 3-6 proportion gypsum (CaSO 4 .2H 2 O) in weight are added to clinkers at the grinding step in order to adjust the hydration degrees. By this way it prevents tricalcium aluminate (3CaO.Al 2 O 3 ) from rapid hardening. If ground without gypsum addition, clinkers when combined with water, harden rapidly. Additives such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, natural slag and trash possessing puzzolanic properties are also added to portland cement clinkers. At power plants, during the burning process of coals, light elements such as hydrogen and carbon are converted to their gaseous forms, and remaining ashes than become rich with uranium content. Thus fly ashes contain radioactive elements such as U-238 (Uranium), Th-232 (Thorium) and K-40 (Potassium). U-238 found in fly ash is not an intensively radioactive element at the beginning. It disintegrates naturally by losing its and particles and is transformed to some radio nuclides. Ra-226 (Radium) is the most active element among these radio nuclides and it is transformed to radon gas (Rn-222) by losing new particle. The rare gas radon and radioactive radium extremely jeopardize human health. Fly ashes when used in cements, it can lead to increase in the radioactivity level which is of prime public concern. It is therefore important to determine the radioactivity level formed in the cements and compare with the standard values. In this study, photon emissions and mechanical strength tests of C type fly ash of Soma power plant and portland cements containing this fly ash under laboratory conditions were measured. In that manner it has been examined whether fly ashes may cause some significant

  14. Effect of the addition of nanosilica on white cement hydration at 25°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sáez del Bosque I.F.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry is keen on reducing natural resource consumption, reusing waste that would otherwise be sent to a rubbish tip and lowering its CO2 emissions. In pursuit of those objectives, the addition of materials such as silica fume, ceramic waste, rice husk and precipitated or colloidal nanosilica, in the various stages of cement manufacture has become increasingly common. That practice inspired the present study (using isothermal conduction calorimetry, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR, XRD and DTA/TG of the effect of precipitated amorphous nanosilica (10 wt% on white portland cement (WPC hydration. The isothermal conduction calorimetry findings, which were consistent with the NMR and DTA/TG results, showed that adding amorphous nanosilica altered reaction kinetics, expediting alite and belite hydration. The addition also intensified the heat flow attributed to alumina phase hydration and brought the respective peak forward. Although no general consensus has been reached in the literature on the attribution of the third peak appearing on the calorimetric curve for WPC, based on the present findings, the main aluminate hydrate product is monosulfoaluminate. Furthermore, a pre-peak inflection point on the profile of the first exothermal peak on the WPC calorimetric curve was interpreted as the beginning of the pozzolanic reaction, which accelerates alite hydration, consuming portlandite and raising the heat released. C-S-H gel nanostructure was also modified. The results revealed a linear relationship in both the blended and the pure cement pastes between the degree of hydration and the number of Q1 and Q2 units in the gel. The presence of Q2 units was much greater and of Q1 units slightly lower in the former than in the latter.

  15. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  16. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  17. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  18. The preparation of lithium aluminate by the hydrolysis of lithium and aluminum alkoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.W.; Clatworthy, B.C.; Gin, A.Y.H.

    1987-10-01

    Lithium aluminate was prepared by heating the hydrolysis products from various combinations of lithium and aluminum alkoxides under an atmosphere of nitrogen. The product was β-LiA1O 2 when aluminum iso-propoxide was a starting material, whereas γ-LiA1O 2 was the product for preparations starting with aluminum n-butoxide. The results were independent of the choice of lithium alkoxide. The hydrolysis of aluminum sec-butoxide with a solution of LiOH led to the γ phase as well. The temperature at which the γ phase developed depended upon the conditions of the hydrolysis reaction and was observed at a temperature as low as 550 degrees Celcius

  19. The aluminization of 600 k WLS fibers for the TileCal/ATLAS/LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Saraiva, J G; Maneira, M J P; Maio, A; Patriarca, J

    2004-01-01

    The TILE CALorimeter, the hadronic sampling calorimeter of ATLAS/LHC /CERN, is made of iron and polystyrene scintillating tiles. The light produced in scintillating tiles is absorbed and guided to the photomultipliers (PMTs) through wave length shifter (WLS) optical fibers. To optimize the detection of jets and muons, the top of the fibers away of the PMTs is coated with an aluminum mirror. This aluminum mirror is produced by planar magnetron sputtering. This process adds to an excellent reproducibility a minimal thermal aggression, important for a proper film adhesion to the plastic surface. To satisfy schedule and optical critical requirements, a dedicated mass production machine named SIDELO II was projected and constructed. A reflectivity of R similar to 75% is achieved and the light output uniformity improved by asymptotically equal to 10%. The aluminization of the fibers and their quality control started in August 1999 and went on continuously until May 2002. The quality control results showed a reprodu...

  20. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors. II. Analysis of magnesium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Rucandio, M.I.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium aluminate, considered as possible mataerial in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentaration ranges are 0.1-0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Ta and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precissions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite power in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author). 4 refs

  1. Spectrographic Determination of Impurities in Ceramic Materials for Nuclear fusion Reactors. II. Analysis of Magnesium Aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucandio, M. I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium aluminate, considered as possible material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 % for Ca, SI and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current are excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Ta and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precessions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author)4 refs

  2. Encapsulation of strontium aluminate phosphors to enhance water resistance and luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yong; Zeng Jianghua; Li Wenyu; Xu Li; Guan Qiu; Liu Yingliang

    2009-01-01

    Strontium aluminate SrAl 2 O 4 :Eu 2+ ,Dy 3+ phosphors are chemically unstable against water or even moisture. To enhance the water resistance of the phosphors, an encapsulation was performed by direct surface reactions with phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ). The morphology, surface structure, surface element composition, water resistance, luminescence, and photoacoustic spectrum of the phosphors before and after encapsulation were discussed. Experimental results showed that phosphors were perfectly encapsulated by amorphous layers in nanoscale and crystalline layers in microscale under different conditions. The water resistance of phosphors was greatly enhanced by the two types of layer. More importantly, the amorphous layers enhanced the luminescence of phosphors markedly. The possible mechanism for the enhancements was also proposed.

  3. Neutron Diffraction Characterization of C–H···Li Interactions in a Lithium Aluminate Polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Jacqueline M.; Waddell, Paul G.; Wheatley, Andrew E. H.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Peel, Andrew J.; Tate, Christopher W.; Linton, David J.

    2014-08-11

    The reaction of AlMe3 with tBuLi in the presence of trimethylacetonitrile affords the bimetallic complex [tBu(Me)Al(μ-Me)2Li·NC(tBu)]∞ (1). Pseudotetrahedral Al centers form by the nucelophilic addition of tBuLi to AlMe3.The alkali-metal center is stabilized through coordination of the unreacted nitrile and polymer formation via the construction of Al(μ-Me)nLi (n = 1, 2) motifs. Neutron diffraction evidences agostic interactions in the bridging methyl group to give further stabilization. There is only one previous report of a neutron structure of a lithium aluminate compound. This work therefore offers an important structural example of agostic interactions and the precise nature of Al(μ-Me)2Li bridging.

  4. Optical properties of rare earth doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshatri, D. S.; Khare, A.

    2014-11-01

    After the first news on rare earth (RE) doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors in late 1990s, researchers all over the world geared up to develop stable and efficient persistent phosphors. Scientists studied various features of long lasting phosphors (LLP) and tried to earmark appropriate mechanism. However, about two decades after the discovery of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+, the number of persistent luminescent materials is not significant. In this review, we present an overview of the optical characteristics of RE doped SAO phosphors in terms of photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and afterglow spectra. Also, we refresh the work undertaken to study diverse factors like dopant concentration, temperature, surface energy, role of activator, etc. Simultaneously, some of our important findings on SAO are reported and discussed in the end.

  5. The Effect of (Ag, Ni, Zn-Addition on the Thermoelectric Properties of Copper Aluminate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiao Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline bulk copper aluminate Cu1-x-yAgxByAlO2 with B = Ni or Zn were prepared by spark plasma sintering and subsequent thermal treatment. The influence of partial substitution of Ag, Ni and Zn for Cu-sites in CuAlO2 on the high temperature thermoelectric properties has been studied. The addition of Ag and Zn was found to enhance the formation of CuAlO2 phase and to increase the electrical conductivity. The addition of Ag or Ag and Ni on the other hand decreases the electrical conductivity. The highest power factor of 1.26 × 10-4 W/mK2 was obtained for the addition of Ag and Zn at 1,060 K, indicating a significant improvement compared with the non-doped CuAlO2 sample.

  6. Parameters governing tritium extraction rates from lithiated ceramics. The case of lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Botter, F.; Briec, M.; Rasneur, B.; Roux, N.

    1986-10-01

    Significant discrepancies between results of authors comparing tritium extraction rates from different lithiated ceramics are found in the literature. Recent results obtained at C.E.A., principally on lithium aluminates, show that, for a given ceramic, parameters other than textural (grain size, porosity, etc...) may play a predominant role. Enhancements of extraction rates have been induced by adding MgO to the solid or H 2 and CO to the sweep gas, but other factors, probably related to the surface condition of samples, may produce even greater effects. Results of investigations of the influence of exposure to air at given partial pressures of water vapor or of CO 2 show that strict preirradiation procedures must be adopted for preparation, storage and handling of ceramic tritium breeders

  7. Structural simulation of superlattices in lithium aluminates; Simulacion estructural de superredes en aluminatos de litio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Basurto S, R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Among the materials to be used on the tritium generator cover of the future fusion reactors the lithium aluminate ({gamma} - LiAlO{sub 2}) is one of the more studied. In this work it is presented the superlattice structural simulation that presents to {gamma} - LiAlO{sub 2} as main phase and to {alpha} - LiAlO{sub 2} as the secondary phase. The simulation is developed considering that as the two phases present different symmetry ({gamma} - LiAlO{sub 2} is tetrahedral and {alpha} - LiAlO{sub 2} is hexahedral) it is had a superlattice LUCS type (Layered Ultrathin Coherent Structure) that is it presents an structure in coherent ultrathin layers since it is what implicates a lesser energy of formation. (Author)

  8. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.O.; Wilding, C.R.; McHugh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I - and IO 3 - species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and E h of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  9. Determination of hydroxide in the presence of aluminate using a modified potentiometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, T.J.

    1975-11-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydroxide concentration in the presence of aluminate and other interfering ions was developed using the method of standard additions (or more specifically in this case, standard subtractions). The procedure called for titration with a strong acid which was added in equal increments at regular time intervals. The potential was recorded after each addition of acid. The data was plotted on Gran's Plot Paper, which is based on work done originally by Gran, or it was entered into a computer to determine the equivalence volume of the titrant. When used on many different samples in different matrices, the method gave results that were approximately 100 +- 1 percent of the calculated value. This was shown to be true even in systems containing aluminate [Al(OH) 4 - ], phosphate (PO 4 3- ), sulfate (SO 4 2- ), nitrate (NO 3 - ), nitrite (NO 2 - ), carbonate (CO 3 2- ), and other ions. The effect of these ions was shown to be negligible if the initial OH - concentration was at least 10 -3 M and barium chloride (BaCl 2 ) was added to complex the PO 4 3- and CO 3 2- ions. These ions were checked at levels of up to 3 M for Al(OH) 4 - and NO 3 - , 2 M for NO 2 - , and 1 M for SO 4 2- , PO 4 3- , and CO 3 2- . The method is applicable to radioactive as well as nonradioactive samples and any heat involved with a radioactive sample is insufficient to cause an error in the determination. On the basis of the work performed it was shown that the method was general enough to be run on a routine basis

  10. The Piriá aluminous lateritic profile: mineralogy, geochemistry and parent rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabllo Henrique Costa dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Relatively small aluminous lateritic deposits are abundant in the northeast and northwest parts of the Pará and Maranhão states, respectively. Most of them hosts aluminum phosphate mineralization forming hills and plateaus that stand out in the topography of the undulating plains of this region. The Piriá ridge is one of those topographic features, covered by lateritic iron crusts that have been studied in the 1970s as part of iron ore exploration campaigns and recently for phosphates prospection. This study improves the knowledge about the evolution of the lateritic Piriá deposit and demonstrates its relationship with the most evolved laterites of the Amazon, known as mature laterites, which formed major ore deposits during the Paleogene. Samples of a 17 meter-deep borehole were investigated through mineralogical (X-ray diffraction -XRD, optical and electron microscopy and chemical methods (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry - ICP-MS, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry - ICP-OES and X-ray fluorescence - XRF. The studied lateritic profile comprises a clay bauxitic horizon overlaid by an aluminous iron crust. Upwardly continuous dissolution of kaolinite occurs with the formation of gibbsite, as the result of intensive leaching, resulting in a higher Al2O3 content in the crust. The continuous formation of hematite from goethite resulted from the transition to more arid conditions. Anatase is a newly formed mineral (100-400 nm crystallites, showing a gradual increase, following the increase in TiO2 content, which is high and indicative of a mafic parent rock, confirmed by the Ti × Zr dispersion pattern. Prominent zoning in the lateritic profile is characterized by the mineralization in bauxite and augelite and abrupt chemical transition between the horizons, marked by a decrease in Si and increase in Fe content from the bottom to the top of the profile. These features are compatible and indicative of

  11. Preparation, characterization and catalytic properties of nickel aluminate nanoparticles: A comparison between conventional and microwave method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ragupathi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, synthesis of nickel aluminate using Opuntia dilenii haw as plant extract by a microwave combustion method (MCM and its comparison with the conventional combustion method (CCM is investigated. O. dilenii haw plant extract simplifies the process, provides an alternative process for a simple and an economical synthesis. The absence of surfactant has led to a simple, cheap and fast method of synthesis of NiAl2O4 nanoparticles. The as-synthesized NiAl2O4 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD studies, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR studies, high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, diffuses reflectance spectroscopy (DRS, and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET surface area analysis. The XRD results confirmed the formation of the cubic phase NiAl2O4. The formation of pure nickel aluminate phase was confirmed by FT-IR. The formation of NiAl2O4 nanoparticles was confirmed by HR-SEM and HR-TEM and their possible formation mechanisms were also proposed. MCM could produce NiAl2O4 with uniform size and well-defined shape with crystallinity. The optical property was determined by DRS. NiAl2O4 prepared by the microwave combustion method was found to possess a higher surface area, lower crystallite size than the NiAl2O4 nanoparticles prepared by the conventional combustion method, which in turn has led to the improved performance toward the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde.

  12. Irradiation damage in gamma lithium aluminate - LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvray-Gely, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystals of gamma lithium aluminate (of tetragonal structure) are irradiated) with various projectiles (electrons, He ions, protons, X and gamma photons) and we used (i) electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption to detect the defects produced, and (ii) transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The lithium aluminate single crystals irradiated with electrons or ions contain five different paramagnetic defects. Each of them has several anisotropic configurations whose EPR signals (i) have a Lande factor close to 2, (ii) exhibit a resolved hyperfine structure and (iii) are identical only when the static magnetic field is along /001/. In addition, four optical absorption bands appear in the range 1-6 eV in the same irradiation conditions. But only three among the five paramagnetic defects and one of the optical bands appear in X-and gamma-ray irradiated samples. Using these observations, we discuss the nature of the detected defects and we conclude about the type of their production mechanism. Particularly, we assign a six-line EPR signal and an optical band in the ultraviolet range to the F + -centre. We compare this hypothesis to a defect model based on the computation of approximate electronic wave functions using the variational method. Our TEM study shows that when gamma-LiAlO 2 single crystals are irradiated with 1 MeV electrons (fluence: 10 20 electrons/sqcm), tridimensional defects (of mean dimension 100 nm) appear. At lower energies, the defect production is hidden by a thermal effect that is sufficient to induce the evaporation of lithium oxyde and the formation of LiAl 5 0 8 [fr

  13. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engqvist, H.; Ederyd, S.; Uhrenius, B.; Hogmark, S.

    2001-01-01

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  14. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  15. Criterion for selection the optimal physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate powder used in investment casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zielińska

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4 modifiers produced by different companies and the influence of different types of modifiers on the grain size of high temperature creep resisting superalloys: Inconel 713C, René 77 and MAR-M 509.The first stage of the research work took over the investigations of physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate manufactured by three different companies: Remet, Mason Color and Permedia Lublin. There were determined the grain size distribution of cobalt aluminate powder, the average diameter and morphology of powder particles, phase composition, as well as sodium and cobalt content, pH value of water suspension and the bulk density. In the next step, the ceramic moulds were made with different kind of cobalt aluminate (Mason Color, Remet, Permedia Lublin and its concentration (0, 5% in the primary slurry. The samples of stepped shape were poured in the ceramic moulds prepared earlier. The average grain size of the γ phase was determined on the stepped samples.It was established that physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate modifier are different up to the manufacturer. For example the modifiers manufactured by Permedia; Mason Color and Remet companies have different the average diameter of particles- 68,050d; 49,6 i 36,7μm, and also cobalt content _CoC=32,53%; 39,43% i 34,79%mass, respectively. The grain size of γ matrix of superalloys depends on the kind of used inoculant. The best grain refinement of the matrix of superalloys: Inconel 713C, René 77 and MAR-M 509 was observed in the castings modified with the use of Mason Color modifier. On the grounds of literature data and obtained results it was established that the cobalt content of cobalt aluminate influences the intensity of nucleation process during the crystallization of superalloys: Inconel 713C, René 77 i MAR-M 509.

  16. Rheological measurements on cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, M.J.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the techniques which have been developed at Winfrith for assessing the rheological properties of cement grouts. A discussion of the theory of rheology and its application to cement is given and the methodology for calibrating a special paddle measuring system for a commercial viscometer is described. The use of the system for determining flow curves, equilibrium viscosity, viscosity as a function of shearing time and structure changes is also discussed. (author)

  17. Effect of polycarboxylate admixture structure on cement paste rheology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranda, M. A. G.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to analyze the effect of the structural differences in four polycarboxylate and polyether admixtures on the rheological properties of cement pastes with different chemical and mineralogical compositions and different active additions (CEM I 42.5 R, CEM I 52.5 R, CEM I 52.5 N/SR, CEM II/AV 42.5R, CEM II/B-L 32.5 R, CEM III/B 32.5R, BL I 52.5R and CAC – European standard EN 197-1:2000. The results of the minislump test concurred with the variations observed in the values of the rheological parameters (shear stress and plastic viscosity. The structural characteristic of the admixtures found to play the most prominent role in their fluidizing effect was the proportion of carboxylate (CG and polyether (EG group components. In cements characteristics such as fineness and the C3A/calcium sulphate and C3S/C3A ratios were also observed to be essential to admixture effectiveness. In this regard, the rheological parameters varied most widely in CEM I 52.5N/SR pastes and least in BL I 52.5R cement pastes. Of the additioned cements, the CEM III/B 32.5R pastes, which contained granulated blast furnace slag, showed the highest rises in flowability. Finally, the fluidizing effect of polycarboxylate superplasticizers was much more intense in calcium aluminate cements, although flowability declined rapidly in this material.El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar el efecto de las diferencias estructurales de cuatro aditivos basados en policarboxilatos y poliéteres sobre las propiedades reológicas de pastas de cemento con diferente composición química, mineralógica y con distintas adiciones activas (CEM I 42,5 R, CEM I 52,5 R, CEM I 52,5 N/SR, CEM II/AV 42,5R, CEM II/ B-L 32,5 R, CEM III/B 32,5R, BL I 52,5R y CAC - Norma EN 197-1:2000. Los resultados obtenidos sobre la fluidez de la pasta en el ensayo del “Minislump” coinciden con la evolución de los valores de los parámetros reológicos (esfuerzo de

  18. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  19. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  20. Phase transformations in lithium aluminates irradiated with neutrons; Transformaciones de fase en aluminatos de litio irradiados con neutrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, L.M.; Delfin L, A.; Urena N, F.; Basurto, R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Bosch, P. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The lithium aluminate like candidate to be used in the coverings producers of tritium in the fusion nuclear reactors, presents high resistance to the corrosion to the one to be stuck to structural materials as special steels. However, the crystallographic changes that take place in the cover that is continually subjected to irradiation with neutrons, can alter its resistance to the corrosion. In this work the changes of crystalline structure are shown that they present two types of nano structures of lithium aluminates, subjected to an average total dose 7.81 x 10{sup 8} Gy in the fixed irradiation system of capsules of the one TRIGA Mark lll nuclear reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The studied nano structures presented only phase transformations without formation of amorphous material. (Author)

  1. Polymer-cement interactions towards improved wellbore cement fracture sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, B. S.; Iloejesi, C.; Minkler, M. J.; Schindler, A. K.; Beckingham, L. E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in deep geologic formations is a promising means of reducing point source emissions of CO2. In these systems, CO2 is captured at the source and then injected to be utilized (eg. in enhanced oil recovery or as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal energy plants) or stored in geologic formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or saline aquifers. While CCUS in subsurface systems could aid in reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions, the potential for CO2 leakage from these systems to overlying formations remains a major limitation and poses a significant risk to the security of injected CO2. Thus, improved materials for both initial wellbore isolation and repairing leakage pathways that develop over time are sought. One approach for the repair of cement fractures in wellbore (and other) systems is the injection of polymer materials into the fracture with a subsequent environmentally dependent (temperature, pressure, pH, etc.) densification or solidification. Here, we aim to investigate novel polymer materials for use to repair leaking wellbores in the context of CCUS. We synthesize and fully characterize a series of novel polymer materials and utilize a suite of analysis techniques to examine polymer-cement interactions at a range of conditions (namely temperature, pressure and pH). Initial findings will be leveraged to design novel polymer materials for further evaluation in polymer-cement composite cores, cement fracture healing, and the aging behavior of healed cements.

  2. Mineralogy and microstructure of two Mexican Portland cements for the confinement of radioactive waste; Mineralogia y microestructura de dos cementos mexicanos Portland para el confinamiento de desechos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Campus El Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca Km. 15.5, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Badillo A, V. E.; Ramirez S, J. R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Nava E, N., E-mail: nasiega_181@hotmail.com [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The cementitious materials are involved in the different stages of radioactive waste management because they are used for the waste immobilization in the container, as well as filling in the spaces between containers vaults and also as engineering barrier and construction material in civil construction site. Therefore, is necessary to have a study of commercial cement available nationwide involving solid timely analysis in order to identify which phases are responsible for confinement of radionuclides, if considered the most reactive phase -CSH- or called secondary phases. In this research the hydration products of cement are presented as well as its importance in the nuclear industry. The analysis and observation of the cement clinker and the hydration products on the manufactured pulps with two commercial cements resistant to sulphates was realized using the observation technique of solid X-ray diffraction and nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Fluorescence. The results show the presence of calcium silicate hydrates in the amorphous phase and the presence of ettringite crystals and portlandite sheets is appreciated. The abundant iron phase called tetra calcium ferro aluminate has been identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (Author)

  3. Mutable Lewis and Bronsted Acidity of Aluminated SBA-15 as Revealed by NMR of Adsorbed Pyridine-(15)N

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gurinov, A. A.; Rozhkova, Yu. A.; Zukal, Arnošt; Čejka, Jiří; Shenderovich, I, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 19 (2011), s. 12115-12123 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701; GA ČR GA203/08/0604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : 15N NMR * post-synthesis alumination * phase Beckmann rearrangement Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.186, year: 2011

  4. Preparation of High-purity Lactulose through Efficient Recycle of Catalyst Sodium Aluminate and Nanofiltration: A Pilot-scale Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Tessema, Habtamu Admassu; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Hua, Xiao; Yang, Ruijin

    2018-04-16

    Lactulose, a valuable lactose-originated "bifidus factor" product, is exclusively produced by chemical-based isomerization commercially. Complexing agent of sodium aluminate exhibited high conversion efficiency and strong recyclable stability is more practical for industrial applications. In this study, efficient purification of high-purity lactulose through recycling of sodium aluminate and further desalination by nanofiltration (NF) was implemented in a pilot scale. Over 99.5% of catalyst was prior recycled in the form of Al(OH) 3 precipitate by pH-induced precipitation and centrifugation, residual aluminum was further absorbed by ion exchange resin to an acceptable level (≤10 mg Kg -1 ). Subsequently, impurities (monosaccharides and NaCl) were ideally separated from lactulose syrup by NF process based on their significant retention differences (lactulose: 94.8-97.2%> lactose: 86.2-93.5%> monosaccharides: 36.3-48.7%> NaCl: 9.5-31.1%). High-purity (>95 %) lactulose was obtained with yield >90% in both constant and variable volume diafiltration modes (CVD/VVD) when volume dilution ratio (V c /V f ) was 4.0 and 2.5, respectively. Both experimental and predicted results showed that VVD mode was more water-saving in practical. This is the first trial purification of lactulose syrup from chemical isomerization of lactose catalyzed by sodium aluminate, and the applied methodology is a promising industrial scale purification strategy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of mechanical properties of aluminized coatings in advanced gas turbine blades using a small punch method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Y.; Ito, M. [Chuba Electric Power Co., Nagoya (Japan). Electric Power R and D Center; Sakurai, S. [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan). Mechanical Engineering Research Lab.; Bloomer, T.E.; Kameda, J. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)]|[Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Center for Advanced Technology Development

    1997-04-01

    Advanced technologies of superalloy casting and coatings enable one to enhance the performance of combined cycle gas turbines for electric power generation by increasing the firing temperature. This paper describes examination of the microstructure/composition and mechanical properties (22--950 C) in aluminized CoCrAlY coatings of advanced gas turbine blades using scanning Auger microprobe and a small punch (SP) testing method. Aluminized coatings consisted of layered structure divided into four regimes: (1) Al enriched and Cr depleted region, (2) Al and Cr graded region, (3) fine grained microstructure with a mixture of Al and Cr enriched phases and (4) Ni/Co interdiffusion zone adjacent to the interface. SP specimens were prepared in order that the specimen surface would be located in the various coating regions. SP tests indicated strong dependence of the fracture properties on the various coatings regimes. Coatings 1 and 2 with very high microhardness showed much easier formation of brittle cracks in a wide temperature range, compared to coatings 3 and 4 although the coating 2 had ductility improvement at 950 C. The coating 3 had lower room temperature ductility than the coating 4. However, the ductility in the coating 3 exceeded that in the region 4 above 730 C due to a precipitous ductility increase. The integrity of aluminized coatings while in-service is discussed in light of the variation of the low cycle fatigue life as well as the ductility in the layered structure.

  6. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time.

  7. Radwaste solidification system (cement)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    The radwaste solidification system described herein is designed to package and solidify radioactive waste material produced at nuclear power plants using cement solidification agents, and is referred to as RSS(C). This integrated system consists of all the equipment necessary to store and transfer solidification agents and additives, collect and transfer process waste in the form of solids, liquids, slurries, and sludges, and continuously mix these materials under controlled conditions prior to letdown into a disposable container. As an integrated system, the RSS(C) also includes the process instrumentation necessary to monitor all process conditions throughout the radwaste packaging cycle and provides the operator with the controls necessary to operate the system in a variety of packaging modes. A single process train which is considered adequate for PWR's is described. A dual process train with crossover capability and two separate filling stations is recommended for most BWR applications. A general description of the solidification process by system configuration and subsystem and detailed equipment descriptions including process equipment data sheets are presented. Equipment listings are also presented. A narrative discussion of the operating procedures for processing a variety of radwaste types normally produced in BWR's and PWR's is presented. A safety analysis is presented, and a detailed discussion of system maintenance requirements and the estimated radiation exposure incident to maintenance is presented. The results of laboratory and prototype testing conducted by Hitman Nuclear and Development Corp. (HNDC) to establish the process parameters required to achieve a satisfactory solidified product are given. A summary of the engineering and quality verification requirements implemented through the HNDC Quality Assurance Program is presented

  8. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-461 (Third Review)] Gray Portland Cement... duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4281 (December 2011), entitled Gray Portland Cement...

