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Sample records for aluminium matrix composites

  1. Effect of flyash particles with aluminium melt on the wear of aluminium metal matrix composites

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    Vipin K. Sharma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the fabrication and tribological testing of an aluminium flyash composite. The metal matrix selected was aluminium and flyash contents in different percentages were reinforced in it to fabricate the required metal matrix composite (MMC. Stir casting method was used to fabricate the MMC with 2–4–6% weight of flyash contents in aluminium. Tribological analysis of the tribo pairs formed between the smooth surfaces of cast iron disc and smooth MMC pin has been considered and friction force and wear of the MMC were investigated by using a Pin-on-disc setup. It was observed that the MMC with 6% weight of flyash content in aluminium matrix results in less wear (0.32 g and 4% weight of flyash content gives the low coefficient of friction (0.12 between the tribopairs of cast iron surface and MMC surface.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of aluminium matrix composites containing silicon carbide particles

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    Harris, S.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Engineering and Materials Design; Noble, B. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Engineering and Materials Design; Trowsdale, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Engineering and Materials Design

    1996-12-31

    An examination of the pitting attack in two aluminium matrix composites (1050 and 2124) each reinforced with varying fractions (0-30 wt.%) of silicon carbide particles (SiC{sub p}) in the size range 3-40 {mu}m has been made in 1 N NaCl solution. It has been demonstrated that the existence of pores and crevices at SiC{sub p}/matrix interfaces strongly influences pit initiation. This is further aided by the cracking of large SiC{sub p}{>=}20 {mu}m, during processing. The presence of {theta}(CuAl{sub 2}) and S(CuMgAl{sub 2}) precipitates in 2124-SiC{sub p} composite also promotes pitting attack at SiC{sub p}-matrix and intermetallic-matrix interfaces. (orig.)

  3. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

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    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  4. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

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    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  5. Aluminium Matrix Composites Reinforced with Co-continuous Interlaced Phases Aluminium-alumina Needles

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    Elvio de Napole Gregolin

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available An Al-5SiO2 (5 wt% of SiO2 aluminium matrix fiber composite was produced where the reinforcement consists of fossil silica fibers needles. After being heat-treated at 600 °C, the original fiber morphology was retained but its microstructure changed from solid silica to an interconnected (Al-Si/Al2O3 interlaced structure named co-continuous composite. A technique of powder metallurgy, using commercial aluminium powder and the silica fibers as starting materials, followed by hot extrusion, was used to produce the composite. The co-continuous microstructure was obtained partially or totally on the fibers as a result of the reaction, which occurs during the heat treatment, first by solid diffusion and finally by the liquid Al-Si in local equilibrium, formed with the silicon released by reaction. The internal structure of the fibers was characterized using field emission electron microscope (FEG-SEM and optical microscopy on polished and fractured samples.

  6. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya Ramnath, B.; Elanchezhian, C.; Jaivignesh, M.; Rajesh, S.; Parswajinan, C.; Siddique Ahmed Ghias, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  7. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

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    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  8. Aluminium matrix heterophase composites for air compressor pistons

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    M.Dyzia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of surface test of composite shaped in the permanent mould casting process. As part of the research anddevelopment project realized in the Department of Materials Technology at the Silesian University of Technology, a pilot plant scale stand was built to manufacture of more than 50 kg suspensions in a single technological cycle. Made in industrial conditions castings to form in the five inner core mould mounted in GM110 permanent mould casting machine confirmed the possibility of the shaping the composite pistons. Castings made from composite suspension AlSi7Mg/SiC and AlSi7Mg/SiC + Cg according to the technology procedure were classified as correct and devoted to the proper machining forming working surfaces of the piston to the air compressor. Comparative tests were performed for the casting of unreinforced AlSi7Mg alloy and composite castings. To assess the ability to fill the mold cavity and the accuracy of mapping used in contour shape FRT analysis of the distance between the grooves on the surface of the piston skirt. Studies have confirmed the differences in the fluidity of alloy matrix and composites suspensions. The difference in the accuracy of the dimensional mapping mould does not disqualify of composite materials, all castings are classified as correct and used for machining.

  9. SOLIDIFICATION CHARACTERISTIC OF TITANIUM CARBIDE PARTICULATE REINFORCED ALUMINIUM ALLOY MATRIX COMPOSITES

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    N. FATCHURROHMAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research solidification characteristic of metal matrix composites consisted of titanium carbide particulate reinforced aluminium-11.8% silicon alloy matrix is performed. Vortex mixing and permanent casting method are used as the manufacturing method to produce the specimens. Temperature measurements during the casting process are captured and solidification graphs are plotted to represent the solidification characteristic. The results show, as volume fraction of particulate reinforcement is increased, solidification time is faster. Particulate reinforcement promotes rapid solidification which will support finer grain size of the casting specimen. Hardness test is performed and confirmed that hardness number increased as more particulate are added to the system.

  10. Synthesis of copper coated carbon nanotubes for aluminium matrix composites

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    Maqbool, Adnan; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Hussain, M. Asif; Bakhsh, Nabi

    2014-06-01

    In this investigation copper coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum matrix by the molecular-level mixing process. In optimized plating bath of (1:1) by wt. CNT with Cu, thickness of coated CNTs is reduced to 100 nm to promote uniform distribution of Cu nanoparticle on the surface of pretreated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonication and ball milling. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in nanocomposites samples compared to the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum. The densification increased with the increase in the CNTs content and is more pronounced in Cu-coated CNT nanocomposites.

  11. Ultrasonic investigation of SiC-particle reinforced aluminium matrix composites

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    Hakan Guer, C. [Middle East Tech. Univ., Metallurgical and Materials Eng. Dept., Ankara (Turkey)

    2002-07-01

    In aerospace and automotive industries, SiC particulate reinforced aluminium matrix composites have found many application areas because of their excellent mechanical properties, combined with the ease of formability and low cost. Aim of this study is to investigate the interrelationships between wave velocities and reinforcement content, microstructure and hardness of SiC reinforced Al composites. Specimens were fabricated by hot pressing for various volume fractions of SiC particulate, up to 20 vol.%, and for different combinations of particulate size.

  12. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

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    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  13. Oxidation behaviour of cast aluminium matrix composites with Ce surface coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Feliu, S.; Viejo, F.

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of SiC-reinforced aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp) has been studied after Ce-based treatments. Kinetics data of oxidation process were obtained from gravimetric tests performed at different temperatures (350, 425 and 500 o C). The nature of the oxidation layer was analyzed by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extent of oxidation degradation in untreated composites was preferentially localized in matrix/SiCp interfaces favouring the MgO formation. Ce coatings favoured a uniform oxidation of the composite surface with MgAl 2 O 4 spinel formation. This oxide increased the surface hardness of the materials

  14. An Assessment of Mechanical and Tribological Property of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite

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    R. Santosh Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials has huge requirement in the area of automobile, aerospace, and wear resistant applications. This study presents the synthesis of composite reinforced with SiC and Al2O3 using gravity stir casting. Stir casting is the manufacturing process that is incorporated to produce the composite material because of its extreme bonding capacity with base material. The composition of reinforcement with 6061 aluminium matrix is SiC-7.5% and Al2O3 -2.5% respectively. The average size of reinforcement particle is 30-40 microns. The synthesised composite casting is machined using EDM to prepare specimens for various tests. Microstructure study was carried and the microstructure images prove the existence and dispersion of reinforcement particles in the metal matrix. There is no visible porosity is observed. The hardness of the specimen is tested using Vickers hardness tester and found considerable increase when compare with parent alloy Al 6061. Also mechanical and tribological properties of hybrid Aluminium metal matrix composite were employed. The fortifying material, Silicon Carbide is composed of tetrahedral of carbon and silicon atoms with strong bonds in crystal lattice along with its excellent wear resistance property and alumina have high strength and wear resistance. To avoid enormous material wastage and to achieve absolute accuracy, wire-cut EDM process is capitalised to engrave the specimen as per required dimensions. Three Tensile test specimens were prepared, in order to achieve reliability in results as per ASTM- E8 standard, and the values were tabulated. Impact test was carried out and the readings were tabulated. Wear test was carried out using pin on disc wear test apparatus and the results show considerable increase in wear resistant property when compare with parent alloy Al6061.The above work proves the successful fabrication of composite and evaluation of properties.

  15. Fabrication and Performance Test of Aluminium Alloy-Rice Husk Ash Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite as Industrial and Construction Material

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    Md. Rahat Hossain

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs used extensively in various engineering fields due to their exceptional mechanical properties. In this present study, aluminium matrix composites (AMCs such as aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with rice husk ash particles (RHA are made to explore the possibilities of reinforcing aluminium alloy. The stir casting method was applied to produce aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with various amounts of (2%, 4%, and 6% rice husk ash (RHA particles. Physical treatment was carried out before the rice husk ash manufacturing process. The effect of mechanical strength of the fabricated hybrid composite was investigated. Therefore, impact test, tensile stress, compressive stress, and some other tests were carried out to analyse the mechanical properties. From the experimental results, it was found that maximum tensile, and compressive stress were found at 6% rice husk ash (RHA and aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. In future, the optimum percentages of rice husk ash (RHA to fabricate the hybrid composites will be determined. Also, simulation by finite element method (FEM will be applied for further investigation.

  16. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste.

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    Xavier, L Francis; Suresh, Paramasivam

    2016-01-01

    With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate.

  17. Wear Behavior of Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Prepared from Industrial Waste

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    L. Francis Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increase in the population and industrialization, a lot of valuable natural resources are depleted to prepare and manufacture products. However industrialization on the other hand has waste disposal issues, causing dust and environmental pollution. In this work, Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite is prepared by reinforcing 10 wt% and 20 wt% of wet grinder stone dust particles an industrial waste obtained during processing of quarry rocks which are available in nature. In the composite materials design wear is a very important criterion requiring consideration which ensures the materials reliability in applications where they come in contact with the environment and other surfaces. Dry sliding wear test was carried out using pin-on-disc apparatus on the prepared composites. The results reveal that increasing the reinforcement content from 10 wt% to 20 wt% increases the resistance to wear rate.

  18. A Brief Research Review for Improvement Methods the Wettability between Ceramic Reinforcement Particulate and Aluminium Matrix Composites

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    Razzaq, Alaa Mohammed; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul; Ishak, M. R.; B, Uday M.

    2017-05-01

    The development of new methods for addition fine ceramic powders to Al aluminium alloy melts, which would lead to more uniform distribution and effective incorporation of the reinforcement particles into the aluminium matrix alloy. Recently the materials engineering research has moved to composite materials from monolithic, adapting to the global need for lightweight, low cost, quality, and high performance advanced materials. Among the different methods, stir casting is one of the simplest ways of making aluminium matrix composites. However, it suffers from poor distribution and combination of the reinforcement ceramic particles in the metal matrix. These problems become significantly effect to reduce reinforcement size, more agglomeration and tendency with less wettability for the ceramic particles in the melt process. Many researchers have carried out different studies on the wettability between the metal matrix and dispersion phase, which includes added wettability agents, fluxes, preheating the reinforcement particles, coating the reinforcement particles, and use composting techniques. The enhancement of wettability of ceramic particles by the molten matrix alloy and the reinforcement particles distribution improvement in the solidified matrix is the main objective for many studies that will be discussed in this paper.

  19. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM COMPOSITE

    OpenAIRE

    T. Albert*, C. Pravin Tamil Selvan

    2017-01-01

    A composite material is the combination of two or more materials, which are having different phases and the properties superior to the base material. Aluminium matrix composite (AMCs) are emerging as advance engineering materials due to their strength, ductility and toughness. The aluminium matrix can strengthened by reinforcing with hard ceramic particles like SiC, Al2o3 , B4C etc. In this paper, an effort is made to enhance the mechanical properties like strength and hardness of aluminium ...

  20. Influence of reinforcement proportion and matrix composition on pitting corrosion behaviour of cast aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Merino, S.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of silicon carbide (SiCp) proportion and matrix composition on four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) immersed in 1-3.5 wt% NaCl at 22 deg C was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization. The kinetics of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion damage in Al/SiCp composites was caused by pitting attack and by nucleation and growth of Al 2 O 3 . 3H 2 O on the material surface. The main attack nucleation sites were the interface region between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. The corrosion process was influenced more by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiCp reinforcement and saline concentration

  1. Investigation on mechanical behavior and material characteristics of various weight composition of SiCp reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

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    Pichumani, Sivachidambaram; Srinivasan, Raghuraman; Ramamoorthi, Venkatraman

    2018-02-01

    Aluminium – silicon carbide (Al - SiC) metal matrix composite is produced with following wt % of SiC reinforcement (4%, 8% & 12%) using stir casting method. Mechanical testing such as micro hardness, tensile testing and bend testing were performed. Characterizations, namely micro structure, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, inductive coupled plasma – optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, were carried out on Al - SiC composites. The presence of SiC on Al - SiC composite is confirmed through XRD technique and microstructure. The percentage of SiC was confirmed through ICP-OES technique. Increase in weight percentage of SiC tends to increase micro hardness, ultimate strength & yield strength but it reduces the bend strength and elongation (%) of the material. SEM factrography of tensile tested fractured samples of Al - 8% SiC & Al – 12% SiC showed fine dimples on fractured surface & coarse dimples fractured surface respectively. This showed significant fracture differences between Al - 8% SiC & Al - 12% SiC. From the above experiment, Al - 8% SiC had good micro hardness, ultimate strength & yield strength without significant loss in elongation (%) & bend strength.

  2. Monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviour of the SiC particle-reinforced aluminium matrix composite AMC225xe

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    Smaga, Marek; Walther, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviour of the aluminium matrix composite AMC225xe - i.e., the aerospace grade aluminium alloy AA 2124 reinforced with 25 vol.-% ultrafine SiC particles - is characterised in detail on the basis of mechanical stress-strain hysteresis curves as well as temperature and electrical resistance measurements. A pronounced difference in plastic strain response is observed between tension and compression under monotonic and cyclic loading. In fully reversed stress-controlled constant amplitude tests, negative plastic mean strains developed. The cyclic deformation behaviour of AMC225xe is characterised by pronounced initial cyclic hardening. The endurance limit is reliably estimated in continuous load increase tests. In particular, electrical resistance data are used as input parameters for fatigue life calculations analogous to the Basquin equation. Microstructural details are investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Obtention and evaluation of the fatigue behaviour of aluminium matrix composites subjected to different mechanical surface treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Filho, Edson Souza de

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of the fatigue behaviour of aluminium metal matrix composites (MMC) obtained by powder metallurgy. The testing variables were the volumetric fraction of reinforcements and the type of mechanical surface treatment used. Initially, the composite materials were obtained from aluminium AA 1100 matrix, reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) particles in the volumetric fraction of 5, 10 and 15%. An amount of control material (unreinforced) was produced for comparison purposes. The obtained materials were physically, mechanically and microstructurally characterised. The results showed a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles and an improvement of the ultimate tensile strength of the composites with relation to the control material. However, some defects such as porosity and streaks of pure aluminium were detected. In a second stage, the fatigue tests of the composites were accomplished. The types of surface treatments used in the fabrication of the fatigue test specimens were machining and shot peening. For machining the variables were feed rate and tool type. The shot peened materials did not present a significant fatigue life improvement when compared to the control material. The coarse machined materials presented the worst fatigue life and the machining marks worked as strong stress concentrators. The material reinforced with 5% of SiC, differently of those reinforced with 10 and 15% showed inferior fatigue life when compared to the control material, probably because of a lower yielding strength, or lower reinforcement volumetric fraction. The material machined with hard metal (MD) did not present differences of fatigue life with relation to the machined with PCD, probably due to the class of the hard metal used. The material reinforced with 5% of SiC and shot peened, presented fatigue results with the largest standard deviations. The materials reinforced with 5% of SiC presented the smallest fatigue

  4. Investigation of microstructure-ultrasonic velocity relationship in SiCp-reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guer, C.H.

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-one sets of specimens were fabricated by hot pressing powder mixtures containing various volume and size combinations of pure Al and SiC particles. Neither heat treatment nor secondary deformation processes were applied. The microstructures of the specimens were characterised by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Using a 10 MHz probe, the velocity of ultrasonic longitudinal waves was measured. The results show that in general the ultrasonic velocity increases with an increase in SiC content. However, for larger Al/SiC particle size ratio and higher volume fraction of SiC, ultrasonic velocity decreases owing to microporosity caused by the segregation of SiC particles along the grain boundaries of aluminium. It is concluded that ultrasonic techniques providing fast and non-destructive information are promising for quality assurance of the composites, and may also help to optimise process parameters

  5. Stainless steel fibre reinforced aluminium matrix composites processed by squeeze casting: relationship between processing conditions and interfacial microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, C.; Marchal, Y.; Boland, F.; Delannay, F.

    1993-01-01

    This work investigates the influence of some processing parameters on the extent of interfacial reaction in squeeze cast aluminium matrix composites reinforced with 12 μm diameter, continuous stainless steel fibres. The average thickness of the reaction layer at fibre/matrix interfaces was measured by image analysis. When casting was made in a die at room temperature, the thickness of the reaction layer was affected on a distance of several mm from the lateral surface or from the bottom of the preform. The results indicate that the major part of the reaction occurs before solidification of the liquid metal. The control of the extent of interfacial reaction can be achieved through optimization of both infiltration parameters and features of the preform such as the volume fraction of the fibres. (orig.)

  6. Processing, microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel particles embedded aluminium matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Devinder; Bauri, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Al-Ni particle composite was successfully processed by FSP. → No harmful intermetallics formed. → The composite showed a 3 fold increase in yield strength with high ductility. → FSP also lead to a refined recrystallized grain structure. → A continuous type dynamic recrystallization process seems to be working during FSP. - Abstract: Nickel particles were embedded into an Al matrix by friction stir processing (FSP) to produce metal particle reinforced composite. FSP resulted in uniform dispersion of nickel particles with excellent interfacial bonding with the Al matrix and also lead to significant grain refinement of the matrix. The novelty of the process is that the composite was processed in one step without any pretreatment being given to the constituents and no harmful intermetallic formed. The novel feature of the composite is that it shows a three fold increase in the yield strength while appreciable amount of ductility is retained. The hardness also improved significantly. The fracture surface showed a ductile failure mode and also revealed the superior bonding between the particles and the matrix. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a dynamically recrystallized equiaxed microstructure. A gradual increase in misorientation from sub-grain to high-angle boundaries is observed from EBSD analysis pointing towards a continuous type dynamic recrystallization mechanism.

  7. Microstructure, mechanical and fracture properties of groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide dispersion strengthened aluminium matrix composites

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    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of aluminium hybrid composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash (GSA and silicon carbide was investigated. GSA and silicon carbide with different mix ratios (10:0, 7.5:2.5, 5.0:5.0, 2.5:7.5 and 0:10 constituted 6 and 10 wt.% of the reinforcing phase, while the matrix material was Al–Mg–Si alloy. The hybrid composites were produced via a two-step stir casting technique. Microstructural examination, hardness, tensile and fracture toughness testing were carried out to appraise the mechanical properties of the composites. The results show that with increasing GSA in the reinforcing phase, the hardness, ultimate tensile strength (UTS and specific strength of the composites decreased slightly for both 6 and 10 wt.% reinforced Al–Mg–Si based composites owing to the amount of the oxides of Al, Si, Ca, K2 and Mg present in the composition of GSA. However, the percentage elongation improved marginally and was generally invariant to increasing GSA content while the fracture toughness increased with increasing GSA content. GSA offered a favourable influence on the mechanical properties of Al–Mg–Si hybrid composites comparable to that of rice husk ash and bamboo leaf ash.

  8. Mechanical properties of aluminium based metal matrix composites reinforced with graphite nanoplatelets

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    Alam, Syed Nasimul, E-mail: syedn@nitrkl.ac.in; Kumar, Lailesh

    2016-06-14

    In this work Al-matrix composites reinforced by exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) is fabricated by powder metallurgy route and their microstructure, mechanical properties and sliding wear behaviour were investigated. Here, xGnP has been synthesized from the thermally exfoliated graphite produced from a graphite intercalation compound (GIC) through rapid evaporation of the intercalant at an elevated temperature. The xGnP synthesized was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC/TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The Al and xGnP powder mixtures were consolidated under a load of 565 MPa followed by sintering at 550 °C for 2 h in an inert atmosphere. Al-1, 2, 3 and 5 wt% xGnP nanocomposites were developed. Results of the wear test show that there was a significant improvement in the wear resistance of the composites up to the addition of 3 wt% of xGnP in the Al matrix. The hardness of the various Al-xGnP composites also shows improvement upto the addition of 1 wt% xGnP beyond which there was a decrease in the hardness of the composites. The tensile strength of the Al-xGnP composites continuously reduced with the addition of xGnP due to the formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particles at the interface of the Al and xGnP in the composite.

  9. Pitting corrosion behaviour study of aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Merino, S.; Lopez, M. D.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the SiCp proportion on the pitting corrosion of A3xx.x/SiC/xxp composites was studies by means of potenciodinamic polarization and double cyclic polarization in saline environment at 25 degree centigrade A360/SiC/xxp matrix does not contain copper, whereas the A380/SiC/xxp matric contains 1,39-1,44 wt %Cu. The kinetic study was carried out by gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by low angle XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion is due to nucleation and growth of Al 2 O 3 -3H 2 O on the material surface. The corrosion increases with the reinforcement proportion, chloride concentration and copper content. (Author) 10 refs

  10. Hardfacing of aluminium alloys by means of metal matrix composites produced by laser surface alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available consisted of the hard particles uniformly distributed in the host metal matrix. A strong bond between the particles and matrix was formed in the modified layer. A Rofin Nd: YAG laser was used for injecting the ceramic powder into the substrate...

  11. Influence of vegetable based cutting fluids on cutting force and vibration signature during milling of aluminium metal matrix composites

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    S. Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the environmental and health issues, there is an enormous requirement for developing the novel cutting fluids (CFs. The vegetable based cutting fluid (VBCFs doesn’t affect the environment, diminish the harmful effects to the operator and also enhance the machining performances such as surface roughness, tool life, minimum vibration and cutting forces. In this work, the performances of four different VBCFs like palm, coconut, sunflower, soya bean oils, and a commercial type of CFs were considered to analyze the influence of cutting fluids while measuring the cutting force and vibration signatures during milling of 7075–T6 hybrid aluminium metal matrix composite with carbide insert tool. The experiments were conducted in CNC L-MILL 55 vertical machining center, with milling tool dynamometer to measure the cutting force and a tri-axial accelerometer to measure the vibration signals. The flow rate of the VBCFs were maintained at a constant rate and the results were compared with a commercial cutting fluid. The obtained result shows that palm oil suits better than the other vegetable based cutting fluids in terms of minimum cutting force requirement and minimum vibration. Also, the experimental result shows that the cutting fluid was one of the important parameter needs to be considered which influences the cutting force and vibration signals.

  12. The effect of palm kernel shell ash on the mechanical properties of as-cast aluminium alloy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the effect of palm kernel shell ash (PKSA as reinforcement on the mechanical properties of As-cast aluminium alloy. Recycled aluminium alloy from cylinder of an automotive engine block was degreased by using premium motor spirit (PMS also known as petrol, washed thoroughly with soap and water and sun dried for 5 days. The palm kernel shell was screened of dirt and other unwanted foreign materials before being roasted in furnace. The ash was further pulverized by laboratory ball mill machine followed by sieving to obtain particle sizes of 106 µm and divided into two parts. One portion was treated with NaOH solution while the other part was left as untreated before they are used to reinforced molten aluminium alloy in predetermined proportions. The newly developed composites were characterized with respect to their mechanical properties in response to the tests that were carried out on them. The results indicate that palm kernel shell ash can be used as potential reinforcing material for automobile applications.

  13. Investigation of microstructure-ultrasonic velocity relationship in SiC{sub p}-reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guer, C.H

    2003-11-25

    Twenty-one sets of specimens were fabricated by hot pressing powder mixtures containing various volume and size combinations of pure Al and SiC particles. Neither heat treatment nor secondary deformation processes were applied. The microstructures of the specimens were characterised by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Using a 10 MHz probe, the velocity of ultrasonic longitudinal waves was measured. The results show that in general the ultrasonic velocity increases with an increase in SiC content. However, for larger Al/SiC particle size ratio and higher volume fraction of SiC, ultrasonic velocity decreases owing to microporosity caused by the segregation of SiC particles along the grain boundaries of aluminium. It is concluded that ultrasonic techniques providing fast and non-destructive information are promising for quality assurance of the composites, and may also help to optimise process parameters.

  14. The Inhibitive Potential of Arecaceae Extract on the Corrosivity of Aluminium based Matrix Composite and Medium Carbon Steel in Different Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Aondona IHOM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research study, the inhibitive potential of Arecaceae extract on the corrosivity of aluminium based matrix composite and medium carbon steel in different media have been undertaken. The composite and the carbon steel were exposed in 0.5M NaOH and 0.5M HCl solutions as the control solutions. The Arecaceae extract from the fruit juice was added in volume percentages of 5%v/v and 10%v/v. The exposure time covered 12 days, and the monitored temperature range during the exposure time was 25-39°C. The result indicated that the most corrosive media were those without the Arecaceae inhibitor; where corrosion rate ranged from 0.106mpy to 0.409mpy. The medium carbon steel did not show any sign of corrosion in the 0.5M NaOH solution. Arecaceae inhibitor addition of 5%v/v gave optimum corrosion rate reduction; the corrosion rate was in the range of 0.018mpy to 0.199mpy. Although the lowest range of 0.013mpy to 0.192mpy was obtained with 10%v/v of Arecaceae, however on the overall performance the 5%v/v of Arecaceae was better. The inhibition of corrosion by Arecaceae was as a result of adsorption and phase layers on the surface of the metals.

  15. Development of cerium oxide and nickel oxide-incorporated aluminium matrix for marine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, P. Muhamed; Shibli, S.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study signifies the role of nickel oxide along with cerium oxide on barrier protection of aluminium as a metal matrix composite for marine applications. The incorporation of cerium oxide and nickel oxide in pure aluminium had improved the corrosion resistance and microstructure of the composite. A relatively anodic and stable OCP was exhibited throughout the period during long-term evaluation. Both nickel oxide and cerium oxide acted synergistically to reduce corrosion in aluminium. The mechanisms of barrier protection of the composites are discussed predominantly based on extensive impedance analysis. The results signify the scope of potential use of the composite in marine environment.

  16. A Computational Study on the Use of an Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite and Aramid as Alternative Brake Disc and Brake Pad Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosa Idusuyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model for the heat generation and dissipation in a disk brake during braking and the following release period has been formulated. The model simulates the braking action by investigating the thermal behaviour occurring on the disc and pad surfaces during this period. A comparative study was made between grey cast iron (GCI, asbestos, Aluminium metal matrix composite (AMC, and aramid as brake pad and disc materials. The braking process and following release period were simulated for four material combinations, GCI disc and Asbestos pad, GCI disc and Aramid pad, AMC disc and Asbestos pad, AMC disc and Aramid pad using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The results show similarity in thermal behaviour at the contact surface for the asbestos and aramid brake pad materials with a temperature difference of 1.8 K after 10 seconds. For the brake disc materials, the thermal behaviour was close, with the highest temperature difference being 9.6 K. The GCI had a peak temperature of 489 K at 1.2 seconds and AMC was 465.5 K but cooling to 406.4 K at 10 seconds, while the GCI was 394.7 K.

  17. Studies on mechanical properties of aluminium 6061 reinforced with titanium and E glass fibre metal matrix hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. N. Ravi; Vidyasagar, H. N.; Shivanand, H. K.

    2018-04-01

    2Development of the mmc with fibers and filler materials as a replacement material for some engineering purpose such as automobiles, aerospace are indispensable. Therefore, the studies related to hybrid mmc's of Al6061 were noted in this paper. In this work, Al6061 reinforced with E glass fibers and micro Titanium particles. Hybrid composites was prepared by very feasible and commercially used technique Stir casting and by varying composition of Al6061, Titanium and E-glass fibre. Experiments were done by varying weight fraction of Titanium (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%) and E glass fibre (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%). Wire EDM were used to prepare the specimens required for tensile and hardness according to standards and tests conducted. The proportion of elements which are present the mmc's are identified by EDAX. Optical microscopy were conducted by SU3500 machine Scanning Electron Microscope and Microstructure shows the distribution of reinforced Ti particles and E glass fibres. The characterization of Al6061 hybrid mmc's is having significant impact on the mechanical properties.

  18. A reliability based stress-life evaluation of aluminium-graphite particulate composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achutha, M.V.; Sridhara, B.K.; Abdul Budan, D.

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted on sand cast aluminium-graphite composite specimens on Rotating Beam Fatigue Testing Machine with three different stress levels. Aluminium-graphite (LM 25-5% graphite) composite was processed by closed mould sand casting method. Three-stress level fatigue test program was planned for carrying out fatigue experiments. Three different stress levels selected for fatigue experiments were a fraction of ultimate tensile strength. Statistical design of fatigue experiments was carried out to determine the sample size at each stress level. Experimental results are presented in the form of stress-life (S-N) curves and reliability-stress-life (R-S-N) curves, which are helpful for designers. The S-N curve of the aluminium-graphite composite was compared with its matrix alloy LM 25. Comparison revealed that the fatigue behaviour of the aluminium-graphite composite is superior to that of the matrix alloy

  19. Study of mechanical properties on powdermetalurgy aluminium matrix composites fabricated by stamping or extrusion; Estudio de las propiedades mecanicas en materiales compuestos de matriz aluminio pulvimetalurgicos conformados mediante forja o extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busquets, D.; Gomez, L.; Amigo, V.; Salvador-Moya, M. D.

    2005-07-01

    We have developed composite materials from AA6061 aluminium alloy powders used as matrix and ceramics powders of boron carbide, silicon carbide and boron nitride, used as reinforcements in 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10% vol. by mechanical mixing and milling in planetary mill at 360 rpm vial velocity for 4 h followed of hot stamping and extrusion process on green compacts. Mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests are influenced by the heat treatment, reinforcement fractions and nature. Moreover, these mechanical characteristic are dependent from the processing route. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis revealed the microstructure of materials and let describe the tripartite relation; structure-processing-properties, of the developed materials. (Author) 20 refs.

  20. Taguchi design optimization of machining parameters on the CNC end milling process of halloysite nanotube with aluminium reinforced epoxy matrix (HNT/Al/Ep hybrid composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Pang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the application of Taguchi optimization methodology in optimizing the cutting parameters of end-milling process for machining the halloysite nanotubes (HNTs with aluminium reinforced epoxy hybrid composite material under dry condition. The machining parameters which are chosen to be evaluated in this study are the depth of cut (d, cutting speed (S and feed rate (f. While, the response factors to be measured are the surface roughness of the machined composite surface and the cutting force. An orthogonal array of the Taguchi method was set-up and used to analyse the effect of the milling parameters on the surface roughness and cutting force. The result from this study shows that the application of the Taguchi method can determine the best combination of machining parameters that can provide the optimal machining response conditions which are the lowest surface roughness and lowest cutting force value. For the best surface finish, A1–B3–C3 (d = 0.4 mm, S = 1500 rpm, f = 60 mmpm is found to be the optimized combination of levels for all the three control factors from the analysis. Meanwhile, the optimized combination of levels for all the three control factors from the analysis which provides the lowest cutting force was found to be A2–B2–C2 (d = 0.6 mm, S = 1000 rpm, f = 40 mmpm.

  1. Crack and wear behavior of SiC particulate reinforced aluminium based metal matrix composite fabricated by direct metal laser sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Partha

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, crack density and wear performance of SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) fabricated by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process have been studied. Mainly, size and volume fraction of SiCp have been varied to analyze the crack and wear behavior of the composite. The study has suggested that crack density increases significantly after 15 volume percentage (vol.%) of SiCp. The paper has also suggested that when size (mesh) of reinforcement increases, wear resistance of the composite drops. Three hundred mesh of SiCp offers better wear resistance; above 300 mesh the specific wear rate increases significantly. Similarly, there has been no improvement of wear resistance after 20 vol.% of reinforcement. The scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces have revealed that during the wear test SiCp fragments into small pieces which act as abrasives to result in abrasive wear in the specimen.

  2. Microstructure and properties of aluminium-aluminium oxide graded composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaruzaman, F. F.; Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Ismail, N. M.; Hamedon, Z.; Iqbal, A. K. M. A.; Azhari, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this research works, four-layered aluminium-aluminium oxide (Al-Al2O3) graded composite materials were fabricated using powder metallurgy (PM) method. In processing, metal-ceramic graded composite materials of 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% weight percentage of ceramic concentration were prepared under 30 ton compaction load using a cylindrical die-punch set made of steel. After that, two-step pressureless sintering was carried out at sintering temperature and time 600°C and 3 hours respectively. It was observed that the sintered cylindrical specimens of 30 mm diameter were prepared successfully. The graded composite specimens were analysed and the properties such as density, microstructure and hardness were measured. It was found that after sintering process, the diameter of the graded cylindrical structure was decreased. Using both Archimedes method and rule of mixture (ROM), he density of structure was measured. The obtained results revealed that the microvickers hardness was increased as the ceramic component increases in the graded layer. Moreover, it was observed that the interface of the graded structure is clearly distinguished within the multilayer stack and the ceramic particles are almost uniformly distributed in the Al matrix.

  3. Improvement of the surface properties of aluminium by the formation of intermetallic phases and metal matrix composites during laser surface alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available , beam spot size, laser scan speed and powder feed rate have to be controlled to achieve the desired surface properties. This research project is a preliminary investigation into laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 using a 4.4 kW Rofin Sinar Nd...

  4. Numerical predicting of recycling friendly wrought aluminium alloy compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varužan Kevorkijan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The model presented in this work enables the design of optimal (standard and non-standard “recycling-friendly” compositions and properties of wrought aluminium alloys with significantly increased amounts of post-consumed scrap. The following two routes were modelled in detail: (i the blending of standard and non-standard compositions of wrought aluminium alloys starting from post-consumed aluminium scrap sorted to various degrees simulated by the model; and (ii changing the initial standard composition of wrought aluminium alloys to non-standard “recycling friendly” ones - with broader concentration tolerance limits of alloying elements, without influencing the selected alloy properties, specified in advance.

  5. Aluminium composites casting in rotating magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper technological and material conception of composite manufacturing with intensify of ex-situ powders and some results was shown. Technology of powders stirring with liquid metal in the crucible was shown. For composites required dispersion of reinforcement and matrix crystallization was assisted with rotating electromagnetic field. Improvement of reinforcing particles distribution can be observed. Composite structure was studied with use of light microscopy. Electromagnetic field processing positive influence on reinforcing phase distribution and matrix crystallization process was proved.

  6. Fabrication experience of aluminium clad aluminium matrix dispersion fuels at BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, C.; Hedge, P.W.; Prasad, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Aluminium clad, aluminium matrix plate type dispersion fuels have been fabricated in BARC in recent years as part of fuel development programme for small non-power research reactors. The present paper describes the flowsheet developed for fabrication of Al-UAl x , Al-U 3 Si 2 and Al-U 3 O 8 fuels at BARC. The Al-20% U alloy fuel for KAMINI neutron radiography reactor was prepared by 'melting and casting' route, followed by picture framing and roll-bonding. For higher 'U' density fuels namely, Al-UAl x , Al-U 3 O 8 and Al-U 3 Si 2 the 'powder metallurgy' route was followed for preparation of fuel meat. The novel features in fabrication route were: addition of Zr for stabilizing UAl 3 phase in Al-20% U alloy; x-ray radiography and microdensitometric scanning of radiographs for location of fuel outline inside fuel element and for confirming homogeneous distribution of fissile atoms; immersion ultrasonic testing for confirming good bonding between mating Al surface of the fuel plate. (author)

  7. Behaviour of millscale reinforced Aluminium Bronze composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the desirable characteristics exhibited by most aluminium bronze, the deficient responses in certain critical applications have necessitated improvement in the mechanical properties. The microstructural and mechanical properties of cast aluminium bronze reinforced with iron millscale particles were investigated in ...

  8. Silver Matrix Composites - Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase compositions of composite materials determine their performance as well as physical and mechanical properties. Depending on the type of applied matrix and the kind, amount and morphology of the matrix reinforcement, it is possible to shape the material properties so that they meet specific operational requirements. In the paper, results of investigations on silver alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles are presented. The investigations enabled evaluation of hardness, tribological and mechanical properties as well as the structure of produced materials. The matrix of composite material was an alloy of silver and aluminium, magnesium and silicon. As the reinforcing phase, 20-60 μm ceramic particles (SiC, SiO2, Al2O3 and Cs were applied. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase in the composites was 10%. The composites were produced using the liquid phase (casting technology, followed by plastic work (the KOBO method. The mechanical and tribological properties were analysed for plastic work-subjected composites. The mechanical properties were assessed based on a static tensile and hardness tests. The tribological properties were investigated under dry sliding conditions. The analysis of results led to determination of effects of the composite production technology on their performance. Moreover, a relationship between the type of reinforcing phase and the mechanical and tribological properties was established.

  9. Wear Response of Aluminium 6061 Composite Reinforced with Red Mud at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dabral

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the investigations on dry sliding wear behaviour of aluminium metal matrix composite at room and elevated temperature. Aluminium metal matrix composites reinforced with red mud are prepared by stir casting method. The experiments are planned using Taguchi technique. An orthogonal array, analysis of variance and signal to noise ratio are used to check the influence of wear parameters like temperature, percentage of reinforcement, mesh size, load, sliding distance and sliding speed on dry sliding wear of composites. The optimal testing parameters are found and their values are calculated which are then compared with predicted values. A reasonable agreement is found between predicted and actual values. The model prepared in the present work can be effectively used to predict the specific wear rate of the composites.

  10. Influence of Chemical Composition on Porosity in Aluminium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Kucharčík L.; Brůna M.; Sládek A.

    2014-01-01

    Porosity is one of the major defects in aluminum castings, which results is a decrease of a mechanical properties. Porosity in aluminum alloys is caused by solidification shrinkage and gas segregation. The final amount of porosity in aluminium castings is mostly influenced by several factors, as amount of hydrogen in molten aluminium alloy, cooling rate, melt temperature, mold material, or solidification interval. This article deals with effect of chemical composition on porosity in Al-Si alu...

  11. Microstructural and mechanical properties analysis of an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with the amorphous alloy Al{sub 87.5}Ni{sub 4}Sm{sub 8.5} consolidated by hot extrusion; Propriedades mecanicas e microestruturais de um composito com matrix de aluminio e reforco amorfo de Al{sub 87.5}Ni{sub 4}Sm{sub 8.5} consolidado por extrusao a quente por extrusao a quente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, L.C.R.; Bolfarini, C.; Kiminami, C.S.; Botta, W.J. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Peres, M.M., E-mail: peresmm@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itabira, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is the microstructure and the mechanical properties analysis of an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with the Al{sub 87.5}Ni{sub 4}Sm{sub 8.5} amorphous alloy. The amorphous alloy was produced by melt-spinning and fragmented in powder particles by milling. Pure aluminium power was moistured with amorphous powder in a proportion of 80:20 (% weight) and processed by milling using 350 rpm during 30 minutes for the generation of a homogeneous composite powder. This product was consolidated by extrusion at 235 deg C, ram speed of 2mm/min and extrusion ratio of 7/1, generating a compact and cylindrical bar with 3 mm of width. The result sample was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Microhardness and compression tests show an improvement on the mechanical properties. (author)

  12. Aluminium matrix composites: Challenges and opportunities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... In the last few years, AMCs have been utilised in high-tech structural and functional applications including aerospace, defence, automotive, and thermal management areas, as well as in sports and recreation. It is interesting to note that research on particle-reinforced cast AMCs took root in India during the ...

  13. Abrasive wear response of aluminium alloy-sillimanite particle reinforced composite under low stress condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Mondal, D.P.; Das, S.

    2006-01-01

    The abrasive wear behaviour of aluminium alloy-sillimanite particle reinforced composite under low stress condition has been reported and the results have been compared with the corresponding matrix alloy which was produced and cast under similar conditions. The study showed that wear resistance (inverse of wear rate) of the composite was higher than the matrix alloy. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance and increased with applied load irrespective of materials. The worn surfaces and subsurfaces of the tested samples were examined in the scanning electron microscope in order to understand the material removal mechanism during low stress abrasive wear process

  14. Investigation of mechanical properties of aluminium reinforced glass fibre polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G. B. Veeresh; Pramod, R.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the recent work about reinforcing E-glass into Aluminium foil to attain high strength to weight ratio. Aluminium is corrosion resistant, light in weight and ductile, also when alloyed through other metals deliver the greater strengths as desirable for high-tech applications. The density of pure Aluminium is 2.7 g cm3. Electrical grade glass formally known as E-glass, is by far the most used fiber in reinforced plastic composites. It is a high strength material with light weight compared to steel and corrosive resistant. The matrix and reinforcement is bonded with a resin, named Araldite Ly556, which has density at 25 °C, 1.15-1.20 g cm3. Thus gives a good binding structure. In the present work, Aluminium, E-Glass and Epoxy are combined to fabricate a laminate by Hand-Lay process. Hand-lay is the oldest and simplest method used for producing reinforced plastic laminates. The fabricated metal matrix composites are tested for their mechanical properties. The metal laminate is found to render high strength, hardness, flexural strength and increased wear resistance. Further theoretical simulations was carried out to validate the experimental results.

