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Sample records for aluminate cements hydration

  1. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

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    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  2. Halting of the calcium aluminate cement hydration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium aluminate cement reactions with water lead to the anhydrous phases dissolution resulting a saturated solution, followed by nucleation and crystal growth of the hydrate compounds. This is a dynamic process, therefore, it is necessary to use suitable methods to halt the hydration in order to study the phase transformations kinetics of such materials. In this work two methods are evaluated: use of acetone and microwave drying, aiming to withdraw the free water and inhibit further reactions. X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were used to quantify the phases generated in the cement samples which were kept at 37 deg C for 1 to 15 days. The advantages and disadvantages of those procedures are presented and discussed. The use of microwave to halt the hydration process seems to be effective to withdraw the cement free water, and it can further be used in researches of the refractory castables area, endodontic cements, etc. (author)

  3. Calcium aluminate cement hydration in a high alkalinity environment

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    Palomo, Á.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper forms part of a broader research project that aims primarily to devise new cementitious products via the alkali activation of silico-aluminous materials. This work addresses the possibility of using small percentages of calcium aluminate cement (CAC as a source of reactive aluminium. For this reason, a preliminary review was needed of the behaviour of CACs in highly alkaline media (2, 8 and 12M NaOH solutions. Two, 28- and 180-day mechanical strength was determined and the reaction products were characterized with XRD and FTIR. The water-hydrated CAC was used as the control.The results obtained showed that CAC hardening took place much more slowly in highly alkaline media than in water. Nonetheless, the 28-day compressive strength obtained, ≥80MPa. As main reaction products, to ambient temperature and from the two days of cured, cubic aluminate C3AH6, and AH3 polymorphs are formed, instead of the usual hexagonal aluminatos (CAH10 and C2AH8 that are formed in the normal hydrate with water.El presente trabajo forma parte de una amplia investigación cuyo objetivo principal es el de elaborar nuevos materiales con propiedades cementantes mediante la activación alcalina de materiales de naturaleza silito-aluminosa. En estos estudios se contempla la posibilidad de utilizar pequeños porcentajes de cemento de aluminato de calcio (CAC como fuente de aluminio reactivo. Por ello inicialmente se ha estudiado el comportamiento de los CAC en medios fuertemente alcalinos (disoluciones de NaOH 2M, 8M y 12M. Se determinaron las resistencias mecánicas a 2, 28 y 180 días y se realizó una caracterización de los productos de reacción formados por DRX, FTIR. Como sistema de referencia se consideró la hidratación del CAC con agua.Los resultados obtenidos muestran que en medios fuertemente alcalinos se retrasan los procesos de rápido endurecimiento de CAC con agua. No obstante a 28 días se obtienen valores de resistencia a compresión

  4. Hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement within EVA emulsion by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotera, Masaru; Matsuda, Ikuyo; Miyashita, Keiko; Adachi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hisayuki

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-modified mortars which consist of a polymer emulsion and cement materials have been widely developed in the construction materials fields. Forming process of the polymer-modified cement membrane simultaneously involves evaporation of water within the polymer emulsion and hydration of cement. It is important for the polymer-modified cement paste that the hydrate crystal of cement is generating by the hydration during the setting process under existence of the polymer emulsion. In this study, hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement under existence of poly (ethylene-vinyl acetate) (EVA) emulsion (polymer-cement ratio=100%) was investigated by X-ray diffraction method using synchrotron radiation (SPring-8). The diffraction peaks of calcium aluminate (CA) disappeared after the hardening, on the other hand, the peaks of hydrate crystals of calcium-aluminate cement (C 2 AH 8 and C 3 AH 6 ) could be observed. This polymer-modified cement paste hydrated using the water within the polymer emulsion. The hydration of C 2 AH 8 from CA started at around 300 min, and then C 3 AH 6 hydrate crystal increased after 700 min at ambient temperature. This implies that the conversion from C 2 AH 8 to C 3 AH 6 occurred to be more stable phase. The setting temperature affected the reaction rate. In case of hydration at 35degC, the start time of the hydration for calcium-aluminate cement was quicker than that in the ambient temperature four or more times. (author)

  5. Study of belite calcium sulfo-aluminate cement potential for zinc conditioning: From hydration to durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, St.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium silicate cements are widely used for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste conditioning. However, wastes produced by nuclear activities are very diverse and some of their components may chemically react with cement phases. For instance, ashes resulting from the incineration of technological wastes including neoprene and polyvinylchloride may contain substantial amounts of soluble zinc chloride. This compound is known to strongly delay or inhibit Portland cement setting. One approach to limit adverse cement-waste interactions is to select a binder showing a better compatibility with the waste while keeping cement matrix advantages (low cost, simple process, hydration with water provided by the waste...). This work thus investigates the potential of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement for zinc Zn(II) immobilization. Four aspects were considered: hydration (kinetics and products formed), properties of hydrated binders, mechanisms of zinc retention and durability of the cement pastes (based on leaching experiments and modelling). The influence of three main parameters was assessed: the gypsum content of the cement, the concentration of ZnCl 2 and the thermal evolution at early age. It follows that materials based on a calcium sulfo-aluminate cement containing 20% gypsum are interesting candidates for zinc Zn(II) stabilization/solidification: there is no delay in hydration, mineralogy of the hydrated phases is slightly dependent on thermal history, mechanical strength is high, dimensional changes are limited and zinc Zn(II) is well immobilized, even if the cement paste is leached by pure water during a long period (90 d). (author)

  6. Evaluation of mechanical strength and hydrate products evolution of calcium aluminate cement, for endodontic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the most used retrograde filling cement in the endodontic area. Nevertheless, although its composition is similar to the conventional Portland cement, its high cost, long setting time and low mechanical strength have led to a continuous search for new alternative materials. Considering these aspects, the mechanical strength and crystalline phase evolution of a calcium aluminate cement (CAC), during its hydration process, have been evaluated in this work aiming to apply such material for endodontic treatments. Secar 71 cement samples were prepared and kept in contact with water or SBF (simulated body fluid) during 15 days at 37 deg C. Compressive strength, apparent porosity, X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were carried out for the samples evaluation after 1, 3, 7 and 15 days. The main identified phases were CAH_1_0, C_2AH_8, C_3AH_6 and AH_3. Moreover, when in the presence of SBF, some changes in the amount of the hydrates in the CAC samples were observed, which affected the mechanical behavior of the cement. (author)

  7. Synthesis and hydration behavior of calcium zirconium aluminate (Ca7ZrAl6O18) cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eun-Hee; Yoo, Jun-Sang; Kim, Bo-Hye; Choi, Sung-Woo; Hong, Seong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    Calcium zirconium aluminate (Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 ) cements were prepared by solid state reaction and polymeric precursor methods, and their phase evolution, morphology, and hydration behavior were investigated. In polymeric precursor method, a nearly single phase Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 was obtained at relatively lower temperature (1200 °C) whereas in solid state reaction, a small amount of CaZrO 3 coexisted with Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 even at higher temperature (1400 °C). Unexpectedly, Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 synthesized by polymeric precursor process was the large-sized and rough-shaped powder. The planetary ball milling was employed to control the particle size and shape. The hydration behavior of Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 was similar to that of Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 (C3A), but the hydration products were Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 ·6H 2 O (C3AH6) and several intermediate products. Thus, Zr (or ZrO 2 ) stabilized the intermediate hydration products of C3A

  8. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  9. Effect of Tartaric Acid on Hydration of a Sodium-Metasilicate-Activated Blend of Calcium Aluminate Cement and Fly Ash F.

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    Pyatina, Tatiana; Sugama, Toshifumi; Moon, Juhyuk; James, Simon

    2016-05-27

    An alkali-activated blend of aluminum cement and class F fly ash is an attractive solution for geothermal wells where cement is exposed to significant thermal shocks and aggressive environments. Set-control additives enable the safe cement placement in a well but may compromise its mechanical properties. This work evaluates the effect of a tartaric-acid set retarder on phase composition, microstructure, and strength development of a sodium-metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate/fly ash class F blend after curing at 85 °C, 200 °C or 300 °C. The hardened materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray computed tomography, and combined scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and tested for mechanical strength. With increasing temperature, a higher number of phase transitions in non-retarded specimens was found as a result of fast cement hydration. The differences in the phase compositions were also attributed to tartaric acid interactions with metal ions released by the blend in retarded samples. The retarded samples showed higher total porosity but reduced percentage of large pores (above 500 µm) and greater compressive strength after 300 °C curing. Mechanical properties of the set cements were not compromised by the retarder.

  10. Effect of Tartaric Acid on Hydration of a Sodium-Metasilicate-Activated Blend of Calcium Aluminate Cement and Fly Ash F

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    Tatiana Pyatina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An alkali-activated blend of aluminum cement and class F fly ash is an attractive solution for geothermal wells where cement is exposed to significant thermal shocks and aggressive environments. Set-control additives enable the safe cement placement in a well but may compromise its mechanical properties. This work evaluates the effect of a tartaric-acid set retarder on phase composition, microstructure, and strength development of a sodium-metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate/fly ash class F blend after curing at 85 °C, 200 °C or 300 °C. The hardened materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray computed tomography, and combined scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and tested for mechanical strength. With increasing temperature, a higher number of phase transitions in non-retarded specimens was found as a result of fast cement hydration. The differences in the phase compositions were also attributed to tartaric acid interactions with metal ions released by the blend in retarded samples. The retarded samples showed higher total porosity but reduced percentage of large pores (above 500 µm and greater compressive strength after 300 °C curing. Mechanical properties of the set cements were not compromised by the retarder.

  11. Influence of lithium and boron ions on calcium sulfo-aluminate cement hydration: application for the conditioning of boron ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhoury, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, a solution of boric acid, the pH of which is controlled by the addition of lithium hydroxide, is injected in the primary circuit. Boron acts as a neutron moderator and helps controlling the fission reactions. The primary coolant is purified by flowing through columns of ion exchange resins. These resins are periodically renewed and constitute a low-level radioactive waste. In addition to radionuclides, they mainly contain borate and lithium ions. They are currently encapsulated in an organic matrix before being stored in a near-surface repository. An evolution of the process is considered, involving the replacement of the organic matrix by a mineral one. In this PhD study, the potential of calcium sulfo-aluminate cements (CSAC) to solidify/stabilize borated resins in the presence of lithium is investigated. These binders have the advantage to form hydrates which can incorporate borate ions in their structure, and their hydration is less retarded than that of Portland cement.An analytical approach is adopted, based on a progressive increase in the complexity of the investigated systems. Hydration of ye-elimite-rich CSAC is thus successively investigated in the presence of (i) lithium salts, (ii) lithium hydroxide and sodium borate, and (iii) lithium hydroxide and borated ion exchange resins. The experimental investigation is supplemented by thermodynamic modelling using a database specially developed for the needs of the study. Lithium ions are shown to accelerate CSAC hydration by decreasing the duration of the period of low thermal activity. The postulated mechanism involves the precipitation of lithium-containing aluminum hydroxide. On the contrary, sodium borate retards CSAC hydration by increasing the duration of the period of low thermal activity. Ulexite, a poorly crystallized mineral containing sodium and borates, transiently precipitates at early age. As long as ulexite is present, dissolution of ye-elimite is strongly slowed

  12. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C 3 S, C 2 S) and aluminates (C 3 A, C 4 AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm -1 monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the 1 H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and wide

  13. Hydration kinetics for the alite, belite, and calcium aluminate phase in Portland cements from 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is shown to be a valuable tool for obtaining the quantities of alite and belite in hydrated Portland cements. The hydration (1-180 days) of a white Portland cement with 10 wt.% silica fume added is investigated and the degrees of hydration for alite...

  14. Carbonation of calcium aluminate cement pastes

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    Fernández-Carrasco, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses the results from accelerated tests intended to investigate the ways the different curing methods affect the carbonation of calcium aluminate cements pastes (CAC. The research was focused on the mineralogical composition of hydrated and carbonated samples. The compressive strengths and the porosity of the samples have been determined. Results point out that vaterite and aragonite are formed as a result of carbonation of both cubic and hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates. The polymorph of calcium carbonate formed does not depend on the curing process. Carbonation rates is higher in hexagonal than in cubic hydrates. Results obtained through this study evidence that, as a consequence of the carbonation process of CAC pastes, in test conditions, an increase of the mechanical strengths occurs.

    En el presente trabajo se discuten los resultados obtenidos en los ensayos acelerados llevados a cabo para investigar los efectos de diferentes métodos de curado sobre la carbonatacion de pastas del cemento de aluminato de calcio (CAC. Se estudió la composición mineralógica de las muestras hidratadas y carbonatadas. Además, se determinaron las resistencias mecánicas a compresión y la porosidad de las probetas. Los resultados indican que la vaterita y el aragonito son las polimorfías del CaCO3 que se forman al carbonatar los aluminatos cálcicos hidratos, tanto los de naturaleza hexagonal como cúbica. El polimorfo del carbonato cálcico formado no depende del proceso de curado. La velocidad de carbonatación de los hidratos hexagonales es mayor que la de los cúbicos. Los resultados obtenidos en el presente trabajo han evidenciado que como consecuencia del proceso de carbonatación sobre pastas de CAC, en las condiciones realizadas, se produce un incremento en las resistencias mecánicas.

  15. Thermal expansion properties of calcium aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Woong

    1986-01-01

    In order to eliminate the effect of impurities and aggregates on the thermomechanical properties of the various calcium aluminate hydrates, and to prepare clinkers in which all calcium aluminates are mixed homogeneously, chemically pure CaO and Al 2 O 3 were weighed, blended and heated in various conditions. After quantitative X-ray diffractometry(QXRD), the synthesized clinker was hydrated and cured under the conditions of 30 deg C, W/C=0.5, relative humidity> 90% respectively during 24 hours. And then differential thermal analysis(DTA), thermogravimetry(TG), micro calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis(TMA) and scanning electron microanalysis(SEM) were applied to examine the thermal properties of samples containing, calcium aluminate hydrates in various quantity. (Author)

  16. Density and mechanical properties of calcium aluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Taqi Uddin; Ahmmad, Shaik Kareem

    2018-04-01

    Calcium aluminate cements are a special type of cements which have their composition mainly dominated by the presence of Monocalcium Aluminates. In the present paper for the first time we have shown theoretical density and elastic constants for various calcium aluminate cements. The density of the present CAS decrease with aluminates presents in the cement. Using the density data, the elastic moduli namely Young's modulus, bulk and shear modulus show strong linear dependence as a function of compositional parameter.

  17. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saoût, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  18. Influência de aditivos dispersantes e acelerador na hidratação de cimento e cimento-matriz Influence of dispersant and accelerator additives on hydration of calcium aluminate cement and cement-matrix

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    I. R. Oliveira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A aplicação de concretos refratários, principalmente na siderurgia, é um processo em constante evolução, que apresenta uma forte dependência dos avanços dos conhecimentos sobre os ligantes hidráulicos. Isso se deve a influência exercida por estes ligantes nas propriedades reológicas e desenvolvimento de resistência mecânica de concretos. O processo de hidratação dos ligantes é sensivelmente influenciado pela presença de aditivos, afetando o tempo requerido para efetuar a desmoldagem do corpo conformado. Além disso, a adição de alumina ao cimento também influencia o seu comportamento de hidratação, bem como a extensão do período de indução, a composição das fases e dos produtos de hidratação. Assim, neste trabalho foi estudada a influência da presença de aditivos dispersantes e/ou acelerador no processo de hidratação de cimento e cimento-matriz. Independente do sistema, os aditivos dispersantes atuaram como retardadores do processo de hidratação, principalmente para o caso do ácido cítrico e citrato de diamônio. Tais aditivos apresentaram-se também como os mais eficientes para a combinação com o acelerador Li2CO3, resultando em um tempo de pega intermediário. Isto mostra ser possível controlar a trabalhabilidade reduzindo o tempo para a desmoldagem.A growing demand for refractory castables with specific behaviors has been promoting a continuous technological evolution, in which, one of the most important aspects concerns in a deep knowledge of hydraulic binders. These materials present a great influence on the rheological properties and mechanical strength development of castables, defining their workability periods and demoulding times, respectively. The hydration process of calcium aluminate cement is influenced by the presence of additives, which affects the setting and demoulding time of the shaped body. Besides that, the alumina addition to cement also influences the hydration behaviour, as well

  19. Cinética de hidratação de ligantes à base de alumina hidratável ou aluminato de cálcio Kinetics of hydration of binders based on hydratable alumina or calcium aluminate cement

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    I. R. Oliveira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O estado de dispersão da matriz de um concreto refratário apresenta uma grande influência no comportamento reológico desse material, determinando as técnicas utilizadas para a sua aplicação. Tais métodos normalmente exigem a preparação de concretos com elevada fluidez, que possam ser bombeados com facilidade e sejam capazes de preencher moldes de formato complexo sem a necessidade de aplicação de vibração. Entretanto, embora tais requisitos favoreçam uma boa trabalhabilidade do concreto, tendem a aumentar o tempo requerido para efetuar a desmoldagem do corpo conformado. Uma vez que o desenvolvimento da resistência mecânica do concreto está intimamente relacionado ao processo de hidratação do ligante hidráulico, este necessita ser controlado quando se busca a redução do tempo para a desmoldagem. Tal controle depende de um profundo conhecimento das variáveis que determinam a cinética das reações. Neste contexto, o objetivo deste trabalho foi o de avaliar a influência do tipo de ligante hidráulico, da temperatura e da presença de finos (matriz ou de aditivos inorgânicos adicionados ao concreto sobre o processo de hidratação por meio de medidas de temperatura e ensaios reológicos oscilatórios em função do tempo.The dispersion of refractory castables matrix presents a great influence on their rheological behavior, which defines the most appropriate methods for placing these materials. The growing demand for automatically transported refractory castables has promoted the use of pumpable castables, usually specified as self flow compositions. Nevertheless, castables with higher fluidity present longer workability, leading to extended demoulding times. Because the strength development is intimately linked to the hydration process of calcium aluminate cement or hydratable alumina, it needs to be controlled in order to reach the minimum time for demoulding, contributing to reducing overall costs. The control of cement

  20. Origins of saccharide-dependent hydration at aluminate, silicate, and aluminosilicate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin J; Rawal, Aditya; Funkhouser, Gary P; Roberts, Lawrence R; Gupta, Vijay; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2011-05-31

    Sugar molecules adsorbed at hydrated inorganic oxide surfaces occur ubiquitously in nature and in technologically important materials and processes, including marine biomineralization, cement hydration, corrosion inhibition, bioadhesion, and bone resorption. Among these examples, surprisingly diverse hydration behaviors are observed for oxides in the presence of saccharides with closely related compositions and structures. Glucose, sucrose, and maltodextrin, for example, exhibit significant differences in their adsorption selectivities and alkaline reaction properties on hydrating aluminate, silicate, and aluminosilicate surfaces that are shown to be due to the molecular architectures of the saccharides. Solid-state (1)H, (13)C, (29)Si, and (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements, including at very high magnetic fields (19 T), distinguish and quantify the different molecular species, their chemical transformations, and their site-specific adsorption on different aluminate and silicate moieties. Two-dimensional NMR results establish nonselective adsorption of glucose degradation products containing carboxylic acids on both hydrated silicates and aluminates. In contrast, sucrose adsorbs intact at hydrated silicate sites and selectively at anhydrous, but not hydrated, aluminate moieties. Quantitative surface force measurements establish that sucrose adsorbs strongly as multilayers on hydrated aluminosilicate surfaces. The molecular structures and physicochemical properties of the saccharides and their degradation species correlate well with their adsorption behaviors. The results explain the dramatically different effects that small amounts of different types of sugars have on the rates at which aluminate, silicate, and aluminosilicate species hydrate, with important implications for diverse materials and applications.

  1. Another look at the deterioration of calcium aluminate cement concrete

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    Jambor, Jaromir

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Potential degradation of concrete structures made of calcium aluminate cement (CAC is well known and is caused by transformation (conversion of the thermodynamically metastable into stable calcium aluminate hydrate phases. This recrystallization is influenced by temperature and humidity; the structural degradation of the concrete itself thus its loss of strength, is strongly related to the pore structure of the hydrated cement paste, the critical parameters being the total volume of pores below 15-20 nm and the median micropore radius. This constitutes a novel procedure for evaluation of existing CAC concrete structure.

    La degradación potencial de estructuras de hormigón elaboradas con cemento aluminoso (CA es bien conocida. Este deterioro está causado por la recristalización (conversión de las fases del aluminato cálcico que son termodinámicamente metastables, en fases estables. En esta recristalización influye la temperatura y la humedad. Tanto la degradación del propio hormigón, como su pérdida de resistencias están relacionadas estrechamente con la estructura porosa de la pasta del cemento hidratado, siendo parámetros críticos el volumen total de los poros inferiores a 15-20 nm y el tamaño medio de los radios de los microporos. Esto constituye un nuevo procedimiento para evaluar las estructuras existentes de hormigón de cemento aluminoso (CA.

  2. Review for the improvement of low alkaline cement from viewpoint of hydration control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imoto, Harutake; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2006-01-01

    It is concerns that high pH pore water from cementitious materials will become harmful to barrier system such as bedrock and buffer materials in the radioactive repository. Then sulpho-aluminate type low alkaline cement 'LAC' was developed. But LAC concrete has some problems on its workability and initial crack due to high reactability. It is necessary for LAC to be improved to avoid these problems. In this study, the conventional knowledge on reactability and hardened properties of sulpho-aluminate cement were reviewed from the viewpoint of hydration controlling. From the results, the recipe for the improvement of 'LAC' was investigated. Early hydration of sulpho-aluminate were delayed by the decreasement of calcium hydroxide quantity and increasement of calcium sulphate in cement. Retarder delayed hydration of sulpho-aluminate more than composition of cement. The effect of cement admixture on the early hydration of sulpho-aluminate cement were not reported. Blast furnace slag as cement admixture affect on the long-term hydration and strength development. So, it was guess that sulpho-aluminate type low alkaline cement 'LAC' have good strength development by controlling recipi of additional ratio of blast furnace slag and be-lite content in the sulpho-aluminate cement. (author)

  3. Possibilities of using aluminate cements in high-rise construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddo, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The article describes preferable ways of usage of alternative binders for high-rise construction based on aluminate cements. Possible areas of rational use of aluminate cements with the purpose of increasing the service life of materials and the adequacy of the durability of materials with the required durability of the building are analyzed. The results of the structure, shrinkage and physical and mechanical properties of concrete obtained from dry mixes on the base of aluminate cements for self-leveling floors are presented. To study the shrinkage mechanism of curing binders and to evaluate the role of evaporation of water in the development of shrinkage was undertaken experiment with simple unfilled systems: gypsum binder, portland cement and «corrosion resistant high alumina cement + gypsum». Principle possibility of binder with compensated shrinkage based on aluminate cement, gypsum and modern superplasticizers was defined, as well as cracking resistance and corrosion resistance provide durability of the composition.

  4. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  5. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Apperley, David C. [Solid-State NMR Group, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.

  6. A new aluminium-hydrate species in hydrated Portland cements characterized by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jorgen

    2006-01-01

    Recent 27 Al MAS NMR studies of hydrated Portland cements and calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phases have shown a resonance from Al in octahedral coordination, which cannot be assigned to the well-known aluminate species in hydrated Portland cements. This resonance, which exhibits the isotropic chemical shift δ iso = 5.0 ppm and the quadrupole product parameter P Q = 1.2 MHz, has been characterized in detail by 27 Al MAS and 27 Al{ 1 H} CP/MAS NMR for different hydrated white Portland cements and C-S-H phases. These experiments demonstrate that the resonance originates from an amorphous or disordered aluminate hydrate which contains Al(OH) 6 3- or O x Al(OH) 6-x (3+x)- units. The formation of the new aluminate hydrate is related to the formation of C-S-H at ambient temperatures, however, it decomposes by thermal treatment at temperatures of 70-90 o C. From the experiments in this work it is proposed that the new aluminate hydrate is either an amorphous/disordered aluminate hydroxide or a calcium aluminate hydrate, produced as a separate phase or as a nanostructured surface precipitate on the C-S-H phase. Finally, the possibilities of Al 3+ for Ca 2+ substitution in the principal layers and interlayers of the C-S-H structure are discussed

  7. Influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates in cement hidratation process on corrosion steel bars in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić Farzet H.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chlorides in concrete is a permanent subject of research because they cause corrosion of steel bars. Chlorides added to the concrete during preparation, as accelerators of the bonding of cement minerals process, enter into reaction with aluminates, creating a phase known as chloroaluminate hydrates. In everyday conditions the product of chemical bonding between chlorides and aluminates is usually monochloridealuminate C3A·CaCl2·Hx, better known as Friedel's salt. In this paper, the influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates during the process of cement hydration on corrosion of steel bars in concrete was investigated. The process of chlorides bonding with aluminates yielding monochloride aluminate is monitored by XRD analyses. It was found that the amount of chlorides bonding with aluminates increases with an increase of temperature, and as a result, reduces the amount of 'free' chlorides in concrete. Potentiodynamic measurements have shown that increase in temperature of the heat treatment of working electrodes by chlorides leads to a reduction of steel bars corrosion as a result of either the increase of the monochloride-aluminate content or the decrease of free chlorides amount. Chlorides bound in chloroaluminate hydrates do not cause activation of steel bars corrosion in concrete. It was also proven that the increase of free chlorides concentration in the concrete leads to intensification of steel bars corrosion. This additionally approves that free chlorides are only the activators of process of steel bars corrosion in the concrete.

  8. Conditioning highly concentrated borate solutions with calcium sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champenois, J.B.; Cau dit Coumes, C.; Poulesquen, A.; Le Bescop, P.; Damidot, D.

    2012-01-01

    The early age hydration by borate solution of 3 calcium sulfo-aluminate cements (CSA), containing respectively 0%, 10% and 20% of gypsum by weight of cement was studied using isothermal calorimetry and dynamic mode rheo-metry. XRD and TGA analysis were carried out on pastes with increasing hydration degrees (up to 90 days) to specify the mineralogy and to figure out the mechanisms of borate immobilisation. It has been shown that the retarding effect of borate anions is due to the precipitation of the amorphous calcium borate C 2 B 3 H 8 ; borate anions were then incorporated in Aft-type phases. The macroscopic properties of hydrated binders (compressive strength, length change) were also followed during 180 days. It appears that the mechanical strength continuously increases with the hydration degree. Length changes under wet-curing and sealed bag remain moderate and seem to be stabilized after 180 days

  9. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MgO was added both as spinel (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investigations were conducted in the temperature range 1500–1600°C with 2 h soaking. Structural study of sintered pellets was carried out by extensive XRD analysis. Scanning electron mode ...