  9. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  10. Traction test of temporary dental cements

    OpenAIRE

    Román Rodríguez, Juan Luis; Millan Martínez, Diego; Fons Font, Antonio; Agustín Panadero, Rubén; Fernández Estevan, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Background Classic self-curing temporary cements obstruct the translucence of provisional restorations. New dual-cure esthetic temporary cements need investigation and comparison with classic cements to ensure that they are equally retentive and provide adequate translucence. The objective is to analyze by means of traction testing in a in vitro study the retention of five temporary cements. Material and Methods Ten molars were prepared and ten provisional resin restorations were fabricated u...

  11. Influence of organic solvent treatment on elasticoluminescent property of europium-doped strontium aluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujio, Yuki; Xu, Chao-Nan; Terasaki, Nao; Ueno, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    The influence of an organic solvent treatment on elasticoluminescent (ELS) characteristics of mechanoluminescent (ML) sensor using the composite film consisting of an ELS material and epoxy resin was investigated. We used strontium aluminate doped with a small amount of europium (SrAl 2 O 4 :Eu, SAOE) as an ELS material in this study. After evaluating the ELS characteristics of the fabricated ML sensors using SAOE treated with/without various organic solvents, SAOE treated with methanol and ethanol showed lower ELS intensities than that of untreated SAOE. In contrast, the ELS response curves against strain for the ML sensors using SAOE treated with acetone and toluene, overlapped with that of untreated SAOE. From the characterization of SAOE treated with alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol, we can hypothesize that poor ELS characteristics is due to the degradation of the SAOE grain surfaces by the hydrolyze reaction of SAOE with hydroxyl group of alcohol. Thus, on the basis of the obtained results, we can conclude that the selection of organic solvent used in the preparation of SAOE film is of considerable importance in the development of ML sensor with a highly-reliable ELS characteristic. -- Highlights: • Influence of organic solution treatment on the sensing characteristics of a mechanoluminescent (ML) sensor using SrAl 2 O 4 :Eu has been investigated. • An alcohol treatment of SAOE powder has considerable effect on its ML characteristic. • There is almost no influence of acetone and toluene treatments on ML characteristics

  12. Analyses of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Insulation Retrieved After 19 Years of Space Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Waters, Deborah L.; Mohammed, Jelila S.; Perry, Bruce A.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Since its launch in April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has made many important observations from its vantage point in low Earth orbit (LEO). However, as seen during five servicing missions, the outer layer of multilayer insulation (MLI) has become successively more embrittled and has cracked in many areas. In May 2009, during the 5th servicing mission (called SM4), two MLI blankets were replaced with new insulation pieces and the space-exposed MLI blankets were retrieved for degradation analyses by teams at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The MLI blankets were from Equipment Bay 8, which received direct sunlight, and Equipment Bay 5, which received grazing sunlight. Each blanket contained a range of unique regions based on environmental exposure and/or physical appearance. The retrieved MLI blanket s aluminized-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) outer layers have been analyzed for changes in optical, physical, and mechanical properties, along with space induced chemical and morphological changes. When compared to pristine material, the analyses have shown how the Al-FEP was severely affected by the space environment. This paper reviews tensile properties, solar absorptance, thermal emittance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data and atomic oxygen erosion values of the retrieved HST blankets after 19 years of space exposure.

  13. Formation of microstructural features in hot-dip aluminized AISI 321 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huilgol, Prashant; Rajendra Udupa, K.; Udaya Bhat, K.

    2018-02-01

    Hot-dip aluminizing (HDA) is a proven surface coating technique for improving the oxidation and corrosion resistance of ferrous substrates. Although extensive studies on the HDA of plain carbon steels have been reported, studies on the HDA of stainless steels are limited. Because of the technological importance of stainless steels in high-temperature applications, studies of their microstructural development during HDA are needed. In the present investigation, the HDA of AISI 321 stainless steel was carried out in a pure Al bath. The microstructural features of the coating were studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed that the coating consists of two regions: an Al top coat and an aluminide layer at the interface between the steel and Al. The Al top coat was found to consist of intermetallic phases such as Al7Cr and Al3Fe dispersed in an Al matrix. Twinning was observed in both the Al7Cr and the Al3Fe phases. Furthermore, the aluminide layer comprised a mixture of nanocrystalline Fe2Al5, Al7Cr, and Al. Details of the microstructural features are presented, and their formation mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Solution processed lanthanum aluminate gate dielectrics for use in metal oxide-based thin film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esro, M.; Adamopoulos, G., E-mail: g.adamopoulos@lancaster.ac.uk [Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Mazzocco, R.; Kolosov, O.; Krier, A. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Vourlias, G. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Milne, W. I. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering, University of Canterbury, 4800 Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2015-05-18

    We report on ZnO-based thin-film transistors (TFTs) employing lanthanum aluminate gate dielectrics (La{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}O{sub y}) grown by spray pyrolysis in ambient atmosphere at 440 °C. The structural, electronic, optical, morphological, and electrical properties of the La{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}O{sub y} films and devices as a function of the lanthanum to aluminium atomic ratio were investigated using a wide range of characterization techniques such as UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and field-effect measurements. As-deposited LaAlO{sub y} dielectrics exhibit a wide band gap (∼6.18 eV), high dielectric constant (k ∼ 16), low roughness (∼1.9 nm), and very low leakage currents (<3 nA/cm{sup 2}). TFTs employing solution processed LaAlO{sub y} gate dielectrics and ZnO semiconducting channels exhibit excellent electron transport characteristics with hysteresis-free operation, low operation voltages (∼10 V), high on/off current modulation ratio of >10{sup 6}, subthreshold swing of ∼650 mV dec{sup −1}, and electron mobility of ∼12 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}.

  15. Elastic Properties of Tricalcium Aluminate from High-Pressure Experiments and First-Principles Calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk

    2012-06-04

    The structure and elasticity of tricalcium aluminate (C 3A) have been experimentally and theoretically studied. From high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments, the bulk modulus of 102(6) and 110(3) GPa were obtained by fitting second- and third-order finite strain equation of state, respectively. First-principles calculations with a generalized gradient approximation gave an isotropic bulk modulus of 102.1 GPa and an isothermal bulk modulus of 106.0 GPa. The static calculations using the exchange-correlation functional show an excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Based on the agreement, accurate elastic constants and other elastic moduli were computed. The slight difference of behavior at high pressure can be explained by the infiltration of pressure-transmitting silicone oil into structural holes in C 3A. The computed elastic and mechanical properties will be useful in understanding structural and mechanical properties of cementitious materials, particularly with the increasing interest in the advanced applications at the nanoscale. © 2012 The American Ceramic Society.

  16. Diffusion of lithium-6 isotopes in lithium aluminate ceramics using neutron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhinney, H.G. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); James, W.D. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Center for Chemical Characterization and Analysis); Schweikert, E.A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Center for Chemical Characterization and Analysis); Williams, J.R. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Hollenberg, G. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Nuclear Reactor Material Group, US Dept. of Energy, Hanford, WA (United States)); Welsh, J. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Center for Chemical Characterization and Analysis); Sereatan, W. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-07-01

    Lithium Ceramics offer tremendous potential as a source for the production of tritium ([sup 3]H) for fusion power reactors. Their successful application will depend to a great extent upon the diffusion properties of the [sup 6]Li within the matrix. Consequently knowledge of [sup 6]Li concentration gradients in the ceramic matrices is an important requirement in the continued development of the technology. In this investigation, the neutron depth profile (NDP) technique has been applied to the study of concentration profiles of [sup 6]Li in lithium aluminate ceramics, doped with 1.8%, 50% and 95% [sup 6]Li isotopic concentrations. Specimen for analysis were prepared at Battelle (PNL) as pellet discs. Samples for diffusion studies were arranged as diffusion couples in the following manner: 1.8% [sup 6]Li discs/85% [sup 6]Li powder. Experiments were performed at the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor Building, utilizing 1 MW equivalent thermal neutron fluxes 3x10[sup 11] n/m[sup 2] s. The depth probed by the technique is approximately 15 [mu]m. Diffusion coefficients are in the range of 2.1x10[sup -12] to 7.0x10[sup -11] m[sup 2] s[sup -1] for 1.8% [sup 6]Li-doped ceramics annealed at 1200 and 1400 C, for 4 to 48-h anneal times. (orig.)

  17. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  18. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well

  19. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  20. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  1. Rice Husk Ash Cement – An alternative pozzolana cement for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The engineering properties of the cement resulting from a mixture of OPC plus RHA and lime plus RHA were satisfactory with addition of up to 50% RHA. The RHA improved greatly the compressive strength of lime. The cost of producing RHA was considered in pricing the resulting binder and it showed that the use of RHA ...

  2. Influence of the mineralogical composition of cement in the diffusion of chemical species; Influencia de la composicion mineralogica del cemento en la difusion de especies quimicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, E.

    2015-07-01

    , setting time, color and others. Portland cements commonly used in the construction industry, they are based primarily on the mineral phases of limestone and silica. In conventional cement admixtures the chemical reactivity depends on the ratio of tricalcium and dicalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S/C{sub 2}S), the tricalcium aluminate (C{sub 3}A) influences in the setting time and tetra calcium ferro aluminate (C{sub 4}AF) gives a different color to the cement. In this research the mineralogical composition of two commercial cements is studied and its influence on the phenomenon of radionuclides retention. For this particular concrete discs were manufactured with water, sand and two commercial cements: Tolteca Extra CPC 30-RRS and Cruz Azul CPC Type II 30-R. The solid observation techniques used for analysis of the cement paste and concrete they are: X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy, as well as the nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer and X-ray Fluorescence. (Author)

  3. Development of an immobilisation technique by cementation for non-radioactive simulated liquid waste, from Mo-99 production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arva, E A; Marabini, S G; Varani, J L

    2012-01-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is the responsible for developing a management nuclear waste disposal programme. This programme contemplates the strictly environmental safe and efficient management of the radioactive waste from different sources. Since 1985, CNEA has been producing commercially Mo-99 for medical use. In this process two types of liquid waste are produced. One of them has high alkaline (NaOH 3,5M) and aluminate contents. Since Mo-99 production started, such liquid waste was stored in specially designed containers during production, and after a decay period in smaller containers in interim storage conditions. As this waste is still a liquid, development of an immobilisation technique is required. Immobilisation of radioactive liquid waste by cementation is a frequently used technique, and will be studied in the present work using Mo-99 non-radioactive simulated liquid waste. In this second stage, a full scale (200 liters drum) cementation test using simulated non radioactive waste was carried out. Such test included: using the BEBA 201 mixing machine - the same that will be used with real waste in the future for 'tuning up' the process, construction of a specially designed temperature sensor for measuring the maximum temperature value (five different positions, four inside the drum and one outside) and the time elapsed after all components mixing. Finally, standard specimens (IRAM 1622) were made for mechanical resistance tests after cement setting at 28 days. The results show values of temperature not above 40 o C with the maximum at 12 hours before component mixing and compression strength of 14 MPa. Such values are compatible for a waste immobilisation process by cementation (author)

  4. False set in aireated cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez, T.

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aireation on the appearance or elimination of the false setting in industrial portland cements is studied by means of infrared spectroscopy.

    Se estudia por medio de la espectroscopia infrarroja la influencia de la aireación sobre la aparición o eliminación del fraguado, en cemento portland industriales.

  5. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  6. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  7. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of acetic acid over Cu-Zn supported calcium aluminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Pravakar; Patel, Madhumita; Pant, Kamal K

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by catalytic steam reforming (CSR) of biomass-derived oil. Typically bio oil contains 12-14% acetic acid; therefore, this acid was chosen as model compound for reforming of biooil with the help of a Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst for high yield of H(2) with low CH(4) and CO content. Calcium aluminate support was prepared by solid-solid reaction at 1350°C. X-ray diffraction indicates 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) as major, CaA(l4)O(7) and Ca(5)A(l6)O(14) as minor phases. Cu and Zn were loaded onto the support by wet-impregnation at 10 and 1wt.%, respectively. The catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM and the surface area for both support and Cu-Zn were 10.5 and 5.8m(2)/g, respectively. CSR was carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor (I.D.=19mm) at temperatures between 600 and 800°C with 3-g loadings and (H(2)O/acetic acid) wt. ratio of 9:1. Significantly high (80%) yield of hydrogen was obtained over Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst, as incorporation of Zn enhanced the H(2) yield by reducing deactivation of the catalyst. The coke formation on the support (Ca-12/Al-7) surface was negligible due to the presence of excess oxygen in the 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of damages by neutron irradiation in lithium aluminates; Estudio de danos por irradiacion neutronica en aluminatos de litio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios G, O

    1999-06-01

    Lithium aluminates proposed to the production of tritium in fusion nuclear reactors, due to the thermal stability that they present as well as the behavior of the aluminium to the irradiation. As a neutron flux with profile ({approx_equal} 14 Mev) of a fusion reactor is not available. A irradiation experiment was designed in order to know the micro and nano structure damages produced by fast and thermal neutrons in two irradiation positions of the fusion nuclear reactor Triga Mark III: CT (Thermal Column) and SIFCA (System of Irradiation Fixed of Capsules). In this work samples of lithium aluminate were characterized by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Two samples were prepared by two methods: a) coalition method and b) peroxide method. This characterization comprised original and irradiated samples. The irradiated sample amounted to 4 in total: one for each preparation method and one for each irradiation position. The object of this analysis was to correlate with the received neutron dose the damages suffered by the samples with the neutron irradiation during long periods (440 H), in their micro and nano structure aspects; in order to understand the changes as a function of the irradiation zone (with thermal and fast neutron flux) and the preparation methods of the samples and having as an antecedent the irradiation in SIFCA position by short times (2h). The obtained results are referred to the stability of {gamma} -aluminate phase, under given conditions of irradiation and defined nano structure arrangement. They also refer to the proposals of growth mechanism and nucleation of new phases. The error associated with the measurement of neutron dose is also discussed. (Author)

  9. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  10. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  11. Predictors of excess cement and tissue response to fixed implant-supported dentures after cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Michael; Robra, Bernt-Peter; Walther, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    The cementation of fixed implant-supported restorations involves the risk of excess cement remaining in the peri-implant tissue that may cause a peri-implant tissue response with attachment loss. The aim was to study the peri-implant tissue response after cementation and to detect potential predictors of excess cement. Clinical complications after cementation in several index cases led to a recall of all patients treated with a special methacrylate cement (one hundred five patients with one hundred eighty-eight implants) and systematic reevaluation of 71 patients (68%) with one hundred twenty-six implants (67%). In all cases, suprastructures including abutments were removed, and findings were documented. Implant diameter was significantly associated with the frequency of excess cement. Implant location or system had no significant effect. Excess cement in turn was associated with bleeding on probing, suppuration, and peri-implant attachment loss. In the absence of excess cement 58.8% of implants had no peri-implant attachment loss versus 37.3% when excess cement was present. With increasing retention time of the methacrylate cement, more peri-implant attachment loss was detected. However, the latter association was not significant. Larger diameters are significantly associated with excess cement in peri-implant tissue. Consequences of excess cement may be increased bleeding on probing, suppuration, and possibly peri-implant attachment loss. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Retention of gold alloy crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Lilliam M; Frey, Gary N; Winkler, Mark M; Tate, William H; Burgess, John O; Powers, John M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure in vitro retention of cast gold crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements. Forty-eight human molars were prepared on a lathe to produce complete crown preparations with a consistent taper and split into six groups, eight crowns in each group. Crowns were cast in a high-gold alloy and then cemented. After 24 hours, the retention force (N) was recorded and mean values were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Fisher post-hoc least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test (a = .05). Failure sites were examined under 3100 magnification and recorded. Mean values (SD) for each group in increasing order of retention force were: Harvard Cement: 43 N (27), TempoCem: 59 N (16), PermaCem Dual: 130 N (42), RelyX Luting Cement: 279 N (26), Contax and PermaCem Dual: 286 N (38), and TempoCem with Contax and PermaCem Dual: 340 N (14). The Fisher PLSD interval (P = .05) for comparing cements was 29 N. Zinc-phosphate cement and provisional resin cements had the lowest retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent and the hybrid-ionomer cement had similar retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent applied after use of a provisional resin cement had a significantly higher retention force than the other cements tested.

  13. Retention of provisional crowns cemented with eight temporary cements: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Mariana Ribeiro de Moraes; Santiago, Luiz Carlos

    2004-09-01

    Many temporary cements are commercially available; therefore, it is necessary to indicate them for each clinical requirement with regard to the tensile strength of prosthetic retainers. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the retention of provisional crowns cemented with eight temporary cements, over full crown preparations with standardized mechanical principles as height, taper, and length. For that purpose, eighty human first premolars received full crown preparation with standardized height and taper. Provisional crowns were fabricated and luted with eight brands of temporary cements. Twenty four hours after cementation, the restorations were submitted to tensile strength test in a universal testing machine and the data submitted to ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Mean tensile strength values ranged from 20.1N for Nogenol cement to 67.5N for Hydro C cement. Statistically significant difference (pcrowns cemented with Hydro C cement were more retentive that than those cemented with the other cements, except for Rely X Temp and Temp Bond. The less retentive crowns were those cemented with Nogenol and Freegenol temporary cements.

  14. The Effect of TiO₂ Doped Photocatalytic Nano-Additives on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland and High Alumina Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Nicolás, María; Navarro-Blasco, Íñigo; Fernández, José M; Alvarez, José Ignacio

    2017-10-14

    Mortars with two different binders (Portland cement (PC) and high alumina cement (HAC)) were modified upon the bulk incorporation of nano-structured photocatalytic additives (bare TiO₂, and TiO₂ doped with either iron (Fe-TiO₂) or vanadium (V-TiO₂)). Plastic and hardened state properties of these mortars were assessed in order to study the influence of these nano-additives. Water demand was increased, slightly by bare TiO₂ and Fe-TiO₂, and strongly by V-TiO₂, in agreement with the reduction of the particle size and the tendency to agglomerate. Isothermal calorimetry showed that hydration of the cementitious matrices was accelerated due to additional nucleation sites offered by the nano-additives. TiO₂ and doped TiO₂ did not show pozzolanic reactivity in the binding systems. Changes in the pore size distribution, mainly the filler effect of the nano-additives, accounted for the increase in compressive strengths measured for HAC mortars. A complex microstructure was seen in calcium aluminate cement mortars, strongly dependent on the curing conditions. Fe-TiO₂ was found to be homogeneously distributed whereas the tendency of V-TiO₂ to agglomerate was evidenced by elemental distribution maps. Water absorption capacity was not affected by the nano-additive incorporation in HAC mortars, which is a favourable feature for the application of these mortars.

  15. The Effect of TiO2 Doped Photocatalytic Nano-Additives on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland and High Alumina Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pérez-Nicolás

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mortars with two different binders (Portland cement (PC and high alumina cement (HAC were modified upon the bulk incorporation of nano-structured photocatalytic additives (bare TiO2, and TiO2 doped with either iron (Fe-TiO2 or vanadium (V-TiO2. Plastic and hardened state properties of these mortars were assessed in order to study the influence of these nano-additives. Water demand was increased, slightly by bare TiO2 and Fe-TiO2, and strongly by V-TiO2, in agreement with the reduction of the particle size and the tendency to agglomerate. Isothermal calorimetry showed that hydration of the cementitious matrices was accelerated due to additional nucleation sites offered by the nano-additives. TiO2 and doped TiO2 did not show pozzolanic reactivity in the binding systems. Changes in the pore size distribution, mainly the filler effect of the nano-additives, accounted for the increase in compressive strengths measured for HAC mortars. A complex microstructure was seen in calcium aluminate cement mortars, strongly dependent on the curing conditions. Fe-TiO2 was found to be homogeneously distributed whereas the tendency of V-TiO2 to agglomerate was evidenced by elemental distribution maps. Water absorption capacity was not affected by the nano-additive incorporation in HAC mortars, which is a favourable feature for the application of these mortars.

  16. Effect of the cement type on compatibility with carboxylate super plasticisers; Influencia de la naturaleza del cemento en la compatibilidad con aditivos superplastificantes basados en carboxilatos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundyra-Oracz, G.; Kurdowski, W.

    2011-07-01

    An empirical study was conducted to gain a fuller understanding of the interactions taking place in cement superplasticiser systems. To this end, two clinkers of clinkers of known chemical and phase composition were prepared in this study to gain insight into such interactions. One contained no tricalcium aluminate (C1), while the other had a 9% C{sub 3}A content (C2). These clinkers were ground to approximately 340 m{sup 2}/kg and blended with gypsum only or gypsum and Klein compound (3CaO{center_dot}3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaSO{sub 4}) (1, 2). Sufficient compound was added to C1 to ensure the formation of about the same amount of ettringite after 0.5 and 1 h of hydration as found in cement C2 + gypsum. The admixture used was a carboxylate superplasticiser. Rheology measurements showed that while paste yield stress was correlated to ettringite formation, no such simple relationship was observed for plastic viscosity. Plastic viscosity depended on the total hydrates formed, i.e., not only as ettringite but also as C-S-H gel. The findings revealed that in clinkers with very low sulfate and potassium contents, the rheology of carboxylate-containing cement paste is primarily controlled by ettringite formation. (Author) 15 refs.

  17. Evaluation of the Performance of Local Cements with Imported Class

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Portland cement is the most commonly used cement in the oil and gas industry and it accounts for about 99% of all primary cementing operations throughout the world. For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet the required standards of the American Petroleum Institute ...

  18. Use sulfoferritic cements in construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samchenko, Svetlana V.; Zorin, Dmitriy A.

    2018-03-01

    Currently, high-rise construction has received increasing attention around the world. In the big cities under construction is less space and one solution is the high-rise construction. However, high-rise buildings use special requirements, such as strength, thermal insulation, wind load and others. When concrete is exposed to continuous loads by wind or to mechanical loads, it undergoes abrasion. Resistance to this process depends on the characteristics of materials that the concrete and finishing seams are made of. Research on increasing impact and abrasion resistance of calcium sulfoferrite-based cement stone from the perspective of formation of cement stone structure will be instrumental in developing durable materials for application in high-rise construction.

  19. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Taratuta V. D.; Belokur K. A.; Serga G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  20. Initial acidity of dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, D; Evje, D M

    1984-04-01

    The acidity in aqueous solutions following release of acid components from glass ionomer, silicate, zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate cements has been registered by pH measurements. One brand of each type was studied. Initial setting was accomplished at two different temperatures; 23 degrees C and in the interval from 23 degrees C to about 60 degrees C. In the latter case external heat was transferred to the samples by infrared radiation for a period of 2 min. The highest acidity was associated with the silicate specimen, while the lowest acidity was recorded for the zinc polycarboxylate specimen. Exposure to infrared radiation resulted in a reduced acidity for all types of cements. The effect of infrared exposure was most pronounced for the silicate specimens, resulting in a reduction of acid release by a factor of about 10 compared to the nontreated samples. The resistance to acid release was found to be improved by a factor of about 5 for the glass ionomer and about 3 for the zinc phosphate cement treated in a similar way. Clinically, it seems possible considerably to reduce the risk of pulpal injuries associated with the insertion of silicate restorations by using a moderate infrared radiation treatment. Furthermore, the susceptibility of glass ionomer cements to a high initial erosion should be reduced by the use of such a technique. After exposure of the glass ionomer and silicate specimens to infrared radiation at the temperature interval applied, the samples had a more glossy, tooth-like appearance compared to the nonexposed samples, improving the aesthetic properties.

  1. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varas, M.J.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-01-01

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements

  2. Use of Incineration Solid Waste Bottom Ash as Cement Mixture in Cement Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, N. H.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Jin, T. S.; Kadir, A. A.; Tugui, C. A.; Sandu, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Incineration solid waste bottom ash was use to examine the suitability as a substitution in cement production. This study enveloped an innovative technology option for designing new equivalent cement that contains incineration solid waste bottom ash. The compressive strength of the samples was determined at 7, 14, 28 and 90 days. The result was compared to control cement with cement mixture containing incineration waste bottom ash where the result proved that bottom ash cement mixture able achieve its equivalent performance compared to control cement which meeting the requirement of the standards according to EN 196-1. The pozzolanic activity index of bottom ash cement mixture reached 0.92 at 28 days and 0.95 at 90 and this values can be concluded as a pozzolanic material with positive pozzolanic activity. Calcium hydroxide in Portland cement decreasing with the increasing replacement of bottom ash where the reaction occur between Ca(OH)2 and active SiO2.

  3. Cement replacement materials. Properties, durability, sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the latest findings in the properties and application of Supplementary Cementing Materials and blended cements currently used in the world in concrete. Sustainability is an important issue all over the world. Carbon dioxide emission has been a serious problem in the world due to the greenhouse effect. Today many countries agreed to reduce the emission of CO2. Many phases of cement and concrete technology can affect sustainability. Cement and concrete industry is responsible for the production of 7% carbon dioxide of the total world CO2 emission. The use of supplementary cementing materials (SCM), design of concrete mixtures with optimum content of cement and enhancement of concrete durability are the main issues towards sustainability in concrete industry.

  4. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  5. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-461 (Third Review)] Gray Portland Cement... Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States International... Act) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and cement...

  6. Structural and luminescence effects of Ga co-doping on Ce-doped yttrium aluminate based phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayvacikli, M. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Canimoglu, A. [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, Nigde (Turkey); Muresan, L.E., E-mail: laura_muresan2003@yahoo.com [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Institute for Research in Chemistry, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu Tudoran, L. [Babes Bolyai University, Electronic Microscopy Centre, Clinicilor 37, 400006 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Garcia Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Karabulut, Y. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Jorge, A. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Karali, T. [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 35100 Bornova, İzmir (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Jazan University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-05-05

    Herein, we primarily focus on luminescence spectrum measurements of various types of green emitting yttrium aluminate phosphors modified with gallium (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5-x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12}) synthesised by solid state reaction. The luminescent emission of samples depends on sample temperature and excitation radiation such as incident X-ray, electron and laser beam. Here, we measured radioluminescence (RL), cathodoluminescence (CL), photoluminescence (PL) along with XRD in order to clarify relationship between lattice defects and the spectral luminescence emissions. The RL and CL spectra of YAG:Ce exhibit an emission band ranging from 300 to 450 nm related to Y{sub Al} antisite defects. The broad emission band of garnet phosphors is shifted from 526 nm to 498 nm with increasing of Ga{sup 3+} content, while full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the band tends to be greater than the width of unmodified YAG:Ce garnet. Deconvolution of the spectrum reveals that three emission bands centred at 139, 234 and 294 °C occur in aluminate host garnets. - Highlights: • We present preparation of YAG:Ce{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+} phosphors by a solid state reaction method. • The shape and size of phosphor particles were investigated. • The luminescence properties were studied by different excitation sources.

  7. Synthesis of zinc aluminate with high surface area by microwave hydrothermal method applied in the transesterification of soybean oil (biodiesel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirino, M.R. [Chemistry Laboratory of Federal University of Paraiba (LABQUIM), Campus III, 58200-000 Bananeiras, PB (Brazil); Oliveira, M.J.C. [Academic Unit of Materials Engineering, UFCG, Campina Grande Campus I, 58429-900 Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Keyson, D. [Laboratory of study in Science, DME, Federal University of Paraíba, Campus I, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Lucena, G.L., E-mail: guilherme_leo1@yahoo.com.br [Chemistry Laboratory of Federal University of Paraiba (LABQUIM), Campus III, 58200-000 Bananeiras, PB (Brazil); Oliveira, J.B.L. [Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN, Campus I, 59078-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Gama, L. [Academic Unit of Materials Engineering, UFCG, Campina Grande Campus I, 58429-900 Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel was synthesized by the microwave hydrothermal method in only 15 or 30 min. • The powders show high specific surface area. • ZAT{sub b}15 showed activity of 52.22% for the conversion of soybean oil into biodiesel. - Abstract: Zinc aluminate is a material with high thermal stability and high mechanical strength that, owing to these properties, is used as a catalyst or support. In this work, zinc aluminate spinel was synthesized by the microwave hydrothermal method in only 15 or 30 min at a low temperature (150 °C) without templates, using only Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O, Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, and urea as precursors and applied in the transesterification of soybean oil. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} had a cubic structure without secondary phases. The nitrogen adsorption measurements (BET) revealed a high surface area (266.57 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) for the nanopowder synthesized in 15 min. This powder showed activity of 52.22% for the catalytic conversion of soybean oil into biodiesel by transesterification.