  15. Tribological Properties of Aluminium Alloy Composites Reinforced with Multi-Layer Graphene-The Influence of Spark Plasma Texturing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecki, Marek; Woźniak, Jarosław; Cygan, Tomasz; Petrus, Mateusz; Olszyna, Andrzej

    2017-08-10

    Self-lubricating composites are designed to obtain materials that reduce energy consumption, improve heat dissipation between moving bodies, and eliminate the need for external lubricants. The use of a solid lubricant in bulk composite material always involves a significant reduction in its mechanical properties, which is usually not an optimal solution. The growing interest in multilayer graphene (MLG), characterised by interesting properties as a component of composites, encouraged the authors to use it as an alternative solid lubricant in aluminium matrix composites instead of graphite. Aluminium alloy 6061 matrix composite reinforced with 2-15 vol % of MLG were synthesised by the spark plasma sintering process (SPS) and its modification, spark plasma texturing (SPT), involving deformation of the pre-sintered body in a larger diameter matrix. It was found that the application of the SPT method improves the density and hardness of the composites, resulting in improved tribological properties, particularly in the higher load regime.

  16. Drilling of metal matrix composites: cutting forces and chip formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songmene, V.; Balout, B.; Masounave, J.

    2002-01-01

    Particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs) are known for their low weight and their high wear resistance, but also for the difficulties encountered during their machining. New aluminium MMCs containing with both soft lubricating graphite particles and hard particles (silicon carbide or alumina) with improved machinability were developed. This study investigates the drilling of these composites as compared to non-reinforced aluminium. The microstructure of chip, the cutting forces, the shear angles and the friction at tool-chip interface are used to compare the machinability of these composites. It was found that, during drilling of this new family of composites, the feed rate, and the nature of reinforcing particles govern the cutting forces. The mathematical models established by previous researchers for predicting the cutting forces when drilling metals were validated for these composites. The reinforcing particles within the composite help for chip segmentation, making the composite more brittle and easy to shear during the cutting process. (author)

  17. Investigation of Selective Laser Melting Surface Alloyed Aluminium Metal Matrix Dispersive Reinforced Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, V. V.; Dimitrova, R. B.; Kandeva, M. K.; Sofronov, Y. P.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the improvement of mechanical properties and in particular wear resistance of laser surface alloyed dispersive reinforced thin layers produced by selective laser melting (SLM) technology. The wear resistance investigation of aluminium matrix composite layers in the conditions of dry friction surface with abrasive particles and nanoindentation tests were carried out. The process parameters (as scan speed) and their impact on the wear resistant layers have been evaluated. The alloyed layers containing metalized SiC particles were studied by Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The obtained experimental results of the laser alloyed thin layers show significant development of their wear resistance and nanohardness due to the incorporated reinforced phase of electroless nickel coated SiC particles.

  18. A Numerical Analysis of the Resistance and Stiffness of the Aluminium and Concrete Composite Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polus Łukasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a numerical analysis of the resistance and stiffness of the aluminium and concrete composite beam is presented. Composite aluminium and concrete structures are quite new and they have not been thoroughly tested. Composite structures have a lot of advantages. The composite aluminium and concrete beam is more corrosion-resistant, fire-resistant and stiff than the aluminium beam. The contemporary idea of sustainable buildings relies on new solutions which are more environmentally friendly. Aluminium is lighter and more resistant to corrosion than steel, which is often used in composite structures.

  19. The Effects of Cocos Nucifera (Coconut Shell on the Mechanical and Tribological Properties of Recycled Waste Aluminium Can Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.O. Agunsoye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The dry sliding wear behaviour and mechanical properties of recycled aluminium metal matrix composite reinforced with 5 and 10 % coconut shell particles (CSp has been investigated. The particle size of Cocosnucifera (coconut shell that were used ranges from 50-300µm. The wear behaviors of developed samples were investigated under varied loads and speed using pin on disc equipment. The samples were also subjected to tensile, impact and hardness test. The result shows that the additions of coconut shell particles improved the wear resistance of the recycled aluminium can/CSp composites at low Speed (2.36 m/s. However, with increase in Speed (4.72 m/s, an increase in the specific wear rates were observed. Increasing the coconut shell particles additions to the recycled waste aluminium cans (RWAlC reduced the impact resistance, hence the toughness of the RWAlC/CSp composite samples. However, the impact resistance of the composites increased as the Cocosnucifera particle size increased. The result of the filler size variation shows that decrease in filler particles size improved the tensile strength and yield strength of the developed aluminium metal matrix /CSp composite. The hardness of the composite increased with increased additions of the filler within the matrix.

  20. Influence of Chemical Composition on Porosity in Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucharčík L.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Porosity is one of the major defects in aluminum castings, which results is a decrease of a mechanical properties. Porosity in aluminum alloys is caused by solidification shrinkage and gas segregation. The final amount of porosity in aluminium castings is mostly influenced by several factors, as amount of hydrogen in molten aluminium alloy, cooling rate, melt temperature, mold material, or solidification interval. This article deals with effect of chemical composition on porosity in Al-Si aluminum alloys. For experiment was used Pure aluminum and four alloys: AlSi6Cu4, AlSi7Mg0, 3, AlSi9Cu1, AlSi10MgCu1.

  1. Fatigue behaviour of 6061 aluminium alloy and its composite

    OpenAIRE

    Hwa, Ping

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue behaviour of an artificial aged powder metallurgy 6061 aluminium alloy, and a composite made of this alloy with 15% volume fraction of SiCp was investigated. The alloy was subjected to T6 heat treatment, as was the composite material chosen (which incorporated SiC particles of average size 30pm). An extensive experimental programme was carried out in which fatigue lives were determined using load-controlled axial loading of unnotched cylindrical samples, at stress ratios of-1 and 0.1....

  2. Radiation resistant ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Steiner, D.; Heinisch, H.L.; Newsome, G.A.; Kerch, H.M.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are of interest for nuclear applications because of their high-temperature properties, corrosion resistance, fracture toughness relative to monolithic ceramics, and low neutron activation and after heat. Evaluations of the radiation resistance of commercially available SiC/SiC composites have revealed their promise for this application, but also the need for further development to achieve the desired performance. This paper summarizes the results of a workshop cosponsored by the Offices of Fusion Energy and Basic Energy Sciences of the US Department of Energy and Lockheed-Martin Corporation with forty attendees from national laboratories, universities and industry. A number of promising routes for optimizing the radiation stability of ceramic matrix composites were identified at this workshop. These routes included the newer, more stoichiometric fibers and alternate fiber/matrix interfaces and matrix processing routes. (orig.)

  3. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  4. Simulation of reflectance from white-anodised aluminium surfaces using polyurethane–TiO2 composite coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Johansen, Villads Egede; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental studies were carried out on polyurethane (PU)–TiO2 composite coatings on bright and matte aluminium surfaces with an aim to understand and tailor the light scattering from particles incorporated into an anodised layer for designing the optical appearance...... of anodised surfaces. PU matrix was selected for its matching refractive-index (n = 1.7) with anodic alumina layer. Three different TiO2 particle size distributions were dispersed in PU and spin coated onto bright high-gloss and matte caustic-etched aluminium substrates. The reflectance spectra of coated...

  5. Characteristic evaluation of process parameters of friction stir welding of aluminium 2024 hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadashiva, M.; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.

    2018-04-01

    The Current work is aimed to investigate the effect of process parameters in friction stir welding of Aluminium 2024 base alloy and Aluminium 2024 matrix alloy reinforced with E Glass and Silicon Carbide reinforcements. The process involved a set of synthesis techniques incorporating stir casting methodology resulting in fabrication of the composite material. This composite material that is synthesized is then machined to obtain a plate of dimensions 100 mm * 50 mm * 6 mm. The plate is then friction stir welded at different set of parameters viz. the spindle speed of 600 rpm, 900 rpm and 1200 rpm and feed rate of 40 mm/min, 80 mm/min and 120 mm/min for analyzing the process capability. The study of the given set of parameters is predominantly important to understand the physics of the process that may lead to better properties of the joint, which is very much important in perspective to its use in advanced engineering applications, especially in aerospace domain that uses Aluminium 2024 alloy for wing and fuselage structures under tension.

  6. Investigation of the mechanical properties of Aluminium matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The SEM/EDX and XRF analyses of the materials have shown that the materials developed contained the required elements and the reinforcement is well distributed within the alloy matrix. Highest hardness value of 75.4 HRB was obtained on the sample with 10% SiCp compared with the Al-Mg matrix. Impact energy of ...

  7. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  8. The role of TiB2 in strengthening TiB2 reinforced aluminium casting composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z; Kang, H; Zhao, Y; Zheng, Y; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    With an aim of developing high quality in situ TiB 2 reinforced aluminium foundry alloy based composites, the conventional direct synthesis method was modified into a two-step route. In step one we optimized the halide salt route to fabricate in situ TiB 2 particulate reinforced aluminium matrix composites and in step two we investigated the effects of the Al-5wt.% TiB 2 composite, as a “master composite”, on strengthening the practical foundry alloys. The in situ formed TiB 2 particles play two roles while strengthening the composites: (1) The grain refinement effect that improves the quality of the alloy matrix; and (2) The interactions between the hard particulates and the matrix add extra increment to the material strength. In different alloy systems, TiB 2 may play distinct roles in these two aspects (figure 1). Further analysis of the strengthening mechanisms shows that particle agglomeration behaviour during solidification is responsible for the latter one. The present work details the role of TiB 2 in strengthening TiB 2 reinforced aluminium casting composites. (paper)

  9. Microstructure and hardness performance of AA6061 aluminium composite using friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, C. D.; Fatchurrohman, N.

    2018-04-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) is an industrial waste that has become a potential reinforced material for aluminium matrix composite (AMCs) due to low cost and abundantly available resources. Friction stir processing (FSP) has been introduced as a method to modify surface properties of the metal and alloy including theirs composite as well. The present work reports the production and characterization of AA6061 and AA6061/5 vol% RHA using FSP using parameters rotation speed 1000 rpm and traversed speed 25 mm/min. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy (OM). A homogenous dispersion of RHA particles was obtained in the composite. No agglomeration or segregation was observed. The produced composite exhibited a fine grain structure. An improvement in hardness profile was observed as AA6061/5 vol% RHA improves in hardness compared to FSPed of AA6061 without reinforcement.

  10. Studies on Mechanical Behaviour of Aluminium/Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Reinforced Functionally Graded Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohandas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to fabricate functionally graded aluminium (Al-Si6Cu/ nickel coated SiC metal matrix composite using centrifugal casting route. SiC particles (53-80 µm were coated with nickel using electroless coating technique to enhance the wettability with aluminium matrix. Several attempts were made to coat nickel on SiC by varying the process temperature (65 °C, 75 °C, and 85 °C to obtain a uniform coating. Silicon particles coated with nickel were characterised using EDS enabled Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope and it was found that the maximum nickel coating on SiC occurred at a process temperature of 75°C. This nickel coated SiC particles were used as the reinforcement for the manufacture of functionally graded metal matrix composite and a cast specimen of dimensions 150×90×15 mm was obtained. To ensure the graded properties in the fabricated composites, microstructure (at a distance of 1, 7 and 14 mm and hardness (at a distance of 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 mm from outer periphery taken in the radial direction was analysed using Zeiss Axiovert metallurgical microscope and Vickers micro hardness tester respectively. The microstructure reveals presence of more SiC particles at the outer periphery compared to inner periphery and the hardness test shows that the hardness also decreased from outer periphery (90 HV to inner periphery (78 HV.Tensile strength of specimen from outer zone (1-7mm and inner zone (8-14 mm of casting was also tested and found out a value of 153.3 Mpa and 123.3 Mpa for the outer zone and inner zone respectively. An important observation made was that the outer periphery of casting was particle rich and the inner periphery was particle deficient because of centrifugal force and variation in density between aluminium matrix and reinforcement. Functionally graded Al/SiC metal matrix composite could be extensively used in automotive industry especially in the manufacture of liners and brake drums.

  11. A study of formation of iron nanoparticles in aluminium matrix with helium pores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kichanov, S.E.; Kozlenko, D. P.; Belushkin, A.V.; Reutov, V.F.; Samoilenko, S.O.; Jirák, Zdeněk; Savenko, B. N.; Bulavin, L. A.; Zubavichus, Y.V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 351, č. 1 (2012), "012013-1"-"012013-5" ISSN 1742-6588. [International Workshop on SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor - Devoted to the 75th anniversary of Yu M Ostanevich's Birth /2./. Dubna, 27.05.2011-30.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : iron nanoparticles * aluminium matrix * helium pores Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  12. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  13. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  14. Interface in silicon carbide whisker reinforced aluminium composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Li; Geng, Lin; Yao, Zhongkai; Lei, Tingquan (Harbin Institute of Technology (China))

    1989-09-01

    The interface in SiCw/Al composites was examined. The Auger electron spectroscope analysis of the fracture surface after sputter etching shows that the bonding between SiC whisker and Al matrix is quite good. TEM and X-ray diffraction analysis show that there is no reaction layer at the SiC-Al interface. Si and C cannot diffuse into the matrix, and Al cannot diffuse into the whisker. The experimental results also show that there may be certain orientation relationships between the SiC whisker and the nearby matrix. 7 refs.

  15. Thermomechanically induced residual strains in Al/SiCp metal-matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T.; Clarke, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Residual lattice strains in the aluminium and SiC phases of F3S.20S extruded A359 20% SiC metal-matrix composite were measured by using neutron diffi action at room and elevated temperatures to monitor the effects of in situ uniaxial plastic deformations. The results are interpreted with referenc...

  16. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  17. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  18. Study on fracture behaviour of Hybrid Aluminium Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Niranjan D. B.; Shiva Shankar G. S.; Shankar Latha B.

    2018-01-01

    This work makes an attempt to study of fracture behaviour of hybrid Composite reinforced with hard ceramic Boron carbide as primary phase and secondary phase as soft solid lubricant Molybdenum Disulphide with base matrix Al2219 by two stage stir casting method is incorporated. Compact tension type specimen was utilized for test and dimensions are conformity to ASTM E-647.Fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness test conducted as per ASTM Standard E-399 and E-1820. This study discloses that...

  19. A low cost, light weight cenosphere–aluminium composite for brake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mance parameters are within the permissible limits when the brake disc was made of the proposed material, namely,. AA6063 aluminium alloy with 10% cenosphere composite. Table 1. Material properties of composite. 10 vol% Cenosphere–. Properties. AA6063 composite. Density of the material (kg m−3). 2140. Poisson's ...

  20. Adsorptivity of uranium by aluminium-activated carbon composite adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Ayako; Takagi, Norio; Miyai, Yoshitaka

    1976-01-01

    To research the adsorption process of uranium from sea water by aluminium-activated carbon composite adsorbent (C-Al-OH), the authors examined the effects of temperature, pH and carbonate ion concentration of the solution upon the adsorption of uranium, using sodium chloride solution and natural sea water. The continued mixing of the solution for the duration of two to four hours was required to attain the apparent equilibrium of adsorption. The adsorption velocity at an early stage and the uptake of uranium at the final stage showed an increase in proportion to a rise in the adsorption temperature. In the experiment of adsorption for which sodium chloride solution was used, the linear relationship between the logarithm of the distribution coefficient (K sub(d)) and the pH of the solution was recognized. The uptake of the uranium from the solution at the pH of 12 increased as the carbonate ion concentration in the solution decreased. The uranyl ion in the natural sea water was assumed to be uranyl carbonate complex ion (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- ). As the result of the calculation conducted by using the formation constants for uranyl complexes in literature, it was found that uranyl hydroxo complex ion (UO 2 (OH) 3 - ) increased in line with a decrease of the carbonate ion concentration in the solution. The above results of the experiment suggested that the adsorption of uranium by the adsorbent (C-Al-OH) was cationic adsorption or hydrolysis adsorption being related with the active proton on the surface of the adsorbent. (auth.)

  1. A low cost, light weight cenosphere–aluminium composite for brake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The commonly used composite material for brake rotor consists of silicon carbide (SiC) or aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particles which are more expensive. The weight of conventionally used composite is more compared to base alloy. The aim of this paper is to develop a light weight material for brake disc applications ...

  2. A low cost, light weight cenosphere–aluminium composite for brake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... The commonly used composite material for brake rotor consists of silicon carbide (SiC) or aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particles which are more expensive. The weight of conventionally used composite is more compared to base alloy. The aim of this paper is to develop a light weight material for brake disc ...

  3. Microwave Processed Multifunctional Polymer Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified polymer matrix composites (PMCs) as a critical need for launch and in-space vehicles, but the significant costs of such materials limits their...

  4. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  5. Study on fracture behaviour of Hybrid Aluminium Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan D. B.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work makes an attempt to study of fracture behaviour of hybrid Composite reinforced with hard ceramic Boron carbide as primary phase and secondary phase as soft solid lubricant Molybdenum Disulphide with base matrix Al2219 by two stage stir casting method is incorporated. Compact tension type specimen was utilized for test and dimensions are conformity to ASTM E-647.Fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness test conducted as per ASTM Standard E-399 and E-1820. This study discloses that reinforcing the hard ceramic Boron Carbide of constant 3wt% and soft solid lubricant Molybdenum Disulphide with increasing wt% of 3%, 4%, 5% to Al2219, results increase in energy required to open the crack front to create two new crack surfaces during mode-I type failure and also significantly variation of fracture toughness. Surface of fractured specimens were study under scanning electron microscope and observes that pulled regions tiny dimples results in balance between ductility and strength of prepared hybrid composite.

  6. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  7. Microlevel thermal effects in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    A method for studying the influence of thermal effects on the inelastic response of metal matrix composites is reviewed. A micromechanics approach based upon the method of cells is shown to be quite versatile for studying a variety of materials response phenomena. Yielding and inelastic response of the composite are predicted as functions of thermal stresses, yielding of the matrix, and imperfect fiber/matrix bonding. Results are presented in the form of yield surfaces and nonlinear stress-strain curves for unidirectional and laminated boron/aluminum and silicon-carbide/titanium.

  8. Processing and characterization of aluminium alloys or composites exhibiting low-temperature or high-rate superplasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Wide applications of superplastic forming still face several problems, one is the high temperature that promotes grain growth, another is the low forming rate that makes economically inefficient. The current study is intended to develop a series of fabrication and thermomechanical processing, so as to result in materials possessing either low temperature superplasticity (LTSP) or high rate superplasticity (HRSP). The former has been achieved in the cast Al alloys, while the latter was accomplished in powder-metallurgy aluminium matrix composites. The aluminium alloys, after special thermomechanical processes, exhibited LTSP from 300 to 450 degree C with elongations varying from 300 to 700 %. The LTSP sheets after 700 % elongation at 350 degree C still possessed fine grains 3.7 μm size and narrow surface solute depletion zones 11 μm in with, resulting in a post-SP T6 strength of 500 MPa, significantly higher than that of the HTSP superplasticity alloys tested at 525 degree C or above. Meanwhile, it was found that LTSP materials may be transferred into HTSP materials simply by adding a preloading at 300-400 degree C for a small amount of work. As for the endeavor in making HRSP materials, 2024Al/SiC, 6061Al/SiC and Al/Al 3 Ti systems processed by powder metallurgy or mechanical alloying methods are under investigation. The average sizes of the reinforcing SiC or A13Ti particles, as well as the grain size are all around 1 μm. The aluminium composites have exhibited HRSP at 525-620 degree C and 10 -2 -10 -1 s -l , with elongations varying from 150 to 350 %. This ultimate goal is to produce an alloy or composite exhibiting low temperature and high strain rate superplasticity (LT and HRSP). (author)

  9. The effects of stacking sequence and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of laminate composites of aluminium-epoxy/basalt-glass fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi Azghan, Mehdi; Eslami-Farsani, Reza

    2018-02-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the effects of different stacking sequences and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of fibre metal laminates (FMLs). FMLs were composed of two aluminium alloy 2024-T3 sheets and epoxy polymer-matrix composites that have four layers of basalt and/or glass fibres with five different stacking sequences. For FML samples the thermal cycle time was about 6 min for temperature cycles from 25 °C to 115 °C. Flexural properties of samples evaluated after 55 thermal cycles and compared to non-exposed samples. Surface modification of aluminium performed by electrochemical treatment (anodizing) method and aluminium surfaces have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Also, the flexural failure mechanisms investigated by the optical microscope study of fractured surfaces. SEM images indicated that the porosity of the aluminium surface increased after anodizing process. The findings of the present study showed that flexural modulus were maximum for basalt fibres based FML, minimum for glass fibres based FML while basalt/glass fibres based FML lies between them. Due to change in the failure mechanism of basalt/glass fibres based FMLs that have glass fibres at outer layer of the polymer composite, the flexural strength of this FML is lower than glass and basalt fibres based FML. After thermal cycling, due to the good thermal properties of basalt fibres, flexural properties of basalt fibres based FML structures decreased less than other composites.

  10. A low cost, light weight cenosphere–aluminium composite for brake ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. A low cost, light weight cenosphere–aluminium composite for brake disc application. V Saravanan P R Thyla S R Balakrishnan. Volume 39 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 299-305 ...

  11. Advanced ceramic matrix composites for high energy x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    High energy x-ray targets are the anodes used in high performance tubes, designed to work for long operating times and at high power. Such tubes are used in computed tomography (CT) scan machines. Usually the tubes used in CT scanners have to continuously work at high temperatures and for longer scan durations in order to get maximum information during a single scan. These anodes are composed of a refractory substrate which supports a refractory metallic coating. The present work is a review of the development of a ceramic metal composite based on aluminium nitride (AlN) and molybdenum for potential application as the substrate. This composite is surface engineered by coating with tungsten, the most popular material for high energy x-ray targets. To spray metallic coatings on the surface of ceramic matrix composites dc blown arc plasma is employed. The objective is to increase the performance and the life of an x-ray tube. Aluminium nitride-molybdenum ceramic matrix composites were produced by uniaxial hotpressing mixtures of AlN and Mo powders. These composites were characterized for their mechanical, thermal, electrical and micro-structural properties. An optimized composition was selected which contained 25 vol.% of metallic phase dispersed in the AlN matrix. These composites were produced in the actual size of an anode and coated with tungsten through dc blown arc plasma spraying. The results have shown that sintering of large size anodes is possible through uniaxial pressing, using a modified sintering cycle

  12. The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behaviour of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Y.; Ozdin, K.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behavior of the SiC particle-reinforced aluminium composites produced by liquid metallurgy was investigated under different sizes of SiC grits at a fixed speed. The results show that the wear loss of composite was considerably lower than that of aluminium alloy. The wear loss increased linearly with sliding distance for both materials, but indicating a considerable difference. It increased with increasing SiC abrasive particles. Moreover, SEM examination indicates that abrasive wear observed for the matrix alloy. The depth of wear grooves decreased with decreasing the abrasive particle size and load. For the composites, wear surfaces were found to be a quite smooth indicating that no abrasive grooves appeared

  13. COMPOSITION OF FOWLPOX VIRUS AND INCLUSION MATRIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RANDALL, C C; GAFFORD, L G; DARLINGTON, R W; HYDE, J

    1964-04-01

    Randall, Charles C. (University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson), Lanelle G. Gafford, Robert W. Darlington, and James M. Hyde. Composition of fowlpox virus and inclusion matrix. J. Bacteriol. 87:939-944. 1964.-Inclusion bodies of fowlpox virus infection are especially favorable starting material for the isolation of virus and inclusion matrix. Electron micrographs of viral particles and matrix indicated a high degree of purification. Density-gradient centrifugation of virus in cesium chloride and potassium tartrate was unsatisfactory because of inactivation, and clumping or disintegration. Chemical analyses of virus and matrix revealed significant amounts of lipid, protein, and deoxyribonucleic acid, but no ribonucleic acid or carbohydrate. Approximately 47% of the weight of the virus and 83% of the matrix were extractable in chloroform-methanol. The lipid partitions of the petroleum ether extracts were similar, except that the phospholipid content of the matrix was 2.2 times that of the virus. Viral particles were sensitive to diethyl ether and chloroform.

  14. Formation of Composite Surface during Friction Surfacing of Steel with Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Janakiraman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial pure aluminium was deposited on medium carbon steel using friction surfacing route. An aluminium rod was used as the consumable tool. Normal load and tool rotation speed were the variables. Under certain combinations of load and speed the deposition was continuous and uniform. The deposit consisted of Al embedded with fine particles of iron. The interface between substrate material and deposited material was smooth and relatively small. A mechanism is discussed for formation of a composite surface on the steel substrate.

  15. Influence of Heat Treatment on Abrasive Wear Resistance of Silumin Matrix Composite Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors attempted at examining the effect of heat treatment on abrasive wear resistance of metal composite castings. Metal matrix composites were made by infiltrating preforms created from unordered short fibers (graphite or silumin with liquid aluminium alloy AlSi12(b. Thus prepared composites were subject to solution heat treatment at a temperature of 520°C for four hours, then aging at a temperature of 220°C for four hours. Abrasion resistance of the material was tested before and after thermal treatment.

  16. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  17. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Metal Matrix Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Current trends in the mechanics and energy industries impose increasing demands on metallic materials, combining elevated service temperatures and severe mechanical solicitations. Metal matrix composite coatings with ceramic reinforcements are good candidates in view of fulfilling the requirements for an improved mechanical durability, and for other complex functions (e.g. self-lubrication, biocompatibility...). First of all, this paper provides an introduction to metal matrix compos...

  18. Optimization of epoxy-aluminium composites used in cryosorption pumps by thermal conductivity studies from 4.5 K to 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, R.; Shivaprakash, N. C.; Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, U.

    2017-12-01

    Cryosorption pump is a capture vacuum pump which retains gas molecules by chemical or physical interaction on their internal surfaces when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Cryosorption pumps are the only solution in nuclear fusion systems to achieve high vacuum in the environment of hydrogen and helium. An important aspect of this development is the proper adhesion of the activated carbons on the metallic panels using a high thermal conductivity and high bonding strength adhesive. Typical adhesives used are epoxy based. The thermal conductivity of the adhesive can be improved by using fine aluminium powder as the filler in the base epoxy matrix. However, the thermal conductivity data of such epoxy-aluminium composites is not available in literature. Hence, we have measured the thermal conductivities of the above epoxy-aluminium composites (with varied volume fraction of aluminium in epoxy) in the temperature range from 4.5 K to 300 K using a G-M cryocooler based thermal conductivity experimental set-up. The experimental results are discussed in this paper which will be useful towards the development of cryosoprtion pumps with high pumping speeds.

  19. SYNTHESIS OF FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINIUM COMPOSITE AND INVESTIGATION ON ITS ABRASION WEAR BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. RADHIKA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Functionally graded aluminium (Al-Si5Cu3 metal matrix composite reinforced with 10 wt-percent of boron carbide particles having average size of 33 µm was synthesized through horizontal centrifugal casting method. The specimen of length 150 mm and outer diameter of 154 mm with the thickness of 20 mm was produced under the centrifuging speed of 1000 rpm. Composite specimens were prepared as per ASTM standards from the casting and subjected to microstructural evaluation, hardness testing and three body abrasion wear test. The microstructural observation was done on the surfaces at the distance of 1, 2.5, 10 and 15 mm from the outer periphery of the casting and the result shows that larger amount of particles observed at distance of 2.5 mm and very less particles observed at the distance of 15 mm. The hardness test was conducted on the different surfaces in the radial direction from the outer periphery and found decrease in hardness from 2.5 to 15 mm. The abrasion wear test was conducted using dry abrasion tester for various loads of 28, 40 and 52 N at different distances from the outer periphery of the casting and the results revealed that wear rate gradually increases when moving towards the inner periphery and also with the increasing load. Therefore higher wear resistance was observed at the outer periphery and the lower wear resistance was obtained at the inner periphery. This property makes them suitable for using in wear applications such as in cylinder liners.

  20. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  1. Drilling of polymer-matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaraj, Vijayan; Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composites are recognised as good candidates for structural components due to their inherent properties. However, they present several kinds of damages while creating holes for assembly. Delamination is considered the most serious damage since it reduces service life of the component. Thrust and delamination can be controlled by proper drill point geometry. Drilling at high speed is also a current requirement of the aerospace industry. This book focus on drilling of polymer matrix composites for aerospace and defence applications. The book presents introduction to machining of polymer composites and discusses drilling as a processing of composites.

  2. Three body abrasion of laser surface alloyed aluminium AA1200

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4 kW Nd:YAG laser to improve the abrasion wear resistance. Aluminium surfaces reinforced with metal matrix composites and intermetallic phases were achieved. The phases present depended...

  3. Comparison of Energy Absorption of Aluminium-composite Tubes Subjected to Axial Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Tahir; Ya, H. H.; Zaki Abdullah, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, energy absorption capability and failure modes of partially wrapped aluminium tubes have been studied. These tubes are used in the front side of automobiles and aircraft applications. Filament winding technique was used for partial wrapping of these tubes. Partially wrapping on the external surface of aluminium tubes was done with glass fibers, and epoxy resin, which is a composite material. Various composite layers and fiber angles were used in partial wrapping, which includes 4, 6 and 8 composite layers of ± 55° fiber angle. These tubes were subjected to axial crushing using the universal ‎testing machine, and testing speed was 5mm/min. Failure modes and energy absorption analysis were carried out after testing. The experimental results revealed that partially wrapped aluminium tubes are 3.81%, 8.13% and 17.06% more efficient in energy absorption as compared to the tubes without wrapping. Furthermore, the effect of composite layers and failure modes has also been described.

  4. Ceramic matrix composites by microwave assisted CVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) processes for producing continuously reinforced ceramic composites are reviewed. Potential advantages of microwave assisted CVI are noted and numerical studies of microwave assisted CVI are reviewed. The models predict inverted thermal gradients in fibrous ceramic preforms subjected to microwave radiation and suggest processing strategies for achieving uniformly dense composites. Comparisons are made to experimental results on silicon-based composite systems. The role played by the relative ability of fiber and matrix to dissipate microwave energy is noted. Results suggest that microwave induced inverted gradients can be exploited to promote inside-out densification. 10 refs., 2 figs

  5. CMH-17 Volume 5 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulonis, Rachael; Kiser, J. Douglas; David, Kaia E.; Davies, Curtis; Ashforth, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of issues must be addressed during the process of certifying CMC (ceramic matrix composite) components for use in commercial aircraft. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5, Revision A on ceramic matrix composites has just been revised to help support FAA certification of CMCs for elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 contains detailed sections describing CMC materials processing, design analysis guidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the content of this latest revision will be presented along with a description of how CMH-17, Volume 5 could be used by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and others in the future.

  6. Estimation of the mechanical properties of aluminium and an aluminium composite after equal channel angular pressing by means of the small punch test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobeš, Ferdinand; Dymáček, Petr; Besterci, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 626, FEB (2015), s. 313-321 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1452; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Mechanical characterization * Aluminium alloys * Composites * Equal channel angular processing * Grain refinement Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.647, year: 2015

  7. Effect of type and percentage of reinforcement for optimization of the cutting force in turning of Aluminium matrix nanocomposites using response surface methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyadarshi, Devinder [DAV Institute of Engineering and Technology, Jalandhar (India); Sharma, Rajesh Kumar [Institute of Technology, Hamirpur (India)

    2016-03-15

    Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs) now hold a significant share of raw materials in many applications. It is of prime importance to study the machinability of such composites so as to enhance their applicability. Sufficient work has been done for studying the machining of AMCs with particle reinforcements of micron range. This paper presents the study of AMCs with particle reinforcement of under micron range i.e. nanoparticles. This paper brings out the results of an experimental investigation of type and weight percent of nanoparticles on the tangential cutting force during turning operation. SiC, Gr and SiC-Gr (in equal proportions) were used with Al-6061 alloy as the matrix phase. The results indicate that composites with SiC require greater cutting force followed by hybrid and then Gr. Increase in the weight percent also significantly affected the magnitude of cutting force. RSM was used first to design and analyze the experiments and then to optimize the turning process and obtain optimal conditions of weight and type of reinforcements for turning operation.

  8. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslain, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  9. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naslain, R, E-mail: naslain@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [University of Bordeaux 3, Allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2011-10-29

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  10. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naslain, R

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  11. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  12. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  13. Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with coconut fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Gelfuso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with treated coconut fibers were produced. Fibers chemically treated (alkalization-CCUV samples or mechanically treated (ultrasonic shockwave-CMUV samples were dried using UV radiation. The goal was to combine low cost and eco-friendly treatments to improve fiber-matrix adhesion. Composite samples containing up to 20 vol. (% of untreated and treated coconut fibers were taken from boxes fabricated by injection molding. Water absorption and mechanical properties were investigated according to ASTM D570-98 and ASTM D638-03, respectively. Electrical characterizations were carried out to identify applications of these composites in the electrical sector. NBR 10296-Electrical Tracking Standard (specific to industry applications and conductivity measurements were obtained applying 5 kV DC to the samples. CMUV samples containing 5 vol. (% fiber presented superior tensile strength values (σ~28 MPa compared to the untreated fibers composite (σ~22 MPa or alkali treatment (σ~24 MPa. However, CMUV composites containing 10 vol. (% fiber presented best results for the electrical tracking test and electrical resistivity (3 × 10(7 Ω.m. The results suggest that composites reinforced with mechanically treated coconut fibers are suitable for electrical applications.

  14. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 {mu}m. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  15. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 μm. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  16. Fatigue Behavior of a Functionally-Graded Titanium Matrix Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Scott R

    2005-01-01

    Functionally-graded Titanium Matrix Composites are an attempt to utilize the high-strength properties of a titanium matrix composite with a monolithic alloy having the more practical machining qualities...

  17. Optimization of Squeeze Casting Process Parameters Using Taguchi in LM13 Matrix B4C Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhil, K. T.; Arul, Sanjivi

    2018-02-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composite has widely used in aerospace and automobile industry due to its high strength to weight ratio. Aluminium LM13 matrix B4C reinforced composites are mainly manufactured by Squeeze casting process. The present work optimizes squeeze casting process parameters using Taguchi method. The control factors used for the experiments were Squeeze Pressure, Die Preheat Temperature and weight percentage of Boron Carbide (B4C) along with multiple performance characteristic of Hardness, Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) and Yield Strength (YS). The L27 orthogonal array was used for experimental design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to determine the significant factor and found out that Squeeze pressure is the most significant factor followed by percentage of B4C.

  18. Machining parameters optimization during machining of Al/5 wt% alumina metal matrix composite by fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Arindam; Patil, Pravin

    2017-06-01

    This experimental work presents the study of machining parameters of Ytterbium fiber laser during machining of 5 mm thick Aluminium/5wt%Alumina-MMC (Metal Matrix Composite). Response surface methodology (RSM) is used to achieve the optimization i.e. minimize hole tapering and maximize Material Removal Rate (MRR). A mathematical model has been developed and ANOVA has been done for correlating the interactive and higher-order influences of Ytterbium fiber laser machining parameters (laser power, modulation frequency, gas pressure, wait time, pulse width) on Material Removal Rate (MRR) and hole tapering during machining process.

  19. [Effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming-yi; Zhang, Xiu-yin

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker (ABW). ABW was surface-treated with 0%, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% silan coupling agent (γ-MPS), and mixed with resin matrix to synthesize 5 groups of composite resins. After heat-cured at 120 degrees centigrade for 1 h, specimens were tested in three-point flexure to measure strength according to ISO-4049. One specimen was selected randomly from each group and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed with SAS 9.2 software package. The flexural strength (117.93±11.9 Mpa) of the group treated with 2% silane coupling agent was the highest, and significantly different from that of the other 4 groups (α=0.01). The amount of silane coupling agent has impact on the flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with whiskers; The flexual strength will be reduced whenever the amount is higher or lower than the threshold. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (08DZ2271100).

  20. Microstructural evolution in WC-Co cermet reinforced - A17075 metal matrix composites by stir casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Krishna, U. B.; Ranganatha, P.; Auradi, V.; Mahendra Kumar, S.; Vasudeva, B.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMCs) are preferred because of their enhanced properties like high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop cermet (WC-Co) reinforced with Al7075 metal matrix composite by stir casting technique. WC-Co cermet is reduced to an average size of 10μm through ball milling using Alumina as grinding media. Ball milled WC-Co Cermet in an amount of 6 wt. % is used as reinforcement in Al7075 matrix. Microstructural characterization of the prepared composites is carried out using SEM/EDX and XRD studies. X-ray diffraction studies have revealed the peaks corresponding to α-Al, WC, Co and minor Al5W phases. SEM/EDX characterization revealed the uniform distribution of cermet in Al matrix. Further studies also revealed that, addition of WC-Co cermet to Al7075 matrix has resulted in improvement in hardness and Densities of Al7075 matrix.

  1. Influence of cold rolling and fatigue on the residual stress state of a metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanus, E.; Ericsson, T.; Lu, J.; Decomps, F.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the matrix alloy and the particle in a metal matrix composite gives rise to residual stresses in the material. In the present work the effect of cold rolling and four-point bending fatigue on the residual stress state of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminium alloy (AA 2014) has been investigated. The three dimensional stress state measured in both phases: matrix and reinforcement, has been determined by using an X-ray diffraction technique. It was found that cold rolling induces surface compressive macrostresses of about -250 MPa, with a penetration depth around 2 mm. The absolute values of the pseudomacrostresses in both phases are significantly reduced due to the single track rolling. Stress relaxation occurs during four-point bending fatigue. (orig.)

  2. Fracture behaviour of brittle (glass) matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, - (2005), s. 115-122 ISSN 0255-5476. [International Conference on Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture /4./. Brno, 23.06.2004-25.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Ceramic matrix composite s * fracture toughness * toughening effects Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  3. Process optimization in Nd:YAG laser microdrilling of alumina–aluminium interpenetrating phase composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjib Biswas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In laser beam micromachining process, the quality of the drilled hole is of great importance. The quality of the microdrilled hole mainly depends on appropriate selection of process parameters. Predefined diameter of hole with minimum taper is of today's demand. The composite used for microdrilling operation is alumina–aluminium (Al2O3–Al interpenetrating phase composite (IPC, which is widely used in aircraft and space stations. Until date, no experimental study has been done to obtain microdrilled hole of desired diameter. In the present paper three hole qualities such as hole diameter at entry, at exit and hole taper have been optimized individually as well as simultaneously using a central composite design (CCD based on response surface methodology (RSM during pulsed Nd:YAG laser microdrilling operation on alumina–aluminium IPC sheet of 1.14 mm thickness. The analysis of variance (ANOVA test has also been done to identify the process parameters that contributed the most to get desired hole quality.

  4. Characterization of Hybrid CNT Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Pressley, James; Sauti, Godfrey; Czabaj, Michael W.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied extensively since their discovery and demonstrated at the nanoscale superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties in comparison to micro and macro scale properties of conventional engineering materials. This combination of properties suggests their potential to enhance multi-functionality of composites in regions of primary structures on aerospace vehicles where lightweight materials with improved thermal and electrical conductivity are desirable. In this study, hybrid multifunctional polymer matrix composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets into Hexcel® IM7/8552 prepreg, a well-characterized toughened epoxy carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite. The resin content of these interleaved CNT sheets, as well as ply stacking location were varied to determine the effects on the electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance of the composites. The direct-current electrical conductivity of the hybrid CNT composites was characterized by in-line and Montgomery four-probe methods. For [0](sub 20) laminates containing a single layer of CNT sheet between each ply of IM7/8552, in-plane electrical conductivity of the hybrid laminate increased significantly, while in-plane thermal conductivity increased only slightly in comparison to the control IM7/8552 laminates. Photo-microscopy and short beam shear (SBS) strength tests were used to characterize the consolidation quality of the fabricated laminates. Hybrid panels fabricated without any pretreatment of the CNT sheets resulted in a SBS strength reduction of 70 percent. Aligning the tubes and pre-infusing the CNT sheets with resin significantly improved the SBS strength of the hybrid composite To determine the cause of this performance reduction, Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness of the CNT sheet to CFRP interface was characterized by double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notch flexure (ENF) testing, respectively. Results are compared to the

  5. Fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Ipiña J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the fracture toughness in metal matrix composites (Duralcan reinforced with 15% of Al(20(3 and SiC are presented in this work. The application of Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics is discussed and the obtained values are compared with the ones obtained by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Results show that J IC derived K JC values are higher than the corresponding values obtained by direct application of the linear elastic methodology. The effect of a heat treatment on the material fracture toughness was also evaluated in which the analyzed approaches showed, not only different toughness values, but also opposite tendencies. A second comparison of the J IC and K JC values obtained in this work with toughness values reported in the literature is presented and discussed.