  10. Hot corrosion of pack cementation aluminized carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, A.F.; Mohamed, K.E.; Abd El-Azim, M.E.; Soliman, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Low carbon steel was aluminized by the pack cementation technique at various aluminizing temperatures and times in or der to have different aluminide coatings. The aluminized specimens were sprayed at the beginning of the hot corrosion experiments with Na C 1+Na 2 SO 4 solution. The hot corrosion tests were carried out by thermal cycling at 850 degree C in air. The results were evaluated by, corrosion kinetics based on weight change measurements, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was found that the maximum corrosion resistance to this corrosive environment is achieved by aluminizing at 900 degree C for 19 h or 950 degree C for >4 h. These aliminizing conditions lead to formation of thick aluminide coatings with sufficient aluminium concentration (>15 wt%) at their outer surface necessary for continuous formation of protective Al 2 O 3 scale. The tested materials are used in protection of some components used in electric power stations (conventional or nuclear)

  11. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  12. Evaluation of bioactivity in vitro of endodontic calcium aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, I.R.; Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bioactivity is referred to as the capacity of a material to develop a stable bond with living tissue via the deposition of hydroxyapatite. Materials which exhibit this property can be used to repair diseased or damaged bone tissue and can be designed to remain in situ indefinitely. An indication of bioactivity can be obtained by the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of a substrate in simulated body fluids (SBF) in vitro. Therefore, set samples of calcium aluminate endodontic cement were maintained in contact with SBF solutions (Kokubo and Rigo) and their surfaces were later evaluated by means of SEM, EDX and DRX. Measurements of pH and ionic conductivity were also carried out for SBF solutions in contact with set samples of endodontic cement. The ideal conditions of precipitation were obtained in SBF Rigo been observed a surface layer with spherical morphology characteristic of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite.(author)

  13. Study of the ultrasonic waves action on the preparation of calcium aluminates cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenco, R.R.; Exposito, C.C.D.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium aluminates cements were prepared through a route that uses the sonochemical process. In this process, calcia and alumina in an aqueous suspension are put under an ultrasonic bath during some time. After that, the water is evaporated and the material is heat treated. In this work, the action of ultrasonic waves were studied on initials molar compositions calcia:alumina of 1:1. It was also verified the influence of the water on the reactivity of initial solids. SEM and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the obtained materials. In addition, mechanical strength of the products was evaluated through splitting tensile tests. The X-ray diffractograms showed that the presence of the water was enough to form hydrated compounds. However the material subjected to the sonochemical process presented the highest mechanical strength, indicating the potential of this route of synthesis. (author)

  14. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  15. Contribution to the study of wastes stabilization by sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, S.

    2005-02-01

    Calcium sulfo-aluminate cement is mainly composed of yeelimite known to be a precursor of ettringite formation. Ettringite is able to incorporate several heavy metals by isomorphous substitutions without altering its crystalline structure. The design of a binder required for immobilizing heavy metals was undertaken. The hydration study of clinker, and cement containing 4 amounts of gypsum has been carried out by means of XRD, DTA and IR spectrometry. It was pointed out that the addition of gypsum enhances hydration. Two binders were selected: 80/20 and 70/30. The immobilisation of 7 pollutants was very successful. Nevertheless, damages appeared with the binder 70/30 containing sodium chromate and dichromate: sodium caused activation of yeelimite reactivity and important dissolution of gypsum leading to important ettringite production. With a great amount of gypsum (30 %), dissolution led to secondary ettringite formation which damaged the hardened paste. Adding polyol enhances the retention of sodium chromate. On the other hand, the immobilisation of two types of weakly radioactive wastes supplied by CEA has been made. Results obtained in terms of setting time, compressive strength and leaching were excellent. (author)

  16. Synthesis optimization of calcium aluminate cement phases for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Oliveira, I.R.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied as a potential material for applications in the areas of health such as, endodontics and bone reconstruction. These studies have been based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by investigating the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance for biomedical applications. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the CAC synthesis routes in the Al 2 O 3 -CaCO 3 and Al 2 O 3 -CaO systems, as well as the phase characterization attained by means of X ray analysis. The Al 2 O 3 -CaO route enabled the production of the target phases (CA, CA 2 , C 3 A and C 12 A 7 ) with a higher purity compared to the Al2O3-CaCO3 one. As a result the particular properties of these phases can be evaluated to define a more suitable composition that results in better properties for an endodontic cement and other applications. (author)

  17. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  18. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  19. X-AFm stabilization as a mechanism of bypassing conversion phenomena in calcium aluminate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratory for the Chemistry of Construction Materials LC2, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))" >Falzone, Gabriel; Balonis, Magdalena; 2, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratory for the Chemistry of Construction Materials LC2, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))" >Sant, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Phase conversion phenomena are often observed in calcium aluminate cements (CACs), when the water-rich hydrates (e.g., CAH 10 , C 2 AH 8 ) formed at early ages, at temperatures ≤ 30 °C, expel water in time to form more compact, less water-rich structures (C 3 AH 6 ). The phase conversions follow a path regulated by the thermodynamic stabilities (solubilities) of phases. Based on this premise, it is proposed that conversion phenomena in CACs can be bypassed by provoking the precipitation of phases more preferred than those typically encountered along the conversion pathway. Therefore, X-AFm formation (where in this case, X = NO 3 − ) triggered by the sequential addition of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO 3 ) 2 = CN) additives is identified as a new means of bypassing conversion. A multi-method approach comprising X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analytics, and evaluations of the compressive strength is applied to correlate phase balances and properties of CAC systems cured at 25 °C and 45 °C. The results highlight the absence of the C 3 AH 6 phase across all systems and the curing conditions considered, with enhanced strengths being noted, when sufficient quantities of CN are added. The experimental outcomes are supported by insights gained from thermodynamic calculations which highlight thermodynamic selectivity as a means of regulating and controlling the evolutions of solid phase balances using inorganic salts in CACs, and more generally in cementing material systems

  20. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF INTERACTION REACTIONS FOR SODIUM AND ALUMINUM SULPHATES WITH COMPONENTS OF HYDRATING PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Yukhnevskiy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical additives are widely used in the technology of concrete with the purpose to solve various problems and sulphate-containing additives-electrolytes are also used as accelerators for setting and hardening of cement. Action mechanism of additive accelerators for setting and hardening of cement is rather complicated and can not be considered as well-established. An influence of sulfate-containing additives such as sodium sulfate is reduced to acceleration of cement silicate phase hydration by increasing ionic strength of the solution. In addition to it, exchange reactions of anion additive with portlandite phase (Ca(OH2 and aluminate phases of hardening cement have a significant effect on hardening process that lead to formation of readily soluble hydroxides and hardly soluble calcium salts. The influence of sulfate-containing additives on properties of water cement paste and cement stone is quite diverse and depends on salt concentration and cation type. For example, the action of the aluminum sulphate additive becomes more complicated if the additive is subjected to hydrolysis in water, which is aggravated in an alkaline medium of the water cement paste. Formation of hydrolysis products and their reaction with aluminate phases and cement portlandite lead to a significant acceleration of setting. Thus, despite the similarity of additives ensuring participation of anions in the exchange reactions, the mechanism of their influence on cement setting and hardening varies rather significantly. The present paper considers peculiar features concerning the mechanism of interaction of sodium and aluminum sulfate additives in cement compositions from the viewpoint of thermochemistry. Thermochemical equations for reactions of sulfate-containing additives with phases of hydrated cement clinker have been given in the paper. The paper contains description how to calculate thermal effects of chemical reactions and determine an influence of the formed

  1. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  2. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  3. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.; Chae, S. R.; Benmore, C. J.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  4. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  5. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  6. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  7. Small angle neutron scattering from hydrated cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, T.M.; Bertram, W.K.; Aldridge, L.P.

    1996-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the microstructure of hydrating cement made with, and without silica fume. Some significant differences were found between the SANS spectra of pastes made from OPC (ordinary Portland cement) and DSP (made with silica fume and superplasticiser). The SANS spectra are interpreted in terms of scattering from simple particles. Particle growth was monitored during hydration and it was found that the growth correlated with the heat of hydration of the cement

  8. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different......Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...

  9. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Ju-hyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (strätlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt

  10. Mössbauer, XRD, and Complex Thermal Analysis of the Hydration of Cement with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vili Lilkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration of cement with and without fly ash is studied with Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, and thermal analysis. Iron in cement is present as Fe3+-ions and occupies two octahedral positions, with close isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings. Iron in fly ash is present as Fe2+ and Fe3+, and the Mössbauer spectra display three doublets—two for Fe3+ in octahedral coordination and one for Fe2+. A third doublet was registered in the hydrating plain cement pastes after the 5th day, due to Fe3+ in tetrahedral coordination in the structure of the newly formed monosulphate aluminate. In cement pastes with fly ash, the doublet of tetrahedral iron is formed earlier because the quantity of ettringite and portlandite is low and more monosulphate crystallizes. No Fe(OH3 phase forms during hydration of C4AF. The fly ash displays pozzolanic properties, which lead to lowering of the portlandite quantity in the cement mixtures and increasing of the high temperature products.

  11. The impact of zirconium oxide radiopacifier on the early hydration behaviour of white Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Nichola J.; Li, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide has been identified as a candidate radiopacifying agent for use in Portland cement-based biomaterials. During this study, the impact of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide on the hydration and setting reactions of white Portland cement (WPC) was monitored by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), 29 Si and 27 Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vicat apparatus. The presence of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide particles in the size-range of 0.2 to 5 μm was found to reduce the initial and final setting times of WPC from 172 to 147 min and 213 to 191 min, respectively. Zirconium oxide did not formally participate in the chemical reactions of the hydrating cement; however, the surface of the zirconium oxide particles presented heterogeneous nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products which accelerated the initial setting reactions. The presence of zirconium oxide was found to have little impact on the development of the calcium (sulpho)aluminate hydrate phases. - Highlights: ► This is the first study of Portland cement-based biomaterials by 27 Al and 29 Si NMR. ► 20 wt.% ZrO 2 radiopacifier accelerates the early cement hydration reactions. ► Extent of hydration after 6 h is increased from 5.7% to 15% in the presence of ZrO 2 . ► Initial and final setting times are reduced by 25 and 22 min, respectively. ► ZrO 2 provides nucleation sites for the precipitation of early hydration products.

  12. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  13. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Ju-hyuk

    2011-06-01

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (strätlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydration of refractory cements, with spinel phase generated in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavat, A.E; Grasselli, M.C; Giuliodori Lovecchio, E

    2008-01-01

    High alumina refractory materials with additions of synthetic spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) have good thermo mechanical and attack from slag properties, which are useful in many technological applications. The spinel phase generated in-situ, MA, has proven to be a suitable and economic alternative to the use of sintered or electrocast spinels. Prior studies have established synthesis conditions for refractory cements with the spinel phase generated in-situ (CCAMA) starting with alumina mixtures and Buenos Aires dolomites. The binding properties of the aluminous cements depend on the hydrated calcium aluminates that form in the setting and hardening stages of the pastes. To avoid breaks, the refractory material must undergo programmed heating before reaching the serviceable temperature. It should also include the present phases and the transformations that occur at different temperatures. In this context knowledge about the green mineral composition and its response to an increase in temperature is especially important. This work presents studies to define the composition of CCAMA cement mortars at different hydration ages, and to estimate phase proportions and behavior during dehydration. DRX and FTIR techniques are applied in order to follow the structural changes that take place during the hydration process. The evolution of the dehydration is also studied, mostly using FTIR. The mortars were prepared with a water/cement ration of 0.5, recommended for this kind of work. The hydration was carried out at room temperature and samples were analyzed at the following ages: 15 min.; 1 h.; 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 60 and 90 days. With the results the evolution of the phases as a function of the age of the hydration were studied. The main hydrate that was formed was CAH 10 , with a significantly increased proportion during the first 14 days of hydration. Its carbonation was also observed by the presence of calcium carboaluminates and the formation of gibbsite. The MA phase is also

  15. Influence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Le Saout, Gwenn; Gallucci, Emmanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the presence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cement was investigated. Blending of Portland cement with limestone was found to influence the hydrate assemblage of the hydrated cement. Thermodynamic calculations as well as experimental observations indicated that in the presence of limestone, monocarbonate instead of monosulfate was stable. Thermodynamic modelling showed that the stabilisation of monocarbonate in the presence of limestone indirectly stabilised ettringite leading to a corresponding increase of the total volume of the hydrate phase and a decrease of porosity. The measured difference in porosity between the 'limestone-free' cement, which contained less than 0.3% CO 2 , and a cement containing 4% limestone, however, was much smaller than calculated. Coupling of thermodynamic modelling with a set of kinetic equations which described the dissolution of the clinker, predicted quantitatively the amount of hydrates. The quantities of ettringite, portlandite and amorphous phase as determined by TGA and XRD agreed well with the calculated amounts of these phases after different periods of time. The findings in this paper show that changes in the bulk composition of hydrating cements can be followed by coupled thermodynamic models. Comparison between experimental and modelled data helps to understand in more detail the dominating processes during cement hydration

  16. HYDRATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF BLENDED CEMENT WITH SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene foamed plastic wastes are a kind of environmental pollutant. It could be recycled in cement industry as a chemical agent. In this paper, the effects of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS on the hydration and microstructure of blended cement were investigated by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP. SPS slightly delayed the hydration of alite and decreased its hydration degree. SPS did not change the phase compositions during hydration. SPS changed the morphology of ettringite (AFt and decreased the pore volumes and the sizes of pores.

  17. The impact of zirconium oxide radiopacifier on the early hydration behaviour of white Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Nichola J; Li, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide has been identified as a candidate radiopacifying agent for use in Portland cement-based biomaterials. During this study, the impact of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide on the hydration and setting reactions of white Portland cement (WPC) was monitored by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), (29)Si and (27)Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vicat apparatus. The presence of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide particles in the size-range of 0.2 to 5 μm was found to reduce the initial and final setting times of WPC from 172 to 147 min and 213 to 191 min, respectively. Zirconium oxide did not formally participate in the chemical reactions of the hydrating cement; however, the surface of the zirconium oxide particles presented heterogeneous nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products which accelerated the initial setting reactions. The presence of zirconium oxide was found to have little impact on the development of the calcium (sulpho)aluminate hydrate phases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Microstructure of hydrated cement pastes as determined by SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, T.; Bertram, W.; Aldridge, L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Technologists have known how to make concrete for over 2000 years but despite painstaking research no one has been able to show how and why concrete sets. Part of the problem is that the calcium silicate hydrate (the gel produced by hydrating cement) is amorphous and cannot be characterised by x-ray crystallographic techniques. Small angle neutron scattering on instrument V12a at BENSC was used to characterise the hydration reactions and show the growth of the calcium silicate hydrates during initial hydration and the substantial differences in the rate of growth and structure as different additives are used. SANS spectra were measured as a function of the hydration from three different types of cement paste: 1) Ordinary Portland Cement made with a water to cement ratio of about 0.4; 2) A blend of Ordinary Portland Cement(25%) and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (75%) with a water to cement ration of about 0.4; 3) A dense paste made from silica fume(24%), Ordinary Portland Cement (76%) at a water to powder ratio of 0.18. The differences in the spectra are interpreted in terms of differences between the microstructure of the pastes

  19. Modeling the influence of limestone addition on cement hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the influence of using Portland limestone cement “PLC” on cement hydration by characterization of its microstructure development. The European Standard EN 197-1:2011 and Egyptian specification ESS 4756-1/2009 permit the cement to contain up to 20% ground limestone. The computational tools assist in better understanding the influence of limestone additions on cement hydration and microstructure development to facilitate the acceptance of these more economical and ecological materials. μic model has been developed to enable the modeling of microstructural evolution of cementitious materials. In this research μic model is used to simulate both the influence of limestone as fine filler, providing additional surfaces for the nucleation and growth of hydration products. Limestone powder also reacts relatively slow with hydrating cement to form monocarboaluminate (AFmc phase, similar to the mono-sulfoaluminate (AFm phase formed in ordinary Portland cement. The model results reveal that limestone cement has accelerated cement hydration rate, previous experimental results and computer model “cemhyd3d” are used to validate this model.

  20. HEC influence on cement hydration measured by conductometry

    OpenAIRE

    Pourchez , Jérémie; Grosseau , Philippe; Guyonnet , René; Ruot , Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Cellulose ethers are of universal use in factory-made mortars, though their influences on mortar properties at a molecular scale are poorly understood. Recent studies dealt with the influence of hydroxyethylmethyl cellulose (HEMC) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) molecular parameters on cement hydration. It was concluded that the degree of substitution is the most relevant factor on cement hydration kinetics, contrary to the molecular weight. Nevertheless, the ...

  1. Corrosion Resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cement Concrete Exposed to a Chloride Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Ki Yong; Cho, Chang-Geun

    2014-01-28

    The present study concerns a development of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) concrete to enhance the durability against an externally chemically aggressive environment, in particular, chloride-induced corrosion. To evaluate the inhibition effect and concrete properties, CAC was partially mixed with ordinary Portland cement (OPC), ranging from 5% to 15%, as a binder. As a result, it was found that an increase in the CAC in binder resulted in a dramatic decrease in the setting time of fresh concrete. However, the compressive strength was lower, ranging about 20 MPa, while OPC indicated about 30-35 MPa at an equivalent age. When it comes to chloride transport, there was only marginal variation in the diffusivity of chloride ions. The corrosion resistance of CAC mixture was significantly enhanced: its chloride threshold level for corrosion initiation exceeded 3.0% by weight of binder, whilst OPC and CAC concrete indicated about 0.5%-1.0%.

  2. Prediction of hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water using a numerical cement hydration model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D numerical cement hydration model is used for predicting alkali and hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water. First, this numerical model is calibrated for Dutch cement employing both chemical shrinkage and calorimetric experiments. Secondly, the strength development of some

  3. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Composites Made with Aluminous Cement and Basalt Fibers Developed for High Temperature Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Reiterman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present paper deals with the experimental study of the composition of refractory fiber-reinforced aluminous cement based composites and its response to gradual thermal loading. Basalt fibers were applied in doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0% in volume. Simultaneously, binder system based on the aluminous cement was modified by fine ground ceramic powder originated from the accurate ceramic blocks production. Ceramic powder was dosed as partial replacement of used cement of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25%. Influence of composition changes was evaluated by the results of physical and mechanical testing; compressive strength, flexural strength, bulk density, and fracture energy were determined on the different levels of temperature loading. Increased dose of basalt fibers allows reaching expected higher values of fracture energy, but with respect to results of compressive and flexural strength determination as an optimal rate of basalt fibers dose was considered 0.25% in volume. Fine ground ceramic powder application led to extensive increase of residual mechanical parameters just up to replacement of 10%. Higher replacement of aluminous cement reduced final values of bulk density but kept mechanical properties on the level of mixtures without aluminous cement replacement.

  4. Solubility data for cement hydrate phases (25oC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, M.; Glasser, F.P.; Kindness, A.; Macphee, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Solubility measurements were performed on most of the more thermodynamically-stable cement hydrate phases, at 25 o C. The results for each hydrate phase are summarised in the form of datasheets. Solubility properties are discussed, and where possible a K sp value is calculated. The data are compared with the data in the literature. (author)

  5. Effect of saccharides on the hydration of ordinary Portland cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochova, K.; Schollbach, K.; Gauvin, F.; Brouwers, H. J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the use of natural fibres as a sustainable alternative for reinforcements in cement-based materials has increased significantly. However, these lignocellulose fibres containing saccharides can have important retarding effects on cement hydration. The objective of this study is to

  6. Modelling the effects of waste components on cement hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, R.J.; Brouwers, Jos

    2000-01-01

    Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) is often used for the Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) of waste containing heavy metals and salts. These waste componenents will precipitate in the form of insoluble compounds onto unreacted cement clinker grains preventing further hydration. In this study the long

  7. A positron annihilation study on the hydration of cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consolati, G.; Quasso, F.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy experiments were carried out in various ordinary Portland cement pastes, in an attempt to monitor the porosity of the pastes. It is found that positronium intensity is well correlated to the time evolution of the total porosity and it is influenced by the water-to-cement ratio. This parameter is also sensitive to the delayed hydration process induced by adding methanol to the water-cement mixture

  8. Early hydration cement Effect of admixtures superplasticizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Early hydration of portland cement with superplasticizer admixtures of different nature has been studied. These admixtures were: one based on melamine synthetic, other based on vinyl copolymer and other based on polyacrylate copolymers. The dosage of the formers were constant (1% weigth of cement and for the third, the influence of admixture dosage was also evaluated, giving dosage values among 1-0.3%. The pastes obtained were studied by conduction calorimetry, XRD and FTIR. Also the apparent fluidity was determined by "Minislump" test. The main results obtained were: a superplasticizers admixtures used, regardless of their nature and for the polycarboxilate one the dosage, retard the silicate hydration (specially, alite phase, b The ettringite formation is affected by the nature of the admixture. cA relationship between the dosage of admixture based on polycarboxilates and the time at the acceleration has been established. A lineal relation (y = 11.03 + 16.05x was obtained. From these results is possible to know, in function of dosage admixture, the time when the masive hydration products and the setting times are produced. Also the total heat releases in these reactions is independent of the nature and dosage of admixture, saying that in all cases the reactions are the same.

    En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado la hidratación inicial de un cemento portland aditivado con superplastificantes de diferente naturaleza. Dichos aditivos fueron: uno basado en melaminas sintéticas, otro en copolímeros vinilicos y otro en policarboxilatos. La dosificación de los dos primeros se fijó constante en 1% en peso con relación al cemento, mientras que para el tercero se evaluó, también, la influencia de la dosificación, tomando proporciones desde el 1% hasta el 0,3%. Las pastas obtenidas se estudiaron por: calorimetría de conducción, DRX y FTIR. También se determinó la fluidez de la pasta a través del ensayo del "Minislump ". Los

  9. Effect of the strontium aluminate and hemihydrate contents on the properties of a calcium sulphoaluminate based cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velazco, G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of strontium aluminate (SrAl2O4 on the hydration process of a calcium sulphoaluminate (C4A3Ŝ cement was investigated. Cement pastes were prepared by mixing C4A3Ŝ , hemihydrate (CaSO4· ½H2O, CŜH0.5 and 0, 10 or 20wt% of SrAl2O4 (SrA. The amount of CŜH0.5 was 15, 20 or 25wt% based on the C4A3Ŝ quantity. The cement pastes were hydrated using water to cement ratios (w/c of 0.4 and 0.5. Samples were cured from 1 to 28 d. The compressive strength and setting time were evaluated and the hydration products were characterized. It was found that the setting time was delayed up to 42 min for the samples containing SrAl2O4 compared to samples without addition. The samples with 25wt% hemihydrate containing 20wt% SrAl2O4 developed the highest compressive strength (60 MPa after 28 d of curing. The main product after hydration was ettringite (C6AŜ3H32. The morphology of this phase consisted of thin needle-shaped crystals.Se investigó el efecto de la adición de aluminato de estroncio (SrAl2O4 sobre las propiedades de un cemento de sulfoaluminato de calcio (C4A3Ŝ. Se prepararon muestras mezclando C4A3Ŝ, hemihidrato (CaSO4· ½H2O, CŜH0.5 y 0, 10 o 20% e.p de SrAl2O4 (SrA. La cantidad de CŜH0.5 fue de 15, 20 o 25% e.p. basado en la cantidad de C4A3Ŝ. Las relaciones agua/cemento utilizadas fueron 0.4 y 0.5. Las muestras fueron curadas hasta 28 d. Se evaluó el tiempo de fraguado y la resistencia a la compresión. Los productos de hidratación se caracterizaron mediante DRX y MEB. El tiempo de fraguado se retardó hasta 42 minutos con la adición del SrAl2O4 comparado con las muestras sin adiciones. Las muestras con 25% e.p. de yeso y 20% e.p. de SrAl2O4 desarrollaron la mayor resistencia a la compresión alcanzando 60 MPa a 28 d de curado. Los análisis por MEB y DRX muestran como principal producto de hidratación a la etringita (C6AŜ3H32, cuya morfología se observa como cristales aciculares.

  10. Re-examining the prospects of aluminous cements based on alkali-earth and rare-earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    In the family of aluminous cements the potential of strontium aluminate, the strontium-barium aluminate and the barium aluminate cements have been sporadically and incoherently studied over several decades in various parts of the world and more particularly in the East European countries without much wide-spread commercial success. Attempts had also been made to extend the exploratory studies to the (Ca, Sr, Ba)O-Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -HfO 2 system to synthesize super-refractory binders. In fact, the above compositions, prima facie, seem to have the potential of arriving at cementitious formulations that, apart from being super-refractory, may as well be highly resistant to seawater, X-rays and gamma radiation. Looking at these potentials, quite a few experimental studies have been carried out under the guidance and supervision of the present author. The present paper is an endeavour to collate the data on some of these systems both from the published literature as well as from the author's findings. The prime motive has been to review and re-assess the prospects of manufacturing a range of new aluminous binders with superior properties.

  11. Failure of cement hydrates: freeze-thaw and fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Del Gado, Emanuela; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland

    Mechanical and viscoelastic behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the ``glue'' of cement. Even more than the atomistic structure, the mesoscale amorphous texture of cement hydrates over hundreds of nanometers plays a crucial role for material properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nano-scale building units of cement hydrates and on their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles.Our mesoscale model was able to reconcile different experimental results ranging from small-angle neutron scattering, SEM, adsorption/desorption of N2, and water to nanoindentation and gain the new fundamental insights into the microscopic origin of the properties measured. Our results suggest that heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H, impacting the rheological and mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. In this talk I discuss recent investigation on failure mechanism at the mesoscale of hardened cement paste such as freeze-thaw and fracture. Using correlations between local volume fractions and local stress we provide a link between structural and mechanical heterogeneities during the failure mechanisms.

  12. INFLUENCE OF CURING TEMPERATURE ON THE PHYSICO-MECHANICAL, CHARACTERISTICS OF CALCIUM ALUMINATE CEMENT WITH AIR-COOLED SLAG OR WATER-COOLED SLAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heikal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature, sequence, crystallinity and microstructure of hydrated phases were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that the formation of different hydrated phases was temperature dependence. The physico-mechanical and microstructural characteristics were investigated after curing at 20, 40 and 60° C. The results indicated that for the substitution of calcium aluminate cement (CAC by air-cooled slag (AS or water-cooled slag (WS at 20° C, the compressive strength increases with slag content up to 10 wt.%, then followed by a decrease with further slag substitution up to 25 wt.%; but the values are still higher than those of the neat CAC pastes at different curing ages up to 60 days. After 28 days of hydration at 40-60° C, the compressive strength increases with the slag content. This is attributed to the prevention of the conversion reaction, which was confirmed by XRD, DSC and SEM techniques, and the preferential formation of stratlingite (gehleinte-like phase. The SEM micrographs showed a close texture of hydrated CAC/slag blends made with AS or WS at 40°C due to the formation of C2ASH8 and C-S-H phases.

  13. Hydration kinetics of cement composites with varying water-cement ratio using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shaumik; Dash, Jyotirmayee; Devi, Nirmala; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Cement is mixed with water in an optimum ratio to form concrete with desirable mechanical strength and durability. The ability to track the consumption of major cement constituents, viz., Tri- and Dicalcium Silicates (C3S, C2S) reacting with water along with the formation of key hydration products, viz., Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (C-S-H) which gives the overall strength to the concrete and Calcium Hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), a hydration product which reduces the strength and durability, using an efficient technique is highly desirable. Optimizing the amount of water to be mixed with cement is one of the main parameters which determine the strength of concrete. In this work, THz spectroscopy has been employed to track the variation in hydration kinetics for concrete samples with different water-cement ratios, viz., 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6. Results show that for the sample with water-cement ratio of 0.3, significant amount of the C3S and C2S remain unreacted even after the initial hydration period of 28 days while for the cement with water-cement ratio of 0.6, most of the constituents get consumed during this stage. Analysis of the formation of Ca(OH)2 has been done which shows that the concrete sample with water-cement ratio of 0.6 produces the highest amount of Ca(OH)2 due to higher consumption of C3S/C2S in presence of excess water which is not desirable. Samples with water-cement ratio of 0.4 and 0.5 show more controlled reaction during the hydration which can imply formation of an optimized level of desired hydration products resulting in a more mechanically strong and durable concrete.