  8. Effect of aluminate ions on the heat of hydration of cementitious waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1993-11-01

    During the hydration and setting of high-salt content liquid waste grouts, considerable heat is generated by exothermic reactions within the grout. These reactions include hydration reactions of cementitious solids and reactions between waste constituents and the solids. Adiabatic temperature rises exceeding 80 degrees C have been estimated for grouts prepared with a dry blend of 47 wt % fly ash, 47 wt % blast furnace slag, and 6 wt % type I/II Portland cement (1) Performance criteria for grout disposal specify that the temperature of the grout waste form must not exceed 90 degrees C (2) To counter the increase in temperature, inert solids were added to the ''47/47/6'' dry blend to reduce the amount of heat-generating solids, thereby decreasing the temperature rise. Based on preliminary results from adiabatic calorimetry, a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % class F fly ash, 28 wt % ground blast furnace slag, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement was selected for further testing

  9. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  10. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Chae, Sejung R.

    2013-05-22

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three dimensions revealing volumetric details. Scanning transmission X-ray microscope combines high spatial resolution imaging with high spectral resolution of the incident beam to reveal X-ray absorption near edge structure variations in the material nanostructure. Microdiffraction scans the surface of a sample to map its high order reflection or crystallographic variations with a micron-sized incident beam. High pressure X-ray diffraction measures compressibility of pure phase materials. Unique results of studies using the above tools are discussed-a study of pores, connectivity, and morphology of a 2,000 year old concrete using nanotomography; detection of localized and varying silicate chain depolymerization in Al-substituted tobermorite, and quantification of monosulfate distribution in tricalcium aluminate hydration using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy; detection and mapping of hydration products in high volume fly ash paste using microdiffraction; and determination of mechanical properties of various AFm phases using high pressure X-ray diffraction. © 2013 The Author(s).

  11. Effect of Co2+ Ions Doping on the Structural and Optical Properties of Magnesium Aluminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwal, Kiran; Ismail, Bushra; Rajani, K. S.; Kissinger, N. J. Suthan; Zeb, Aurang

    2017-07-01

    Cobalt-doped nanosized magnesium aluminate (Mg1-xCoxAl2O4) samples having different compositions ( x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation method. All samples were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultra violet-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence and diffused reflectance spectroscopy. The results of XRD revealed that the samples were spinel single phase cubic close packed crystalline materials. The lattice constant and x-ray density were found to be affected by the ionic radii of the doped metal cations. Using the Debye-Scherrer formula, the calculated crystalline size was found to be Co2+ ion concentration-dependent and varied between 32 nm and 40 nm. Nano-dimensions and phase of the Mg1-xCoxAl2O4 samples were analyzed and the replacement of Mg2+ ions with Co2+ ions was confirmed by elemental analysis. Three strong absorption bands at 540 nm, 580 nm and 630 nm were observed for the doped samples which are attributed to the three spin-allowed 4T1g (4F) → 4T2g, 4A2g, 4T1g (4P) electronic transitions of Co2+ at tetrahedral lattice sites. Nanophosphors have optical properties different from bulk because of spatial confinement and non-radiative relaxation. Decreases in particle size can increase the surface area and the defects, which can in turn increase the luminescent efficiency to make it very useful for tunable laser operations, persistent phosphorescence, color centers, photoconductivity and luminescence for display technology. MgAl2O4 was doped with Co2+ ions using a co-precipitation method and the optical absorption studies revealed that there is a decrease of band gap due to the increase of Co2+ content. The emission intensity of this phosphor is observed at 449 nm with a sharp peak attributed to the smaller size of the particles and the homogeneity of the powder.

  12. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite resin cements.

  13. Evaluation of cement thixotropy for the cement of oil wells in areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster. Keywords: cementing; lost circulation; ...

  14. Properties of paving units incorporating slag cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan A. El Nouhy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect and possibility of using Portland slag cement in the production of interlocking paving units. Paving units consist of two layers. Four mixes were cast. The first mix was the control mix, in which Portland cement was used in the two layers. In the second mix, Portland slag cement was used in the upper layer, Portland cement was used in the backing layer. In the third mix, Portland cement was placed in the upper layer, while Portland slag cement was used in the backing layer. Finally, in the fourth mix, Portland cement was fully replaced by Portland slag cement in both layers. Tests were carried out in order to investigate the properties of the manufactured specimens at ages 28 and 180 days, respectively. Compressive strength and abrasion resistance were conducted according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM C 140 and ASTM C418. Water absorption, split tensile strength, abrasion resistance, as well as, skid resistance were performed according to both Egyptian Standard Specifications (ESS 4382 and European Standard (EN 1338. The Egyptian standard is identical with the European standard. The results indicate that it is feasible to use Portland slag cement in the manufacture of paving blocks as the conditions of the conducted tests were satisfied at age180 days except for the minimum splitting tensile strength test.

  15. Integer programming of cement distribution by train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarsih

    2018-01-01

    Cement industry in Central Java distributes cement by train to meet daily demand in Yogyakarta and Central Java area. There are five destination stations. For each destination station, there is a warehouse to load cements. Decision maker of cement industry have a plan to redesign the infrastructure and transportation system. The aim is to determine how many locomotives, train wagons, and containers and how to arrange train schedules with subject to the delivery time. For this purposes, we consider an integer programming to minimize the total of operational cost. Further, we will discuss a case study and the solution the problem can be calculated by LINGO software.

  16. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  17. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  18. Efficiency modeling of solidification/stabilization of multi-metal contaminated industrial soil using cement and additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voglar, Grega E.; Lestan, Domen

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We assess the feasibility of using soil S/S for industrial land reclamation. → Retarders, accelerators, plasticizers were used in S/S cementitious formulation. → We proposed novel S/S efficiency model for multi-metal contaminated soils. - Abstract: In a laboratory study, formulations of 15% (w/w) of ordinary Portland cement (OPC), calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and pozzolanic cement (PC) and additives: plasticizers cementol delta ekstra (PCDE) and cementol antikorodin (PCA), polypropylene fibers (PPF), polyoxyethylene-sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) and aqueous acrylic polymer dispersion (Akrimal) were used for solidification/stabilization (S/S) of soils from an industrial brownfield contaminated with up to 157, 32,175, 44,074, 7614, 253 and 7085 mg kg -1 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and As, respectively. Soils formed solid monoliths with all cementitious formulations tested, with a maximum mechanical strength of 12 N mm -2 achieved after S/S with CAC + PCA. To assess the S/S efficiency of the used formulations for multi-element contaminated soils, we propose an empirical model in which data on equilibrium leaching of toxic elements into deionized water and TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) solution and the mass transfer of elements from soil monoliths were weighed against the relative potential hazard of the particular toxic element. Based on the model calculation, the most efficient S/S formulation was CAC + Akrimal, which reduced soil leachability of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and As into deionized water below the limit of quantification and into TCLP solution by up to 55, 185, 8750, 214, 4.7 and 1.2-times, respectively; and the mass transfer of elements from soil monoliths by up to 740, 746, 104,000, 4.7, 343 and 181-times, respectively.

  19. Study on the bound water of several high specific surface-area oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina); Etude de l'eau de constitution de plusieurs oxydes a grande surface specifique (glucine, alumine, silice-alumine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouquerol, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-11-01

    This study is concerned with the bound water of several oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina) at different steps of their dehydration (heating temperatures between 150 and 1100 deg. C). The following techniques have been used simultaneously: Thermal analysis (a new method has been developed), nitrogen adsorption (study of the texture), Diborane hydrolysis (qualitative and quantitative analysis of surface water), Infra-red spectrography (in the absorption range of water), Nuclear magnetic resonance (in the resonance range of protons). Thanks to these different techniques, five kinds of bound water have been observed. Attention is called on the great influence of the thermal treatment conditions on the evolution of the products resulting from the decomposition of alumina {alpha}-trihydrate Al(OH){sub 3} and beryllium {alpha}-hydroxide, in the course of the dehydration. Moreover, the author emphasizes the peculiar properties of the two kinds of oxides (alumina and beryllia) prepared through a new method of treatment under low pressure and constant speed of decomposition. Such particular features concern mainly texture, bound water, and consequently, also catalytic activity. (author) [French] Ce travail porte sur l'eau de constitution de plusieurs oxydes (glucine, alumine, silice-alumine) aux differents degres de leur deshydratation (temperatures de traitement comprises entre 150 et 1100 deg. C). Cette etude met simultanement en oeuvre: l'analyse thermique (proposition d'une nouvelle methode), l'adsorption d'azote (etude de texture), l'hydrolyse du diborane (analyse qualitative et quantitative de l'eau de surface), la spectrographie infra-rouge (dans le domaine d'absorption de l'eau), la resonance magnetique nucleaire (dans le domaine de resonance des protons). A l'aide de ces differentes techniques, cinq formes d'eau de constitution ont ete observees. L'attention est attiree sur la tres grande influence

  20. Rietveld analysis, powder diffraction and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Phase quantification of cement is essential in its industrial use, however many methods are inaccurate and/or time consuming. Powder diffraction is one of the more accurate techniques used for quantitative phase analysis of cement. There has been an increase in the use of Rietveld refinement and powder diffraction for the analysis and phase quantification of cement and its components in recent years. The complex nature of cement components, existence of solid solutions, polymorphic variation of phases and overlapping phase peaks in diffraction patterns makes phase quantification of cements by powder diffraction difficult. The main phase in cement is alite, a solid solution of tricalcium silicate. Tricalcium silicate has been found to exist in seven modifications in three crystal systems, including triclinic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral structures. Hence, phase quantification of cements using Rietveld methods usually involves the simultaneous modelling of several tricalcium silicate structures to fit the complex alite phase. An industry ordinary Portland cement, industry and standard clinker, and a synthetic tricalcium silicate were characterised using neutron, laboratory x-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction. Diffraction patterns were analysed using full-profile Rietveld refinement. This enabled comparison of x-ray, neutron and synchrotron data for phase quantification of the cement and examination of the tricalcium silicate. Excellent Rietveld fits were achieved, however the results showed that the quantitative phase analysis results differed for some phases in the same clinker sample between various data sources. This presentation will give a short introduction about cement components including polymorphism, followed by the presentation of some problems in phase quantification of cements and the role of Rietveld refinement in solving these problems. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  1. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Łuczaj-Cepowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. Material and methods: Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC, Fuji IX (GC, Ketac Molar (3M Espe and Ketac Silver (3M Espe. Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Results: Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Discussion: Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  2. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Łuczaj-Cepowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus.Material and methods: Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC, Fuji IX (GC, Ketac Molar (3M Espe and Ketac Silver (3M Espe. Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Results: Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Discussion: Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  3. Effect of Austenite Stability on Pack Aluminizing of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christopher; Kvryan, Armen; Kasnakjian, Shahan; Coronado, Armando; Sujittosakul, Sutine; Villalpando, Obed; Ravi, Vilupanur A.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were applied to the surfaces of several austenitic stainless steels—UNS S30300, S30400, S30900, S31000, and S31600 (Type 303, 304, 309, 310, and 316)—by the halide activated pack cementation process. The coating compositions, microstructures, and hardness were determined for the different steels coated at 850°C for 25 h. The stability of the austenite phase for each type of steel was calculated by determining the ratio of the nickel to the chromium equivalents based on their nominal compositions. The thickness of the inner diffusion zone in the coating was shown to be inversely related to the austenite stability of the steels. Microhardness measurements were obtained across the coating thickness and into the substrate. The hardness values followed the same trends as the aluminum composition profile into the substrate.

  4. Analysis of Chemical Composition of Portland Cement in Ghana: A Key to Understand the Behavior of Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Bediako, Mark; Amankwah, Eric Opoku

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Portland cement in concrete or mortar formation is very well influenced by chemical compositions among other factors. Many engineers usually have little information on the chemical compositions of cement in making decisions for the choice of commercially available Portland cement in Ghana. This work analyzed five different brands of Portland cement in Ghana, namely, Ghacem ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland limestone cement (PLC), CSIR-BRRI Pozzomix, Dangote OPC, a...

  5. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using the Cement-in-Cement Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Pallante, Graham D; Floccari, Lorena V; Vasileiadis, George I; Trousdale, Robert T

    2017-03-01

    The cement-in-cement technique is useful in the setting of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), especially to gain acetabular exposure, change a damaged or loose femoral component, or change the version, offset, or length of a fixed femoral component. The goal of this retrospective study was to assess the clinical and radiographic characteristics of revision THA using the cement-in- cement technique. Between 1971 and 2013, a total of 63 revision THAs used an Omnifit (Osteonics, Mahwah, New Jersey) or Exeter (Howmedica, Mahwah, New Jersey) stem and the cement-in-cement technique at the senior author's institution. Aseptic loosening (74%) was the predominant preoperative diagnosis followed by periprosthetic fracture (14%), instability (8%), and implant fracture (6%). Mean clinical follow-up was 5.5±3.8 years. The Harris Hip Score had a statistically significant increase of 18.5 points (Prevision THA using the cement-in-cement technique. There were 13 returns to the operating room, resulting in an overall failure rate of 21%. Eleven (18%) cases required revision THA, but only 1 (2%) revision THA was for aseptic removal of the femoral component. All other femoral implants had no evidence of component migration, cement mantel fracture, or circumferential lucent lines at final follow-up. The patients who underwent cement-in-cement revision THA at the senior author's institution had good restoration of function but a high complication rate. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e348-e351.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Feasibility of producing nano cement in a traditional cement factory in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sada Abdalkhaliq Hasan Alyasri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the economic feasibility of producing nano cement through the establishment of a production line within an existing cement factory. Creating a nano cement production line within the Alkufa Cement factory in Iraq is selected as a case study. Evaluation measures including internal rate of return (IRR, net present value (NPV and breakeven point (BEP are used to evaluate the possible gain that can be achieved from this option. The results demonstrated a positive NPV. The IRR is found to be 26.8% and BEP is reached within 3 years after the establishment of the line. This indicates that producing nano cement in the existing cement factory is economically feasible and can be more advantageous than the ordinary cement.

  7. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.A.; Glasser, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  8. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  9. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  10. Cemented or cementless total knee arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudhon Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since 1996 we have been using cementless fixation with hydroxyapatite (HA coating. The purpose of this paper is to compare survivorship of a series of 100 cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA to a similar series of 100 cementless with a follow up of 11–16 years. Material methods: Both TKA are mobile bearing total knee postero-stabilized. They can be used with cement or without cement. Among 1030 New Wave TKATM implanted from 2002 to 2015 we have identified 100 cemented TKAs and 100 cementless TKAs. All these cases were primary replacement. Differences in survival probability were determined using log-rank test. Results: Survival probabilities at 11 years of follow-up were: Cemented group: 90.2% CI95% [81.9–94.8]; Cementless group: 95.4% CI95% [88.1–98.2]. Comparison between both group showed significant difference, p = 0.32. Discussion: The advantages of cementless TKA are bone stock preservation, cement debris protection and the potential to achieve biologic fixation. Cementless implants rely on a porous or roughened surface to facilitate bone formation. HA has been shown to accelerate bone integration and to decrease micro motion of the components and to increase fixation. With a survival probability of 90.2% (cemented version and 95.4% (cementless version, this total knee prosthesis performs as intended in primary total knee arthroplasty. No statistical differences could be found between cemented and cementless implants.

  11. Pre-portland cements and geopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Perná, Ivana; Ertl, Z.; Miller, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-62 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : caementum * cement itious * calcareous cement Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2012_01/5_Hanzlicek.pdf

  12. Elaborating the History of Our Cementing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Zhi; Shen, Lei; Løvik, Amund N.

    2017-01-01

    development of cement in-use stocks in residential, nonresidential, and civil engineering sectors of all world countries. We found that global cement production spreads unevenly among 184 countries, with China dominating the global production and consumption after the 1990s. Nearly all countries have shown...

  13. Dangote cement : an African success story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akinyoade, A.; Uche, C.U.

    2016-01-01

    This paper critiques the rise of Dangote Cement plc to become the dominant player in the Nigerian cement industry. Although the close relationship between the company's founder, Aliko Dangote, and subsequent Nigerian governments has been an important factor in this success story, we argue that it is

  14. Effect of Air and Vacuum Storage on the Degradation of X-Ray-Exposed Aluminized-Teflon Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Gummow, Jonathan D.

    2001-01-01

    Metalized Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene, DuPont), a common thermal control material, has been found to degrade in the low-Earth-orbit space environment. The aluminized-FEP (Al-FEP) exterior layer on the Hubble Space Telescope has become extremely embrittled, with extensive cracking occurring on all sides of the telescope. This embrittlement has been primarily attributed to radiation exposure (x-rays from solar flares, electron/proton radiation, and possibly near-ultraviolet radiation) combined with thermal cycling. Limited samples of FEP tested after long-term exposure to low Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope and on the Long Duration Exposure Facility indicated that there might be continued degradation in tensile properties over time. An investigation was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center to evaluate the effect of air and vacuum storage on the mechanical properties of x-ray-exposed FEP. Aluminized-FEP (5-mil-thick) tensile samples were x-ray exposed with 15.3-kV copper xrays for 2 hr, reducing the percent elongation to failure by approximately 50 percent in comparison to that for pristine Al-FEP. X-ray-exposed samples were stored in air or under vacuum for various time periods to see the effect of storage on tensile properties. Tensile results indicated that samples stored in air had larger decreases in tensile properties than samples stored under vacuum had, as seen in the graph. Samples stored under vacuum (for up to 400 hr) showed no further decrease in tensile properties over time, whereas samples stored in air (for up to 900 hr) appeared to show decreases in tensile properties over time. X-ray-exposed samples stored in air developed a hazy appearance in the exposed area, as seen in the photographs. When the source of the haziness was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, it was found to reside at the Al/FEP interface as witnessed by an increased surface roughness of the aluminized side of the

  15. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  16. THE GLASS IONOMER CEMENT IN DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Matos Vieira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The glass ionomer cement was developed in the past century 70s, after continuous researches about silicate cement. Over the years, glass ionomers have been playing an important role on restorative dentistry. Initially, the material was used for restoration of small cavities, however, its usage has been increased. The main indications at present are: as core buildup restorative, luting cement, liner and base and as a sealant. Recently, glass ionomer cement has been used for ART restorations and in some medicine fields because of the positive biointeraction with bone cells. Although glass ionomer cements exhibit an initial critical solubility and poor aesthetics, great biological properties like fluoride release to oral environment, chemical bonding to tooth tissues and biocompatibility leads this material elective for many purposes. Finally, their inherent antimicrobial properties contributes to the treatment of many situations in dentistry.

  17. Cement analysis using d + D neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    In the cement industry, the primary concern is quality control. The earlier the cement industry can institute quality control upon their product, the more significant their savings in labor, energy and material. We are developing a prototype cement analyzer using pulsed neutrons from a d-D electronic neutron generator with the goal of ensuring quality control of cement in an on-line manner. By utilizing a low intensity d-D neutron source and a specially-designed moderator assembly, we are able to produce one of the safest neutron-based systems in the market. Also, this design includes some exciting new methods of data acquisition which may substantially reduce the final installation costs. In our proof-of-principle measurements, we were able to measure the primary components of cement (Al, Si, Ca and Fe) to limits required for the raw materials, the derived mixes and the clinkers utilizing this neutron generator

  18. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  19. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  20. Effect of the cement type on compatibility with carboxylate superplasticisers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bundyra-Oracz, G.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An empirical study was conducted to gain a fuller understanding of the interactions taking place in cementsuperplasticiser systems. To this end, two clinkers of known chemical and phase composition were prepared in this study to gain insight into such interactions. One contained no tricalcium aluminate (C1, while the other had a 9% C3A content (C2. These clinkers were ground to approximately 340 m2/kg and blended with gypsum only or gypsum and Klein compound (3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4 (1, 2. Sufficient compound was added to C1 to ensure the formation of about the same amount of ettringite after 0.5 and 1 h of hydration as found in cement C2 + gypsum. The admixture used was a carboxylate superplasticiser. Rheology measurements showed that while paste yield stress was correlated to ettringite formation, no such simple relationship was observed for plastic viscosity. Plastic viscosity depended on the total hydrates formed, i.e., not only as ettringite but also as C-S-H gel. The findings revealed that in clinkers with very low sulfate and potassium contents, the rheology of carboxylate-containing cement paste is primarily controlled by ettringite formation.

    En el presente trabajo se ha realizado un estudio empírico con el objetivo de profundizar en el conocimiento de las interacciones del sistema cemento-superplastificante. Con este fin, se prepararon dos clínkeres con una composición química y de fases conocida: el primero (C1 sin aluminato tricálcico y el segundo (C2 con un contenido en C3A del 9%. Ambos se molieron hasta obtener una superficie específica aproximada de 340 m2/kg y se emplearon con dos adiciones: yeso y el compuesto de Klein (3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4 (1, 2. Se añadió la cantidad necesaria del compuesto de Klein a C1 para garantizar la formación, tras 0,5 y 1ª h. de hidratación, de aproximadamente la misma cantidad de etringita en dicho

  1. Synthesis of modified calcium aluminate with lanthanum manganite (LSM) for possible use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, F.C.T.; Jurado, J.; Sousa, V.C. de

    2016-01-01

    The fuel cells solid oxide (SOFC) is made up of three basic elements: two electrodes, the anode and cathode and a conductive electrolyte ions. The objective of this work consists of calcium aluminate synthesis modified LSM in a 1: 1 by combustion synthesis method with a view to its use as a cathode in SOFC. The characterization of the post was carried out by the methods of XRD, TEM and EIS. After heat treatment at 1200°C/4 hours it was possible to obtain Ca0.5Sr1.5MnO4 and CaMnO2.56 phases. The material showed a semiconductor characteristics because with increasing temperature the electrical resistance value tends to decrease obtaining electrical conductivity greater than 10-6S / cm featuring an extrinsic semiconductor with an activation energy of 0.12. Therefore, with an activation energy value within the range of materials used for a SOFC cathodes. (author)

  2. Radiative cooling test facility and performance evaluation of 4-MIL aluminized polyvinyl fluoride and white-paint surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruskopf, M.S.; Berdahl, P.; Martin, M.; Sakkal, F.; Sobolewski, M.

    1980-11-01

    A test facility designed to measure the amount of radiative cooling a specific material or assembly of materials will produce when exposed to the sky is described. Emphasis is placed upon assemblies which are specifically designed to produce radiative cooling and which therefore offer promise for the reduction of temperatures and/or humidities in occupied spaces. The hardware and software used to operate the facility are documented and the results of the first comprehensive experiments are presented. A microcomputer-based control/data acquisition system was employed to study the performance of two prototype radiator surfaces: 4-mil aluminized polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and white painted surfaces set below polyethylene windscreens. The cooling rates for materials tested were determined and can be approximated by an equation (given). A computer model developed to simulate the cooling process is presented. (MCW)

  3. A simulation method of the reduction of nitrogen oxides over a silver aluminate catalyst in static tests of combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chłopek, Zdzisław; Darkowski, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a proposition of simulation studies of nitrogen oxide catalytic reduction. The method enables estimating the influence of catalytic reactors on ecological properties of engines in static bench tests (e.g., ECE R49, United Nations Economic Commission for Europe [UN/ECE], 2000; Standard No. ISO 8178-4:1996, International Organization for Standardization [ISO], 1996; Merkisz (1998). An algorithm of simulation studies is shown. A model catalytic reactor for selective catalytic reduction is described. Silver aluminate deposited on steel substrate covered with aluminium phosphate is used as a catalyst. Propene is used as a reductant. The results of reactor studies in a chemical lab are presented. A simulation of the influence of catalytic reactor properties on ecological properties of an engine was done. Unitary emission conversion coefficients of nitrogen oxide in a static test ECE R49 were determined.

  4. Lanthanum aluminate synthesis by reverse precipitation starting from pseudoboehmite; Sintesis de aluminato de lantano mediante precipitacion inversa partiendo de pseudoboehmita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portilla Z, K. G.; Zarate M, J.; Tapia O, J. P.; Hernandez M, W., E-mail: whernandezmu@gmail.com [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Instituto de Investigacion en Metalurgia y Materiales, Ciudad Universitaria, Edif. U, 58060 Morelia (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The lanthanum aluminate (Lao) shows a thermoluminescence response thus has been proposed as a material for dosimetry; this has made have been proposed various methods for their synthesis (hydrothermal, sol-gel, combustion, precipitation, etc.) These methods are complex or expensive if part of reagent grade materials which limits its application to larger scales. Therefore is proposed to use the pseudoboehmite as a precursor of alumina for the Lao phase. Pseudoboehmite was synthesized by reverse precipitation starting from aluminum sulfate and as precipitating agent the ammonium hydroxide. Lao perovskite phase was obtained at 1500 degrees C and 10 h of calcination s, at lower temperatures the presence of other phases as lanthanum oxide was detected. Also the morphology of the powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, finding clusters whose sizes are in the range of ∼0.25 and 1 μm. The measurement of the density by the Archimedes method reached 94% of the theoretical. (Author)

  5. Recent progress in advanced optical materials based on gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Guang; Sakka, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    This review article summarizes the recent achievements in stabilization of the metastable lattice of gadolinium aluminate garnet (Gd3Al5O12, GAG) and the related developments of advanced optical materials, including down-conversion phosphors, up-conversion phosphors, transparent ceramics, and single crystals. Whenever possible, the materials are compared with their better known YAG and LuAG counterparts to demonstrate the merits of the GAG host. It is shown that novel emission features and significantly improved luminescence can be attained for a number of phosphor systems with the more covalent GAG lattice and the efficient energy transfer from Gd3+ to the activator. Ce3+ doped GAG-based single crystals and transparent ceramics are also shown to simultaneously possess the advantages of high theoretical density, fast scintillation decay, and high light yields, and hold great potential as scintillators for a wide range of applications. The unresolved issues are also pointed out.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of spinel-type zinc aluminate nanoparticles by a modified sol-gel method using new precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davar, Fatemeh, E-mail: davar@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: > Modified sol-gel method for synthesis of spinel-type zinc aluminate nanoparticles. > Zn(en){sub 2}{sup 2+} complex (en = ethylenediamine) as new Zn{sup 2+} source. > Effect of reaction temperature on the particle size. - Abstract: In the present paper, we report the successful synthesis of spinel-type of zinc aluminate (ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles by a modified sol-gel method. Aluminum nitrate and Zn(en){sub 2}{sup +} complex (en: ethylenediamine) as new Zn{sup 2+} source were used. Diethylene glycol monoethyl ether and citric acid are employed as solvent and chelating agent. This method starts from the precursor complex, and involves formation of homogeneous solid intermediates, reducing atomic diffusion paths during thermal treatment. ZnO and ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were obtained when the precursor was heat-treated at 350 deg. C in air for 2 h. The stages of the formation of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, as well as the characterization of the resulting compounds were done using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure, particle size, and temperature of formation of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases were found to depend on the precursors and methods used for preparation and the calcination temperature. The lowest temperature for preparation of the ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} is about 550 deg. C.