  6. Investigation and in situ removal of spatter generated during laser ablation of aluminium composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, A.C., E-mail: andrei.popescu@inflpr.ro [Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Delval, C.; Shadman, S.; Leparoux, M. [Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Study of spatter generated during laser irradiation of an aluminium nanocomposite. • Number of droplets was 1.5–3 times higher for laser in depth vs surface focused beams. • High speed imaging revealed particles exploding in flight similar to a fireworks effect. • Three methods were selected for droplets removal in situ and the results are analyzed. - Abstract: Spatter generated during laser irradiation of an aluminium alloy nanocomposite (AlMg5 reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles) was monitored by high speed imaging. Droplets trajectory and speed were assessed by computerized image analysis. The effects of laser peak power and laser focusing on the plume expansion and expulsed droplet speeds were studied in air or under argon flow. It was found that the velocity of visible droplets expulsed laterally or at the end of the plume emission from the metal surface was not dependent on the plasma plume speed. The neighbouring area of irradiation sites was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Droplets deposited on the surface were classified according to their size and counted using a digital image processing software. It was observed that the number of droplets on surface was 1.5–3 times higher when the laser beam was focused in depth as compared to focused beams, even though the populations average diameter were comparable. Three methods were selected for removing droplets in situ, during plume expansion: an argon gas jet crossing the plasma plume, a fused silica plate collector transparent to the laser wavelength placed parallel to the irradiated surface and a mask placed onto the aluminium composite surface. The argon gas jet was efficient only for low power irradiation conditions, the fused silica plate failed in all tested conditions and the mask was successful for all irradiation regimes.

  7. Effect of the particle size on the mechanical properties of 60 vol.% SiCp reinforced Al matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlatci, H.; Cimenoglu, H.; Candan, E.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the reinforcing particle size on the mechanical properties of 60 vol.% SiC reinforced aluminium matrix composites produced by the pressure infiltration technique was examined by compression, impact and wear tests. The compression strength and the impact resistance decreased with increasing reinforcing particle size. The composites exhibited different abrasion behaviour depending on the size of abrasive Al 2 O 3 grains. On fine abrasive Al 2 O 3 grains (85 μm), the abrasion resistance increased with increasing reinforcing SiC particle size. The contrary result was obtained on coarse abrasive Al 2 O 3 grains (250 μm). The wear test conducted on M2 quality tool steel revealed that reinforcing of aluminium with coarse SiC particles has a very beneficial effect on the wear resistance with respect to fine reinforcing SiC particles. (orig.)

  8. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  9. Multifunctional Metal Matrix Composite Filament Wound Tank Liners, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials offer tremendous potential for lightweight propellant and pressurant tankage for space applications. Thin MMC liners for COPVs...

  10. Development of Intelligent Processing Methodology for Intermetallic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs), reinforced with a dispersed ceramic phase, will be incorporated into metallic matrices to serve as reinforcing entities within the resulting multi-lithic reinforced composite (MRC...

  11. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Aluminium and Copper Composite Coatings Deposited by LPCS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnicki M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study of microstructure and corrosion resistance of composite coatings (Al+Al2O3 and Cu+Al2O3 deposited by Low Pressure Cold Spraying method (LPCS. The atmospheric corrosion resistance was examined by subjecting the samples to cyclic salt spray and Kesternich test chambers, with NaCl and SO2 atmospheres, respectively. The selected tests allowed reflecting the actual working conditions of the coatings. The analysis showed very satisfactory results for copper coatings. After eighteen cycles, with a total time of 432 hours, the samples show little signs of corrosion. Due to their greater susceptibility to chloride ions, aluminium coatings have significant corrosion losses.

  12. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  13. Fiber-Matrix Interphase Development in Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rellick, G

    1998-01-01

    In carbon/carbon (C/C) composites-i.e., a composite in which a carbon matrix is reinforced with carbon fiber when the matrix is derived from a thermosetting resin, we always observe a distinct, highly graphitizable, and well-oriented...

  14. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of

  15. Nondestructive Characterization of Two-Phase Metal-Matrix Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    to a time standard. The alloys 1100. 3003. 5052 , 6061. and 2024. Aluminium specific technique may utilise a standin,-wave pat- alloys that contain...obtained for rolled ferritic steel sheets, rolled ferritic steel plates and for extruded metal-matrix composites of the aluminium alloys Al-8091, Al-7064...and Salama Table 1. Chemical composition of aluminium alloyvs and volhme percentage of SiC reinforcement of the MNIC-specimens Alloying Elements Alloy

  16. Investigations on thermal properties, stress and deformation of Al/SiC metal matrix composite based on finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ramesh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AlSiC is a metal matrix composite which comprises of aluminium matrix with silicon carbide particles. It is characterized by high thermal conductivity (180-200 W/m K, and its thermal expansion are attuned to match other important materials that finds enormous demand in industrial sectors. Although its application is very common, the physics behind the Al-SiC formation, functionality and behaviors are intricate owing to the temperature gradient of hundreds of degrees, over the volume, occurring on a time scale of a few seconds, involving multiple phases. In this study, various physical, metallurgical and numerical aspects such as equation of continuum for thermal, stress and deformation using finite element (FE matrix formulation, temperature dependent material properties, are analyzed. Modelling and simulation studies of Al/SiC composites are a preliminary attempt to view this research work from computational point of view.

  17. Modeling the Stress Strain Behavior of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    Woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites represent one of the most mature composite systems to date. Future components fabricated out of these woven ceramic matrix composites are expected to vary in shape, curvature, architecture, and thickness. The design of future components using woven ceramic matrix composites necessitates a modeling approach that can account for these variations which are physically controlled by local constituent contents and architecture. Research over the years supported primarily by NASA Glenn Research Center has led to the development of simple mechanistic-based models that can describe the entire stress-strain curve for composite systems fabricated with chemical vapor infiltrated matrices and melt-infiltrated matrices for a wide range of constituent content and architecture. Several examples will be presented that demonstrate the approach to modeling which incorporates a thorough understanding of the stress-dependent matrix cracking properties of the composite system.

  18. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of microPCMs have been fabricated using the in situ polymerization with various core/shell ratio and average diameter; the thermal conductivity of microPCMs/epoxy composites were investigated in detai...

  19. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different composite nanolubricant concentrations on Aluminium 2024 plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, N. N. M.; Azmi, W. H.; Redhwan, A. A. M.; Sharif, M. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Wear of sliding parts and operational machine consistency enhancement can be avoided with good lubrication. Lubrication reduce wear between two contacting and sliding surfaces and decrease the frictional power losses in compressor. The coefficient of friction and wear rate effects study were carried out to measure the friction and anti-wear abilities of Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants a new type of compressor lubricant to enhanced the compressor performances. The tribology test rig employing reciprocating test conditions to replicate a piston ring contact in the compressor was used to measure the coefficient of friction and wear rate. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different Al2O3-SiO2/PAG composite nanolubricants of Aluminium 2024 plate for 10-kg load at different speed were investigated. Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG 46) lubricant using two-steps method of preparation. The result shows that the coefficient friction and wear rate of composite nanolubricants decreased compared to pure lubricant. The maximum reduction achievement for friction of coefficient and wear rate by Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants by 4.78% and 12.96% with 0.06% volume concentration. Therefore, 0.06% volume concentration is selected as the most enhanced composite nanolubricants with effective coefficient of friction and wear rate reduction compared to other volume concentrations. Thus, it is recommended to be used as the compressor lubrication to enhanced compressor performances.

  20. Thermal residual stresses in SiC particle reinforced aluminium composites: a study by the Taylor-based nonlocal theory of plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D. F.; Liu, X.; Mei, H.; Lei, Z. T.; Liu, L. S.

    2013-03-01

    Strain gradient theories have been considered to be an effective means for capturing the size effects on ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCp), but the results predicted by them are significantly lower than the corresponding experimental data. One reason might be, that the thermal residual stresses caused by thermal contraction mismatch between the metal matrix and the ceramic particle were neglected in the numerical models. By incorporating the Taylor-based nonlocal theory (TNT) of plasticity, the finite element method (FEM) is applied in the present research, to investigate the effect of thermal residual stresses on the yield stress and average axial stresses of the aluminium matrix reinforced by silicon carbide particles (SiCp/Al). The elements of the matrix have been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code through its USER-ELEMENT (UEL) interface for TNT plasticity. Some comparisons with the associated literature demonstrate that the numerical model with the thermal residual stresses is more in agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  2. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  3. Effect of friction time on the properties of friction welded YSZ‐alumina composite and 6061 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday M. Basheer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of alumina 0, 25, 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ composite and 6061 aluminium alloy joints formed by friction welding. The alumina-YSZ composites were prepared through slip casting in plaster of Paris molds (POP and subsequently sintered at 1600°C, while the aluminium rods were machined down using a lathe machine to the dimension required. The welding process was carried out under different rotational speeds and friction times, while friction force (0.5 ton-force was kept constant. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the interface of the joints structure. The experimental results showed that the friction time has a significant effect on joint structure and mechanical properties.

  4. Matrix effect on leaching of Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) from epoxy resin based inner lacquer of aluminium tubes into semi-solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Uwe; Haverkamp, Jan Boris; Zapf, Thomas; Lipperheide, Cornelia

    2016-04-01

    To study the impact of different semi-solid dosage form components on the leaching of Bisphenol A (BPA) and Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) from the epoxy resin-based inner lacquer of aluminium tubes, the tubes were filled with different matrix preparations and stored at an elevated temperature. Despite compliance with the European Standards EN 15348 and EN 15766 on porosity and polymerisation of internal coatings of aluminium tubes, the commercially available tubes used in the study contained an increased amount of polymerisation residues, such as unbound BPA, BADGE and BADGE derivatives in the lacquer, as determined by acetonitrile extraction. Storage of Macrogol ointments in these tubes resulted in an almost quantitative migration of the unbound polymerisation residues from the coating into the ointment. In addition, due to alterations observed in the RP-HPLC chromatograms of the matrix spiked with BADGE and BADGE derivatives it is supposed that the leachates can react with formulation components. The contamination of the medicinal product by BPA, BADGE and BADGE derivatives can be precluded by using aluminium tubes with an internal lacquer with a low degree of unbound polymerisation residues. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peat, Tom, E-mail: tompeat12@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); McNutt, Philip [TWI Ltd., Granta Park, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom); Iqbal, Naveed [TWI Technology Centre, Wallis Way, Catcliff, Rotherham, S60 5TZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • WC-CoCr, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings were cold spray deposited on AA5083 and friction stir processed. • The SprayStirred WC-CoCr demonstrated a hardness increase of 100% over the cold sprayed coating. • As-deposited and SprayStirred coatings were examined under slurry erosion test conditions. • Mass and volume loss was measured following 20-min exposure to the slurry. • The WC-CoCr and Al2O3 demonstrated a reduction in volume loss of approx. 40% over the cold sprayed coating. - Abstract: This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide – cobalt chromium, chromium carbide – nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the

  6. Laser Assisted Machining of Metal Matrix Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal matrix composites (MMC's) are of great interest in aerospace applications where their high specific strength provides a weight saving alternative to standard...

  7. Ceramic Matrix Composite Environmental Barrier Coating Durability Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  8. Ceramic Matrix Composite Environmental Barrier Coating Durability Model, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  9. Fiber composite materials: A survey of fiber matrix interface mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Report is described which discusses mechanism of load transfer from matrix to fiber through interface and effects of interface on composite structural integrity. Theoretical considerations are supplemented with experimental data. General trends and significant points are illustrated graphically.

  10. Modern Nondestructive Test Methods for Army Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strand, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    .... Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are potentially good high-temperature structural materials because of their low density, high elastic moduli, high strength, and for those with weak interfaces, surprisingly good damage tolerance...

  11. MICRO-CRACK BEHAVIOUR IN POLYMER MATRIX OF PARTICULATE COMPOSITE: INFLUENCE OF NON-LINEAR MATRIX

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majer, Z.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 106, SUPPL. 3 (2012), S472-S473 ISSN 0009-2770 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : polymer matrix composite * fracture behaviour * non-linear matrix * micro-crack Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 0.453, year: 2012

  12. Modification of natural matrix lac-bagasse for matrix composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Nanik Dwi; Widjaya, Karna; Triyono

    2016-02-01

    Material technology continues to be developed in order to a material that is more efficient with composite technology is a combination of two or more materials to obtain the desired material properties. The objective of this research was to modification and characterize the natural matrix lac-bagasse as composite films. The first step, natural matrix lac was changed from solid to liquid using an ethanol as a solvent so the matrix homogenly. Natural matrix lac was modified by adding citric acid with concentration variation. Secondly, the bagasse delignification using acid hydrolysis method. The composite films natural matrix lac-bagasse were prepared with optimum modified the addition citric acid 5% (v/v) and delignification bagasse optimum at 1,5% (v/v) in hot press at 80°C 6 Kg/cm-1. Thirdly, composite films without and with modification were characterized functional group analysis using FTIR spectrophotometer and mechanical properties using Universal Testing Machine. The result of research showed natural matrix lac can be modified by reaction with citric acid. FTIR spectra showed without and with modification had functional groups wide absorption 3448 cm-1 group -OH, C=O ester strong on 1712 cm-1 and the methylene group -CH2 on absorption 1465 cm-1. The mechanical properties showed tensile strength 0,55 MPa and elongation at break of 0,95 %. So that composite films natural matrix lac can be made with reinforcement bagasse for material application.

  13. Review on preparation techniques of particle reinforced metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Bin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the investigation status of the techniques for preparation of metal matrix composites and the research outcomes achieved recently. The mechanisms, characteristics, application ranges and levels of development of these preparation techniques are analyzed. The advantages and the disadvantages of each technique are synthetically evaluated. Lastly, the future directions of research and the prospects for the preparation techniques of metal matrix composites are forecasted.

  14. Light weight polymer matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix is layed up, cured, and thermally aged at about 750.degree. F. in the presence of an inert gas. The heat treatment improves the structural integrity and alters the electrical conductivity of the materials. In the preferred embodiment PMR-15 polyimides and Celion-6000 graphite fibers are used.

  15. On low cycle fatigue in metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Ø; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    A numerical cell model analysis is used to study the development of fatigue damage in aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. The material is subjected to cyclic loading with either stress control or strain control, and the matrix material is represented by a cyclic plasticity model......, in which continuum damage mechanics is incorporated to model fatigue damage evolution. This material model uses a superposition of kinematic and isotropic hardening, and is able to account for the Bauschinger effect as well as ratchetting, mean stress relaxation, and cyclic hardening or softening. The cell...... model represents a material with transversely staggered fibres. With focus on low cyclic fatigue, the effect of different fibre aspect ratios, different triaxial stress states, and balanced as well as unbalanced cyclic loading is studied....

  16. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern......Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...

  17. Experimental study on mechanical behavior of fiber/matrix interface in metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Chiang, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    The technique SIEM(Speckle Interferometry with Electron Microscopy) was employed to quantitatively measure the deformation on the fiber/matrix interface in SCS-6/Ti-6-4 composite at a microscale level. The displacement field within the fiber/matrix interphase zone was determined by in-situ observation with sensitivity of 0.003(microm). The macro-mechanical properties were compared with micro-mechanical behavior. It is shown that the strength in the interphase zone is weaker than the matrix tensile strength. The deformation process can be characterized by the uniform deformation, interface strain concentration and debond, and matrix plastic deformation

  18. Effect of matrix cracking and material uncertainty on composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayathri, P.; Umesh, K.; Ganguli, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laminated composite plate model based on first order shear deformation theory is implemented using the finite element method. Matrix cracks are introduced into the finite element model by considering changes in the A, B and D matrices of composites. The effects of different boundary conditions, laminate types and ply angles on the behavior of composite plates with matrix cracks are studied. Finally, the effect of material property uncertainty, which is important for composite material on the composite plate, is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Probabilistic estimates of damage detection reliability in composite plates are made for static and dynamic measurements. It is found that the effect of uncertainty must be considered for accurate damage detection in composite structures. The estimates of variance obtained for observable system properties due to uncertainty can be used for developing more robust damage detection algorithms.

  19. Composition of microfouling on aluminium and fibre glass panels exposed in Agatti waters (Lakshadweep Island)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raveendran, T.V.; Sankaran, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    Rate of microfouling build-up was high during the initial periods of exposure of test surfaces but decreased with the increasing duration. Fibre glass surfaces showed higher deposition than those of aluminium. Carbohydrates and lipids were the major...

  20. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the latest efforts to develop aluminum nanocomposites with enhanced damping and mechanical properties and good workability. The nanocomposites exhibited high strength, improved damping behavior and good ductility, making them suitable for use as wires. Since the production of metal matrix nanocomposites by conventional melting processes is considered extremely problematic (because of the poor wettability of the nanoparticles), different powder metallurgy routes were investigated, including high-energy ball milling and unconventional compaction methods. Special attention was paid to the structural characterization at the micro- and nanoscale, as uniform nanoparticle dispersion in metal matrix is of prime importance. The aluminum nanocomposites displayed an ultrafine microstructure reinforced with alumina nanoparticles produced in situ or added ex situ. The physical, mechanical and functional characteristics of the materials produced were evaluated using different mechanical tests and micros...

  1. A Matrix Splitting Method for Composite Function Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Ganzhao

    2016-12-07

    Composite function minimization captures a wide spectrum of applications in both computer vision and machine learning. It includes bound constrained optimization and cardinality regularized optimization as special cases. This paper proposes and analyzes a new Matrix Splitting Method (MSM) for minimizing composite functions. It can be viewed as a generalization of the classical Gauss-Seidel method and the Successive Over-Relaxation method for solving linear systems in the literature. Incorporating a new Gaussian elimination procedure, the matrix splitting method achieves state-of-the-art performance. For convex problems, we establish the global convergence, convergence rate, and iteration complexity of MSM, while for non-convex problems, we prove its global convergence. Finally, we validate the performance of our matrix splitting method on two particular applications: nonnegative matrix factorization and cardinality regularized sparse coding. Extensive experiments show that our method outperforms existing composite function minimization techniques in term of both efficiency and efficacy.

  2. Magnesium Matrix Composite Foams—Density, Mechanical Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Cho

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Potential of widespread industrial applications of magnesium has been realized in recent years. A variety of magnesium alloy matrix composites are now being studied for mechanical properties. Since magnesium is the lightest structural metal, it can replace aluminum in existing applications for further weight savings. This review presents an overview of hollow particle filled magnesium matrix syntactic composite foams. Fly ash cenospheres are the most commonly used hollow particles for such applications. Fly ash cenospheres primarily have alumino-silicate composition and contain a large number of trace elements, which makes it challenging to study the interfacial reactions and microstructure in these composites. Microstructures of commonly studied AZ and ZC series magnesium alloys and their syntactic foams are discussed. Although only a few studies are available on these materials because of the nascent stage of this field, a comparison with similar aluminum matrix syntactic foams has provided insight into the properties and weight saving potential of magnesium matrix composites. Analysis shows that the magnesium matrix syntactic foams have higher yield strength at the same level of density compared to most other metal matrix syntactic foams. The comparison can guide future work and set goals that need to be achieved through materials selection and processing method development.

  3. Machinability study on discontinuously reinforced aluminium composites (DRACs using response surface methodology and Taguchi’s design of experiments under dry cutting condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raviraj Shetty1

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of metal matrix composites with discontinuous reinforcement represents a well-established method for improving the strength and stiffness of a material. This paper discusses the use of Taguchi’s design of experiments and response surface methodology (RSM for minimising the surface roughness in turning of discontinuously reinforced aluminium composites (DRACs having aluminum alloy 6061 as the matrix and containing 15 vol. % of silicon carbide particles with a mean diameter of 25µm under dry cutting condition. The measured results are then collected and analysed with the help of a commercial software package MINITAB15. The experiments are conducted using Taguchi’s experimental design technique. The matrices of test conditions include cutting speed, feed rates and depth of cut. The effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness is evaluated and the optimum cutting condition for minimising the surface roughness is determined. A second-order model is established between the cutting parameters and the surface roughness using RSM. The experimental results reveal that the most significant machining parameter for surface roughness is feed, followed by cutting speed. The predicted values and measured values are fairly close, which indicates that the developed model can be effectively used to predict the surface roughness in the machining of DRACs.

  4. Formation of Composite Surface during Friction Surfacing of Steel with Aluminium

    OpenAIRE

    Janakiraman, S.; Bhat, K. Udaya

    2012-01-01

    Commercial pure aluminium was deposited on medium carbon steel using friction surfacing route. An aluminium rod was used as the consumable tool. Normal load and tool rotation speed were the variables. Under certain combinations of load and speed the deposition was continuous and uniform. The deposit consisted of Al embedded with fine particles of iron. The interface between substrate material and deposited material was smooth and relatively small. A mechanism is discussed for formation of a ...

  5. The effect of surface pre-conditioning treatments on the local composition of Zr-based conversion coatings formed on aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezo, J.; Vandendael, I.; Posner, R.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Mol, J.M.C.; Terryn, H.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Field Emission Auger Electron Spectroscopy was used for local elemental analysis. • Acid and alkaline pre-conditioning treatments induces Cu-enrichment on AA6014. • A Cu-containing Zr-based conversion treatment for aluminium alloys was evaluated. • Cu-rich areas enhance the local formation of Zr-based conversion films on AA6014. • Thermal pre-conditioning treatments inhibits the formation of Zr-based coatings. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of different alkaline, acidic and thermal pre-conditioning treatments applied to different Al alloy surfaces. The obtained results are compared to the characteristics of Zr-based conversion coatings that were subsequently generated on top of these substrates. Focus is laid on typical elemental distributions on the sample surfaces, in particular on the amount of precipitated functional additives such as Cu species that are present in the substrate matrix as well as in the conversion bath solutions. To this aim, Field Emission Auger Electron spectra, depth profiles and surface maps with superior local resolution were acquired and compared to scanning electron microscopy images of the sample. The results show how de-alloying processes, which occur at and around intermetallic particles in the Al matrix during typical industrial alkaline or acidic cleaning procedures, provide a significant source of crystallization cores for any following coating processes. This is in particular due for Cu-species, as the resulting local Cu structures on the surface strongly affect the film formation and compositions of state-of-the-art Zr-based films. The findings are highly relevant for industrial treatments of aluminium surfaces, especially for those that undergo corrosion protection and painting process steps prior to usage.

  6. Composite Matrix Systems for Cryogenic Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As an alternative material to aluminum-lithium, cryotanks developed from fiber reinforced composites can offer significant weight savings in applications for fuel...

  7. Statistical model to predict dry sliding wear behaviour of Aluminium-Jute bast ash particulate composite produced by stir-casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambo Anthony VICTOR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A model to predict the dry sliding wear behaviour of Aluminium-Jute bast ash particulate composites produced by double stir-casting method was developed in terms of weight fraction of jute bast ash (JBA. Experiments were designed on the basis of the Design of Experiments (DOE technique. A 2k factorial, where k is the number of variables, with central composite second-order rotatable design was used to improve the reliability of results and to reduce the size of experimentation without loss of accuracy. The factors considered in this study were sliding velocity, sliding distance, normal load and mass fraction of JBA reinforcement in the matrix. The developed regression model was validated by statistical software MINITAB-R14 and statistical tool such as analysis of variance (ANOVA. It was found that the developed regression model could be effectively used to predict the wear rate at 95% confidence level. The wear rate of cast Al-JBAp composite decreased with an increase in the mass fraction of JBA and increased with an increase of the sliding velocity, sliding distance and normal load acting on the composite specimen.

  8. Exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (LM6/TIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum matrix composites (LM6/TiC) is a mix of excellent properties of aluminum casting alloy (LM6), and particles of (TiC) which make it the first choice in many applications like airplane and marine industries. During this research the extrudability and mechanical specifications of this composite (LM6/TiC) are ...

  9. Development and characterization of 430L matrix composites gradient materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maria Ruiz-Navas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new concept that is Functionally Gradient Materials (FGM. The materials developed in this work are constituted by a 430L matrix core and composite materials with this matrix and gradient concentration with NbC reinforcement, from the core to the surface, through different steps. Composite powders of different content in NbC were produced through high energy milling in order to obtain the gradient composition. The morphology and microhardness of these powders were characterised and subsequently were processed through conventional P/M techniques, pressing and sintering. The materials obtained show improved wear behaviour.

  10. The tensile failure modes of metal-matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M. A.; Wills, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The strengths of individual boron fibers extracted from various as-received and thermally fatigued aluminum alloy matrix materials were measured. The results are described in terms of a Weibull distribution, and strengths of composites fabricated from these fibers are calculated in terms of lower and upper bounds. Tests conducted on composite specimens indicated that strengths approaching the upper bounds can be achieved in composites fabricated by normal diffusion bonding techniques. Cyclic temperature changes effectively reduced the strength values toward the lower bounds. It was concluded that this effect resulted from the degradation of the strength of the fiber-matrix bond.

  11. Kinetics of the niobium dissolution in liquid aluminium, for in situ composite production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urtiga Filho, Severino L.; Robert, Maria Helena

    1996-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility of the production of composites in the system Al-Nb through the in situ formation of the reinforcement phase, i.e., the intermetallic Nb Al 3 . This composites are produced by the addition of metallic Nb to. The intermetallic is then formed when the Nb is dissolved into the liquid Al. The thermodynamic conditions, the dissolution kinetics and the mechanisms involved are investigated. Different test parameters (temperature and time) are used, with the aim of assessing the dissolution rate. Results show that the dissolution rate depends on the temperature and on stress condition which are induced by the dissolution process. Furthermore, the results also present the necessary conditions for the Nb dissolution to produce the intermetallic formation, which are dispersed in the Al matrix, in such a way that the composite shows a good dispersion of reinforcements. (author)

  12. Electrical and Thermal Properties of Glass Matrix-Al/sub 2/TiO/sub 5/ Composites Prepared at Low Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, L.J.; Wei, X.Y.; Wang, X.M.; LI, N.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the electrical and thermal properties of glass matrix composites filled with different amounts of aluminium titanate (Al/sub 2/TiO/sub 5/) powder varying from 5 to 15 wt. percent have been investigated. In order to optimize the processing route, some sintering strategies were tested. The densest specimens were obtained by less pressure of the sintering. The composites were characterized by means of SEM micrography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), dilatometry and impedance spectrometry. XRD results showed that the main crystallization phases were Wollastonite, Aluminium titanate, Rutile, and Alumina in all sintered glass matrix composites. It was also revealed that addition of 15 wt.% aluminium titanate has increased the relative density and decreased thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) (6.9*10/sup -6/degree C) and electrical conductivity (3.1*10/sup -4 Ohm.cm) in comparison with other composites. The results would be explained considering nature and concentration of the formed crystalline phases and their micro-structures. (author)

  13. Fatigue-Testing Apparatus for Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Leonard J.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical load cycling simulated in realistic fatigue tests. Efficient joining of metal matrix composite components to supporting structures is major concern facing users of these materials. Lewis Research Center designed and developed two thermal/mechancical fatigue test facilities, one to test metal matrix composite specimens and another to test compostite/metal attachment bond joints. Thermal/mechanical fatigue facility designed for testing metal matrix composites permits specimen-temperature excursions with controlled heating and loading rates. Second facility designed to test composite/metal attachment bond joints and to permit heating to maximum temperature of 1,400oC (760oC) within 10 min and cooling to 300oF (150oC) within 3 min. Facility has unique capabilities not found in other laboratories.

  14. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  15. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  16. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are ceramic materials, such as SiC, that have been reinforced by high strength fibers, such as carbon. Designers are interested in using ceramic matrix composites because they have the capability of withstanding significant loads while at relatively high temperatures (in excess of 1,000 C). Ceramic matrix composites retain the ceramic materials ability to withstand high temperatures, but also possess a much greater ductility and toughness. Their high strength and medium toughness is what makes them of so much interest to the aerospace community. This work concentrated on two different tasks. The first task was to do an extensive literature search into the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composite materials. This report contains the results of this task. The second task was to use this understanding to help interpret the ceramic matrix composite mechanical test results that had already been obtained by NASA. Since the specific details of these test results are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), they are reported in a separate document (Jordan, 1997).

  17. Improving Turbine Performance with Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Under the new NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, efforts are on-going within the Supersonics Project aimed at the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composites into hot section components of future gas turbine engines. Due to recent NASA advancements in SiC-based fibers and matrices, these composites are lighter and capable of much higher service temperatures than current metallic superalloys, which in turn will allow the engines to operate at higher efficiencies and reduced emissions. This presentation briefly reviews studies within Task 6.3.3 that are primarily aimed at developing physics-based concepts, tools, and process/property models for micro- and macro-structural design, fabrication, and lifing of SiC/SiC turbine components in general and airfoils in particular. Particular emphasis is currently being placed on understanding and modeling (1) creep effects on residual stress development within the component, (2) fiber architecture effects on key composite properties such as design strength, and (3) preform formation processes so that the optimum architectures can be implemented into complex-shaped components, such as turbine vanes and blades.

  18. Modelling of a cracked aluminium plate repaired with composite octagonal patch in mode I and mixed mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouinas, D.; Bachir Bouiadjra, B.; Achour, B.; Benderdouche, N.

    2009-01-01

    Adhesively bonded composite patch repair technique has been successfully applied in military aircraft repair and has recently been expanded to commercial aircraft industry. This technique is applied to extend the service life of cracked aluminium components. In this paper, the finite element method is applied to analyse the central crack's behaviour repaired by a boron/epoxy composite patch. The effects of the mechanical and geometrical properties of the patch on the variation of the stress intensity factor at the crack tip were highlighted. The obtained results show that the stress intensity factor at the crack tip, repaired by an octagonal patch of height 2c/3, is reduced by 5% with regard to the one repaired by an octagonal patch of size 'c'. For a height patch of c/3 the reduction is about 7%. The maximum reduction of composite patch of fibres in y-direction is about 30% compared to the aluminium patch. This reduction doubles when a composite patch of fibres in x-direction is used. The adhesive properties must be optimised to increase the performance of the repair of structures by such reinforcement

  19. 4TH International Conference on High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Topic to be covered include fibers, interfaces, interphases, non-oxide ceramic matrix composites, oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composites, coatings, and applications of high-temperature ceramic matrix...

  20. Analysis of Damage in a Ceramic Matrix Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Talreja, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of damage and the associated mechanical response are stud ied for a unidirectionally fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite subjected to uniaxial tensile loading parallel to fibers. A multi-stage development of damage is identified, and for each stage the governing mechanisms...... are discussed. For distributed matrix micro cracking a continuum damage model is used as the basis for describing the associated stress-strain behavior. A simplified analysis of frictional sliding at the fiber/matrix inter face is made to elucidate its effect on the stress-strain response....

  1. Phase composition and properties of rapidly cooled aluminium-zirconium-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovskaya, E.M.; Badalova, L.M.; Podd''yakova, E.I.; Kazakova, E.F.; Loboda, T.P.; Gribanov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Using the methods of physicochemical analysis the interaction of aluminium with zirconium and chromium is studied. Polythermal cross sections between Al 3 -Zr-Al 7 Cr and radial polythermal cross section from aluminium-rich corner with the ratio of components Zr:Cr=5:7 by mass are constructed. The effect of zirconium and chromium content on electrochemical characteristics of aluminium-base rapidly quenching alloys in systems Al-Cr, Al-Zr, Al-Cr-Zr. An increase in chromium concentration in oversaturated solid solution of Al-Cr system expands considerably the range of passive state. When Al 7 Cr phase appears the range of passive stae vanishes

  2. Fatigue and frictional heating in ceramic matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.K.; Sørensen, B.F.; Brøndsted, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set...... with a high spatial and temperature resolution and changes in the heat dissipation can be measured almost instantaneously. The technique has been tested on uni-directional ceramic matrix composites. Experimental results are shown and the possibilities and the limitations of the technique are discussed....

  3. Preparing polymeric matrix composites using an aqueous slurry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Towell, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An aqueous process was developed to prepare a consolidated composite laminate from an aqueous slurry. An aqueous poly(amic acid) surfactant solution was prepared by dissolving a poly(amic acid) powder in an aqueous ammonia solution. A polymeric powder was added to this solution to form a slurry. The slurry was deposited on carbon fiber to form a prepreg which was dried and stacked to form a composite laminate. The composite laminate was consolidated using pressure and was heated to form the polymeric matrix. The resulting composite laminate exhibited high fracture toughness and excellent consolidation.

  4. New bismaleimide matrix resins for graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M.-T. S.; Chen, T. S.; Parker, J. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Two new bismaleimide resins based on the N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have been synthesized and characterized. The mixtures of the two resins gave better handling, processing, mechanical, and thermal properties in graphite composites than did the individual resins. The mechanical strength of the cured graphite composites prepared from the 1:1 copolymer of the two bismaleimide resins was excellent at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites from the new bismaleimide matrix resin systems are compared with conventional composites based on epoxy and other bismaleimide systems. The copolymer system provides another method for improving bismaleimide resins.

  5. The effect of surface pre-conditioning treatments on the local composition of Zr-based conversion coatings formed on aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, J.; Vandendael, I.; Posner, R.; de Wit, J. H. W.; Mol, J. M. C.; Terryn, H.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of different alkaline, acidic and thermal pre-conditioning treatments applied to different Al alloy surfaces. The obtained results are compared to the characteristics of Zr-based conversion coatings that were subsequently generated on top of these substrates. Focus is laid on typical elemental distributions on the sample surfaces, in particular on the amount of precipitated functional additives such as Cu species that are present in the substrate matrix as well as in the conversion bath solutions. To this aim, Field Emission Auger Electron spectra, depth profiles and surface maps with superior local resolution were acquired and compared to scanning electron microscopy images of the sample. The results show how de-alloying processes, which occur at and around intermetallic particles in the Al matrix during typical industrial alkaline or acidic cleaning procedures, provide a significant source of crystallization cores for any following coating processes. This is in particular due for Cu-species, as the resulting local Cu structures on the surface strongly affect the film formation and compositions of state-of-the-art Zr-based films. The findings are highly relevant for industrial treatments of aluminium surfaces, especially for those that undergo corrosion protection and painting process steps prior to usage.

  6. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  7. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  8. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  9. Mechanical behaviour of a continuous fibre reinforced titanium matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, N.A.; Lovett, D.J.; Warwick, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    C/TiB2-coated SiC monofilament has been consolidated in a Ti-6Al-4V matrix. The composite shows strength greater than 1700 MPa and a stiffness of 210 GPa. Exposure to 865 C in vacuum leads to little strength loss after 3.25 hours. The strength of the composite after longer exposure at this temperature also has been studied and related to fracture behavior. 6 refs

  10. Metallic-fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevost, F.; Schnedecker, G.; Boncoeur, M.

    1994-01-01

    A refractory metal wire cloth is embedded in an oxide ceramic matrix, using a plasma spraying technology, in order to elaborate composite plates. When mechanically tested, the composite fails with a pseudo-ductile fracture mode whereas the ceramic alone is originally brittle. It exhibits a higher fracture strength, and remains in the form of a single piece even when straining is important. No further heat treatment is needed after the original processing to reach these characteristics. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs

  11. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  12. Debonding of short fibres among particulates in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2003-01-01

    A numerical analysis is carried out for the development of damage by fibre-matrix debonding in aluminium reinforced by aligned, short SiC fibres. A unit cell-model that has earlier been applied to study materials with arrays of transversely staggered fibres is here extended to contain a number...

  13. KS R41B. A high performance steel-aluminium composite material; KS R41B. Ein Stahl-Aluminium-Verbundwerkstoff fuer hohe Belastungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deicke, K. [KS Gleitlager GmbH (Germany). Bereich Metall; Matucha, H.; Schubert, W. [KS Gleitlager GmbH, St. Leon-Rot (Germany); Steffens, T. [KS Gleitlager GmbH, Neckarsulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Aluminium-tin alloys have been well-known for a long time and have proved to be suitable bearing materials for crankshaft bearings for many years. The known alloy AlZn4,5SiCuPb is one of the aluminium materials capable of sustaining the highest mechanical loads. In order to achieve optimum sliding properties, it would be necessary to increase the share of the soft lead phase in the alloy. This article by KS Gleitlager GmbH shows a reasonably priced manufacturing technology for high-performance aluminium-zinc-silicon-copper alloys. (orig.) [German] Die Aluminium-Zinn-Lagerlegierungen sind seit langem bekannt und haben sich seit Jahren als Lagerwerkstoff fuer Kurbelwellenlager bewaehrt. Die Legierung AlZn4,5SiCuPb gehoert zu den mechanisch am hoechsten belastbaren Aluminium-Werkstoffen. Um optimale Gleiteigenschaften zu erzielen, muesste in der Legierung der Anteil des weichen Bleis noch weiter erhoeht werden. Dieser Beitrag der KS Gleitlager GmbH zeigt eine kostenguenstige Herstelltechnologie fuer hochbelastbare Aluminium-Zink-Silizium-Kupfer-Legierungen. (orig.)

  14. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertzen, William Kirby [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Thermosetting polymer-matrix composites for structural repair applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, William Kirby

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporation of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Cement matrix composite construction features for production of waterproofing coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Суханевич, Марина Володимирівна

    2014-01-01

    It is investigated the properties of the matrix based on Portland cement, slag-contain and fly-ash- slag-contain cements modified with the addition of natural zeolite and complex additives consisting of carbon nanotubes in C-3 solution plasticizer as the main component of composite waterproofing material that is applied to wet concrete in the form of thin-layer coatings.

  18. exploration the extrudability of aluminum matrix composite (lm6/tic)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lanez

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... The first step includes alignment the die, billet, punch and press. In the second step, the press will push ... available as shafts from the works done by other researcher as shown in "Fig. 8". Length and diameter are reducing by ... Composite shafts before extrusion. In this work, the matrix is aluminum silicon ...

  19. The S-matrix for scattering of composite systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, P. van; Ruijgrok, Th.

    1967-01-01

    It is shown that the asymptotically stationary states, as introduced by Van Hove1), provide a natural tool to describe the scattering of composite systems. The scattering problem is formulated in terms of these a.s. states and a unitary S-matrix is defined. In this paper we treat the formal aspects

  20. Optically-transparent oxide fibre-reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Desimone, D.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Lee, W. E.; Koch, D.; Horvath, J.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 356, 44-49 (2010), s. 2591-2597 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : fracture toughness * glas matrix composites * light transmittance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2010

  1. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  2. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  3. Stainless steel matrix composites reinforced with AlCr{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, W.M. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (Brazil); Velasco, F.; Torralba, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of AlCr{sub 2} intermetallic addition to austenitic stainless steel powder on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of sintered specimens has been investigated. It has been recognised that loss of chromium at the grain boundaries of sintered stainless steel decreases its corrosion resistance. With the objective of decreasing this effect and to keep a stable passivity, the intermetallic AlCr{sub 2} in the form of powder was mixed with AISI 316L in different proportions. Samples of these materials were compacted at 700 MPa and sintered at 1120 C for 30 minutes in dissociated ammonia and vacuum. The mechanical properties, the corrosion resistance and the microstructure were studied. Composite materials sintered in dissociated ammonia achieve higher mechanical properties than sintered in vacuum. Studies realised by SEM suggest that metal matrix composites present an increase in the content of chromium, but in the grain boundaries exhibit a transient liquid phase produced by diffusion of aluminium from AlCr{sub 2}. (orig.) 13 refs.

  4. Update on CMH-17 Volume 5 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulonis, Rachael; Kiser, J. Douglas; David, Kaia E.; Davies, Curtis R.; Ashforth, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of issues must be addressed during the process of certifying CMC (ceramic matrix composite) components for use in commercial aircraft. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5, Revision A on ceramic matrix composites has just been revised to help support FAA certification of CMCs for elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 contains detailed sections describing CMC materialsprocessing design, analysisguidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the content of this latest revision will be presented along with a description of how CMH-17, Volume 5 could be used by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and others in the future.

  5. Research and development of advanced aluminium/graphite composites for thermal management applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wyszkowska, Edyta; Bertarelli, Alessandro

    Thermal management materials are continuously gaining importance as a consequence of everlasting evolution in performance of electronic and electric devices. In particular, by improving the heat exchanger’s materials' properties (i.e. thermal conductivity) it is possible to boost further performance and miniaturization of such devices. Due to their high thermal conductivity, Copper and Aluminium are currently the most commonly used materials for thermal management applications. However, the mismatch in thermal expansion between Cooper/Aluminium and Silicon is limiting the heat transfer at the interface between the electronic chip and the heat exchanger. Furthermore, Copper is indeed characterized by a high thermal conductivity but at the same time its high density (8.9 g/cm3) increases weight of the final product, which in most of the cases does not meet specific application requirements. High cost of these materials is another constraint which limits their application. Due to aforementioned facts, monolith...