  14. Hydration of fly ash cement and microstructure of fly ash cement pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiyuan, H.

    1981-01-01

    The strength development and hydration of fly ash cement and the influence of addition of gypsum on those were studied at normal and elevated temperatures. It was found that an addition of a proper amount of gypsum to fly ash cement could accelerate the pozzolanic reaction between CH and fly ash, and as a result, increase the strength of fly ash cement pastes after 28 days.

  15. Effect of cement/wood ratios and wood storage conditions on hydration temperature, hydration time, and compressive strength of wood-cement mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy W.C. Lee; Zhongli Hong; Douglas R. Phillips; Chung-Yun Hse

    1987-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cement/wood ratios and wood storage conditions on hydration temperature, hydration time, and compressive strength of wood-cement mixtures made from six wood species: southern pine, white oak, southern red oak, yellow-poplar, sweetgum, and hickory. Cement/wood ratios varied from 13/1 to 4/1. Wood storage conditions consisted of air-...

  16. Properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourounis, S.; Tsivilis, S.; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Papadimitriou, G.D.; Tsibouki, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The present research study investigates the properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag, a by-product of the conversion process of iron to steel. For this purpose, a reference sample and three cements containing up to 45% w/w steel slag were tested. The steel slag fraction used was the '0-5 mm', due to its high content in calcium silicate phases. Initial and final setting time, standard consistency, flow of normal mortar, autoclave expansion and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days were measured. The hydrated products were identified by X-ray diffraction while the non-evaporable water was determined by TGA. The microstructure of the hardened cement pastes and their morphological characteristics were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It is concluded that slag can be used in the production of composite cements of the strength classes 42.5 and 32.5 of EN 197-1. In addition, the slag cements present satisfactory physical properties. The steel slag slows down the hydration of the blended cements, due to the morphology of contained C 2 S and its low content in calcium silicates

  17. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  18. Heat of hydration measurements on cemented radioactive wastes. Part 1: cement-water pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the hydration of cement pastes in terms of chemical and kinetic models. A calorimetric technique was used to measure the heat of hydration to develop these models. The effects of temperature, water/cement ratio and cement replacements, ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and pulverised fuel ash (PFA) on the hydration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is reported. The incorporation of BFS or PFA has a marked effect on the hydration reaction. The effect of temperature is also important but changing the water/cement ratio has little effect. Results from cement pastes containing only water and cement yield total heats of reaction of 400, 200 and 100 kJ/kg for OPC, BFS and PFA respectively. Using the results from the models which have been developed, the effect of major salts present in radioactive waste streams can be assessed. Values of the total heat of reaction, the time to complete 50 percent reaction, and the energy of activation, can be compared for different waste systems. (U.K.)

  19. Effect of aluminate ions on the heat of hydration of cementitious waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1993-11-01

    During the hydration and setting of high-salt content liquid waste grouts, considerable heat is generated by exothermic reactions within the grout. These reactions include hydration reactions of cementitious solids and reactions between waste constituents and the solids. Adiabatic temperature rises exceeding 80 degrees C have been estimated for grouts prepared with a dry blend of 47 wt % fly ash, 47 wt % blast furnace slag, and 6 wt % type I/II Portland cement (1) Performance criteria for grout disposal specify that the temperature of the grout waste form must not exceed 90 degrees C (2) To counter the increase in temperature, inert solids were added to the ''47/47/6'' dry blend to reduce the amount of heat-generating solids, thereby decreasing the temperature rise. Based on preliminary results from adiabatic calorimetry, a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % class F fly ash, 28 wt % ground blast furnace slag, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement was selected for further testing

  20. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Feng; Meyer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

  1. Early hydration of portland cement with crystalline mineral additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahhal, V.; Talero, R.

    2005-01-01

    This research presents the effects of finely divided crystalline mineral additions (quartz and limestone), commonly known as filler, on the early hydration of portland cements with very different mineralogical composition. The used techniques to study the early hydration of blended cements were conduction calorimeter, hydraulicity (Fratini's test), non-evaporable water and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the stimulation and the dilution effects increase when the percentage of crystalline mineral additions used is increased. Depending on the replacement proportion, the mineralogical cement composition and the type of crystalline addition, at 2 days, the prevalence of the dilution effect or the stimulation effect shows that crystalline mineral additions could act as sites of heat dissipation or heat stimulation, respectively

  2. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  3. Hydration study of ordinary portland cement in the presence of zinc ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Adriana Trezza

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydration products of Portland cement pastes, hydrated in water and in the presence of zinc ions were studied comparatively at different ages. Hydration products were studied by X ray diffractions (XRD and infrared spectroscopy (IR. Although IR is not frequently used in cement chemistry, it evidenced a new phase Ca(Zn(OH32. 2H2O formed during cement hydration in the presence of zinc. The significant retardation of early cement hydration in the presence of zinc is assessed in detail by differential calorimetry as a complement to the study carried out by IR and XRD, providing evidence that permits to evaluate the kinetic of the early hydration.

  4. Positron annihilation probing for the hydratation rate of cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllylae, R.; Karras, M.

    1975-01-01

    Positron annihilation has been found to be a possible probe for the exponential hydratation of cement paste. Both lifetime and Doppler line broadening measurements revealed the hydratation rate. With the aid of increased stability in the lifetime spectrometer it has been possible to extend the measuring sensitivity over a period of several weeks. Two main lifetimes, tau 1 = 480 +- 20 psec and tau 2 = 2.1 +- 0.1 nsec, were observed to be constant during the hydratation. The intensity of the 2.1 nsec component changed from 4 to 8% after 47 days, and simultaneously the annihilation line narrowed from 2.6 to 2.4 keV. This behaviour has been interpreted as an increase in positronium formation. The possible practical applications of positron annihilation radiation as a hydratation probe has been evaluated for use in a concrete laboratory and even for regular construction work. (orig.) [de

  5. Calcium aluminate cement concrete: durablllty and conversión. A fresh look at an old subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George, C. M.

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper re-examines the relationship between durability and conversion of calcium aluminate cement concretes, CACC. Conversion is a natural and inevitable process whereby these materials reach a stable mature condition. Numerous structures built more than half a century ago remain serviceable and in service today. Some of these are illustrated. They are the best testament to the durability of converted concrete having survived far longer in the converted than the unconverted condition. The unique rapid hardening characteristics of CACC offer a valuable selfheating capability. Conversión is immediate and this leads to better long term strengths because more cement is hydrated. Moreover, recent work has shown that the thermodynamically stable hydrates of converted CAC are intrinsically more resistant to attack from such aggressive agents as sulphuric acid. This provides an explanation of the excellent long term performance of Fondu concretes, for example in many saewer applications. Our knowledge and understanding today of the durability of calcium alumínate bonded materials has been built on close to 100 years of accumulated experience and laboratory studies. We know how to use these materials and we know what to expect from them. We can be confident that they will serve us well in the century ahead.

    Este trabajo examina de nuevo la relación entre durabilidad y conversión de hormigones de cemento aluminoso, HAC (High Alumina Cement. La conversión es un proceso natural e inevitable a través del cual este material consigue una condición definitiva y estable. Numerosas estructuras que se edificaron hace más de medio siglo siguen utilizables y utilizadas hoy en día. Algunas de estas estructuras vienen ilustradas en este trabajo. Ellas sirven como mejor ejemplo de la durabilidad del hormigón convertido, ya que han sobrevivido mucho más tiempo en el estado convertido que en el no convertido. Las singulares caracter

  6. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrivener, Karen L.; Juilland, Patrick; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C 3 A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed

  7. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivener, Karen L., E-mail: Karen.scrivener@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 (Switzerland); Juilland, Patrick [Sika Technology AG, Zürich (Switzerland); Monteiro, Paulo J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  8. Modelling the incongruent dissolution of hydrated cement minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrated calciumsilicates are the main constituents of hydrated portland cements. Their chemistry will strongly influence the longterm behaviour of a concrete system envisioned in use in radioactive waste repositories. Experimental data show that hydrated calciumsilicates dissolve incongruently, depending on the calcium/silicon ratio of the solid. A model that simulates the incongruent dissolution behaviour of these hydrated calciumsilicates is presented. In the model the hydrated calciumcilicates are represented as a mixture of two congruently soluble components. The dissolution of the particular components is described using the concept of variable activities in the solid state. Each component's activity in the solid state is obtained from a large body of solubility data by applying the Gibbs-Duhem equation for nonideal mixtures. Using this approach a simplified set of equations, which describe the solubility of the components as a function of the calcium/silicon ratio of the solid, is derived. As an application, the degradation of a standard portland cement in pure water and in a carbonate-rich groundwater is modelled. (orig.)

  9. Hydration characteristics and structure formation of cement pastes containing metakaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvorkin Leonid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metakaolin (MK is one of the most effective mineral admixtures for cement-based composites. The deposits of kaolin clays are wide-spread in the world. Metakaolin is comparable to silica fume as an active mineral admixture for cement-based composites. In this paper, the rheological and mechanical properties of cement paste containing metakaolin are investigated. The effect of MK is more evident at “tight” hydration conditions within mixtures with low water-cement ratio, provided by application of superplasticizers. The cement is replaced with 0 to 15% metakaolin, and superplasticizer content ranged from 0 to 1.5% by weight of cementitious materials (i.e. cement and metakaolin. An equation is derived to describe the relationship between the metakaolin and superplasticizer content and consistency of pastes. There is a linear dependence between metakalolin content and water demand. Second-degree polynomial describe the influence of superplasticizer content. The application of SP and MK may produce cement-water suspensions with water-retaining capacity at 50-70% higher than control suspensions. The investigation of initial structure forming of cement pastes with SP-MK composite admixture indicates the extension of coagulation structure forming phase comparing to the pastes without additives. Crystallization stage was characterized by more intensive strengthening of the paste with SP-MK admixture comparing to the paste without admixtures and paste with SP. Results on the porosity parameters for hardened cement paste indicate a decrease in the average diameter of pores and refinement of pore structure in the presence of metakaolin. A finer pore structure associated with an increase in strength. X-ray analysis data reveal a growing number of small-crystalline low-alkaline calcium hydrosilicates and reducing portlandite content, when MK dosage increases. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM data confirm, that hardened cement paste containing MK has

  10. The hydration of slag, part 2: reaction models for blended cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The hydration of slag-blended cement is studied by considering the interaction between the hydrations of slag and Portland cement clinker. Three reaction models for the slag-blended cement are developed based on stoichiometric calculations. These models correlate the compositions of the unhydrated

  11. HYDRATION AND PROPERTIES OF BLENDED CEMENT SYSTEMS INCORPORATING INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikal M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the characteristics of ternary blended system, namely granulated blast-furnace slag (WCS, from iron steel company and Homra (GCB from Misr Brick (Helwan, Egypt and silica fume (SF at 30 mass % pozzolanas and 70 mass % OPC. The required water of standard consistency and setting times were measured as well as physico-chemical and mechanical characteristics of the hardened cement pastes were investigated. Some selected cement pastes were tested by TGA, DTA and FT-IR techniques to investigate the variation of hydrated products of blended cements. The pozzolanic activity of SF is higher than GCB and WCS. The higher activity of SF is mainly due to its higher surface area than the other two pozzolanic materials. On the other side, GCB is more pozzolanic than WCS due to GCB containing crystalline silica quartz in addition to an amorphous phase. The silica quartz acts as nucleating agents which accelerate the rate of hydration in addition to its amorphous phase, which can react with liberating Ca(OH2 forming additional hydration products.

  12. Influence of agglomeration of a recycled cement additive on the hydration and microstructure development of cement based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study, including experimental and mechanism analysis, on investigating the effect of agglomeration of a recycled cement additive on the hydration and microstructure development of cement based materials. The recycled additive is firstly produced form waste hardened cement paste

  13. High voltage microscopy of the hydration of cement with special respect to the influence of superplasticizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Fredrikson, A.

    1990-02-01

    This report describes a study of cement hydration, using high voltage 'humid cell' electron microscopy. Samples with and without superplasticizer were inserted in the humid cell, thus allowing the superplasticizer to affect the hydration process while observing it in the microscope. It is concluded that after an initial period of rather rapid hydration, further hydration is retarded by the superplasticizer. It probably forms a Helmholtz-type cloud of organic molecules around cement grains. (authors)

  14. Influence of Superplasticizer-Microsilica Complex on Cement Hydration, Structure and Properties of Cement Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. M.; Kramar, L. Ya; Orlov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    According to the study results, the influence of complex additives based on microsilica and superplasticizers on the processes of the heat release, hydration, hardening, formation of the structure and properties of cement stone was determined. Calorimetry, derivatography, X-ray phase analysis, electronic microscopy and physical-mechanical methods for analyzing the properties of cement stone were used for the studies. It was established that plasticizing additives, in addition to the main water-reducing and rheological functions, regulate cement solidification and hardening while polycarboxylate superplasticizers even contribute to the formation of a special, amorphized microstructure of cement stone. In a complex containing microsilica and a polycarboxylate superplasticizer the strength increases sharply with a sharp drop in the capillary porosity responsible for the density, permeability, durability, and hence, the longevity of concrete. All this is a weighty argument in favor of the use of microsilica jointly with a polycarboxylate superplasticizer in road concretes operated under aggressive conditions.

  15. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  16. Molybdeno-Aluminizing of Powder Metallurgy and Wrought Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys by Pack Cementation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsipas, Sophia A.; Gordo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Wear and high temperature oxidation resistance of some titanium-based alloys needs to be enhanced, and this can be effectively accomplished by surface treatment. Molybdenizing is a surface treatment where molybdenum is introduced into the surface of titanium alloys causing the formation of wear-resistant surface layers containing molybdenum, while aluminizing of titanium-based alloys has been reported to improve their high temperature oxidation properties. Whereas pack cementation and other surface modification methods have been used for molybdenizing or aluminizing of wrought and/or cast pure titanium and titanium alloys, such surface treatments have not been reported on titanium alloys produced by powder metallurgy (PM). Also a critical understanding of the process parameters for simultaneous one step molybdeno-aluminizing of titanium alloys by pack cementation and the predominant mechanism for this process have not been reported. The current research work describes the surface modification of titanium and Ti-6Al-4V prepared by PM by molybdeno-aluminizing and analyzes thermodynamic aspects of the deposition process. Similar coatings are also deposited to wrought Ti-6Al-4V and compared. Characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. For both titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, the use of a powder pack containing ammonium chloride as activator leads to the deposition of molybdenum and aluminium into the surface but also introduces nitrogen causing the formation of a thin titanium nitride layer. In addition, various titanium aluminides and mixed titanium aluminium nitrides are formed. The appropriate conditions for molybdeno-aluminizing as well as the phases expected to be formed were successfully determined by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. - Highlights: •Simultaneous co-deposition of Mo-Al onto powder metallurgy and wrought Ti alloy •Thermodynamic calculations were used to optimize deposition conditions

  17. Molybdeno-Aluminizing of Powder Metallurgy and Wrought Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys by Pack Cementation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsipas, Sophia A., E-mail: stsipas@ing.uc3m.es; Gordo, Elena

    2016-08-15

    Wear and high temperature oxidation resistance of some titanium-based alloys needs to be enhanced, and this can be effectively accomplished by surface treatment. Molybdenizing is a surface treatment where molybdenum is introduced into the surface of titanium alloys causing the formation of wear-resistant surface layers containing molybdenum, while aluminizing of titanium-based alloys has been reported to improve their high temperature oxidation properties. Whereas pack cementation and other surface modification methods have been used for molybdenizing or aluminizing of wrought and/or cast pure titanium and titanium alloys, such surface treatments have not been reported on titanium alloys produced by powder metallurgy (PM). Also a critical understanding of the process parameters for simultaneous one step molybdeno-aluminizing of titanium alloys by pack cementation and the predominant mechanism for this process have not been reported. The current research work describes the surface modification of titanium and Ti-6Al-4V prepared by PM by molybdeno-aluminizing and analyzes thermodynamic aspects of the deposition process. Similar coatings are also deposited to wrought Ti-6Al-4V and compared. Characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. For both titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, the use of a powder pack containing ammonium chloride as activator leads to the deposition of molybdenum and aluminium into the surface but also introduces nitrogen causing the formation of a thin titanium nitride layer. In addition, various titanium aluminides and mixed titanium aluminium nitrides are formed. The appropriate conditions for molybdeno-aluminizing as well as the phases expected to be formed were successfully determined by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. - Highlights: •Simultaneous co-deposition of Mo-Al onto powder metallurgy and wrought Ti alloy •Thermodynamic calculations were used to optimize deposition conditions

  18. Characterization and chemical activity of Portland cement and two experimental cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the chemical activity of Portland cement and two other cement types with similar chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate with the aim of developing these cements for further applications in dentistry. The chemical composition of the three cement types namely Portland cement, calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement was evaluated by elemental analysis using energy dispersive analysis with X-ray under the scanning electron microscope and by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to determine the phases. The constituents of the hydration reaction by-products were evaluated by XRD analysis of the set cements at 1, 7, 28 and 56 days and by analysis of the leachate by ion chromatography. The pH of both cements and leachate was determined at different time intervals. Cements admixed with micro-silica were also tested to determine the effect of micro-silica on the reaction by-products. All three cement types were composed of tricalcium silicate as the main constituent phase. The hydration reaction of Portland cement produced calcium hydroxide. However, this was not present in the other cements tested at all ages. Admixed micro-silica had little or no effect on the cements with regard to reaction by-products. The pH of all cements tested was alkaline. Both the experimental calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement had different hydration reactions to that of Portland cement even though calcium silicate was the major constituent element of both cement types. No calcium hydroxide was produced as a by-product to cement hydration. Micro-silica addition to the cement had no effect on the hydration reaction.

  19. Ternary Blends of High Aluminate Cement, Fly ash and Blast-furnace slag for Sewerage Lining Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, L. C.; Kuo, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    High aluminate cement (HAC), fly ash (FA) and blast-furnace slag (BFS) have been treated sustainable materials for the use of cement products for wastewater infrastructure due to their capabilities of corrosion resistance. The purpose of this study is to optimize a ternary blend of above mentioned materials for a special type of mortar for sewerage lining. By the using of Taguchi method, four control parameters including water/cementitious material ratio, mix water content, fly ash content and blast-furnace slag content were considered in nine trial mix designs in this study. By evaluating target properties including (1) maximization of compressive strength, (2) maximization of electricity resistance and (3) minimization of water absorption rate, the best possible levels for each control parameter were determined and the optimal mix proportions were verified. Through the implementation of the study, a practical and completed idea for designing corrosion resistive mortar comprising HAC, FA and BSF is provided.

  20. Mitigating the effects of system resolution on computer simulation of Portland cement hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2008-01-01

    CEMHYD3D is an advanced, three-dimensional computer model for simulating the hydration processes of cement, in which the microstructure of the hydrating cement paste is represented by digitized particles in a cubic domain. However, the system resolution (which is determined by the voxel size) has a

  1. The effect of dolomite type and Al2O3 content on the phase composition in aluminous cements containing spinel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Naghizadeh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of dolomite type and Al2O3 content on the phase composition in aluminous cements containing MA spinel is investigated. For this reason, the raw and calcined dolomites are used as raw materials along with calcined alumina in the preparation of the cement. Then, different compositions are prepared at 1350°C using the sintering method and their mineralogical compositions are investigated using the diffractometric technique. Also, their microstructures arre evaluated. The results indicate that raw materials used have great effect on the type and amount of formed phases in cement composition. Independently of the dolomite type used, a mixed phase product consisting of spinel accompanied by CA and CA2 is obtained. The content of CA phase in the cement composition is decreased with increasing of Al2O3 in the raw materials composition. On the other hand, the content of CA2 phase is increased with the addition of Al2O3. In addition, the results show that the formation of C12A7 is favored by use of calcined dolomite.

  2. Hydration Phenomena of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes (CNT/Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvaneshwari Balasubramaniam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The exciting features of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, such as high elastic modulus, high thermal and electrical conductivities, robustness, and nanoscopic surface properties make them attractive candidates for the cement industry. They have the potential to significantly enhanceengineering properties. CNTs play an important and critical role as nano-anchors in concrete, which enhance the strength by bridging pores in the composite matrix, thereby ensuring robust mechanical strength. The diameter, dispersion, aspect ratio, and interfacial surface interaction of CNTs affect the physical and mechanical properties of concrete, if due care is not taken. In this paper, the usable amount of CNT is scaled down considerably from 0.5% to 0.025% by weight of the cement and the fluctuation caused by these phenomena is assessed. It is observed that the properties and exact quantities of incorporated CNTs influence the hydration and consistency of the composites. In order to address these issues, the surface functionalization of CNTs and rheological studies of the composites are performed. The hydration products and functional groups are carefully optimized and characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and a Zeta potential analyzer. For Mixes 6 and 7, the compressive and tensile strength of CNTs incorporated in mortar specimens caused77% and 48% increases in split tensile strength, respectively, and 17% and 35% increases in compressive strength, respectively, after 28 days of curing and compared withthe control Mix.

  3. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); León-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  4. Determining the water-cement ratio, cement content, water content and degree of hydration of hardened cement paste: Method development and validation on paste samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the initial cement content, water content and free water/cement ratio (w/c) of hardened cement-based materials made with Portland cements that have unknown mixture proportions and degree of hydration. This method first quantifies the composition of the hardened cement paste, i.e. the volumetric fractions of capillary pores, hydration products and unreacted cement, using high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode and image analysis. From the obtained data and the volumetric increase of solids during cement hydration, we compute the initial free water content and cement content, hence the free w/c ratio. The same method can also be used to calculate the degree of hydration. The proposed method has the advantage that it is quantitative and does not require comparison with calibration graphs or reference samples made with the same materials and cured to the same degree of hydration as the tested sample. This paper reports the development, assumptions and limitations of the proposed method, and preliminary results from Portland cement pastes with a range of w/c ratios (0.25-0.50) and curing ages (3-90 days). We also discuss the extension of the technique to mortars and concretes, and samples made with blended cements.

  5. The crucial effect of early-stage gelation on the mechanical properties of cement hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Kanduč, Matej; Li, Lunna; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-07-01

    Gelation and densification of calcium-silicate-hydrate take place during cement hydration. Both processes are crucial for the development of cement strength, and for the long-term evolution of concrete structures. However, the physicochemical environment evolves during cement formation, making it difficult to disentangle what factors are crucial for the mechanical properties. Here we use Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations to study a coarse-grained model of cement formation, and investigate the equilibrium and arrested states. We can correlate the various structures with the time evolution of the interactions between the nano-hydrates during the preparation of cement. The novel emerging picture is that the changes of the physicochemical environment, which dictate the evolution of the effective interactions, specifically favour the early gel formation and its continuous densification. Our observations help us understand how cement attains its unique strength and may help in the rational design of the properties of cement and related materials.

  6. Hydration rate and strength development of low-heat type portland cement mortar mixed with pozzolanic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Jun

    1998-01-01

    Recently, low-heat type Portland cement was specified in Japan Industrial Standards (JIS). Its hydration proceeds slowly. The results of the research so far obtained indicate that slow hydration of cement and mixing of pozzolanic materials with cement make micro-structure of harded cement paste dense and durable. In this study, a blended cement using low-heat type Portland cement and some of pozzolanic materials has been newly developed and its strength property and hydration ratio were checked. The followings are conclusion. (1) Hydration rate of cement paste varies with the replacement ratio of pozzolanic materials. (2) A good liner relationship between strength and total hydration rate of cement paste was observed. (3) A proper replacement ratio of both base-cement and pozzolanic material for manufacturing a blended cement is 50%. (author)

  7. Moessbauer and calorimetric studies of portland cement hydration in the presence of black gram pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Sarita; Kurian, Sajith; Dwivedi, V. N.; Das, S. S.; Singh, N. B.; Gajbhiye, N. S.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of different concentrations of naturally occurring admixture in the form of fine powder of black gram pulse (BGP) on the hydration of Portland cement was studied by isothermal calorimetry and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The spectra were recorded for anhydrous cement and the hydration products at room temperature and 77 K. In the presence of BGP, the spectra showed superparamagnetic doublets at room temperature and the sextet at 77 K, due to the presence of fine particles of iron containing component. Moessbauer studies of hydration products confirmed the formation of nanosize hydration products containing Fe 3+ . The isomer shift (δ) and the quadrupole splitting (ΔE Q ) values of C 4 AF in the cement confirmed iron in an octahedral and tetrahedral environment with +3 oxidation state. The high value of quadrupole splitting showed the high asymmetry of the electron environment around the iron atom. The overall mechanism of the hydration of cement in presence of BGP is discussed.

  8. Hydration study of limestone blended cement in the presence of hazardous wastes containing Cr(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trezza, M.A.; Ferraiuelo, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    Considering the increasing use of limestone cement manufacture, the present paper tends to characterize limestone behavior in the presence of Cr(VI). The research reported herein provides information regarding the effect of Cr(VI) from industrial wastes in the limestone cement hydration. The cementitious materials were ordinary Portland cement, as reference, and limestone blended cement. The hydration and physicomechanical properties of cementitious materials and the influence of chromium at an early age were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), conductimetric and mechanical tests. Portland cement pastes with the addition of Cr(VI) were examined and leaching behavior with respect to water and acid solution were investigated. This study indicates that Cr(VI) modifies the rate and the components obtained during the cement hydration

  9. HYDRATION PROCESS AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CEMENT PASTE WITH RECYCLED CONCRETE POWDER AND SILICA SAND POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Topič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete powder (RCP mostly consisting of cement paste could be reused as partial cement replacement. The aim of this paper is to compare hydration and mechanical properties of RCP and two types of silica sand powder (SSP. Comparison of those materials combined with cement can highlight the binder properties of recycled concrete powder. Using of two types of SSP also show an influence of their fines on hydration process and mechanical properties. Particle size analysis and calorimetric measurement were carried out and mechanical properties such as bulk density, dynamic Young’s modulus and compression strength were examine. Calorimetric measurement proves the presence of exposed non-hydrated particles in RCP that can react again. However lower density of old cement paste in RCP overweight the mentioned potential of RCP and mechanical properties are decreasing compared with reference cement paste and cement paste SSP.

  10. Description of the structural evolution of a hydrating portland cement paste by SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeussler, F.; Eichhorn, F.; Baumbach, H.

    1994-01-01

    On the spectrometer MURN at the pulsed reactor IBR-2 dry Portland cement, silica fume, and a hydrating Portland cement paste were studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). By using the TOF-method a momentum transfer from 0.07 nm -1 to 7 nm -1 is detectable. Every component (dry cement powder, clinker minerals, hydrating cement pastes) shows a different scattering behaviour. In the measured Q-region the hardening cement paste does not show a Porod-like behaviour of SANS-curves. In contrast the Porod's potential law holds for dry powder samples of clinker minerals and silica fume. In experiments carried out to observe the hydration progress within the first 321 days the characteristics of the scattering curves (potential behaviour, the radius of gyration, and the macroscopic scattering cross section at Q = 0 nm -1 were measured. Some evolution of the inner structure of the hardened cement paste was noted. (orig.)