  7. The application of sol-gel and gel-precipitation technology to the preparation of spheres of lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.W.; Clatworthy, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    A concept for preparing spheres of lithium aluminate by either a sol-gel or gel-precipitation process based on the precipitation of a lithium salt in the pores of an aluminum hydroxide gel has been tested and has proved to be not feasible. The addition of any of the following salts: lithium formate; lithium oxalate; or lithium carbonate to a solution of aluminum nitrate hydrolysed to a hydroxyl number greater than 2.85 caused the hydrolysed solution, or sol, to gel immediately. The addition of lithium formate to a dialysed sol caused it to flocculate at low pH and prevented the transformation from a sol to a gel from occurring at elevated pH. This behaviour was linked to the adsorption of the anions - formate, oxalate, or carbonate - onto the surface of the sol particles. Hydrolysis of solutions of aluminum nitrate together with either lithium formate, lithium oxalate, or lithium carbonate, such that the mole ratio of aluminum to lithium was 1:1, resulted in the formation of a crystalline precipitate containing both lithium and aluminum. The lithium to aluminum ratio of the precipitate was 0.44:1 when lithium was introduced as the carbonate. Spheres could be made by gel-precipitation if the viscosity of the feed solution was first increased to 200 cps by the addition of polyvinyl alcohol. However, the lithium not chemically bound in the precipitate diffused out of the spheres during gelation. Heating of the lithium-deficient spheres to 950 degrees C produced a mixture of lithium aluminate and the spinel phase, LiAl 5 O 8

  8. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.

    2017-10-02

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  9. Dehydration kinetics of Portland cement paste at high temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    Portland cement paste is a multiphase compound mainly consisting of calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) gel, calcium hydroxide (CH) crystal, and unhydrated cement core. When cement paste is exposed to high temperature, the dehydration of cement paste leads to not only the decline in strength, but also

  10. Effect of Cement Grades on some properties of Sandcrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of cement grade on some properties of sandcrete. The cement used for this work was Ordinary Portland cement (Dangote brand) of grade 42.5 and 32.5 meeting the requirement of ASTM C150 type 1 cement. Three types of fine aggregate was also used to produce ...

  11. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one self-adhesive cement (Panavia SA plus) were included in this study. The interface of the cement and the tooth surface with the different pre-treatments was analyzed using SEM. pH values of the cements and primers were measured. The highest bond strength values for all cements were achieved with etching and primer on enamel (25.6 ± 5.3 - 32.3 ± 10.4 MPa). On dentin, etching and priming produced the highest bond strength values for all cements (8.6 ± 2.9 - 11.7 ± 3.5 MPa) except for Panavia V5, which achieved significantly higher bond strengths when pre-treated with primer only (15.3 ± 4.1 MPa). Shear bond strength values were correlated with the micro-retentive surface topography of enamel and the tag length on dentin except for Panavia V5, which revealed the highest bond strength with primer application only without etching, resulting in short but sturdy tags. The highest bond strength can be achieved for Panavia F 2.0, Permaflo DC, and Panavia SA plus when the tooth substrate is previously etched and the respective primer is applied. The new cement Panavia V5 displayed low technique-sensitivity and attained significantly higher adhesion of all tested cements to dentin when only primer was applied.

  12. Mineralogical stabilization of Ternesite in Belite Sulfo-Aluminate Clinker elaborated from limestone, shale and phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Addi K.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mineralogical evolution of sulfoaluminate clinker elaborated from moroccan prime materials limestone, shale and phosphogypsum as a byproduct from phosphoric acid factories. The advantage of the production of this type of clinker is related to the low clinkerisation temperature which is known around 1250°C, and to less consumption quantity of limestone thus enabling less CO2 emissions during the decarbonation process compared to that of Portland cement. In this study we determine the stability conditions of belite sulfoaluminate clinker containing belite (C2S ye’elimite (C4A3$ and ternesite (C5S2$. The hydration compounds of this clinker are also investigated. The monitoring of the synthesized and hydrated phases is performed by X-Ray Diffraction and Infrared spectroscopy. The results show the formation of ternesite at 800°C and the stabilization of clinker containing y’elminite, belite and ternesite at temperatures between 1100 and 1250°C.

  13. Cementation of silver ions on metallic copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaskula, M.

    2009-01-01

    The silver cementation on metallic copper was investigated in the presence or absence of oxygen. The influence of sulphuric acid and copper sulphate concentration on the silver cement morphology was studied in details, and results were linked with the previously determined kinetics data of the process. The morpgology of silver depopsit was found to be independent of the prosence of oxygen in the system in as well as the sulphuric acide concentration. Contrary, the concentration of copper sulphate strongly influenced the morphology of silver deposite. Two-stage mechanism of cementation was proposed. (authors).

  14. Thermal behavior of asphalt cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudy, P.M.; Letoffe, J.M.; Martin, D.; Planche, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Asphalt cements are highly complex mixtures of hydrocarbon molecules whose thermal behavior is of prime importance for petroleum and road industry. From DSC, the determination of several thermal properties of asphalts is given, e.g. glass-transition temperature and crystallized fraction content.The dissolution of a pure n-paraffin C n H 2n+2 in an asphalt, as seen by DSC, should be a single peak. For 20 g of these glasses change with time and temperature. The formation of the crystallized phases is superposed to the enthalpic relaxation of the glasses, making a kinetic study very difficult. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  16. Geotechnical characterization of a triassic clay-cement mixes

    OpenAIRE

    Zokaitė, Kamilė

    2016-01-01

    Geotechnical Characterization of a Triassic Clay-Cement Mix. This thesis deals with modification of Triassic clay with cement, using soil-cement mixing method. For tracking of the changes in geotechnical parameters between clay-cement mix and natural Triassic clay, data from earlier researches were used. During the preparation of the clay-cement mix, 40 % of water was added to the dry natural clay. Also there were made three different groups of specimens were they had different amount of ceme...

  17. Nanofunctionalized zirconia and barium sulfate particles as bone cement additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Gillani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Riaz Gillani1, Batur Ercan1, Alex Qiao3, Thomas J Webster1,21Division of Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3G3 Technology Innovations, LLC, Pittsford, NY, USAAbstract: Zirconia (ZrO2 and barium sulfate (BaSO4 particles were introduced into a methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA solution with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA beads during polymerization to develop the following novel bone cements: bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 nanoparticles, bone cements with ZrO2 nanoparticles functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMS, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 nanoparticles, and bone cements with BaSO4 nanoparticles functionalized with TMS. Results demonstrated that in vitro osteoblast (bone-forming cell densities were greater on bone cements containing BaSO4 ceramic particles after four hours compared to control unmodified bone cements. Osteoblast densities were also greater on bone cements containing all of the ceramic particles after 24 hours compared to unmodified bone cements, particularly those bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles. Bone cements containing ceramic particles demonstrated significantly altered mechanical properties; specifically, under tensile loading, plain bone cements and bone cements containing unfunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited brittle failure modes whereas bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited plastic failure modes. Finally, all bone cements containing ceramic particles possessed greater radio-opacity than unmodified bone cements. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated a positive impact on the properties of traditional bone cements for orthopedic applications with the addition of unfunctionalized and TMS functionalized ceramic nanoparticles

  18. Influence of cementation and cement type on the fracture load testing methodology of anterior crowns made of different materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Beuer, Florian; Ender, Andreas; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Wimmer, Timea

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of cementation on fracture load of anterior crowns made of CAD/CAM-resin-blocks (ART), leucite-reinforced glass-ceramics (LRG), lithium disilicate ceramics (LIT), veneered zirconia (ZRO) and veneered alloy (DEG). Each crown group (n=15/subgroup) was cemented on the metal abutment as follows: i. using glass ionomer, ii. using self-adhesive resin cement, and iii. not cemented. Crowns were tested and analyzed with 2-way and 1-way ANOVA (Scheffé test), and Weibull statistics (pcompared to other groups (pcrowns than for cemented (pmetal ceramic crowns should be generally cemented. Glass-ceramic crowns should be cemented using adhesive cement. Cementation and cement type did not have an influence on the fracture load results for resin, zirconia or lithium disilicate crowns.

  19. Salts slurries using in 'offshore' recent cementation in Campos Basin; Pastas salinas utilizadas em cimentacoes recentes 'offshore' na Bacia de Santos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, Ricardo [BJ Services, Macae, RJ (Brazil); Simao, Cristina Aiex; Sledz, Marcelo [PETROBRAS S.A., RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    PETROBRAS has recently begun active drilling on locations where the interest zone is below salt formations, which can be as thick as 2000 meters, formation that may contain mobile salts as taquihydryte. This paper refers to the slurries used on the first well drilled under those conditions and to slurry designs used in other similar wells. The challenge is to avoid the open hole closure by the taquihydryte before the next phase is drilled and cased. In order to do so, it was programmed to use a heavy spacer to maintain the wells stability for at least 30 days, due to hydrostatic pressure. This spacer and the heavy salt slurry (18,5 lb/gal) were used for the first time in Brazil. To cement the production casings, similar formulations were used, although with 15,8 lb/gal density slurries and a minimum of 10% bwow salt (NaCl). On the surface cementing operations, light slurries with sea water, salt, and, silicate and aluminate based additives, were designed and used, followed by the 15,8 lb/gal with 18% bwow salt slurry. Information about the different slurries are presented. (author)

  20. Shielding properties of fibre cement wallboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, D L; Godwin, G A; Coakley, K S

    1998-09-01

    Transmission data for a fibre cement wallboard (villaboard) are determined for use in diagnostic shielding designs. Villaboard is found to be more attenuating than plasterboard e.g. 9 mm of villaboard is equivalent to 16 mm of plasterboard.

  1. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  2. High performance concrete with blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, P.P.; Saraswati, S.; Basu, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Principal objectives of the proposed project are two folds. Firstly, to develop the HPC mix suitable to NPP structures with blended cement, and secondly to study its durability necessary for desired long-term performance. Three grades of concrete to b considered in the proposed projects are M35, M50 and M60 with two types of blended cements, i.e. Portland slag cement (PSC) and Portland pozzolana cement (PPC). Three types of mineral admixtures - silica fume, fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag will be used. Concrete mixes with OPc and without any mineral admixture will be considered as reference case. Durability study of these mixes will be carried out

  3. Recycled materials in Portland cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    This report pertains to a comprehensive study involving the use of recycled materials in Portland cement concrete. Three different materials were studied including crushed glass (CG), street sweepings (SS), and recycled concrete (RC). Blast furnace s...

  4. Basalt waste added to Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Melanda Mendes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement is widely used as a building material and more than 4.3 billion tons were produced in 2014, with increasing environmental impacts by this industry, mainly through CO2 emissions and consumption of non-removable raw materials. Several by-products have been used as raw materials or fuels to reduce environmental impacts. Basaltic waste collected by filters was employed as a mineral mixture to Portland cement and two fractions were tested. The compression strength of mortars was measured after 7 days and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Electron Diffraction Scattering (EDS were carried out on Portland cement paste with the basaltic residue. Gains in compression strength were observed for mixtures containing 2.5 wt.% of basaltic residue. Hydration products observed on surface of basaltic particles show the nucleation effect of mineral mixtures. Clinker substitution by mineral mixtures reduces CO2 emission per ton of Portland cement.

  5. Subgrade stabilization alternatives to lime and cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    This project involved four distinct research activities, (1) the influence of temperature on lime-stabilized soils, (2) the influence of temperature on cement-stabilized soils (3) temperature modeling of stabilized subgrade and (4) use of calcium chl...

  6. Cementation of radioactive liquid scintillator waste simulate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayoumi, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting is an important analytical tool with extensive applications in medicine and basic applied research and used in quantification of □ -particles, weak □ and x-rays. The generated spent liquid scintillator radioactive waste should be limited and controlled to protect man and his environment. In this study, the radioactive spent liquid scintillator waste simulate (SLS) was immobilized in cement matrix using a surfactant in order to facilitate and increase the amount of SLS incorporated into the cementitious materials. Mechanical properties of the final cement waste form were acceptable for blocks containing up to 20% SLS in presence of surfactant. X-ray diffraction, IR analysis and scanning electron microscope proved that the hydration of cement materials is not significantly affected by organic scintillator waste. Therefore, the cement matrix could be recommended for solidification of SLS for the acceptable mechanical, physical and chemical characterizations reached.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of aluminate YAlO3 and LaAlO3 thin films for alternative gate dielectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.-M.; Shi, G.H.; Yu, L.C.; Li, T.L.; Liu, Z.G.; Dai, J.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Amorphous aluminate YAlO 3 (YAO) thin films on n-type silicon wafers as gate dielectric layers of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices are prepared by pulsed laser deposition. As a comparison, amorphous aluminate LaAlO 3 (LAO) thin films are also prepared. The structural and electrical characterization shows that the as-prepared YAO films remain amorphous until 900 C and the dielectric constant is ∝14. The measured leakage current of less than 10 -3 A/cm 2 at a bias of V G =1.0 V for ∝40-nm-thick YAO and LAO films obeys the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling mechanism. It is revealed that the electrical property can be significantly affected by the oxygen pressure during deposition and post rapid thermal annealing, which may change the fixed negative charge density at the gate interface. (orig.)

  8. Topics in cement and concrete research

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwers, Jos; Russel, M.I.; Basheer, P.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper addresses several topics in regard to the sustainable design and use of concrete. First, major features concerning the sustainable aspects of the material concrete are summarised. Then the major constituent, from an environmental point of view, cement is discussed in detail, particularly the hydration and application of slag cement. The intelligent combining of mineral oxides, which are found in clinker, slag, fly ashes etc., is designated as mineral oxide engineering. It re...

  9. Alternative Fuels in Cement Clinker Production Process

    OpenAIRE

    , E Zaka; , R Pinguli; , J Gabili; , E Arapi

    2016-01-01

    Cement industry in Albania is experiencing a rapid development, but this industry is distinguished for high consumption of resources. Cement manufacturing companies do constantly researches on reducing the production cost by optimizing the equipments, replacing raw materials and fuel. However, alternative fuels should be alternative according to the process requirements, easily obtainable in quantity, and with a lower cost. Since the combustible fuels are becoming increasingly important, this...

  10. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one sel...

  11. Estimating the chloride transport in cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Princigallo, A.

    2012-01-01

    A method was developed to measure the diffusion coefficient of chloride ions in cement paste based on an analytical solution to Fick’s 2nd law in a cylindrical coordinate system. This natural method yielded diffusivity results within as little as a month. Testing time was reduced by exploiting the three-dimensional inward flux in the specimen. In an attempt to determine the saturation concentration, dense portland cement pastes were exposed to a concentrated chloride solution. The method prov...

  12. Study on properties and testing methods of thermo-responsive cementing system for well cementing in heavy oil thermal recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, thermo-responsive cement slurry system were being developed, the properties of conventional cement slurry, compressive strength high temperature of cement sheath, mechanical properties of cement sheath and thermal properties of cement sheath were being tested. Results were being used and simulated by Well-Life Software, Thermo-responsive cement slurry system can meet the requirements of heavy oil thermal recovery production. Mechanical and thermal properties of thermo-responsive cement sheath were being tested. Tensile fracture energy of the thermo-responsive cement sheath is larger than conventional cement. The heat absorption capacity of conventional cement sheath is larger than that of thermo-responsive cement sheath, this means more heat is needed for the unit mass once increasing 1.0 °C, which also indicates that thermo-responsive cement own good heat insulating and preservation effects. The heat conductivity coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of thermo-responsive cement is less than and conventional cement, this means that thermo-responsive cement have good heat preservation and insulation effects with good thermal expansion stabilities.

  13. Evaluation of the amount of excess cement around the margins of cement-retained dental implant restorations: the effect of the cement application method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Winston W L; Duncan, Jesse; Afshar, Manijeh; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Complete removal of excess cement from subgingival margins after cementation of implant-supported restorations has been shown to be unpredictable. Remaining cement has been shown to be associated with periimplant inflammation and bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the amount of excess cement after cementation with 4 different methods of cement application for cement-retained implant-supported restorations. Ten implant replicas/abutments (3i) were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Forty complete veneer crowns (CVCs) were fabricated by waxing onto the corresponding plastic waxing sleeves. The wax patterns were cast and the crowns were cemented to the implant replicas with either an interim (Temp Bond) or a definitive luting agent (FujiCEM). Four methods of cement application were used for cementation: Group IM-Cement applied on the internal marginal area of the crown only; Group AH-Cement applied on the apical half of the axial walls of the crown; Group AA-Cement applied to all axial walls of the interior surface of the crown, excluding the occlusal surface; and Group PI-Crown filled with cement then seated on a putty index formed to the internal configuration of the restoration (cementation device) (n=10). Cement on the external surfaces was removed before seating the restoration. Cement layers were applied on each crown, after which the crown was seated under constant load (80 N) for 10 minutes. The excess cement from each specimen was collected and measured. One operator performed all the procedures. Results for the groups were compared, with 1 and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test (α=.05). No significant difference in the amount of excess/used cement was observed between the 2 different types of cements (P=.1). Group PI showed the least amount of excess cement in comparison to other test groups (P=.031). No significant difference was found in the amount of excess cement among groups MI, AH, and AA. Group AA showed the

  14. Determinación de la resistencia del hornnigón en viguetas fabricadas con cemento aluminóso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Fuente Sánchez, Antonio

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Not Available.

    La resistencia de los hormigones en viguetas de cemento aluminóso es uno de los parámetros más solicitados a los laboratorios de control. La dificultad de su determinación estriba en la gran cantidad de armaduras que suelen llevar las alas de la vigueta, siendo el alma la única zona de la que pueden extraerse muestras de hormigón.

  15. Development of a biodegradable bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof Abdullah; Nurhaslinda Ee Abdullah; Wee Pee Chai; Norita Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradable bone cement is a newly developed bone repair material, which is able to give immediate support to the implant area, and does not obstruct the bone repairing and regeneration process through appropriate biodegradation rate, which is synchronized with the mechanical load it should bear. The purpose of this study is to locally produce biodegradable bone cement using HA as absorbable filler. The cement is composed of an absorbable filler and unsaturated polyester for 100% degradation. Cross-linking effect is achieved through the action of poly (vinyl pyrrol lidone) (PVP) and an initiator. On the other hand, PPF was synthesized using direct esterification method. Characteristics of the bone cement were studied; these included the curing time, cross-linking effect and curing temperature. The products were characterized using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) to perform phase analysis and Scanning Electrons Microscopes to determine the morphology. The physical and mechanical properties of the bone cement were also investigated. The biocompatibility of the bone cement was tested using simulated body physiological solution. (Author)

  16. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

  17. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 1: Processing and characterization of MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2006-08-25

    This paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the processes applied to MSWI fly ash with a view to reusing it safely in cement-based materials. Part 1 presents two stabilization processes and Part 2 deals with the use of the two treated fly ashes (TFA) in mortars. Two types of binder were used: an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) containing more than 95% clinker (CEM I 52.5R) and a binary blend cement composed of 70% ground granulated blast furnace slag and 30% clinker (CEM III-B 42.5N). In this first part, two stabilization processes are presented: the conventional process, called "A", based on the washing, phosphation and calcination of the ash, and a modified process, called "B", intended to eliminate metallic aluminum and sulfate contained in the ash. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the two TFA were comparable. The main differences observed were those expected, i.e. TFA-B was free of metallic aluminum and sulfate. The mineralogical characterization of the two TFAs highlighted the presence of large amounts of a calcium aluminosilicate phase taking two forms, a crystalline form (gehlenite) and an amorphous form. Hydration studies on pastes containing mixed TFA and calcium hydroxide showed that this phase reacted with calcium hydroxide to form calcium aluminate hydrates. This formation of hydrates was accompanied by a hardening of the pastes. These results are very encouraging for the reuse of such TFA in cement-based materials because they can be considered as pozzolanic additions and could advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based materials. Finally, leaching tests were carried out to evaluate the environmental impact of the two TFAs. The elements which were less efficiently stabilized by process A were zinc, cadmium and antimony but, when the results of the leaching tests were compared with the thresholds of the European landfill directive, TFA-A could nevertheless be accepted at landfills for non

  18. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of the carbon oxide in contact with catalysts issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaane, Mikhail

    1966-01-01

    Addressing the study of the oxidation reaction of carbon oxide which produces carbon dioxide, this research thesis reports the study of this reaction in presence of catalysts (2NiO + Al 2 O 3 , NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO + NiAl 2 O 4 ) issued from the decomposition of nickel hydro-aluminates at different temperatures. The first part describes experimental techniques and the nature of materials used in this study. The second part reports the study of the catalytic activity of the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 catalyst during the oxidation of CO. Preliminary studies are also reported: structure and texture of nickel hydro-aluminate which is the raw material used to produce catalysts, activation of this compound to develop the catalytic activity in CO oxidation, chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on the 2NiO+Al 2 O 3 solid, interaction of adsorbed gases at the solid surface, and kinetic study of the oxidation reaction. The third part reports the study of the catalytic activity in the oxidation reaction of CO of spinel catalysts (NiAl 2 O 4 and NiO+NiAl 2 O 4 ) obtained by calcination of nickel hydro-aluminates at high temperature. The formation of the spinel phase, the chemisorption of CO, O 2 and CO 2 on NiAl 2 O 4 , and the kinetic of the oxidation reaction are herein studied

  19. A Combined Brazing and Aluminizing Process for Repairing Turbine Blades by Thermal Spraying Using the Coating System NiCrSi/NiCoCrAlY/Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaus, M.; Möhwald, K.; Maier, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    The repair and maintenance of components in the aerospace industry play an increasingly important role due to rising manufacturing costs. Besides welding, vacuum brazing is a well-established repair process for turbine blades made of nickel-based alloys. After the coating of the worn turbine blade has been removed, the manual application of the nickel-based filler metal follows. Subsequently, the hot gas corrosion-protective coating is applied by thermal spraying. The brazed turbine blade is aluminized to increase the hot gas corrosion resistance. The thermal spray technology is used to develop a two-stage hybrid technology that allows shortening the process chain for repair brazing turbine blades and is described in the present paper. In the first step, the coating is applied on the base material. Specifically, the coating system employed here is a layer system consisting of nickel filler metal, NiCoCrAlY and aluminum. The second step represents the combination of brazing and aluminizing of the coating system which is subjected to a heat treatment. The microstructure, which results from the combined brazing and aluminizing process, is characterized and the relevant diffusion processes in the coating system are illustrated. The properties of the coating and the ramifications with respect to actual applications will be discussed.

  20. The influence of cement thickness on stem subsidence and cement creep in a collarless polished tapered stem: When are thick cement mantles detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, E; Kaneuji, A; Tsuda, R; Numata, Y; Ichiseki, T; Fukui, K; Kawahara, N

    2017-05-01

    Favourable results for collarless polished tapered stems have been reported, and cement creep due to taper slip may be a contributing factor. However, the ideal cement thickness around polished stems remains unknown. We investigated the influence of cement thickness on stem subsidence and cement creep. We cemented six collarless polished tapered (CPT) stems (two stems each of small, medium and large sizes) into composite femurs that had been reamed with a large CPT rasp to achieve various thicknesses of the cement mantle. Two or three tantalum balls were implanted in the proximal cement in each femur. A cyclic loading test was then performed for each stem. The migration of the balls was measured three-dimensionally, using a micro-computed tomography (CT) scanner, before and after loading. A digital displacement gauge was positioned at the stem shoulder, and stem subsidence was measured continuously by the gauge. Final stem subsidence was measured at the balls at the end of each stem. A strong positive correlation was observed between mean cement thickness and stem subsidence in the CT slices on the balls. In the small stems, the balls moved downward to almost the same extent as the stem. There was a significant negative correlation between cement thickness and the horizontal:downward ratio of ball movement. Collarless polished tapered stems with thicker cement mantles resulted in greater subsidence of both stem and cement. This suggests that excessive thickness of the cement mantle may interfere with effective radial cement creep. Cite this article: E. Takahashi, A. Kaneuji, R. Tsuda, Y. Numata, T. Ichiseki, K. Fukui, N. Kawahara. The influence of cement thickness on stem subsidence and cement creep in a collarless polished tapered stem: When are thick cement mantles detrimental? Bone Joint Res 2017;6:-357. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.65.BJR-2017-0028.R1. © 2017 Kaneuji et al.

  1. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied.

  2. Investigation of Possible Wellbore Cement Failures During Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-11-01

    We model and assess the possibility of shear failure, using the Mohr-Coulomb model ? along the vertical well by employing a rigorous coupled flow-geomechanic analysis. To this end, we vary the values of cohesion between the well casing and the surrounding cement to representing different quality levels of the cementing operation (low cohesion corresponds to low-quality cement and/or incomplete cementing). The simulation results show that there is very little fracturing when the cement is of high quality.. Conversely, incomplete cementing and/or weak cement can causes significant shear failure and the evolution of long fractures/cracks along the vertical well. Specifically, low cohesion between the well and cemented areas can cause significant shear failure along the well, but the same cohesion as the cemented zone does not cause shear failure. When the hydraulic fracturing pressure is high, low cohesion of the cement can causes fast propagation of shear failure and of the resulting fracture/crack, but a high-quality cement with no weak zones exhibits limited shear failure that is concentrated near the bottom of the vertical part of the well. Thus, high-quality cement and complete cementing along the vertical well appears to be the strongest protection against shear failure of the wellbore cement and, consequently, against contamination hazards to drinking water aquifers during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  3. Ceramic residue for producing cements, method for the production thereof, and cements containing same

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez de Rojas, María Isabel; Frías, Moisés; Asensio, Eloy; Medina Martínez, César

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a ceramic residue produced from construction and demolition residues, as a puzzolanic component of cements. The invention also relates to a method for producing said ceramic residues and to another method of producing cements using said residues. This type of residue is collected in recycling plants, where it is managed. This invention facilitates a potential commercial launch.

  4. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly...

  5. Relation between microstructure and dielectric breakdown in the case of aluminous ceramics (SEMM method); Comportement d'alumines face a l'injection de charges. Relation microstructure - claquage dielectrique - mesure des charges d'influence (methode SEMM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebault, J.

    1999-02-01

    The dielectric breakdown is strongly linked to the injection and the accumulation of charges in a non-conducting material. The physics of charged insulators proposes mechanisms of trapping and transport of charges in aluminium oxides by considering defects as localization sources of charges and of energy. In order to measure the influence of defects on dielectric breakdown, various aluminous ceramics have been elaborated. The nature and the quantity of defects have been characterized by the nature and the rate of impurities, by porosity, by the quantity of grain boundaries and by the presence and distribution of secondary phases. These materials have undergone breakdown tests. The dielectric rigidity depends strongly on the nature and the distribution of crystallographic defects (vacancy, interstitial ions and dislocation), on the other hand porosity below 5% has no influence. The doping of an alumina ceramic containing less than 100 ppm of impurities implies a diminution of its dielectric rigidity. The measurement of the SEMM (scanning electron microscopy mirror) effect allows the characterization of insulating materials. This method permits the evaluation of the ability for materials to trap charges, it gives information about the charge kinetic of trapping, charge localization and the energy levels of traps. (A.C.)

  6. Microstructural characterization of industrial chromite and spinel cement kiln refractories with emphasis on the iron-rich rims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercankoesk, Y. [Cimentas Cement Co. Isikkent, Izmir (Turkey); Akkurt, S. [Mechanical Engineering Dept., Izmir Inst. of Tech., Izmir (Turkey); Ciftcioglu, M. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Izmir Inst. of Tech., Izmir (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    Magnesia-chromite (MgO + MgO.Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and magnesia-spinel (MgO + MgO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) refractory bricks that are used in the high temperature zones of rotary cement kilns are investigated for their microstructural characteristics. Their microstructures are important because the size, shape and distribution of periclase grains, chromites and the quality of their bonding phases significantly affect their service performances. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microstructures of industrial brick samples to develop a protocol to compare different products e.g. for evaluation as replacement bricks. In some of the chromite containing bricks iron-rich rims were observed, while a domestic brick with similar chemistry had no such feature. These iron-rich rims were examined using SEM-EDS. It was found that the counter-diffusion of Fe{sup +3} and Cr{sup +3} were responsible for their formation. Exsolved chrome-spinel was widely observed in the microstructures of chromite bricks. Magnesia-spinel bricks were found to contain low melting calcium aluminates as bond phases in the microstructure, posing a threat to service performance. Portmortem microanalysis of industrially used bricks revealed alkali attack in addition to creep as main destruction mechanisms for brick. Traces of elements like Mo, S and alkalies were observed and thought to originate from the use of waste derived fuels. (orig.)