  6. Analysis of Tribological Behaviour of Functionally Graded LM13 Aluminium/TiS2 Composite Using Design of Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Radhika

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Functionally graded LM13 aluminium/10wt% TiS2 composite was fabricated by centrifugal casting method and hollow cylindrical part has the dimension of 150x150x20 mm was obtained. The microstructural evaluation and vicker’s micro-hardness test was carried out on the surfaces at the distance of 1, 6, 12 and 18 mm from the outer surface of functionally graded composites. The microstructural investigation reveals that the TiS2 reinforcement particles concentrated more on the outer periphery and less at the inner periphery of the composite. The hardness of the composite surface increases at the particle rich region of outer periphery and decreases towards inner region. The dry sliding wear experiments were conducted on the composite specimens as per plan of Taguchi’s L16 orthogonal array design. The parameters considered were load, sliding velocity, sliding distance and distance from outer periphery of the composite, varied for four levels. Signal- to- Noise ratio and Analysis of Variance were carried out and the significance test revealed that distance from outer periphery had major impact (43.11 % followed by sliding distance (31.19 %, load (16.59 %, and sliding velocity (7.33 %. Adequacy of model was predicted through regression equation and the error was found to be less than 8 %. The scanning electron microscope analysis carried out for the worn-out surfaces showed maximum wear resistance of the functionally graded composite at outer periphery.

  7. Internal friction in a new kind of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Juan, J.; No, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new kind of metal matrix composites, based on powders of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) surrounded by an indium matrix, specifically designed to exhibit high mechanical damping. The damping properties have been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature between 150 and 400 K, frequency between 3 x 10 -3 and 3 Hz, and strain amplitude between 5 x 10 -6 and 10 -4 . The material exhibits, in some range of temperature, internal friction as high as 0.54. The extremely high damping is discussed in the light of the microstructure of the material, which has been characterized in parallel

  8. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  9. Laser cladding of wear resistant metal matrix composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, A.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coatings with wear-resistant properties as well as with a low friction coefficient are produced by laser cladding. The structure of these coatings is determined by required performance and realized as metal matrix composite (MMC), where solid lubricant serves as a ductile matrix (e.g. CuSn), reinforced by appropriate ceramic phase (e.g. WC/Co). One of the engineered coating with functionally graded material (FGM) structure has a dry friction coefficient 0.12. Coatings were produced by coaxial injection of powder blend into the zone of laser beam action. Metallographic and tribological examinations were carried out confirming the advanced performance of engineered coatings

  10. Research and development of advanced aluminium/graphite composites for thermal management applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wyszkowska, Edyta; Olejnik, Ewa; Bertarelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Thermal management materials are continuously gaining importance as a consequence of everlasting evolution in performance of electronic and electric devices. In particular, by improving the heat exchanger’s materials' properties (i.e. thermal conductivity) it is possible to boost further performance and miniaturization of such devices. Due to their high thermal conductivity, Copper and Aluminium are currently the most commonly used materials for thermal management applications. However, the m...

  11. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  12. Microstructure and composition of rare earth-transition metal-aluminium-magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Maria Carlotti Zarpelon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the microstructure and chemical composition of La0.7-xPr xMg0.3Al 0.3Mn0.4Co0.5 Ni3.8 (0 < x < 0.7 metal hydride alloys has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X ray analysis (EDX and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The substitution of La with Pr changed the grain structure from equiaxial to columnar. The relative atomic ratio of rare earth to (Al, Mn, Co, Ni in the matrix phase was 1:5 (LaNi5-type structure. Magnesium was detected only in two other phases present. A grey phase revealed 11 at.% Mg and the concentration ratios of other elements indicated the composition to be close to PrMgNi4. A dark phase was very heterogeneous in composition, attributed to the as-cast state of these alloys. The phases identified by XRD analysis in the La0.7Mg0.3Al0.3Mn0.4Co 0.5Ni3.8 alloy were: La(Ni,Co5, LaAl(Ni,Co4, La2(Ni,Co7 and AlMn(Ni,Co2. Praseodymium favors the formation of a phase with a PuNi3-type structure. Cobalt substituted Ni in the structures and yielded phases of the type: Pr(Ni,Co5 and Pr(Ni,Co3.

  13. Development and Characterisation of Aluminium Matrix Nanocomposites AlSi10Mg/MgAl2O4 by Laser Powder Bed Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Marchese

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, additive manufacturing techniques have been gaining attention for the fabrication of parts from aluminium alloys to composites. In this work, the processing of an AlSi10Mg based composite reinforced with 0.5% in weight of MgAl2O4 nanoparticles through laser powder bed fusion (LPBF process is presented. After an initial investigation about the effect of process parameters on the densification levels, the LPBF materials were analysed in terms of microstructure, thermo-mechanical and mechanical properties. The presence of MgAl2O4 nanoparticles involves an increment of the volumetric energy density delivered to the materials, in order to fabricate samples with high densification levels similar to the AlSi10Mg samples. However, the application of different building parameters results in modifying the size of the cellular structures influencing the mechanical properties and therefore, limiting the strengthening effect of the reinforcement.

  14. Matrix-reinforcement reactivity in P/M titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Romero, F.; Salvador, M. D.; Busquets, D.

    2007-01-01

    The high reactivity of titanium and the facility of the same one to form intermetallics makes difficult obtaining composites with this material and brings the need in any case of covering the principal fibres used as reinforcement. To obtain composites of titanium reinforced with ceramic particles ins proposed in this paper, for this reason it turns out to be fundamental to evaluate the reactivity between the matrix and reinforcement. Both titanium nitride and carbide (TiN and TiC) are investigated as materials of low reactivity whereas titanium silicide (TiSi 2 ) is also studied as materials of major reactivity, already stated by the scientific community. This reactivity will be analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) there being obtained distribution maps of the elements that allow to establish the possible influence of the sintering temperature and time. Hereby the matrix-reinforcement interactions are optimized to obtain suitable mechanical properties. (Author) 39 refs

  15. Inorganic Polymer Matrix Composite Strength Related to Interface Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bridge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin transfer molding of an inorganic polymer binder was successfully demonstrated in the preparation of ceramic fiber reinforced engine exhaust valves. Unfortunately, in the preliminary processing trials, the resulting composite valves were too brittle for in-engine evaluation. To address this limited toughness, the effectiveness of a modified fiber-matrix interface is investigated through the use of carbon as a model material fiber coating. After sequential heat treatments composites molded from uncoated and carbon coated fibers are compared using room temperature 3-point bend testing. Carbon coated Nextel fiber reinforced geopolymer composites demonstrated a 50% improvement in strength, versus that of the uncoated fiber reinforced composites, after the 250 °C postcure.

  16. Shear testing of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements of a combined experimental/analytical methodology for accurate shear characterization of unidirectional composites in the linear and nonlinear range, with particular attention devoted to metal matrix composites. It is illustrated that consistent results can be obtained for a large class of composites from two commonly employed shear test methods currently in use by composites researchers when the influence of various factors that affect the determination of the actual shear response is properly analyzed. These factors include the effects of material anisotropy, specimen geometry, manner of load introduction, and test fixture design on the stress and deformation fields in the test section of off-axis and Iosipescu specimens. Common errors associated with the measurement of deformation fields and calculation of stress fields are discussed and quantified. Particular problems in the determination of the shear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum using the Iosipescu test are illustrated and discussed.

  17. Metallic-glass-matrix composite structures with benchmark mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Joseph P.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2010-12-01

    Metallic-glass-matrix composites demonstrating unusual combination of high strength, high toughness, and excellent processability are utilized to fabricate cellular structures of egg-box topology. Under compressive loading, the egg-box panels are capable of undergoing extensive plastic collapse at very high plateau stresses enabling absorption of large amounts of mechanical energy. In terms of specific mechanical energy absorbed, the present panels far outperform panels of similar topology made of aluminum or fiber-reinforced polymer composites, and even surpass steel structures of highly buckling-resistant topologies, thus emerging among the highest performance structures of any kind.

  18. Processing and Testing Re2Si207 Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    determined. 1. Introduction The application of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is limited by mechanical property degradation in oxidizing...using the Archimedes method. 2.3. Indentation and Characterization The hardnesses of the sintered pellets were measured by Vickers indentation at...J. Mechanical Properties and Atomistic Deformation Mechanism of g-Y2Si2O7 from First- Principles Investigations. Acta mat. 55, 6019-6026 (2007). 10

  19. Silver matrix composites reinforced with galvanically silvered particles

    OpenAIRE

    J. Śleziona; J. Wieczorek,

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents the possibility of the application of metalic layers drifted with the use of the galvanic methods on the ceramic particles surface. The application of the layers was aimed at obtaining the rewetting of the reinforcing particles with the liquid silver in the course of the producing of silver matrix composites with the use of mechanical stirring method. To enable introducing of the iron powder and glass carbon powder to liquid silver the solution of covering the powd...

  20. Natural fiber reinforced composites with moringa and vnyl ester matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Sundara, Babu Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    In this research work an attempt is carried out for producing a Natural Plant Based fiber Reinforced Composites using the Moringa Resins and Vinyl Ester by utilizing the wastage of natural plant based fiber as Reinforcement material and Matrix material as Natural Resin and Vinyl Ester. The objective of the work is Utilization of Natural Plant Based Bio- degardable wastage into an alternative materials in the industrial applications by analyzing, Various Manufacturing and testing. Initially th...

  1. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  2. Fracture Resistance Evaluation of Fibre Reinforced Brittle Matrix Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 290, - (2005), s. 167-174 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramic s /2./. Stará Lesná, 03.10.2004-06.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Keywords : fibre-reinforced ceramic s * glass matrix composites * chevron notch Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2005

  3. Fracture behaviour of hybrid glass matrix composites: thermal ageing effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, D. N.; Atiq, S.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2003), s. 177-1185 ISSN 1359-835X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : glass matrix * hybrid composites * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.131, year: 2003 http://www.sciencedirect.com

  4. Caracterisation du composite titanium diboride-carbone avec l'aluminium liquide et le bain cryolithique des cuves d'electrolyse de l'aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Martin

    with the carbon matrix to form a TiB2/Al4 C3 composite sealing the surface to further penetration. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. An Facile High-Density Polyethylene - Exfoliated Graphite - Aluminium Hydroxide Composite: Manufacture, Morphology, Structure, Antistatic and Fireproof Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui LI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite intercalation compounds (GIC and exfoliated graphite (EG as raw materials were prepared with flake graphite, concentrated sulphuric acid (H2SO4, potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7 and peracetic acid (CH3CO3H and characterized. Then, high-density polyethylene-exfoliated graphite (HDPE-EG composites were fabricated with HDPE and EG via in situ synthesis technique in the different mass ratio, and their resistivity values (ohms/sq were measured. Based on the resistivity values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG composite with the antistatic property could be fabricated while the mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30. Last, HDPE-EG-aluminium hydroxide (HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composites were manufactured with HDPE, GIC and Al(OH3 via the in situ synthesis-thermal expansion technique, and their resistivity values and limiting oxygen index (LOI values were measured. Based on the resistivity values and LOI values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite with the antistatic and fireproof property could be manufactured while HDPE, GICs and Al(OH3 of mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30 : 1.00. Otherwise, the petal-like morphology and structure of HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite were characterized, which consisted of EG, HDPE and Al(OH3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4275

  6. MOORA-Based Tribological Studies on Red Mud Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of an experimental investigation on the effects of applied load, sliding velocity, wt.% of reinforcement and hardness of the counterface material in dry sliding wear studies performed on red mud-based aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC. The specific wear rate and the coefficient of friction are considered as the output quality characteristics. Taguchi-based L9 orthogonal array has been used to accomplish the objective of the experimental study. Analysis of variance (ANOVA is employed to find the optimal setting and the effect of each parameter on the output performance characteristics. It has been observed that optimal factor setting for each output performance is different. In order to minimize the two responses simultaneously, multiobjective optimization based on ratio analysis (MOORA is adopted. MOORA revealed that the optimal combination of the dry sliding wear parameters for the multiperformance characteristics of the red mud based aluminium is the set normal load at 20 N, sliding velocity 3 m/s, % of reinforcement 20%, and counterface hardness of the material 58 HRC.

  7. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatchurrohman, N; Marini, C D; Suraya, S; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc. (paper)

  8. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  9. Creep-fatigue behaviour of aluminum alloy-based metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbera, Daniele; Chen, Haofeng; Liu, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) represents a valuable option as structural material for different type of structures and components. Despite this they struggle to become widely adopted due to expensive manufacturing process and complex microstructural behaviour. When subjected to cyclic load conditions the structural response of MMC is not trivial, and becomes even more difficult when high temperature load is involved. Different failure mechanisms would happen and they are originated by the different material properties between the fibre and surrounding matrix. Among all, the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient is recognized to be the dominant one. The significantly differing coefficients of thermal expansion between ceramic and metal give rise to micro thermal stresses, which enhance the initiation of matrix micro cracks. Their performance under varying load and high temperature is complex, and hence it is difficult to have a clear understanding of the structural responses, especially when fatigue and creep damages become the main failures of MMCs. To improve current understanding of the relationship between creep fatigue interaction of MMCs, the history of thermal and mechanical loading, and the creep dwell period, a highly accurate but robust direct simulation technique on the basis of the Linear Matching Method (LMM) framework has been proposed in this paper, and been applied to model the fatigue and creep behaviour of MMCs. A homogenised FE model is considered in all analyses, which consist of continuous silicon carbide fibres embedded in a square 2024T3 aluminium alloy matrix array. Various factors that affect creep and fatigue behaviours of composites are analysed and discussed, including effects of the applied load level, dwell period and temperature on the MMC's performance. The effects of reversed plasticity on stress relaxation and creep deformation of MMC are investigated, and the behaviours of cyclically enhanced creep and elastic follow-up are

  10. Wear behaviour of A356 aluminium alloy reinforced with micron and nano size SiC particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Camagu, ST

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A method for producing metal matrix composites MMC was successfully implemented for mixing nano and low micron (“Hybrid”) sized SiC reinforcing particles in an aluminium alloy matrix. Due to the improved specific modulus and strength, MMC...

  11. Effect of Bottom Ash and Fly Ash as a Susceptor Material on The Properties of Aluminium Based Composites Prepared by Microwave Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Muhammad Wan Nur Azrina Binti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of aluminium as a single material in automotive applications is not suitable without a mixture with reinforcement materials that can support the properties at high temperature. In this study, aluminium based composite were prepared with weight percentage of SiC reinforcement, varying from 5 to 20 wt%. Aluminium powder and reinforcement materials were mixed using ball milling machine with speed of 100 rpm for 2 hours. The powder mixture were then compressed at pressure 4 tonnes with 5 minutes holding time. The compact samples were sintered using microwave sintering technique. Microwave sintering techniques in this study using two different types of susceptor materials that are bottom ash and fly ash. Sintered aluminium based composites using bottom ash susceptor material involving the sintering temperature of 526 °C for 30 minutes whereas for the samples sintered using fly ash susceptor material, involving a temperature of 523 °C for 15 minutes. From the result, the sintered samples using fly ash susceptor material, showed higher density with a value of 2.1933 g/cm3 compared to bottom ash 2.0002 g/cm3 and having the higher hardness value 72.1315 HV compared to bottom ash 50.0511HV. The using of fly ash could affect the heating rate during the sintering process which could influence the properties of aluminium based composites. In conclusion, the type of susceptor could affect the physical and mechanical properties of aluminum-based composite reinforced with silicon carbide.

  12. Influence of composition and distribution of the reinforcing particles on fatigue properties of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochreiter, E.; Jeglitsch, F.

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue-life-time behaviour has been examined of extruded 6061 aluminium alloy composites reinforced with 15 vol.% SiC and 10 vol.% Al 2 O 3 particles. The peak particle sizes are at about 4.5 and 6 μm. Within measured S-N curves the fatigue life-time at given stress amplitudes of SiC p /AA6061 is superiour to that of Al 2 O 3p /AA6061 in the low-cycle fatigue region as well as in the high-cycle fatigue region. The discussion of these results has been done by means of theoretical evaluated crack propagation curves. Interfacial bonding has been studied by means of TEM investigations. (orig.)

  13. Hoop Tensile Properties of Ceramic Matrix Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, HeeMan; Barnett, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain properties in the hoop direction were obtained for 100-mm diameter SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite cylinders using ring specimens machined form the cylinder ends. The cylinders were fabricated from 2D balanced SiC fabric with several material variants, including wall thickness (6,8, and 12 plies), SiC fiber type (Sylramic, Sylramic-iBN, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon S), fiber sizing type, and matrix type (full CVI SiC, and partial CVI SiC plus slurry cast + melt-infiltrated SiC-Si). Fiber ply splices existed in all the hoops. Tensile hoop measurements are made at room temperature and 1200 C using hydrostatic ring test facilities. The failure mode of the hoops, determined through microstructural examination, is presented. The hoop properties are compared with in-plane data measured on flat panels using same material variants, but containing no splices.

  14. Effect of residual stress and surface roughness on the fatigue behaviour of aluminium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaga, M; Eifler, D

    2010-01-01

    In this investigation the fatigue properties of specimens manufactured with different turning parameters were investigated in stress-controlled constant amplitude tests at ambient temperature. The change of feed rate and depth of cut lead to a change in the near surface microstructure. Hence the fatigue properties were influenced significantly due to different surface roughness and surface residual stress resulting from the unequal turning processes. The cyclic deformation behaviour of AMC225xe is characterised by pronounced initial cyclic hardening. Continuous load increase tests allow a reliable estimation of the endurance limit of AMC225xe with one single specimen on the basis of cyclic deformation, temperature and electrical resistance data.

  15. Hybrid aluminium matrix composite AWJ turning using olivine and Barton garnet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nag, A.; Ščučka, Jiří; Hlaváček, Petr; Klichová, Dagmar; Srivastava, A. K.; Hloch, Sergej; Dixit, A. R.; Foldyna, Josef; Zeleňák, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 92, September 2017 (2017), s. 1-8 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : abrasive water jet turning * abrasive mass flow rate * abrasivegrain * hybrid metalmatrixcomposite * surface topography Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools OBOR OECD: Mechanical engineering Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00170-017-1036-0.pdf

  16. Hybrid aluminium matrix composite AWJ turning using olivine and Barton garnet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nag, A.; Ščučka, Jiří; Hlaváček, Petr; Klichová, Dagmar; Srivastava, A. K.; Hloch, Sergej; Dixit, A. R.; Foldyna, Josef; Zeleňák, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 92, September 2017 (2017), s. 1-8 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : abrasive water jet turning * abrasive mass flow rate * abrasivegrain * hybridmetalmatrixcomposite * surface topography Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools OBOR OECD: Mechanical engineering Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00170-017-1036-0.pdf

  17. Hybrid aluminium matrix composite AWJ turning using olivine and Barton garnet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nag, A.; Ščučka, Jiří; Hlaváček, Petr; Klichová, Dagmar; Srivastava, A. K.; Hloch, Sergej; Dixit, A. R.; Foldyna, Josef; Zeleňák, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 92, September 2017 (2017), s. 1-8 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : abrasive water jet turning * abrasive mass flow rate * abrasivegrain * hybridmetalmatrixcomposite * surface topography Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00170-017-1036-0.pdf

  18. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  19. LDEF results for polymer matrix composite experiment AO 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the results obtained to-date on a polymer matrix composite experiment (AO 180) located at station D-12, about 82 deg off the 'ram' direction. Different material systems comprised of graphite, boron, and aramid (Kevlar) fiber reinforcements were studied. Although previous results were presented on in-situ thermal-vacuum cycling effects, particularly dimensional changes associated with outgassing, additional comparative data will be shown from ground-based tests on control and flight samples. The system employed was fully automated for thermal-vacuum cycling using a laser interferometer for monitoring displacements. Erosion of all three classes of materials due to atomic oxygen (AO) will also be discussed, including angle of incidence effects. Data from this experiment will be compared to published results for similar materials in other LDEF experiments. Composite materials' erosion yields will be presented on an AO design nomogram useful for estimating total material loss for given exposure conditions in low Earth orbit (LEO). Optical properties of these materials will also be compared with control samples. A survey of the damage caused by micrometeoroids/debris impacts will be addressed as they relate to polymer matrix composites. Correlations between hole size and damage pattern will be given. Reference to a new nomogram for estimating the number distribution of micrometeoroid/debris impacts for a given space structure as a function of time in LEO will be addressed based on LDEF data.

  20. Effect of Lubrication on Sliding Wear of Red Mud Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy 6061

    OpenAIRE

    N. Panwar; R.P. Poonia; G. Singh; R. Dabral; A. Chauhan

    2017-01-01

    In present study, Red mud, an industrial waste, has been utilized as a reinforcement material to fabricate Aluminium 6061 matrix based metal matrix composite. Taguchi L18 orthogonal array has been employed for fabrication of composite castings and for conducting the tribological experimentation. ANOVA analysis has been applied to examine the effect of individual parameters such as sliding condition: dry and wet, reinforcement weight fraction, load, speed, and sliding distance on specific wear...

  1. Multiscale modeling of PVDF matrix carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh

    2017-06-01

    Self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced composites have the potential to enable structural health monitoring that is inherent to the composite material rather than requiring external or embedded sensors. It has been demonstrated that a self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite can be created by using the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) as the matrix material and using a Kevlar layer to separate two carbon fiber layers. In this configuration, the electrically conductive carbon fiber layers act as electrodes and the Kevlar layer acts as a dielectric to prevent the electrical shorting of the carbon fiber layers. This composite material has been characterized experimentally for its effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. However, for design purposes, it is desirable to obtain a predictive model of the effective piezoelectric coefficients for the final smart composite material. Also, the inverse problem can be solved to determine the degree of polarization obtained in the PVDF material during polarization by comparing the effective d 33 and d 31 values obtained in experiment to those predicted by the finite element model. In this study, a multiscale micromechanics and coupled piezoelectric-mechanical finite element modeling approach is introduced to predict the mechanical and piezoelectric performance of a plain weave carbon fiber reinforced PVDF composite. The modeling results show good agreement with the experimental results for the mechanical and electrical properties of the composite. In addition, the degree of polarization of the PVDF component of the composite is predicted using this multiscale modeling approach and shows that there is opportunity to drastically improve the smart composite’s performance by improving the polarization procedure.

  2. The influence of alloy composition on residual stresses in heat treated aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.S., E-mail: jeremy.robinson@ul.ie [Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick (Ireland); Redington, W. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    The as quenched properties of eight different heat treatable aluminium alloys are related to residual stress magnitudes with the objective being to establish if there is a relationship between the residual stress and the as quenched alloy hardness and strength. Near surface residual stresses were assessed with X-ray diffraction using both the established sin{sup 2}ψ method and the more recent cos α technique. Through thickness residual stresses were also characterised using neutron diffraction. The alloys were chosen to encompass a wide range of strengths. The low to medium strength alloys were 6060 and 6082, medium to high strength 2618A, 2014A, 7075, 7010 and two variants of 7449, while the very high strength alloy was the powder metallurgy alloy N707. To assess the as quenched strength, dynamic hardness and tensile properties were determined from samples tested immediately after quenching to minimise the influence of precipitation hardening by natural aging. In addition, hot hardness measurements were made in situ on samples cooled to simulate quench paths. Within the experimental constraints of the investigation, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness was found to follow the same pattern for all the alloys investigated, varying from tensile in the interior to surface compression. The influence of alloy strength was manifested as a change in the observed residual stress magnitudes, and surface residual stresses were found to vary linearly with as quenched hardness and strength. - Highlights: • As quenched aluminium alloys contain high magnitude residual stresses. • Surface is compressive balance by a tensile core. • As quenched surface residual stress is linear function of alloy strength. • In situ hot hardness demonstrates rapid change in intrinsic hardness during rapid cooling.

  3. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to coatings to the fiber preform was also required to accommodate the high preform thickness. The thick-section CMC processing developed in this work proved to be invaluable for component development, fabrication, and testing in two complementary efforts. In a project for the Army, involving SiC/SiC blisk development, nominally 0.8 in. thick x 8 in. diameter (approx. 2 cm thick x 20 cm diameter) components were successfully infiltrated. Blisk hubs were machined using diamond-embedded cutting tools and successfully spin-tested. Good ply uniformity and extremely low residual porosity (matrix composites fabricated via CVI or PIP. The pyrolytic carbon/zirconium nitride interface coating optimized in this work for use on carbon fibers was incorporated in the SiC/SiC composites and yielded a >41 ksi (approx. 283 MPa) flexural strength.

  4. Double Vacuum Bag Process for Resin Matrix Composite Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A double vacuum bag molding assembly with improved void management and laminate net shape control which provides a double vacuum enviromnent for use in fabricating composites from prepregs containing air and/or volatiles such as reactive resin matrix composites or composites from solvent containing prepregs with non-reactive resins matrices. By using two vacuum environments during the curing process, a vacuum can be drawn during a B-stage of a two-step cycle without placing the composite under significant relative pressure. During the final cure stage, a significant pressure can be applied by releasing the vacuum in one of the two environments. Inner and outer bags are useful for creating the two vacuum environments with a perforated tool intermediate the two. The composite is placed intermediate a tool plate and a caul plate in the first environment with the inner bag and tool plate defining the first environment. The second environment is characterized by the outer bag which is placed over the inner bag and the tool plate.

  5. Discontinuously reinforced titanium matrix composites for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, V.; Leguey, T.; Monge, M.A.; Munoz, A.; Pareja, R.; Victoria, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have reinforced α-Ti with different contents of TiC particles using the in situ technique and conventional casting. Compositional and microstructural characterization of the TiC/Ti composite material was made by XRD and SEM-EDS. Tensile tests at RT, 723 and 973 K have been performed on samples heat treated at 1000 K for 30 min which were prepared from cold rolled material. The effect of the content, size and morphology of the TiC particles on the tensile properties has been investigated. The results indicate that the expected improvement in the mechanical characteristics of TiC/Ti composites is inhibited by the detrimental presence of coarse dendritic particles of TiC. The premature failure of these composites at RT is due to cracking of the coarse TiC particles. Local softening due to inhomogeneous plastic deformation of the Ti matrix appears to contribute to the tensile failure of the TiC/Ti composites deformed at 723 and 973 K.

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Combustor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiangang G.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Stephan, Robert R.; Barnett, Terry R.; Ojard, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    Combustor liners fabricated from a SiC/SiC composite (silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix) were nondestructively interrogated before and after combustion rig testing by x-ray, ultrasonic, and thermographic techniques. In addition, mechanical test results were obtained from witness coupons, representing the as-manufactured liners, and from coupons machined from the components after combustion exposure. Thermography indications correlated with reduced material properties obtained after rig testing. The thermography indications in the SiC/SiC liners were delaminations and damaged fiber tows, as determined through microstructural examinations.

  7. Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Disk for Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Mike; Genge, Gary; Kiser, Doug

    2000-01-01

    NASA has recently completed testing of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC), integrally bladed disk (blisk) for rocket engine turbopumps. The turbopump's main function is to bring propellants from the tank to the combustion chamber at optimal pressures, temperatures, and flow rates. Advantages realized by using CMC blisks are increases in safety by increasing temperature margins and decreasing costs by increasing turbopump performance. A multidisciplinary team, involving materials, design, structural analysis, nondestructive inspection government, academia, and industry experts, was formed to accomplish the 4.5 year effort. This article will review some of the background and accomplishments of the CMC Blisk Program relative to the benefits of this technology.

  8. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the key materials challenges for Generation IV reactor technology is to improve the strength and resistance to corrosion and radiation damage in the metal cladding of the fuel pins during high-temperature operation. Various candidate Gen IV designs call for increasing core temperature to improve efficiency and facilitate hydrogen production, operation with molten lead moderator to use fast neutrons. Fuel pin lifetime against swelling and fracture is a significant limit in both respects. The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite. In the context of the mission of the SBIR program, this Phase I grant has been successful. The development of a means to attain interfacial bonding between metal and ceramic has been a pacing challenge in materials science and technology for a century. It entails matching or grading of thermal expansion across the interface and attaining a graded chemical composition so that impurities do not concentrate at the boundary to create a slip layer. To date these challenges have been solved in only a modest number of pairings of compatible materials, e.g. Kovar and glass, titanium and ceramic, and aluminum and ceramic. The latter two cases have given rise to the only presently available MMC materials, developed for aerospace applications. Those materials have been possible because the matrix metal is highly reactive at elevated temperature so that graded composition and intimate bonding happens naturally at the fiber-matrix interface. For metals that are not highly reactive at processing temperature, however, successful bonding is much more difficult. Recent success has been made with copper MMCs for cooling channels in first-wall designs for fusion

  9. Metal matrix composites synthesis, wear characteristics, machinability study of MMC brake drum

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Nanjappan; Davim, J Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This book is dedicated to composite materials, presenting different synthesis processes, composite properties and their machining behaviour. The book describes also the problems on manufacturing of metal matrix composite components. Among others, it provides procedures for manufacturing of metal matrix composites and case studies.

  10. Laser Machining of Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, D. C.; Ojard, G.; Brewer, D.

    2012-01-01

    As interest grows in considering the use of ceramic matrix composites for critical components, the effects of different machining techniques, and the resulting machined surfaces, on strength need to be understood. This work presents the characterization of a Melt Infiltrated SiC/SiC composite material system machined by different methods. While a range of machining approaches were initially considered, only diamond grinding and laser machining were investigated on a series of tensile coupons. The coupons were tested for residual tensile strength, after a stressed steam exposure cycle. The data clearly differentiated the laser machined coupons as having better capability for the samples tested. These results, along with micro-structural characterization, will be presented.

  11. Update on CMH-17 Volume 5: Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Kaia; Pierce, Jennifer; Kiser, James; Keith, William P.; Wilson, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    CMC components are projected to enter service in commercial aircraft in 2016. A wide range of issues must be addressed prior to certification of this hardware. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5 on ceramic matrix composites is being revised to support FAA certification of CMCs for hot structure and other elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 will contain detailed sections describing CMC materials processing, design analysis guidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the status of and plans for two of these areas, which are being addressed by the M and P Working Group and the Testing Working Group, will be presented along with a timeline for the preparation of CMH-17, Volume 5.

  12. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.

  13. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beristain, Jokin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD. The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 μm. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool.El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de la maquinabilidad del material compuesto de matriz metálica aluminio-carburo de silicio en operaciones de torneado. Las herramientas de corte utilizadas han sido de metal duro con y sin recubrimiento, diferentes grados de diamante policristalino (PCD y diamante monocristalino (MCD. El material mecanizado ha sido AMC225xe, compuesto de la aleación de aluminio AA 2124 con un 25% en peso de partículas de SiC con un tamaño medio de 3 μm. Los experimentos se han realizado con diferentes velocidades de corte en una operación de refrentado, midiendo la rugosidad superficial, las fuerzas y el desgaste de la herramienta. La superficie desgastada de la herramienta ha sido examinada en el microscopio electrónico (SEM. Se ha observado que el filo recrecido y el material adherido son mayores en el caso de las herramientas de MCD que en las de PCD. El filo recrecido actúa como una capa protectora contra la abrasión.

  14. Microstructure of a cement matrix composite reinforced with polypropylene fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, J. M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the microstructural characterization of a composite material, which is comprised of polypropylene fibers in an cement matrix, by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. The microstructure of the different phases that compose the matrix is very heterogeneous, though there is a uniform distribution of the fibers inside it. The surface of this composite is different after setting, cured and hardening depending if the zone is or not in touch with the walls of the mould. The interface between the different crystalline regions of the cement matrix and the dispersed fibers shows compatibility between the matrix and the polymeric fibers. The mechanical properties (compression and bending strength have also been evaluated. The use of melamine formaldehyde as additive leads to a reinforcement of the cement matrix and to the improvement of the mechanical properties.

    Se ha llevado a cabo una observacíón microestructural detallada de un material compuesto de fibras de polipropileno embebidas en una matriz de cemento usando los nuevos tipos de microscopía electrónica de barrido, tales como: un microscopio electrónico medioambiental (acrónimo en inglés: ESEM y uno de emisión de campo (acrónimo en inglés: FESEM. La microestructura de las diferentes fases que componen la matriz es muy heterogénea, aunque hay una distribución uniforme de las fibras dentro de ellas. La superficie de este material compuesto es diferente después del fraguado, curado y endurecimiento según qué zonas estén o no en contacto con las paredes del molde. La interfase entre las diferentes fases cristalinas de la matriz de cemento y las fibras dispersadas se ha observado a diferentes aumentos, comprobándose compatibilidad entre la matriz y las fibras poliméricas. Las propiedades de resistencia mecánica (tanto a flexión como a compresión han sido tambi

  15. Application of Anodization Process for Cast Aluminium Surface Properties Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodarczyk-Fligier A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An huge interest is observed in last years in metal matrix composite, mostly light metal based, which have found their applications in many industry branches, among others in the aircraft industry, automotive-, and armaments ones, as well as in electrical engineering and electronics, where one of the most important issue is related to the corrosion resistance, especially on the surface layer of the used aluminium alloys. This elaboration presents the influence of ceramic phase on the corrosion resistance, quality of the surface layer its thickness and structure of an anodic layer formed on aluminium alloys. As test materials it was applied the aluminium alloys Al-Si-Cu and Al-Cu-Mg, for which heat treatment processes and corrosion tests were carried out. It was presented herein grindability test results and metallographic examination, as well. Hardness of the treated alloys with those ones subjected to corrosion process were compared.

  16. Insect phylogenomics: results, problems and the impact of matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsch, Harald O; Meusemann, Karen; Wipfler, Benjamin; Schütte, Kai; Beutel, Rolf; Misof, Bernhard

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we investigated the relationships among insect orders with a main focus on Polyneoptera (lower Neoptera: roaches, mantids, earwigs, grasshoppers, etc.), and Paraneoptera (thrips, lice, bugs in the wide sense). The relationships between and within these groups of insects are difficult to resolve because only few informative molecular and morphological characters are available. Here, we provide the first phylogenomic expressed sequence tags data ('EST': short sub-sequences from a c(opy) DNA sequence encoding for proteins) for stick insects (Phasmatodea) and webspinners (Embioptera) to complete published EST data. As recent EST datasets are characterized by a heterogeneous distribution of available genes across taxa, we use different rationales to optimize the data matrix composition. Our results suggest a monophyletic origin of Polyneoptera and Eumetabola (Paraneoptera + Holometabola). However, we identified artefacts of tree reconstruction (human louse Pediculus humanus assigned to Odonata (damselflies and dragonflies) or Holometabola (insects with a complete metamorphosis); mayfly genus Baetis nested within Neoptera), which were most probably rooted in a data matrix composition bias due to the inclusion of sequence data of entire proteomes. Until entire proteomes are available for each species in phylogenomic analyses, this potential pitfall should be carefully considered.

  17. Metal matrix composites for sustainable lotus-effect surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosonovsky, Michael; Hejazi, Vahid; Nyong, Aniedi E; Rohatgi, Pradeep K

    2011-12-06

    The lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. However, such surfaces require micropatterning, which is extremely vulnerable to even small wear rates. This limits the applicability of the lotus effects to situations when wear is practically absent. To design sustainable superhydrophobic surfaces, we suggest using metal matrix composites (MMCs) with hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. Such surfaces, if properly designed, provide roughness and heterogeneity needed for superhydrophobicity. In addition, they are sustainable, since when the surface layer is deteriorated and removed due to wear, hydrophobic reinforcement and roughness remains. We present a model and experimental data on wetting of MMCs. We also conducted selected experiments with graphite-reinforced MMCs and showed that the contact angle can be determined from the model. In order to decouple the effects of reinforcement and roughness, the experiments were conducted for initially smooth and etched matrix and composite materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Machinability study of Al-TiC metal matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa P. N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites have emerged as an advanced class of structural materials have a combination of different, superior properties compared to an unreinforced matrix, which can result in a number of service benefits such as increased strength, higher elastic moduli, higher service temperature, low CTE, improved wear resistance, high toughness, etc. The excellent mechanical properties of these materials together with weight saving makes them very attractive for a variety of engineering applications in aerospace, automotive, electronic industries, etc. Hence, these materials provide as alternative substitutes for conventional engineering materials when specific mechanical properties necessary for required applications. In this work an attempt is made to study the machining parameters of Al6061/TiC MMC. The composite is developed by reinforcing TiC particles in varying proportions of 3, 6, 9 and 12 % weight fractions to the Al6061 matric alloy through stir casting technique. Cutting forces were measured by varying cutting speed and feed rate with constant depth of cut for different % weight fractions. The results showed that the cutting force increases with the increase of feed rate and decreases with the increase of cutting speed for all the weight fractions. Cutting parameters were optimized using Taguchi technique.

  19. Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of admixing of aluminium phosphate on oxychloride cement in the matrix has been investigated. It is shown that aluminium phosphate retards the setting process of the cement and improves water-tightness.

  20. Thermal expansion behaviour of high performance PEEK matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, R K; Mulik, U P; Tiwari, A N; Negi, Y S

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion behaviour of high performance poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) composites reinforced with micro- (8 μm) and nano- (39 nm) sized Al 2 O 3 particles was studied. The distribution of Al 2 O 3 in the PEEK matrix was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was reduced from 58 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 for pure PEEK to 22 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 43 vol% micro-Al 2 O 3 and to 23 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 12 vol% nano-Al 2 O 3 composites. For a given volume fraction, nano-Al 2 O 3 particles are more effective in reducing the CTE of composites than that of micro-Al 2 O 3 particles. This may be attributed to the much higher interfacial area or volume of nanocomposites than that of microcomposites. The upper limit and lower limit of the Schapery model separately fit closely the CTE of the micro- and nano-composites, respectively. Other models such as the rule of mixture and Kerner and Turner models were also correlated with the data

  1. Effect of aluminium particles on mechanical and morphological properties of epoxy nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Sefiu A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bumper is a front or rear part of automobiles. It is designed and shaped to be impact absorbing and protecting automobiles from damage in low impact collisions. Initially, they were made from heavy steels, increasing the weight of automobiles and fuel consumption. Also, high impacts of steel bumpers on pedestrians during accidental collision cause fatalities and or disabilities. An effort to enhance fuel efficiency, safety, freedom of design and shape detailing, heavy alloys for automobile applications are now being replaced with polymeric composites. Aluminium micro particles and nanoparticles were prepared from aluminium cans through sand casting, lathe machine spinning, and ball milling techniques. Both types of aluminium particles were incorporated into a mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, epoxy resin cured with amine base hardener (ABH. Phases of the epoxy polymer and composites were identified using Xray Diffraction (XRD. Spatial arrangement of the phases within the matrix and their elemental composition were examined using Scanning Electron Microscope with attached energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX. Tensile, impact and micro hardness tests were conducted on the prepared epoxy/aluminium composites. Results of the XRD showed the presence of aluminium compounds/phases due to chemical reactions between aluminium particles and DGEBA/ABH system. SEM confirmed a homogeneous distribution of the phases within the epoxy matrix, and that there is a strong adhesion between the epoxy matrix and aluminium particles. Correlation between the mechanical properties of the prepared nanocomposite and the procured bumper materials exhibited a fair suitability of the prepared nanocomposites for automobile applications.

  2. Polymer composite adsorbents using particles of molecularly imprinted polymers or aluminium oxide nanoparticles for treatment of arsenic contaminated waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önnby, L; Pakade, V; Mattiasson, B; Kirsebom, H

    2012-09-01

    Removal of As(V) by adsorption from water solutions was studied using three different synthetic adsorbents. The adsorbents, (a) aluminium nanoparticles (Alu-NPs, polymers (polymer backbones of pure polyacrylamide (MIP-cryo) were of better stability than the amine containing polymer backbone (Alu-cryo). Both composites worked well in the studied pH range of pH 2-8. Adsorption tested in real wastewater spiked with arsenic showed that co-ions (nitrate, sulphate and phosphate) affected arsenic removal for Alu-cryo more than for MIP-cryo. Both composites still adsorbed well in the presence of counter-ions (copper and zinc) present at low concentrations (μg/l). The unchanged and selective adsorption in realistic water observed for MIP-cryo was concluded to be due to a successful imprinting, here controlled using a non-imprinted polymer (NIP). A development of MIP-cryo is needed, considering its low adsorption capacity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fabrication of Ceramic Matrix Composite Tubes Using a Porous Mullite/Alumina Matrix and Alumina/Mullite Fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radsick, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    ... or from inadequate oxide-based ones. A porous mullite/alumina matrix combined with alumina/mullite fiber reinforcement eliminates the need for an interface coating while producing a strong, tough and oxidation resistant composite...