  11. Evolution of the hydration in cements with additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonavetti, V. L.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the hydration mechanism of portland cement pastes with limestone, quartz and natural pozzolan (80/20 weight was analized. The techniques used were nonevaporable water content, pozzolanic activity and X-ray diffraction. Results show that filler effect increases initially the amount of hydration products in all pastes. For limestone pastes, the dilution effect is significant at long time, for quartz and pozzolan pastes the dilution effect was lower due to the contribution of the pozzolanic reaction.

    En el presente trabajo se analizó el mecanismo de hidratación de pastas de cemento portland normal con la incorporación de caliza, cuarzo y puzolana natural (proporción 80/20 en peso, por medio de la evaluación del contenido de agua no evaporable, la actividad puzolánica por vía química y la formación de productos de hidratación por DRX. Los resultados obtenidos permitieron determinar un aumento de la cantidad de productos de hidratación inicial debidos al efecto filler en todas las pastas. En las pastas con caliza se evidenció el efecto de dilución a edades avanzadas, en tanto que en las pastas con cuarzo y puzolana, este efecto fue menos predominante debido a la contribución de la reacción puzolánica.

  12. Hydrate Phase Assemblages in Blends of Ye'elimite and Gypsum with Alite and Belite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Calcium sulpho-aluminate (CSA) cements all contain ye’elimite, either as the main phase or in intermediate amounts, while they differ in their content of accessory phases. Belite is the main phase in most CSA cements, however, alite - CSA cements have been produced. The hydrate phases formed during...... and hydration kinetics. The improved understanding of the hydrate phase assemblages as well as the hydration kinetics for the model systems will form the fundamental basis for further optimizations of blended systems including ye’elimite with the aim of maximizing the reaction degree of the main clinker phases...... hydration of CSA cements depend on the type of CSA cement and the amount of gypsum added. The hydration reactions of the main phases are by themselves well documented, whereas the simultaneous hydration of CSA cement components is not fully understood in terms of hydration products and kinetics. To further...

  13. Effect of Graphene Oxide (GO on the Morphology and Microstructure of Cement Hydration Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on the microstructure of cement mortars were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric (TG, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. Cement mortar samples with different proportions of GO (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 wt % based on the weight of cement were prepared. The test results showed that GO affected the crystallization of cement hydration products, C–S–H (calcium silicate hydrate is the main hydrate product and CH (calcium hydroxide. The morphology of hydration products changed with the increase of GO content. Furthermore, the results of XRD analyses showed that the diffraction peak intensity and the crystal grain size of CH (001, (100, (101, and (102 for GO samples increased considerably compared with the control sample. Based on the results, it can be understood that GO can modify the crystal surface of CH, leading to the formation of larger crystals.

  14. A thermodynamic approach to the hydration of sulphate-resisting Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Wieland, Erich

    2006-01-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to model changes in the hydrate assemblage and the composition of the pore solution during the hydration of calcite-free and calcite-containing sulphate-resisting Portland cement CEM I 52.5 N HTS. Modelling is based on thermodynamic data for the hydration products and calculated hydration rates for the individual clinker phases, which are used as time-dependent input parameters. Model predictions compare well with the composition of the hydrate assemblage as observed by TGA and semi-quantitative XRD and with the experimentally determined compositions of the pore solutions. The calculations show that in the presence of small amounts of calcite typically associated with Portland cement, C-S-H, portlandite, ettringite and calcium monocarbonate are the main hydration products. In the absence of calcite in the cement, however, siliceous hydrogarnet instead of calcium monocarbonate is observed to precipitate. The use of a higher water-to-cement ratio for the preparation of a calcite-containing cement paste has a minor effect on the composition of the hydrate assemblage, while it significantly changes the composition of the pore solution. In particular, lower pH value and higher Ca concentrations appear that could potentially influence the solubility and uptake of heavy metals and anions by cementitious materials

  15. A sample holder for the study of isothermal heat of hydration of cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    Different techniques for measuring heat of hydration of cement are discussed, and a sample holder designed specially for measuring isothermal heat of hydration is described. A particular characteristic of the sample holder is the vacuum mixing technique which ensures a momentary and homogeneous...

  16. Radon exhalation of hardening concrete: monitoring cement hydration and prediction of radon concentration in construction site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovler, Konstantin

    2006-01-01

    The unique properties of radon as a noble gas are used for monitoring cement hydration and microstructural transformations in cementitious system. It is found that the radon concentration curve for hydrating cement paste enclosed in the chamber increases from zero (more accurately - background) concentrations, similar to unhydrated cement. However, radon concentrations developed within 3 days in the test chamber containing cement paste were approximately 20 times higher than those of unhydrated cement. This fact proves the importance of microstructural transformations taking place in the process of cement hydration, in comparison with cement grain, which is a time-stable material. It is concluded that monitoring cement hydration by means of radon exhalation method makes it possible to distinguish between three main stages, which are readily seen in the time dependence of radon concentration: stage I (dormant period), stage II (setting and intensive microstructural transformations) and stage III (densification of the structure and drying). The information presented improves our understanding of the main physical mechanisms resulting in the characteristic behavior of radon exhalation in the course of cement hydration. The maximum value of radon exhalation rate observed, when cement sets, can reach 0.6 mBq kg(-1) s(-1) and sometimes exceeds 1.0 mBq kg(-1) s(-1). These values exceed significantly to those known before for cementitious materials. At the same time, the minimum ventilation rate accepted in the design practice (0.5 h(-1)), guarantees that the concentrations in most of the cases will not exceed the action level and that they are not of any radiological concern for construction workers employed in concreting in closed spaces.

  17. About influence of some superplasticizers on hydration and the structure of hardened cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koryanova Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current construction can not be imagined without the use of high-quality mortars and concretes obtained by using high-tech and workable mixtures with lower water content. Obtaining such mixtures in current conditions is impossible without the use of superplasticizers. The use of superplasticizers in concrete technology requires an answer to the question of the influence of superplasticizers on the deformation-strength properties of cement stone. There is a well-known dependence “composition-technology-structure-properties”, from which it follows that the strength and deformation properties of cement stone directly depend on the hydration of cement stone in the early stages and structure formation. The influence of some types of superplasticizers on the hydration and structure of cement stone, namely, total, open and conditionally-closed porosity, total contraction, autogenous shrinkage, contraction porosity and hydration heat is considered in the article.

  18. Influence of spraying on the early hydration of accelerated cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, Renan P.; Cavalaro, Sergio H.P.; Cano, Miguel; Figueiredo, Antonio D.

    2016-01-01

    In practice, most of the studies about the interaction between cement and accelerators is performed with hand-mixed pastes. However, in many applications mixing occurs through spraying, which may affect accelerators reactivity and the microstructure of the hardened paste. The objective of this study is to analyze how the mixing process influences the early hydration of accelerated cement pastes. Isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and SEM imaging were performed on cement pastes produced by hand-mixing and by spraying, using equivalent doses of an alkali-free and an alkaline accelerator and two types of cement. Results showed a great influence of the spraying process on the reactivity of accelerators and on the morphology of the precipitated hydrates. Variations in hydration kinetics caused by the mixing method are explained and the results obtained might have a significant repercussion on how future research on the behavior of accelerated mixes will be performed.

  19. Effects of substituting D2O for H2O on SANS measurements of hydrating cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, T.M.; Prior, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of cement have been found useful in the investigation of the shape and growth of particles formed during hydration. Calorimetric measurements of hydrating cement samples have shown that the substitution of D 2 O for H 2 O has the effect of slowing the hydration process. In order to throw some light on this phenomenon, we have measured SANS profiles from cement samples hydrating in H 2 O and D 2 O. This involved obtaining SANS profiles at half-hourly intervals during the initial stage of hydration. The only instruments capable of this at present are located at the Hahn-Meitner Institute in Berlin and at the Nuclear Physics Institute at Rez near Prague. Initial experiments carried out on the V12a UltraSANS diffractometer at The Hahn-Meitner Institute were only partially successful owing to excessive multiple scattering in the D 2 O samples. Subsequent measurements were therefore carried out on the similar instrument at Rez near Prague which operates at a shorter neutron wavelength. Results from these measurements show profound differences in the evolution of cements hydrating in D 2 O and those hydrating in H 2 O

  20. Revealing the influence of water-cement ratio on the pore size distribution in hydrated cement paste by using cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bede, Andrea; Ardelean, Ioan

    2017-12-01

    Varying the amount of water in a concrete mix will influence its final properties considerably due to the changes in the capillary porosity. That is why a non-destructive technique is necessary for revealing the capillary pore distribution inside hydrated cement based materials and linking the capillary porosity with the macroscopic properties of these materials. In the present work, we demonstrate a simple approach for revealing the differences in capillary pore size distributions introduced by the preparation of cement paste with different water-to-cement ratios. The approach relies on monitoring the nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation distribution of cyclohexane molecules confined inside the cement paste pores. The technique reveals the whole spectrum of pores inside the hydrated cement pastes, allowing a qualitative and quantitative analysis of different pore sizes. The cement pastes with higher water-to-cement ratios show an increase in capillary porosity, while for all the samples the intra-C-S-H and inter-C-S-H pores (also known as gel pores) remain unchanged. The technique can be applied to various porous materials with internal mineral surfaces.

  1. Effect of Fly Ash and Silica Fume on the Mechanical Properties of Cement Paste at Different Stages of Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-10

    All materials were placed in a clean, labeled stainless steel mixing bowl and weighed to the nearest ten thousandth of a pound. The cement and fly...on the Mechanical Properties of Cement Paste at Different Stages of Hydration This thesis investigates the effect of fly ash and silica fume on... cement paste hydration. Percentages of each additive will replace the cement by volume to be studied at five ages. These percentages will be compared

  2. Effect of three natural pozzolans in portland cement hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahhal, V.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural pozzolans have been used since ancient times and continues to be used today. The chemistry and morphological composition of natural pozzolans and their particle size distribution allows classifying them as more or less reactive pozzolan. In this research several techniques have been used to study the influence of pozzolan on portland cement hydration as much as to evaluate the mechanical and durable properties of concretes, mortars and pastes containing pozzolans. This paper describes the effect of incorporating three natural pozzolans to two cements with very different mineralogical composition. The techniques used were: conduction calorimetry and Fratini test. Results proved that pozzolanic activity and the acceleration and retardation of hydration reaction depend on the mineralogical composition of the portland cernent used. Effects of dilution, stimulation, acceleration or retardation reactions, behavior into areas of heat dissipation and pozzolanic activity depend on the percentage of pozzolan used and the age in which it has been analyzed.

    El uso de las puzolanas naturales se remonta a la antigüedad, no obstante, actualmente continúa su utilización. La composición química y morfológica de las puzolanas naturales, sumado al tamaño de sus partículas, las califican como más o menos reactivas. En el estudio de las mismas, se han aplicado variadas técnicas para el análisis de sus interferencias en las reacciones de hidratación de los cementos portland; así como para la evaluación de las propiedades resistentes y duraderas que pueden conferirle a los hormigones, morteros o pastas de los que formen parte. Este trabajo versará sobre los efectos que produce la incorporación de tres puzolanas naturales a dos cementos portland de muy diferente composición mineralógica. Las técnicas aplicadas para su estudio han sido: la calorimetría de conducción y el ensayo de Fratini. Los resultados obtenidos permiten determinar

  3. Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Liang; Ko, Ming-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Juu-En

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic β-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The composition of cement hydrating at 60 deg C from synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auld, J.; Turner, K.; Thorogood, G.J.; Ball, C.J.; Aldridge, L.P.; Taylor, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Cement consists of 5 phases C3S, C2S, C3A, C4AF (where C denotes CaO, S denotes SiO 2 , A denotes AI 2 O 3 and F denotes Fe 2 O 3 ) and gypsum. When cement hydrates it forms an amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) as well as the crystalline ettringite and calcium hydroxide. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the hydrated cement is difficult to interpret because of its complexity. In addition, the overlapping lines from the remaining cement compounds make it difficult to quantify the amount of the crystalline components present. Using Rietveld analysis we have been able to interpret the patterns obtained from synchrotron x-ray diffraction patterns obtained at the Photon Factory at the Australian National Beamline Facility using BIGDIF. The changes in the composition of the hydrated cement paste were determined as a function of time during hydration at 60 deg C. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  5. Effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer on the hydration characteristics of portland cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa.M. El Gamal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (modified lignosulphonate base on the hydration characteristics of hardened Portland cement pastes were studied at different curing conditions. Four mixtures were prepared using 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 wt% addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (SR of cement. These pastes were hydrated under two different conditions; (i normal curing at room temperature; 25 °C up to 90 days periods and (ii hydrothermal curing at a pressure of 8 atm. of saturated steam up to 24 h. The compressive strength, combined water content, free lime content, gel/space ratio and microstructure of hardened cement pastes were studied. The results revealed that addition of SR superplasticizer promote the dispersion of cement particles and interacts with Ca(OH2. The addition of SR superplasticizer exhibits Portland cement better workability during the preparation of pastes. In addition, amore compact structure were obtained leading to higher values of compressive strength for all the hardened hydrated pastes under both normal and hydrothermal curing. The results indicated that the addition of SR superplasticizer to Portland cement does not alter the types of hydration products formed during normal or hydrothermal conditions; only it caused a decrease in the degree of the porosity of the formed pastes.

  6. Influence of silica fume and fly ash on hydration, microstructure and strength of cement based mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Kaimao

    1992-10-01

    The influence of fly ash and silica fume on the hydration, microstructure and strength of cement-based mixtures was investigated. A literature review of the hydration processes, compressive strength development, and microstructure of Portland cement is presented, followed by description of materials and specimens preparation and experimental methodology. It was found that silica fume retards cement hydration at low water/concrete ratios. It reduces calcium hydroxide significantly and increases the amount of hydrates at early ages. Fly ash retards hydration more significantly at high water/concrete ratios than at low ratios. The combination of silica fume and fly ash further retards hydration at one day. Silica fume dominates the reaction with calcium hydroxide. Silica fume significantly increases early strength of mortars and concrete, while fly ash reduces early strength. Silica fume can substantially increase strength of fly ash mortar and concrete after 7 days. Silica fume refines pores in the range 100-500 A, while fly ash mortars exhibit gradual pore refinement as hydration proceeds. Silica fume dominates the pore refinement if used with fly ash. 89 refs., 74 figs., 16 tabs.

  7. 1H NMR relaxometry as an indicator of setting and water depletion during cement hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Biyun; Faure, Paméla; Thiéry, Mickaël; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been used to detect setting and microstructure evolution during cement hydration. NMR measurements were performed since casting, during setting and until hardening (from 0 to 3 days). The mobility of water molecules was assessed by an analysis focused on the diagram of longitudinal relaxation time T 1 generated by an Inversion Recovery sequence. The initial stiffening of the solid network was identified by an analysis of the relaxation rate 1/T 1 . The kinetics of water depletion was investigated by using a simple one-pulse acquisition sequence. In parallel, conventional techniques (Vicat needle and temperature monitoring), as well as numerical simulations of hydration, were used to complement and validate these NMR results. Cement pastes and mortars with different water-to-cement ratios made of grey or white OPCs were tested. Furthermore, the effects of the addition of sand, super-plasticizer and silica fume on the hydration kinetics were investigated

  8. INFLUENCE OF SUBSTITUTION OF ORDINARY PORTLAND CEMENT BY SILICA FUME ON THE HYDRATION OF SLAG-PORTLAND CEMENT PASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. El-Alfi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Effect of gradual substitution of ordinary Portland cement by a few percent of silica fume (0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 wt.% on the hydration properties of slag-Portland cement pastes up to 12 months was investigated. The results show that the composite cement pastes containing silica fume give the higher physico-mechanical properties than that of the slag-Portland cement. Also, the XRD results reveal that the peak of Ca(OH2 shows higher intensity in the sample without silica fume and completely disappears in the sample containing 7.5 wt.% silica fume content. Also, the intensity peaks of C4AH13 sharply increase with silica fume content.

  9. High-temperature Corrosion Resistance of Composite Coating Prepared by Micro-arc Oxidation Combined with Pack Cementation Aluminizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Zu-jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 ceramic film was obtained by micro-arc oxidation (MAO process on Al/C103 specimen, which was prepared by pack cementation aluminizing technology on C103 niobium alloy. With the aid of XRD and SEM equipped with EDS, chemical compositions and microstructures of the composite coatings before and after high-temperature corrosion were analyzed. The behavior and mechanism of the composite coatings in high-temperature oxidation and hot corrosion were also investigated. The results indicate that oxidation mass gain at 1000℃ for 10h of the Al/C103 specimen is 6.98mg/cm2, and it is 2.89mg/cm2 of the MAO/Al/C103 specimen. However, the mass gain of MAO/Al/C103 specimen (57.52mg/cm2 is higher than that of Al/C103 specimen (28.08mg/cm2 after oxidation 20h. After hot corrosion in 75%Na2SO4 and 25%NaCl at 900℃ for 50h, the mass gain of Al/C103 and MAO/Al/C103 specimens are 70.54mg/cm2 and 55.71mg/cm2 respectively, Al2O3 and perovskite NaNbO3 phases are formed on the surface; the diffusion of molten salt is suppressed, due to part of NaNbO3 accumulated in the MAO micropores. Therefore, MAO/Al/C103 specimen exhibits better hot corrosion resistance.

  10. The role of calcium ions and lignosulphonate plasticiser in the hydration of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, L.H.; Knight, J.C.; Maharaj, R.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments involving equilibrium dialysis, conductivity, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) have been carried out to investigate the role of calcium ions and polymeric plasticisers in cement/admixture hydration. Results from a study of lignosulphonic acid, sodium salt, acetate as a plasticiser shows that a plasticiser has dual role; one mainly as a kinetic inhibitor (poison) in cement hydration mechanism and the other as a dispersant. Evidence of a weak Ca 2+ binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic moieties was found at low ionic strengths of 0.1 M using ITC. No evidence of formal Ca 2+ binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic acid moieties was found using equilibrium dialysis at higher ionic strength of 1 M (ionic strengths of 0.4 M are typically found in Portland cement pore solution), as is often suggested in cement/admixture literature

  11. Photocatalytic NO{sub x} abatement by calcium aluminate cements modified with TiO{sub 2}: Improved NO{sub 2} conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Nicolás, M. [MIMED Research Group, Department of Chemistry and Soil Sciences, School of Sciences, University of Navarra, c/Irunlarrea, 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Balbuena, J.; Cruz-Yusta, M.; Sánchez, L. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, School of Sciences, University of Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, 14071 Córdoba (Spain); Navarro-Blasco, I.; Fernández, J.M. [MIMED Research Group, Department of Chemistry and Soil Sciences, School of Sciences, University of Navarra, c/Irunlarrea, 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Alvarez, J.I., E-mail: jalvarez@unav.es [MIMED Research Group, Department of Chemistry and Soil Sciences, School of Sciences, University of Navarra, c/Irunlarrea, 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} was studied in two types of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) under two different curing regimes. The effect of the TiO{sub 2} addition on the setting time, consistency and mechanical properties of the CACs was evaluated. The abatement of gaseous pollutants (NO{sub x}) under UV irradiation was also assessed. These cementitious matrices were found to successfully retain NO{sub 2}: more abundant presence of aluminates in white cement (w-CAC, iron-lean) helped to better adsorb NO{sub 2}, thus improving the conversion performance of the catalyst resulting in a larger NO{sub x} removal under UV irradiation. As evidenced by XRD, SEM, EDAX and zeta potential analyses, the presence of ferrite in dark cement (d-CAC, iron-reach) induced a certain chemical interaction with TiO{sub 2}. The experimental findings suggest the formation of new iron titanate phases, namely pseudobrookite. The reduced band-gap energy of these compounds compared with that of TiO{sub 2} accounts for the photocatalytic activity of these samples.

  12. Application of Neutron imaging in pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement: comparison of hydration of H20 with D2O based Portland cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussenova, D.; Bilheux, H.; Radonjic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Wellbore Cement studies have been ongoing for decades. The studies vary from efforts to reduce permeability and resistance to corrosive environment to issues with gas migration also known as Sustained Casing Pressure (SCP). These practical issues often lead to health and safety problems as well as huge economic loss in oil and gas industry. Several techniques have been employed to reduce the impact of gas leakage. In this study we purely focus on expandable liners, which are introduced as part of oil well reconstruction and work-overs and as well abandonment procedures that help in prevention of SCP. Expandable liner is a tube that after application of a certain tool can increase its diameter. The increase in diameter creates extra force on hydrated cement that results in reducing width of interface fractures and cement-tube de-bonding. Moreover, this also causes cement to change its microstructure and other porous medium properties, primarily hydraulic conductivity. In order to examine changes before and after operations, cement pore structure must be well characterized and correlated to cement slurry design as well as chemical and physical environmental conditions. As modern oil well pipes and tubes contain iron, it is difficult to perform X-ray tomography of a bulk measurement of the cement in its wellbore conditions, which are tube wall-cement-tube wall. Neutron imaging is a complementary technique to x-ray imaging and is well suited for detection of light elements imbedded in metallic containers. Thus, Neutron Imaging (NI) is investigated as a tool for the detection of pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement. Recent measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) neutron imaging facility. NI is is highly sensitive to light elements such as Hydrogen (H). Oil well cements that have undergone a full hydration contain on average 30%-40% of free water in its pore structure. The unreacted water is the main

  13. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, M; Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Herfort, D

    2012-01-01

    M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012).......M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012)....

  14. CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATES HYDRATES: FORMATION, STABILITY AND INFLUENCE ON STANDARD PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziliunas A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of phosphogypsum to produce the binders requires a much higher input than preparation of natural gypsum stone. This makes it uncompetitive material. The investigations presented therein are meant to reduce this input by looking for the ways of rendering impurities harmless. Soluble acid orthophosphates are the main harmful impurity of phosphogypsum. The studies show that dry insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates (1.09 % and 2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum have little effect on W/C, setting times and soundness of Portland cement pastes. Insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates {CaHPO4∙2H2O, Ca8(HPO42(PO44∙5H2O and Ca9(HPO4(PO45(OH∙4H2O} formed in acidic medium (pH = 4.2 - 5.9 have been destroyed in alkaline medium and reduce standard compressive strength of cement up to 28 %. Calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group are stable in alcaline medium, while in dry state they reduce the standard compressive strength of cement until 10 %, but their suspensions prolong setting times of Portland cement as soluble orthophosphates – 2 - 3 times. Alkalis in cement increase pH of paste, but do not change the process of formation of calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group: it takes place through an intermediate phase - CaHPO4·2H2O, whose transformation into apatite lasts for 2 - 3 months.

  15. Uptake of selenate on hydrated and degraded cement: batch and dynamic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, I.; Rovira, I.; Marti, V.; Pablo, J. de; Duro, L.; Gaona, X.; Colas, E.; Grive, M.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of selenate sorption and retardation in batch and dynamic experiments on hydrated and degraded cement has been studied. Desorption studies have also been carried in order to assess the reversibility of the sorption process. Sorption data onto degraded cement have been treated assuming the formation of surface complexes, whereas sorption kinetics has been fitted by using a pseudo-first order kinetic equation. Dynamic flow experiments have also been modelled. (authors)

  16. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement as a Carbonic Cement: The Mechanisms, Dynamics, and Implications of Self-Sealing and CO2 Resistance in Wellbore Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, George Drake Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-07-28

    This report analyzes the dynamics and mechanisms of the interactions of carbonated brine with hydrated Portland cement. The analysis is based on a recent set of comprehensive reactive-transport simulations, and it relies heavily on the synthesis of the body of work on wellbore integrity that we have conducted for the Carbon Storage Program over the past decade.

  17. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  18. Effects of lithium nitrate admixture on early-age cement hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, M.J.; Kurtis, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Although the benefits of lithium admixtures for mitigation of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) have been well documented, the potential ancillary effects of lithium compounds on cement and concrete remain largely uncharacterized. To examine the effects of the most common lithium admixture - lithium nitrate - on early-age behavior, the admixture was introduced at dosages of 0% to 400% of the recommended dosage to six cements of varying composition and to a cement-fly ash blend. Behavior was examined by isothermal calorimetry and measurements of chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, and setting time. Results indicate that lithium nitrate accelerates the early hydration of most cements but may retard hydration after 24 h. In the lowest alkali cement tested, set times were shortened in the presence of lithium nitrate by 15-22%. Higher dosages appeared to increase autogenous shrinkage after 40 days. The replacement of cement by Class F fly ash at 20% by weight appeared to diminish the early acceleration effects, but later hydration retardation and autogenous shrinkage were still observed

  19. Individual and combined effects of chloride, sulfate, and magnesium ions on hydrated Portland-cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, T.S.; Wakeley, L.D.; Young, C.L.

    1994-03-01

    Ground water with a high concentration of magnesium ion is known to cause deterioration to portland cement concretes. A proposed mechanism for this deterioration process published previously involves an approximate 1:1 replacement of Ca ions by Mg ions in the crystalline phases of hydrated cement. The current study was undertaken to determine which ions, among magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, cause deterioration; whether their deleterious action is individual or interdependent; and to relate this mechanism of deterioration to the outlook for a 100-yr service life of concretes used in mass placements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Loss of Ca ion by cement pastes was found to be strongly related to the concentration of Mg ion in simulated ground-water solutions in which the paste samples were aged. This was true of both salt- containing and conventional cement pastes. No other ion in the solutions exerted a strong effect on Ca loss. Ca ion left first from calcium hydroxide in the pastes, depleting all calcium hydroxide by 60 days. Some calcium silicate hydrate remained even after 90 days in the solutions with the highest concentration of Mg ion, while the paste samples deteriorated noticeably. The results indicated a mechanism that involves dissolution of Ca phases and transport of Ca ions to the surface of the sample, followed by formation of Mg-bearing phases at this reaction surface rather than directly by substitution within the microstructure of hydrated cement. Given that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate are the principal strength-giving phases of hydrated cement, this mechanism indicates the likelihood of significant loss of integrity of a concrete exposed to Mg-bearing ground water at the WIPP. The rate of deterioration ultimately will depend on Mg-ion concentration, the microstructure materials of the concrete exposed to that groundwater, and the availability of brine

  20. Research on the nanolevel influence of surfactants on structure formation of the hydrated Portland cement compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guryanov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of the structure formation process on a nanolevel of the samples of hydrated Portland cement compositions containing the modifying additives has been conducted with the help of small angle neutron scattering method. Carbonate and aluminum alkaline slimes as well as the complex additives containing surfactants were used as additives. The influence of slimes and surfactants on structural parameters change of Portland cement compositions of the average size of the disseminating objects, fractal dimension samples is considered. These Portland cement compositions are shown to be fractal clusters.

  1. Estimation of the degree of hydration of blended cement pastes by a scanning electron microscope point-counting procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Garboczi, E.J.; Bentz, D.P.; Stutzman, P.E.; Mason, T.O.