  7. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; ; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  8. Chromium content in human skin after in vitro application of ordinary cement and ferrous-sulphate-reduced cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullerton, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; Avnstorp, C

    1993-01-01

    The amount of chromium found in human skin after in vitro application of cement suspensions on full-thickness human skin in diffusion cells was investigated. Cement suspensions made from ordinary Portland cement or Portland cement with the chromate reduced with added ferrous sulphate were used....... The cement suspensions were either applied on the skin surface under occlusion for 48 h or applied repeatedly every 24 h for 96 h. No statistically significant difference in chromium content of skin layers between skin exposed to ordinary Portland cement, skin exposed to cement with added ferrous sulphate...... and unexposed skin was observed, despite a more permeable skin barrier at the alkaline pH of the cement suspensions, i.e., pH 12.5. Increased chromium levels in epidermis and dermis were seen when ordinary Portland cement was applied as a suspension with added sodium sulphate (20%) on the skin surface for 96 h...

  9. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de; Bezerra, U.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  10. Effect of Cement Type on Autogenous Deformation of Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietro, Lura; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of non-evaporable water content, chemical shrinkage, autogenous deformation, internal relative humidity (RH), pore solution composition, and early-age elastic modulus are presented and discussed. All experiments were performed on Portland cement and blast-furnace slag...... (BFS) cement pastes. Self-desiccation shrinkage of the BFS cement paste was modeled based on the RH measurements, following the capillary-tension approach. The main findings of this study are: 1) self-desiccation shrinkage can be related to self-desiccation both for Portland and for BFS cement pastes......, taking into account the influence of the dissolved salts in the pore solution, 2) the BFS cement paste studied shows pronounced self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage, mainly caused by its very fine pore structure....

  11. Petroleum Sludge as gypsum replacement in cement plants: Its Impact on Cement Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlamoudi, Ali; Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Khodja, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Due to high cost of cement manufacturing and the huge amount of resources exhaustion, companies are trying to incorporate alternative raw materials or by-products into cement production so as to produce alternative sustainable cement. Petroleum sludge is a dangerous waste that poses serious imparts on soil and groundwater. Given that this sludge contains a high percentage of anhydrite (CaSO4), which is the main component of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), it may play the same gypsum role in strength development. In this research, a total replacement of gypsum (100%) has been substituted by petroleum sludge in cement production and has led to an increase of 28.8% in UCS values after 28 curing days. Nevertheless, the burning of this waste has emitted a considerable amount of carbon monoxide (CO) gas that needs to be carefully considered prior to use petroleum sludge within cement plants.

  12. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, S.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of hydrated cement systems are described. The behaviour of slag-based cement is described with a view to predicting their long term pH, Esub(n) and mineralogical balance. Modelling studies which enable the prediction at long ages of cement composites are advanced and a base model of the CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O system presented. The behaviour of U and I in cements is explored. The tolerance of cement systems for a wide range of miscellaneous waste stream components and environmental hazards is described. The redox potential in cements is effectively lowered by irradiation. (author)

  13. Quality control of cemented waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slate, L.J.

    1994-12-31

    To insure that cemented radwaste remains immobilized after disposal, certain standards have been set in Europe by the Commission of the European Communities. One such standard is compressive strength. If the compressive strength can be predicted during the early curing stages, time and money can be saved and the quality of the final waste form guaranteed. It was determined that the 7- and 28-day compressive strength from radwaste cementation can be predicted during the mixing and early curing stages by at least three methods. The three that were studied were maturity, rheology, and impedance. Maturity is a temperature-to-time measurement, rheology is a shear stress-to-shear rate measurement, and impedance is the opposition offered to the flow of alternating current. These three methods were employed on five different cemented radwaste concentrations with three different water-to-cement ratios; thus, a total of 15 different mix designs were considered. The results showed that the impedance was the easiest to employ for an on-line process. The results of the impedance method showed a very good relationship between impedance and water-to-cement ratio; therefore, an accurate prediction of compressive strength of cemented radwaste can be drawn from this method. The results of the theology method were very good. The method showed that concrete conforms to the Bingham plastic rheologic model, and the theology method can be used to predict the compressive strength of cemented radwaste, but may be too cumbersome. The results of the maturity method were shown to be limited in accuracy for determining compressive strength.

  14. In situ hydration of sulphoaluminate cement mixtures monitored by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turrillas, X. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, L.G.; Carvalho, A.M.; Carezzato, G.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rossetto, C.M. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (FATEC), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The hydration of calcium sulpho-aluminate cement mixtures was studied in situ by synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the XRD1 beamline of the Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS) in Campinas, SP. The powder specimens were introduced in borosilicate glass capillary tubes of 0.7 mm of internal diameter and imbued with deionized water. As the hydration reaction is very fast the capillaries were placed on the goniometer and the data collection was started after two minutes of mixing with water. The X-ray energy chosen to get an adequate flux for these short time acquisitions was 12 keV or more precisely 1.033258 Å, determined with polycrystalline corundum standard. Diffraction patterns were collected sequentially every 35 seconds for several hours at temperatures ranging from 40 degC to 55 degC with an accuracy better than 0.1 degC attained with the help of a hot air blower. The diffracted signal was collected with an array of twenty-four Mythen detectors at 760 mm from the capillary tube. The diffraction patterns had appropriate statistics to determine the kinetics of the reaction either by quantitative Rietveld analysis or by fitting isolated diffraction peaks to Gaussian curves as a function of time. The most important phases involved in the hydration are Klein´s salt, also known as Ye’elimite, Ca4(AlO2)6SO4, and gypsum, CaSO4.2H2O to yield Ettringite, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12 - 26H2O, phase responsible for the mechanical properties. (author)

  15. Effect of wet curing duration on durability parameters of hydraulic cement concretes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic cement concrete slabs were cast and stored outdoors in Charlottesville, Virginia, to study the impact of wet curing duration on durability parameters. Concrete mixtures were produced using portland cement, portland cement with slag cement, ...

  16. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongliang; Liu, Xinrong; Liu, Xianshan

    2015-07-02

    Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08) under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa) were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content ( C v ) on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using C v . The research reveals that when C v is high (e.g., C v = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as C v increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When C v is low (e.g., C v = 0.01), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of C v (the cementing agent content) with c ' (the cohesion force of the sample) and Δϕ' (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance) is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  17. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content (Cv on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using Cv. The research reveals that when Cv is high (e.g., Cv = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as Cv increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When Cv is low (e.g., Cv = 0.01, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of Cv (the cementing agent content with c′ (the cohesion force of the sample and Δϕ′ (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  18. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels of Cements and Cement Composites in the Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Eštoková

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in the cements ranged from 8.58–19.1 Bq·kg−1, 9.78–26.3 Bq·kg−1 and 156.5–489.4 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The radiological parameters in cement samples were calculated as follows: mean radium equivalent activity Raeq = 67.87 Bq·kg−1, gamma index Iγ = 0.256, alpha index Iα = 0.067, the absorbed gamma dose rate D = 60.76 nGy·h−1, external hazard index Hex = 0.182 and internal hazard index Hin was 0.218. The radionuclide activity in composites ranged from 6.84–10.8 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 13.1–20.5 Bq·kg−1 for 232Th and 250.4–494.4 Bq·kg−1 for 40K. The calculated radiological parameters of cements were lower than calculated radiological parameters of cement composites.

  19. Colorectal cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in asbestos cement and cement workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, K.

    1993-09-01

    Radiologically visible parenchymal changes (small opacities >= 1/0;ILO 1980 classification) were present in 20% of a sample of workers (N=174), employed for 20 years (median) in an asbestos cement plant. Exposure-response relationships were found, after controlling for age and smoking habits. In a sample of asbestos cement workers with symptoms and signs suggestive of pulmonary disease (N=33), increased lung density measured by x-ray computed tomography, and reduced static lung volumes and lung compliance was found. In a cohort of asbestos cement workers (N=1.929) with an estimated median exposure of 1.2 fibres/ml, the mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease was increased in comparison to a regional reference cohort (N=1.233). A two-to three-fold increase of non-malignant respiratory mortality was noted among workers employed for more than a decade in the asbestos cement plant, compared to cement workers (N=1.526), who in their turn did not experience and increased risk compared to the general population. In the cohorts of asbestos cement and cement workers, there was a tow-to three-fold increased incidence of cancer in the right part of the colon, compared to the general population as well as to external reference cohorts of other industrial workers (N=3.965) and fishermen (N=8.092). A causal relation with the exposure to mineral dust and fibres was supported by the findings of higher risk estimated in subgroups with high cumulated asbestos doses or longer duration of cement work. The incidence of cancer in the left part of the colon was not increased. Morbidity data, but not mortality data, disclosed the subsite-specific risk pattern. Both asbestos cement workers and cement workers has an increased incidence of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, and with the fishermen. The risk was, however, of the same magnitude among the other industrial workers. 181 refs

  20. Extraction Optimization, Characterization, and Bioactivities of Polysaccharides from Pinelliae Rhizoma Praeparatum Cum Alumine Employing Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Jie; Mo, Xue-Lin; Tang, Xiao-Zhang; Li, Jiang-Hua; Hu, Mei-Bian; Yan, Dan; Peng, Wei; Wu, Chun-Jie

    2017-06-09

    In this study, the ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides (PSA) from Pinelliae Rhizoma Praeparatum Cum Alumine (PRPCA) was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). The structural characteristics of PSA were analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, high performance gel permeation chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. In addition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of PSA were studied by different in vitro assays. Results indicated that the optimal extraction conditions were as follows: the ratio of water to raw of 30 mL/g, extraction time of 46.50 min, ultrasonic temperature of 72.00 °C, and ultrasonic power of 230 W. Under these conditions, the obtained PSA yield (13.21 ± 0.37%) was closely agreed with the predicted yield by the model. The average molecular weights of the PSA were estimated to be 5.34 × 10³ and 6.27 × 10⁵ Da. Monosaccharide composition analysis indicated that PSA consisted of mannose, galactose uronic acid, glucose, galactose, arabinose with a molar ratio of 1.83:0.55:75.75:1.94:0.45. Furthermore, PSA exhibited moderate antioxidant and antibacterial activities in vitro. Collectively, this study provides a promising strategy to obtain bioactive polysaccharides from processed products of herbal medicines.

  1. The effect of the host composition on the lifetime decay properties of barium/strontium aluminates compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Marcos V. dos S.; Andrade, A. B.; Valerio, Mário E. G.; Montes, Paulo J. R

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of the structural change on the luminescence of Eu-doped barium/strontium aluminates when excited with monochromatic X-rays (also known as X-ray excited optical luminescence—XEOL). Ba 1−x Sr x Al 2 O 4 samples, with 0  2+ and Eu 3+ transitions, although no Eu 2+ was observed in the X-ray absorption spectra. The XEOL intensities while the sample is under irradiation decreased as a function of the irradiation time, indicating the buildup of radiation damage. The saturation level of the XEOL is directly correlated to the amount of damages induced by the irradiation and the sample composition. The Ba-rich samples are the ones with higher XEOL yield. X-ray induced long lasting phosphorescence (LLP) was also observed for all samples and it was found that the duration of the phosphorescence emission also depends on the sample composition. In Sr-rich samples, the LLP has a slower decay time constant than in Ba-rich samples. A model of the radiation induced luminescence is presented and all these features are discussed in terms of the energetic costs and the type of defects generated in the sample

  2. Phase transition in Sr8[Al12O24](MoO4)2 aluminate sodalite (SAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depmeier, W.; Melzer, R.; Hu, X.

    1993-01-01

    The cubic-tetragonal phase transition at 571 K of the aluminate sodalite Sr 8 [Al 12 O 24 ](MoO 4 ) 2 (SAM) has ben studied by following the position of the (pseudo-)cubic {400} reflections as a function of temperature. The high resolution of the synchrotron powder diffraction experiment allowed the temperature dependencies to be followed with good precision. The tetragonal a lattice parameter appears to be a linear extrapolation of the cubic one, with only a small upward shift at the transition, whereas the c parameter decreases strongly below 571 K. These observations can be explained by a model which assumes the superposition of a ferroelastic strain component, and a volume strain component. The volume strain can be rationalized as being the result of a 'shearing' of the sodalite framework. Causes and consequences of the 'shearing' in relation to the sodalite framework are discussed. The weakly first-order transition is nearly tricritical; power-law exponents seem to be influenced by defects. The thermal expansion of the cubic lattice parameter, as well as of the tetragonal a axis, is nearly linear. The linear thermal-expansion coefficient α is 8.6(4)x10 -6 K -1 . The tetragonal c axis also expands linearly between room temperature and about Tc-100 K with practically the same coefficient, but behaves non-linearly nearer to the transition temperature. (orig.)

  3. K-Ar ages of rocks from Lago Alumine, Rucachoroi and Quillen, North Patagonian Andes, Neuquen, Republica Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre, Carlos O.; Vattuone, M.E; Linares, Enrique; Leal, Pablo R

    2001-01-01

    This study presents new K-Ar ages of granitic rocks from the Patagonian Batholit in the North Patagonian Andes (38 o 00'- 39 o 30' SL), from localities near Alumine lake and from Norquinco lake to Quillen valley, in the Neuquen Province, Argentine. The granitic rocks of Patagonia had been recognized as Upper Paleozoic to Middle Jurassic batholits and as Late Jurassic to Tertiary batholiths (Rapela and Pankhurst, 1992). Geochronologically, Rapela and Kay (1988) had distinguished Early Cretaceous (140 to 120 Ma) and Late Cretaceous (110 to 75 Ma ) magmatic episodes based in potassium-argon data. For the granitic rocks of the area of Paso Icalma, Moquehue and the Rahue granodiorites, Cingolani et al. (1991) presented Rb-Sr whole rock isochron ages of 70±10 Ma, 209±13 Ma and 237±37 Ma, respectively, and Varela et al. (1994), with the same method, cited an age of 285±5 Ma for the Rahue granodiorites and diorites (au)

  4. Investigation of Expanding Cements. Report 1. Summary of Information Available as of 1 July 1963

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-09-01

    research) be tamed and utiliz -a. Today, expectations of such kind may with some right be stamped as banalities, and one might prefer the more limited...the following tabulation: Cementing Material,% by weight Grout Portland Expansive Aluminium Mi_z Type of Grout Cement Fly Ash Component Powder A 8o 20...tures, as a function of the behaviour of cements. Cold cements-- workable cements--ductile cements--non-shrinking cements and cements with controlled

  5. Alpha radioactivity in Indian cement samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nain, M.; Chauhan, R. P.; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    The essential constituents of radioactive and each of cements like lime, silica and alumina are derived from earth's crust in which radioactive elements like uranium, thorium etc are also present in varying amounts almost everywhere. These two elements are considered as the parent elements of uranium and thorium radioactive decay series in which radon and thoron are produced respectively as decay products. In the present study the samples of ordinary Portland cement , Portland pozzolana cement and some other cementious finishing materials like white cement, Plaster of Paris , cement putty etc were collected and analysed for radium and radon concentrations along with radon exhalation rates. Materials and Methods: Alpha sensitive LR-115 Type II plastic track detectors commonly known as S olid State Nuclear Track Detectors w ere used to measure the radium and radon concentration. The alpha particles emitted from the radon causes the radiation damaged tracks. The Chemical etching in NaOH at 60 C for about 90 minutes was done to reveal these latent tracks, which were then scanned and counted by an optical microscope of suitable magnification. By calculating the track density of registered tracks, the radon and radium concentrations along with exhalation rate of radon, were determined using required formulae. Results: The radon and radium concentration in various brands of cements found to vary from 333±9.9 to 506±13.3 Bq m-3 and from 3.7±0.1 to 5.6±0.2 Bq k g-1 while in various cementious finishing materials used in the construction, these were found to vary from 378±19.7 to 550±9.8 Bq m-3 and from 4.2±0.2 to 6.1±0.1 Bq Kg-1, respectively. Based on the data the mass and surface exhalation rates were also calculated Conclusion: The measurements indicate that there is marginal variation of the concentration of radium and radon in various brands of cements in India with lower levels in the cement samples having red oxide and higher levels in fly ash based cement

  6. The influence of temporary cements on dental adhesive systems for luting cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José C V; Coelho, Paulo G; Janal, Malvin N; Silva, Nelson R F A; Monteiro, André J; Fernandes, Carlos A O

    2011-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that bond strength of total- and self-etching adhesive systems to dentine is not affected by the presence of remnants from either eugenol-containing (EC) or eugenol-free (EF) temporary cements after standardized cleaning procedures. Thirty non-carious human third molars were polished flat to expose dentine surfaces. Provisional acrylic plates were fabricated and cemented either with EC, EF or no temporary cements. All specimens were incubated for 7 days in water at 37°C. The restorations were then taken out and the remnants of temporary cements were mechanically removed with a dental instrument. The dentine surfaces were cleaned with pumice and treated with either total-etching (TE) or self-etching (SE) dental adhesive systems. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the presence of remnants of temporary cements before and after dentine cleaning procedures. Composite resin build-ups were fabricated and cemented to the bonded dentine surfaces with a resin luting cement. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain 0.9mm(2) beams for microtensile bond strength testing. Fractographic analysis was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. ANOVA showed lower mean microtensile bond strength in groups of specimens treated with EC temporary cement than in groups treated with either no cement or an EF cement (p<0.05). Mean microtensile bond strength was lower in groups employing the SE rather than the TE adhesive system (p<0.001). SE samples were also more likely to fail during initial processing of the samples. There was no evidence of interaction between cement and adhesive system effects on tensile strength. Fractographic analysis indicated different primary failure modes for SE and TE bonding systems, at the dentine-adhesive interface and at the resin cement-resin composite interface, respectively. The use of eugenol-containing temporary cements prior to indirect bonding restorations reduce, to a statistically similar

  7. Hybrid Alkaline Cements: Bentonite-Opc Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Garcia-Lodeiro

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Moderately alkaline activators can be used to formulate cementitious binders with a high Supplemetary Cementitious Materials (SCMs and a low portland cement content (hybrid alkaline cements. This study aimed to prepare hybrid alkaline cements containing large percentages of dehydroxylated bentonite (BT and small Portland cement (OPC fractions, with 5% Na2SO4 as a solid alkaline activator. The hydration kinetics of the pastes hydrated in water in the presence and absence of the solid activator were assessed by isothermal conduction calorimetry, whilst the reaction products were characterised with X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD and Fourier-transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. The presence of the alkaline activator hastened OPC and BT/OPC hydration: more heat of hydration was released, favouring greater initial bentonite reactivity. The portlandite forming during cement hydration reacted readily with the Na2SO4, raising medium alkalinity and enhancing bentonite dissolution and with it reaction product precipitation (primarily (N,C-A-S-H-like gels that co-exist with C-S-H- or C-A-S-H-like gels. The presence of sulfate ions favoured the formation of AFm-like phases. Preceding aspects accelerated the hydration reactions, with the formation of more reaction product and matrix densification. As a result, the 28 days Na2SO4 activated systems developed greater mechanical strength than the water-hydrated systems, with the 60% BT/40% OPC blends exhibiting higher compressive strength than the 100% OPC pastes.

  8. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  9. Microbial-influenced cement degradation: Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews literature which addresses the effect of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are identified, which are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with concrete and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Mechanisms inherent in microbial-influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. This report provides sufficient evidence of the potential for microbial-influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW to justify the enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion, as well as the development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbiological-induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form

  10. EFFECT OF NANOMATERIALS IN CEMENT MORTAR CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAIL N. AL-RIFAIE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is considered as brittle materials and widely used due to high compressive strength but unfortunately having and has low tensile strength that has a numerous negative impacts on the lifespan of concrete made structures. Therefore, mechanical properties of cement mortar have been investigated experimentally using different types and ratios of nano material to improve the properties. Since the strength of the concrete is of high importance, different materials have been used to enhance the compressive and the tensile characteristics of the cement mortar compressive and tensile strength. Mainly, this objective has been implemented through using micro cement, micro sand, nano silica, and nano clay in developing a nano-cement mortar which can to improve the concrete for the constructional applications. The samples were prepared and tested under tensile and compressive mode according to ASTM-2011 regulations for concrete. The parameters that are taken consideration during the investigation were micro sand, micro cement, nano silica, developed nano clay, and naphthalene sulphonate as super- plasticizers. In general, it has been observed that the results showed a significant increase in both compressive and tensile strength of the mortar at early stages of hardening, where a maximum increase of 22% in the compressive strength was achieved , whereas 3.7 time increase in the compressive strength was recorded over the tradition levels of the concrete strength.

  11. Properties of pellet cement-glass package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, K.; Izumida, T.

    1989-01-01

    A new solidification technique using cement-glass, which is a mixture of sodium silicate, silicon phosphate and cement is presented. It was developed to solidify sodium sulfate or sodium borate pellets generated from nuclear power plants. The optimum composition of Na 2 O, SiO 2 and P 2 O 5 · 2SiO 2 , main components of cement-glass, was defined to be 1:2:1 by studying the solidification mechanism. Polymer impregnated concrete was selected as material of the container to increase the stability. Since the package consists of inorganic materials, it shows good fire resistance and radiation stability. Added cement absorbs free water which is generated by the solidification reaction of Na 2 O, SiO 2 and P 2 O 5 · 2SiO 2 . Then, soluble pellets can be solidified without dissolving some part of them. Since polymer impregnated concrete has little porosity, the pellet cement-glass package which uses a polymer impregnated concrete container shows very low leachability

  12. Plug cementing: Horizontal to vertical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvert, D.G.; Heathman, J.F.; Griffith, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an in-depth study of cement plug placement that was conducted with large-scale models for the improvement of plug cementing practices and plug integrity. Common hole and workstring geometries were examined with various rheology and density ratios between the drilling fluid and cement. The critical conditions dictating the difference between success and failure for various wellbore angles and conditions were explored, and the mechanisms controlling slurry movement before and after placement are now better understood. An understanding of these mechanisms allows the engineer to better tailor a design to specific hole conditions. Controversial concepts regarding plug-setting practices have been examined and resolved. The cumulative effects of density, rheology, and hole angle are major factors affecting plug success. While the Boycott effect and an extrusion effect were observed to be predominant in inclined wellbores, a spiraling or {open_quotes}roping{close_quotes} effect controls slurry movement in vertical wellbores. Ultimate success of a cement plug can be obtained if allowances are made for these effects in the job design, provided all other previously published recommended placement practices are followed. Results of this work can be applied to many sidetracking and plug-to-abandon operations. Additionally, the understanding of the fluid movement (creep) mechanisms holds potential for use in primary and remedial cementing work, and in controlling the placement of noncementitious fluids in the wellbore.

  13. An Experimental Study of Portland Cement and Superfine Cement Slurry Grouting in Loose Sand and Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijing Yao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Grouting technology is widely applied in the fields of geotechnical engineering in infrastructure. Loose sand and sandy soil are common poor soils in tunnel and foundation treatments. It is necessary to use superfine cement slurry grouting in the micro-cracks of soil. The different effectiveness of Portland cement slurry and superfine cement slurry in sandy soil by the laboratory grouting experiment method were presented in this paper. The grouting situations of superfine cement slurry injected into sand and sandy soil were explored. The investigated parameters were the dry density, wet density, moisture content, internal friction angle, and cohesion force. The results show that the consolidation effect of superfine cement is better than that of Portland cement due to the small size of superfine cement particles. The superfine cement can diffuse into the sand by infiltration, extrusion, and splitting. When the water–cement ratio of superfine cement slurry is less than 2:1 grouting into loose sand, the dry and wet density decrease with the increase in the water–cement ratio, while the moisture content and cohesive force gradually increase. When the water–cement ratio of superfine cement slurry is 1:1 grouting into loose sand and sandy soil, the dry density, wet density, and cohesive force of loose sand are larger than those of sandy soil. The results of the experiment may be relevant for engineering applications.

  14. Assessment of limestone blended cements for transportation applications : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This research assessed the applicability of Type IL cements satisfying AASHTO M 240 specifications for use in transportation applications in place of Type I/II cements which satisfy AASHTO M 85 specifications for construction of transportation struct...

  15. Reducing cement content in concrete mixtures : [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Concrete mixtures contain crushed rock or gravel, and sand, bound together by Portland cement in combination with supplemental cementitious materials (SCMs), which harden through a chemical reaction with water. Portland cement is the most costly comp...

  16. Migration of ions in cement paste as studied by SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, K.E.; Aldridge, L.P.; Rougeron, P.

    1998-01-01

    Cement is often used to condition and encapsulate low level radioactive waste before it is disposed of in a repository. Ground water can attack these waste-forms by transporting aggressive ions into the cement paste and by removing radioactive ions from the paste. The extent of the attack will be governed by the diffusion of the ions in the cement paste. In this study we examine the migration of aggressive carbonate ions and inactive Cs and Sr through cement pastes. The use of SIMS for establishing the penetration depths and diffusion profiles for Cs and Sr in cement will be explored. The penetration profiles of Cs and Sr in a non-zeolite cement paste were examined and compared to those of a paste made with zeolite. The effects of the non-homogeneous nature of the cement was most pronounced in the study of the zeolite rich cement; Cs being preferentially accumulated in the zeolite material. (authors)

  17. Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of admixing of aluminium phosphate on oxychloride cement in the matrix has been investigated. It is shown that aluminium phosphate retards the setting process of the cement and improves water-tightness.

  18. Heat of hydration measurements on cemented radioactive wastes. Part 1: cement-water pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the hydration of cement pastes in terms of chemical and kinetic models. A calorimetric technique was used to measure the heat of hydration to develop these models. The effects of temperature, water/cement ratio and cement replacements, ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and pulverised fuel ash (PFA) on the hydration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is reported. The incorporation of BFS or PFA has a marked effect on the hydration reaction. The effect of temperature is also important but changing the water/cement ratio has little effect. Results from cement pastes containing only water and cement yield total heats of reaction of 400, 200 and 100 kJ/kg for OPC, BFS and PFA respectively. Using the results from the models which have been developed, the effect of major salts present in radioactive waste streams can be assessed. Values of the total heat of reaction, the time to complete 50 percent reaction, and the energy of activation, can be compared for different waste systems. (U.K.)

  19. Characteristics of Portland blast-furnace slag cement containing cement kiln dust and active silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdel Rahman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This investigation dealt with the effect of active silica, silica fume (SF or rice husk ash (RHA, on the mechanical and physico-chemical characteristics of the hardened blended cement pastes made of Portland blast-furnace slag cement (PSC containing cement kiln dust (CKD cured under normal conditions. Two blends made of PSC and CKD, improved by SF and two blends made of PSC and CKD improved by RHA were investigated. Hardened blended cement pastes were prepared from each cement blend by using water/cement ratio (W/C of 0.30 by weight and hydrated for various curing ages of 1, 3, 7, 28 and 90 days at the normal curing conditions under tap water at room temperature. Each cement paste was tested for its physico-chemical and mechanical characteristics; these characteristics include: compressive strength and kinetics of hydration. The phase composition of the formed hydration products was identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential thermal analysis (DTA. It was found that the partial substitution of PSC by 10% and 15% of CKD is associated with an increase in the rate of hydration and a subsequent improvement of compressive strength of hardened PSC–CKD pastes. In addition, the replacement of PSC, in PSC–CKD blends, by 5% active silica was accompanied by further improvement of the physico-mechanical characteristics of the hardened PSC–CKD pastes.