  4. Aluminium bridges, aluminium bridge decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade. In building and civil engineering the increase of aluminium applications is due to various aspects like light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions, and esthetics. The paper starts

  5. Surface integrity of solvent-challenged ormocer-matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Larissa Maria; Schneider, Luis Felipe J; Silikas, Nick; Watts, David C

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the surface integrity of solvent-challenged ormocer-matrix composites, photoactivated by different light exposure modes, through surface-hardness measurements at different periods of time; and to compare such behavior with dimethacrylate-based materials. One hundred percent ormocer-based matrix (experimental ormocer (ORM)), a commercial mixed dimethacrylate-ormocer-based matrix (Admira (ADR)) and two commercial dimethacrylate-based matrix composites (experimental controls, (Grandio (GRD) and Premise (PRE)) were evaluated. Disk specimens (4 mm × 2 mm) were prepared from each material and light-activated using either a standard (S) or soft-start (SS) light exposure protocol with an LED-curing unit. Top, irradiated surface Knoop hardness (KHN) was measured within the following experimental groups (n=5): Group 1: immediately after exposure; Group 2: after dry and dark storage, Group 3: after storage in distilled water, and Group 4: immersion in absolute ethanol. Hardness of Groups 2-4 were measured after 7 days storage. Immediate hardness values were submitted to Student's t-tests separately for each material. Hardness values after treatments were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test to compare values among different storage media and light exposure mode protocols. Comparisons among materials were described using percentage of hardness change. Statistical testing was performed at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Immediate hardness values were not affected by the light exposure mode, regardless of the material. In general, exposure mode did not significantly affect hardness after 7 days storage, regardless of storage media or material. After 7 days dry storage, hardness values increased for all materials relative to immediate testing, and decreased after water and ethanol storage, with ethanol showing the greatest effect. The experimental ormocer-based material had the lowest percentage hardness change and thus proved more resistant to solvent

  6. The mean grain size determination of boron carbide (B4C)-aluminium (Al) and boron carbide (B4C)-nickel (Ni) composites by ultrasonic velocity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Ridvan; Sarpuen, Ismail H.; Yalim, H. Ali; Erol, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Tuba; Tuncel, Sabri

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the mean grain size of ceramic-metal composites, made from boron carbide (B 4 C)-aluminium (Al)-nickel (Ni) powders, has been determined with ultrasonic velocity technique by using a 2 MHz transducer. An ultrasonic velocity-grain size master graph was plotted using a 4 MHz ultrasonic transducer. The results were compared to the mean grain size obtained from SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) images

  7. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos G. Dassios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared thermography (IRT and acoustic emission (AE are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material’s performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately.

  8. Wear and Reactivity Studies of Melt infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, David C.; Ojard, Greg; Brewer, David N.

    2013-01-01

    As interest grows in the use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for critical gas turbine engine components, the effects of the CMCs interaction with the adjoining structure needs to be understood. A series of CMC/material couples were wear tested in a custom elevated temperature test rig and tested as diffusion couples, to identify interactions. Specifically, melt infiltrated silicon carbide/silicon carbide (MI SiC/SiC) CMC was tested in combination with a nickel-based super alloy, Waspaloy, a thermal barrier coating, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a monolithic ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N4). To make the tests more representative of actual hardware, the surface of the CMC was kept in the as-received state (not machined) with the full surface features/roughness present. Test results include: scanning electron microscope characterization of the surfaces, micro-structural characterization, and microprobe analysis.

  9. Leveraging metal matrix composites to reduce costs in space mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Ted; Claridge, Rex; Walker, Jim

    1994-01-01

    Advanced metal matrix composites may be one of the most promising technologies for reducing cost in structural components without compromise to strength or stiffness. A microlight 12.50 N (2.81 lb), two-axis, solar array drive assembly (SADA) was made for the Advanced Materials Applications to Space Structures (AMASS) Program flight experiment. The SADA had both its inner and outer axis housings fabricated from silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumimun. Two versions of the housings were made. The first was machined from a solid billet of material. The second was plaster cast to a near net shape that required minimal finish machining. Both manufacturing methods were compared upon completion. Results showed a cost savings with the cast housing was possible for quantities greater than one and probable for quantities greater than two. For quantities approaching ten, casting resulted in a reduction factor of almost three in the cost per part.

  10. Abrasive waterjet machining characteristics of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yong Wie; Shin, Young Sam

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum matrix composite Al356/SiCp(Vol. 15%)(Al MMC) material has been cut under various cutting conditions using Abrasive WaterJet (AWJ) machining process. The experimental cutting was carried out using three different material thicknesses of 10, 20, 30mm with a 0.33mm diameter orifice. The pump pressure, traverse rate, StandOff Distance(SOD) were taken as process parameters. After cutting the quality of the specimen in terms of kerf width, kerf taper, and surface finish were measured to characterize machinability of the material. As a result of the study, the maximum traverse rate for 30mm thick Al MMC under the pump pressure of 350 MPa reached up to 70 mm/min and the surface roughness of the material showed surface finish Ra in the range of 2.3∼23.4μm.

  11. Abrasive waterjet machining characteristics of aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yong Wie; Shin, Young Sam [Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    Aluminum matrix composite Al356/SiCp(Vol. 15%)(Al MMC) material has been cut under various cutting conditions using Abrasive WaterJet (AWJ) machining process. The experimental cutting was carried out using three different material thicknesses of 10, 20, 30mm with a 0.33mm diameter orifice. The pump pressure, traverse rate, StandOff Distance(SOD) were taken as process parameters. After cutting the quality of the specimen in terms of kerf width, kerf taper, and surface finish were measured to characterize machinability of the material. As a result of the study, the maximum traverse rate for 30mm thick Al MMC under the pump pressure of 350 MPa reached up to 70 mm/min and the surface roughness of the material showed surface finish Ra in the range of 2.3{approx}23.4{mu}m.

  12. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  13. Effect of Cutting Parameters on Thrust Force and Surface Roughness in Drilling of Al-2219/B4C/Gr Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, V. M.; Basavarajappa, G. S. Shiva Shankar S.; Suresh, R.

    2016-09-01

    In aluminium matrix composites, reinforcement of hard ceramic particle present inside the matrix which causes tool wear, high cutting forces and poor surface finish during machining. This paper focuses on effect of cutting parameters on thrust force, surface roughness and burr height during drilling of MMCs. In the present work, discuss the influence of spindle speed and feed rate on drilling the pure base alloy (Al-2219), mono composite (Al- 2219+8% B4C) and hybrid composite (Al-2219+8%B4C+3%Gr). The composites were fabricated using liquid metallurgy route. The drilling experiments were conducted by CNC machine with TiN coated HSS tool, M42 (Cobalt grade) and carbide tools at various spindle speeds and feed rates. The thrust force, surface roughness and burr height of the drilled hole were investigated in mono composite and hybrid composite containing graphite particles, the experimental results show that the feed rate has more influence on thrust force and surface roughness. Lesser thrust force and discontinuous chips were produced during machining of hybrid composites when compared with mono and base alloy during drilling process. It is due to solid lubricant property of graphite which reduces the lesser thrust force, burr height and lower surface roughness. When machining with Carbide tool at low feed and high speeds good surface finish was obtained compared to other two types of cutting tool materials.

  14. Fabrication and tribological response of aluminium 6061 hybrid composite reinforced with bamboo char and boron carbide micro-fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethan, K. N.; Pai, Anand; Keni, Laxmikant G.; Singhal, Ashish; Sinha, Shubham

    2018-02-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have a wide scope of industrial applications and triumph over conventional materials due to their light weight, higher specific strength, good wear resistance and lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The present study aims at establishing the feasibility of using Bamboo charcoal particulate and boron carbide as reinforcements in Al-6061 alloy matrix and to investigate their effect on the wear of composites taking into consideration the interfacial adhesion of the reinforcements in the alloy. Al-6061 alloy was chosen as a base metallic alloy matrix. Sun-dried bamboo canes were used for charcoal preparation with the aid of a muffle furnace. The carbon content in the charcoal samples was determined by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy). In present study, stir casting technique was used to prepare the samples with 1%, 2%, and 3% weight of bamboo charcoal and boron carbide with Al-6061. The fabricated composites were homogenised at 570°C for 6 hours and cooled at room temperature. Wear studies were carried out on the specimens with different speed and loads. It was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with increase in the reinforcement content.

  15. Low Energy Contrast of Metal Matrix Composite in SEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Matsuda, K.; Hrnčiřík, Petr; Müllerová, Ilona

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 9, Sup. 3 (2003), s. 328 - 329 ISSN 1431-9276. [MC 2003. Dresden, 07.09.2003-12.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1065304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : low energy contrasts * scanning electron microscope * aluminium alloys Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.648, year: 2003

  16. Stochastic Virtual Tests for High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian N.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Begley, Matthew; Blacklock, Matthew; Do, Bao-Chan; Fast, Tony; Naderi, Mehdi; Novak, Mark; Rajan, Varun P.; Rinaldi, Renaud G.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Rossol, Michael N.; Shaw, John H.; Sudre, Olivier; Yang, Qingda; Zok, Frank W.; Marshall, David B.

    2014-07-01

    We review the development of virtual tests for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites with textile reinforcement. Success hinges on understanding the relationship between the microstructure of continuous-fiber composites, including its stochastic variability, and the evolution of damage events leading to failure. The virtual tests combine advanced experiments and theories to address physical, mathematical, and engineering aspects of material definition and failure prediction. Key new experiments include surface image correlation methods and synchrotron-based, micrometer-resolution 3D imaging, both executed at temperatures exceeding 1,500°C. Computational methods include new probabilistic algorithms for generating stochastic virtual specimens, as well as a new augmented finite element method that deals efficiently with arbitrary systems of crack initiation, bifurcation, and coalescence in heterogeneous materials. Conceptual advances include the use of topology to characterize stochastic microstructures. We discuss the challenge of predicting the probability of an extreme failure event in a computationally tractable manner while retaining the necessary physical detail.

  17. Wear mechanisms in powder metallurgy high speed steels matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordo, E.; Martinez, M. A.; Torralba, J. M.; Jimenez, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The development of metal matrix composites has a major interest for automotive and cutting tools industries since they possess better mechanical properties and wear resistance than corresponding base materials. One of the manufacturing methods for these materials includes processing by powder metallurgy techniques. in this case, blending of both, base material and reinforcement powders constitute the most important process in order to achieve a homogeneous distribution of second phase particles. in the present work, composite materials of M3/2 tool steel reinforced with 2.5,5 and 8 vol% of niobium carbide have been prepared. In order to ensure a homogeneous mix, powders of both materials were mixed by dry high-energy mechanical milling at 200 r.p.m. for 40 h. After a recovering annealing, two routes for consolidate were followed die pressing and vacuum sintering, and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Pin-on-disc tests were carried out to evaluate wear behaviour in all the materials. Results show that ceramic particles additions improve wear resistance of base material. (Author) 9 refs

  18. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  19. Solid State Non-powder Process for Boron Nitride Nanotube Metal Matrix Composite, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) provide potential for advanced lightweight high stiffness structures that are critical for...

  20. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  1. Assessment of delay-and-sum algorithms for damage detection in aluminium and composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif-Khodaei, Z; Aliabadi, M H

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensors are increasingly being used in active structural health monitoring, due to their durability, light weight and low power consumption. In the present work damage detection and characterization methodologies based on Lamb waves have been evaluated for aircraft panels. The applicability of various proposed delay-and-sum algorithms on isotropic and composite stiffened panels have been investigated, both numerically and experimentally. A numerical model for ultrasonic wave propagation in composite laminates is proposed and compared to signals recorded from experiments. A modified delay-and-sum algorithm is then proposed for detecting impact damage in composite plates with and without a stiffener which is shown to capture and localize damage with only four transducers. (papers)

  2. Equal channel angular pressing of powder processed Al6061/SiC nano metal matrix composites and study of its wear properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongale, Arunkumar M.; Kumar, Satish

    2018-03-01

    Nano Metal Matrix Composites were fabricated by a novel approach by combining powder metallurgy and equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using aluminium alloy 6061 (Al6061) as matrix phase and 2, 4 and 6 wt% of silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiCnp) as reinforcements. Alloying elements of Al6061 in their elemental form are blended together using high energy planetary ball mill and calculated wt% of SiCnp were mixed with it. Thus formed composite powder mixture is compacted in a uniaxial compaction die and then subjected to ECAP up to three passes. Density and porosity of samples were estimated using Archimedes’ principle. Pin on disc setup is used to evaluate the wear properties of the composites under different speed and loading conditions. Tests revealed that increase in wt% of SiCnp reduces the wear rate of the composites whereas increasing the load and speed increases wear rate of the composite samples. SEM micrographs of worn surfaces indicated different types of wear mechanism responsible for wear of the specimens under different testing conditions. Also, wt% of SiCnp and the number of passes through ECAP were found to increase the hardness value of the composite material.

  3. Polymer matrix composites research: A survey of federally sponsored programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report identifies research conducted by agencies of the federal government other than the Department of Energy (DOE) in the area of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). DOE commissioned the report to avoid duplicating other agencies' efforts in planning its own research program for PMCs. PMC materials consist of high-strength, short or continuous fibers fused together by an organic matrix. Compared to traditional structural metals, PMCs provide greater strength and stiffness, reduced weight and increased heat resistance. The key contributors to PMC research identified by the survey are the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). The survey identified a total of 778 projects. More than half of the total projects identified emphasize materials research with a goal toward developing materials with improved performance. Although an almost equal number of identified materials projects focus on thermosets and thermoplastics receive more attention because of their increased impact resistance and their easy formability and re-formability. Slightly more than one third of projects identified target structures research. Only 15 percent of the projects identified focus on manufacturing techniques, despite the need for efficient, economical methods manufacturing products constructed of PMCs--techniques required for PMCs to gain widespread acceptance. Three issues to be addressed concerning PMCs research are economy of use, improvements in processing, and education and training. Five target technologies have been identified that could benefit greatly from increased use of PMCs: aircraft fuselages, automobile frames, high-speed machinery, electronic packaging, and construction.

  4. THE DEPENDENCE OF DIELECTRIC PERMEABILITY AND SPECIFIC VOLUME RESISTANCE OF POLYMER COMPOSITES ON THE CONCENTRATION OF NANO-DIMENSIONAL ALUMINIUM PARTICLES AND CARBON BLACK FILLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Akhriev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The main idea of the present study was the production of polymer composites based on synthetic isoprene elastomer and low-density polyethylene containing nanoparticles of carbon black and aluminium in various amounts.Methods. An exponential approach was used throughout the study to better control the region of small additives; this control was impossible to achieve using a linear distribution of nanofillers among the small additives. The composites were filled with nanosized aluminium and DG-100 carbon black particles with a specific adsorption surface of 100 m2 /g and having an average particle size of 20-30 nm. Electrophysical parameters were measured by conventional techniques of electron microscopy, electron shadow microscopy and hydrostatic weighing. Maxwell-Wagner theory and polarisation model were applied.Results. For a composite containing 80% of isoprene synthetic rubber (SCI-3 and 20% of low-density polyethylene, the dielectric permeability and specific volume resistivity dependences were studied experimentally and their graphs were plotted against the concentration of nanosized particles of aluminium and carbon black fillers. The features of these curves were considered. It is shown that, for small amounts of Al and carbon black nanoparticles in the composite, significant changes (extrema take place on the curves ԑ '= ԑ' (C and ρᵥ = ρᵥ (C, which do not conform to the Maxwell-Wagner polarisation model. For some heterogeneous polymer mixtures, a distribution of carbon black particles was observed that led to a superadditive electrical resistance.Conclusion. It is shown that for small amounts of Al and carbon black nanoparticles in composite materials, significant changes (extrema take place on the curves ԑ '= ԑ' (C and ρᵥ = ρᵥ (C that do not fit within the framework of the Maxwell-Wagner polarisation model.

  5. High Frequency Anodising of Aluminium-TiO2 Surface Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Bordo, Kirill; Jensen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    High frequency anodising of Al–TiO2 surface composites using pulse reverse pulse technique was investigated with an aim to understand the effect of the anodising parameters on the optical appearance, microstructure, hardness and growth rate of the anodic layer. Friction stir processing was employed...... to prepare the Al–TiO2 surface composites, which were anodised in a 20 wt.% sulphuric acid bath at 10 °C as a function of pulse frequency, pulse duty cycle, and anodic cycle voltage amplitudes. The optical appearance of the films was characterized and quantified using an integrating sphere-spectrometer setup......, which measures the total and diffuse reflectance from the surface. The change in optical reflectance spectra from the anodised layer was correlated to the applied anodising parameters and microstructure of the anodic layer as well as the Al–TiO2 substrate. Change in hardness of the anodised layer...

  6. Effect of Copper Coated SiC Reinforcements on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Wear of Aluminium Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kori, P. S.; Vanarotti, Mohan; Angadi, B. M.; Nagathan, V. V.; Auradi, V.; Sakri, M. I.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental investigations are carried out to study the influence of copper coated Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforcements in Aluminum (Al) based Al-SiC composites. Wear behavior and mechanical Properties like, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness are studied in the present work. Experimental results clearly revealed that, an addition of SiC particles (5, 10 and 15 Wt %) has lead in the improvement of hardness and ultimate tensile strength. Al-SiC composites containing the Copper coated SiC reinforcements showed better improvement in mechanical properties compared to uncoated ones. Characterization of Al-SiC composites are carried out using optical photomicrography and SEM analysis. Wear tests are carried out to study the effects of composition and normal pressure using Pin-On Disc wear testing machine. Results suggested that, wear rate decreases with increasing SiC composition, further an improvement in wear resistance is observed with copper coated SiC reinforcements in the Al-SiC metal matrix composites (MMC’s).

  7. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  8. Effective medium theory for elastic matrix composites containing dispersed particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhon, M.S.; Metz, R.J.; Freed, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new, effective medium theory to study the wave propagation and mechanical properties of a composite system with dispersed particulates. One main emphasis here is in formulating the theory and in analyzing the structure of the contribution of the fillers to the elastic response. By constructing the elastic propagator (whose fluid mechanical counterpart is known as the Oseen tensor), we show that an analogy between the theoretical description of the particulate system and of suspension rheology exists when the former corresponds to a high-rigidity solid matrix (or, analogously, when the Poisson ratio is close to 1/2) in steady state. The effective Lame constants for this case are derived by combining this analogy with the theory developed by Freed and Muthukumar for the rheology of a suspension of spheres. The analogy is also useful in our new prediction of the phenomenon of elastic screening, the possible existence of a cutoff frequency below which elastic waves cannot propagate in the filler system

  9. Milling of Nanoparticles Reinforced Al-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alokesh Pramanik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the face milling of nanoparticles reinforced Al-based metal matrix composites (nano-MMCs using a single insert milling tool. The effects of feed and speed on machined surfaces in terms of surface roughness, surface profile, surface appearance, chip surface, chip ratio, machining forces, and force signals were analyzed. It was found that surface roughness of machined surfaces increased with the increase of feed up to the speed of 60 mm/min. However, at the higher speed (100–140 mm/min, the variation of surface roughness was minor with the increase of feed. The machined surfaces contained the marks of cutting tools, lobes of material flow in layers, pits and craters. The chip ratio increased with the increase of feed at all speeds. The top chip surfaces were full of wrinkles in all cases, though the bottom surfaces carried the evidence of friction, adhesion, and deformed material layers. The effect of feed on machining forces was evident at all speeds. The machining speed was found not to affect machining forces noticeably at a lower feed, but those decreased with the increase of speed for the high feed scenario.

  10. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment because of their light weight, higher temperature capability, and oxidation resistance. Limitations of SiC/SiC CMCs include surface recession and component cracking and associated chemical changes in the CMC. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC/SiC CMCs include the incorporation of coating systems that provide surface protection, which has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The development of EBCs for the protection of gas turbine hot section CMC components was a continuation of coating development work for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithics. Work on EBC development for SiC/SiC CMCs has been ongoing at several national laboratories and the original gas turbine equipment manufacturers. The work includes extensive laboratory, rig and engine testing, including testing of EBC coated SiC/SiC CMCs in actual field applications. Another EBC degradation issue which is especially critical for CMC components used in aircraft engines is the degradation from glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) with other minor oxides. This paper addresses the need for and properties of external coatings on SiC/SiC CMCs to extend their useful life in service and the retention of their properties.

  11. Effects of β-spodumene on the phase development and densification of alumina/aluminium-titanate composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manurunga, P.; Low, I.M.; O'Connor, B.H.; Kennedy, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Spodumene (Li 2 O.Al 2 O 3 .4SiO 2 ) has a monoclinic α polymorph which is stable under ambient conditions and it transforms irreversibly at 1080 deg C to a tetragonal β polymorph which melts at 1423 deg C. Spodumene has been widely used in the glass and ceramic industry for decades as a lithia-bearing flux and low-expansion filler in whiteware bodies. It is also commonly used for making glasses and ceramics which are harder, smoother, chemical and thermal shock resistant. Recently, spodumene has been used as a liquid-phase sintering aid for the densification of alumina, mullite, and aluminium-titanate (AT). In this paper, we describe the use of dilatometry and high temperature neutron diffraction to study respectively the effect of β-spodumene additions (0-15 wt %) on the densification, and in-situ phase formation and abundances in alumina composites containing 30 wt% at temperatures in the range 1000-1400 deg C. These composites were produced using reaction sintering of alumina and rutile. Determination of relative phase abundances in these materials has been performed using the Rietveld refinement method. Results show that β-spodumene began to decompose by phase separation and partial melting at 1290 deg C, followed by complete melting at 1330 deg C. Formation of AT was observed to occur at 1310 deg C and its abundance increased with temperature. The presence of β-spodumene did not react with alumina or rutile to form additional phases. Up to 5 wt% β-spodumene was involved in the liquid-phase-sintering and densification of the alumina-AT composite. Addition of β-spodumene in excess of 5 wt% resulted in pronounced vitrification which partly recrystallised when cooled to room temperature. The presence of glassy phase has been verified by selected-area diffraction in transmission electron microscopy. Dilatometry results show that the presence of up to 5 wt% β-spodumene resulted in a lower onset of sintering temperature and improved densification

  12. Mechanical and corrosion behaviors of developed copper-based metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manvandra Kumar; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Ji, Gopal

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of cast copper-tungsten carbide (WC) metal matrix composites (MMCs). Copper matrix composites have been developed by stir casting technique. Different sizes of micro and nano particles of WC particles are utilized as reinforcement to prepare two copper-based composites, however, nano size of WC particles are prepared by high-energy ball milling. XRD (X-rays diffraction) characterize the materials for involvement of different phases. The mechanical behavior of composites has been studied by Vickers hardness test and compression test; while the corrosion behavior of developed composites is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that hardness, compressive strength and corrosion resistance of copper matrix composites are very high in comparison to that of copper matrix, which attributed to the microstructural changes occurred during composite formation. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) reveals the morphology of the corroded surfaces.

  13. High-Temperature Fatigue of a Hybrid Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. T.; Sanders, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    An aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) brake drum was tested in fatigue at room temperature and extreme service temperatures. At room temperature, the hybrid composite did not fail and exceeded estimated vehicle service times. At higher temperatures (62 and 73 pct of the matrix eutectic), fatigue of a hybrid particle/fiber MMC exhibited failure consistent with matrix overloading. Overaging of the A356 matrix coupled with progressive fracture of the SiC particles combined to create the matrix overload condition. No evidence of macro-fatigue crack initiation or growth was observed, and the matrix-particle interface appeared strong with no debonding, visible matrix phases, or porosity. An effective medium model was constructed to test the hypothesis that matrix overloading was the probable failure mode. The measured particle fracture rate was fit using realistic values of the SiC Weibull strength and modulus, which in turn predicted cycles to failure within the range observed in fatigue testing.

  14. A Micro Raman Investigation of Viscoelasticity in Short Fibre Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt-Thomsen, Jan

    The purpose of the present Ph.D. project is to investigate the load transfer mechanisms between the fibre and matrix and the stress/strain fields in and around single fibres in short fibre reinforced viscoelastic polymer matrix composites subjected to various loading histories. The materials...... considered are high modulus carbon fibres embedded in a polypropylene matrix. The polypropylene matrix displays nonlinear viscoelasticity and its constitutive behaviour is modelled using the Schapery model....

  15. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  16. High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms in Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.; McManus, Hugh L.

    1997-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in demanding structural applications in which they may be exposed to harsh environments. The durability of such materials is a major concern, potentially limiting both the integrity of the structures and their useful lifetimes. The goal of the current investigation is to develop a mechanism-based model of the chemical degradation which occurs, such that given the external chemical environment and temperatures throughout the laminate, laminate geometry, and ply and/or constituent material properties, we can calculate the concentration of diffusing substances and extent of chemical degradation as functions of time and position throughout the laminate. This objective is met through the development and use of analytical models, coupled to an analysis-driven experimental program which offers both quantitative and qualitative information on the degradation mechanism. Preliminary analyses using coupled diffusion/reaction model are used to gain insight into the physics of the degradation mechanisms and to identify crucial material parameters. An experimental program is defined based on the results of the preliminary analysis which allows the determination of the necessary material coefficients. Thermogravimetric analyses are carried out in nitrogen, air, and oxygen to provide quantitative information on thermal and oxidative reactions. Powdered samples are used to eliminate diffusion effects. Tests in both inert and oxidative environments allow the separation of thermal and oxidative contributions to specimen mass loss. The concentration dependency of the oxidative reactions is determined from the tests in pure oxygen. Short term isothermal tests at different temperatures are carried out on neat resin and unidirectional macroscopic specimens to identify diffusion effects. Mass loss, specimen shrinkage, the formation of degraded surface layers and surface cracking are recorded as functions of exposure time. Geometry effects in

  17. Research and Development Progress of National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites on Advanced Aeronautical Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Bintai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applications and research progress in advanced aeronautical resin matrix composites by National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites (LAC were summarized. A novel interlaminar toughening technology employing ultra-thin TP non-woven fabric was developed in LAC, which significantly improved the compression after impact (CAI performances of composite laminates.Newly designed multilayer sandwich stealth composite structures exhibited a good broadband radar absorbing properties at 1-18 GHz.There were remarkable developments in high toughness and high temperature resin matrix composites, covering major composite processing technologies such as prepreg-autoclave procedure, liquid composite molding and automation manufacture, etc. Finally, numerical simulation and optimization methods were deliberately utilized in the study of composites curing behavior, resin flow and curing deformation. A composite material database was also established.In conclusion, LAC has been a great support for the development of aeronautical equipment, playing such roles as innovation leading, system dominating, foundation supporting and application ensuring of aerocomposites.

  18. EH3 matrix mineralogy with major and trace element composition compared to chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, S. W.; McDonough, W. F.; NéMeth, P.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the matrix mineralogy in primitive EH3 chondrites Sahara 97072, ALH 84170, and LAR 06252 with transmission electron microscopy; measured the trace and major element compositions of Sahara 97072 matrix and ferromagnesian chondrules with laser-ablation, inductively coupled, plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS); and analyzed the bulk composition of Sahara 97072 with LA-ICPMS, solution ICPMS, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The fine-grained matrix of EH3 chondrites is unlike that in other chondrite groups, consisting primarily of enstatite, cristobalite, troilite, and kamacite with a notable absence of olivine. Matrix and pyroxene-rich chondrule compositions differ from one another and are distinct from the bulk meteorite. Refractory lithophile elements are enriched by a factor of 1.5-3 in chondrules relative to matrix, whereas the matrix is enriched in moderately volatile elements. The compositional relation between the chondrules and matrix is reminiscent of the difference between EH3 pyroxene-rich chondrules and EH3 Si-rich, highly sulfidized chondrules. Similar refractory element ratios between the matrix and the pyroxene-rich chondrules suggest the fine-grained material primarily consists of the shattered, sulfidized remains of the formerly pyroxene-rich chondrules with the minor addition of metal clasts. The matrix, chondrule, and metal-sulfide nodule compositions are probably complementary, suggesting all the components of the EH3 chondrites came from the same nebular reservoir.

  19. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenqing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced areas, low reject rate and good technical tolerance. As a new kind of piston material, it has been used for mass production of about 400,000 pieces of automobile engines piston. China has become one of a few countries in which aluminum alloy matrix composite materials have been used in automobile industry and attained industrialization.

  20. Effect of the type of radiation on the degradation behavior of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1992-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler: E-glass or carbon fiber cloth; matrix; epoxy or polyimide resin) were irradiated with neutrons and 60 Co γ-rays at room temperature or at 5 K. Three-point bend tests were then carried out at 77 K. Comparison of the neutron and γ-ray irradiation effects shows that the radiation sensitivity of the glass/epoxy and glass/polyimide composites is 1.8-2.6 times higher to neutrons than to γ-rays, indicating a higher sensitivity of the epoxy and polyimide matrix resins to recoil protons than to γ-rays. Absorbed dose calculations, on the other hand, show that the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition in polymer matrix composites is inhomogeneous for neutrons, although almost homogeneous for γ-rays. In addition, the neutron irradiation of boron-containing E-glass fiber composites produces additional radiation damage due to a 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the glass fibers, thus significantly enhancing a decrease in the composite strength. These facts indicate that as far as polymer matrix composites are concerned, the irradiation effects of neutrons will be rather difficult to simulate with different types of radiation such as protons and carbon ions from an ion accelerator. Thus, it may be prudent that such simulation irradiation be carried out mainly for pure resins to be used as matrix in polymer matrix composites. (author)

  1. Mechanism of radiation-induced degradation in mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1988-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler, E-glass or carbon fibre cloth; matrix, epoxy or polyimide resin) and pure epoxy and polyimide resins were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays or 2 MeV electrons at room temperature. Mechanical tests were then carried out at 77K and at room temperature. Following irradiation, the Young's (tensile) modulus of these composites and pure resins remains practically unchanged even at 170 MGy for both test temperatures. The ultimate strength, however, decreases appreciably with increasing dose. The dose dependence of the composite strength depends not only on the combination of fibre and matrix in the composite but also on the test temperature. A relationship is found between the composite ultimate strain and the matrix ultimate strain, thus indicating that the dose dependence of the composite strength is virtually determined by a change in the matrix ultimate strain due to irradiation. Based on this finding, we propose a mechanism of radiation-induced degradation of a polymer matrix composite in order to explain the dose dependence of the composite strength measured at 77 K and at room temperature. (author)

  2. A macro-micromechanics analysis of a notched metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    Macro- and micromechanics analysis were conducted to determine the matrix and fiber behaviors near the notch in a center-notched metal-matrix composite. In this approach, the macrolevel analysis models the entire notched specimen using a 3D finite element program that uses the vanishing-fiber-diameter model to simulate the elastic-plastic behavior of the matrix and the elastic behavior of the fiber. The microlevel behavior is analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model containing one fiber and the surrounding matrix. The viability of this analysis is demonstrated using results for a boron/aluminum monolayer.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Macroscopic Behavior of Particulate Composite with Crosslinked Polymer Matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Máša, B.; Hutař, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 129-132 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/1409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Particle reinforced composites * polymer matrix composite * mechanical response Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  4. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols resolved via positive matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äijälä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Heikkinen, Liine; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is a complex mixture of various chemical species such as organic compounds, sulfates, nitrates, ammonia, chlorides, black carbon and sea salt. As aerosol chemical composition strongly influences aerosol climate effects (via cloud condensation nucleus activation, hygroscopic properties, aerosol optics, volatility and condensation) as well as health effects (toxicity, carcinogenicity, particle morphology), detailed understanding of atmospheric fine particle composition is widely beneficial for understanding these interactions. Unfortunately the comprehensive, detailed measurement of aerosol chemistry remains difficult due to the wide range of compounds present in the atmosphere as well as for the miniscule mass of the particles themselves compared to their carrier gas. Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Canagaratna et al., 2007) is an instrument often used for characterization of non-refractive aerosol types: the near-universal vaporization and ionisation technique allows for measurement of most atmospheric-relevant compounds (with the notable exception of refractory matter such as sea salt, black carbon, metals and crustal matter). The downside of the hard ionisation applied is extensive fragmentation of sample molecules. However, the apparent loss of information in fragmentation can be partly offset by applying advanced statistical methods to extract information from the fragmentation patterns. In aerosol mass spectrometry statistical analysis methods, such as positive matrix factorization (PMF; Paatero, 1999) are usually applied for aerosol organic component only, to keep the number of factors to be resolved manageable, to retain the inorganic components for solution validation via correlation analysis, and to avoid inorganic species dominating the factor model. However, this practice smears out the interactions between organic and inorganic chemical components, and hinders the understanding of the connections between primary and

  5. Stress and Damage in Polymer Matrix Composite Materials Due to Material Degradation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Hugh L.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods for calculating stresses and damage caused by degradation of the matrix constituent in polymer matrix composite materials. Laminate geometry, material properties, and matrix degradation states are specified as functions of position and time. Matrix shrinkage and property changes are modeled as functions of the degradation states. The model is incorporated into an existing composite mechanics computer code. Stresses, strains, and deformations at the laminate, ply, and micro levels are calculated, and from these calculations it is determined if there is failure of any kind. The rationale for the model (based on published experimental work) is presented, its integration into the laminate analysis code is outlined, and example results are given, with comparisons to existing material and structural data. The mechanisms behind the changes in properties and in surface cracking during long-term aging of polyimide matrix composites are clarified. High-temperature-material test methods are also evaluated.

  6. ASTM and VAMAS activities in titanium matrix composites test methods development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.; Harmon, D. M.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Russ, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are being considered for a number of aerospace applications ranging from high performance engine components to airframe structures in areas that require high stiffness to weight ratios at temperatures up to 400 C. TMC's exhibit unique mechanical behavior due to fiber-matrix interface failures, matrix cracks bridged by fibers, thermo-viscoplastic behavior of the matrix at elevated temperatures, and the development of significant thermal residual stresses in the composite due to fabrication. Standard testing methodology must be developed to reflect the uniqueness of this type of material systems. The purpose of this paper is to review the current activities in ASTM and Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) that are directed toward the development of standard test methodology for titanium matrix composites.

  7. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  8. Mechanical properties of composite sandwich plates containing magnesium matrix composite face sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song-Jeng; Hsieh, Ti-Ching; Lin, Bo-Zhou; Hong, Pin-Sen

    2008-11-01

    The fabrication of magnesium alloy metal-matrix composites (MMCs) and the mechanical properties of the sandwich formed with this material were investigated. Magnesium alloy composites containing various volume percentage of 0.99, 2.91, 4.76 and 9.09 % silicon-carbide (SiC) particles were prepared by molten metal mixing and machined as the faceplate of the sandwich. The particle had been dispersed by the injecting of the argon gas from a stainless pipe. Optical microscopic examination, hardness and tensile test were carried out. The sandwich was combined by the hot press method and studied by bending test. It is observed that the hardness of MMCs increases, but its strength decreases with increasing volume percentage of silicon-carbide particle, according to the results of hardness and bending test. It can be found that the specific strength and specific bending strength of sandwich composites fabricated with the faceplates of magnesium alloy added SiC reinforcements are a little higher than that sandwich with the aluminum alloy faceplates, but less than that of sandwich with magnesium alloy.

  9. Polyvinylpyrrolidone Matrix as an Effective Reducing Agent and Stabilizer during Reception of Silver Nanoparticles in Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Semenyuk, Nataliya; Kostiv, Ulyana; Dudok, Galyna; Nechay, Jaroslav; Skorokhoda, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    The use of polyvinylpyrrolidone matrix as an effective reducing agent and stabilizer during reception of silver nanoparticles in composites is substantiated. The influence of various factors on patterns of obtaining silver nanoparticles and their size.

  10. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The work proposed herein is to demonstrate that the higher temperature capabilities of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) can be fully utilized to reduce emissions and...

  11. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  12. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries

  13. Ultra-Low-Density (ULD) Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR proposal seeks to demonstrate a new class of ultra-low-density (ULD) polymer matrix composites of high specific modulus and specific strength...

  14. Composite Armor Performance Enhancement by Tethered Polymer Chains at the Fiber-Matrix Interface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalika, D

    1998-01-01

    ... properties of fiber composites. The governing strategy was to tailor the discontinuous fiber-matrix interface so as to introduce a volume of interaction capable of providing additional, molecular-level energy dissipation mechanisms...

  15. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 2D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  16. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 3D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  17. Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite in Humid Environments at Intermediate Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaRochelle, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    Stress rupture tests on the Sylramic(TM) fiber with an in-situ layer of boron nitride, boron nitride interphase, and SiC matrix ceramic matrix composite were performed at 550 degrees C and 750 degrees C with 0.0, 0.2...

  18. Anisotropic thermal expansion behaviors of copper matrix in β-eucryptite/copper composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lidong; Xue Zongwei; Qiao Yingjie; Fei, W.D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The thermal expansion behaviors of Cu matrix were studied by in situ XRD. ► The expansion of Cu{1 1 1} plane is linear, that of Cu{2 0 0} is nonlinear. ► The anisotropic thermal expansion of Cu is related to the twinning of Cu matrix. ► The twinning of Cu matrix makes the CTE of the composite increasing. - Abstract: A β-eucryptite/copper composite was fabricated by spark plasma sintering process. The thermal expansion behaviors of Cu matrix of the composite were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction during heating process. The results show that Cu matrix exhibits anisotropic thermal expansion behaviors for different crystallographic directions, the expansion of Cu{1 1 1} plane is linear in the temperature range from 20 °C to 300 °C and the expansion of Cu{2 0 0} is nonlinear with a inflection at about 180 °C. The microstructures of Cu matrix before and after thermal expansion testing were investigated using transmission electronic microscope. The anisotropic thermal expansion behavior is related to the deformation twinning formed in the matrix during heating process. At the same time, the deformation twinning of Cu matrix makes the average coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite increase.

  19. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  20. Wear rate optimization of Al/SiCnp/e-glass fibre hybrid metal matrix composites using Taguchi method and genetic algorithm and development of wear model using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongale, Arunkumar M.; Kumar, Satish; Sachit, T. S.; Jadhav, Priya

    2018-03-01

    Studies on wear properties of Aluminium based hybrid nano composite materials, processed through powder metallurgy technique, are reported in the present study. Silicon Carbide nano particles and E-glass fibre are reinforced in pure aluminium matrix to fabricate hybrid nano composite material samples. Pin-on-Disc wear testing equipment is used to evaluate dry sliding wear properties of the composite samples. The tests were conducted following the Taguchi’s Design of Experiments method. Signal-to-Noise ratio analysis and Analysis of Variance are carried out on the test data to find out the influence of test parameters on the wear rate. Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis and Energy Dispersive x-ray analysis are conducted on the worn surfaces to find out the wear mechanisms responsible for wear of the composites. Multiple linear regression analysis and Genetic Algorithm techniques are employed for optimization of wear test parameters to yield minimum wear of the composite samples. Finally, a wear model is built by the application of Artificial Neural Networks to predict the wear rate of the composite material, under different testing conditions. The predicted values of wear rate are found to be very close to the experimental values with a deviation in the range of 0.15% to 8.09%.

  1. Modelling of polypropylene fibre-matrix composites using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP fibre-matrix composites previously prepared and studied experimentally were modelled using finite element analysis (FEA in this work. FEA confirmed that fibre content and composition controlled stress distribution in all-PP composites. The stress concentration at the fibre-matrix interface became greater with less fibre content. Variations in fibre composition were more significant in higher stress regions of the composites. When fibre modulus increased, the stress concentration at the fibres decreased and the shear stress at the fibre-matrix interface became more intense. The ratio between matrix modulus and fibre modulus was important, as was the interfacial stress in reducing premature interfacial failure and increasing mechanical properties. The model demonstrated that with low fibre concentration, there were insufficient fibres to distribute the applied stress. Under these conditions the matrix yielded when the applied stress reached the matrix yield stress, resulting in increased fibre axial stress. When the fibre content was high, there was matrix depletion and stress transfer was inefficient. The predictions of the FEA model were consistent with experimental and published data.

  2. Composite properties for S-2 glass in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, L. L.; Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The authors have measured thermal and mechanical properties of several composites of S-2 glass fiber in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix. The filament-wound composites ranged from 50 to 70 vol% fiber. The composites had generally good to excellent mechanical properties, particularly in view of the moderate cost of the material. However, the composites showed rapid increases in transverse thermal expansion above 50 C, and this property must be carefully considered if any use above that temperature is contemplated.

  3. Structure, composition and function of interfaces in ceramic fibre/matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pippel, E.

    1993-01-01

    Improving the properties of fibre reinforced ceramics and glasses by optimizing their microstructure requires the knowledge of this structure down to the atomic level. In these materials energy-dissipative processes during fracture particularly act within an interface layer or layer system between fibre and matrix which can either be produced by fibre coating, or which develops during the processing of the composites. Examples are presented of the microstructural phenomena of such layers revealed by HVEM and HREM and complemented by microchemical information via a nanoscale EDXS equipment. The investigations are carried out on Nicalon fibres in Duran glass as well as on Tyranno, Nicalon and carbon fibres in different SiC-matrices. Finally, a process is discussed which may control the important interface parameters. (orig.)