    2004-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) point-counting technique was employed to study the hydration of plain portland and blended cement pastes containing fly ash or slag. For plain portland cement pastes, the results for the degree of cement hydration obtained by the SEM point-counting technique were consistent with the results from the traditional loss-on-ignition (LOI) of nonevaporable water-content measurements; agreement was within ±10%. The standard deviation in the determination of the degree of cement hydration via point counting ranged from ±1.5% to ±1.8% (one operator, one sample). For the blended cement pastes, it is the first time that the degree of hydration of cement in blended systems has been studied directly. The standard deviation for the degree of hydration of cement in the blended cement pastes ranged from ±1.4% to ±2.2%. Additionally, the degrees of reaction of the mineral admixtures (MAs) were also measured. The standard deviation for the degree of fly ash reaction was ±4.6% to ±5.0% and ±3.6% to ±4.3% for slag. All of the analyses suggest that the SEM point-counting technique can be a reliable and effective analysis tool for use in studies of the hydration of blended cement pastes

  2. The Effect of TiO₂ Doped Photocatalytic Nano-Additives on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland and High Alumina Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Nicolás, María; Navarro-Blasco, Íñigo; Fernández, José M; Alvarez, José Ignacio

    2017-10-14

    Mortars with two different binders (Portland cement (PC) and high alumina cement (HAC)) were modified upon the bulk incorporation of nano-structured photocatalytic additives (bare TiO₂, and TiO₂ doped with either iron (Fe-TiO₂) or vanadium (V-TiO₂)). Plastic and hardened state properties of these mortars were assessed in order to study the influence of these nano-additives. Water demand was increased, slightly by bare TiO₂ and Fe-TiO₂, and strongly by V-TiO₂, in agreement with the reduction of the particle size and the tendency to agglomerate. Isothermal calorimetry showed that hydration of the cementitious matrices was accelerated due to additional nucleation sites offered by the nano-additives. TiO₂ and doped TiO₂ did not show pozzolanic reactivity in the binding systems. Changes in the pore size distribution, mainly the filler effect of the nano-additives, accounted for the increase in compressive strengths measured for HAC mortars. A complex microstructure was seen in calcium aluminate cement mortars, strongly dependent on the curing conditions. Fe-TiO₂ was found to be homogeneously distributed whereas the tendency of V-TiO₂ to agglomerate was evidenced by elemental distribution maps. Water absorption capacity was not affected by the nano-additive incorporation in HAC mortars, which is a favourable feature for the application of these mortars.

  3. The Effect of TiO2 Doped Photocatalytic Nano-Additives on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland and High Alumina Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pérez-Nicolás

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mortars with two different binders (Portland cement (PC and high alumina cement (HAC were modified upon the bulk incorporation of nano-structured photocatalytic additives (bare TiO2, and TiO2 doped with either iron (Fe-TiO2 or vanadium (V-TiO2. Plastic and hardened state properties of these mortars were assessed in order to study the influence of these nano-additives. Water demand was increased, slightly by bare TiO2 and Fe-TiO2, and strongly by V-TiO2, in agreement with the reduction of the particle size and the tendency to agglomerate. Isothermal calorimetry showed that hydration of the cementitious matrices was accelerated due to additional nucleation sites offered by the nano-additives. TiO2 and doped TiO2 did not show pozzolanic reactivity in the binding systems. Changes in the pore size distribution, mainly the filler effect of the nano-additives, accounted for the increase in compressive strengths measured for HAC mortars. A complex microstructure was seen in calcium aluminate cement mortars, strongly dependent on the curing conditions. Fe-TiO2 was found to be homogeneously distributed whereas the tendency of V-TiO2 to agglomerate was evidenced by elemental distribution maps. Water absorption capacity was not affected by the nano-additive incorporation in HAC mortars, which is a favourable feature for the application of these mortars.

  4. Evaluation of bioactivity in vitro of endodontic calcium aluminate cement; Avaliacao da bioatividade in vitro de cimento endodontico a base de aluminato de calcio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, I.R.; Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L., E-mail: ivonero@univap.br [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pandolfelli, V.C. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Bioactivity is referred to as the capacity of a material to develop a stable bond with living tissue via the deposition of hydroxyapatite. Materials which exhibit this property can be used to repair diseased or damaged bone tissue and can be designed to remain in situ indefinitely. An indication of bioactivity can be obtained by the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of a substrate in simulated body fluids (SBF) in vitro. Therefore, set samples of calcium aluminate endodontic cement were maintained in contact with SBF solutions (Kokubo and Rigo) and their surfaces were later evaluated by means of SEM, EDX and DRX. Measurements of pH and ionic conductivity were also carried out for SBF solutions in contact with set samples of endodontic cement. The ideal conditions of precipitation were obtained in SBF Rigo been observed a surface layer with spherical morphology characteristic of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite.(author)

  5. Tensile strength of hydrated cement paste phases assessed by microbending tests and nanoindentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Králík, V.; Šmilauer, V.; Polívka, Leoš; Jäger, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 73, Oct (2016), 164-173 ISSN 0958-9465 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cement * hydration products * micro-beam * tensile strength * fracture energy * nanoindentation * focused ion beam Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.265, year: 2016

  6. The mechanical properties and hydration characteristics of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongxu Li; Xuyan Song [Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2008-04-15

    The mechanical properties of several kinds of coal gangue calcined with limestone were researched so as to find the optimum way of calcinations with limestone. The microstructure and property of hydration process of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the method of mercury in trusion poremeasurement. When the proper amounst of gypsum and fluorite were taken as mineralizers in the course of calcinations of added-calcium coal gangue, the activity of coal gangue can be effectively improved. The results of mechanical property and structural characteristics such as hydration, hydration products and microstructure etc. of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue are consistent.

  7. Effect of MXene (Nano-Ti3C2 on Early-Age Hydration of Cement Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new two-dimensional material, MXene (nano-Ti3C2 has been widely applied in many fields, especially for reinforced composite materials. In this paper, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction (XRD, hydration heat, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and EDS analysis were used to analyze the impact of MXene on cement hydration properties. The obtained results revealed that (a MXene could greatly improve the early compressive strength of cement paste with 0.04 wt% concentration, (b the phase type of early-age hydration products has not been changed after the addition of MXene, (c hydration exothermic rate within 72 h has small difference at different amount of MXene, and (d morphologies of hydration products were varied with the dosage of MXene, a lot of tufted ettringites appeared in 3 d hydration products when the content of MXene was 0.04 wt%, which will have a positive effect on improving the early mechanical properties of cement paste. MXene has inhibited the Portland cement hydration process; the main role of MXene in the cement hydration process is to promote the messy ettringite becoming regular distribution at a node and form network connection structure in the crystals growth process, making the mechanics performance of cement paste significantly improved.

  8. Sustainable Nanopozzolan Modified Cement: Characterizations and Morphology of Calcium Silicate Hydrate during Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mohamed Sutan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are environmental and sustainable benefits of partially replacing cement with industrial by-products or synthetic materials in cement based products. Since microstructural behaviours of cement based products are the crucial parameters that govern their sustainability and durability, this study investigates the microstructural comparison between two different types of cement replacements as nanopozzolan modified cement (NPMC in cement based product by focusing on the evidence of pozzolanic reactivity in corroboration with physical and mechanical properties. Characterization and morphology techniques using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were carried out to assess the pozzolanic reactivity of cement paste modified with the combination of nano- and micro silica as NPMC in comparison to unmodified cement paste (UCP of 0.5 water to cement ratio (w/c. Results were then substantiated with compressive strength (CS results as mechanical property. Results of this study showed clear evidence of pozzolanicity for all samples with varying reactivity with NPMC being the most reactive.

  9. Immobilisation of radwaste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Pointer, C.; Cowie, J.; Wilding, C.R.; Mattingley, N.J.; Evans, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The solubilities and influence on cement pH are reported for calcium aluminate and aluminosulphate hydrates. The solubility of Ca(OH) 2 is reported to 700 bars. Polymerization of C-S-H is investigated by NMR. Specific interactions of U 6+ and iodine (I - , IO 3 - ) with cement components are described. The impact of radiation on cements and the influence of higher temperature are documented. The role of dissolved Ca and CO 2 in groundwaters as dissolution media for cements are reported. (author)

  10. Modifying Cement Hydration with NS@PCE Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fine particles could accelerate cement hydration process, or, more specifically, this accelerating effect can be attributed to additional surface area introduced by fine particles. In addition to this view, the surface state of fine particles is also an important factor, especially for nanoparticles. In the previous study, a series of nano-SiO2-polycarboxylate superplasticizer core-shell nanoparticles (NS@PCE were synthesized, which have a similar particle size distribution but different surface properties. In this study, the impact of NS@PCE on cement hydration was investigated by heat flow calorimetry, mechanical property measurement, XRD, and SEM. Results show that, among a series of NS@PCE, NS@PCE-2 with a moderate shell-core ratio appeared to be more effective in accelerating cement hydration. As dosage increases, the efficiency of NS@PCE-2 would reach a plateau which is quantified by various characteristic values. Compressive strength results indicate that strength has a linear correlation with cumulative heat release. A hypothesis was proposed to explain the modification effect of NS@PCE, which highlights a balance between initial dispersion and pozzolanic reactivity. This paper provides a new understanding for the surface modification of supplementary cementitious materials and their application and also sheds a new light on nano-SiO2 for optimizing cement-based materials.

  11. Hydration kinetics of cements by Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Application to Portland-cement-derived endodontic pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, Villiam; Fantazzini, Paola; Mongiorgi, Romano; Sauro, Salvatore; Zanna, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) of 1 H nuclei is used to monitor the maturation up to 30 days of three different endodontic cement pastes. The “Solid–liquid” separation of the NMR signals and quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times allow one to follow the formation of chemical compounds and the build-up of the nano- and subnano-structured C–S–H gel. 1 H populations, distinguished by their different mobilities, can be identified and assigned to water confined within the pores of the C–S–H gel, to crystallization water and Portlandite, and to hydroxyl groups. Changes of the TD-NMR parameters during hydration are in agreement with the expected effects of the different additives, which, as it is known, can substantially modify the rate of reactions and the properties of cementitious pastes. Endodontic cements are suitable systems to check the ability of this non-destructive technique to give insight into the complex hydration process of real cement pastes.

  12. Effect of Nano-SiO2 on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper systematically studied the modification of cement-based materials by nano-SiO2 particles with an average diameter of about 20 nm. In order to obtain the effect of nano-SiO2 particles on the mechanical properties, hydration, and pore structure of cement-based materials, adding 1%, 3%, and 5% content of nano-SiO2 in cement paste, respectively. The results showed that the reaction of nano-SiO2 particles with Ca(OH2 (crystal powder started within 1 h, and formed C–S–H gel. The reaction speed was faster after aging for three days. The mechanical properties of cement-based materials were improved with the addition of 3% nano-SiO2, and the early strength enhancement of test pieces was obvious. Three-day compressive strength increased 33.2%, and 28-day compressive strength increased 18.5%. The exothermic peak of hydration heat of cement increased significantly after the addition of nano-SiO2. Appearance time of the exothermic peak was advanced and the total heat release increased. Thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC analysis showed that nano-SiO2 promoted the formation of C–S–H gel. The results of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP showed that the total porosity of cement paste with 3% nano-SiO2 was reduced by 5.51% and 5.4% at three days and 28 days, respectively, compared with the pure cement paste. At the same time, the pore structure of cement paste was optimized, and much-detrimental pores and detrimental pores decreased, while less harmful pores and innocuous pores increased.

  13. Effect of Nano-SiO2 on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liguo; Zheng, Dapeng; Zhang, Shupeng; Cui, Hongzhi; Li, Dongxu

    2016-01-01

    This paper systematically studied the modification of cement-based materials by nano-SiO2 particles with an average diameter of about 20 nm. In order to obtain the effect of nano-SiO2 particles on the mechanical properties, hydration, and pore structure of cement-based materials, adding 1%, 3%, and 5% content of nano-SiO2 in cement paste, respectively. The results showed that the reaction of nano-SiO2 particles with Ca(OH)2 (crystal powder) started within 1 h, and formed C–S–H gel. The reaction speed was faster after aging for three days. The mechanical properties of cement-based materials were improved with the addition of 3% nano-SiO2, and the early strength enhancement of test pieces was obvious. Three-day compressive strength increased 33.2%, and 28-day compressive strength increased 18.5%. The exothermic peak of hydration heat of cement increased significantly after the addition of nano-SiO2. Appearance time of the exothermic peak was advanced and the total heat release increased. Thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analysis showed that nano-SiO2 promoted the formation of C–S–H gel. The results of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) showed that the total porosity of cement paste with 3% nano-SiO2 was reduced by 5.51% and 5.4% at three days and 28 days, respectively, compared with the pure cement paste. At the same time, the pore structure of cement paste was optimized, and much-detrimental pores and detrimental pores decreased, while less harmful pores and innocuous pores increased. PMID:28335369

  14. Early and late hydration of supersulphated cements of blast furnace slag with fluorgypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazaldúa-Medellín, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydration, strength development and composition of hydration products of supersulphated cements were characterized from the first 48 hours up to 360 days. Two compositions of 80% Blast furnace slag, 10–15% Fluorgypsum and 10–5% Portland cement were cured in dry and wet conditions. The main hydration products were ettringite and C-S-H since the first hours and up to 360 days as evidenced by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and electron microscopy. The strength was favored by higher fluorgypsum contents and lower Portland cement contents. These cements generated heats of hydration of 40–57 KJ/Kg after 28 hours, which are lower than portland cement.Se realizó la caracterización de la hidratación, desarrollo de resistencia y la composición de los productos de hidratación de los cementos supersulfatados durante las primeras 48 horas y hasta 360 días. Se estudiaron dos composiciones de 80% de Escoria de alto horno, 10–15% de Fluoryeso y 10–5% de Cemento portland, se curaron en condiciones secas y húmedas. Los principales productos de hidratación fueron etringita y C-S-H desde las primeras horas y hasta 360 días, como se evidenció por difracción de rayos X, análisis térmico y microscopía electrónica de barrido. La resistencia se favoreció con mayor contenido de fluoryeso y bajos contenidos de cemento portland. Estos cementos generaron calores de hidratación de 40–57 KJ/Kg después de 28 horas, los cuales resultan más bajos que los generados por el cemento portland.

  15. Class H cement hydration at 180 deg. C and high pressure in the presence of added silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Luke, Karen; Funkhouser, Gary P.

    2008-01-01

    Under deep oil-well conditions of elevated temperature and pressure, crystalline calcium silicate hydrates are formed during Portland cement hydration. The use of silica rich mineral additives leads to the formation of crystalline hydrates with better mechanical properties than those formed without the additive. The effects of silica flour, silica fume (amorphous silica), and a natural zeolite mixture on the hydration of Class H cement slurries at 180 deg. C under externally applied pressures of 7 and 52 MPa are examined in real time using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. For some compositions examined, but not all, pressure was found to have a large effect on the kinetics of crystalline hydrate formation. The use of silica fume delayed both C 3 S hydration and the formation of crystalline silicate hydrates compared to what was seen with other silica sources

  16. In situ monitoring of the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement with ESEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wei; Zhang Yunsheng; Lin Wei; Liu Zhiyong

    2004-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) was used to in situ quantitatively study the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement under an 80% RH environment. An energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDXA) was also employed to distinguish the chemical composition of hydration product. The ESEM micrographs showed that metakaolin particles pack loosely at 10 min after mixing, resulting in the existence of many large voids. As hydration proceeds, a lot of gels were seen and gradually precipitated on the surfaces of these particles. At later stage, these particles were wrapped by thick gel layers and their interspaces were almost completely filled. The corresponding EDXA results illustrated that the molar ratios of K/Al increase while Si/Al decrease with the development of hydration. As a result, the molar ratios of K/Al and Si/Al of hydration products at an age of 4 h amounted to 0.99 and 1.49, respectively, which were close to the theoretical values (K/Al=1.0, Si/Al=1.0 for K-PS geopolymer cement paste). In addition, well-developed crystals could not been found at any ages; instead, spongelike amorphous gels were always been observed

  17. Hydration of a low-alkali CEM III/B–SiO2 cement (LAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Le Saout, Gwenn; Ben Haha, Mohsen; Figi, Renato; Wieland, Erich

    2012-01-01

    The hydration of a low-alkali cement based on CEM III/B blended with 10 wt.% of nanosilica has been studied. The nanosilica reacted within the first days and 90% of the slag reacted within 3.5 years. C-S-H (Ca/Si ∼ 1.2, Al/Si ∼ 0.12), calcite, hydrotalcite, ettringite and possibly strätlingite were the main hydrates. The pore water composition revealed ten times lower alkali concentrations than in Portland cements. Reducing conditions (HS − ) and a pH value of 12.2 were observed. Between 1 month and 3.5 years of hydration more hydrates were formed due to the ongoing slag reaction but no significant differences in the composition of the pore solution or solid phase assemblage were observed. On the basis of thermodynamic calculations it is predicted that siliceous hydrogarnet could form in the long-term and, in the presence of siliceous hydrogarnet, also thaumasite. Nevertheless, even after 3.5 year hydration, neither siliceous hydrogarnet nor thaumasite have been observed.

  18. Propriedades e bioatividade de um cimento endodôntico à base de aluminato de cálcio Properties and bioactivity of endodontic calcium aluminate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Oliveira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Desde sua introdução na endodontia como um material retro-obturador e selador de defeitos da raiz dental, o agregado de trióxido mineral (MTA tem sido considerado como um material endodôntico revolucionário. Apesar disso, este material apresenta algumas propriedades limitantes, necessitando alterações em sua composição bem como desenvolvimento de novos materiais. Assim, o objetivo desse trabalho foi mostrar a influência de aditivos no desenvolvimento de um cimento endodôntico à base de cimento de aluminato de cálcio (ECAC. Além disso, foram avaliadas as propriedades do ECAC em comparação com o MTA, quando em contato com solução de fluido corporal simulado (SBF. Testes de manipulação e medidas de resistência à compressão, porosidade aparente, tempo de endurecimento, pH e condutividade iônica, foram realizados para os materiais MTA puro e ECAC contendo aditivos. Considerando as propriedades apresentadas pelo ECAC, este material alternativo pode ser indicado para múltiplas aplicações em endodontia.The mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, a material primarily developed as a root-end filling has been extensively investigated as an innovative product for endodontic applications. However, changes in its formulation/composition involving its mineral aggregates and the development of alternatives of materials have been proposed in an attempt to overcome its negative physical-chemical characteristics. In this work, the influence of additives addition on the development of a novel endodontic cement based on calcium aluminate, has been evaluated. In addition, the properties of endodontic calcium aluminate cement (ECAC were compared with the gold standard mineral-trioxide-aggregate in contact with simulated body fluid (SBF. Manipulation tests and measurements of compressive strength, apparent porosity, setting time, pH and ionic conductivity were carried out on plain MTA and calcium aluminate cement with and without various additives

  19. Agricultural residues based composites part II: Hydration characteristics of cement- cellulosic fibers composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekal, E.E.; Kishar, E.A.; Abd-El-Khader, A.H.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Mobarak, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is the utilization of the local agricultural wastes, such as ice straw bagasse, cotton stalks and linen fibers, which cause a big environmental problem. Different cement-fiber composites were prepared using 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6% fibers by weight of cement. The lengths of the fibers used were 0.5, 0.8, and 1.25 mm. Hydration of the different, composites was carried out at room temperature for various lime intervals namely, 1.3,7 .28 and 90 days. Combined water contents, compressive strength and phase composition of the different prepared composites were examined

  20. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  1. Hydration characteristics of zirconium oxide replaced Portland cement for use as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Cutajar, A; Mallia, B

    2011-08-01

    Zirconium oxide can be added to dental materials rendering them sufficiently radiopaque. It can thus be used to replace the bismuth oxide in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Replacement of Portland cement with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at a water/cement ratio of 0.3 resulted in a material with adequate physical properties. This study aimed at investigating the microstructure, pH and leaching in physiological solution of Portland cement replaced zirconium oxide at either water-powder or water-cement ratios of 0.3 for use as a root-end filling material. The hydration characteristics of the materials which exhibited optimal behavior were evaluated. Portland cement replaced by zirconium oxide in varying amounts ranging from 0 to 50% in increments of 10 was prepared and divided into two sets. One set was prepared at a constant water/cement ratio while the other set at a constant water/powder ratio of 0.3. Portland cement and MTA were used as controls. The materials were analyzed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the hydration products were determined. X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX) was used to analyze the elemental composition of the hydration products. The pH and the amount of leachate in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were evaluated. A material that had optimal properties that satisfied set criteria and could replace MTA was selected. The microstructure of the prototype material and Portland cement used as a control was assessed after 30 days using SEM and atomic ratio diagrams of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca versus Al/Ca were plotted. The hydration products of Portland cement replaced with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at water/cement ratio of 0.3 were calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide and minimal amounts of ettringite and monosulphate. The calcium hydroxide leached in HBSS solution resulted in an increase in the pH value. The zirconium oxide acted as inert filler and exhibited no reaction with the hydration by-products of Portland

  2. Cement hydration from hours to centuries controlled by diffusion through barrier shells of C-S-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Aghdam, Saeed; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Abdolhosseini Qomi, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    Although a few good models for cement hydration exist, they have some limitations. Some do not take into account the complete range of variation of pore relative humidity and temperature, and apply over durations limited from up a few months to up to about a year. The ones that are applicable for long durations are either computationally too intensive for use in finite element programs or predict the hydration to terminate after few months. However, recent tests of autogenous shrinkage and swelling in water imply that the hydration may continue, at decaying rate, for decades, provided that a not too low relative pore humidity (above 0.7) persists for a long time, as expected for the cores of thick concrete structural members. Therefore, and because design lifetimes of over hundred years are required for large concrete structures, a new hydration model for a hundred year lifespan and beyond is developed. The new model considers that, after the first day of hydration, the remnants of anhydrous cement grains, gradually consumed by hydration, are enveloped by contiguous, gradually thickening, spherical barrier shells of calcium-silicate hydrate (C-S-H). The hydration progress is controlled by transport of water from capillary pores through the barrier shells toward the interface with anhydrous cement. The transport is driven by a difference of humidity, defined by equivalence with the difference in chemical potential of water. Although, during the period of 4-24 h, the C-S-H forms discontinuous nano-globules around the cement grain, an equivalent barrier shell control was formulated for this period, too, for ease and effectiveness of calculation. The entire model is calibrated and validated by published test data on the evolution of hydration degree for various cement types, particle size distributions, water-cement ratios and temperatures. Computationally, this model is sufficiently effective for calculating the evolution of hydration degree (or aging) at every

  3. Development of Magnesium Silicate Hydrate cement system for nuclear waste encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Vandeperre, L.J.; Cheeseman, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    A novel low pH cement system for encapsulating nuclear industry wastes containing aluminium has been developed using blends of MgO and silica fume (SF). Identification of the hydrated phases in MgO/silica fume samples showed that brucite formed in early stages of hydration and then reacted with the silica fume to produce a magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel phase. When all brucite reacts with silica fume a cement system with an equilibrium pH just below 10 was achieved. Selected mixes have been characterized for hydration reactions, setting time and strength development. Mortar samples with w/s ratios of 0.5 and 50% by weight of sand added achieved compressive strengths in excess of 95 MPa after 28 days. The addition of MgCO 3 buffered the early pH and the addition of fine sand particles eliminated shrinkage cracking. The interaction of the optimised mortar with Al metal has been investigated. Al metal strips were firmly bound into the MgO:SF:sand samples and no H 2 gas detected, and this indicates that the novel systems developed in this work have potential for encapsulating certain types of problematic legacy wastes from the nuclear industry. (authors)

  4. Mercury release from fly ashes and hydrated fly ash cement pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen; Zhang, Chao-yang; Kong, Xiang-ming; Zhuo, Yu-qun; Zhu, Zhen-wu

    2018-04-01

    The large-scale usage of fly ash in cement and concrete introduces mercury (Hg) into concrete structures and a risk of secondary emission of Hg from the structures during long-term service was evaluated. Three fly ashes were collected from coal-fired power plants and three blend cements were prepared by mixing Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) with the same amount of fly ash. The releasing behaviors of Hg0 from the fly ash and the powdered hydrated cement pastes (HCP) were measured by a self-developed Hg measurement system, where an air-blowing part and Hg collection part were involved. The Hg release of fly ashes at room temperature varied from 25.84 to 39.69 ng/g fly ash during 90-days period of air-blowing experiment. In contrast, the Hg release of the HCPs were in a range of 8.51-18.48 ng/g HCP. It is found that the Hg release ratios of HCPs were almost the same as those of the pure fly ashes, suggesting that the hydration products of the HCP have little immobilization effect on Hg0. Increasing temperature and moisture content markedly promote the Hg release.

  5. Hydration mechanisms of ternary Portland cements containing limestone powder and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Weerdt, K.; Haha, M. Ben; Le Saout, G.; Kjellsen, K.O.; Justnes, H.; Lothenbach, B.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of minor additions of limestone powder on the properties of fly ash blended cements was investigated in this study using isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and pore solution analysis. The presence of limestone powder led to the formation of hemi- and monocarbonate and to a stabilisation of ettringite compared to the limestone-free cements, where a part of the ettringite converted to monosulphate. Thus, the presence of 5% of limestone led to an increase of the volume of the hydrates, as visible in the increase in chemical shrinkage, and an increase in compressive strength. This effect was amplified for the fly ash/limestone blended cements due to the additional alumina provided by the fly ash reaction.

  6. Thermodynamic modelling of the effect of temperature on the hydration and porosity of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Matschei, Thomas; Moeschner, Goeril; Glasser, Fred P.

    2008-01-01

    The composition of the phase assemblage and the pore solution of Portland cements hydrated between 0 and 60 deg. C were modelled as a function of time and temperature. The results of thermodynamic modelling showed a good agreement with the experimental data gained at 5, 20, and 50 deg. C. At 5 and at 20 deg. C, a similar phase assemblage was calculated to be present, while at approximately 50 deg. C, thermodynamic calculations predicted the conversion of ettringite and monocarbonate to monosulphate. Modelling showed that in Portland cements which have an Al 2 O 3 /SO 3 ratio of > 1.3 (bulk weight), above 50 deg. C monosulphate and monocarbonate are present. In Portland cements which contain less Al (Al 2 O 3 /SO 3 < 1.3), above 50 deg. C monosulphate and small amounts of ettringite are expected to persist. A good correlation between calculated porosity and measured compressive strength was observed

  7. Peculiarities of hydration of Portland cement with synthetic nano-silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsay, Galyna

    2017-12-01

    Application of nano-materials in cement products significantly, improves their properties. Of course, the effectiveness of the materials depends on their quantity and the way they are introduced into the system. So far, amongst nano-materials used in construction, the most preferred was nano-silica. This research investigated the effect of synthetic precipitated nano-silica on the cement hydration as well as, on the physical and mechanical properties of pastes and mortars. Obtained results showed that admixture of nano-silica enhanced flexural and compressive strength of cement after 2 and 28 days, however, only when admixture made up 0.5% and 1.0%. On the other hand, the use of nano-silica in the amount 2% had some limitations, due to its ability to agglomerate, which resulted in deterioration of the rheological and mechanical properties.

  8. Calcium aluminates hydration in presence of amorphous SiO2 at temperatures below 90 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas Mercury, J.M.; Turrillas, X.; Aza, A.H. de; Pena, P.