  20. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  1. Cementation of wastes with boric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, Cledola C.O.; Haucz, Maria Judite A.; Alves, Lilian J.L.; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear power plants (PWR) are generated wastes, such as concentrate, which comes from the evaporation of liquid radioactive wastes, and spent resins. Both have boron in their composition. The cementation process is one of the options to solidify these wastes, but the boron has a negative effect on the setting of the cement mixture. In this paper are presented the experiments that are being carried out in order to overcome this problem and also to improve the efficiency of the process. Simulated wastes were cemented using additives (clays, admixtures etc.). In the process and product is being evaluated the effect of the amount, type and addition order of the materials. The mixtures were selected in accordance with their workability and incorporated waste. The solidified products are monolithic without free water with a good mechanical resistance. (author)

  2. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar

    ppmvin 1960 to 390 ppmv in 2012, probably due to human activity. A lot of research is being carried out forreducing CO2emissions from large stationary sources. Ofwhich, the carbonate looping process is anew process and has the potential to reduce CO2emissions with lower energy penalties. Most of thework...... and the main parameter that controls the performance of the carbonator, a process model integrating the carbonate looping process with the cement pyro-process was simulated. The process simulation results indicate that the CO2 emission was only 0.07 kg/ kg cl, with an energy penalty of 2 MJ/kg CO2 captured......Production of cement is an energy intensive process and is the source of considerable CO2emissions. Itis estimated that the cement industry contributes around 8% of total global CO2emissions. CO2is oneof the major greenhouse gases. In the atmosphere, the CO2concentration has increased from 310...

  3. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fujiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the effect of the fibers on the fracture toughness of the material. The results obtained indicate that, while fiber reinforcement leads to a decrease in compressive strength, J-integral calculations at maximum load for the different notch root radii have indicated, particularly for the case of long fibers, a significant superiority of the reinforced material in comparison with the plain cement mortar, in consistence with the impact test data.

  4. Pore structure in blended cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canut, Mariana Moreira Cavalcanti

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained...... supplement each other. Cement pastes (w/b=0.4) with and without slag and fly ash cured at two moisture (sealed and saturated) and temperature (20 and 55ºC) conditions were used to investigate the combined impact of SCMs addition and curing on the pore structure of pastes cured up to two years. Also...... volume and threshold pore size were found when comparing with plain cement paste at the same curing conditions. The porosity methods MIP, LTC and SEM have been shown to be suitable to characterise pore parameters of the pastes. MIP is a simple and fast method which covers a large range of pore sizes...

  5. Revision of hemiarthroplasty to total hip arthroplasty using the cement-in-cement technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, E J; Williams, D H; Howell, J R; Hubble, M J

    2015-12-01

    Revision of a cemented hemiarthroplasty of the hip may be a hazardous procedure with high rates of intra-operative complications. Removing well-fixed cement is time consuming and risks damaging already weak bone or perforating the femoral shaft. The cement-in-cement method avoids removal of intact cement and has shown good results when used for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). The use of this technique for the revision of a hemiarthroplasty to THA has not been previously reported. A total of 28 consecutive hemiarthroplasties (in 28 patients) were revised to a THA using an Exeter stem and the cement-in-cement technique. There were four men and 24 women; their mean age was 80 years (35 to 93). Clinical and radiographic data, as well as operative notes, were collected prospectively and no patient was lost to follow-up. Four patients died within two years of surgery. The mean follow up of the remainder was 70 months (25 to 124). Intra-operatively there was one proximal perforation, one crack of the femoral calcar and one acetabular fracture. No femoral components have required subsequent revision for aseptic loosening or are radiologically loose. Four patients with late complications (14%) have since undergone surgery (two for a peri-prosthetic fracture, and one each for deep infection and recurrent dislocation) resulting in an overall major rate of complication of 35.7%. The cement-in-cement technique provides reliable femoral fixation in this elderly population and may reduce operating time and rates of complication. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. Cementation of the solid radioactive waste with polymer-cement solutions using the method of impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of solid radioactive waste (SRW), i.e. inclusion of solid radioactive waste into cement matrix without cavities - is one of the main technological processes used for conditioning low and intermediate level radioactive waste. At FSUE 'Radon' the industrialized method of impregnation has been developed and since 2003 has been using for cementation of solid radioactive waste. The technology is that the polymer-cement solution, having high penetrating properties, is supplied under pressure through a tube to the bottom of the container in which solid radioactive waste has preliminarily been placed. The polymer-cement solution is evenly moving upwards through the channels between the particles of solid radioactive waste, fills the voids in the bulk volume of the waste and hardens, forming a cement compound, the amount of which is equal to the original volume. The aim of the investigation was a selection of a cement solution suitable for SRW impregnation (including fine particles) without solution depletion and bottom layers stuffing. It has been chosen a polymer: PHMG (polyhexamethylene-guanidine), which is a stabilizing and water-retaining component of the cement solution. The experiments confirm that the polymer increases the permeability of the cement solution by a 2-2.5 factor, the viscosity by a 1.2 factor, the stability of the consistency by a 1.5-1.7 factor, and extends the operating range of the W/C ratio to 0.5-1.1. So it is possible to penetrate a volume of SRW bigger by a 1.5-2.0 factor. It has been proved, that PHMG polymer increases strength and frost-resistance of the final compounds by a 1.8-2.7 factor, and contributes to fast strength development at the beginning of hardening and it decreases Cs-137 leashing rate by a 1.5-2 factor

  7. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. Because hydraulic cement requires a chemical hydration reaction for setting and hardening, it is subject to potential interactions between elements in the waste and binder that can retard or prevent solidification. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above its melting point, combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991

  8. Application of glass ionomer cements in restorative dentistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh P; Kamath M

    1999-01-01

    Dentistry was marked with radical changes in clinical restorative procedures. If the inherent characteristic of the ionomer cement was examined, it becomes very clear to the researcher as well as the dentist, that no other material has had an impact as comparable to glass ionomer cements on restorative dentistry. This scientific paper highlights the clinical applications of the cement in restorative dentistry. Glass ionomer cements are bioactive, by forming permanent adhesive bonds to dentin ...

  9. Retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, J E; Richards, L C; Abbott, J R

    2008-12-01

    The cementation of crowns to dental implant abutments is an accepted form of crown retention that requires consideration of the properties of available cements within the applied clinical context. Dental luting agents are exposed to a number of stressors that may reduce crown retention in vivo, not the least of which is occlusal loading. This study investigated the influence of compressive cyclic loading on the physical retention of cast crown copings cemented to implant abutments. Cast crown copings were cemented to Straumann synOcta titanium implant abutments with three different readily used and available cements. Specimens were placed in a humidifier, thermocycled and subjected to one of four quantities of compressive cyclic loading. The uniaxial tensile force required to remove the cast crown copings was then recorded. The mean retention values for crown copings cemented with Panavia-F cement were statistically significantly greater than both KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements at each compressive cyclic loading quantity. KetacCem and TempBond non-eugenol cements produced relatively low mean retention values that were not statistically significantly different at each quantity of compressive cyclic loading. Compressive cyclic loading had a statistically significant effect on Panavia-F specimens alone, but increased loading quantities produced no further statistically significant difference in mean retention. Within the limitations of the current in vitro conditions employed in this study, the retention of cast crown copings cemented to Straumann synOcta implant abutments with a resin, glass ionomer and temporary cement was significantly affected by cement type but not compressive cyclic loading. Resin cement is the cement of choice for the definitive non-retrievable cementation of cast crown copings to Straumann synOcta implant abutments out of the three cements tested.

  10. Expansion control for cementation of incinerated ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Suzuki, S.; Hanada, K.; Tomioka, O.; Sato, J.; Irisawa, K.; Kato, J.; Kawato, Y.; Meguro, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose of radioactive incinerated ash waste. A small amount of metallic Al, which was not oxidized in the incineration, existed in the ash. When such ash was mixed with a cement material and water, alkaline components in the ash and the cement were dissolved in the mixing water and then metallic Al reaction with the alkaline compounds resulted in generation of H 2 . Because the H 2 generation began immediately just after the mixing, H 2 bubbles pushed up the mixed grout material and an expanded solidified form was obtained. The expansion leads to lowering the strength of the solidified form and making harmful void. In this study, we tried to control H 2 generation from the reaction of metallic Al in the cementation by means of following two methods, one was a method to let metallic Al react prior to the cementation and the other was a method to add an expansion inhibitor that made an oxide film on the surface of metallic Al. In the pre-treatment, the ash was soaked in water in order to let metallic Al react with it, and then the ash with the immersion solution was dried at 105 Celsius degrees. The pre-treated ash was mixed with an ordinary portland cement and water. The inhibitor of lithium nitrite, sodium nitrite, phosphoric acid, or potassium dihydrogen phosphate was added at the mixing process. The solidified forms prepared using the pre-treated ash and lithium nitrite were not expanded. Phosphoric acid and sodium nitrite were effective for expansion control, but potassium dihydrogen phosphate did not work. (authors)

  11. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Lee, Chang Hwa; Heo, Cheol Min; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho

    2011-01-01

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  12. Crowns cemented on crown preparations lacking geometric resistance form. Part II: effect of cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different cements on resistance to dislodgment of crowns cemented on preparations lacking geometric resistance form. A preparation that offered no geometric resistance form, with 20 degrees total occlusal convergence (TOC), 0.9 mm wide shoulder finish line, and a 2.5 mm axial wall height was created on an ivorine tooth using a milling machine. Ten metal test specimen die replicas and 10 standardized metal crowns with recipient sites for the application of external forces through a universal testing machine were fabricated. The crowns were cemented on the dies under 5 and 10 kg external loads, the marginal openings measured, loaded to dislodgment, and cleaned of cement. The process was repeated using zinc oxide and eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate (ZPh), resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI), and composite resin (CR) cements. Marginal openings under 5 kg cementation loads were 74.63 (+/-15.04) for ZOE, 75.98 (+/-18.20) microm for ZPh, 98.58 (+/-22.62) microm for RMGI, and 105.82 (+/-20.07) microm for CR cements respectively; under 10 kg cementation loads they were 57.62 (+/-15.86) microm, 59.55 (+/-15.41) microm, 95.00 (+/-19.52) microm, 101.30 (+/-12.52) microm respectively. Oblique dislodgment forces, measured with a Universal testing machine, were 40.18 (+/- 6.76) N for ZOE, 215.65 (+/-45.79) N for ZPh, 165.43 (+/-19.53) N for RMGI, and 181.54 (+/-30.75) N for CR respectively when crowns were cemented under 5 kg loads. The corresponding values for 10 kg loads were 38.62 (+/-4.19), 274.86 (+/-54.22), 139.70 (+/-21.71), and 160.40 (+/-21.21) respectively. Only zinc phosphate cement produced statistically enhanced resistance when crowns were cemented under 10 kg force (p value = 0.035). Under the conditions of the present study only crowns cemented with zinc phosphate displayed increased resistance to dislodgment on preparations lacking resistance form.

  13. Quality control of cemented waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, L.J.; Wacks, M.E.; Cornellissen, H.A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Seven day and 28 day compressive strength from radwaste cementation can be predicted during the mixing and early curing stages by at least three methods: maturity, rheology, and impedance. Best results were obtained via the impedance method, where the water-to-cement ratio was seen to be the primary factor. The rheology method produced physically consistent results, but may be to cumbersome to be practical. The results of the maturity method were shown to be limited in its accuracy for determining compressive strength

  14. Controls on Cementation in a Chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meireles, Leonardo Teixeira Pinto; Hussein, A.; Welch, M.J.

    In this study, we identify different controls on cementation in a chalk reservoir. Biot’s coefficient, a measure of cementation, stiffness and strength in porous rocks, is calculated from logging data (bulk density and sonic Pwave velocity). We show that Biot’s coefficient is correlated...... to the water saturation of the Kraka reservoir and is partly controlled by its stratigraphic sub-units. While the direct causal relationship between Biot’s coefficient and water saturation cannot be extended for Biot’s coefficient and porosity, a correlation is also identified between the two, implying...

  15. ASSESSMENT OF DEFORMATION AND STRENGTH OF SOILS STRENGTHENED BY CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainov Mihail Petrovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are few studies of deformation and strength properties of loose soils strengthened by cementing. Based on the data of already arranged grout curtains it was determined that in cemented gravel-pebble soil there are 7...9 % of cement, which is less than in concrete. To assess deformation and strength of such soils it is possible to use the data of tests conducted by other authors, where the effect of cement contents on sand-cement mix properties was studied. Analysis of experimental data showed that cemented soil may be identified with concrete only with high content of cement (more than 10 %. At cement content 7...9 % in soil the strength deformation of cemented soil varies to a small extent. Its deformation becomes 2-3 times less. It greatly depends on compression stresses. The formulae are proposed which permit assessing the effect of compression and cement content on deformation of cemented soil. It is shown that strength of cemented soil is less than that even of the weakest concrete. It has a sufficiently high cohesion, but the friction angle is approximately the same as that of the initial soil.

  16. Geotechnical properties of clayey soil stabilized with cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to investigate the different effects of cement-sawdust ash and cement on a clayey soil sampled from Mandate Lodge, Landmark University, Omu-Aran, Nigeria. The binder mix of cementsawdust ash (CSDA) was mixed in a ratio of 1:1. The CSDA and cement were added to the soil samples at ...

  17. Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Oxychloride cement (magnesia cement) has many superior properties to that of portland cement (Sorel 1867; Beau- din and Ramachandra 1975; Beaudin et al 1977). The chemical composition of the additive or admixture availa- ble in commercial grade is AlPO4. Little scientific data are available about its effect on ...

  18. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or remove...

  19. Development of hydroxyapatite bone cement for controlled drug ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... difference could be detected in XRD patterns of the TCH–HA cement with various amounts of drug. By increasing the drug concentration, mechanical strength of cement was decreased and its setting time was increased. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using HA cement as a carrier for drug delivery.

  20. Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components and its application to phase analysis and hydration performance of OPC cement. Rohan Jadhav N C Debnath. Volume 34 Issue 5 August 2011 pp 1137- ... Keywords. Portland cement; X-ray diffraction; crystal structure; characterization; Rietveld method.

  1. Assessment of Pollution Potentialities of some Portland Cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical analysis of some Portland cement commonly used in Nigeria was carried out. All the cement studies were found to be good for concrete work especially where no special property is required. The concentration levels of heavy metals in all the cement samples were above the tolerance limit and therefore need to ...

  2. Radiopacity of portland cement associated with different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; de Oliveira El Kadre, Guâniara D'arc; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Guerreiro Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of Portland cement associated with the following radiopacifying agents: bismuth oxide, zinc oxide, lead oxide, bismuth subnitrate, bismuth carbonate, barium sulfate, iodoform, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide. A ratio of 20% radiopacifier and 80% white Portland cement by weight was used for analysis. Pure Portland cement and dentin served as controls. Cement/radiopacifier and dentin disc-shaped specimens were fabricated, and radiopacity testing was performed according to the ISO 6876/2001 standard for dental root sealing materials. Using Insight occlusal films, the specimens were radiographed near to a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 2 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized and radiopacity compared with the aluminum stepwedge using Digora software (Orion Corporation Soredex, Helsinki, Finland). The radiographic density data were converted into mmAl and analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test (alpha = 0.05). The radiopacity of pure Portland cement was significantly lower (p cement/radiopacifier mixtures were significantly more radiopaque than dentin and Portland cement alone (p Portland cement/bismuth oxide and Portland cement/lead oxide presented the highest radiopacity values and differed significantly from the other materials (p Portland cement/zinc oxide presented the lowest radiopacity values of all mixtures (p Portland cement as radiopacifying agents. However, the possible interference of the radiopacifiers with the setting chemistry, biocompatibility, and physical properties of the Portland cement should be further investigated before any clinical recommendation can be done.

  3. The Suitability of Lime Rice Husk Ash Cement as Construction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, by gradually increasing the percentage contents of silica, potassium oxide and sodium oxide in the Portland cement to the values found in the rice husk ash a new product, "Artificial Lime Rice Husk Ash" (ALRHA) cement was produced. The new product ALRHA cement compared favourably with the ordinary rice ...

  4. CEMENT KILN DUST AS A MATERIAL FOR BUILDING BLOCKS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the results of a study on the properties of hollow sandcrete blocks with cement kiln dust (CKD) as an additive and as a replacement for ordinary portland cement (OPC). When CKD was used as a replacement for cement, the compressive strength and density of blocks generally decreased with higher ...

  5. A comparison of retentive strength of implant cement depending on various methods of removing provisional cement from implant abutment

    OpenAIRE

    Keum, Eun-Cheol; Shin, Soo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effectiveness of various methods for removing provisional cement from implant abutments, and what effect these methods have on the retention of prosthesis during the definitive cementation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implant fixture analogues and abutments were embedded in resin blocks. Forty cast crowns were fabricated and divided into 4 groups each containing 10 implants. Group A was cemented directly with the definitive cement (Cem-Implant). The remainder ...

  6. Determining the water-cement ratio, cement content, water content and degree of hydration of hardened cement paste: Method development and validation on paste samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the initial cement content, water content and free water/cement ratio (w/c) of hardened cement-based materials made with Portland cements that have unknown mixture proportions and degree of hydration. This method first quantifies the composition of the hardened cement paste, i.e. the volumetric fractions of capillary pores, hydration products and unreacted cement, using high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode and image analysis. From the obtained data and the volumetric increase of solids during cement hydration, we compute the initial free water content and cement content, hence the free w/c ratio. The same method can also be used to calculate the degree of hydration. The proposed method has the advantage that it is quantitative and does not require comparison with calibration graphs or reference samples made with the same materials and cured to the same degree of hydration as the tested sample. This paper reports the development, assumptions and limitations of the proposed method, and preliminary results from Portland cement pastes with a range of w/c ratios (0.25-0.50) and curing ages (3-90 days). We also discuss the extension of the technique to mortars and concretes, and samples made with blended cements.

  7. A comparison of retentive strength of implant cement depending on various methods of removing provisional cement from implant abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Eun-Cheol; Shin, Soo-Yeon

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of various methods for removing provisional cement from implant abutments, and what effect these methods have on the retention of prosthesis during the definitive cementation. Forty implant fixture analogues and abutments were embedded in resin blocks. Forty cast crowns were fabricated and divided into 4 groups each containing 10 implants. Group A was cemented directly with the definitive cement (Cem-Implant). The remainder were cemented with provisional cement (Temp-Bond NE), and classified according to the method for cleaning the abutments. Group B used a plastic curette and wet gauze, Group C used a rubber cup and pumice, and Group D used an airborne particle abrasion technique. The abutments were observed using a stereomicroscope after removing the provisional cement. The tensile bond strength was measured after the definitive cementation. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test (α=.05). Group B clearly showed provisional cement remaining, whereas the other groups showed almost no cement. Groups A and B showed a relatively smooth surface. More roughness was observed in Group C, and apparent roughness was noted in Group D. The tensile bond strength tests revealed Group D to have significantly the highest tensile bond strength followed in order by Groups C, A and B. A plastic curette and wet gauze alone cannot effectively remove the residual provisional cement on the abutment. The definitive retention increased when the abutments were treated with rubber cup/pumice or airborne particle abraded to remove the provisional cement.

  8. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheen Juneja Arora

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The temporary cements with eugenol showed more microleakage than those without eugenol. SC-10 crowns showed more microleakage compared to Protemp 4 crowns. SC-10 crowns cemented with Kalzinol showed maximum microleakage and Protemp 4 crowns cemented with HY bond showed least microleakage.

  9. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  10. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.; Gordon, L.E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste

  11. Preparation and characterization of a novel bioactive bone cement: glass based nanoscale hydroxyapatite bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Nai; Huang, Wenhai; Wang, Deping; Zhang, Liying; Li, Haifeng

    2004-12-01

    A novel type of glass-based nanoscale hydorxypatite (HAP) bioactive bone cement (designed as GBNHAPC) was synthesized by adding nanoscale hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystalline (20-40 nm), into the self-setting glass-based bone cement (GBC). The inhibition rate of nanoscale HAP and micron HAP on osteosarcoma U2-OS cells was examined. The effects of nanoscale HAP on the crystal phase, microstructure and compressive strength of GBNHAPC were studied respectively. It was concluded that nanoscale HAP could inhibit the cell proliferation, while micron HAP could not, and that nanoscale HAP could be dispersed in the cement evenly and the morphology did not change significantly after a longer immersion time. XRD and FTIR results show nanoscale HAP did not affect the setting reaction of the cement. Furthermore, GBNHAPC had a higher compressive strength (92 MPa) than GBC. It was believed that GBNHAPC might be a desirable biomaterial that could not only fill bone defects but also inhibit cancer cell growth.

  12. Influence of Superplasticizer-Microsilica Complex on Cement Hydration, Structure and Properties of Cement Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. M.; Kramar, L. Ya; Orlov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    According to the study results, the influence of complex additives based on microsilica and superplasticizers on the processes of the heat release, hydration, hardening, formation of the structure and properties of cement stone was determined. Calorimetry, derivatography, X-ray phase analysis, electronic microscopy and physical-mechanical methods for analyzing the properties of cement stone were used for the studies. It was established that plasticizing additives, in addition to the main water-reducing and rheological functions, regulate cement solidification and hardening while polycarboxylate superplasticizers even contribute to the formation of a special, amorphized microstructure of cement stone. In a complex containing microsilica and a polycarboxylate superplasticizer the strength increases sharply with a sharp drop in the capillary porosity responsible for the density, permeability, durability, and hence, the longevity of concrete. All this is a weighty argument in favor of the use of microsilica jointly with a polycarboxylate superplasticizer in road concretes operated under aggressive conditions.

  13. Quenchable water-rich, aluminous post-stishovite: implications for seismic anomalies in the mid-mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, R.; Frost, D. J.; Panero, W. R.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Miyajima, N.; Bureau, H.; Raepsaet, C.; Siersch, N.; Kohn, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    At mid-mantle pressures, stishovite undergoes a displacive phase transition to the calcium chloride structure. It has been argued that softening accompanying this phase transition leads to very low seismic velocities and that silica-rich materials in the lower mantle may therefore be effective scatterers of seismic energy. The post-stishovite phase is also a promising candidate for water storage in the lower mantle, as it is both stable at very high temperatures and isostructural with the high pressure hydrous phases delta-AlOOH and Phase H. Pure SiO2 post-stishovite is unquenchable, making ex-situ characterisation impossible. In this study, we exploit the stabilisation of the post-stishovite structure due to alumina incorporation to synthesise and quench large crystals of post-stishovite. Single crystals are characterised by X-ray diffraction, TEM and Raman spectroscopy, and water contents are analysed with elastic recoil detection and FTIR. We show that water contents in our post-stishovite crystals are consistent with an SiO2-AlOOH solid solution, containing 3-7 times more water per atom of aluminium than stishovite. Our results suggest that almost 1 wt % H2O could be incorporated into post-stishovite crystals in lower mantle mafic rocks. We use ab-initio simulations to investigate the effect of pressure on the mechanism of hydroxyl incorporation into aluminous stishovite and post-stishovite. Finally, we discuss the potential for post-stishovite to affect seismic velocities in the lower mantle. In addition to the scattering potential of the phase transition, patchy low velocity layers in the mid-mantle might represent regions where hydrous melts are reacting with post-stishovite. In the lowermost mantle, transformation of post-stishovite to seifertite could result in the formation of a hydrous melt that might explain seismologically observed ultra low velocity zones.

  14. Effect of Solar Exposure on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Thermal Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Aobo; Ashmead, Claire C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to low Earth orbital (LEO) environment, external spacecraft materials degrade due to radiation, thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and atomic oxygen (AO) interaction. Collisions between AO and spacecraft can result in oxidation of external spacecraft surface materials, which can lead to erosion and severe structural and/or optical property deterioration. It is therefore essential to understand the AO erosion yield (Ey), the volume loss per incident oxygen atom (cu cm/atom), of polymers to assure durability of spacecraft materials. The objective of this study was to determine whether solar radiation exposure can increase the rate of AO erosion of polymers in LEO. The material studied was a section of aluminized-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) thermal shield exposed to space on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for 8.25 years. Retrieved samples were sectioned from the circular thermal shield and exposed to ground laboratory thermal energy AO. The results indicate that the average Ey of the solar facing HST Al-FEP was 1.9 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom, while the average Ey of the anti-solar HST Al-FEP was 1.5 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. The Ey of the pristine samples was 1.6- 1.7 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. These results indicate that solar exposure affects the post-flight erosion rate of FEP in a plasma asher. Therefore, it likely affects the erosion rate while in LEO.

  15. Polymorphism of the iron doped strontium aluminate SrAl 1.5Fe 0.5O 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmoulins, H.; Malo, S.; Boudin, S.; Caignaert, V.; Hervieu, M.

    2009-07-01

    The partial substitution of Al by Fe atoms in SrAl 2O 4 allowed to stabilize four stuffed tridymite derivative structures SrAl 1.5Fe 0.5O 4. The different phases have been characterized by TEM and XRPD techniques. Two are isotypes of those observed for the undoped oxides, namely the hexagonal phase with √{3}A× √{3}A× C (with A and C being the tridymite unit cell parameters) and space group P6 3 and the monoclinic one with A× √{3}A× C, β≈93° and space group P2 1, with a synthesis temperature lower than the one required for SrAl 2O 4. By annealing, two original phases, denoted O 1 and O 2, are obtained; they are metrically similar (3 A× √{3}A× C and β≈90°) and only differ by their space groups. The TEM study showed that the transitions between the different phases follow topotactic mechanisms, through the formation of twinning boundaries, antiphase boundaries and planar defects. The annealed sample exhibits a mesomorph state and a reversible transition from this semi-ordered state to a crystalline phase. This dynamic transition takes place over a very wide temperature range from 620 to 1120 °C. The reversibility of the transition has been studied by DSC measurements. The crystallization energy of the orthorhombic phases is of the order of 10 J/g, at T≈622 °C as T decreases. The variation of the peak height observed as the annealing temperature increases is explained by the complex microstructures, which create an ill-defined energy barrier. Structural models related to the stuffed tridymite derivative structures are proposed for the new forms of the ferri-aluminate.

  16. Analyses of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Multilayer Insulation Blankets Retrieved After 19 Years of Space Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groh, Kim K.; Perry, Bruce A.; Mohammed, Jelila S.; Banks, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Since its launch in April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has made many important observations from its vantage point in low Earth orbit (LEO). However, as seen during five servicing missions, the outer layer of multilayer insulation (MLI) has become increasingly embrittled and has cracked in many areas. In May 2009, during the 5th servicing mission (called SM4), two MLI blankets were replaced with new insulation and the space-exposed MLI blankets were retrieved for degradation analyses by teams at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The retrieved MLI blankets were from Equipment Bay 8, which received direct sunlight, and Equipment Bay 5, which received grazing sunlight. Each blanket was divided into several regions based on environmental exposure and/or physical appearance. The aluminized-Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) outer layers of the retrieved MLI blankets have been analyzed for changes in optical, physical, and mechanical properties, along with chemical and morphological changes. Pristine and as-retrieved samples (materials) were heat treated to help understand degradation mechanisms. When compared to pristine material, the analyses have shown how the Al-FEP was severely affected by the space environment. Most notably, the Al-FEP was highly embrittled, fracturing like glass at strains of 1 to 8 percent. Across all measured properties, more significant degradation was observed for Bay 8 material as compared to Bay 5 material. This paper reviews the tensile and bend-test properties, density, thickness, solar absorptance, thermal emittance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental composition measurements, surface and crack morphologies, and atomic oxygen erosion yields of the Al-FEP outer layer of the retrieved HST blankets after 19 years of space exposure.