  4. High-pressure direct synthesis of aluminium nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Bockowski, M; Grzegory, I; Krukowski, S; Wróblewski, M; Porowski, S

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of direct synthesis of aluminium nitride (AlN) under high nitrogen pressure up to 1 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K. At pressure from 10 to 650 MPa we observe the combustion synthesis of AlN. As the result of the combustion process one can obtain the AlN sintered powder or AlN/Al metal matrix composites. For N sub 2 pressure higher than 650 MPa the crystal growth of AlN from the solution of atomic nitrogen in aluminium is possible. Both needle-like and bulk AlN single crystals, up to 1 cm and 1 mm, respectively, have been obtained.

  5. Corrosion Characterization Of ZA-27 Red Mud Metal Matrix Composites In Sodium Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to evaluate the corrosion characteristics of red mud metal in sodium chloride solution. Metal matrix composites MMC are heterogeneous systems containing matrix and reinforcement. Matrix may be alloy or metal or polymer. Reinforcement may be particulate or fiber or whisker. Their physical and mechanical properties can be tailored according to requirement. They are used in automobile aircraft and marine industries because of their increased corrosion resistance. In this study weight loss corrosion tests and Potestiodynamic polarization studies by using potestiostat are conducted on ZA-27 Red Mud metal matrix composites in different concentrated sodium chloride solutions. Both matrix and reinforcements are commercially available. Composites are prepared by liquid melt metallurgy technique using vortex method. Composites containing 2 4 and 6 percent of preheated but uncoated red mud are prepared. Cylindrical specimens and rectangular specimens are machined. Studies are carried out in 0.035 0.352 and 3.5 solutions of sodium chloride. In all the tests the composites were less prone to corrosion than the matrix. Hence the composites can be used in the marine environment.

  6. Steam Assisted Accelerated Growth of Oxide Layer on Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Yuksel, Serkan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of aluminium alloys is related to the composition and morphology of the oxide film on the surface of aluminium. In this paper we investigated the use of steam on the surface modification of aluminium to produce boehmite films. The study reveals a detailed investigation...... of the effect of vapour pressure, structure of intermetallic particles and thickness of boehmite films on the corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloys....

  7. Toughness of polyester matrix composites reinforced with sugarcane bagasse fibers evaluated by Charpy impact tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Scarpini Candido

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The fibers extracted from the sugarcane bagasse have been investigated as possible reinforcement for polymer matrix composites. The use of these composites in engineering applications, associated with conditions such as ballistic armor, requires information on the impact toughness. In the present work, Charpy tests were performed in ASTM standard specimens of polyester matrix composites, reinforced with 10, 20 and 30 vol% of continuous and aligned sugarcane bagasse fibers, in order to evaluate the impact energy. Within the standard deviation, the composite absorbed impact energy increased with the volume fraction of sugarcane bagasse fiber. This toughness performance was found by scanning electron microscopy to be associated with the fiber/matrix delamination. Keywords: Sugarcane bagasse fiber, Polyester composites, Charpy test, Impact toughness

  8. Effect of Lubrication on Sliding Wear of Red Mud Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy 6061

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Panwar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In present study, Red mud, an industrial waste, has been utilized as a reinforcement material to fabricate Aluminium 6061 matrix based metal matrix composite. Taguchi L18 orthogonal array has been employed for fabrication of composite castings and for conducting the tribological experimentation. ANOVA analysis has been applied to examine the effect of individual parameters such as sliding condition: dry and wet, reinforcement weight fraction, load, speed, and sliding distance on specific wear rate obtained experimentally. It has been found that tensile strength and impact energy increases while elongation decreases, with increasing weight fraction and decrease in particle size of red mud. The percentage contribution of the effect of factors on SWR is Sliding condition (73.17, speed (7.84, percentage reinforcement (7.35, load (5.75, sliding distance (2.24, and particle size (1.25. It has also been observed that specific wear rate is very low in wet condition. However, it decreases with increase in weight fraction of reinforcement, decrease in load and sliding speed. Al6061/red mud metal matrix composites have shown reasonable strength and wear resistance. The use of red mud in Aluminium composite provides the solution for disposal of red mud and can possibly become an economic replacement of Aluminium and its alloys.

  9. Effect of particulate matrix inhibitors on microstructure and properties of 2-D carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlomak, P.; Takano, Shigeru; Wright, M.A.; Ju, Chien-Ping.

    1991-01-01

    Extended-life applications of structural carbon-carbon (C-C) composites involve multiple periods of operation in high-temperature oxidizing environments and as such require a reliable oxidation protection system (OPS). Advanced OPS's generally consist of an external ceramic coating combined with an in-depth matrix inhibitor. This work investigated the effects produced by particulate inhibitors doped on the matrix on the microstructure of 2D, PAN fiber-pitch matrix C-C's. Boron and zirconium-based particulate inhibitors were added to the matrix material prior to heat treatment. A process was developed to assure a uniform distribution of the inhibitors. Oxidation behavior of such matrix-inhibited composites was evaluated using isothermal oxidation tests. 5 refs

  10. Pre-form ceramic matrix composite cavity and method of forming and method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Philip Harold; Delvaux, John McConnell; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-06-09

    A pre-form CMC cavity and method of forming pre-form CMC cavity for a ceramic matrix component includes providing a mandrel, applying a base ply to the mandrel, laying-up at least one CMC ply on the base ply, removing the mandrel, and densifying the base ply and the at least one CMC ply. The remaining densified base ply and at least one CMC ply form a ceramic matrix component having a desired geometry and a cavity formed therein. Also provided is a method of forming a CMC component.

  11. Effects of ductile matrix failure in three dimensional analysis of metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Full three dimensional numerical cell model analyses are carried out for a metal reinforced by short fibers, to study the development of ductile matrix failure. A porous ductile material model is used to describe the effect of the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence. In each case studied...... a rounded vertex on the yield surface. The full three dimensional model is used to study effects of deviations from equal transverse tension in directions perpendicular to the fibers. (C) 1998 Acta Metallurgica Inc....

  12. Fabrication of fiber composites with a MAX phase matrix by reactive melt infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, F; Krenkel, W

    2011-01-01

    Due to the inherent brittleness of ceramics it is very desirable to increase the damage tolerance of ceramics. The ternary MAX phases are a promising group of materials with high fracture toughness. The topic of this study is the development of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) with a matrix containing MAX phases, to achieve a damage tolerant structural composite material. For this purpose carbon fiber reinforced preforms with a carbon-titanium carbide matrix (C/C-TiC) were developed and infiltrated with silicon by a pressureless reactive melt infiltration. Finally liquid silicon caused the formation of SiC, TiSi 2 and Ti 3 SiC 2 in the matrix of the composite.

  13. VARTM Processing of High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Criss, Jr, Jim M

    2008-01-01

    The overall technical objective of the Phase 1 effort was to extend and advance the state the-art in high temperature composite fabrication techniques by developing a High Tempera Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM...

  14. Multifunctional Metal Matrix Composite Filament Wound Tank Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used for storing pressurized gases on board spacecraft when mass saving is a key requirement. All future mass...

  15. Young`s modulus of ceramic matrix composites with polysiloxane based matrix at elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Martin; Glogar, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2004), s. 2239-2242 ISSN 0022-2461 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0177; GA ČR GP106/02/P025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : composite material * Young `s modulus * high temperature Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.864, year: 2004

  16. Fractography of Alumina Fibre Reinforced Ex-polysiloxane Matrix Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudnayová, E.; Glogar, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 223, - (2002), s. 119-124 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramic s 2001. Stará Lesná, 13.05.2001-16.05.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/00/1140; GA ČR GA106/99/0096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : alumina fibre * fibrous composite * fracture features Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.497, year: 2002

  17. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  18. Wear of semi-solid rheocast SiCp/Al metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available compared with the 50% SiC MMC wear rate due to wear of the aluminum matrix. This trend is reversed on diamond abrasives due to pull-out of the irregular shaped composite particles. The 50% SiC MMC suffers from composite particle fracture porosity after high...

  19. Development and optimization of manufacture process for heat resistant fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glogar, Petr; Hron, P.; Burian, M.; Balík, Karel; Černý, Martin; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Vymazalová, Z.; Červencl, J.; Pivoňka, M.

    -, č. 14 (2005), 25-32 ISSN 1214-9691 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : polysiloxane resin * pyrolysis * ceramic matrix composite Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  20. Bone induction by composite of bioerodible polyorthoester and demineralized bone matrix in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Solheim, E; Bang, G

    1991-01-01

    A composite of a local, sustained, drug-release system, Alzamer bioerodible polyorthoester, and demineralized bone-matrix (DBM) particles implanted in the abdominal muscle of 89 Wistar rats induced cartilage and bone formation at the same rate as DBM when evaluated histologically and by 85Sr uptake....... The composite implant was technically easier to use than DBM alone....

  1. Porous composite materials with polyamide reinforcement and siloxane matrix with nano-hydroxyapatite as biomaterials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Karel; Bačáková, Lucie; Sochor, M.; Suchý, Tomáš; Černý, Martin; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Lisá, Věra; Filová, Elena; Grausová, Ľubica; Sedláček, R.; Tichý, P.

    -, č. 18 (2009), s. 43-51 ISSN 1214-9691 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/1576 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : aramid fibers * polymer-matrix composites * mechanical properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  2. Matrix damage helaing in fiber reinforced composite materials containing embedded active and passive wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, T.C.; Warnet, L.L.; Akkerman, R.; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Brinkman, E.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced composite materials are susceptible to matrix cracking and delamination upon impact. Active and passive wires can be embedded within the composite material to support the healing behavior. Upon a local heating stimulus the wires, oriented mostly in the out-of-plane

  3. Damage analysis of fiber reinforced resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Hu Kaiwei; Mu Jingyang; Bai Shuxin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the damage modes of the carbon fiber and the glass fiber reinforced epoxy or bakelite resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser under different power densities were analyzed, and the changes of the microstructure and the tensile strength of the composites were also researched. When the resin matrix composites were radiated at a power density more than 0.1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix would be decomposed and the tensile properties of the radiated samples were lost over 30% while the carbon fiber hardly damaged and the glass fiber melted. When the power density of the laser was raised to 1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix burned violently and the carbon fiber cloth began to split with some carbon fiber being fractured, therefore, the fracture strength of the radiated sample lost over 80%. The higher the power density of radiation was, the more serious the damage of the sample was. It was also found that the difference of the matrixes had little effect on the damage extent of the composites. The influence of the radiation density on the temperature of the radiated surface of the carbon/resin composite was numerically calculated by ANSYS finite element software and the calculation results coincided with the damage mode of the radiated composites. (authors)

  4. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  5. Recent developments in advanced aircraft aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dursun, Tolga; Soutis, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To compete with composites, performance of aluminium alloys should be increased. • Al–Li alloys have higher strength, fracture and fatigue/corrosion resistance. • Improvements of aerospace Al alloys are due to optimised solute content and ratios. • In selecting new materials, there should be no reduction in the level of safety. • The use of hybrid materials could provide additional opportunities for Al alloys. - Abstract: Aluminium alloys have been the primary material for the structural parts of aircraft for more than 80 years because of their well known performance, well established design methods, manufacturing and reliable inspection techniques. Nearly for a decade composites have started to be used more widely in large commercial jet airliners for the fuselage, wing as well as other structural components in place of aluminium alloys due their high specific properties, reduced weight, fatigue performance and corrosion resistance. Although the increased use of composite materials reduced the role of aluminium up to some extent, high strength aluminium alloys remain important in airframe construction. Aluminium is a relatively low cost, light weight metal that can be heat treated and loaded to relatively high level of stresses, and it is one of the most easily produced of the high performance materials, which results in lower manufacturing and maintenance costs. There have been important recent advances in aluminium aircraft alloys that can effectively compete with modern composite materials. This study covers latest developments in enhanced mechanical properties of aluminium alloys, and high performance joining techniques. The mechanical properties on newly developed 2000, 7000 series aluminium alloys and new generation Al–Li alloys are compared with the traditional aluminium alloys. The advantages and disadvantages of the joining methods, laser beam welding and friction stir welding, are also discussed

  6. Microstructure Characteristics of Fe-Matrix Composites Reinforced by In-Situ Carbide Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Song, Yanpei

    2017-10-01

    Carbide particulates reinforced iron-matrix composites were prepared by in-situ synthesis reaction between Ti, V and C on liquid alloys surface. The microstructure of the composite was characterized by SEM, TEM and OM. The results showed that the main phases were α-Fe, carbide particulate; besides, there were small amounts of γ-Fe and graphite (G) in the composite. The carbides were TiVC2 and VC in the shape of short bar and graininess. The matrix consisted of martensite and small amounts of retained austenite.

  7. Characterization of hybrid aluminum matrix composites for advanced applications – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswinder Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid aluminum matrix composites (HAMCs are the second generation of composites that have potential to substitute single reinforced composites due to improved properties. This paper investigates the feasibility and viability of developing low cost-high performance hybrid composites for automotive and aerospace applications. Further, the fabrication characteristics and mechanical behavior of HAMCs fabricated by stir casting route have also been reviewed. The optical micrographs of the HAMCs indicate that the reinforcing particles are fairly distributed in the matrix alloy and the porosity levels have been found to be acceptable for the casted composites. The density, hardness, tensile behavior and fracture toughness of these composites have been found to be either comparable or superior to the ceramic reinforced composites. It has been observed from the literature that the direct strengthening of composites occurs due to the presence of hard ceramic phase, while the indirect strengthening arises from the thermal mismatch between the matrix alloy and reinforcing phase during solidification. Based on the database for material properties, the application area of HAMCs has been proposed in the present review. It has been concluded that the hybrid composites offer more flexibility and reliability in the design of possible components depending upon the reinforcement's combination and composition.

  8. Fabrication and properties of ceramic composites with a boron nitride matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.P.; Cofer, C.G.; Economy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) matrix composites reinforced by a number of different ceramic fibers have been prepared using a low-viscosity, borazine oligomer which converts in very high yield to a stable BN matrix when heated to 1,200 C. Fibers including Nicalon (SiC), FP (Al 2 O 3 ), Sumica and Nextel 440 (Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 ) were evaluated. The Nicalon/BN and Sumica/BN composites displayed good flexural strengths of 380 and 420 MPa, respectively, and modulus values in both cases of 80 GPa. On the other hand, FP/BN and Nextel/BN composites exhibited very brittle behavior. Nicalon fiber with a carbon coating as a buffer barrier improved the strength by 30%, with a large amount of fiber pullout from the BN matrix. In all cases except for Nicalon, the composites showed low dielectric constant and loss

  9. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. I-V characteristic and mechanism of carbon black filled epoxy resin matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyong; Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2007-07-01

    The I-V characteristic of the epoxy resin matrix composites containing conductive carbon black (CB) and sprayed CB is experimentally studied. The test results indicate that the I-V characteristic of the CB filled epoxy resin matrix composites is affected by the CB diameter. The composites containing sprayed CB with the diameter of 123nm have a linear relation between current and voltage and no variation in resistance post-exposed to an electric field. However, the composites containing conductive CB with the diameter of 33nm have a nonlinear I-V characteristic and the resistance of the composites post-exposed to an electric field decreases dramatically. A DC circuit model based on the experimental research is proposed. The occurrence of the electrical breakdown induces the nonlinear I-V characteristic and the dramatic decrease of the electrical resistance of the composites post-exposed to an electric field.

  11. Influence of particles-matrix interphase on stress distribution in particulate composite with polymer matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majer, Zdeněk; Hutař, J.; Náhlík, Luboš; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2007), s. 143-148 ISSN 1802-680X. [Výpočtová mechanika 2007. Hrad Nečtiny, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/05/0227; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : particulate composite * crack propagation * interphase * CaCO3 – PP composite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  12. "A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

    2007-03-30

    Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

  13. Ferromagnetic Levan Composite: An Affinity Matrix to Purify Lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Angeli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and inexpensive procedure used magnetite and levan to synthesize a composite recovered by a magnetic field. Lectins from Canavalia ensiformis (Con A and Cratylia mollis (Cramoll 1 and Cramoll 1,4 did bind specifically to composite. The magnetic property of derivative favored washing out contaminating proteins and recovery of pure lectins with glucose elution. Cramoll 1 was purified by this affinity binding procedure in two steps instead of a previous three-step protocol with ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography through a CM-cellulose column.

  14. Composite absorbers consisting of inorganic ion-exchangers and polyacrylonitrile binding matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebesta, F.; John, J.; Motl, A.; Peka, V.; Vackova, E.

    1997-01-01

    Both cementation and vitrification was shown by preliminary experiments to be applicable for treatment of the spent composite absorbers with polyacrylonitrile binding matrix for final disposal. Loading of cement mix with composite absorbers up to 5-9% (w/w) were achieved Admixtures of natural clinoptilolite were found to improve compressive strength of the samples. The presence of PAN binding polymer was found not to disqualify the composite absorber tested from final treatment by vitrification. (author)

  15. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Luo, Xiangwei [Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Niu, Jitai, E-mail: niujitai@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe-Ni-Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn-Cd-Ag-Cu) with a melting point of about 400 Degree-Sign C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)-Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al-SiC composite.

  16. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao; Luo, Xiangwei; Niu, Jitai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. ► The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. ► Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. ► Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. ► High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al–SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe–Ni–Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn–Cd–Ag–Cu) with a melting point of about 400 °C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)–Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al–SiC composite.

  17. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  18. Matrix composition and mechanics of decellularized lung scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Thomas H; Calle, Elizabeth A; Colehour, Maegen B; Niklason, Laura E

    2012-01-01

    The utility of decellularized native tissues for tissue engineering has been widely demonstrated. Here, we examine the production of decellularized lung scaffolds from native rodent lung using two different techniques, principally defined by use of either the detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). All viable cellular material is removed, including at least 99% of DNA. Histochemical staining and mechanical testing indicate that collagen and elastin are retained in the decellularized matrices with CHAPS-based decellularization, while SDS-based decellularization leads to loss of collagen and decline in mechanical strength. Quantitative assays confirm that most collagen is retained with CHAPS treatment but that about 80% of collagen is lost with SDS treatment. In contrast, for both detergent methods, at least 60% of elastin content is lost along with about 95% of native proteoglycan content. Mechanical testing of the decellularized scaffolds indicates that they are mechanically similar to native lung using CHAPS decellularization, including retained tensile strength and elastic behavior, demonstrating the importance of collagen and elastin in lung mechanics. With SDS decellularization, the mechanical integrity of scaffolds is significantly diminished with some loss of elastic function as well. Finally, a simple theoretical model of peripheral lung matrix mechanics is consonant with our experimental findings. This work demonstrates the feasibility of producing a decellularized lung scaffold that can be used to study lung matrix biology and mechanics, independent of the effects of cellular components. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well as SEM observations of the prepared composites confirmed the gradient concentration of Ni particles in the composite materials. The application of the centrifugal slip casting method allows for the graded distribution of metal particles in the samples.

  20. Effect of fiber content on the properties of glass fiber-phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.Y.; Shahid, M.R.; Subhani, T.; Sharif, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    Glass fiber-Phenolic matrix composite is used for the manufacturing of parts /components related to electronic and aerospace industry due to its high strength, dimensional stability and excellent electrical insulation properties. The evaluation of this composite material is necessary prior to make parts/components of new designs. In the present research, thermosetting phenolic plastic was reinforced with E-glass fiber in different fiber-to-resin ratios to produce composites of different compositions. Mechanical and electrical properties of these composite materials were evaluated with reference to the effect of fiber content variation in phenolic resin. (author)

  1. Non-self-similar cracking in unidirectional metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, G.; Dharani, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the fracture behavior of unidirectional Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) show the presence of extensive matrix damage and non-self-similar cracking of fibers near the notch tip. These failures are primarily observed in the interior layers of an MMC, presenting experimental difficulties in studying them. Hence an investigation of the matrix damage and fiber fracture near the notch tip is necessary to determine the stress concentration at the notch tip. The classical shear lag (CLSL) assumption has been used in the present study to investigate longitudinal matrix damage and nonself-similar cracking of fibers at the notch tip of an MMC. It is seen that non-self-similar cracking of fibers reduces the stress concentration at the notch tip considerably and the effect of matrix damage is negligible after a large number of fibers have broken beyond the notch tip in a non-self-similar manner. Finally, an effort has been made to include non-self-similar fiber fracture and matrix damage to model the fracture behavior of a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite for two different matrices viz. a 6061-0 fully annealed aluminum matrix and a heat treated 6061-T6 aluminum matrix. Results have been drawn for several characteristics pertaining to the shear stiffnesses and the shear yield stresses of the two matrices and compared with the available experimental results

  2. High fiber-low matrix composites: kenaf fiber/polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand R. Sanadi; J.F. Hunt; D.F. Caulfield; G. Kovacsvolgyi; B. Destree

    2002-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated in the use of lignocellulosic fibers and wastes (both agricultural and wood based) as fillers and reinforcements in thermoplastics. In general, present technologies limit fiber loading in thermoplastics to about 60 percent by weight of fiber. To produce high fiber content composites for commercial use while maintaining adequate...

  3. Additive Manufacturing of Thermoplastic Matrix Composites Using Ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Meghan

    Advanced composite materials have great potential for facilitating energy efficient product design and their manufacture if improvements are made to current composite manufacturing processes. This thesis focuses on the development of a novel manufacturing process for thermoplastic composite structures entitled Laser-Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing ('LUAM'), which is intended to combine the benefits of laser processing technology, developed by Automated Dynamics Inc., with ultrasonic bonding technology that is used commercially for unreinforced polymers. These technologies used together have the potential to significantly reduce the energy consumption and void content of thermoplastic composites made using Automated Fiber Placement (AFP). To develop LUAM in a methodical manner with minimal risk, a staged approach was devised whereby coupon-level mechanical testing and prototyping utilizing existing equipment was accomplished. Four key tasks have been identified for this effort: Benchmarking, Ultrasonic Compaction, Laser Assisted Ultrasonic Compaction, and Demonstration and Characterization of LUAM. This thesis specifically addresses Tasks 1 and 2, i.e. Benchmarking and Ultrasonic Compaction, respectively. Task 1, fabricating test specimens using two traditional processes (autoclave and thermal press) and testing structural performance and dimensional accuracy, provide results of a benchmarking study by which the performance of all future phases will be gauged. Task 2, fabricating test specimens using a non-traditional process (ultrasonic conpaction) and evaluating in a similar fashion, explores the the role of ultrasonic processing parameters using three different thermoplastic composite materials. Further development of LUAM, although beyond the scope of this thesis, will combine laser and ultrasonic technology and eventually demonstrate a working system.

  4. Investigations on LM6 Metal Matrix Composite with borosilicate Glass Reinforcement for Aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnaraj, J. David; Sathish, S.

    2017-10-01

    The recycling of glass wastes from the industries and society holds a threat to the environment and leads to the need for new applications. While producing a metal matrix composite production cost is an important factor which decides the suitable application. So, while developing a new material with this low - cost has great importance in this competitive world. In this study, an metal-matrix composite fabricated from an aluminum alloy (LM6) and Borosilicate glass powder particles with % addition of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% were produced by liquid Processing (stir casting) technique. The variations in the mechanical properties like toughness, compressive strength, hardness, and tensile were examined. The microstructures of the fabricated metal matrix composite have been obtained by using Metallographic microscope. The addition of the borosilicate glass indicated an improved behavior in the hardness and toughness properties. The Rockwell hardness value of fabricated metal matrix composite increases with the increase in % of reinforcement. The compressive and tensile strength of the fabricated MMC increases until reinforcement reaches a maximum of 7.5%. The microstructure of the fabricated MMC shows that the reinforcements were homogeneously distributed in the fabricated metal matrix composite.

  5. The effect of alumina nanofillers size and shape on mechanical behavior of PMMA matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hasan Somaya Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites with the addition of alumina nanofillers show improvement in mechanical properties. The PMMA polymer was used as a matrix and two different types of nanofillers, having extremely different shapes were added in the matrix to form the composite. Reinforcements were based on alumina nanoparticles having either spherical shape or whiskers having the length to diameter ratio of 100. The influence of alumina fillers size, shape and fillers loading on mechanical properties of prepared composite were studied using the nanoindentation measurements and dynamic mechanical analysis. It was observed that both alumina whiskers and alumina spherical nanoparticles added in the PMMA matrix improved the mechanical properties of the composite but the improvement was significantly higher with alumina whisker reinforcement. The concentration of the reinforcing alumina spherical nanoparticles and alumina whiskers in PMMA matrix varied up to 5 wt. %. The best performance was obtained by the addition of 3 wt. % of alumina whiskers in the PMMA matrix with regard to mechanical properties of the obtained composite.

  6. Constraints effects in swollen particulate composites with hyperelastic polymer matrix of finite extensibility modeled by FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šomvársky, Ján; Dušek, Karel; Dušková-Smrčková, Miroslava

    2014-03-01

    The class of particulate composites with cross-linked hyperelastic polymer matrix and non-deformable filler particles represents many important biopolymer and engineering materials. At application conditions, the matrix is either in the swollen state, or the swollen state is utilized for matrix characterization. In this contribution, a numerical model for simulation of equilibrium stress-strain and swelling behavior of this composite material was developed based on finite element method using COMSOL Multiphysics® software. In the constitutive equations (Gibbs energy), the elastic contribution is based on statistical-mechanical model of a network composed of freely jointed chains of finite extensibility and polymer-solvent mixing term is derived from the Flory-Huggins lattice model. A perfect adhesion of matrix-to-particle is assumed. The adhesion of matrix to stiff surface generates stress and degree-of-swelling fields in the composite. The existence of these fields determines the mechanical and swelling properties of the composite. Spatial distribution of filler particles in the composite plays an important role.

  7. A planar model study of creep in metal matrix composites with misaligned short fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of fibre misalignment on the creep behaviour of metal matrix composites is modelled, including hardening behaviour (stage 1), dynamic recovery and steady state creep (stage 2) of the matrix material, using an internal variable constitutive model for the creep behaviour of the metal...... matrix. Numerical plane strain results in terms of average properties and detailed local deformation behaviour up to large strains are needed to show effects of fibre misalignment on the development of inelastic strains and the resulting over-all creep resistance of the material. The creep resistance...... for the composite is markedly reduced by the fibre misalignment and the time needed to reach an approximate steady state is elongated due to the strain induced rotation of the short fibres in the matrix....

  8. Flexural Test in Epoxy Matrix Composites Reinforced with Hemp Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Anna Carolina C.; Rohen, Lázaro A.; Margem, Frederico M.; Vieira, Carlos Maurício F.; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    Synthetic fiber has been gradually replaced by natural fiber, such as lignocellulosic fiber. In comparison with synthetic fiber, natural fiber has shown economic and environmental advantages. The natural fiber presents interfacial characteristics with polymeric matrices that favor a high impact energy absorption by the composite structure. However, until now, little information has been released about the hemp fiber incorporated in polymeric matrices. Specimens containing 0, 10, 20 and 30% in volume of hemp fibers were aligned along the entire length of a mold to create plates of these composites. Those plates were cut following the ASTM standard to obtain specimens for bending tests and the results showed the increase in the flexural strength with the increase of fiber amount.

  9. Evaluation of Amorphous Ribbon Reinforced Resin Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-30

    magnetic properties offered by the ribbons may result in some unique composite applications. UNiLASSMI lED SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF T--- PAGE(Wfa DOMa...presented in Table 2. Excellent transverse to longitudinal property ratios are demonstrated in these data. The cold rolled carbon steel / epoxy system...reinforcements. Amorphous metals have specific strengths significantly higher than that offered by cold rolled steel alloys. The cold rolled steels have an

  10. Chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon nitride, boron nitride, and silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventri, R.D.; Galasso, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports composites of carbon/chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) Si 3 N 4 , carbon/CVD BN, mullite/CVD SiC, and SiC yarn/CVD SiC prepared to determine if there were inherent toughness in these systems. The matrices were deposited at high enough temperatures to ensure that they were crystalline, which should make them more stable at high temperatures. The fiber-matrix bonding in the C/Si 3 N 4 composite appeared to be too strong; the layers of BN in the matrix of the C/BN were too weakly bonded; and the mullite/SiC composite was not as tough as the SiC/SiC composites. Only the SiC yarn/CVD SiC composite exhibited both strength and toughness

  11. Thermal exposure effects on the mechanical properties of a polycrystalline alumina fiber/aluminum matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of thermal exposures and elevated test temperature on the mechanical properties of a unidirectional polycrystalline alumina fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite were investigated. Test temperatures up to 590 K and 2500 hours exposures at 590 K did not significantly affect fiber dominated properties but did severely degrade matrix dominated properties. Fiber strength, degraded by the fabrication process, was restored by post fabrication thermal exposures. Possible degradation mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Microstructural characterisation of electrodeposited coatings of metal matrix composite with alumina nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indyka, P; Beltowska-Lehman, E; Bigos, A

    2012-01-01

    In the present work a nanocrystalline Ni-W metallic matrix was used to fabricate Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings. The MMC (metal matrix composite) coatings with inert α-Al 2 O 3 particles (30 - 90 nm) were electrodeposited from aqueous electrolytes under direct current (DC) and controlled hydrodynamic conditions in a system with a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The chemical composition and microstructure of electrodeposited composites mainly control their functional properties; however, the particles must be uniformly dispersed to exhibit the dispersion-hardening effect. In order to increase the alumina particles incorporation as well as to promote the uniform distribution of the ceramic phase in a matrix, outer ultrasonic field was applied during electrodeposition. The influence of embedded alumina nanoparticles on structural characteristics (morphology, phase composition, residual stresses) of the resulting Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 coatings was investigated in order to obtain a nanocomposite with high hardness and relatively low residual stresses. Surface and cross-section morphology and the chemical composition of deposits was examined in the scanning electron microscope, the EDS technique was used. Microstructure and phase composition were determined by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Based on microstructural and micromechanical properties of the coatings, the optimum conditions for obtaining crack-free homogeneous Ni-W/Al 2 O 3 composite coatings have been determined.

  13. Boron-bearing species in ceramic matrix composites for long-term aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naslain, R.; Guette, A.; Rebillat, F.; Pailler, R.; Langlais, F.; Bourrat, X.

    2004-01-01

    Boron-bearing refractory species are introduced in non-oxide ceramic matrix fibrous composites (such as SiC/SiC composites) to improve their oxidation resistance under load at high temperatures with a view to applications in the aerospace field. B-doped pyrocarbon and hex-BN have been successfully used as interphase (instead of pure pyrocarbon) either as homogeneous or multilayered fiber coatings, to arrest and deflect matrix cracks formed under load (mechanical fuse function) and to give toughness to the materials. A self-healing multilayered matrix is designed and used in a model composite, which combines B-doped pyrocarbon mechanical fuse layers and B- and Si-bearing compound (namely B 4 C and SiC) layers forming B 2 O 3 -based fluid healing phases when exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere. All the materials are deposited by chemical vapor infiltration. Lifetimes under tensile loading of several hundreds hours at high temperatures are reported

  14. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC/RBSN composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, James D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  15. Data on a Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Knowles

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates” (Knowles et al. [1]. The composite comprised a Fe2(Mo, Ti matrix with bcc (Mo, Ti precipitated laths produced in situ by an aging heat treatment, which was shown to confer a toughening effect (Knowles et al. [1]. Here, details are given on a focused ion beam (FIB slice and view experiment performed on the composite so as to determine that the 3D morphology of the bcc (Mo, Ti precipitates were laths rather than needles. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (S(TEM micrographs of the microstructure as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX maps are presented that identify the elemental partitioning between the C14 Laves matrix and the bcc laths, with Mo rejected from the matrix into laths. A TEM selected area diffraction pattern (SADP and key is provided that was used to validate the orientation relation between the matrix and laths identified in (Knowles et al. [1] along with details of the transformation matrix determined.

  16. Tempering Behavior of TiC-Reinforced SKD11 Steel Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-In; Kim, Seong Hoon; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Kim, Dae Ha; Hwang, Keum-Cheol; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-03-01

    TiC-reinforced SKD11 steel matrix composite, fabricated by a pressure infiltration casting, undergoes monotonic decrease in hardness as tempering temperature increases. Element mappings by TEM-EDS and thermodynamic calculation indicate that remarkable redistribution of V between the reinforcement and the steel matrix occurs by partial dissolution and re-precipitation of MC carbides upon casting process. The absence of secondary hardening is led by the enrichment of V in the reinforcement that reduces the V content in the steel matrix; this reduction in V content makes the precipitation of fine VC sluggish during the tempering.

  17. Strain redistribution around holes and notches in fiber-reinforced cross-woven brittle matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben Krogsdal; Brøndsted, Povl

    1997-01-01

    A study of the strain redistribution around holes in two different cross-woven ceramic matrix composites is presented. The strain redistribution around holes in C-f/SiCm and SiCf/SiCm has been measured experimentally under plane stress conditions. Using micro-mechanics and Continuum Damage...... Mechanics, and an identification procedure based on a uni-axial tensile test and a shear test the strain redistribution around a hole or a notch due to matrix cracking can be predicted. Damage due to fiber breakage is not included in the model. Initial matrix damage in the C-f/SiCm material has...

  18. Engineering Interfaces in Metal Matrix Composites (Volume 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-10

    metalographically polished in a Syntron vibratory polisher . These polished surfaces were then coated with SiC of near stoichiometric composition, using a plasma...stresses in annealed coatings on polished (100) silicon wafers cause 0delamination failure if the coating is thick enough to supply the strain energy...20).11(20),.II(20).11(20) Complex*16 BB(20.20). BcB (20,20).cBcB(20,20),cBB(20,20).Cposs Complex*16 X2(20),X21(20).12II(20),ZI Complex*16 Conl,Con2

  19. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  20. Chemical Stability of the Fiber Coating/Matrix Interface in Silicon-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and boron nitride are used as fiber coatings in silicon-based composites. In order to assess the long-term stability of these materials, reactions of carbon/Si3N4 and BN/SiC were studied at high temperatures with Knudsen effusion, coupon tests, and microstructural examination. In the carbon/Si3N4 system, carbon reacted with Si3N4 to form gaseous N2 and SiC. The formation of SiC limited further reaction by physically separating the carbon and Si3N4. Consequently, the development of high p(N2) at the interface, predicted from thermochemical calculations, did not occur, thus limiting the potential deleterious effects of the reaction on the composite. Strong indications of a reaction between BN and SiC were shown by TEM and SIMS analysis of the BN/SiC interface. In long-term exposures, this reaction can lead to a depletion of a BN coating and/or an unfavorable change of the interfacial properties, limiting the beneficial effects of the coating.

  1. Local-global analysis of crack growth in continuously reinfoced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Ahmed, Shamim

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a mathematical model for predicting the strength and micromechanical failure characteristics of continuously reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The local-global analysis models the vicinity of a propagating crack tip as a local heterogeneous region (LHR) consisting of spring-like representation of the matrix, fibers and interfaces. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects of LHR size, component properties, and interface conditions on the strength and sequence of the failure processes in the unidirectional composite system.

  2. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  3. Effect of aging hardening on in situ synthesis magnesium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiuqing; Liao Lihua; Ma Naiheng; Wang Haowei

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composites reinforced with TiC particulates was synthesized using in situ synthesis technique. The result of XRD revealed the presence of TiC in precursor blocks and TiC/AZ91 composites. Effect of aging hardening on the composites was described using Brinell hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the aging hardening peak of TiC/AZ91 composite appeared earlier comparatively with that of AZ91 magnesium alloy. And the appearance of aging hardening peak was earlier under the higher aging temperature such as 200 deg. C. The precipitating behavior of Mg 17 Al 12 phase in AZ91 alloy and TiC/AZ91 composites was described. Little discontinuous was discovered in the composites, and the amount of continuous precipitate in the composite matrix is smaller comparatively to that of AZ91 alloy. These results were analyzed with the fine grain size, much more interface between TiC and magnesium and high-density dislocation in magnesium matrix, which was contributed to the addition of TiC particulates

  4. Production of Decorative Cast Metal Matrix Composites with a Complex Relief and Nonmetal Reinforcement Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Spasova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is relevant to the research of possibilities for the production of decorative complex relief metal matrix composites (MMCs of the “invitro” type, with unformed and unchanging reinforcement (strengthening phase in the process of creating a composite. The research on the methods of metal matrix composites development in this paper has been brought to the application of different space vacuum schemes for composite synthesisof vacuuming the space for composites synthesis by using the notion of the “capillary forming”. In this method the metal matrix (copper alloy melt was infiltrated in the space between the pellets of reinforcement phase (quartz particles – SiO2, whereas the classical method adopted for the obtaining MMCs “in vitro”, uses a mechanism of forced insertion of the reinforcement phase into the ready for use melt, followed by homogenization of the composite structure. In the particular case, because the obtained composite will have a complex relief three-dimensional surface, the conditions for compacting the building phases in the three directions x, y, z should be virtually equalized. In order to accomplish the task set, a laboratory system is developed. The experiments were conducted with laboratory equipment elaborated on the base of another equipment for "capillary forming" with extra vacuum. The structures of the obtained MMCs were tested by metallographic analysis.

  5. Al-matrix composite materials reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonneville, J; Laplanche, G; Joulain, A; Gauthier-Brunet, V; Dubois, S

    2010-01-01

    Al-matrix material composites were produced using hot isostatic pressing technique, starting with pure Al and icosahedral (i) Al-Cu-Fe powders. Depending on the processing temperature, the final reinforcement particles are either still of the initial i-phase or transformed into the tetragonal ω-Al0 0.70 Cu 0.20 Fe 0.10 crystalline phase. Compression tests performed in the temperature range 293K - 823K on the two types of composite, i.e. Al/i and Al/ω, indicate that the flow stress of both composites is strongly temperature dependent and exhibit distinct regimes with increasing temperature. Differences exist between the two composites, in particular in yield stress values. In the low temperature regime (T ≤ 570K), the yield stress of the Al/ω composite is nearly 75% higher than that of the Al/i composite, while for T > 570K both composites exhibit similar yield stress values. The results are interpreted in terms of load transfer contribution between the matrix and the reinforcement particles and elementary dislocation mechanisms in the Al matrix.

  6. Wear Resistance of TiC Reinforced Cast Steel Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobula S.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wear resistance of TiC-cast steel metal matrix composite has been investigated. Composites were obtained with SHSB method known as SHS synthesis during casting. It has been shown the differences in wear between composite and base cast steel. The Miller slurry machine test were used to determine wear loss of the specimens. The slurry was composed of SiC and water. The worn surface of specimens after test, were studied by SEM. Experimental observation has shown that surface of composite zone is not homogenous and consist the matrix lakes. Microscopic observations revealed the long grooves with SiC particles indented in the base alloy area, and spalling pits in the composite area. Due to the presence of TiC carbides on composite layer, specimens with TiC reinforced cast steel exhibited higher abrasion resistance. The wear of TiC reinforced cast steel mechanism was initially by wearing of soft matrix and in second stage by polishing and spalling of TiC. Summary weight loss after 16hr test was 0,14÷0,23 g for composite specimens and 0,90 g for base steel.

  7. Fiber coating/matrix reactions in silicon-base ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.N.; Jacobson, N.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Knudsen cell technique and coupons of carbon coated Si3N4 and BN coated SiC were employed to study the possible reactions at the SiC/C/Si3N4 and SiC/BN/SiC interface. Carbon reacts with Si3N4 to form gaseous N2 and solid SiC. Solid SiC acts as a physical barrier to the reaction, which prevents the generation of high N2 pressure predicted from thermochemical calculations. Thus, deleterious effects of the reaction to the composite are limited. Limited reactions between BN and C-rich SiC was observed. However, the vapor pressure was so low that it is not likely to cause any interfacial instability. The predicted formation of a BN-C solid solution was not observed. 10 refs

  8. Fiber coating/matrix reactions in silicon-base ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. N.; Jacobson, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Knudsen cell technique and coupons of carbon coated Si3N4 and BN coated SiC were employed to study the possible reactions at the SiC/C/Si3N4 and SiC/BN/SiC interface. Carbon reacts with Si3N4 to form gaseous N2 and solid SiC. Solid SiC acts as a physical barrier to the reaction, which prevents the generation of high N2 pressure predicted from thermochemical calculations. Thus, deleterious effects of the reaction to the composite are limited. Limited reactions between BN and C-rich SiC was observed. However, the vapor pressure was so low that it is not likely to cause any interfacial instability. The predicted formation of a BN-C solid solution was not observed.