    2006-01-01

    The hydration behaviour of Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 , Ca 12 Al 14 O 33 and CaAl 2 O 4 with added amorphous silica at 40, 65 and 90 deg. C has been studied for periods ranging from 1 to 31 days. In hydrated samples crystalline phases like katoite (Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3- x (OH) 4 x ) and gibbsite, Al(OH) 3 , were identified, likewise amorphous phases like Al(OH) x , calcium silicate hydrates, C-S-H, and calcium aluminosilicate hydrates, C-S-A-H, were identified. The stoichiometry of Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3- x (OH) 4 x (0≤3-x≤0.334), which was the main crystalline product, was established by Rietveld refinement of X-ray and neutron diffraction data and by transmission electron microscopy. - Graphical abstract: Katoite, Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3- x (OH) 4 x (0≤3-x≤0.334), was identified besides gibbsite, Al(OH) 3 , as a crystalline stable hydration products in Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 , Ca 12 Al 14 O 33 and CaAl 2 O 4 hydrated with added amorphous silica between 40 and 90 deg. C

  9. Quantitative study of Portland cement hydration by X-Ray diffraction/Rietveld analysis and geochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelot, F.; Seaman, J. C.; Simner, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study the hydration of Portland cements containing blast-furnace slag and type V fly ash were investigated during cement curing using X-ray diffraction, with geochemical modeling used to calculate the total volume of hydrates. The goal was to evaluate the relationship between the starting component levels and the hydrate assemblages that develop during the curing process. Blast furnace-slag levels of 60, 45 and 30 wt.% were studied in blends containing fly ash and Portland cement. Geochemical modelling described the dissolution of the clinker, and predicted quantitatively the amount of hydrates. In all cases the experiments showed the presence of C-S-H, portlandite and ettringite. The quantities of ettringite, portlandite and the amorphous phases as determined by XRD agreed well with the calculated amounts of these phases after different periods of time. These findings show that changes in the bulk composition of hydrating cements can be described by geochemical models. Such a comparison between experimental and modelled data helps to understand in more detail the active processes occurring during cement hydration.

  10. Use of X-ray diffraction to quantify amorphous supplementary cementitious materials in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellings, R.; Salze, A.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    The content of individual amorphous supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements was quantified by the PONKCS [1] X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The analytical precision and accuracy of the method were assessed through comparison to a series of mixes of known phase composition and of increasing complexity. A 2σ precision smaller than 2–3 wt.% and an accuracy better than 2 wt.% were achieved for SCMs in mixes with quartz, anhydrous Portland cement, and hydrated Portland cement. The extent of reaction of SCMs in hydrating binders measured by XRD was 1) internally consistent as confirmed through the standard addition method and 2) showed a linear correlation to the cumulative heat release as measured independently by isothermal conduction calorimetry. The advantages, limitations and applicability of the method are discussed with reference to existing methods that measure the degree of reaction of SCMs in blended cements

  11. Electrical Current Flow and Cement Hydration : Implications on Cement-Based Microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Peng, G; Koleva, D.A.; van Breugel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Stray current is an electrical current “leakage” from metal conductors and electrical installations. When it flows through cement-based materials, electrical energy is converted to thermal energy that causes increasing temperature due to Joule heating phenomena. The aim of this paper is to shed

  12. Recycling of porcelain tile polishing residue in portland cement: hydration efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelisser, Fernando; Steiner, Luiz Renato; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-02-21

    Ceramic tiles are widely used by the construction industry, and the manufacturing process of ceramic tiles generates as a major residue mud derived from the polishing step. This residue is too impure to be reused in the ceramic process and is usually discarded as waste in landfills. But the analysis of the particle size and concentration of silica of this residue shows a potential use in the manufacture of building materials based on portland cement. Tests were conducted on cement pastes and mortars using the addition of 10% and 20% (mass) of the residue. The results of compressive strength in mortars made up to 56 days showed a significant increase in compressive strength greater than 50%. The result of thermogravimetry shows that portlandite is consumed by the cement formed by the silica present in the residue in order to form calcium silicate hydrate and featuring a pozzolanic reaction. This effect improves the performance of cement, contributes to research and application of supplementary cementitious materials, and optimizes the use of portland cement, reducing the environmental impacts of carbon dioxide emissions from its production.

  13. Synthesis optimization of calcium aluminate cement phases for biomedical applications; Avaliacao da sintese das fases de cimento de aluminato de calcio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Oliveira, I.R. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pandolfelli, V.C. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied as a potential material for applications in the areas of health such as, endodontics and bone reconstruction. These studies have been based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by investigating the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance for biomedical applications. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the CAC synthesis routes in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaCO{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO systems, as well as the phase characterization attained by means of X ray analysis. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO route enabled the production of the target phases (CA, CA{sub 2}, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 12}A{sub 7}) with a higher purity compared to the Al2O3-CaCO3 one. As a result the particular properties of these phases can be evaluated to define a more suitable composition that results in better properties for an endodontic cement and other applications. (author)

  14. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    . According to these experimental results, the acoustic emission measured around setting time was attributed to cavitation events occurring in the pores of the cement paste due to self-desiccation. This paper shows how acoustic emission might be used to indicate the time when the fluid–solid transition occurs......In this study, the acoustic emission activity of cement pastes was investigated during the first day of hydration. Deaired, fresh cement pastes were cast in sealed sample holders designed to minimize friction and restraint. The majority of acoustic emission events occurred in lower water to cement...... ratio pastes, while cement pastes with higher water to cement ratios showed significantly less acoustic activity. These acoustic events occurred around the time of setting. A layer of water on the surface of the cement pastes substantially reduced acoustic emission activity at the time of setting...

  15. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tingting [Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Materials, Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vandeperre, Luc J. [Department of Materials, Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, Christopher R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  16. Studies on the fixation of tritiated water using the cement hydration, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimaki, Kenzo; Tsutsui, Tenson; Miake, Chiaki.

    1989-01-01

    In the previous paper, we have reported the results of basic experiments to fix tritiated water using the hydration of cement, and found that most tritiated water transfers to surrounding water, even if it is incorporated using the hydration of cement. In this report, we tried to apply a simple compartment model to the tritium transfer curves reported in the previous paper, which represent the phenomena that most water containing tritium is exchanging with a surrounding water, regardless of its forms, i.e., a crystalline water, free water and so on. We divided a solidified cement into three groupes with respect to the exchangeability of water, i.e., a compartment of fixed water, of compositions expect water, and of exchanging water. We developed a simple compartment model under the assumption that the water in the third compartment is exchangeable with the sorrounding water with a certain exchanging volume rate E, not altering by time. The transfer curves calculated with the model contains unknown parameter, E. By the method of least squares, varying the values of E, we could obtain most approximated transfer curves of tritium to those obtained by the previous experiments. In the result, we knew that the simple compartment model is applied to the tritium transfer curves reported in the previous paper. (author)

  17. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases...... in Portland cement, i.e. tricalcium silicate, dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium alumino ferrite. Details of the The process of solid state synthesis are is described in general including practical advice on equipment and techniques. Finally In addition, some exemplary mix compositions...

  18. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR characterization of hydrates formed in calcium aluminate-silica fume mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Rivas Mercury, J.M.; Aza, A.H. de; Turrillas, X.; Sobrados, I.; Sanz, J.

    2008-01-01

    Partially deuterated Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) y (OH) 12-4y -Al(OH) 3 mixtures, prepared by hydration of Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 (C 3 A), Ca 12 Al 14 O 33 (C 12 A 7 ) and CaAl 2 O 4 (CA) phases in the presence of silica fume, have been characterized by 29 Si and 27 Al magic-angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize anhydrous and fully hydrated samples. In hydrated compounds, Ca 3 Al 2 (OH) 12 and Al(OH) 3 phases were detected. From the quantitative analysis of 27 Al NMR signals, the Al(OH) 3 /Ca 3 Al 2 (OH) 12 ratio was deduced. The incorporation of Si into the katoite structure, Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3-x (OH) 4x , was followed by 27 Al and 29 Si NMR spectroscopies. Si/OH ratios were determined from the quantitative analysis of 27 Al MAS-NMR components associated with Al(OH) 6 and Al(OSi)(OH) 5 environments. The 29 Si NMR spectroscopy was also used to quantify the unreacted silica and amorphous calcium aluminosilicate hydrates formed, C-S-H and C-A-S-H for short. From 29 Si NMR spectra, the amount of Si incorporated into different phases was estimated. Si and Al concentrations, deduced by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron data, indicate that only a part of available Si is incorporated in katoite structures. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron micrograph of CaAl 2 O 4 -microsilica mixture hydrated at 90 deg. C for 31 days showing a cubic Ca 3 Al 2.0±0.2 (SiO 4 ) 0.9±0.2 (OH) 1.8 crystal surrounded by unreacted amorphous silica spheres

  19. IMPACT OF INCREASED ALUMINATE CONCENTRATIONS ON PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE MIXES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Erich Hansen, E; Vickie Williams, V

    2007-01-01

    trends observed as the aluminate concentration increased in the salt solution were decreased Bingham Plastic yield stress and plastic viscosity, greater flowability of the grout, and reduced gel times and bleed volume for SWPF based mixes. On the other hand, the set times increased significantly with increasing aluminate concentration in the salt solutions. For the SWPF mixes, the set time increased from 1 to 4 days and for the Tank 11 mixes, the set time increased from 1 to 2 days. Heat of hydration measurements were consistent with the increased set times with extended induction periods (2 to 4 days) as aluminate concentration increased in the salt solution. This extended induction period of heat evolution observed with increasing aluminate concentrations must be addressed for Saltstone operations to avoid exceeding temperature limits. It is anticipated that the induction period will be temperature dependent and should be measured for future projections and included in the thermal modeling. The overall heat generation was greater in the mixes containing higher concentrations of aluminate. In fact, for the total heat release values calculated using curve fitting for longer times, the amount of heat was increased by 33% for SWPF based solutions and by 46% for Tank 11 based solutions. The larger amount of heat from mixes containing higher aluminate concentration must be accounted for in the modeling effort which determines the pour schedule for Saltstone. The increased induction periods were shown to be associated with hydration reactions of the blast furnace slag. The rate of heat generation with high aluminate solutions and Portland cement were only accelerated whereas high aluminate mixes containing blast furnace slag only showed the characteristic increase in induction time that was observed with mixes prepared using the premix blend of cementitious materials. It was shown that fly ash does not react significantly during the first seven days of curing but then

  20. Role of Polycarboxylate-ether superplasticizers on cement hydration kinetics and microstructural development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentini L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycarboxylate-ether (PCE superplasticizers are a fundamental constituent of modern cementbased materials due to their impact on the rheology of the fresh mix and mechanical performance of the hardened material. The effect of PCEs on cement hydration kinetics has been known since their introduction in the early 1980s. However, detailed knowledge of the role played by PCE macromolecules on the basic mechanisms of cement hydration (dissolution, diffusion, precipitation is still lacking. A better understanding of how such mechanisms are influenced by the addition of PCE is no doubt beneficial to the design of novel superplasticizing admixtures. Here, I report on some recent findings about the role of PCE superplasticizers on cement hydration kinetics and microstructural development. The interaction between PCE and C3S pastes was investigated by an ad-hoc kinetic model based on a combination of generalized forms of the Avrami and BNG (Boundary Nucleation and Growth models. The model is used to fit the rate of C-S-H precipitation measured by in-situ X-ray powder diffraction combined with mass balance calculations. The results show that a switch from heterogeneous to homogeneous C-S-H nucleation occurs in the presence of PCEs and that the C-S-H growth rate decreases proportionally to the amount of PCE used. The predicted switch to homogeneous nucleation is in agreement with experimental results obtained by XRD-enhanced micro-tomography imaging, showing that, in the presence of PCE, C-S-H preferentially forms in the pore space rather than at the surface of clinker particles.

  1. Assessment of hydration process and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill by electrical resistivity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbin; Tian, Xichun; Cao, Peiwang

    2018-04-01

    Cemented paste backfill (CPB) is an emerging mine backfill technique that allows environmentally hazardous tailings to return to the underground openings or stopes, thereby maximising the safety, efficiency and productivity of operation. Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) is one of the most commonly used parameters for evaluating the mechanical performance of CPB; the prediction of the UCS of CPB structures from early to advanced ages is of great practical importance. This study aims to investigate the predictability of the UCS of CPB during the hydration process based on electrical resistivity (ER) measurement. For this purpose, the samples prepared at different cement-to-tailing ratios and solid contents were subjected to the ER test during the whole hydration process and UCS tests at 3, 7, 28 days of curing periods. The effect of cement-to-tailing ratio and solid content on the ER and UCS of CPB samples was obtained; the UCS values were correlated with the corresponding ER data. Microstructural analysis was also performed on CPB samples to understand the effect of microstructure on the ER data. The result shows that the ER of CPB decreases first and then increases with the speed which is faster in the previous part than the latter. The ER and UCS of CPB samples increased with increasing cement-to-tailing ratio and solid content and curing periods. A logarithmic relationship is established for each mixture in order to predict the UCS of CPB based on ER. Scanning electron microscope analyses have revealed that the microstructure of the CPB changes with the age from the initial floc to honeycomb, and eventually to the compact clumps. The ER properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties. The major output of this study is that ER test is effectively capable for a preliminary prediction of the UCS of CPB.

  2. Influence of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions on the hydration process of portland cement and blended cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović, B. M.

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the influence of the concentration of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in mortar batch waters upon the hydration process of various Portland and additive cements. An increase in the mechanical resistence of said cements is observed, after 28 days, when the concentration of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions in the mortar batch waters increases. This suggests a possible microstructural explanation of said phenomenon.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la concentración de los iones Sr2+ y Ba2+ en las aguas de amasado sobre el proceso de hidratación de varios cementos portland y de adición. Se comprueba un incremento de las resistencias mecánicas de dichos cementos, a los 28 días, cuando aumenta la concentración de los iones Ba2+ y Sr2+ en las aguas de amasado, lo cual sugiere una posible explicación microestructural a dicho fenómeno.

  3. Study of cements silicate phases hydrated under high pressure and high temperature; Etude des phases silicatees du ciment hydrate sous haute pression et haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meducin, F.

    2001-10-01

    This study concerns the durability of oil-well cementing. Indeed, in oil well cementing a cement slurry is pumped down the steel casing of the well up the annular space between it and the surrounding rock to support and protect the casing. The setting conditions of pressure and temperature may be very high (up to 1000 bar and 250 deg C at the bottom of the oil-well). In this research, the hydration of the main constituent of cement, synthetic tri-calcium silicate Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 2}, often called C{sub 3}S (C = CaO; S = SiO{sub 2} and H H{sub 2}O), is studied. Calcium Silicate hydrates are prepared in high-pressure cells to complete their phase diagram (P,T) and obtain the stability conditions for each species. Indeed, the phases formed in these conditions are unknown and the study consists in the hydration of C{sub 3}S at different temperatures, pressures, and during different times to simulate the oil-well conditions. In a first step (until 120 deg C at ambient pressure) the C-S-H, a not well crystallized and non-stoichiometric phase, is synthesized: it brings adhesion and mechanical properties., Then, when pressure and temperature increase, crystallized phases appear such as jaffeite (Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6}) and hillebrandite (Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2}). Silicon {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (using standard sequences MAS, CPMAS) allow us to identify all the silicates hydrates formed. Indeed, {sup 29}Si NMR is a valuable tool to determine the structure of crystallized or not-well crystallized phases of cement. The characterization of the hydrated samples is completed by other techniques: X- Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The following results are found: jaffeite is the most stable phase at C/S=3. To simulate the hydration of real cement, hydration of C{sub 3}S with ground quartz and with or without super-plasticizers is done. In those cases, new phases appear: kilchoanite mainly, and xonotlite. A large amount of

  4. Retention of alkali ions by hydrated low-pH cements: Mechanism and Na+/K+ selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, T.T.H.; Chabas, E.; Pochard, I.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Haas, J.; Frizon, F.; Nonat, A.

    2013-01-01

    Low-pH cements, also referred to as low-alkalinity cements, can be designed by replacing significant amounts of Portland cement by pozzolanic materials. Their pore solution is characterized by a pH near 11, and an alkali concentration much lower than that of Portland cement. This work investigates the retention of sodium and potassium by a hydrated low-pH cement comprising 60% Portland cement and 40% silica fume. It is shown that sorption of potassium is higher than that of sodium and mainly results from counterion charge balancing of the C-S-H negative surface charge. To explain the greater retention of potassium compared to sodium, it is postulated that potassium, unlike sodium, may enter the interlayer of C-S-H to compensate the negative charges in the interlayer, in addition to the external surfaces. This assumption is supported by structural characterization of C-S-H using X-ray diffraction

  5. The influence of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Korzen, Migge Sofie Hoffmann; Skibsted, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes effects of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste, which is an important subject in relation to life-time modelling of reinforced concrete structures. The influence of cement type on chloride binding is investigated by substituting cement with pure...... cement clinker. Both theoretical considerations and experimental data for chloride binding in cement pastes are presented. A physico-chemically based model to describe the influence of temperature on physical binding of chloride is presented. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear...... magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for quantification of the anhydrous and hydrated aluminate and silicate phases in the chloride exposed cement pastes. The 27Al isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling is reported for a synthetic sample of Friedel's salt, Ca2Al(OH)6Cl×2H2O....

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of diffusion and relaxation in hydrating white cement pastes of different water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Galvosas, Petrik; Geier, Oliver; Zimmermann, Christian; Dakkouri, Marwan; Karger, Jorg

    2001-01-01

    While the nuclear spin relaxation time changes in hydrating cement materials have been widely studied by various groups during the last 20 years, data on the self-diffusion behavior of the pore water during hydration of a cement paste are much scarcer. Taking advantage of improved spectrometer hardware for pulsed field gradient diffusometry and a specialized pulse sequence which is designed to compensate the detrimental effects of inner magnetic field gradients in the sample we have studied the water self-diffusion behavior in pastes prepared from white cement at various water/cement ratios. For the same mixtures, studies of the transverse spin relaxation behavior were also conducted. A comparison of the results from both techniques shows that the diffusion coefficient starts to decrease only much later than the relaxation times for all pastes studied. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  7. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Windt, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.dewindt@mines-paristech.fr [MINES ParisTech, PSL Research University, Centre de Géosciences, 35 Rue St-Honoré, 77305 Fontainebleau Cedex (France); Bertron, Alexandra; Larreur-Cayol, Steeves; Escadeillas, Gilles [University of Toulouse, UPS/INSA/LMDC, 135 Av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate.

  8. Mechanistic study and modeling of radionuclides retention by the hydrated calcium silicates (HCS) of cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointeau, I.

    2000-09-01

    This work attempts to investigate the modelling of radioisotopes (Cs + , Pb 2+ , Eu 3+ ) immobilization in cement matrix, in the frame of the design of engineered barrier of a deep radwaste repository. The model development concept consists of three major steps: - surface chemistry modelling of the calcium silicate hydrate CSH, used to simulate hydrated cement behaviour; - solid analysis of the batch sorption experiments: identification of the uptake mechanism; - both previous steps are used, with isotherm data, in the modelling of the radioisotopes immobilization in the CSH matrix. Final results: (all modelling are available for all the range of studied Ca/Si ratios and have been validated with predictive calculations). - A thermodynamic modelling of the CSH surface chemistry has been developed. The labile calcium and proton sorption constants on silanol sites (>SiOH) have been extracted. - Cs + is sorbed on two sites. The silanol site (weak site) has a high site density (10 sites.nm -2 ), which accounts for the CSH unsaturation in high [CS + ]. A strong site is also identified. - Pb 2+ immobilization in CSH matrix is modelled with surface equilibria and solubility equilibrium. - Eu 3+ fixation has been investigated with solid analysis: Site-Selective anti Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy, XPS and SEM-EDS. Eu 3+ thus does not precipitate in CSH water but is sorbed on the CSH surface (high hydroxylated environment). Europium is also (minority site) inserted in the CSH framework. (author)

  9. Vitrified medical wastes bottom ash in cement clinkerization. Microstructural, hydration and leaching characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamarkou, S; Christopoulos, D; Tsakiridis, P E; Bartzas, G; Tsakalakis, K

    2018-04-19

    The present investigation focuses on the utilization of medical wastes incineration bottom ash (MBA), vitrified with soda lime recycled glass (SLRG), as an alternative raw material in cement clinkerization. Bottom ash is recovered from the bottom of the medical wastes incineration chamber, after being cooled down through quenching. It corresponds to 10-15 wt% of the initial medical wastes weight and since it has been classified in the category of hazardous wastes, its safe management has become a major environmental concern worldwide. MBA glasses of various syntheses were initially obtained during the MBA vitrification simultaneously with various amounts of silica scrap (20, 25 and 30 wt% correspondingly). The produced MBA glasses were in turn used for the production of Portland cement clinker, after sintering at 1400 °C, thus substituting traditional raw materials. Both evaluation of vitrification and sintering products was carried out by chemical and mineralogical analyses along with microstructure examination. The final cements were prepared by clinkers co-grinding in a laboratory ball mill with appropriate amounts of gypsum (≈5.0 wt%) and the evaluation of their quality was carried out by determining setting times, standard consistency, expansibility and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days. Finally, the leaching behaviour of the vitrified MBA and hydrated cements, together with the corresponding of the "as received" MBA, was further examined using the standard leaching tests of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the EN 12457-2. According to the obtained results, the quality of the produced cement clinkers was not affected by the addition of the vitrified MBA in the raw meal, with the trace elements detected in all leachates measured well below the corresponding regulatory limits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. X-ray diffractometry of steam cured ordinary Portland and blast-furnace-slag cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarini, G.; Djanikian, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies some aspects of the phases produced by hydration of ordinary and blast-furnace-slag cements, at normal conditions and steam cured (60 and 95 0 C), using an X-ray diffraction technique. The blast-furnace-slag cement was a mixture of 50% of ordinary Portland cement and 50% of blast-furnace-slag (separately grinding). After curing the X-ray diffraction reveals that, in relation to ordinary Portland cement, the main phases in blast-furnace-slag cement are hydrated silicates and aluminates, hydro garnet, etringitte and mono sulphate. After steam curing the hydration of blast-furnace-slag cement proceeds. This is a result of the slag activation by the curing temperature. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Numerical simulation of heat and mass transport during hydration of Portland cement mortar in semi-adiabatic and steam curing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Bautista, E.; Bentz, D. P.; Sandoval-Torres, S.; de Cano-Barrita, P. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    A model that describes hydration and heat-mass transport in Portland cement mortar during steam curing was developed. The hydration reactions are described by a maturity function that uses the equivalent age concept, coupled to a heat and mass balance. The thermal conductivity and specific heat of mortar with water-to-cement mass ratio of 0.30 was measured during hydration, using the Transient Plane Source method. The parameters for the maturity equation and the activation energy were obtaine...

  12. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Neubauer, Jürgen [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  13. Performances of hydrated cement treated crushed rock base for Western Australian roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphat Chummuneerat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The resilient modulus (RM of hydrated cement treated crushed rock base (HCTCRB affected by amount of hydration periods, compaction and dryback processes was presented using repeated load triaxial tests. The related trends of RM corresponding to the different hydration periods still cannot be concluded. Instead, It is found that the moisture content plays more major influence on the RM performance. Higher additional water during compaction of HCTCRB, even at its optimum moisture content and induced higher dry density, led to the inferior RM performance compared to the sample without water addition. The RM of damper samples can be improved through dryback process and superior to that of the sample without water addition at the same moisture content. However, the samples without water addition during compaction deliver the comparable RM values even its dry density is lower than the other two types. These results indicate the significant influence of moisture content to the performances of HCTCRB with regardless of the dry density. Finally, the experimental results of HCTCRB and parent material are evaluated with the K-θ model and the model recommended by Austroads. These two models provide the excellent fit of the tested results with high degree of determination.

  14. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H

  15. A study of sorption mechanism onto cement hydrates by isotherm measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari

    2003-01-01

    In the concept for TRU waste disposal in Japan, cement is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material and is expected to provide chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cement material, which controls the aqueous concentrations of elements in the porewater, is a very important parameter when considering the release of radionuclides from the near field of a repository. Many safety assessment calculations currently assume radionuclide retardation as linear sorption equilibrium and describe it with a distribution ratio (R d value). In this study, the sorption mechanism is discussed by measuring the sorption isotherm of caesium, strontium and thorium onto Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H gel), to justify and support this assumption. In addition, the effect of competitive sorption between thorium and uranium and other groundwater ions is studied by examining sorption using a range of sodium chloride concentrations to simulate different groundwater ionic strengths. Based on the experimental results, we have showed that: Caesium and strontium sorb by substitution for Ca in C-S-H phases and the presence of some calcium sites with different ion-exchange log K values is suggested; Thorium would be fixed in a surface co-precipitation to form a solubility-limiting phase. The results of sorption experiments are reasonably well modelled by the ion-exchange model for caesium and strontium and the surface co-precipitation model for thorium, respectively. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic properties of hydrated cement phases: C-S-H, C-A-S-H and M-S-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosz, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used building materials in the world. Durability, mechanical and chemical properties have made it a material of choice in storage concepts proposed by the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (Andra), including the achievement of retaining structures, cell plugs, massive supports or conditioning waste. The study of the stability of the constituent phases of cementitious materials is needed in view of the planned quantities and the durability of the structures, and must consider (i) temperature ranges suitable for cement matrices containment in contact with exothermic waste (25-80 deg. C), and (ii) a representative time scale of the lifetime of the storage. The Andra ThermoChimie project therefore aims to develop a consistent thermodynamic database, to model the chemical evolution of cement materials in the environment of radioactive waste. However, in the present state, the database offers only thermodynamic data of cementitious crystalline phases, as well as a limited data set of three different chemical compositions for nano-crystalline C-S-H. This does not allow to reproduce the degradation of cementitious materials, or model the degradation of the new formulations, such as 'Low pH' concretes. The objective is therefore to acquire a thermodynamic complementary data set on phases such as C-S-H (Calcium Silicate Hydrates) C-A-S-H (Calcium Aluminate Silicate Hydrates) and M-S-H (Magnesium Silicate Hydrates), to complete the ThermoChimie database. This study is based on experimental, analytical and digital work, in order to obtain a set of thermodynamic data (Δ f G 0 , Δ f H 0 , Cp(T), S 0 ) sufficiently representative of the chemical variability of these phases. Finally, this set of data allows the development of a thermodynamic predictive model in extended spaces of compositions and temperatures. Development of this predictive model requires (i) The acquisition of thermodynamic properties on

  17. Thermodynamic description of the solubility of C-S-H gels in hydrated Portland cement. Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, J.M.

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study is to compile the available information published in the scientific literature regarding the solubility of C-S-H (calcium silica hydrate) gels, which are the main components of hydrated Portland cement. Modeling the thermodynamic properties of C-S-H, including its incongruent dissolution behavior, is an important requirement to understand the evolution and degradation of hydrated cement and concrete. The thermodynamic modeling of C-S-H started with the use of empirical or semi-empirical models and evolved to the application of solid solution models. Most of the experimental work has been performed at or near 25 deg C and the models are in principle applicable to temperatures near 25 deg C. One of the models provides an explicit dependence on temperature. (orig.)

  18. The effect of silica fume on early hydration of white Portland cement via fast field cycling-NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Codruţa.; Bede, Andrea; Ardelean, Ioan

    2017-12-01

    Fast Field Cycling (FFC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is used to monitor the influence introduced on the hydration process by the addition of silica fume in a cement paste mixture, prepared with white Portland cement. The FFC relaxometry technique was implemented due to its sensitivity to a wider range of molecular motions, which gives more information than other relaxometry techniques performed at a fixed frequency. This unique feature of FFC relaxometry allows better separation of the surface and bulk contributions from the global measured relaxation rate. The relaxation process is dominated by the interaction of water protons with the paramagnetic centers located on the surface of cement grains. In the frame of a two-phase exchange model, this allows the monitoring of the influence of an addition of silica fume on the evolution of surface-to-volume ratio during the early hydration stages.