  17. Retention and marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with provisional cements enriched with chlorhexidine diacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Chweidan, Harry; Matalon, Shlomo; Pilo, Raphael

    2007-11-01

    Provisional crowns cemented with provisional luting agents are susceptible to washout, marginal leakage, and secondary caries when placed for a prolonged period. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of incorporating chlorhexidine diacetate (antibacterial agent) into provisional cements on retention and marginal leakage of provisional crowns in vitro. Provisional crowns of acrylic resin (Duralay) were fabricated for 12 intact human molars with rounded-shoulder preparations. The 12 provisional crowns were luted individually with Temp Bond, Temp Bond NE, and Freegenol provisional cements with and without incorporation of chlorhexidine diacetate (CHDA) salt. Each test group included the same 12 specimens. Specimens with no luting agent served as the control (n=12). Specimens were thermal cycled 100 times (5 degrees C and 55 degrees C) with a 10-second dwell time, stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for 6 days, and then immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin at 37 degrees C for 6 hours. Seven days after cementation, removal test of the crowns (tensile retention test) was conducted with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Marginal leakage was assessed with a 5-level dye penetration scale. Results of the retention test were subjected to a 2-way ANOVA with repeated measures. A Bonferroni test was used to compare the means. Marginal leakage data were subjected to a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed ranks test. All hypothesis testing was conducted at the 95% level of confidence. Retention of provisional crowns cemented with Freegenol enriched with CHDA increased 3-fold to an average level of 80.9 N. However, incorporation of CHDA into Temp Bond or Temp Bond NE did not affect retention. CHDA incorporated into the cements had no significant effect on the marginal leakage of all the tested cements. The addition of CHDA increased retention of Freegenol and had no significant effect on the marginal leakage of the tested cements.

  18. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these ''problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120 degree C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Influence of microwave irradiation of cement mixtures on the strength of cement stone and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, M. S.; Dyakonov, M. V.; Krasnokutskiy, R. A.; Kolyaskin, A. D.; Dmitriev, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of microwave irradiation of mixtures on the strength of cement stone and concrete was studied. Created at NRNU MEPHI experimental installation for the investigation of microwave effects on imperfect dielectrics and semiconductor materials was the source of radiation. It is shown that on the twenty-eighth day after mixing, the strength of the cement stone increases by 1.2 times, and that of concrete by 2.2 times.

  20. A Study on Provisional Cements, Cementation Techniques, and Their Effects on Bonding of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod Kumar, G.; Soorya Poduval, T.; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P.

    2013-01-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restorati...

  1. Calcium phosphate cement scaffolds with PLGA fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Letícia Araújo; dos Santos, Luís Alberto

    2013-04-01

    The use of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials has revolutionized current orthopedics and dentistry in repairing damaged parts of the skeletal system. Among those biomaterials, the cement made of hydraulic grip calcium phosphate has attracted great interest due to its biocompatibility and hardening "in situ". However, these cements have low mechanical strength compared with the bones of the human body. In the present work, we have studied the attainment of calcium phosphate cement powders and their addition to poly (co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibers to increase mechanical properties of those cements. We have used a new method that obtains fibers by dripping different reagents. PLGA fibers were frozen after lyophilized. With this new method, which was patented, it was possible to obtain fibers and reinforcing matrix which furthered the increase of mechanical properties, thus allowing the attainment of more resistant materials. The obtained materials were used in the construction of composites and scaffolds for tissue growth, keeping a higher mechanical integrity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Peat Soil Stabilization using Lime and Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambri, Nadhirah Mohd; Ghazaly, Zuhayr Md.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the comparison between two additive Lime and Cement for treating peat soil in term of stabilization. Peat and organic soils are commonly known for their high compressibility, extremely soft, and low strength. The aim of this paper is to determine the drained shear strength of treated peat soil from Perlis for comparison purposes. Direct Shear Box Test was conducted to obtain the shear strength for all the disturbed peat soil samples. The quick lime and cement was mixed with peat soil in proportions of 10% and 20% of the dry weight peat soil. The experiment results showed that the addition of additives had improved the strength characteristics of peat soil by 14% increment in shear strength. In addition, the mixture of lime with peat soil yield higher result in shear strength compared to cement by 14.07% and 13.5% respectively. These findings indicate that the lime and cement is a good stabilizer for peat soil, which often experienced high amount of moisture content.

  3. Topics in cement and concrete research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Jos; Russel, M.I.; Basheer, P.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper addresses several topics in regard to the sustainable design and use of concrete. First, major features concerning the sustainable aspects of the material concrete are summarised. Then the major constituent, from an environmental point of view, cement is discussed in detail,

  4. Marginal adaptation of ceramic inserts after cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Pfeiffer, P; Nergiz, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    The advantage of using ceramic inserts is to prevent major drawbacks of composite resins such as polymerization shrinkage, wear and microleakage. This in vitro study evaluated the marginal adaptation of two approximal ceramic insert systems after cementation to the cavities opened with ultrasonic

  5. PROPERTIES OF CEMENT PASTE AND CONCRETE CONTAINING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper assessed the effect of calcium carbide waste (CCW) as additive on the properties of cement paste and concrete. The CCW used was sourced from a local panel beating workshop. It was sundried and sieved through a 75 µm sieve and characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analytical method.

  6. Percutaneous cement augmentation for osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaaly, Amer; Rizkallah, Maroun; Bachour, Falah; Atallah, Firas; Moreau, Pierre Emmanuel; Maalouf, Ghassan

    2017-06-01

    Thoracolumbar vertebral fracture incidents usually occur secondary to a high velocity trauma in young patients and to minor trauma or spontaneously in older people.Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures and affect one-fifth of the osteoporotic population.Percutaneous fixation by 'vertebroplasty' is a tempting alternative for open surgical management of these fractures.Despite discouraging initial results of early trials for vertebroplasty, cement augmentation proved its superiority for the treatment of symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral fracture when compared with optimal medical treatment.Early intervention is also gaining ground recently.Kyphoplasty has the advantage over vertebroplasty of reducing kyphosis and cement leak.Stentoplasty, a new variant of cement augmentation, is also showing promising outcomes.In this review, we describe the additional techniques of cement augmentation, stressing the important aspects for success, and recommend a thorough evaluation of thoracolumbar fractures in osteoporotic patients to select eligible patients that will benefit the most from percutaneous augmentation. A detailed treatment algorithm is then proposed. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:293-299. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160057.

  7. The case of Mugher cement facto

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thomas

    through co-generation of carbonate/bicarbonate: The case of Mugher cement factory. Getachew Dagnew Gebreeyessus1*, Tassisa Kaba2 and Bhagwan Singh Chandravanshi3. 1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 235, Harar, Ethiopia. 2School of Chemical and Bio-Engineering, ...

  8. Portland cement concrete air content study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-20

    This study took the analysis of Portland cement concrete air content. Based on the information gathered, this study hold the results were : 1) air-entrained concrete was more durable than non-air entrained concrete all other factors being equal; 2) A...

  9. Application of Carbonate Looping to Cement Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, cycle experiments of different types of limestone, cement raw meal and a mixture of limestone and clay were carried out in laboratory scale setups at more realistic conditions (i.e. calcination temperature is 950°C and CO2 concentration is 80%) to simulate the performance of ...

  10. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  11. The Effect of Temporary Cement Cleaning Methods on the Retention of Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Young; An, Hongseok; Park, Eun-Jin

    2017-06-09

    To evaluate the effect of temporary cement cleaning methods on the retention of cemented crowns using zinc phosphate cement and resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Forty titanium specimens were fabricated to simulate prepared molars with minimally retentive taper. The Ni-Cr cast crowns were fabricated, temporarily cemented, and separated. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the temporary cement cleaning method (n = 10) as follows: control group (no temporary cementation), orange solvent group, ultrasonic cleaning group, and air-abrasion group. After the cleaning procedures, the specimens were cemented with definitive cements (zinc phosphate cement and resin-modified glass ionomer, RMGI, cement) and subjected to thermocycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time, 10 seconds). The tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine, and the results were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test (α = 0.05). When cemented with zinc phosphate cement, the statistical analysis showed that the value of the air-abrasion group was significantly higher than those of the other groups (p crowns when zinc phosphate cement was used for permanent cementation. Airborne-particle abrasion after provisional cementation improved retention of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement; however, the use of temporary cement significantly decreased retention of permanently cemented crowns when RMGI cement was used regardless of the temporary cement cleaning method. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Effect of dentin sealers on postoperative sensitivity of complete cast crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdulhamaid A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate the effects of pretreatments with copal/ether varnish and dentin bonding system on postoperative sensitivity of complete cast crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement. Three posterior teeth with no pain symptoms were selected from each of 17 patients, totaling 51 teeth, for which a crown was indicated. Rexillium III complete cast crowns were prepared using conventional laboratory techniques. For each patient, the first tooth, which served as the control, received only glass ionomer cement (Ketac-Cem). Copal/ether varnish (Bosworth Copaliner) was applied to the second tooth preparation prior to cementation. Dentin bonding agent (OptiBond Solo Plus) was used on the third tooth before cementation. Sensitivity to different stimuli (cold, heat) was assessed at 7 days, 1 month, and 6 months following restorative procedures by questionnaire. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups regarding applied stimulus and day of the study (p > 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the postoperative sensitivity responses from 7 days to 1 month, and from 1 month to 6 months (p > 0.05). Postoperative sensitivity resulting from glass ionomer cement with complete cast crowns cannot be completely eliminated with the prior use of a cavity varnish or bonding agent. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Absorption Characteristics of Cement Combination Concrete Containing Portland Cement, fly ash, and Metakaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folagbade S.O.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance to water penetration of cement combination concretes containing Portland cement (PC, fly ash (FA, and metakaolin (MK have been investigated at different water/cement (w/c ratios, 28-day strengths, and depths of water penetration using their material costs and embodied carbon-dioxide (eCO2 contents. Results revealed that, at equal w/c ratio, eCO2 content reduced with increasing content of FA and MK. MK contributed to the 28-day strengths more than FA. Compared with PC, FA reduced cost and increased the depth of water penetration, MK increased cost and reduced the depth of water penetration, and their ternary combinations become beneficial. At equal strengths and levels of resistance to water penetration, most of the cement combination concretes are more environmentally compatible and costlier than PC concrete. Only MK binary cement concretes with 10%MK content or more and ternary cement concretes at a total replacement level of 55% with 10%MK content or more have higher resistance to water penetration than PC concrete.

  14. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  15. Aluminizing of steel 316L and the nickel-base alloy inconel 625 and followed by a high-temperature oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokanova, P.; Glasbrenner, H.; Zimmermann, H.

    1995-03-01

    The supercritical water oxidation process of hazardous waste has to be carried out in a reactor which is resistant against corrosion and high pressure and temperature. Pressure tube materials are coated for protection against corrosion. In this work, the reactor materials Inconel 625 and steel 316L have been powder pack aluminized. These coated specimens were subsequently oxidized. Powder mixtures of different composition were tested, time and temperature of the coating and the oxidation processes were varied. Good results were obtained on the steel 316L in respect to thickness of the layer, composition, and adherence on the steel. (orig.)

  16. Post-cementation colorimetric evaluation of the interaction between the thickness of ceramic veneers and the shade of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaro, Patricia Angélica Milani; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Ornaghi, Bárbara Pick; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the color parameters (CIELab*) after the cementation of ceramic disks of different thicknesses onto a resin substrate using four different shades of resin cements, and determine the color difference (ΔE) between the adhesively cemented disks and a 10 mm-thick A1 shade ceramic control (target color). Ceramic disks, simulating laminate veneers, with thicknesses of 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 mm (shade A1, IPS Classic) were fabricated (n = 40) and cemented with a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II, shades A1, bleach, opaque and transparent) onto 120 2 mm-thick resin composite substrates (shade A3.5, Adoro). Each ceramic disk was photocured for 80 seconds. The determination of the CIELab* parameters of each ceramic-cement-substrate set was performed with a spectrophotometer. A 10 mm-thick A1 ceramic disk was used as a control. The results for the color difference (ΔE) obtained from L*, a* and b* parameters were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The ΔE values ranged from 2.46 (1.0 mm, opaque cement) to 12.11 (0.5 mm, A1 cement). The opaque cement showed the lower ΔE values, followed by the bleach, transparent and A1 cements. With respect to the thickness of the ceramic, color differences between the target color and the group with 1.0 mm ceramic disks were smaller for all cement shades tested. Only the combination of 1.0 mm ceramic disks cemented with the opaque cement was able to mask the background color (ΔE resin cement were smaller in comparison with the bleach, transparent and A1 cements.

  17. Densified ultra-light cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Densified cement systems were developed in the early 1980s, about three decades past. The research led to historical developments in cement and concrete research, forming the baseline for the design of modern cement systems, the socalled high-performance and ultra-high performance concrete. Cement...... production comprehends one of the relevant carbon emission footprints in the world. The substitution of cement by supplementary cementitious additions encompasses several other health hazards, risks and also technical difficulties such as limited or incoherent pozzolanic activity. Superabsorbent polymers can...... be used as a “clean technology” in the production of cement-based materials for structural applications with a low carbon footprint. This paper describes the principles of this concept coupled with experimental results on the basic properties of this enhanced type of cement-based materials with combined...

  18. Cementation and solidification of Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    Cementation studies on various aqueous waste streams at Rocky Flats have shown this technology to be effective for immobilizing the RCRA constituents in the waste. Cementation is also being evaluated for encapsulation of incinerator ash. Experiments will initially evaluate a surrogate ash waste using a Taguchi experimental design to optimize the cement formulation and waste loading levels for this application. Variables of waste loading, fly ash additions, water/cement ratio, and cement type will be tested at three levels each during the course of this work. Tests will finally be conducted on actual waste using the optimized cement formulation developed from this testing. This progression of tests will evaluate the effectiveness of cement encapsulation for this waste stream without generating any additional wastes

  19. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  20. Assessment of cement durability in repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.G.A.; Vicente, R.; Isiko, V.L.K.; Miyamoto, H.; Marumo, J.T.; Gobbo, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed at investigating the durability of cement paste under nuclear waste repository conditions using accelerated tests. Cement paste samples are examined after being exposed to the environmental conditions that are expected to prevail in the repository environment and the results are compared with those obtained with unexposed specimens or specimens exposed to reference conditions. The following exposure conditions were selected: a) Immersion in salt solution, distilled water, or kept in dry storage; b) Room temperature (20 C. degrees) or high temperature (60 C. degrees); c) Immersion time of 30 days or 60 days (not for dry storage); d) Irradiation to a dose of (400 kGy) or background radiation (0 kGy). After exposure to the stressing conditions, the effects of each factor on the cement paste samples were observed by changes in their characteristics. Compressive strength tests were performed on all samples and some of them were investigated in terms of changes in mineralogy by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). With the results obtained so far it was possible to point out the following conclusions. First, after a period of immersion in water, cement paste samples further hydrated and presented higher mechanical resistance, as expected. Secondly, dry storage did not allow a complete hydration as a consequence of pore water evaporation. High temperatures intensified this process and led to the ettringite decomposition to meta-ettringite. Thirdly, higher temperature accelerated hydration kinetics and promoted higher mechanical resistance in samples kept under immersion. Fourthly, the irradiation dose applied was unable to change the mineralogy of cement paste samples and fifthly, no statistically significant differences were observed between 30 or 60 days exposure time, for the test conditions

  1. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  2. Retardation effect of different alcohols on the cement coagulation in polycarboxylate- and naphthalene-based cement admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. M.; Zhou, F. L.

    2017-12-01

    Alcohol has great potential to delay the coagulation of cement. The effects of alcohol on paste fluidity and normal consistency coagulation time have been studied for polycarboxylate superplasticizer and naphthene cement admixture. Seven alcohols were combined with polycarboxylate superplasticizer and naphthene at a concentration of 0.01-0.09%, respectively, including n-propanol, methanol, sorbitol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, ethanol, and mannitol. The fluidity and normal consistency coagulation time of each cement admixture were measured. The performance of both polycarboxylate superplasticizer and naphthene cement admixtures were compared to develop cement admixture with delayed coagulation.

  3. Use of sodium aluminate in waste water treatment plants: wishes of saving money and innovating; Uso del aluminato sodico en las EDAR: una propuesta para innovar y economizar costes de explotacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbert Fernandez, F.; Delgado Espinola, G.; Soler Cantalosella, M.; Dalman Martori, E.; Iranzo Blasco, C.; Sanz Torrejon, A.

    2006-07-01

    Most waste water treatment plants have processes to remove nutrients in order to avoid eutrophication in water receiving bodies. Regarding phosphorus removal. the most common option is chemical precipitation with ferric or aluminical precipitation with ferric or aluminium salts. We show here the successful experience carried out by the WWTP of Blanes and the company Safloc. A method ato remove phosphorus from waste water was developed by adding sodium aluminate. The use of this compound has turned out to be a sustainable way for this purpose in terms of costs, reliability and minimization of sludge production. (Author)

  4. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  5. Effect of interim cement application on bond strength between resin cements and dentin: Immediate and delayed dentin sealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigagão, Vinícius C; Barreto, Luis F D; Gonçalves, Kellem A S; Amaral, Marina; Vitti, Rafael P; Neves, Ana C C; Silva-Concílio, Laís R

    2017-06-01

    Despite the advances in materials and techniques, adhesion to dentin is challenging because of the complex composition of dentin's mineral, organic, and fluid phases. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of 2 different resin cements (conventional and self-adhesive) with or without previous dentin sealing and the effect of interim cement. Forty-five molars were embedded into acrylic resin blocks and a flat dentin surface was exposed. Twenty teeth (n=5 per group) were treated with the conventional resin cement associated with etch-and-rinse or self-etch adhesive approaches, applied before (immediate dentin sealing) or after (delayed dentin sealing) the application/removal of interim cement. Another 25 teeth (n=5, per group) were treated with self-adhesive resin cement with (self-etch mode [immediate dentin sealing or delayed dentin sealing]) or without adhesive application. Furthermore, in the self-adhesive resin cement group, the application of polyacrylic acid for dentin etching before cementation was evaluated. Composite resin blocks were cemented onto flat, treated dentin surfaces, and the assemblies were sectioned into bar-shaped specimens for microtensile bond strength testing. The data were subjected to 1-way ANOVA followed by the post-hoc Tukey test (α=.05). The failure patterns were classified as cohesive, adhesive, or mixed. The application of adhesive before interim cement (immediate dental sealing) promoted the highest values of bond strength for both resin cements (Presin cement, polyacrylic acid-enhanced bond strength after the application of interim cement. The application of dental adhesive immediately after tooth preparation (immediate dentin sealing) and before the use of an interim cement promoted the highest values of bond strength to dentin with the resin cements tested. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (Plower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The C-S-H gel of Portland cement mortars: Part I. The interpretation of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyses from scanning electron microscopy, with some observations on C-S-H, AFm and AFt phase compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famy, C.; Brough, A.R.; Taylor, H.F.W.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalyses of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel in Portland cement pastes rarely represent single phases. Essential experimental requirements are summarised and new procedures for interpreting the data are described. These include, notably, plots of Si/Ca against other atom ratios, 3D plots to allow three such ratios to be correlated and solution of linear simultaneous equations to test and quantify hypotheses regarding the phases contributing to individual microanalyses. Application of these methods to the C-S-H gel of a 1-day-old mortar identified a phase with Al/Ca=0.67 and S/Ca=0.33, which we consider to be a highly substituted ettringite of probable composition C 6 A 2 S-bar 2 H 34 or {Ca 6 [Al(OH) 6 ] 2 ·24H 2 O}(SO 4 ) 2 [Al(OH) 4 ] 2 . If this is true for Portland cements in general, it might explain observed discrepancies between observed and calculated aluminate concentrations in the pore solution. The C-S-H gel of a similar mortar aged 600 days contained unsubstituted ettringite and an AFm phase with S/Ca=0.125

  8. The influence of starch oxidization and aluminate coupling agent on interfacial interaction, rheological behavior, mechanical and thermal properties of poly(propylene carbonate)/starch blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guo; Zhang, Shui-Dong; Huang, Han-Xiong; The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering of the Ministry of Education Team

    Poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) is a kind of new biodegradable polymer that is synthesized by copolymerization of propylene oxide and carbon dioxide. In this work, PPC end-capped with maleic anhydride (PPCMA)/thermoplastic starch (TPS), PPCMA/thermoplastic oxidized starch (TPOS) and PPCMA/AL-TPOS (TPOS modified by aluminate coupling agent) blends were prepared by melt blending to improve its thermal and mechanical properties. FTIR results showed that there existed hydrogen-bonding interaction between PPCMA and starch. SEM observation revealed that the compatibility between PPCMA and TPOS was improved by the oxidation of starch. The enhanced interfacial interactions between PPCMA and TPOS led to a better performance of PPC blends such as storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G''), complex viscosity (η*), tensile strength and thermal properties. Furthermore, the modification of TPOS by aluminate coupling agent (AL) facilitated the dispersion of oxidized starch in PPC matrix, and resulted in increasing the tensile strength and thermal stability. National Natural Science Foundation of China, National Science Fund of Guangdong Province.

  9. Hot-Dip Aluminizing on AISI F55–UNS S32760 Super Duplex Stainless Steel Properties: Effect of Thermal Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Francesco Ciuffini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of super duplex stainless steels AISI F55-UNS S32760 in hot-dip aluminizing process has been studied, investigating the influence of cold working and of different initial microstructures obtained through a preliminary thermal treatment. The microstructural features examined are the secondary austenite precipitation, the static recovery of ferrite and the thermal dissolution of austenite within ferritic matrix. The hot-dip aluminizing temperature has been optimized through sessile drop tests. The treatment has been performed at 1100 °C for 300 s, 900 s and 2700 s. A strong chemical interaction occurs, generating intermetallic compounds at the interface. Molten aluminum interacts exclusively with the ferritic phase due to its much higher diffusivity in this phase coupled with its marked ferrite-stabilizer behavior. Thus, the influence of cold working is not remarkable, since the strains are mainly allocated by austenitic phase. The diffusivity of aluminum increases due to lattice defects thermally generated and, mainly, to influence given by grain boundaries, multiplied by secondary austenite precipitation, which act as short-circuit diffusion paths. Ni and Cr contents in the ferritic matrix have an influence but not highly relevant. Then, the best starting condition of the super duplex stainless steel substrates, to obtain a thick interfacial layer, are the thermal annealing at 1080 °C for 360 s/mm after a solution thermal treatment at 1300 °C for 60 s/mm.

  10. Contribution to the study of porous or very finely divided alumina; Contribution a l'etude des alumines poreuses ou tres finement divisees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juillet, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-12-15

    An amorphous porous alumina having a large surface area can be made non-stoichiometric by a treatment at 500 - 700 deg C in a vacuum. The oxygen deficit after a treatment at 500 deg C, and the aluminium deficit after a treatment at 700 deg C, give rise to semiconductor properties successively of type n and of the type p. A crystallized {delta}-alumina in the form of non-porous spherical grains compressed at a pressure of 1 to 5 metric tons/cm{sup 2} is also non-stoichiometric with a deficit of oxygen or of aluminium. None of these phenomena could be observed with a sample which had not been compressed. The favorable influence of oxygen on the recrystallization process of amorphous alumina, and on the {delta}-{alpha}, transformation of crystallized alumina has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the strains produced by the compression of the {delta}-alumina make possible its transformation in air into a at a temperature lower than the temperature necessary to observe this phenomenon with non-compressed {delta}-alumina. Amorphous alumina undergoes an intergranular sintering at 500 deg C and an intergranular sintering at 1 000 deg C. Only the latter occurs in the case of spherical alumina grains. For these, the strains brought about by the compression cause a lowering of 100 deg C in the threshold sintering temperature, with respect to the temperature required to produce the phenomena in a non-compressed sample. The amount of sintering in a crystallized alumina pellet depends, as well, on the rate of rise of temperature. This study tends to show that new properties, or at least unusual solid-state properties, can be observed on disorganised solids or on solids which are crystallized but which have a large surface area and a certain amount of strain. (author) [French] Une alumine poreuse amorphe de grande surface specifique peut etre rendue non-stoechiometrique par traitement sous vide pousse a 500-700 deg C. Le deficit en oxygene apres chauffage a 500 deg C, puis le

  11. Spin transition of ferric iron in the calcium-ferrite type aluminous phase: Fe 3+ Spin Transition in the CF Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ye [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan China; Qin, Fei [Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, MOE, and School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing China; Wu, Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan China; Huang, Haijun [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan China; McCammon, Catherine A. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth Germany; Yoshino, Takashi [Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University, Misasa Japan; Zhai, Shuangmeng [Key Laboratory of High-temperature and High-pressure Study of the Earth' s Interior, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang China; Xiao, Yuming [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne Illinois USA; Prakapenka, Vitali B. [GeoSoilEnviroCARS, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois USA

    2017-08-01

    We investigated Fe-free and Fe-bearing CF phases using nuclear forward scattering and X-ray diffraction coupled with diamond anvil cells up to 80 GPa at room temperature. Octahedral Fe3+ ions in the Fe-bearing CF phase undergo a high-spin to low-spin transition at 25–35 GPa, accompanied by a volume reduction of ~2.0% and a softening of bulk sound velocity up to 17.6%. Based on the results of this study and our previous studies, both the NAL and CF phases, which account for 10–30 vol % of subducted MORB in the lower mantle, are predicted to undergo a spin transition of octahedral Fe3+ at lower mantle pressures. Spin transitions in these two aluminous phases result in an increase of density of 0.24% and a pronounced softening of bulk sound velocity up to 2.3% for subducted MORB at 25–60 GPa and 300 K. The anomalous elasticity region expands and moves to 30–75 GPa at 1200 K and the maximum of the VΦ reduction decreases to ~1.8%. This anomalous elastic behavior of Fe-bearing aluminous phases across spin transition zones may be relevant in understanding the observed seismic signatures in the lower mantle.

  12. The contemporary cement cycle of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, A.; Van Oss, H. G.; Keoleian, G.; Kesler, S.E.; Kendall, A.

    2009-01-01

    A country-level stock and flow model for cement, an important construction material, was developed based on a material flow analysis framework. Using this model, the contemporary cement cycle of the United States was constructed by analyzing production, import, and export data for different stages of the cement cycle. The United States currently supplies approximately 80% of its cement consumption through domestic production and the rest is imported. The average annual net addition of in-use new cement stock over the period 2000-2004 was approximately 83 million metric tons and amounts to 2.3 tons per capita of concrete. Nonfuel carbon dioxide emissions (42 million metric tons per year) from the calcination phase of cement manufacture account for 62% of the total 68 million tons per year of cement production residues. The end-of-life cement discards are estimated to be 33 million metric tons per year, of which between 30% and 80% is recycled. A significant portion of the infrastructure in the United States is reaching the end of its useful life and will need to be replaced or rehabilitated; this could require far more cement than might be expected from economic forecasts of demand for cement. ?? 2009 Springer Japan.