  9. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  10. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy; Obtencao, usinagem e desgaste de materiais compositos de matriz metalica processados via metalurgia do po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de. E-mail: erbjesus@usp.br

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  11. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  12. Corn gluten meal as a biodegradable matrix material in wood fibre reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, M.D.H. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand); Pickering, K.L. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)]. E-mail: klp@waikato.ac.nz; Weal, S.J. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2005-12-05

    This study was undertaken to investigate corn gluten meal (CGM) as a biodegradable matrix material for wood fibre reinforced composites. CGM was used alone, as well as hybridized with polypropylene, and reinforced with radiata pine (Pinus Radiata) fibre using a twin-screw extruder followed by injection moulding. Tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were carried out to assess the composites. For composites from CGM and wood fibres, extrusion was carried out with the aid of the following plasticizers: octanoic acid, glycerol, polyethylene glycol and water. Windows of processability for the different plasticizers were obtained for all plasticizers. These were found to lie between 20 and 50 wt.% of plasticizer with a maximum of approximately 20% wood fibre reinforcement. The best mechanical properties were obtained with a matrix containing 10 wt.% octanoic acid and 30 wt.% water, which gave a tensile strength and Young's modulus of 18.7 MPa and 4 GPa, respectively. Hybrid matrix composites were compounded with a maleated polypropylene coupling agent and benzoyl peroxide as a cross-linking agent. The highest tensile strength and Young's modulus obtained from hybrid matrix composites were 36.9 MPa and 5.8 GPa with 50 wt.% fibre.

  13. A Preliminary Investigation of Ductility-Enhancement Mechanism through In Situ Nanofibrillation in Thermoplastic Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Patham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary investigation of interrelationships between tensile stress-strain characteristics and morphology evolution during deformation is conducted on a commercially available thermoplastic composite with a low-surface-energy nanofibrillating poly(tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE additive. In this class of composites, the deformation-associated nanofibrillation of the low-surface-energy additive has been hypothesized to provide an additional dissipation mechanism, thereby enhancing the ductility of the composite. This class of composites offers potential for automotive light weighting in exterior and interior body and fascia applications; it is therefore of interest to investigate processing-structure-property interrelationships in these materials. This study specifically probes the interrelationships between the plastic deformation within the matrix and the fibrillation of the low-surface-energy additive; tensile tests are carried out at two different temperatures which are chosen so as to facilitate and suppress plastic deformation within the matrix polymer. Based on these preliminary investigations, it is noted that PTFE fibrillation acts synergistically with the ductile deformation of the matrix resin resulting in higher strains to failure of the composite; the results also suggest that the mechanism of fibrillation-assisted enhancement of strains to failure may not operate in the absence of matrix plasticity.

  14. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber/copper matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, D.L. [Case Western Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); McDanels, D.L. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  15. Charpy impact tenacity of epoxy matrix composites reinforced with aligned jute fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Camposo Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites are gaining attention as engineering materials for advanced applications, including components of high performance ballistic armors. This requires superior mechanical properties, such as tenacity. Composites reinforced with jute fiber are currently being investigated as possible advanced engineering materials. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to evaluate the impact resistance of epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol% of continuous and aligned jute fibers. This evaluation was performed by measuring the Charpy absorbed impact energy of standard ASTM notched specimens. The results indicated a significant increase in the absorbed impact energy with the volume fraction of jute fibers. The microstructural mechanism related to this performance was revealed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Keywords: Jute fiber, Epoxy composites, Charpy, Impact test

  16. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber/copper matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  17. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  18. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    Structural and functional materials used in solid- and liquid-fueled energy systems are subject to gas- and condensed-phase corrosion and erosion by entrained particles. For a given material, its temperature and the composition of the corrodents determine the corrosion rates, while gas flow conditions and particle aerodynamic diameters determine erosion rates. Because there are several mechanisms by which corrodents deposit on a surface, the corrodent composition depends not only on the composition of the fuel, but also on the temperature of the material and the size range of the particles being deposited. In general, it is difficult to simulate under controlled laboratory conditions all of the possible corrosion and erosion mechanisms to which a material may be exposed in an energy system. Therefore, with funding from the Advanced Research Materials Program, the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is coordinating with NCC Engineering and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide researchers with no-cost opportunities to expose materials in pilot-scale systems to conditions of corrosion and erosion similar to those occurring in commercial power systems. The EERC has two pilot-scale solid-fuel systems available for exposure of materials coupons. The slagging furnace system (SFS) was built under the DOE Combustion 2000 Program as a testing facility for advanced heat exchanger subsystems. It is a 2.5-MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) solid-fuel combustion system with exit temperatures of 2700 to 2900 F to ensure that the ash in the main combustor is molten and flowing. Sample coupons may be exposed in the system either within the slagging zone or near the convective air heater at 1800 F (980 C). In addition, a pilot-scale entrained-bed gasifier system known as the transport reactor development unit (TRDU) is available. Also operating at approximately 2.5 MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr), it is a pressurized unit

  19. EVALUATION & COMPARISION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM ALLOY 5052 REINFORCED WITH SILICONCARBIDE, GRAPHITE AND FLY ASH HYBRID METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    ANKUSH SACHDEVA; RAM NARAYAN; R.D.GUPTA

    2013-01-01

    The engineering fraternity has always been looking forward to develop an outstanding and wonder-materials which would fit the ever-changing demands of the world. In order to fullfill the demands various newdiscoveries have been made by scientists, engineers and resrearchers. In todays competitive world many, materials have been tried for various unexplored conditions , but the never ending demand of the world encourages the researchers to develop the new material. Now the researchers are prep...

  20. Non linear viscoelasticity applied for the study of durability of polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardon, A.; Brinson, H. F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is described for the durability analysis of polymer matrix composites, based on nonlinear viscoelasticity theory. The durability analysis is performed on the basis of a certain number of tests carried out on limited and, if possible, short time scale by the use of accelerating factors. The method was applied to thermomatrix composites under uniaxial and biaxial loadings, showing satisfactory agreement between the life-time predictions and the published data on real-time behavior.

  1. Determination of lattice orientation in aluminium alloy grains by low energy gallium ion-channelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, Jonathan R. [Aerospace Metal Composites Ltd., RAE Road, Farnborough, GU14 6XE (United Kingdom); Dashwood, Richard J. [WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chater, Richard J., E-mail: r.chater@imperial.ac.u [Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Polished sections of a fine-grained aluminium, silicon carbide metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy were prepared by sputtering using a low energy gallium ion source and column (FIB). The MMC had been processed by high temperature extrusion. Images of the polished surface were recorded using the ion-induced secondary electron emission. The metal matrix grains were distinguished by gallium ion-channelling contrast from the silicon carbide component. The variation of the contrast from the aluminium grains with tilt angle can be recorded and used to determine lattice orientation with the contrast from the silicon carbide (SiC) component as a reference. This method is rapid and suits site-specific investigations where classical methods of sample preparation fail.

  2. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    Geopolymers have the potential to cross the process performance gap between polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites (CMC), enabling high temperature capable composites that are manufactured at relatively low temperatures. Unfortunately, the inherently low toughness of these geopolymers limits the performance of the resulting fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites. Toughness improvements in composites can be addressed through the adjustments in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength and through the improvements in the inherent toughness of the constituent materials. This study investigates the potential to improve the inherent toughness of the geopolymer matrix material through the addition of nanofillers, by considering physical dimensions, mechanical properties, reinforcing capability and interfacial bond strength effects. A process optimization study was first undertaken to develop the ability to produce consistent, neat geopolymer samples, a critical precursor to producing nano-filled geopolymer for toughness evaluation. After that, single edge notched bend beam fracture toughness and un-notched beam flexural strength were evaluated for silicon carbide, alumina and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymer samples treated at various temperatures in reactive and inert environments. Toughness results of silicon carbide and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymers suggested that with the improved baseline properties, high aspect ratio nanofillers with high interfacial bond strength are the most capable in further improving the toughness of geopolymers. Among the high aspect ratio nanofillers i.e. nanofibers, 2vol% silicon carbide whicker (SCW) showed the highest improvement in fracture toughness and flexural strength of ~164% & ~185%, respectively. After heat treatment at 650 °C, SCW reinforcement was found to be effective, with little reduction in the performance, while the performance of alumina nanofiber (ANF) reinforced geopolymer significantly

  3. Standard test method for translaminar fracture toughness of laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of translaminar fracture toughness, KTL, for laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials of various ply orientations using test results from monotonically loaded notched specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to room temperature laboratory air environments. 1.3 Composite materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by type of polymer matrix or fiber, provided that the specimen sizes and the test results meet the requirements of this test method. This test method was developed primarily from test results of various carbon fiber – epoxy matrix laminates and from additional results of glass fiber – epoxy matrix, glass fiber-polyester matrix pultrusions and carbon fiber – bismaleimide matrix laminates (1-4, 6, 7). 1.4 A range of eccentrically loaded, single-edge-notch tension, ESE(T), specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but planar size may be variable and adjusted, with asso...

  4. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  5. Friction Stir Processing of Copper-Coated SiC Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we proposed a novel friction stir processing (FSP to produce a locally reinforced aluminum matrix composite (AMC by stirring copper-coated SiC particulate reinforcement into Al6061 alloy matrix. Electroless-plating process was applied to deposit the copper surface coating on the SiC particulate reinforcement for the purpose of improving the interfacial adhesion between SiC particles and Al matrix. The core-shell SiC structure provides a layer for the atomic diffusion between aluminum and copper to enhance the cohesion between reinforcing particles and matrix on one hand, the dispersion of fine copper in the Al matrix during FSP provides further dispersive strengthening and solid solution strengthening, on the other hand. Hardness distribution and tensile results across the stir zone validated the novel concept in improving the mechanical properties of AMC that was realized via FSP. Optical microscope (OM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM investigations were conducted to investigate the microstructure. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA, and X-ray diffraction (XRD were explored to analyze the atomic inter-diffusion and the formation of intermetallic at interface. The possible strengthening mechanisms of the AMC containing Cu-coated SiC particulate reinforcement were interpreted. The concept of strengthening developed in this work may open a new way of fabricating of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites.

  6. Cast composites with Al-matrix reinforced with intermetallic carbide phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work authors presented collected results from studies concerning the manufacturing of metal matrix composites with reinforcement of intermetallic phases, mainly carbides, with use of different casting techniques. For composite matrix different Al-Si alloys were used. Presented results include microstructural studies, quantitative analysis, phases description and their chemical composition. In this part of the work authors characterized the transition zone between the reinforcing particles and metal matrix, showing the possibilities of controlling the properties of the transition zone and type of occurring transition phases.During the studies two casting methods were used: permanent mould casting and lost wax casting. Authors indicated restrictions and possibilities of these methods in dispersive composite elements reinforced with metallic particles. The characteristic feature of such particles is their physical and chemical reactivity, which deteriorates the rheological properties of the liquid dispersion. Selection of technological parameters for manufacturing and casting was aimed on proper filling of the mould with liquid dispersion.Both methods of casting were used for manufacturing of elements which technical application requires special tribological properties, eg. brake discs. Operating properties of all obtained composites were studied and analyzed. Authors showed the analysis of tribological studies connected with the composite structure and type and quantity of the reinforcement used.

  7. Mechanical Properties of TC4 Matrix Composites Prepared by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the penetration performance of TC4, the direct laser deposition technology was used to prepare TC4 composite material. TA15+30% TiC powder, TA15+20%Cr3C2 powder and TA15+15%B4C powder were used as deposited materials for TC4 matrix. The micromorphology, change of hardness of the deposited coating and mechanical properties of the three composites were studied. The experimental results demonstrate that the TC4 matrix with the three kinds of materials can form a complete metallurgical bonding, and the strength of TC4-(TA15+TiC, TC4-(TA15+Cr3C2 and TC4-(TA15+B4C are higher than that of TC4 matrix materials, while the plasticity is slightly worse.

  8. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  9. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional......The present paper accesses the significance of shrinkage inducedclamping pressure in fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms incementitious composite materials. The paper contains a description of an experimental setup whichallows mbox{measurement} of the clamping pressure which develops on anelastic...... inhomogeneity embedded in a matrix consisting of acementitious material undergoing shrinkage during hydration(autogenous shrinkage). Furthermore, the paperpresents the analysis necessary to perform an interpretation of the experimental results and which allows for thedetermination of the clamping pressure...

  10. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  11. Effect of sintering temperatures on titanium matrix composites reinforced by ceramic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, F.; Amigo, V.; Busquets, D.; Klyatskina, E. [Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department. Polytechnical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Titanium and titanium composites have a potential use in aerospace and biotechnology industries, and nowadays in others like sports and fashion ones. In this work composite materials, based on titanium matrix reinforced with ceramic particles, have been developed. PM route is used to obtain compact and sintered samples. TiN and TiAl powders, are milled with Ti powder in different volumetric percentages in a ball mill. These mixtures are pressed in a uniaxial press and sintered in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures between 1180 to 1220 deg. C. Porosity of samples is analysed, before and after the sintering process, by Archimedes technique and by image analysis. Mechanical properties and the reinforcement particles influence in the titanium matrix are studied by flexion test in green and sintered states, and by hardness and microhardness tests. Complimentarily, a microstructural analysis is carried out by optical and electron microscopy, and the reactivity between the reinforce particles and titanium matrix are studied. (authors)

  12. Finite element implementation and numerical issues of strain gradient plasticity with application to metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksson, Per; Gudmundson, Peter; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2009-01-01

    of quadrilateral type are examined and a few numerical issues are addressed related to these elements as well as to strain gradient plasticity theories in general. Numerical results are presented for an idealized cell model of a metal matrix composite under shear loading. It is shown that strengthening due...

  13. Metal particles constraint in glass matrix composites and its impact on fracture toughness enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotoul, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    387-389 (2004), s. 404-408 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : brittle matrix composites * crack bridging * crack trapping Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  14. Effect of static pre-loading on fracture toughness of Nicalon fibre glass matrix composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Chawla, K. K.; Kulkarmi, R.; Koopman, M.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    č. 367 (2004), s. 17-23 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Nicalon fibre * glass matrix composite * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  15. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional...

  16. Bone induction by composite of bioerodible polyorthoester and demineralized bone matrix in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Solheim, E; Bang, G

    1991-01-01

    A composite of a local, sustained, drug-release system, Alzamer bioerodible polyorthoester, and demineralized bone-matrix (DBM) particles implanted in the abdominal muscle of 89 Wistar rats induced cartilage and bone formation at the same rate as DBM when evaluated histologically and by 85Sr upta...

  17. Properties of porous FeAlOy/FeAlx ceramic matrix composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Porous ceramic matrix composites FeAlOy/FeAlx with incorporated metal inclusions (cermets) were synthesized by pressureless method, which includes hydrothermal treatment of mechanically alloyed FeAl powder followed by calcination. Their main structural, textural and mechanical features are described.

  18. Sliding wear resistance of metal matrix composite layers prepared by high power laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, Vaclav; Matthews, D; de Hosson, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Two laser surface engineering techniques, Laser Cladding and Laser Melt Injection (LMI), were used to prepare three different metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 1 mm and approximately 25-30% volume fraction of ceramic particles. SiC/Al-8Si, WC/Ti-6Al-4V and TiB2/Ti-6Al-4V layers

  19. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this work, the technique is used to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) by using an elementally blended feedstock combining metal and ceramic powders in the melt pool, which melt and solidify to create the required morphology. Ti6Al4V + TiC MMCs were...

  20. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  1. Properties of porous FeAlOy/FeAlx ceramic matrix composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 7. Properties of porous FeAlO/FeAl ceramic matrix composite influenced by mechanical activation of FeAl powder. V Usoltsev S Tikhov A Salanov V Sadykov G Golubkova O Lomovskii. Volume 36 Issue 7 December 2013 pp 1195-1200 ...

  2. Critique of Macro Flow/Damage Surface Representations for Metal Matrix Composites Using Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidance for the formulation of robust, multiaxial, constitutive models for advanced materials is provided by addressing theoretical and experimental issues using micromechanics. The multiaxial response of metal matrix composites, depicted in terms of macro flow/damage surfaces, is predicted at room and elevated temperatures using an analytical micromechanical model that includes viscoplastic matrix response as well as fiber-matrix debonding. Macro flow/damage surfaces (i.e., debonding envelopes, matrix threshold surfaces, macro 'yield' surfaces, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate, and surfaces of constant dissipation rate) are determined for silicon carbide/titanium in three stress spaces. Residual stresses are shown to offset the centers of the flow/damage surfaces from the origin and their shape is significantly altered by debonding. The results indicate which type of flow/damage surfaces should be characterized and what loadings applied to provide the most meaningful experimental data for guiding theoretical model development and verification.

  3. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: j.h.you@ipp.mpg.de

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated.

  4. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, J.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated

  5. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens

  6. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  7. Bibliography on Ceramic Matrix Composites and Reinforcing Whiskers, Platelets, and Fibers, 1970-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Ceram. Soc. Bull. Interface Structure and Matrix Crystallization 68 (2), 429-442, 1989 in SiC (Nicalon)- Pyrex Composites (AD D143 179) Murthy, V. S. R...Int. SAMPE Tech. Conf, 21st 1989 7.1.0.76 21, 903-14, Sep 1989 Iosipescu In-Plane Shear Tests of SiC- Pyrex (AD D250 284 Composites Seerat-Un-Nabi, A...Mechanical Properties of Particle Composites 5 (1), 1-4, 1989 Haber, R. A. Wachtman Jr., J. B.(1AD D142 6958) Bol. Soc. Esp. Ceram. Vidrio 29 (2), 69-72

  8. Synthesis and characterization of copper–alumina metal matrix composite by conventional and spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, K.; Ray, B.C.; Chaira, D.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The evolution of microstructure, density and hardness of Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composites with different techniques of sintering has been demonstrated here. The effect of sintering atmosphere has also been discussed. Synthesis of microcomposites was carried out by reinforcing 5, 10 and 15 vol.% of alumina powder particle (average size ∼5.71 μm) in copper matrix via conventional sintering using H 2 and N 2 atmospheres. Nanocomposites of 1, 5, 7 vol.% alumina (average size 2 O 3 metal matrix microcomposites and nanocomposites via conventional route and spark plasma sintering routes are studied and compared. Maximum Vickers hardness of 60 and 80 are obtained when the Cu–15 vol.% Al 2 O 3 is conventionally sintered in N 2 and H 2 atmosphere respectively. However, maximum hardness value of 125 is achieved for the Cu–5 vol.% Al 2 O 3 nanocomposite prepared by spark plasma sintering. It has been observed that Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composite (MMC) shows poor mechanical properties when it is conventionally sintered in N 2 atmosphere than H 2 atmosphere. Highlights: ► Better matrix–reinforcement interfacial bonding and compatibility in hydrogen atmosphere than nitrogen atmosphere. ► An improvement in density and hardness under hydrogen atmosphere than in nitrogen atmosphere is manifested. ► Spark plasma sintering method results in higher density and hardness values than conventional sintering. - Abstract: The evolution of microstructure, density and hardness of Cu–Al 2 O 3 metal matrix composites with different techniques of sintering have been demonstrated here. The effect of sintering atmosphere on the interfacial compatibility of matrix and reinforcement has also been discussed. Synthesis of microcomposites was carried out by reinforcing 5, 10 and 15 vol.% of alumina powder particles (average size ∼5.71 μm) in copper matrix via conventional sintering using N 2, H 2 and Ar atmospheres. Nanocomposites of 1, 5, 7 vol

  9. A micro-Raman study of Cu-particulate-filled epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tognana

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A micro-Raman study is carried out to investigate the influence of the filler on the curing process of bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (DGEBA-based epoxy matrix composites. The composites are cured (14 h at 393 K with an anhydride (methyl tetrahydro phthalic anhydride, MTHPA, 100:90 pbw, catalyzed with a tertiary amine (0.7 pbw and filled with a 30% volume of Cu particles of approximately 75 µm in diameter. The experimental results are compared with those obtained for the same epoxy resin unfilled and for the same composite with Cu filler but not catalyzed. The micro-Raman experimental technique is used to search for information on the curing process in different regions of the matrix, near to and far from the copper filler, taking into account the results of differential-scanning-calorimetry measurements performed on the same composites. The results provide information on the influence of the copper filler on the curing process of the epoxy matrix. Differences were observed in the peaks associated with the epoxy ring and the ester group as a function of the distance to the nearest copper particle, but no differences were observed between the different composites.

  10. Local-global analysis of crack growth in continuously reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Ahmed, Shamin

    1988-01-01

    The development is described of a mathematical model for predicting the strength and micromechanical failure characteristics of continuously reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The local-globe analysis models the vicinity of a propagating crack tip as a local heterogeneous region (LHR) consisting of spring like representation of the matrix, fibers and interfaces. This region is embedded in an anisotropic continuum (representing the bulk composite) which is modeled by conventional finite elements. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects of LHR size, component properties, interface conditions, etc. on the strength and sequence of the failure processes in the unidirectional composite system. The results are compared with those predicted by the models developed by Marshall et al. (1985) and by Budiansky et al. (1986).

  11. Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Studies of Fly Ash Reinforced AA-6351 Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uthayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash particles are potentially used in metal matrix composites due to their low cost, low density, and availability in large quantities as waste by-products in thermal power plants. This study describes multifactor-based experiments that were applied to research and investigation on dry sliding wear system of stir-cast aluminum alloy 6351 with 5, 10, and 15 wt.% fly ash reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs. The effects of parameters such as load, sliding speed, and percentage of fly ash on the sliding wear, specific wear rate, and friction coefficient were analyzed using Grey relational analysis on a pin-on-disc machine. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was also employed to investigate which design parameters significantly affect the wear behavior of the composite. The results showed that the applied load exerted the greatest effect on the dry sliding wear followed by the sliding velocity.

  12. Izod Impact Test in Epoxi Matrix Composites Reinforced with Hemp Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohen, Lázaro A.; Margem, Frederico M.; Neves, Anna C. C.; Monteiro, Sérgio N.; Gomes, Maycon A.; de Castro, Rafael G.; Maurício, F. V. Carlos; de Paula, Fernanda

    Synthetic fiber has been gradually replaced by natural fiber, such as lignocellulosic fiber. In comparison with synthetic fiber, natural fiber has shown economic and environmental advantages. The natural fiber presents interfacial characteristics with polymeric matrices that favor a high impact energy absorption by the composite structure. However, until now little has been evaluated about the hemp fiber incorporated in polymeric matrices. This study has the purpose of evaluate the impact resistance of this kind of epoxy matrix composite reinforced with different percentages of hemp fibers. The impact resistance has substantially increased the relative amount of hemp fiber incorporated as reinforcement in the composite. This performance was associated with the difficulty of rupture imposed by the fibers resulting from the interaction of hemp fiber / epoxy matrix that helps absorb the impact energy.

  13. Insights on synergy of materials and structures in biomimetic platelet-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhavand, Navid; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid materials such as biomimetic platelet-matrix composites are in high demand to confer low weight and multifunctional mechanical properties. This letter reports interfacial-bond regulated assembly of polymers on cement-an archetype model with significant infrastructure applications. We demonstrate a series of 20+ molecular dynamics studies on decoding and optimizing the complex interfacial interactions including the role and types of various heterogeneous, competing interfacial bonds that are key to adhesion and interfacial strength. Our results show an existence of an optimum overlap length scale (˜15 nm) between polymers and cement crystals, exhibiting the best balance of strength, toughness, stiffness, and ductility for the composite. This finding, combined with the fundamental insights into the nature of interfacial bonds, provides key hypotheses for selection and processing of constituents to deliberate the best synergy in the structure and materials of platelet-matrix composites.

  14. Numerical Simulations of As-Extruded Mg Matrix Composites Interpenetrated by Metal Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Wang, H.; Wang, S. R.; Yang, X. F.; Li, P.

    2017-12-01

    The interpenetrating magnesium composites reinforced by three-dimensional braided stainless steel wire reinforcement were fabricated and investigated. The extrusion processes of the composites in different conditions were carried out and simulated by finite element method using the DEFORM-3D software. The results show that the matrix and reinforcement of the composites form a good interfacial bonding and the grains were refined by extrusion and the influence of reinforcement, which are in accordance with the enhanced strength and degraded plasticity. The combined quality between the matrix and reinforcement can be strengthened in extrusion chamber where occurred large strain and suffered intense stress, and the effective stress of the material increases continuously with the increase in extrusion ratio and the decrease in extrusion speed until it reaches a stable value.

  15. Characterization on C/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites with Novel Fiber Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, J. Douglas; McCue, Terry; Verrilli, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are attractive candidate materials in the aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, low density and higher temperature capabilities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is pursuing the use of CMC components in advanced Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) propulsion applications. Carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) is the primary material of interest for a variety of RLV propulsion applications. These composites offer high- strength carbon fibers and a high modulus, oxidation-resistant matrix. For comparison, two types of carbon fibers were processed with novel types of interface coatings (multilayer and pseudoporous). For RLV propulsion applications, environmental durability will be critical. The coatings show promise of protecting the carbon fibers from the oxidizing environment. The strengths and microstructures of these composite materials are presented.

  16. Composite Coatings with Ceramic Matrix Including Nanomaterials as Solid Lubricants for Oil-Less Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the theoretical basis of manufacturing and chosen applications of composite coatings with ceramic matrix containing nanomaterials as a solid lubricant (AHC+NL. From a theoretical point of view, in order to reduce the friction coefficient of sliding contacts, two materials are required, i.e. one with a high hardness and the other with low shear strength. In case of composite coatings AHC+NL the matrix is a very hard and wear resistant anodic oxide coating (AHC whereas the solid lubricant used is the nanomaterial (NL featuring a low shear strength such as glassy carbon nanotubes (GC. Friction coefficient of cast iron GJL-350 sliding against the coating itself is much higher (0.18-0.22 than when it slides against a composite coating (0.08-0.14. It is possible to reduce the friction due to the presence of carbon nanotubes, or metal nanowires.

  17. EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF BASALT TEXTILE REINFORCED CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Valentová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the analysis of a ceramic matrix composite, more specifically the plain weave textile fabric composite made of basalt fibers embedded into the pyrolyzed polysiloxane matrix. Attention is paid to the determination of effective elastic properties of the yarn via homogenization based on the Mori-Tanaka averaging scheme and the 1st order numerical homogenization method adopting a suitable representative computational model. The latter approach is then employed to simulate the response of the yarn when loaded beyond the elastic limits. The required mechanical properties of individual material phases are directly measured using nanoindentation with in-build scanning probe microscopy. Applicability of the proposed computational methodology is supported by the analysis of a unidirectional fibrous composite, representing the yarn, subjected to a macroscopically uniform strain.

  18. Modeling Cyclic Fatigue Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures in Steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbiao Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the cyclic fatigue hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs at elevated temperatures in steam have been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existing in matrix cracking modes 3 and 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, is considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The hysteresis loops of 2D SiC/SiC composites corresponding to different peak stresses, test conditions, and loading frequencies have been predicted using the present analysis. The damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire matrix cracking modes of the composite, and the hysteresis dissipated energy increase with increasing fatigue peak stress. With increasing cycle number, the interface shear stress in the longitudinal yarns decreases, leading to transition of interface slip types of matrix cracking modes 3 and 5.

  19. Microstructure and hardness of WC-Co particle reinforced iron matrix surface composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Peng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high Cr cast iron surface composite material reinforced with WC-Co particles 2-6 mm in size was prepared using a pressureless sand mold infiltration casting technique. The composition, microstructure and hardness were determined by means of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA, scanning electron microscope (SEM and Rockwell hardness measurements. It is determined that the obtained composite layer is about 15 mm thick with a WC-Co particle volumetric fraction of ~38%. During solidification, interface reaction takes place between WC-Co particles and high chromium cast iron. Melting and dissolving of prefabricated particles are also found, suggesting that local Co melting and diffusion play an important role in promoting interface metallurgical bonding. The composite layer is composed of ferrite and a series of carbides, such as (Cr, W, Fe23C6, WC, W2C, M6C and M12C. The inhomogeneous hardness in the obtained composite material shows a gradient decrease from the particle reinforced metal matrix composite layer to the matrix layer. The maximum hardness of 86.3 HRA (69.5 HRC is obtained on the particle reinforced surface, strongly indicating that the composite can be used as wear resistant material.

  20. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  1. Improvement of thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composites for 4. generation nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrero, J.

    2009-11-01

    This study deals with thermal conductivity improvement of SiCf/SiC ceramic matrix composites materials to be used as cladding material in 4. generation nuclear reactor. The purpose of the study is to develop a composite for which both the temperature and irradiation effect is less pronounced on thermal conductivity of material than for SiC. This material will be used as matrix in CMC with SiC fibers. Some TiC-SiC composites with different SiC volume contents were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintering process enables to fabricate specimens very fast, with a very fine microstructure and without any sintering aids. Neutron irradiation has been simulated using heavy ions, at room temperature and at 500 C. Evolution of the thermal properties of irradiated materials is measured using modulated photothermal IR radiometry experiment and was related to structural evolution as function of dose and temperature. It appears that such approach is reliable to evaluate TiC potentiality as matrix in CMC. Finally, CMC with TiC matrix and SiC fibers were fabricated and both mechanical and thermal properties were measured and compare to SiCf/SiC CMC. (author)

  2. Matrix intensification alters avian functional group composition in adjacent rainforest fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus P Deikumah

    Full Text Available Conversion of farmland land-use matrices to surface mining is an increasing threat to the habitat quality of forest remnants and their constituent biota, with consequences for ecosystem functionality. We evaluated the effects of matrix type on bird community composition and the abundance and evenness within avian functional groups in south-west Ghana. We hypothesized that surface mining near remnants may result in a shift in functional composition of avifaunal communities, potentially disrupting ecological processes within tropical forest ecosystems. Matrix intensification and proximity to the remnant edge strongly influenced the abundance of members of several functional guilds. Obligate frugivores, strict terrestrial insectivores, lower and upper strata birds, and insect gleaners were most negatively affected by adjacent mining matrices, suggesting certain ecosystem processes such as seed dispersal may be disrupted by landscape change in this region. Evenness of these functional guilds was also lower in remnants adjacent to surface mining, regardless of the distance from remnant edge, with the exception of strict terrestrial insectivores. These shifts suggest matrix intensification can influence avian functional group composition and related ecosystem-level processes in adjacent forest remnants. The management of matrix habitat quality near and within mine concessions is important for improving efforts to preserveavian biodiversity in landscapes undergoing intensification such as through increased surface mining.

  3. Mapping the coupled role of structure and materials in mechanics of platelet-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanian, Shafee; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2018-03-01

    Despite significant progresses on understanding and mimicking the delicate nano/microstructure of biomaterials such as nacre, decoding the indistinguishable merger of materials and structures in controlling the tradeoff in mechanical properties has been long an engineering pursuit. Herein, we focus on an archetype platelet-matrix composite and perform ∼400 nonlinear finite element simulations to decode the complex interplay between various structural features and material characteristics in conferring the balance of mechanical properties. We study various combinatorial models expressed by four key dimensionless parameters, i.e. characteristic platelet length, matrix plasticity, platelet dissimilarity, and overlap offset, whose effects are all condensed in a new unifying parameter, defined as the multiplication of strength, toughness, and stiffness over composite volume. This parameter, which maximizes at a critical characteristic length, controls the transition from intrinsic toughening (matrix plasticity driven without crack growths) to extrinsic toughening phenomena involving progressive crack propagations. This finding, combined with various abstract volumetric and radar plots, will not only shed light on decoupling the complex role of structure and materials on mechanical performance and their trends, but provides important guidelines for designing lightweight staggered platelet-matrix composites while ensuring the best (balance) of their mechanical properties.

  4. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  5. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  6. Use of high temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jay Alan; Merrill, Gary Brian; Ludeman, Evan McNeil; Lane, Jay Edgar

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic composition for insulating components, made of ceramic matrix composites, of gas turbines is provided. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere and the arrangement of spheres is such that the composition is dimensionally stable and chemically stable at a temperature of approximately 1600.degree. C. A stationary vane of a gas turbine comprising the composition of the present invention bonded to the outer surface of the vane is provided. A combustor comprising the composition bonded to the inner surface of the combustor is provided. A transition duct comprising the insulating coating bonded to the inner surface of the transition is provided. Because of abradable properties of the composition, a gas turbine blade tip seal comprising the composition also is provided. The composition is bonded to the inside surface of a shroud so that a blade tip carves grooves in the composition so as to create a customized seal for the turbine blade tip.

  7. A study of the diffusional behavior of a two-phase metal matrix composite exposed to a high temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The progress of diffusion-controlled filament-matrix interaction in a metal matrix composite where the filaments and matrix comprise a two-phase binary alloy system was studied by mathematically modeling compositional changes resulting from prolonged elevated temperature exposure. The analysis treats a finite, diffusion-controlled, two-phase moving-interface problem by means of a variable-grid finite-difference technique. The Ni-W system was selected as an example system. Modeling was carried out for the 1000 to 1200 C temperature range for unidirectional composites containing from 6 to 40 volume percent tungsten filaments in a Ni matrix. The results are displayed to show both the change in filament diameter and matrix composition as a function of exposure time. Compositional profiles produced between first and second nearest neighbor filaments were calculated by superposition of finite-difference solutions of the diffusion equations.

  8. Low-Cost Resin Transfer Molding Process Developed for High-Temperature Polyimide Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The use of high-temperature polymer matrix composites (PMC's) in aircraft engine applications can significantly reduce engine weight and improve performance and fuel efficiency. High-temperature PMC's, such as those based on the PMR-15 polyimide matrix resin developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center, have been used extensively in military applications where performance improvements have justified their use regardless of the cost involved in producing the component. However, in commercial engines cost is a primary driver, and PMC components must be produced at costs comparable to those of the metal components that they will replace.

  9. A possibility of using mechanical alloying for developing metal matrix composites with light-weight reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Vladimir A.; Zhizhin, Konstantin Yu.; Malinina, Elena A.; Ketsko, Valery A.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay T.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of metal matrix composite (MMC) with light-weight reinforcements from 10 types of boron-hydrogen compounds was prepared using the method of mechanical alloying. The boron-hydrogen compounds had a decomposition temperature higher than 500 o C and a density of 1.3-2.5 g/cm 3 . The initial size of particles was 50-500 μm. Aluminum and copper were used as the matrix materials. The reinforcements were 20-40 vol. % of the MMC. Mechanical alloying followed by compaction can yield a good-quality bulk material of reduced density

  10. Effects of loading rate and temperature on dynamic fracture of ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K. H.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    A hybrid experimental-numerical procedure was used to determine the dynamic fracture initiation toughnesses and the dynamic stress intensity factors of alumina, TiB2-particulate/SiC-matrix, and SiC(w)/Al2O3-matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures under static and impact loadings. The dynamic fracture initiation toughnesses at room and elevated temperatures were greater than the corresponding static fracture toughness. The crack velocity versus the dynamic stress intensity factor relations showed minor differences due to temperature changes but significant differences due to the change in loading rates.

  11. Effect of Different Matrix Compositions and Micro Steel Fibers on Tensile Behavior of Textile Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, J.; Sharifi, I.; Andalibi, K.; Kasaei, J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents results of a research on uniaxial tensile behavior of textile reinforced concrete (TRC) prepared with different matrix compositions containing different contents of micro steel fibers. TRC exhibits very favorable stress-strain behavior, high Load-carrying capacity and a certain ductility which results in a strain-hardening behavior. At this paper, different Glass-TRCs were prepared using different commonly used normal and also innovative matrix compositions containing different volume fractions of micro steel fibers. Three commonly used matrices, a polymer-based composite and also a UHPC mixture were prepared containing different percentages of micro steel fibers. The direct tensile tests were applied on all specimens to study the tensile properties (first crack stress and ultimate tensile strength) and strain-hardening behavior. Considering the stress-strain curves of all specimens, it has been found that the tensile properties and strain-hardening behavior of Glass-TRC can be considerably improved by using steel micro fibers in an appropriate matrix composition.

  12. The influence of the composite casting wall thickness on the arrangement of particulate within the matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Konopka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the investigation results concerning the structure of composite pressure die castings with AlSi13Cu2 alloy matrix reinforced with SiC particles. The arrangement of the reinforcing particles within the matrix has been qualitatively assessed in specimens cut out of the castings of diverse wall thickness. Various pressure die castings have been used for the assessment, e. g. the castability test specimens with the wall thickness changed continuously from 3 mm to 0.2 mm. Examination has been held for composites containing various fractions of SiC particles, i.e. 10, 20, or 30 volume percent. An increase in uniformity of arrangement of SiC particles within the matrix accompanying the increase in the reinforcement fraction in composite volume has been observed. No differences caused by changes in casting wall thickness have been found in the reinforcement arrangement. Composites containing over 20 and 30 volume percent of SiC particles exhibit almost ideally uniform reinforcement arrangement. The uniform arrangement of reinforcing particles has been observed even for a casting of wall thickness equal to 0.2 mm.

  13. Additive Manufacturing of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced SiC-based ceramic matrix composites offer significant contributions toward reducing fuel burn and emissions by enabling high overall pressure ratio (OPR) of gas turbine engines and reducing or eliminating cooling air in the hot-section components, such as shrouds, combustor liners, vanes, and blades. Additive manufacturing (AM), which allows high value, custom designed parts layer by layer, has been demonstrated for metals and polymer matrix composites. However, there has been limited activity on additive manufacturing of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In this presentation, laminated object manufacturing (LOM), binder jet process, and 3-D printing approaches for developing ceramic composite materials are presented. For the laminated object manufacturing (LOM), fiber prepreg laminates were cut into shape with a laser and stacked to form the desired part followed by high temperature heat treatments. For the binder jet, processing optimization was pursued through silicon carbide powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of fibers into the powder bed. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted along with XRD, TGA, and mechanical testing. Various technical challenges and opportunities for additive manufacturing of ceramics and CMCs will be presented.

  14. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Tim W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  15. Nanoparticle and gelation stabilized functional composites of an ionic salt in a hydrophobic polymer matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Kanyas

    Full Text Available Polymer composites consisted of small hydrophilic pockets homogeneously dispersed in a hydrophobic polymer matrix are important in many applications where controlled release of the functional agent from the hydrophilic phase is needed. As an example, a release of biomolecules or drugs from therapeutic formulations or release of salt in anti-icing application can be mentioned. Here, we report a method for preparation of such a composite material consisted of small KCOOH salt pockets distributed in the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS polymer matrix and demonstrate its effectiveness in anti-icing coatings. The mixtures of the aqueous KCOOH and SBS-cyclohexane solutions were firstly stabilized by adding silica nanoparticles to the emulsions and, even more, by gelation of the aqueous phase by agarose. The emulsions were observed in optical microscope to check its stability in time and characterized by rheological measurements. The dry composite materials were obtained via casting the emulsions onto the glass substrates and evaporations of the organic solvent. Composite polymer films were characterized by water contact angle (WCA measurements. The release of KCOOH salt into water and the freezing delay experiments of water droplets on dry composite films demonstrated their anti-icing properties. It has been concluded that hydrophobic and thermoplastic SBS polymer allows incorporation of the hydrophilic pockets/phases through our technique that opens the possibility for controlled delivering of anti-icing agents from the composite.

  16. Preliminary Investigation to Determine the Suitable Mixture Composition for Corn Starch Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzaimi Zakaria, Nazri; Ngali, Zamani; Zulkefli Selamat, Mohd

    2017-01-01

    The use of natural fiber as reinforcement in polymeric composites has been seen a dramatically increase over the last decades. The surge in the interest of natural fiber composite or biodegradable composite is mainly due to the attractive cost of production, improved of hardness, better fatigue endurance and good thermal and mechanical resistivity. In this work, corn starch in the form of powder is utilized as the matrix of the composite. However, starch is brittle and has low strength make it inappropriate candidate for matrix binder. The main objective of this study is to modify the mechanical properties of pure corn starch by mixing it with water, glycerol and vinegar. The composition ratio of water is 60~80%, corn starch 10~35%, glycerol is 5~15% and vinegar is 0~5%, ten samples (A-J) have been manufactured and the best mixture composition is selected based on few selection criteria. The selection criteria are visual impaction, hardness and density. From the results, the samples without vinegar are not suitable to be used because of the fungus availability on the surface. Meanwhile the results from the samples with 5 ml vinegar have no fungus on their surface even has been exposed to the ambient air. While the sample C has shown the best sample based on the visual, hardness and density test.