  19. Influence of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions on the hydration process of portland cement and blended cements

    OpenAIRE

    Živanović, B. M.; Petrašinović, Lj.; Milovanović, T.; Karanović, Lj.; Krstanović, I.

    1987-01-01

    This study concerns the influence of the concentration of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in mortar batch waters upon the hydration process of various Portland and additive cements. An increase in the mechanical resistence of said cements is observed, after 28 days, when the concentration of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions in the mortar batch waters increases. This suggests a possible microstructural explanation of said phenomenon.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la concentración de los iones Sr2+ y...

  20. SYNTHESIS OF EXPANDER TO PREVENT CONTRACTION OF CEMENT STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenova Aurika Almazovna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the results of studies of the use of additives containing crystallization components significantly affecting the curing of cement, improving the structure of cement stone and concrete. The crystalline component is obtained using the rotary-pulse unit, which provides not only the grinding of agents, but their interaction with each other as well in order to accelerate the hydration and structure formation in cement stone. The degree, and kinetics of hydration, the composition of hydrated phases, the structure of the additives and cement stone was studied using the following methods: x-ray diffraction (XRD, differential thermal analysis (DTA, scanning electron microscope (SEM. Mechanical properties of cement were determined by standard methods and techniques. The expander produced by means of hydrodynamic activation of the sulfoaluminate clinker (SAC consists of ettringite and hydrated calcium silicates, which are characterized by high dispersion rate (less than 10 µm and reactivity as the seed for the crystallization of hydrated compounds. The introduction of the ultrafine additives of the crystalline SAC (within 1-5% was discovered to cause expansion of the cement stone. Implementation of the additives increases cement hydration and contributes to the formation of active centers of crystallization that lead to the fast formation of ettringite, hydrated calcium aluminates and calcium silicates. The activated crystalline additive provides for significant reduction of porosity, initial curing, and high strength of cement stone. In addition, the additive is an expansive component, forming needle-like crystals of ettringite during hydration. These microcrystals grow in the capillaries of cement stone, filling them, and create conditions for improving the crack resistance of cement concrete.

  1. THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-09-21

    The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

  2. Impact of chloride on the mineralogy of hydrated Portland cement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonis, Magdalena; Lothenbach, Barbara; Le Saout, Gwenn; Glasser, Fredrik P.

    2010-01-01

    Chloride ion is in part bound into ordinary Portland cement paste and modifies its mineralogy. To understand this a literature review of its impacts has been made and new experimental data were obtained. Phase pure preparations of Friedel's salt, Ca 4 Al 2 (Cl) 1.95 (OH) 12.05 .4H 2 O, and Kuzel's salt, Ca 4 Al 2 (Cl)(SO 4 ) 0.5 (OH) 12 .6H 2 O, were synthesized and their solubilities were measured at 5, 25, 55 and 85 o C. After equilibration, solid phases were analysed by X-ray diffraction while the aqueous solutions were analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy and ion chromatography. The solid solutions and interactions of Friedel's salt with other AFm phases were determined at 25 o C experimentally and by calculations. In hydrated cements, anion sites in AFm are potentially occupied by OH, SO 4 and CO 3 ions whereas Cl may be introduced under service conditions. Chloride readily displaces hydroxide, sulfate and carbonate in the AFm structures. A comprehensive picture of phase relations of AFm phases and their binding capacity for chloride is provided for pH ∼ 12 and 25 o C. The role of chloride in AFt formation and its relevance to corrosion of embedded steel are discussed in terms of calculated aqueous [Cl - ]/[OH - ] molar ratios.

  3. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    for the C-S-H phase formed during hydration. It will be demonstrated that Al3+ and flouride guest-ions in the anhydrous and hydrated calcium silicates can be studied in detail by 27Al and 19F MAS NMR, thereby providing information on the local structure and the mechanisms for incorporation of these ions......Solid-state, magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for structural investigations on the nanoscale of the most important phases in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements and of various admixtures. This is primarily due to the fact that the method reflects the first......- and second-coordination spheres of the spin nucleus under investigation while it is less sensitive to long-range order. Thus, crystalline as well as amorphous phases can be detected in a quantitative manner by solid-state NMR. In particular the structure of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase have...

  4. A low temperature aluminizing treatment of hot work tool steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matijevic, B., E-mail: bozidar.matijevic@fsb.hr [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-07-01

    Conventional aluminizing processes by pack cementation are typically carried out at elevated temperatures. A low temperature powder aluminizing technology was applied to hot tool steel H13. The aluminizing treating temperature was from 550 to 620°C. Effects of temperature and time on the microstructure and phase evolution were investigated. Also, the intermetallic layer thickness was measured in the aluminized layer of a steel substrate. The cross-sectional microstructures, the aluminized layer thickness and the oxide layer were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS) were applied to observe the cross-sections and the distribution of elements. (author)

  5. A low temperature aluminizing treatment of hot work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevic, B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional aluminizing processes by pack cementation are typically carried out at elevated temperatures. A low temperature powder aluminizing technology was applied to hot tool steel H13. The aluminizing treating temperature was from 550 to 620°C. Effects of temperature and time on the microstructure and phase evolution were investigated. Also, the intermetallic layer thickness was measured in the aluminized layer of a steel substrate. The cross-sectional microstructures, the aluminized layer thickness and the oxide layer were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS) were applied to observe the cross-sections and the distribution of elements. (author)

  6. Physical chemistry of portland-cement hydrate, radioactive-waste hosts: Final report, January 16, 1987--December 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is a final report summarizing the results of a study of the physical and crystal chemistry of potential hydroxylated radioactive waste hosts compatible with portland cement. Research has focussed on the identification and evaluation of hydrated host phases for four ions: cesium, strontium, iodine and boron. These ions were chosen because they are among the most long lived of the radioactive waste ions as well as the most difficult to immobilize with cement-based materials. Results show that such phases do indeed exist, and that they are excellent host phases for the above ions

  7. Effect of hydrated lime and cement on moisture damage of recycled mixtures with foamed bitumen and emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Nosetti, R.A.; Pérez Jiménez, Félix Edmundo; Martínez Reguero, Adriana Haydée; Miró Recasens, José Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Cold recycling with foamed bitumen can be used as a sustainable and cost-effective rehabilitation technique. This paper focuses on the evaluation of the resistance to the water action in mixtures with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and foamed bitumen by means of indirect tensile test, comparing the effect of two active fillers: cement and hydrated lime. Additionally, mixtures recycled with RAP and asphalt emulsions were also tested in order to compare the response of both technologies. Resu...

  8. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, D.; McCulloch, C.E.; Angus, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Model studies of the behaviour of cement systems have been advanced by considering the nature of the phases formed during hydration and deriving pH-composition models for the CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O system. Preliminary results of Esub(h) measurements are also reported. Leach tests on Sr from cements are interpreted in terms of Sr retention mechanisms. Present results indicate that the aluminate phases in OPC contribute to the chemical retentivity. Studies on cement-clinoptilolite reactions, made using coarse grained clinoptilolite are reported: ferrierite also reacts chemically with cement. Two critical surveys are presented, together with new data: one on the potential of blended cements, the other on cement durability in CO 2 -containing environments. (author)

  9. An i.r. investigation on some calcium aluminate hydrates, Ca2Al(OH)6+X-.yH2O (= 3CaO.Al2O3.CaX2.nH2O, X- = univalent anion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtepen, C.J.M.; Stein, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    The i.r. spectra of some hydrated and dehydrated calcium aluminate hydrates of the type Ca2Al(OH)6+X-·yH2O with X- = Cl-, Br-, J-, ClO3-, NO3-, ClO4- (y = 2) and X- = BrO3-, JO3- (2

  10. Phased-Resolved Strain Measuremetns in Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement Using Synchrotron x-Rays (Prop. 2003-033)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biernacki, Joseph J.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Parnham, C.J.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Bai, J.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction methods developed for the determination of residual stress states in crystalline materials have been applied to study residual strains and strains because of mechanical loading of ordinary portland cement paste. Synchrotron X-rays were used to make in situ measurements of interplanar spacings in the calcium hydroxide (CH) phase of hydrated neat portland cement under uniaxial compression. The results indicate that strains on the order of 1/100 000 can be resolved providing an essentially new technique by which to measure the phase-resolved meso-scale mechanical behavior of cement under different loading conditions. Evaluation of these strain data in view of published elastic parameters for CH suggests that the CH carries a large fraction of the applied stress and that plastic interactions with the matrix are notable.

  11. Properties of calcium depleted hydrated cement paste: mineralogical characterization and cesium adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaahmadi, A.; Tang, L.; Zareen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the changes in adsorption properties of cementitious barriers and the effect on the release of radio-nuclides to the environment during the service life of the repository is of high importance. A major degradation scenario within safety assessment analysis of nuclear waste repositories is decalcification of cementitious materials due to long-term contact with groundwater. In order to decrease the uncertainty in the simulation of this process due to extrapolating short term data sets based on short term experimental analysis, acceleration methods enhancing the decalcification process can be used. However it is not yet completely proved that how different the properties of the aged samples through accelerated leaching is compared to the samples aged in natural ageing process. In this study the changes in cesium adsorption of the hydrated cement paste due to calcium depletion is taken in to consideration. The aged samples are prepared with application of an accelerating electro-chemical migration method. The mineralogical properties of decalcified specimens are characterized to demonstrate their comparability with naturally leached samples. The gradual effect of migration function on cementitious materials indicates a relatively homogenous leaching in cementitious specimens and a considerable increase in specific surface area due to the leaching of calcium. It is concluded that the aged samples having a larger surface area and less calcium and alkalis ions compared to pristine materials, exhibit a higher binding potential for Cs ions

  12. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H in Portland cement (PC paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF, measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. The compressive deformation of the C-S-H nanostructure was comprised of three stages with different interactions between globules. This behavior would originate from the granular nature of C-S-H, which deforms with increasing packing density by slipping the interfaces between globules, rearranging the overall C-S-H nanostructure. This new approach will lead to increasing applications of the PDF technique to understand the deformation mechanism of C-S-H in PC-based materials.

  13. X-ray diffractometry of steam cured ordinary Portland and blast-furnace-slag cements; Difratometria de raios X de pastas de cimento Portland comum e de alto-forno submetidas a cura termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarini, G [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia; Djanikian, J G [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica

    1994-12-31

    This work studies some aspects of the phases produced by hydration of ordinary and blast-furnace-slag cements, at normal conditions and steam cured (60 and 95{sup 0} C), using an X-ray diffraction technique. The blast-furnace-slag cement was a mixture of 50% of ordinary Portland cement and 50% of blast-furnace-slag (separately grinding). After curing the X-ray diffraction reveals that, in relation to ordinary Portland cement, the main phases in blast-furnace-slag cement are hydrated silicates and aluminates, hydro garnet, etringitte and mono sulphate. After steam curing the hydration of blast-furnace-slag cement proceeds. This is a result of the slag activation by the curing temperature. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An in situ synchrotron energy-dispersive diffraction study of the hydration of oilwell cement systems under high temperature/autoclave conditions up to 130 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colston, Sally L.; Barnes, Paul; Jupe, Andrew C.; Jacques, Simon D.M.; Hall, Christopher; Livesey, Paul; Dransfield, John; Meller, Nicola; Maitland, Geoffrey C.

    2005-01-01

    The technique of synchrotron energy dispersive diffraction has been developed for in situ studies of cement hydration under autoclave conditions. This has been applied to oilwell cements hydrating at typical oilwell temperatures up to 130 deg. C. The results show clearly the detailed interplay between 11 detectable phases, from which a phase transformation scheme has been derived; this illustrates the progression of hydration up to 130 deg. C for two extreme cases, with and without conservation of water content and autoclave pressure. The monosulphate hydrate phases are found to exhibit different stability bounds, with a surprising sequence of the 14-water, 10-water then 12-water monosulphate as temperature/time increases; the latter form is particularly associated with conditions of water/pressure loss. The effect of retarders on C 3 S dissolution and CH formation is negligible above 70 deg. C, whereas the effect on the calcium sulphoaluminate hydrates is more complex, and possible reasons for this are discussed

  15. The hydration of slag, part 1: reaction models for blended cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2007-01-01

    Reaction models are proposed to quantify the hydration products and to determine the composition of C–S–H from alkali-activated slags (AAS). Products of the slag hydration are first summarized from observations in literature. The main hydration products include C–S–H, hydrotalcite, hydrogarnet, AFm

  16. The application of thermal analysis to the hydration and conversión Reactions of calcium alumínate Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushnell-Watson, S. M.

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydration of calcium aluminates cements is dominated by that of CA, CaAl2O4, which is a major constituent of all of them. At ambient temperatures, CAH10 and an amorphous phase are formed initially, but these are metastable and slowly (or more rapidly if exposed to higher temperatures transform into C3AH6 and gíbbsite. This conversion reaction is accompanied by and increase ín porosity, which can lead to a loss in strength and vulnerability to chemical attack. Various methods of thermal analysis have been applied as a routine test to determine the degree of conversion, and the results from these methods are critically evaluated. Thermal analysis is a useful technique for identification of the various hydrates that can form in these systems, especially at early stages of hydration when poorly crystalline phases are present. Differential thermal analysis curves showing peaks attributable to all these hydrates are presented and it is shown that overlap frequently occurs, leading to difficulties in interpretation, which can sometimes be minimized by use of a complementary technique such as X-ray diffraction.

    La hidratación de cementos aluminosos está regida por la de CA, CaAl2O4, que es el componente principal. A temperatura ambiente inicialmente se forman CAH10 y una fase amorfa, pero son metaestables y se transforman lentamente (o más rápidamente si se exponen a temperaturas más altas en C3AH6 y gibsita. Esta reacción de conversión está acompañada de un aumento de porosidad, lo que lleva a la pérdida de resistencia y a la vulnerabilidad al ataque químico. Se han aplicado distintos métodos de análisis térmico como una prueba rutinaria para determinar el grado de conversión y se ofrece una evaluación crítica de los resultados de estos métodos. Análisis térmico es una técnica útil para identificar los

  17. A LOW TEMPERATURE ALUMINIZING TREATMENT OF HOT WORK TOOL STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Matijević, Božidar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional aluminizing processes by pack cementation are typically carried out at elevated temperatures. A low temperature powder aluminizing technology was applied to the X40CrMoV5-1 hot tool steel. The aluminizing temperature was from 550 °C to 620 °C. Effects of temperature and time on the microstructure and phase evolution were investigated. Also, the intermetallic layer thickness was measured in the aluminized layer of a steel substrate. The cross-sectional microstructures, the alumini...

  18. Quantitative study of Portland cement hydration by X-ray diffraction/Rietveld analysis and independent methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrivener, K.L.; Fuellmann, T.; Gallucci, E.; Walenta, G.; Bermejo, E.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful technique for the study of crystalline materials. The technique of Rietveld refinement now enables the amounts of different phases in anhydrous cementitious materials to be determined to a good degree of precision. This paper describes the extension of this technique to a pilot study of the hydration of a typical Portland cement. To validate this XRD-Rietveld analysis technique, its results were compared with independent measures of the same materials by the analysis of backscattered electron images (BSE/IA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, the internal consistency of the measurements was studied by comparing the XRD estimates of the amounts of hydrates formed with the amounts expected to form from the XRD estimates of the amounts of anhydrous materials reacted

  19. Effect of the hydration temperature on the microstructure of Class G cement: C-S-H composition and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahafid, Sara; Ghabezloo, Siavash; Duc, Myriam; Faure, Pamela; Sulem, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Curing temperature has a significant influence on cement paste microstructure and the properties of its principal hydrate C-S-H. In this paper, the effect of the hydration temperature in the range of 7 °C to 90 °C on the microstructure of a class G oil-well cement is studied. This is done by combining various experimental methods, including X-ray diffraction associated with the Rietveld analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and porosity evaluation by drying. The experimental results show an increase of the capillary porosity and a decrease of the gel porosity by increasing the hydration temperature. This is attributed to a decrease of the C-S-H intrinsic porosity and a corresponding increase of the C-S-H density for higher curing temperatures. The experimental results are used in a simple analysis method to evaluate the density of C-S-H, as well as its C/S ratio and H/S ratio in dry and saturated conditions. The evaluated C-S-H density varies from 1.88 g/cm 3 at 7 °C to 2.10 g/cm 3 at 90 °C. The results also show a decrease of molar C/S ratio with increasing hydration temperature from 1.93 at 7 °C to 1.71 at 90 °C and of the H/S ratio from 5.1 at 7 °C to 2.66 at 90 °C.

  20. Peculiarities of the processes of hydration of binding substances in the arbolite mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innokentieva, L. S.; Egorova, A. D.; Emelianova, Z. V.

    2017-09-01

    Cement and sand solution is traditionally used for production of wood concrete. But it is known that impact of water-soluble substances of wood on the hardening cement is shown in the stabilizing effect. The "Cement poisons" consisting generally of the HOCH carbohydrate groups, sedimented on a surface of particles of minerals of cement 3CaO.SiO2 (three-calcic silicate) and 3CaO.Al2O3 (three-calcic aluminate) form the thinnest covers which complicate the course of processes of hydration of cement. Plaster in comparison with cement is less sensitive to extractive substances of wood therefore their combination to wood (including waste of logging and a woodworking) both coniferous and deciduous species is allowed. Composite plaster binding with hongurin as active mineral additive agent are applied at selection of composition of arbolite, at the same time dependences of their physicomechanical properties on characteristics of filler are received.

  1. Recycle of fired phosphogypsum waste product as a cement replacement and its role on the hydration and strength development of pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantawi, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Partially up to fully substituted of treated phosphogypsum x(PG) for natural gypsum on the physico- mechanical as well as kinetic of hydration of ordinary Portland cement has been discussed . The results show that by increasing PG % the water to cement ratio decreased while the initial and final setting times increased So PG acts as a retarder and water reducer . The retardation effect may be attributed to formation of ettringite layer which formed on the surface of C3A of cement pastes . The chemically combined water, free lime content and bulk density increased with curing time and with PG content for all cement pastes up to 90 days due to increasing of the rate of hydration. The compressive strength increased by increasing of PG % due to formation of anhydrite , changes in major oxides content and reduction of impurities . X-Ray Diffraction, SEM and DTA of some samples have been studied

  2. The degree of hydration assessment of blended cement pastes by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis. Morphological evolution of the solid phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteagudo, S.M.; Moragues, A.; Gálvez, J.C.; Casati, M.J.; Reyes, E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A proposal of hydration degree calculation for blended cement pastes is presented. • The method is based both on the contributions of various authors and on DTA–TG results. • Paste and mortar specimens with BFS, FA and SF mineral admixtures were used. • The evaluation of CH gives information on hydration and pozzolanic reactions. • The assessment of α provides an insight into future strength evolution. - Abstract: The degree of hydration assessment of cement paste from differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data has been performed by several authors that have offered a number of proposals for technical application to blended cements. In this paper, two calculation methods are studied in detail. Then, a proposal of the degree of hydration calculation for blended cements, based on the analysis of experimental results of DTA–TG, is presented. The proposed method combines the contributions of the authors and allows straightforward calculation of the degree of hydration from the experimental results. Validation of the methodology was performed by macroscopic and microstructural tests through paste and mortar specimens with blast furnace slag, flying ash and silica fume mineral admixtures bei(g)ng used. Tests of scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive analyser on paste specimens, and of mechanical strength on mortar specimens with the same percentages of substitution, were performed. They showed good agreement with the information derived from the differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data

  3. Predicting the Impact of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Cement Hydration Products and Durability of Cementitious Matrix Using Artificial Neural Network Modeling Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Fakhim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the feasibility of using the artificial neural networks modeling in predicting the effect of MWCNT on amount of cement hydration products and improving the quality of cement hydration products microstructures of cement paste was investigated. To determine the amount of cement hydration products thermogravimetric analysis was used. Two critical parameters of TGA test are PHPloss and CHloss. In order to model the TGA test results, the ANN modeling was performed on these parameters separately. In this study, 60% of data are used for model calibration and the remaining 40% are used for model verification. Based on the highest efficiency coefficient and the lowest root mean square error, the best ANN model was chosen. The results of TGA test implied that the cement hydration is enhanced in the presence of the optimum percentage (0.3 wt% of MWCNT. Moreover, since the efficiency coefficient of the modeling results of CH and PHP loss in both the calibration and verification stages was more than 0.96, it was concluded that the ANN could be used as an accurate tool for modeling the TGA results. Another finding of this study was that the ANN prediction in higher ages was more precise.

  4. Study of the relation between hydrated portland cement composition and leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly

  5. Study of hydrated Portland cement composition in regard to leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly

  6. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  7. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  8. Crystallographic characterization of cement pastes hydrated with NaCl; Caracterizacao cristalografica de pastas de cimento hidratadas com NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Carina Gabriela de Melo e; Martinelli, Antonio Eduardo; Melo, Dulce Maria Araujo; Melo, Marcus Antonio de Freitas; Melo, Vitor Rodrigo de Melo e [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the major current challenges faced by oil companies is the exploration of pre salt basins. Salt layers deposited upon the evaporation of ocean water and continental separation are mainly formed by NaCl and isolate immense oil reservoirs. The mechanical stability and zonal isolation of oil wells that run through salt layers must be fulfilled by cement sheaths saturated with NaCl to assure chemical compatibility between cement and salt layer. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of NaCl addition on the hydration of oil well cement slurries as well as identifying the nature of crystalline phases present in the hardened cement. To that end, cement slurries containing NaCl were mixed, hardened and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the presence of NaCl affects the formation of hydration products by the presence of Friedel's salt. The intensity of the corresponding peaks increase as the contents of NaCl in the slurry increase. High concentrations of NaCl in Portland slurries increase the setting time of cement and the presence of Friedel's salt decreases the strength of the hardened cement. (author)

  9. The AFm phase in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matschei, T.; Lothenbach, B.; Glasser, F.P.

    2007-01-01

    The AFm phase of Portland cements refers to a family of hydrated calcium aluminates based on the hydrocalumite-like structure of 4CaO.Al 2 O 3 .13-19 H 2 O. However OH - may be replaced by SO 4 2- and CO 3 2- . Except for limited replacement (50 mol%, maximum) of sulfate by hydroxide, these compositions do not form solid solutions and, from the mineralogical standpoint, behave as separate phases. Therefore many hydrated cements will contain mixtures of AFm phases. AFm phases have been made from precursors and experimentally-determined phase relationships are depicted at 25 deg. C. Solubility data are reported and thermodynamic data are derived. The 25 deg. C stability of AFm phases is much affected by the nature of the anion: carbonate stabilises AFm and displaces OH and SO 4 at species activities commonly encountered in cement systems. However in the presence of portlandite, and as carbonate displaces sulfate in AFm, the reaction results in changes in the amount of both portlandite and ettringite: specimen calculations are presented to quantify these changes. The scheme of phase balances enables calculation of the mineralogical balances of a hydrated cement paste with greater accuracy than hitherto practicable

  10. Altered cement hydration and subsequently modified porosity, permeability and compressive strength of mortar specimens due to the influence of electrical current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of stray current flow on microstructural prop-erties, i.e. pore connectivity and permeability of mortar specimens, and link these to the observed alterations in mechanical properties and cement hydration. Mortar specimens were partly submerged in water and calcium

  11. X-ray spectra and theoretical elastic properties of crystalline calcium silicate hydrates: comparison with cement hydrated gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuela, A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available For 22 crystalline Calcium Silicates Hydrates, we have calculated their structure and their elastic properties by atomistic force field methods as well as simulate their Xray diffraction patterns. From the computed Young moduli, it can be suggested that the key parameters to determine the elastic properties of crystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrates are densities and water content. We have compared these trends with those of cementitious C-S-H gel and synthetic C-S-H type I as a function of their C/S ratios and nominal water content. Our comparison show that the experimentally suggested values of density and Young moduli for C-S-H gel lie in the range of the calculated CSH crystals. However, we conclude that a detailed correspondence might require investigating structurally within CSH gels the role of water and especially of Ca and Si sites through their C/S ratio.

    En este trabajo se han calculado para 22 Silicatos Cálcicos Hidratados cristalinos, su estructura y sus propiedades elásticas mediante métodos atomísticos “force field”, así como simulado sus espectros de difracción de rayos X. De los módulos de Young calculados se puede deducir, que los parámetros clave que determinan las propiedades elásticas de los Silicatos Cálcicos Hidratados cristalinos son la densidad y el contenido en agua. Nuestros resultados muestran que los valores experimentales de la densidad y de los módulos de Young para el gel C-S-H están dentro del rango de los cristales de CSH calculados. Sin embargo, podemos concluir que para establecer una correlación más directa sería necesario investigar el papel que juegan el agua y sobre todo el Ca y Si, mediante la relación C/S, en la estructura del gel CSH.

  12. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  13. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lei; Zhao Qinglin; Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-01-01

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV–VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C 3 A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration. Highlights: ► Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C 3 A and ettringite have been studied. ► C 3 A–gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. ► Welan gum retards the process of C 3 A–gypsum hydration. ► The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  14. Reactions of SO 2 on hydrated cement particle system for atmospheric pollution reduction: A DRIFTS and XANES study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Girish; Wu, Qiyuan; Moon, Juhyuk; Orlov, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    An investigation of the adsorptive property of hydrated cement particle system for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal was conducted. In situ and ex situ experiments using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) characterization techniques were employed to identify surface species formed during the exposure to SO2. Oxidation of SO2 to sulfate and sulfite species observed during these experiments indicated dominant reaction pathways for SO2 reaction with concrete constituents, such as calcium hydroxide, which were also moderated by adsorption on porous surfaces of crushed aggregates. The impact of variable composition of concrete on its adsorption capacity and reaction mechanisms was also proposed in this work.

  15. Interaction of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement, with alkaline chlorides, analogy with clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viallis-Terrisse, H.