  13. Polyethylene glycol improves elution properties of polymethyl methacrylate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, John A; Tiedeken, Nathan C; Gershkovich, Grigory E; Kushner, Jeffrey A; Dratch, Benjamin; Samuel, Solomon P

    2015-03-01

    Bone cements are used as adjuncts to fracture fixation methods and can also function as a local drug delivery system. The ability to elute drugs makes bone cement a promising and powerful chemotherapy treatment modality for osseous tumors. However, because of poor elution rates, the clinical application of this drug delivery mode remains challenging. Soluble fillers, such as sugars, salts, or biocompatible polymers, offer a solution to improve elution rates. This study quantified the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the elution properties of three commercially available bone cements. Two grams of Vertebroplastic, Palacos, and Confidence bone cement powder containing three concentrations (0%, 20%, or 50%) of PEG filler were hand mixed with 10 mg of methotrexate. This powder mixture was then polymerized with 1.0 mL of the cement specific liquid monomer. The cylindrical elution samples were placed in saline solution and methotrexate elution was recorded for 720 h. The cumulative and daily elution rate increased as the concentration of PEG increased for each bone cement. However, the percent of increase depended on the bone cement used. Cumulative methotrexate elution increased by 40%-54% in case of the highest PEG filler concentration when compared with controls. PEG soluble filler offers a promising method for improving methotrexate drug elution in bone cement. Future studies need to optimize the PEG and bone cement ratio that produces the greatest drug elution profile without sacrificing the biomechanical properties of bone cement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microstructure characteristics of cement-stabilized sandy soil using nanosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asskar Janalizadeh Choobbasti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was conducted to explore the impact of nanosilica on the microstructure and mechanical characteristics of cemented sandy soil. Cement agent included Portland cement type II. Cement content was 6% by weight of the sandy soil. Nanosilica was added in percentages of 0%, 4%, 8% and 12% by weight of cement. Cylindrical samples were prepared with relative density of 80% and optimum water content and cured for 7 d, 28 d and 90 d. Microstructure characteristics of cement-nanosilica-sand mixtures after 90 d of curing have been explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD tests. Effects of curing time on microstructure properties of cemented sandy soil samples with 0% and 8% nanosilica have been investigated using SEM test. Unconfined compression test (for all curing times and compaction test were also performed. The SEM and AFM tests results showed that nanosilica contributes to enhancement of cemented sandy soil through yielding denser, more uniform structure. The XRD test demonstrated that the inclusion of nanosilica in the cemented soil increases the intensity of the calcium silicate hydrate (CSH peak and decreases the intensity of the calcium hydroxide (CH peak. The results showed that adding optimum percentages of nanosilica to cement-stabilized sandy soil enhances its mechanical and microstructure properties.

  15. Effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Mouhat, Mathieu; Nergård, John Magnus; Lægreid, Solveig Jenssen; Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Örtengren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The present study investigated the effect of cements on fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns in relation to their compressive strength. Materials and methods Four different cements were tested: zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), self-adhesive resin-based cement (SRC) and resin-based cement (RC). RC was used in both dual cure mode (RC-D) and chemical cure mode (RC-C). First, the compressive strength of each cement was tested according to a standard (ISO 9917-1:2004). Second, load-to-failure test was performed to analyze the crown fracture resistance. CAD/CAM-produced monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm were prepared and cemented to dies with each cement. The crown–die samples were loaded until fracture. Results The compressive strength of SRC, RC-D and RC-C was significantly higher than those of ZPC and GIC (p crown between the groups. Conclusion The values achieved in the load-to-failure test suggest that monolithic zirconia crowns with a minimal thickness of 0.5 mm may have good resistance against fracture regardless of types of cements. PMID:27335900

  16. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH) 2 , Al (OH) 3 and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs + from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes

  17. Pedicle screw augmentation with bone cement enforced Vicryl mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Samuel L; Bachmann, Elias; Fischer, Michael; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christoph A; Snedeker, Jess G; Farshad, Mazda

    2018-01-01

    Achieving sufficient mechanical purchase of pedicle screws in osteoporotic or previously instrumented bone is technically and biologically challenging. Techniques using different kinds of pedicle screws or methods of cement augmentation have been used to address this challenge, but are associated with difficult revisions and complications. The purpose of this biomechanical trial was to investigate the use of biocompatible textile materials in combination with bone cement to augment pullout strength of pedicle screws while reducing the risk of cement extrusion. Pedicle screws (6/40 mm) were either augmented with standard bone-cement (Palacos LV + G) in one group (BC, n = 13) or with bone-cement enforced by Vicryl mesh in another group (BCVM, n = 13) in osteoporosis-like saw bone blocks. Pullout testing was subsequently performed. In a second experimental phase, similar experiments were performed using human cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (n = 10). In osteoporosis-like saw bone blocks, a mean screw pullout force of 350 N (±125) was significantly higher with the Bone cement (BC) compared to bone-cement enforced by Vicryl mesh (BCVM) technique with 240 N (±64) (p = 0.030). In human cadaveric lumbar vertebrae the mean screw pullout force was 784 ± 366 N with BC and not statistically different to BCVM with 757 ± 303 N (p = 0.836). Importantly, cement extrusion was only observed in the BC group (40%) and never with the BCVM technique. In vitro textile reinforcement of bone cement for pedicle screw augmentation successfully reduced cement extrusion compared to conventionally delivered bone cement. The mechanical strength of textile delivered cement constructs was more reproducible than standard cementing. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:212-216, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Agglomerates, smoke oxide particles, and carbon inclusions in condensed combustion products of an aluminized GAP-based propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wen; Liu, Peijin; Yang, Wenjing

    2016-12-01

    In solid propellants, aluminum is widely used to improve the performance, however the condensed combustion products especially the large agglomerates generated from aluminum combustion significantly affect the combustion and internal flow inside the solid rocket motor. To clarify the properties of the condensed combustion products of aluminized propellants, a constant-pressure quench vessel was adopted to collect the combustion products. The morphology and chemical compositions of the collected products, were then studied by using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive (SEM-EDS) method. Various structures have been observed in the condensed combustion products. Apart from the typical agglomerates or smoke oxide particles observed before, new structures including the smoke oxide clusters, irregular agglomerates and carbon-inclusions are discovered and investigated. Smoke oxide particles have the highest amount in the products. The highly dispersed oxide particle is spherical with very smooth surface and is on the order of 1-2 μm, but due to the high temperature and long residence time, these small particles will aggregate into smoke oxide clusters which are much larger than the initial particles. Three types of spherical agglomerates have been found. As the ambient gas temperature is much higher than the boiling point of Al2O3, the condensation layer inside which the aluminum drop is burning would evaporate quickly, which result in the fact that few "hollow agglomerates" has been found compared to "cap agglomerates" and "solid agglomerates". Irregular agglomerates usually larger than spherical agglomerates. The formation of irregular agglomerates likely happens by three stages: deformation of spherical aluminum drops; combination of particles with various shape; finally production of irregular agglomerates. EDS results show the ratio of O to Al on the surface of agglomerates is lower in comparison to smoke oxide particles. C and O account for

  19. Polymorphism of the iron doped strontium aluminate SrAl1.5Fe0.5O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmoulins, H.; Malo, S.; Boudin, S.; Caignaert, V.; Hervieu, M.

    2009-01-01

    The partial substitution of Al by Fe atoms in SrAl 2 O 4 allowed to stabilize four stuffed tridymite derivative structures SrAl 1.5 Fe 0.5 O 4 . The different phases have been characterized by TEM and XRPD techniques. Two are isotypes of those observed for the undoped oxides, namely the hexagonal phase with √(3)Ax√(3)AxC (with A and C being the tridymite unit cell parameters) and space group P6 3 and the monoclinic one with Ax√(3)AxC, β∼93 o and space group P2 1 , with a synthesis temperature lower than the one required for SrAl 2 O 4 . By annealing, two original phases, denoted O 1 and O 2 , are obtained; they are metrically similar (3Ax√(3)AxC and β∼90 o ) and only differ by their space groups. The TEM study showed that the transitions between the different phases follow topotactic mechanisms, through the formation of twinning boundaries, antiphase boundaries and planar defects. The annealed sample exhibits a mesomorph state and a reversible transition from this semi-ordered state to a crystalline phase. This dynamic transition takes place over a very wide temperature range from 620 to 1120 deg. C. The reversibility of the transition has been studied by DSC measurements. The crystallization energy of the orthorhombic phases is of the order of 10 J/g, at T∼622 deg. C as T decreases. The variation of the peak height observed as the annealing temperature increases is explained by the complex microstructures, which create an ill-defined energy barrier. Structural models related to the stuffed tridymite derivative structures are proposed for the new forms of the ferri-aluminate. - Graphical abstract: Four tridymite derivative structures SrAl 1.5 Fe 0.5 O 4 have been characterized. Two phases are isotypes of those observed for SrAl 2 O 4 . Two 'orthorhombic' original phases are characterized by superstructures. The transitions between the different phases follow topotactic mechanisms. The transition LT→HT takes place from 620 to 1120 deg. C, explained

  20. Microleakage of porcelain and composite machined crowns cemented with self-adhesive or conventional resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Mohamed; El-Mowafy, Omar; Roperto, Renato

    2010-10-01

    Resistance of machined crowns to microleakage when cemented with new self-adhesive cements has not been fully investigated. This study evaluated microleakage of machined crowns milled from porcelain and composite blocks and bonded to teeth with self-adhesive and conventional resin cement. Thirty-two freshly extracted premolars of similar shape and size were sterilized and mounted in resin blocks. Teeth received standard crown preparations with 1-mm circumferential shoulder finish line, flat occlusal surface reduced by 2 mm, and ideal angle of convergence. Prepared teeth were divided into two equal groups and assigned to either porcelain (Vita Mark II, Vident) or composite (Paradigm MZ100, 3M ESPE) blocks for crown fabrication. Optical impressions were captured for each tooth with the intraoral camera of a CEREC 3D machine. Crowns were designed and milled from both materials. Each group was then subdivided into two subgroups (n = 8) according to cement used (self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE or resin cement with self-etching adhesive, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray). Following seating, a 5-kg weight was applied on the occlusal surface of the crown for 5 minutes. Specimens were then stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. Specimens were thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C, then coated with nail varnish and immersed in a 2.0% basic red fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours. Teeth were then rinsed and sectioned mesiodistally and assessed under magnification for microleakage. A five-point scale was used to score degree of microleakage. Data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. Crown material had no significant effect on microleakage (p= 0.67); however, cement type had a significant effect (p cement, the resin cement with separate primer/bonding agent resulted in significantly lower microleakage scores, irrespective of crown material. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Cement selection for cement-retained crown technique with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, James L; Wilcox, Charles; Wilwerding, Terry

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retentive nature of common dental cements that have been adapted for use in the implant abutment cement-retained crown (CRC) technique with those specifically formulated for this purpose. Ten regular diameter implant analogs were embedded in stainless steel disks. Unmodified CRC abutments were attached and torqued to 30 Ncm. Test crowns were waxed and cast with base metal alloy. Castings were fitted, cleaned with aluminum oxide, and steam cleaned prior to application of the cement. The cements used were: (1) Temp Bond, (2) UltraTemp, regular, (3) UltraTemp firm, (4) ImProv with petroleum jelly coating of crown, (5) ImProv without petroleum jelly, (6) Premier Implant with KY Jelly coating of abutment, (7) Premier Implant without KY jelly, (8) TR-2, (9) Fleck's, (10) Ketac Cem Aplicap, and (11) Fuji Plus Capsule. After cementation, assemblies were stored for 24 hours. Each sample was subjected to a pull-out test using an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/min. Loads required to remove the crowns were recorded, and mean values for each group determined. A one-way ANOVA and a post hoc least square difference (LSD) test were done for pairwise comparison at a confidence interval of 95%. The mean values (+/-SD) of loads at failure (n = 10) for various cements were as follows (N): Ultratemp, regular 358.6 (+/-38.2) (Group A), ImProv without petroleum jelly 172.4 (+/-59.6) (Group B), Fleck's 171.8 (+/-62.2) (Group B), Ketac Cem 167.8 (+/-69.1) (Group B), UltraTemp firm 158.8 (+/-62.7) (Group BC), Fuji Plus 147.5 (+/-69.7) (Group BC), Premier without KY jelly 131.6 (+/-31.8) (Group BC), ImProv using petroleum jelly 130.8 (+/-42.5) (Group BC), Temp Bond 117.8 (+/-48.3) (Group C), TR-2 41.2 (+/-16.6) (Group D), and Premier with KY jelly 31.6 (+/-24.8) (Group D). Groups with the same letter were not significantly different. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it is not suggested

  2. A study on leaching behaviour of cement blocks used as matrix for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    and b. leaching of Cs activity from cement matrix having ferric, vermiculite and bentonite. 3.3 Optimization of period of curing of cement. In order to confirm the results on the feasibility of forma- tion of cement blocks and also to optimize the curing time to obtain cement blocks of maximum strength, 10 g of. Portland cement ...

  3. 76 FR 28318 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants AGENCY... by the Portland Cement Industry and the New Source Performance Standards for Portland Cement Plants... emission limits applicable to the Portland cement industry. See 75 FR 54970 (Sept. 9, 2010). The rule...

  4. Microleakage of a self-adhesive resin cement after post cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilotti, Veridiana; Consalter, Admilton Fritsche; Dobrovolsk, Max; Bosquirolli, Virginia; Busato, Priscila R D; Mendonça, Marcio J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microleakage a self-adhesive cement recently marketed Rely X U100 (3M ESPE). Thirty roots of bovine teeth with 14 mm long were restored with self-adhesive cement and Glassix fiber post DC3 (FGM). Roots were randomly divided into three groups (n=10) according to the technique of placement of the cementing agent: G1 - Centrix syringe; G2 - Lentulo drill and G3 - Manual technical. After cementation, provisional restorations were fabricated with composite resin (Opallis/FGM) without the use adhesive system. After they were finished, polished and thermo cycled by 1000 cycles, in water at temperature of 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, 30 seconds in each bath. For microleakage test each group of roots was immersed in recipients with Rodhamine B dye solution buffered at 2%, during 24 hours. After this time, the samples were washed in tap water, sectioned and evaluation of dye leakage. The values of infiltration were obtained by the qualitative method (scoring) and statistical analysis using Kruskal-Wallis test and also by the quantitative method (Image Tool) and statistical analysis using ANOVA one way. For both tests, no significant difference between the techniques of placement of the self-adhesive cement. Based on these findings, micro-infiltration was present in all groups, and the placement technique did not influence the degree of micro-leakage, both for the qualitative analysis as to the quantitative.

  5. Radiopacity of dental restorative materials and cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byung Chul; Yang, Hong So; Chung, Hyun Ju; Oh, Won Mann

    1994-01-01

    The radiopacity of six composite resins, three resin luting cements and ten filling materials were studied. The purpose was to obtain an indication of radiopacity value of different brands within each of these groups of materials and to show differences in radiopacities of filling materials and natural tooth structures. On radiographs, the optimal densities of standardized samples were determined by computer imaging system and radiopacity values of the materials were expressed in millimeter equivalent aluminum. Within to groups of materials studied, there was considerable variation in radiopacity. The composite resins of P-50, Zl00 and prisma AP. H displayed much higher radiopacities than aluminum. Panavia resin cement was shown to be similarly radiopaque to aluminum. Generally, the radiopacity of base and filling materials appeared to combined applications for restorative treatment of teeth, lower radiopacity can interfere with the diagnosis and detection of gaps near the restoration.

  6. Scrap tire ashes in portland cement production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Adriana Trezza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrap tires are not considered harmful waste, but their stocking and disposal are a potential health and environmental risk. Properly controlled calcinations at high temperatures make tire combustion an interesting alternative due to its high calorific power, comparable to that of fuel-oil. Consequently, using them as an alternative combustible material in cement kilns makes it possible to give it a valuable use. However, it remains to be assured whether the impurities added to the clinker through these fuels do not affect its structure or properties.This paper shows the studies carried out on different clinkers under laboratory conditions with different levels of addition of scrap tire ashes, added by partially replacing traditional fuel in cement kilns.

  7. DESIGN OF CEMENT COMPOSITES WITH INCREASED IMPERMEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedyuk Roman Sergeevich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the development of composite binders for producing concrete with improved characteristics of gas, water and vapor permeability. The authors investigate the processes of composite materials formation in order of decreasing scale levels from macro to nanostructures. The criteria for optimization of the volume of dispersed additives in concrete are offered. The authors theoretically studied the technological features of the formation of hydrated cement stone structure. A positive effect of nanodispersed additives on the structure and physico-mechanical properties of cement composite materials are predicted. Thanks to its improved features, such as good ratio of strength and body density, high density and lifetime, the modified concrete may be used when solving various practical tasks of the construction branch.

  8. Sidoarjo Mud: A Potential Cement Replacement Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyanto T.R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental and analytical research conducted to study the properties of mortar when treated Sidoarjo mud was added into the mix replacing partially the cement content. The replacements were done at 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20%. Compression, tensile, porosity and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of Sidoarjo mud in mortar. Analyses on the mud were also conducted through X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray Fluorescence (XRF, and scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (SEM-EDX. The results showed that the mud could be used as a cementitious material with optimum ordinary Portland cement (OPC replacement at 10%.

  9. High temperature cement raw meal flowability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarup, Claus; Hjuler, Klaus; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The flowability of cement raw meal is investigated at temperatures up to 850°C in a specially designed monoaxial shear tester. Consolidation stresses of 0.94, 1.87 and 2.79kPa are applied. The results show that the flowability is reduced as temperature is increased above 550°C, indicated by incre......The flowability of cement raw meal is investigated at temperatures up to 850°C in a specially designed monoaxial shear tester. Consolidation stresses of 0.94, 1.87 and 2.79kPa are applied. The results show that the flowability is reduced as temperature is increased above 550°C, indicated...... by increasing unconfined yield strength and reduced flowability factors. Deviation and reproducibility are acceptable for all temperatures except for 850°C where belite formation and possibly calcination sinter the raw meal....

  10. [Environment load from China's cement production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tian-le; He, Wei; Zeng, Xiao-lan; Huang, Xin; Ma, Bao-guo

    2006-10-01

    Based on the life-cycle theory, a quantitative evaluation of the environment load caused by cement manufacturing in China was carried out with the application of the CML. environmental impact assessment method. The results show that global warming potential, energy depletion potential and abiotic depletion potential make the main contribution to the environment impact, their environmental loads corresponding to identical environmental impact sorts being 2.76%, 2.34% and 1.39% of the overall load of the whole world, respectively. In 2004, the environment load from cement manufacturing in China is roughly 1.28% of the overall load of the whole world, in which the environmental loads from the shaft kiln processing, wet rotary processing and new-type dry processing being 0.84%, 0.12% and 0.32%, respectively. And it can be reduced to about 1% by replacing backward production processes with the dry method production process.

  11. Stabilization of marly soils with portland cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maksim; Karzin, Evgeny; Lukina, Valentina; Lukinov, Vitaly; Kholkin, Anatolii

    2017-10-01

    Stabilization of marlous soils with Portland cement will increase the service life of motor roads in areas where marl is used as a local road construction material. The result of the conducted research is the conclusion about the principal possibility of stabilization of marlous soils with Portland cement, and about the optimal percentage of the mineral part and the binding agent. When planning the experiment, a simplex-lattice plan was implemented, which makes it possible to obtain a mathematical model for changing the properties of a material in the form of polynomials of incomplete third order. Brands were determined for compressive strength according to GOST 23558-94 and variants of stabilized soils were proposed for road construction.

  12. Porosity and liquid absorption of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krus, M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Kunzel, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    are not accessible to the smaller helium atoms. Considering the results of dilatation tests both before and after water and hexane saturation, it seems possible that a contraction of capillary pores due to moisture-related swelling of the cement gel leads to the non-linear water absorption over the square root......The moisture behaviour of building materials exposed to the natural climate is largely dependent on their water absorption. In contrast to most building stones, cementitious materials like concrete do not exhibit a water absorption that is proportional to the square root of time. There must...... be a slowing-down effect which is related to water because the absorption of organic liquids, such as hexane, is quite normal. Measurements of the porosity of hardened cement paste determined by helium pycnometry and water saturation show that water molecules can enter spaces in the microstructure which...

  13. Estimating the chloride transport in cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Princigallo, A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A method was developed to measure the diffusion coefficient of chloride ions in cement paste based on an analytical solution to Fick’s 2nd law in a cylindrical coordinate system. This natural method yielded diffusivity results within as little as a month. Testing time was reduced by exploiting the three-dimensional inward flux in the specimen. In an attempt to determine the saturation concentration, dense portland cement pastes were exposed to a concentrated chloride solution. The method proved to be useful for exploring cement hydration-induced changes in the diffusion coefficient of cement paste.

    Se ha desarrollado un método para medir el coeficiente de difusión de los iones cloruro en la pasta de cemento, partiendo de una aplicación analítica de la segunda ley de Fick en un sistema de coordinadas cilíndrico. Este método, que es natural, demostró ser capaz de producir resultados de difusividad en tan solo un mes. Se consiguió reducir el tiempo de ensayo mediante el aprovechamiento de la tridimensionalidad del flujo desde el exterior al interior de la probeta. A fin de determinar la concentración de saturación, se sometieron las pastas de cemento Portland a una disolución de cloruros concentrada. Este método resultó ser útil en el estudio de los cambios del coeficiente de difusión de la pasta de cemento provocados por las reacciones de hidratación que tienen lugar en esta.

  14. Sidoarjo Mud: A Potential Cement Replacement Material

    OpenAIRE

    Biyanto T.R.; Masilamani M.B.; Bayuaji R.; Nuruddin M.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and analytical research conducted to study the properties of mortar when treated Sidoarjo mud was added into the mix replacing partially the cement content. The replacements were done at 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20%. Compression, tensile, porosity and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of Sidoarjo mud in mortar. Analyses on the mud were also conducted through X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), and scanning e...

  15. Quantitative characterization of the microstructure of fresh cement paste via random packing of polydispersed Platonic cement particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W X; Chen, H S

    2012-01-01

    On a microscopic scale, fresh cement paste is composed of random packing of irregular cement particles, and their initial packing behavior plays an important role in microstructural evolution. The preponderance of previous works has focused on the microstructure model by random packing of three-dimensional spheroidal particles, and little is known about non-spheroidal particles. In this paper, a modified cement particle size distribution function is used to facilitate the particle size distribution of convex polyhedral cement particles. Based on an overlapping detection algorithm, the microstructure model of fresh cement paste is simulated by the random sequential packing of Platonic cement particles of various sizes. Applying stereological tools and the serial sectioning analysis technique, the modeling microstructure composed of polydispersed Platonic cement particles is characterized and compared with that of ellipsoidal cement particles with various aspect ratios. The statistical results are investigated to evaluate the influence of cement particle shape on the microstructure of fresh cement paste. Finally, with the derived experimental and numerical results of microstructural parameters, the reliability of the statistical results is verified. (paper)

  16. Retention of metal-ceramic crowns with contemporary dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Zhang, Hai; Wataha, John C

    2009-09-01

    New types of crown and bridge cement are in use by practitioners, and independent studies are needed to assess their effectiveness. The authors conducted a study in three parts (study A, study B, and study C) and to determine how well these new cements retain metal-ceramic crowns. The authors prepared teeth with a 20-degree taper and a 4-millimeter length. They cast high-noble metal-ceramic copings, then fitted and cemented them with a force of 196 newtons. The types of cements they used were zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer, conventional resin and self-adhesive modified resin. They thermally cycled the cemented copings, then removed them. They recorded the removal force and calculated the stress of dislodgment by using the surface area of each preparation. They used a single-factor analysis of variance to analyze the data (alpha = .05). The mean stresses necessary to remove crowns, in megapascals, were 8.0 for RelyX Luting (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), 7.3 for RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), 5.7 for Panavia F (Kuraray America, New York) and 4.0 for Fuji Plus (GC America, Alsip, Ill.) in study A; 8.1 for RelyX Luting, 2.6 for RelyX Luting Plus (3M ESPE) and 2.8 for Fuji CEM (GC America) in study B; and 4.9 for Maxcem (Kerr, Orange, Calif.), 4.0 for BisCem (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.), 3.7 for RelyX Unicem Clicker (3M ESPE), 2.9 for iCEM (Heraeus Kulzer, Armonk, N.Y.) and 2.3 for Fleck's Zinc Cement (Keystone Industries, Cherry Hill, N.J.) in study C. Powder-liquid versions of new cements were significantly more retentive than were paste-paste versions of the same cements. The mean value of crown removal stress for the new self-adhesive modified-resin cements varied appreciably among the four cements tested. All cements retained castings as well as or better than did zinc phosphate cement. Powder-liquid versions of cements, although less convenient to mix, may be a better clinical choice when crown retention is an issue. All cements tested will retain castings

  17. Low level radwaste packaging: why not cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Over the past several years many words have been expended in a quest to define a variety of competing radioactive waste immobilization technologies. With the more recent recognition of the technical pitfalls of urea-formaldehyde (UF) a liquid chemical binder considered as optimum less than two years ago, utilities, architect-engineers and systems vendors find themselves in a technology void, awaiting the inevitable breakthrough which will identify the perfect immobilization agent. The culmination of these pressures has brought about the introduction of new immobilization technologies including: one which offers both volume reduction and immobilization in yet another new binder agent; the costly development of highly sophisticated volume reduction systems, the highly-concentrated products from which may pose as-yet unknown immobilization problems; and, the marketing of several new more expensive liquid chemical binders which are reputed to have eliminated the kinds of problems associated with urea-formaldehyde. This paper addresses these issues by coming full circle and arriving back at the initial approach employed for low level radwaste immobilization, the use of cement. Based on an evaluation of the three principal competing immobilization approaches, liquid chemical, bitumen and cement, the merits and drawbacks of each is examined. As will be described, an objective assessment of these competing technologies has resulted in a somewhat surprising conclusion that, while none of the approaches is without disadvantages, cement can be shown to offer the most reliable, versatile long-term solution to today's needs

  18. Application of tracer technique in cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran'ai, L.

    1979-01-01

    Application is stated of the radioisotope indication method in the cement industry. The method was applied in three directions. In the first direction, by means of labelling of 300 steel mill balls by cobalt-60, wear of them was examined. The degree of wear of milling balls in the process of milling was determined according to the decrease of their weight. Radioactive label served only for tracing controll balls. In the second direction, according to the natural radioactivity being presented in ashes by radioisotopes radium-226 and thorium-229, amount of ashes in the products of cement milling was determined (in the mill product, cement product, flying dust and back loading groats). In the third direction, by means of labelling of definite fractions of mille by radioisotope gold-198, optimization of technological parameters of silos were raw meal is homogenization. The following technological parameters have been established: amount of homogenized material; time of homogenization and frequency of intensity changing of supplied compressed air jet [ru

  19. Global CO2 emissions from cement production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robbie M.

    2018-01-01

    The global production of cement has grown very rapidly in recent years, and after fossil fuels and land-use change, it is the third-largest source of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. The required data for estimating emissions from global cement production are poor, and it has been recognised that some global estimates are significantly inflated. Here we assemble a large variety of available datasets and prioritise official data and emission factors, including estimates submitted to the UNFCCC plus new estimates for China and India, to present a new analysis of global process emissions from cement production. We show that global process emissions in 2016 were 1.45±0.20 Gt CO2, equivalent to about 4 % of emissions from fossil fuels. Cumulative emissions from 1928 to 2016 were 39.3±2.4 Gt CO2, 66 % of which have occurred since 1990. Emissions in 2015 were 30 % lower than those recently reported by the Global Carbon Project. The data associated with this article can be found at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.831455.

  20. Coal Bottom Ash for Portland Cement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Argiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of industrialization growth, the amount of coal power plant wastes has increased very rapidly. Particularly, the disposal of coal bottom ash (CBA is becoming an increasing concern for many countries because of the increasing volume generated, the costs of operating landfill sites, and its potential hazardous effects. Therefore, new applications of coal bottom ash (CBA have become an interesting alternative to disposal. For instance, it could be used as a Portland cement constituent leading to more sustainable cement production by lowering energy consumption and raw material extracted from quarries. Coal fly and bottom ashes are formed together in the same boiler; however, the size and shape of these ashes are very different, and hence their effect on the chemical composition as well as on the mineralogical phases must be studied. Coal bottom ash was ground. Later, both ashes were compared from a physical, mechanical, and chemical point of view to evaluate the potential use of coal bottom ash as a new Portland cement constituent. Both ashes, produced by the same electrical power plant, generally present similar chemical composition and compressive strength and contribute to the refill of mortar capillary pores with the reaction products leading to a redistribution of the pore size.