  17. Nanoparticle and Gelation Stabilized Functional Composites of an Ionic Salt in a Hydrophobic Polymer Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyas, Selin; Aydın, Derya; Kizilel, Riza; Demirel, A. Levent; Kizilel, Seda

    2014-01-01

    Polymer composites consisted of small hydrophilic pockets homogeneously dispersed in a hydrophobic polymer matrix are important in many applications where controlled release of the functional agent from the hydrophilic phase is needed. As an example, a release of biomolecules or drugs from therapeutic formulations or release of salt in anti-icing application can be mentioned. Here, we report a method for preparation of such a composite material consisted of small KCOOH salt pockets distributed in the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) polymer matrix and demonstrate its effectiveness in anti-icing coatings. The mixtures of the aqueous KCOOH and SBS-cyclohexane solutions were firstly stabilized by adding silica nanoparticles to the emulsions and, even more, by gelation of the aqueous phase by agarose. The emulsions were observed in optical microscope to check its stability in time and characterized by rheological measurements. The dry composite materials were obtained via casting the emulsions onto the glass substrates and evaporations of the organic solvent. Composite polymer films were characterized by water contact angle (WCA) measurements. The release of KCOOH salt into water and the freezing delay experiments of water droplets on dry composite films demonstrated their anti-icing properties. It has been concluded that hydrophobic and thermoplastic SBS polymer allows incorporation of the hydrophilic pockets/phases through our technique that opens the possibility for controlled delivering of anti-icing agents from the composite. PMID:24516593

  18. Fatigue Life Prediction of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the fatigue life of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites, i.e., SiC/SiC, SiC/Si-N-C, SiC/Si-B4C, and Nextel 610™/Aluminosilicate, at room and elevated temperatures has been predicted using the micromechanics approach. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. The Budiansky-Hutchinson-Evans shear-lag model was used to describe the microstress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress and fibers strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the fatigue and oxidation effects on fatigue life of the composite, which is controlled by interface frictional slip and diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix multicrackings. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface/fiber oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures, based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the load carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fractures. The fatigue life S- N curves of 2D SiC/SiC, SiC/Si-N-C, SiC/Si-B4C, and Nextel 610™/Aluminosilicate composites at room temperature and 800, 1000 and 1200 °C in air and steam have been predicted.

  19. The effect orientation of features in reconstructed atom probe data on the resolution and measured composition of T1 plates in an A2198 aluminium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Maria A; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Artefacts in atom probe tomography can impact the compositional analysis of microstructure in atom probe studies. To determine the integrity of information obtained, it is essential to understand how the positioning of features influences compositional analysis. By investigating the influence of feature orientation within atom probe data on measured composition in microstructural features within an AA2198 Al alloy, this study shows differences in the composition of T1 (Al2CuLi) plates that indicates imperfections in atom probe reconstructions. The data fits a model of an exponentially-modified Gaussian that scales with the difference in evaporation field between solutes and matrix. This information provides a guide for obtaining the most accurate information possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Advanced bredigite-containing magnesium-matrix composites for biodegradable bone implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Sina Naddaf; Huan, Zhiguang; Mol, Arjan; Leeflang, Sander; Chang, Jiang; Zhou, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The present research was aimed at developing magnesium-matrix composites that could allow effective control over their physiochemical and mechanical responses when in contact with physiological solutions. A biodegradable, bioactive ceramic - bredigite was chosen as the reinforcing phase in the composites, based on the hypothesis that the silicon- and magnesium-containing ceramic could protect magnesium from fast corrosion and at the same time stimulate cell proliferation. Methods to prepare composites with integrated microstructures - a prerequisite to achieve controlled biodegradation were developed. A systematic experimental approach was taken in order to elucidate the in vitro biodegradation mechanisms and kinetics of the composites. It was found that the composites with 20-40% homogenously dispersed bredigite particles, prepared from powders, could indeed significantly decrease the degradation rate of magnesium by up to 24 times. Slow degradation of the composites resulted in the retention of the mechanical integrity of the composites within the strength range of cortical bone after 12days of immersion in a cell culture medium. Cell attachment, cytotoxicity and bioactivity tests confirmed the stimulatory effects of bredigite embedded in the composites on the attachment, viability and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells. Thus, the multiple benefits of adding bredigite to magnesium in enhancing degradation behavior, mechanical properties, biocompatibility and bioactivity were obtained. The results from this research showed the excellent potential of the bredigite-containing composites for bone implant applications, thus warranting further in vitro and in vivo research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fabrication of Nano-CeO2 and Application of Nano-CeO2 in Fe Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiebao, W.; Chunxiang, C.; Xiaodong, W.; Guobin, L.

    2010-01-01

    It is expatiated that nano-CeO2 is fabricated by the direct sedimentation method. The components and particles diameter of nano-CeO2 powders are analyzed by XRD and SEM . The thermodynamic analysis and acting mechanism of nano-CeO2 with Al in Fe matrix composites are researched, which shows that the reaction is generated between CeO2 and Al in the composite, that is, 3CeO2+4Al - 2Al2O3+3[Ce], which obtains Al2O3 and active [Ce] during the sintering process. The active [Ce] can improve the performance of CeO2/Fe matrix composites. The suitable amount of CeO2 is about 0.05% in CeO2/Fe matrix composites. SEM fracture analysis shows that the toughness sockets in nano-CeO2/Fe matrix composites are more than those in no-added nano-CeO2 composites, which can explain that adding nano-CeO2 into Fe matrix composite, the toughness of the composite is improved significantly. Applied nano-CeO2 to Fe matrix diamond saw blades shows that Fe matrix diamond saw blade is sharper and of longer cutting life than that with no-added nano-CeO2.

  2. Graphene-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites: A Review of Synthesis Methods and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Gupta, Nikhil; Behera, Rakesh K.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2018-03-01

    Graphene-reinforced aluminum (Gr-Al) matrix nanocomposites (NCs) have attracted strong interest from both research and industry in high-performance weight-sensitive applications. Due to the vastly different bonding characteristics of the Al matrix (metallic) and graphene (in-plane covalent + inter-plane van der Waals), the graphene phase has a general tendency to agglomerate and phase separate in the metal matrix, which is detrimental for the mechanical and chemical properties of the composite. Thus, synthesis of Gr-Al NCs is extremely challenging. This review summarizes the different methods available to synthesize Gr-Al NCs and the resulting properties achieved in these NCs. Understanding the effect of processing parameters on the realized properties opens up the possibility of tailoring the synthesis methods to achieve the desired properties for a given application.

  3. Interfacial reaction in cast WC particulate reinforced titanium metal matrix composites coating produced by laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dejian; Hu, Peipei; Min, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Laser injection of ceramic particle was conducted to produce particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Cast WC particle (WCp) was used as injection reinforcement to avoid excessive release of carbon atoms into the melt pool. The interfaces and boundaries between WC and Ti matrix were investigated by electron microscopy study. Compared with single crystal WCp, cast WCp was an appropriate solution to control the reaction products (TiC) in the matrix and the total amount of reaction products was significantly reduced. Irregular-shape reaction layers were formed around cast WCp. The reaction layers consist of a W2C layer and a mixed layer of W and TiC. Such reaction layers are effective in load transfer under an external load.

  4. Fabrication of in-situ grown graphene reinforced Cu matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yakun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; Shi, Chunsheng; Li, Jiajun; Nash, Philip; Zhao, Naiqin

    2016-01-01

    Graphene/Cu composites were fabricated through a graphene in-situ grown approach, which involved ball-milling of Cu powders with PMMA as solid carbon source, in-situ growth of graphene on flaky Cu powders and vacuum hot-press sintering. SEM and TEM characterization results indicated that graphene in-situ grown on Cu powders guaranteed a homogeneous dispersion and a good combination between graphene and Cu matrix, as well as the intact structure of graphene, which was beneficial to its strengthening effect. The yield strength of 244 MPa and tensile strength of 274 MPa were achieved in the composite with 0.95 wt.% graphene, which were separately 177% and 27.4% enhancement over pure Cu. Strengthening effect of in-situ grown graphene in the matrix was contributed to load transfer and dislocation strengthening. PMID:26763313

  5. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  6. Performance of Plain Woven Jute Fabric-Reinforced Polyester Matrix Composite in Multilayered Ballistic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ballistic performance of plain woven jute fabric-reinforced polyester matrix composites was investigated as the second layer in a multilayered armor system (MAS. Volume fractions of jute fabric, up to 30 vol %, were mixed with orthophthalic polyester to fabricate laminate composites. Ballistic tests were conducted using high velocity 7.62 mm ammunition. The depth of penetration caused by the bullet in a block of clay witness, simulating a human body, was used to evaluate the MAS ballistic performance according to the international standard. The fractured materials after tests were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results indicated that jute fabric composites present a performance similar to that of the much stronger Kevlar™, which is an aramid fabric laminate, as MAS second layer with the same thickness. The mechanism of this similar ballistic behavior as well as the comparative advantages of the jute fabric composites over the Kevlar™ are discussed.

  7. Spark plasma sintering of ceramic matrix composite based on alumina, reinforced by carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonov, A. A.; Khasanov, A. O.; Danchenko, V. A.; Khasanov, O. L.

    2017-12-01

    Alumina composites reinforced with 3 vol.% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The influence of sintering temperature (1400-1600 °C) on the composites microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated. Microstructure observations of the composite shows that some CNTs site along alumina grains boundary, while others embed into the alumina grains and shows that CNTs bonded strongly with the alumina matrix contributing to fracture toughness and microhardness increase. MWCNTs reinforcing mechanisms including CNT pull-out and crack deflection were directly observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). For Al2O3/CNT composite sintered at 1600 °C, fracture toughness and microhardness are 4.93 MPa·m1/2 and 23.26 GPa respectively.

  8. Tensile strength of ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE thermoplastic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banowati, Lies; Hadi, Bambang K.; Suratman, Rochim; Faza, Aulia

    2016-01-01

    Technological developments should be trooped to prevent a gap between technology and environmental sustainability, then it needs to be developed “Green technology”. In this research is making of green composites which use natural fiber ramie as reinforcement. Whereas the matrix used was HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) thermoplastic polymer which could be recycled and had a good formability and flexibility. The ramie yarns and fibers for unidirectional (0°) direction respectively were mixed with HDPE powder and processed using hot compression molding. The surface morphology was observed by SEM (Scanning Electrone Microscopy). Results showed that both tensile strength of the ramie fiber/HDPE composites increased in comparison with the ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE composites. However, the ramie yarn (spinning by machine)/HDPE composites have a good producibility for wider application. Analysis of the test results using the Weibull distribution as approaches to modeling the reliability of the specimens.

  9. Deformation features of aluminium in tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a method to analyse stress-strain curves. Plastic and elastic strains were studied. The strains were done by tensile tests in four types of materials: highly pure aluminium, pure aluminium, commercially pure aluminium and aluminium - uranium. The chemical compositions were obtained by spectroscopy analysis and neutron activation analysis. Tensile tests were carried out at three strain rates, at room temperature, 100,200, 300 and 400 0 C, with knives extensometer and strain-gages to studied the elastic strain region. A multiple spring model based on two springs model to analyse elastic strain caused by tests without extensometers, taking in account moduli of elasticity and, an interactive analysis system with graphic capability were developed. It was suggested a qualitative model to explain the quantized multielasticity of Bell. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. The influence of sintering on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapasztó, Orsolya; Lemmel, Hartmut; Markó, Márton; Balázsi, Katalin; Balázsi, Csaba; Tapasztó, Levente

    2014-10-01

    Optimizing the dispersion of carbon nanostructures in ceramic matrix composites is a fundamental technological challenge. So far most efforts have been focused on improving the dispersion of nanostructures during the powder phase processing, due to the limited information and control on their possible redistribution during the sintering. Here, we address this issue by comparing multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced Si3N4 composites prepared from the same starting powder dispersion but sintered using two different techniques. We employ ultra-small angle neutron scattering measurements to gain reliable information on the dispersion of nanostructures allowing a direct comparison of their redistribution during the sintering.

  11. Kevlar/PMR-15 polyimide matrix composite for a complex shaped DC-9 drag reduction fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, R. T.; Mccarthy, R. F.; Willer, M. S.; Hrach, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program was established by NASA to improve the fuel efficiency of commercial transport aircraft and thereby to reduce the amount of fuel consumed by the air transportation industry. One of the final items developed by the program is an improved fairing which is the aft closure for the thrust reverser actuators on the JT8D nacelles on DC-9 aircraft. The reduced-drag fairing uses, in the interest of weight savings, an advanced composite construction. The composite material contains Kevlar 49 fibers in a PMR-15 matrix. Attention is given to the aerodynamic configuration, the material system, and aspects of fabrication development.

  12. Effect of platelet orientation on the properties of alumina platelet zirconia matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft Sørensen, O.; Li, W.-Y.

    1996-01-01

    Platelet alignment in Al2O3pl - TZ3YS composites formed by injection moulding, slip casting, and tape casting, has been examined. Mechanical properties have been determined in terms of flexural strength and fracture toughness, with respect to materials formed by different techniques, and to the p...... 220 and 300 degrees C, which is approximately in the same range as for the matrix....

  13. Effect of oxidation at elevated temperature on elastic and interface properties of ceramic matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brandstetter, J.; Glogar, Petr; Loidl, D.; Kromp, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 290, - (2005), s. 340-343 ISSN 1013-9826. [International conference on fractography of advanced ceramics /2./. Stará Lesná, 03.10.2005-06.10.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK2067107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : polysiloxane * ceramic matrix composite * shear modulus Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2005

  14. Toughening effects quantification in glass matrix composite reinforced by alumina platelets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotoul, M.; Pokluda, J.; Šandera, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 12 (2008), s. 2908-2918 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : glass matrix composites * crack deflection * fracture surface toughness * residual stresses Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2008

  15. The Effect of Stochastically Varying Creep Parameters on Residual Stresses in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Constituent properties, along with volume fraction, have a first order effect on the microscale fields within a composite material and influence the macroscopic response. Therefore, there is a need to assess the significance of stochastic variation in the constituent properties of composites at the higher scales. The effect of variability in the parameters controlling the time-dependent behavior, in a unidirectional SCS-6 SiC fiber-reinforced RBSN matrix composite lamina, on the residual stresses induced during processing is investigated numerically. The generalized method of cells micromechanics theory is utilized to model the ceramic matrix composite lamina using a repeating unit cell. The primary creep phases of the constituents are approximated using a Norton-Bailey, steady state, power law creep model. The effect of residual stresses on the proportional limit stress and strain to failure of the composite is demonstrated. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using a normal distribution for the power law parameters and the resulting residual stress distributions were predicted.

  16. An Analytical Model of Thermal Conductivity for Carbon/Carbon Composites with Pitch-Based Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hai Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon/carbon (C/C composites are composed of carbon fibers, carbon matrix, and pores and cracks, which have been successfully used in various aerospace applications. In this paper, nanoscale submodel is proposed to describe the thermal conductivity of the matrix based on its microscopic structure, and then the submodel is incorporated into a microscale model to analytically predict the equivalent thermal conductivities of the composites by equivalent circuit approach. The results predicted by the present model agree well with those from the experimental measurements. Based on the model, the effects of the composite porosity as well as the thickness and porosity of the interface phase on the thermal performance of five composites are studied. It is found that the thermal conductivities show decreasing trends in responding to an increase in each of the three parameters. The composite porosity has a significant effect on the thermal conductivities both parallel and transverse to the fiber axis, while the thickness and the porosity of the interface phase remarkably affect the thermal conductivity only transverse to the fiber axis.

  17. Impact of the nonvolatile wine matrix composition on the in vivo aroma release from wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-González, Carolina; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria; Pozo-Bayón, M Ángeles

    2014-01-08

    The impact of the nonvolatile wine matrix composition on the retronasal aroma release of four volatile compounds added to different types of wines has been evaluated. For this purpose, a tailor-made retronasal aroma trapping device (RATD) was used to entrap the exhaled breath of six panelists previously trained in a specific consumption procedure. Five wines of different composition (white wine, sparkling white wine, young red wine, aged red wine, and a sweet wine) were evaluated. Prior to the evaluation, with the exception of the sweet wine, the wines were adjusted to the same ethanol content and aromatized with a mixture of four target volatile compounds. Aroma release data were submitted to multivariate statistical analysis in order to relate wine chemical composition and aroma release during wine drinking. Results showed interindividual differences and a clustering of panelists among lower and higher aroma releasers, which was in agreement to the differences in their breathing capacity. A significant influence of the matrix composition in the low aroma releasers group during wine consumption was observed. The consumption of red wines provoked a significantly higher aroma release than the consumption of white and sweet wines. From the chemical composition determined in the wine samples (pH, total acidity, total polyphenols, neutral polysaccharides, residual sugar, and nitrogenous compounds), the amount of total polyphenols was better correlated with the observed effect.

  18. Die-cast heterophase composites with AlSi13Mg1CuNi matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dyzia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the performed tests, an advantageous interaction of glassy carbon particles in a couple consisting of a heterophase composite and a spheroidal cast iron has been corroborated. It was found that, the presence of glassy carbon in the heterophase composite (SiC+C affects the stabilization of the friction coefficient value as a function of the friction distance and reduces the intensity of the wearing-in stage of the interacting surfaces. Both a decrease of the friction coefficient and the wear of the heterophase composites may be connected with the carbon particles' chipping effect and the deposition of its fragments on the surface of the interacting components of the friction couple, which forms a kind of a solid lubricating agent in the system. This should allow applying of this material to the composite piston - cylinder sleeve system in piston air-compressors. Further works will concern the selection of the matrix alloy composition with the purpose of reducing the phenomenon of particles chipping during machining. It seems that one of the possibilities is the application of a more plastic matrix and optimizing the fraction of reinforcing phases and their gradient distribution in the casting.

  19. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  20. Mechanical properties of waste paper/jute fabric reinforced polyester resin matrix hybrid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sekhar

    2017-09-15

    Hybrid composites were prepared with jute fabric and un-shredded newspaper in polyester resin matrix. The experiment was designed 1:2 weights ratio jute and unshredded newspaper to have 42 (w/w)% fibre content hybrid composites and two different sequences jute/paper/jute and paper/jute/paper of waste newspaper and jute fabric arrangement. Reinforcing material is characterized by chemically, X-ray diffraction methods, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and tensile testing. The tensile, flexural and interlaminar shear strength and fracture surface morphology of composites were evaluated and compared. It was found that tensile and flexural properties of the hybrid composite are higher than that of pure paper-based composite but less than pure woven jute composite. The hybridization effect of woven jute fabric and layering pattern effect on mechanical properties of newspaper/woven jute fabric hybrid composites were studied. The test results of composites were analyzed by one-way ANOVA (α=0.05), it showed significant differences among the groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strengthening of porous matrix materials with evaporation/condensation sintering for composite materials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Jeffery John

    1998-12-01

    The need for improved fuel economy and reduced environmental emissions from power turbines has prompted the development of high temperature fiber composite materials. One use of these materials is for liners of the hot combustion regions of jet engines and land based power turbines. Stability of the composite materials against oxidative damage during long term use at high temperatures has motivated recent research into fiber composite materials composed entirely of oxide ceramics. All-oxide fiber reinforced composites containing porous, strongly bonded matrices have become of interest. The porosity provides for crack deflection along the fibers to prevent catastrophic failure of the fiber reinforcements. A new application of a processing method that produces evaporation/condensation sintering was employed to prevent shrinkage of the matrix. This processing method and the properties of the matrix, fibers, and composite were evaluated in this work. Producing a matrix without shrinkage is important to prevent undesirable crack-like voids from forming in the matrix. These voids are caused by constraint against shrinkage by the fiber reinforcements. Dry hydrogen chloride gas produced a reactive gas atmosphere that was used to sinter the zirconia particles with minimal shrinkage because the gas promotes evaporation/condensation sintering with zirconia. Sintering of samples that did not contain fiber reinforcements was studied to evaluate the properties of the matrix material. The sintering of monoclinic, tetragonal, and cubic zirconias in the reactive gas atmosphere was compared. Additions of mullite (which did not sinter significantly at processing temperatures) further reduced the shrinkage. The effects of the processing conditions on the sintering shrinkage, microstructure development, and mechanical properties were studied. Cubic and monoclinic zirconia coarsened significantly in the HCl gas sintering atmosphere. The coarsening of the particles during the sintering

  2. Effect of acid etching duration on tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser-prepared dentine. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousterman, M; Heysselaer, D; Dridi, S M; Bayet, F; Misset, B; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Nammour, S

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser-prepared dentine after different durations of acid etching. The occlusal third of 68 human third molars was removed in order to expose the dentine surface. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: group B (control group), prepared with bur and total etch system with 15 s acid etching [37% orthophosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4))]; group L15, laser photo-ablated dentine (200 mJ) (laser irradiation conditions: pulse duration 100 micros, air-water spray, fluence 31.45 J/ cm(2), 10 Hz, non-contact hand pieces, beam spot size 0.9 mm, irradiation speed 3 mm/s, and total irradiation time 2 x 40 s); group L30, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 30 s acid etching; group L60, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 60 s acid etching; group L90, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 90 s acid etching. A plot of composite resin was bonded onto each exposed dentine and then tested for tensile bond strength. The values obtained were statistically analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with the Tukey-Kramer test at the 95% level. A 90 s acid etching before bonding showed the best bonding value (P < 0.05) when compared with all the other groups including the control group. There is no significance difference between other groups, nor within each group and the control group. There was a significant increase in tensile bond strength of the samples acid etched for 90 s.

  3. Mechanical properties study of particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites by micro-indentation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhanwei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By using instrumental micro-indentation technique, the microhardness and Young’s modulus of SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites were investigated with micro-compression-tester (MCT. The micro-indentation experiments were performed with different maximum loads, and with three loading speeds of 2.231, 4.462 and 19.368 mN/s respectively. During the investigation, matrix, particle and interface were tested by micro-indentation experiments. The results exhibit that the variations of Young’s modulus and microhardness at particle, matrix and interface were highly dependent on the loading conditions (maximum load and loading speed and the locations of indentation. Micro-indentation hardness experiments of matrix show the indentation size effects, i.e. the indentation hardness decreased with the indentation depth increasing. During the analysis, the effect of loading conditions on Young’s modulus and microhardness were explained. Besides, the elastic–plastic properties of matrix were analyzed. The validity of calculated results was identified by finite element simulation. And the simulation results had been preliminarily analyzed from statistical aspect.

  4. Role of manufacturing process parameters on the characteristics of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2003-01-01

    Metal matrix composites, (MMC), are engineered combinations of two or more materials (one of which is a metal) in which tailored properties are achieved by systematic combinations consisting of continuous or discontinuous fibers, whiskers, or particles in a metal result in combinations of very high specific strength. Furthermore, systematic design and procedures can be developed to achieve unique combinations of engineering properties such as high elevated-temperature strengths, damping or electrical properties. In this paper, the theory and practice of MMC are reviewed and discussed. The different techniques used in the manufacturing of MMC in general and aluminum matrix composites in particular e.g. unidirectional solidification, squeeze casting, vortex method and compocasting are presented and discussed. The parameters involved in these techniques and their effects on the characteristics of MMC product are also given and discussed. These include: crucible size and shape, melt temperature, size and shape of the impeller, stirring speed, rate of addition of the particles, the degree of agitation and cooling rate. Furthermore, the effect of these parameters on the mechanical strength and machinability are also presented and discussed. Finally, recent research results in aluminum matrix composites and their future developments are outlined and discussed. (author)

  5. Aroma release in the oral cavity after wine intake is influenced by wine matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Muñoz-González, Carolina; Jiménez-Girón, Ana; Pérez-Jiménez, María; Pozo-Bayón, María Ángeles

    2018-03-15

    The aim of this study has been to investigate if wine matrix composition might influence the interaction between odorants and oral mucosa in the oral cavity during a "wine intake-like" situation. Aroma released after exposing the oral cavity of three individuals to different wines (n=12) previously spiked with six target aromas was followed by an -in vivo intra-oral SPME approach. Results showed a significant effect of wine matrix composition on the intra-oral aroma release of certain odorants. Among the wine matrix parameters, phenolic compounds showed the largest impact. This effect was dependent on their chemical structure. Some phenolic acids (e.g. hippuric, caffeic) were associated to an increase in the intra-oral release of certain odorants (e.g. linalool, β-ionone), while flavonoids showed the opposite effect, decreasing the intra-oral release of aliphatic esters (ethyl hexanoate). This work shows for the first time, the impact of wine composition on oral-mucosa interactions under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Damping mathematical modelling and dynamic responses for FRP laminated composite plates with polymer matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qimao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an assumption that the fibre is elastic material and polymer matrix is viscoelastic material so that the energy dissipation depends only on the polymer matrix in dynamic response process. The damping force vectors in frequency and time domains, of FRP (Fibre-Reinforced Polymer matrix laminated composite plates, are derived based on this assumption. The governing equations of FRP laminated composite plates are formulated in both frequency and time domains. The direct inversion method and direct time integration method for nonviscously damped systems are employed to solve the governing equations and achieve the dynamic responses in frequency and time domains, respectively. The computational procedure is given in detail. Finally, dynamic responses (frequency responses with nonzero and zero initial conditions, free vibration, forced vibrations with nonzero and zero initial conditions of a FRP laminated composite plate are computed using the proposed methodology. The proposed methodology in this paper is easy to be inserted into the commercial finite element analysis software. The proposed assumption, based on the theory of material mechanics, needs to be further proved by experiment technique in the future.

  7. Direct observation of toughening mechanisms in carbon nanotube ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Z.; Riester, L.; Curtin, W.A.; Li, H.; Sheldon, B.W.; Liang, J.; Chang, B.; Xu, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) are driving research into the creation of new strong, tough nanocomposite systems. Here, the first evidence of toughening mechanisms operating in carbon-nanotube-reinforced ceramic composites is presented. A highly ordered array of parallel multiwall CNTs in an alumina matrix was fabricated. Nanoindentation introduced controlled cracks and the damage was examined by scanning electron microscopy. These nanocomposites exhibit the three hallmarks of toughening found in micron-scale fiber composites: crack deflection at the CNT/matrix interface; crack bridging by CNTs; and CNT pullout on the fracture surfaces. Interface debonding and sliding can thus occur in materials with microstructures approaching the atomic scale. Furthermore, for certain geometries a new mechanism of nanotube collapse in 'shear bands' occurs, rather than crack formation, suggesting that these materials can have multiaxial damage tolerance. The quantitative indentation data and computational models are used to determine the multiwall CNT axial Young's modulus as 200-570 GPa, depending on the nanotube geometry and quality. Three-dimensional FEM analysis indicates that matrix residual stresses on the order of 300 MPa are sustained in these materials without spontaneous cracking, suggesting that residual stress can be used to engineer enhanced performance. These nanoscale ceramic composites thus have potential for toughening and damage tolerance at submicron scales, and so are excellent candidates for wear-resistant coatings

  8. Copper matrix composites as heat sink materials for water-cooled divertor target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ha You

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the recent high heat flux (HHF qualification tests of ITER divertor target mock-ups and the preliminary design studies of DEMO divertor target, the performance of CuCrZr alloy, the baseline heat sink material for DEMO divertor, seems to only marginally cover the envisaged operation regime. The structural integrity of the CuCrZr heat sink was shown to be affected by plastic fatigue at 20 MW/m². The relatively high neutron irradiation dose expected for the DEMO divertor target is another serious concern, as it would cause significant embrittlement below 250 °C or irradiation creep above 350 °C. Hence, an advanced design concept of the divertor target needs to be devised for DEMO in order to enhance the HHF performance so that the structural design criteria are fulfilled for full operation scenarios including slow transients. The biggest potential lies in copper-matrix composite materials for the heat sink. In this article, three promising Cu-matrix composite materials are reviewed in terms of thermal, mechanical and HHF performance as structural heat sink materials. The considered candidates are W particle-reinforced, W wire-reinforced and SiC fiber-reinforced Cu matrix composites. The comprehensive results of recent studies on fabrication technology, design concepts, materials properties and the HHF performance of mock-ups are presented. Limitations and challenges are discussed.

  9. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  10. Short and long carbon fibre reinforced Cu-matrix composites: microstructural results and structural origin of properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchgraber, W.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites possess properties of copper, i.e. excellent thermal and electrical conductivities, and properties of carbon fibre, i.e. a small thermal expansion coefficient. Since the desirable properties of the composite can be obtained by selecting the amount, type and orientation of the carbon fibres, it is considered to be suitable for use as electric and electronic materials. This lecture focuses on two-dimensional isotropic carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites with long or short carbon fibres. Short carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites have been produced by hot-pressing of copper coated short carbon fibres. During hot-pressing, the carbon fibres take on a preferred orientation in a plane perpendicular to the hot pressing direction. Within this plane the fibre orientation is random. Long carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites have been made by hot pressing of monolayers consisting of copper coated long carbon fibres. Different orientations of the monolayers will be compared. Both the physical and mechanical properties of the discussed composites are strongly influenced not only by the properties of its individual constituents, but also by the microstructure and properties of the fibre matrix interface. The problem of poor wettability of the carbon fibre by the copper matrix will be discussed. The microstructure of several types of carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites will be discussed. Their thermophysical properties will be compared with microstructural results. (author)

  11. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA airworthiness certification for ceramic matrix composite components in civil aircraft systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonczy Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs are being designed and developed for engine and exhaust components in commercial aviation, because they offer higher temperature capabilities, weight savings, and improved durability compared to metals. The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA issues and enforces regulations and minimum standards covering the safe manufacture, operation, and maintenance of civil aircraft. As new materials, these ceramic composite components will have to meet the certification regulations of the FAA for “airworthiness”. The FAA certification process is defined in the Federal Aviation Regulations (Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, FAA policy statements, orders, advisory circulars, technical standard orders, and FAA airworthiness directives. These regulations and documents provide the fundamental requirements and guidelines for design, testing, manufacture, quality assurance, registration, operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair of aircraft systems and parts. For metallic parts in aircraft, the FAA certification and compliance process is well-established for type and airworthiness certification, using ASTM and SAE standards, the MMPDS data handbook, and FAA advisory circulars. In a similar manner for polymer matrix composites (PMC, the PMC industry and the FAA have jointly developed and are refining parallel guidelines for polymer matrix composites (PMCs, using guidance in FAA circulars and the CMH-17 PMC handbook. These documents discuss design methods and codes, material testing, property data development, life/durability assessment, production processes, QA procedures, inspection methods, operational limits, and repairs for PMCs. For ceramic composites, the FAA and the CMC and aerospace community are working together (primarily through the CMH-17 CMC handbook to define and codify key design, production, and regulatory issues that have to be addressed in the certification of CMC components in

  12. Development and Application of a Tool for Optimizing Composite Matrix Viscoplastic Material Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Naghipour Ghezeljeh, Paria; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2018-01-01

    This document describes a recently developed analysis tool that enhances the resident capabilities of the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) and its application. MAC/GMC is a composite material and laminate analysis software package developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. The primary focus of the current effort is to provide a graphical user interface (GUI) capability that helps users optimize highly nonlinear viscoplastic constitutive law parameters by fitting experimentally observed/measured stress-strain responses under various thermo-mechanical conditions for braided composites. The tool has been developed utilizing the MATrix LABoratory (MATLAB) (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA) programming language. Illustrative examples shown are for a specific braided composite system wherein the matrix viscoplastic behavior is represented by a constitutive law described by seven parameters. The tool is general enough to fit any number of experimentally observed stress-strain responses of the material. The number of parameters to be optimized, as well as the importance given to each stress-strain response, are user choice. Three different optimization algorithms are included: (1) Optimization based on gradient method, (2) Genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization and (3) Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The user can mix and match the three algorithms. For example, one can start optimization with either 2 or 3 and then use the optimized solution to further fine tune with approach 1. The secondary focus of this paper is to demonstrate the application of this tool to optimize/calibrate parameters for a nonlinear viscoplastic matrix to predict stress-strain curves (for constituent and composite levels) at different rates, temperatures and/or loading conditions utilizing the Generalized Method of Cells. After preliminary validation of the tool through comparison with experimental results, a detailed virtual parametric study is

  13. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The Finite Element Analysis-Micromechanics Analysis Code/Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (FEAMAC/CARES) program was used to characterize and predict the progressive damage response of silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix (SiC/RBSN) composite laminate tensile specimens. Studied were unidirectional laminates [0] (sub 8), [10] (sub 8), [45] (sub 8), and [90] (sub 8); cross-ply laminates [0 (sub 2) divided by 90 (sub 2),]s; angled-ply laminates [plus 45 (sub 2) divided by -45 (sub 2), ]s; doubled-edge-notched [0] (sub 8), laminates; and central-hole laminates. Results correlated well with the experimental data. This work was performed as a validation and benchmarking exercise of the FEAMAC/CARES program. FEAMAC/CARES simulates stochastic-based discrete-event progressive damage of ceramic matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures. It couples three software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating-unit-cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC, and Abaqus is used to model the overall composite structure. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events that incrementally progress until ultimate structural failure.

  14. Effects of neutron irradiation on polymer matrix composites at 5 K and at room temperature. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, S.; Kirk, M.A.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial distribution of absorbed dose in a composite specimen irradiated in the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was calculated for four kinds of cloth-filled polymer-matrix composites (filler: E-glass or carbon fiber; matrix: epoxy or polyimide resin). This calculation was performed by taking into account the range of recoil particles and the array of fibers in the composite. The average ratio of the energy of recoils protons deposited in a matrix of a composite to that deposited in an infinite matrix is 0.55-0.79, depending on the IPNS neutron spectra and on the kinds of composite materials. For E-glass fiber composites which have a 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reaction taking place in the fiber, the average ratio of the energy of α and 7 Li particles deposited in the matrix to that deposited in an infinite fiber material is about 0.79. On the basis of these ratios, the conversion factor from total neutron fluence to absorbed dose for a matrix of a composite is calculated for composite materials irradiated in IPNS. (orig.)

  15. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sudhakar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  16. Cyclic Fiber Push-In Test Monitors Evolution of Interfacial Behavior in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    SiC fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites are being developed for high-temperature advanced jet engine applications. Obtaining a strong, tough composite material depends critically on optimizing the mechanical coupling between the reinforcing fibers and the surrounding matrix material. This has usually been accomplished by applying a thin C or BN coating onto the surface of the reinforcing fibers. The performance of these fiber coatings, however, may degrade under cyclic loading conditions or exposure to different environments. Degradation of the coating-controlled interfacial behavior will strongly affect the useful service lifetime of the composite material. Cyclic fiber push-in testing was applied to monitor the evolution of fiber sliding behavior in both C- and BN-coated small-diameter (15-mm) SiC-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The cyclic fiber push-in tests were performed using a desktop fiber push-out apparatus. At the beginning of each test, the fiber to be tested was aligned underneath a 10- mm-diameter diamond punch; then, the applied load was cycled between selected maximum and minimum loads. From the measured response, the fiber sliding distance and frictional sliding stresses were determined for each cycle. Tests were performed in both room air and nitrogen. Cyclic fiber push-in tests of C-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC showed progressive increases in fiber sliding distances along with decreases in frictional sliding stresses for continued cycling in room air. This rapid degradation in interfacial response was not observed for cycling in nitrogen, indicating that moisture exposure had a large effect in immediately lowering the frictional sliding stresses of C-coated fibers. These results indicate that matrix cracks bridged by C-coated fibers will not be stable, but will rapidly grow in moisture-containing environments. In contrast, cyclic fiber push-in tests of both BN-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC and BNcoated, Si

  17. Mixed Matrix Composite Membranes Containing POSS Molecules for Carbon Dioxide Removal Application

    KAUST Repository

    Rini, Eki Listya

    2011-05-10

    CO2 removal by membrane processes is considerably potential for several applications such as natural gas and synthesis gas purification, enhanced oil recovery application, and carbon dioxide capture in combat against global warming. Dense polymeric membranes are commonly utilized for these type of gas separation applications. Nevertheless, the intrinsic properties of dense polymeric membranes, which commonly characterize by the low gas permeability versus high gas selectivity trade–off or vice versa, is less desirable. In order to meet the increased demand of CO2 removal, a strategy to improve the gas separation performance of a polymeric membrane is investigated in this study. With this regard, mixed matrix membranes in which inorganic non porous fillers are incorporated into a polymeric matrix were prepared to achieve the aforementioned objective. The mixed matrix membranes were prepared from Pebax® block copolymers and PEG POSS® molecules. These hybrid membranes were formed as both dense and multilayer composite membranes. The dense transparent membranes with well–dispersed fillers could be obtained by variation of the solvent mixture. The DSC analyses showed that incorporation of PEG POSS® into Pebax® matrix altered the thermal properties of the matrix. The multilayer composite membranes were then prepared from a PTMSP gutter layer deposited on a PAN porous support and an adjacent hybrid Pebax®/PEG POSS® as the top layer. These hybrid multilayer composite membranes exhibited an enhanced CO2 selectiv4 ity by a factor of two relative to the pure Pebax®. In these hybrid systems, the CO2 separation was presumably enhanced by the high ether oxides content from PEG POSS® that has high affinities for CO2. For particular composition of Pebax® and PEG POSS® concentrations, the PTMSP gutter layer harnessed the CO2 selectivity without losing the CO2 permeation rate. At the same time, these membrane, however, suffered severe adhesion between the gutter layer

  18. Fabrication, polarization, and characterization of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate a new carbon fiber reinforced composite structure with integrated sensing capabilities. In this composite structure, the typical matrix material used for carbon fiber reinforced composites is replaced with the thermoplastic polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Since PVDF has piezoelectric properties, it enables the structure to be used for integrated load sensing. In addition, the electrical conductivity property of the carbon fabric is harnessed to form the electrodes of the integrated sensor. In order to prevent the carbon fiber electrodes from shorting to each other, a thin Kevlar fabric layer is placed between the two carbon fiber electrode layers as a dielectric. The optimal polarization parameters were determined using a design of experiments approach. Once polarized, the samples were then used in compression and tensile tests to determine the effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. The degree of polarization of the PVDF material was determined by relating the effective d 33 coefficient of the composite to the achieved d 33 of the PVDF component of the composite using a closed form expression. Using this approach, it was shown that optimal polarization of the composite material results in a PVDF component d 33 of 3.2 pC N −1 . Moreover, the Young’s modulus of the composite structure has been characterized. (paper)

  19. Double-Vacuum-Bag Process for Making Resin-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Larry J.

    2007-01-01

    A double-vacuum-bag process has been devised as a superior alternative to a single-vacuum-bag process used heretofore in making laminated fiber-reinforced resin-matrix composite-material structural components. This process is applicable to broad classes of high-performance matrix resins including polyimides and phenolics that emit volatile compounds (solvents and volatile by-products of resin-curing chemical reactions) during processing. The superiority of the double-vacuum-bag process lies in enhanced management of the volatile compounds. Proper management of volatiles is necessary for making composite-material components of high quality: if not removed and otherwise properly managed, volatiles can accumulate in interior pockets as resins cure, thereby forming undesired voids in the finished products. The curing cycle for manufacturing a composite laminate containing a reactive resin matrix usually consists of a two-step ramp-and-hold temperature profile and an associated single-step pressure profile as shown in Figure 1. The lower-temperature ramp-and-hold step is known in the art as the B stage. During the B stage, prepregs are heated and volatiles are generated. Because pressure is not applied at this stage, volatiles are free to escape. Pressure is applied during the higher-temperature ramp-and-hold step to consolidate the laminate and impart desired physical properties to the resin matrix. The residual volatile content and fluidity of the resin at the beginning of application of consolidation pressure are determined by the temperature and time parameters of the B stage. Once the consolidation pressure is applied, residual volatiles are locked in. In order to produce a void-free, high-quality laminate, it is necessary to design the curing cycle to obtain the required residual fluidity and the required temperature at the time of application of the consolidation pressure.

  20. Damage and failure behavior of metal matrix composites under biaxial loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Steven Wayne

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for increased use in structures that require the ductility and damage tolerance of the metal matrix and the enhanced strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures of high performance fibers. Particularly promising for advanced aerospace engines and airframes are SiC fiber/titanium matrix composites (TMCs). A large program was undertaken in the Air Force to characterize the deformation and failure behaviors of TMCs and to develop computational models that can be used for component design. The effort reported here focused on a SiC SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite under biaxial loading conditions. Biaxial loading conditions are important because multiaxial stresses have been shown to influence the strength and ductility of engineering materials and, in general, structural components are subjected to multiaxial loads. The TMC material response, including stress-strain curves and failure surfaces, was measured using a combination of off-axis uniaxial tension and compression tests and biaxial cruciform tests. The off-axis tests produce combinations of in-plane tension, compression, and shear stresses, the mix of which are controlled by the relative angle between the fiber and specimen axes. The biaxial cruciform tests allowed independent control over the tensile or compressive loads in the fiber and transverse directions. The results of these characterization tests were used to develop a microstructural constitutive model and failure criteria. The basis of the micromechanical constitutive model is a representative unit volume of the MMC with a periodic array of fibers. The representative unit volume is divided into a fiber and three matrix cells for which the microstructural equilibrium and compatibility equations can be analyzed. The resulting constitutive model and associated failure criteria can be used to predict the material behavior under general loading conditions.