    2000-01-01

    This work, belonging to a more general study on the structure and reactivity of cement, deals with the experimental and theoretical analysis of the interaction of alkaline chlorides with calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement paste. The interaction of alkaline cations with C-S-H is interfacial, involving both electrostatic and surface complexation mechanisms. The C-S-H surface is constituted of silanol sites, partially dissociated due to the high pH of the interstitial solution. The calcium ions, present in large amounts in the equilibrium solution of C-S-H, constitute potential determining ions for the C-S-H surface. The alkaline ions seem to compete with calcium for the same surface sites. The adsorption isotherms show that caesium presents a better affinity than sodium and lithium for the C-S-H surface. Moreover, solid-state NMR suggests that caesium forms with the surface sites inner-sphere complexes, whereas sodium seems to keep its hydration sphere. These results are in agreement with zeta potential measurements, which let suppose a specific adsorption of caesium ions, and an indifferent behaviour of both other alkaline ions. A model for the C-S-H surface was proposed, from the electric double layer model, and mass action laws expressing the complexation of the different ionic species with the silanol sites. The whole study relies on a structural analogy with smectites, some clays presenting well-known cationic adsorption properties. The structural similarity between both minerals is enhanced by some similarities of reactivity, though significant behaviour differences could also be noted. (author)

  16. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  17. Pore solution in alkali-activated slag cement pastes. Relation to the composition and structure of calcium silicate hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puertas, F.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between the composition of pore solution in alkali-activated slag cement (AAS) pastes activated with different alkaline activator, and the composition and structure of the main reaction products, has been studied. Pore solution was extracted from hardened AAS pastes. The analysis of the liquids was performed through different techniques: Na, Mg and Al by atomic absorption (AA), Ca ions by ionic chromatography (IC) and Si by colorimetry; pH was also determined. The solid phases were analysed by XRD, FTIR, solid-state 29 Si and 27 Al NMR and BSE/EDX. The most significant changes in the ionic composition of the pore solution of the AAS pastes activated with waterglass take place between 3 and 24 h of reaction. These changes are due to the decrease of the Na content and mainly to the Si content. Results of 29 Si MAS NMR and FTIR confirm that the activation process takes place with more intensity after 3 h (although at this age, Q 2 units already exist). The pore solution of the AAS pastes activated with NaOH shows a different evolution to this of pastes activated with waterglass. The decrease of Na and Si contents progresses with time. The nature of the alkaline activator influences the structure and composition of the calcium silicate hydrate formed as a consequence of the alkaline activation of the slag. The characteristic of calcium silicate hydrate in AAS pastes activated with waterglass is characterised by a low structural order with a low Ca/Si ratio. Besides, in this paste, Q 3 units are detected. The calcium silicate hydrate formed in the pastes activated with NaOH has a higher structural order (higher crystallinity) and contains more Al in its structure and a higher Ca/Si ratio than those obtained with waterglass

  18. The biocompatibility of modified experimental Portland cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the biocompatibility of a group of new potential dental materials and their eluants by assessing cell viability. Calcium sulpho-aluminate cement (CSA), calcium fluoro-aluminate cement (CFA) and glass-ionomer cement (GIC; Ketac Molar), used as the control, were tested for biocompatibility. Using a direct test method cell viability was measured quantitatively using alamarBluetrade mark dye, and an indirect test method where cells were grown on material elutions and cell viability was assessed using methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay as recommended by ISO 10 993-Part 5 for in vitro testing. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance and Tukey multi-comparison test method. Elution collected from the prototype cements and the GIC cured for 1 and 7 days allowed high cell activity after 24 h cell exposure, which reduced after 48 h when compared to the nontoxic glass-ionomer control, but increased significantly after 72 h cell contact. Elutions collected after 28 days revealed reduced cell activity at all cell exposure times. Cells placed in direct contact with the prototype materials showed reduced cell activity when compared with the control. Cell growth was poor when seeded in direct contact with the prototype cements. GIC encouraged cell growth after 1 day of contact. The eluted species for all the cements tested exhibited adequate cell viability in the early ages with reduced cell activity at 28 days. Changes in the production of calcium hydroxide as a by-product of cement hydration affect the material biocompatibility adversely.

  19. Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in masonry cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1987-03-01

    Portland cements are widely used as solidification agents for low-level radioactive wastes. However, it is known that boric acid wastes, as generated at pressurized water reactors (PWR's) are difficult to solidify using ordinary portland cements. Waste containing as little as 5 wt % boric acid inhibits the curing of the cement. For this purpose, the suitability of masonry cement was investigated. Masonry cement, in the US consists of 50 wt % slaked lime (CaOH 2 ) and 50 wt % of portland type I cement. Addition of boric acid in molar concentrations equal to or less than the molar concentration of the alkali in the cement eliminates any inhibiting effects. Accordingly, 15 wt % boric acid can be satisfactorily incorporated into masonry cement. The suitability of masonry cement for the solidification of sodium sulfate wastes produced at boiling water reactors (BWR's) was also investigated. It was observed that although sodium sulfate - masonry cement waste forms containing as much as 40 wt % Na 2 SO 4 can be prepared, waste forms with more than 7 wt % sodium sulfate undergo catastrophic failure when exposed to an aqueous environment. It was determined by x-ray diffraction that in the presence of water, the sulfate reacts with hydrated calcium aluminate to form calcium aluminum sulfate hydrate (ettringite). This reaction involves a volume increase resulting in failure of the waste form. Formulation data were identified to maximize volumetric efficiency for the solidification of boric acid and sodium sulfate wastes. Measurement of some of the waste form properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment included leachability, compression strengths and chemical interactions between the waste components and masonry cement. 15 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Influence of triethanolamine on the hydration product of portlandite in cement paste and the mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Rong, Zhang; Xiang-Ming, Kong; Zi-Chen, Lu; Zhen-Bao, Lu; Qing, Zhang; Bi-Qin, Dong; Feng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The influences of triethanolamine (TEA) on the portlandite in hardened cement pastes (HCPs) were systematically investigated. Results show that the addition of TEA in cement pastes leads to a visible reduction of Ca(OH) 2 (CH) content and considerably alters the morphology of CH crystals from large and parallel-stacked lamellar shape to smaller and distorted actinomorphic one. For the first time, the CH micro-crystals and even non-crystalline CH in HCPs were observed in the presence of TEA. Due to integration of CH micro-crystals in C–S–H phase, remarkable higher Ca/Si ratio of C–S–H phase was found. The formation of TEA-Ca 2+ complex via the interaction between Ca 2+ and the oxygen atoms in TEA molecule was evidenced by the results of NMR and UV. It is believed that TEA can be introduced into the crystallization process of portlandite and thus significantly alters the morphology of CH crystals and even the content of the crystalline CH phase.

  1. Application of the electrical characterization to the study of the hydrated phases of the cement with coal bottom ash; Aplicacion de la caracterizacion electrica al estudio de las fases hidratadas de cemento con adicion de escorias de centrales termicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, E.; Frutos, J. de; Alvaro, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The present paper investigates the influence of using Bottom and Fly Ash as partial replacement of cement in the hydration process. Through measurements of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X -ray diffraction (XRD), we analyze from the early stages to the hydration process to the end. Values of EIS, XRD and its relation, are used to determine transformation of hydrated phases, and for each of the substitutions, is indicated as modified the hydrated phase as a function of time and compared it with the reference material. It also proves the relevance of using EIS measures in real time, and as non destructive testing to characterize the hydration process of these materials. (Author)

  2. Characterization of cement-based ancient building materials in support of repository seal materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    Ancient mortars and plasters collected from Greek and Cypriot structures dating to about 5500 BC have been investigated because of their remarkable durability. The characteristics and performance of these and other ancient cementitious materials have been considered in the light of providing information on longevity of concrete materials for sealing nuclear waste geological repositories. The matrices of these composite materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) gypsum cements; (2) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated-lime cements; (3) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated-lime cements (+- siliceous components); and (4) pozzolana/hydrated-lime cements. Most of the materials investigated, including linings of ore-washing basins and cisterns used to hold water, are in categories (2) and (3). The aggregates used included carbonates, sandstones, shales, schists, volcanic and pyroclastic rocks, and ore minerals, many of which represent host rock types of stratigraphic components of a salt repository. Numerous methods were used to characterize the materials chemically, mineralogically, and microstructurally and to elucidate aspects of both the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical (mineralogical) and microstructural factors. Durability was found to be affected by matrix mineralogy, particle size and porosity, and aggregate type, grading, and proportioning, as well as method of placement and exposure conditions. Similar factors govern the potential for durability of modern portland cement-containing materials, which are candidates for repository sealing. 29 references, 29 figures, 6 tables

  3. Microstructure and oxidation behaviour of aluminized coating of inconel 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, F.A.; Hussain, N.; Shahid, K.A.; Rehman, S.; Qureshi, A.H.; Khan, I.H.

    1999-01-01

    Microstructural and oxidation characteristics of aluminized coated Inconel 625 have been examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fine-probe spot and linescan EDS microanalysis techniques. The formation of slowly growing adherent metallic coatings is essential for protection against the severe environments. Aluminising of the superalloy samples was carried out by pack cementation process at 900 deg. C. in an argon atmosphere. The samples were subsequently oxidized in air at various temperatures to examine performance of the pack aluminized coated alloy. The microstructural changes that occurred in the aluminized layer at various exposure temperature and time were examined to study the oxidation behavior and formation of different phases in the aluminized coating deposited on Inconel 625. (author)

  4. Revealing the Effect of Irradiation on Cement Hydrates: Evidence of a Topological Self-Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Sant, Gaurav; Phillips, James C; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2017-09-20

    Despite the crucial role of concrete in the construction of nuclear power plants, the effects of radiation exposure (i.e., in the form of neutrons) on the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H, i.e., the glue of concrete) remain largely unknown. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically investigate the effects of irradiation on the structure of C-S-H across a range of compositions. Expectedly, although C-S-H is more resistant to irradiation than typical crystalline silicates, such as quartz, we observe that radiation exposure affects C-S-H's structural order, silicate mean chain length, and the amount of molecular water that is present in the atomic network. By topological analysis, we show that these "structural effects" arise from a self-organization of the atomic network of C-S-H upon irradiation. This topological self-organization is driven by the (initial) presence of atomic eigenstress in the C-S-H network and is facilitated by the presence of water in the network. Overall, we show that C-S-H exhibits an optimal resistance to radiation damage when its atomic network is isostatic (at Ca/Si = 1.5). Such an improved understanding of the response of C-S-H to irradiation can pave the way to the design of durable concrete for radiation applications.

  5. Calcium aluminates potential for endodontics and orthopedics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.L. dos; Andrade, T.L.; Oliveira, I.R.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The mostly used material in the areas of endodontics (MTA, mineral trioxide aggregate) and bone reconstruction (PMMA, polymethyl methacrylate) present some limiting properties requiring thus changes in their compositions as well as the development of alternative materials. In this context, a novel biomaterial-based calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied in order to keep the positive properties and clinical applications of MTA and PMMA, overcoming some their disadvantages. Recent studies involving the use of CAC are based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by searching the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance in applications in the areas of health. By the optimization of the CAC phases production, this article aims to present their characterization based on hydration temperature; working time and setting time; pH, ions solubilization and dissolution in contact with water and different solutions of simulated body fluid. The results indicated the CA phase as the most suitable for application in the areas of health. (author)

  6. Natural cement and stone restoration of Bourges Cathedral (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gosselin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural cement, also called "Roman cement", was invented at the end of the 18th Century and played an important role in the development of civil engineering works until the 1860s. More surprisingly, it was also used to restore historic buildings, such as gothic cathedrals. This paper deals with the mineralogy and the durability of natural cement, in the particular case of the Bourges Cathedral in France. This study illustrates the interest of this material particularly adapted in stone repair or substitution. Contrary to traditional mortars, the present samples are made of neat cement paste, revealed by the absence of mineral additions as quartz or carbonate sand. Several combined techniques (SEM-EDS, TGA, XRD were carried out to determine the composition of the hydraulic binder rich in calcium aluminate hydrates. The raw marl at the origin of the cement production contains oxidized pyrites which consist in a potential source of sulphate pollution of the surrounding limestone. The exposition of the cement in urban environment leads to some weathering features as atmospheric sulphation. Finally a petrophysical approach, based on water porosity, capillary sorption and compressive strength, has been performed to demonstrate the durability and the compatibility of roman cement applied as a restoration mortar of historical building.

  7. Remagnetization and Cementation of Unconsolidated Sediments in the Mallik 5L-38 Well (Canadian Arctic) by Solute Exclusion During Gas Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T. S.; Enkin, R. J.; Esteban, L.

    2007-05-01

    Bulk magnetic properties provide a sensitive measure of sedimentary diagenesis related to the stability and growth of gas hydrates. The deposit at Mallik (Mackenzie Delta, Canadian Arctic) occurs in unconsolidated Tertiary sands, but is absent in interstratified silt layers. A detailed sampling of the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 5L-38 core tested the use of magnetic properties for detecting diagenetic changes related to the hydrate. Petrographic studies reveal that the sands are well sorted and clean, with quartz > chert >> muscovite and little fines content. Excepting a few rare bands of indurated dolomite in the midst of the gas hydrate zone, there is little or no cementation in the sands. Detrital magnetite is the dominant magnetic mineral, comprising up to a few percent of the sand grain population. In contrast, the muddier layers have a somewhat different detrital grain composition, richer in lithic (sedimentary and metamorphic) grains, feldspar, and clays. They are extensively diagenetically altered (to as much as 30- 40%) and cemented with carbonates, clays, chlorite and the iron sulphide greigite (the dominant magnetic mineral). The greigite is recognized by its isotropic creamy-white reflectance, cubic to prismatic habit, and characteristic tarnish to faintly bluish bireflectant mackinawite. Habits range from disseminated cubes and colliform masses to inflationary massive sulphide veins and clots. Rare detrital grains of magnetite were observed among the silt grains, but never in a reaction relationship or overgrown. Instead the greigite has nucleated separately, in tensional fractures and granular masses up to 4 mm across. In this particular sediment sequence, being so quartz and chert rich, there is insufficient local source for the introduced cements (calcite, dolomite, greigite, clays, jarosite), so ions must have been introduced by fluid flow. Magnetic studies reveal a bi-modal character related to the lithology (sands versus silts) and their magnetic

  8. Modelling of chemical evolution of low pH cements at long term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitouri, Y.; Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A.; Bourbon, X.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the underground radioactive waste repository, low-pH cements were developed to reduce interactions between concrete and clay barrier. These cements contain high proportions of mineral additions like silica fume, fly ash or blast furnace slag for example. The high ratio of cement replacement by pozzolanic additions allows to reduce the pH by a global reduction of Ca/Si ratio of the hydrates (according to the one observed on CEM I pastes). In order to predict the short term development of the hydration for each component of this cement, a multiphasic hydration model, previously developed, is used. The model predicts the evolution of hydration degree of each anhydrous phase and consequently the quantity of each hydrate in paste (CH, aluminates, CSH with different Ca/Si ratios). However, this model is not suitable to determine the long term mineralogical and chemical evolution of the material, due to the internal change induced by chemical imbalance between initial hydrates. In order to evaluate the chemical characteristics of low pH cement based materials, and thus assess its chemical stability in the context of radioactive waste storage, a complementary model of chemical evolution at long term is proposed. This original model is based on 'solid-solution' principles. It assumes that the microdiffusion of calcium plays a major role to explain how the different Ca/Si ratio of initial C-S-H tends together toward a medium stabilized value. The main mechanisms and full development of the model equations are presented first. Next, a comparison of the model with experimental data issue from EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) analysis on low pH cement allows to test the model. (authors)

  9. Role of Adsorption Phenomena in Cubic Tricalcium Aluminate Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rupert J; Geng, Guoqing; Li, Jiaqi; Rodríguez, Erich D; Ha, Juyoung; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Sposito, Garrison; Lammers, Laura N; Kirchheim, Ana Paula; Monteiro, Paulo J M

    2017-01-10

    The workability of fresh Portland cement (PC) concrete critically depends on the reaction of the cubic tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A) phase in Ca- and S-rich pH >12 aqueous solution, yet its rate-controlling mechanism is poorly understood. In this article, the role of adsorption phenomena in C 3 A dissolution in aqueous Ca-, S-, and polynaphthalene sulfonate (PNS)-containing solutions is analyzed. The zeta potential and pH results are consistent with the isoelectric point of C 3 A occurring at pH ∼12 and do not show an inversion of its electric double layer potential as a function of S or Ca concentration, and PNS adsorbs onto C 3 A, reducing its zeta potential to negative values at pH >12. The S and Ca K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data obtained do not indicate the structural incorporation or specific adsorption of SO 4 2- on the partially dissolved C 3 A solids analyzed. Together with supporting X-ray ptychography and scanning electron microscopy results, a model for C 3 A dissolution inhibition in hydrated PC systems is proposed whereby the formation of an Al-rich leached layer and the complexation of Ca-S ion pairs onto this leached layer provide the key inhibiting effect(s). This model reconciles the results obtained here with the existing literature, including the inhibiting action of macromolecules such as PNS and polyphosphonic acids upon C 3 A dissolution. Therefore, this article advances the understanding of the rate-controlling mechanism in hydrated C 3 A and thus PC systems, which is important to better controlling the workability of fresh PC concrete.

  10. Duplex aluminized coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  11. Microstructure of amorphous aluminum hydroxide in belite-calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Fei; Yu, Zhenglei; Yang, Fengling; Lu, Yinong, E-mail: yinonglu@njtech.edu.cn; Liu, Yunfei, E-mail: yfliu@njtech.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Belite-calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement is a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cement. Herein, aluminum hydroxide (AH{sub 3}), the main amorphous hydration product of BCSA cement, was investigated in detail. The microstructure of AH{sub 3} with various quantities of gypsum was investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The AH{sub 3} with various morphologies were observed and confirmed in the resulting pastes. Particular attention was paid to the fact that AH{sub 3} always contained a small amount of Ca according to the results of EDS analysis. The AH{sub 3} was then characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results of HRTEM indicated that Ca arose from nanosized tricalcium aluminate hexahydrate which existed in the AH{sub 3}.

  12. Mineralogy and microstructure of two Mexican Portland cements for the confinement of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, E.; Badillo A, V. E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Nava E, N.

    2014-10-01

    The cementitious materials are involved in the different stages of radioactive waste management because they are used for the waste immobilization in the container, as well as filling in the spaces between containers vaults and also as engineering barrier and construction material in civil construction site. Therefore, is necessary to have a study of commercial cement available nationwide involving solid timely analysis in order to identify which phases are responsible for confinement of radionuclides, if considered the most reactive phase -CSH- or called secondary phases. In this research the hydration products of cement are presented as well as its importance in the nuclear industry. The analysis and observation of the cement clinker and the hydration products on the manufactured pulps with two commercial cements resistant to sulphates was realized using the observation technique of solid X-ray diffraction and nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Fluorescence. The results show the presence of calcium silicate hydrates in the amorphous phase and the presence of ettringite crystals and portlandite sheets is appreciated. The abundant iron phase called tetra calcium ferro aluminate has been identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (Author)

  13. Potential Use Of Carbide Lime Waste As An Alternative Material To Conventional Hydrated Lime Of Cement-Lime Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khaja, Waheeb A.

    1992-01-01

    The present study aimed at the possibility of using the carbide lime waste as an alternative material to the conventional lime used for cement-lime mortar. The waste is a by-product obtained in the generation of acetylene from calcium carbide. Physical and chemical properties of the wastes were studied. Two cement-lime-sand mix proportions containing carbide lime waste were compared with the same mix proportions containing conventional lime along with a control mix without lime. Specimens wer...

  14. Mechanistic study and modeling of radionuclides retention by the hydrated calcium silicates (HCS) of cements; Etude mecanistique et modelisation de la retention de radionucleides par les silicates de calcium hydrates (CSH) des ciments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointeau, I

    2000-09-01

    This work attempts to investigate the modelling of radioisotopes (Cs{sup +}, Pb{sup 2+}, Eu{sup 3+}) immobilization in cement matrix, in the frame of the design of engineered barrier of a deep radwaste repository. The model development concept consists of three major steps: - surface chemistry modelling of the calcium silicate hydrate CSH, used to simulate hydrated cement behaviour; - solid analysis of the batch sorption experiments: identification of the uptake mechanism; - both previous steps are used, with isotherm data, in the modelling of the radioisotopes immobilization in the CSH matrix. Final results: (all modelling are available for all the range of studied Ca/Si ratios and have been validated with predictive calculations). - A thermodynamic modelling of the CSH surface chemistry has been developed. The labile calcium and proton sorption constants on silanol sites (>SiOH) have been extracted. - Cs{sup +} is sorbed on two sites. The silanol site (weak site) has a high site density (10 sites.nm{sup -2}), which accounts for the CSH unsaturation in high [CS{sup +}]. A strong site is also identified. - Pb{sup 2+} immobilization in CSH matrix is modelled with surface equilibria and solubility equilibrium. - Eu{sup 3+} fixation has been investigated with solid analysis: Site-Selective anti Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy, XPS and SEM-EDS. Eu{sup 3+} thus does not precipitate in CSH water but is sorbed on the CSH surface (high hydroxylated environment). Europium is also (minority site) inserted in the CSH framework. (author)

  15. Sorption kinetics of superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) in fresh Portland cement-based pastes visualized and quantified by neutron radiography and correlated to the progress of cement hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroefl, Christof, E-mail: christof.schroefl@tu-dresden.de [Technische Universität Dresden, Fakultät Bauingenieurwesen, Institut für Baustoffe, DE-01062 Dresden (Germany); Mechtcherine, Viktor [Technische Universität Dresden, Fakultät Bauingenieurwesen, Institut für Baustoffe, DE-01062 Dresden (Germany); Vontobel, Peter; Hovind, Jan; Lehmann, Eberhard [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, CH-5232 Villigen/AG (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    Water sorption of two superabsorbent polymers in cement-based pastes has been characterized by neutron radiography. Cement pastes with W/C of 0.25 and 0.50 and one additionally containing silica fume (W/C = 0.42) were investigated. The SAPs differed in their inherent sorption kinetics in extracted cement pore solution (SAP 1: self-releasing; SAP 2: retentive). Desorption from SAP 1 started very early after paste preparation. Hence, its individual non-retentiveness governs its behavior only. SAP 2 released water into all matrices, but its kinetics were different. In the paste with the highest W/C, some moderate water release was recorded from the beginning. In the other two pastes, SAP 2 retained its stored liquid during the dormant period, i.e., up to the percolation threshold. Intense desorption then set in and continued throughout the acceleration period. These findings explain the pronouncedly higher efficiency of SAP 2 as internal curing admixture as compared to SAP 1.

  16. Sorption kinetics of superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) in fresh Portland cement-based pastes visualized and quantified by neutron radiography and correlated to the progress of cement hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroefl, Christof; Mechtcherine, Viktor; Vontobel, Peter; Hovind, Jan; Lehmann, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Water sorption of two superabsorbent polymers in cement-based pastes has been characterized by neutron radiography. Cement pastes with W/C of 0.25 and 0.50 and one additionally containing silica fume (W/C = 0.42) were investigated. The SAPs differed in their inherent sorption kinetics in extracted cement pore solution (SAP 1: self-releasing; SAP 2: retentive). Desorption from SAP 1 started very early after paste preparation. Hence, its individual non-retentiveness governs its behavior only. SAP 2 released water into all matrices, but its kinetics were different. In the paste with the highest W/C, some moderate water release was recorded from the beginning. In the other two pastes, SAP 2 retained its stored liquid during the dormant period, i.e., up to the percolation threshold. Intense desorption then set in and continued throughout the acceleration period. These findings explain the pronouncedly higher efficiency of SAP 2 as internal curing admixture as compared to SAP 1

  17. Study of the action of phosphate ions contained in the mixing water on the hydration of a Portland cement; Etude de l'action des phosphates presents dans l'eau de gachage sur l'hydratation d'un ciment Portland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benard, Ph

    2005-12-15

    Cementation is considered as the most attractive solution for the conditioning of low and intermediate radioactive wastes. The species contained in these wastes can strongly influence the reactivity of the cement pastes, it is in particular the case of the ortho-phosphate ions which are found in the evaporation concentrates. The aim of our work was to determine the influence of these ions on the hydration and the rheological properties of the cement pastes at early age as well as the mechanical and physical properties on the hardened material. (author)

  18. Superplasticizer function and sorption in high performance cement based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.N.; Roe, L.H.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes laboratory studies undertaken to determine interactions between the main components of high-performance cement-based grout. These interactions were studied with the grouts in both their unset and hardened states with the specific intention of determining the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer; the phase of residence of the superplasticizer in hardened materials; and the permanence of the superplasticizer in hardened grouts. In unset pastes attempts were made to extract superplasticizer by mechanical processes. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was leached from the grouts. A microautoradiographic method was developed to investigate the phases of residence of superplasticizer in hardened grouts and confirm the inferences from the leaching studies. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was located on the hydrated phases formed during the early stages of cement hydration. These include tricalcium aluminate hydrates and tricalcium silicate phases. There is some tendency for the superplasticizer to sorb on ettringite. The presence of superplasticizer did not coincide with the locations of unreacted silica fume and high silica content phases such as C 2 S-H. The observations explain the findings of the studies of unset pastes which also showed that the sorption of superplasticizer is likely to be enhanced with increased mixing water content and, hence, distribution in and exposure to the hydration reaction surfaces in the grout. Superplasticizer can be leached in very small quantities from the hardened grouts. Rapid release takes place from the unsorbed superplasticizer contained in the accessible pore space. Subsequent release likely occurs with dissolution of the cement phases and the exposure of isolated pores to groundwater. (au) (37 refs.)

  19. On the Relation of Setting and Early-Age Strength Development to Porosity and Hydration in Cement-Based Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lootens, Didier; Bentz, Dale P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a linear relationship between compressive strength (mortar cubes and concrete cylinders) and cumulative heat release normalized per unit volume of (mixing) water for a wide variety of cement-based mixtures at ages of 1 d and beyond. This paper utilizes concurrent ultrasonic reflection and calorimetry measurements to further explore this relationship from the time of specimen casting to 3 d. The ultrasonic measurements permit a continuous evaluation of thicke...

  20. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    losses) during wet/dry cycling. SCMs have been found to be effective in mitigating composite degradation through several processes, including a reduction in the calcium hydroxide content, stabilization of monosulfate by maintaining pore solution pH, and a decrease in ettringite reprecipitation accomplished by increased binding of aluminum in calcium aluminate phases and calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase.

  1. Heavy ion beam measurement of the hydration of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, R.A.; Schweitzer, J.S.; Spillane, T.; Zickefoose, J.; Rolfs, C.; Becker, H.-W.; Kubsky, S.; Castellote, M.; Viedma, P.G. de; Cheung, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The setting and development of strength of Portland cement concrete depends upon the reaction of water with various phases in the Portland cement including dicalcium silicate (C 2 S), tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) and tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A). The early age hydration reaction and setting time are determined by surface layers on the cement grains that form a region that is only a few 100 nm thick. This has been difficult to observe with conventional methods. Ion beam techniques have been used to investigate these layers in detail at the Tandem Accelerator facility of the University of the Ruhr in Bochum, Germany. The primary method has been Nuclear Resonance Reaction Analysis (NRRA) involving the 1 H( 15 N,αγ) 12 C reaction to measure the hydrogen depth profile. This technique has an H detection sensitivity of about 10 ppm and an H-depth resolution of a few nm at the surface.. Freshly cleaved mica is used as a calibration standard for conversion of gamma-ray counts to H concentration. The beam energy to depth conversion factor is obtained by numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo code TRIM. NRRA with the 1 H( 19 F, αγ) 16 O reaction has also been used to measure the hydrogen depth profile. Some samples were implanted with a 131 Xe layer in order to measure the depth profile of other significant elements such as calcium with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), and also to measure the erosion of the surface layers

  2. A new quantification method based on SEM-EDS to assess fly ash composition and study the reaction of its individual components in hydrating cement paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durdziński, Paweł T., E-mail: pawel.durdzinski@gmail.com [Laboratory of Construction Materials, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dunant, Cyrille F. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Haha, Mohsen Ben [HeidelbergCement Technology Center GmbH (HeidelbergCement AG), Rohrbacher Str. 95, 69181 Leimen (Germany); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Calcareous fly ashes are high-potential reactive residues for blended cements, but their qualification and use in concrete are hindered by heterogeneity and variability. Current characterization often fails to identify the dominant, most reactive, amorphous fraction of the ashes. We developed an approach to characterize ashes using electron microscopy. EDS element composition of millions of points is plotted in a ternary frequency plot. A visual analysis reveals number and ranges of chemical composition of populations: silicate, calcium-silicate, aluminosilicate, and calcium-rich aluminosilicate. We quantified these populations in four ashes and followed their hydration in two Portland-ash systems. One ash reacted at a moderate rate: it was composed of 70 vol.% of aluminosilicates and calcium-silicates and reached 60% reaction at 90 days. The other reacted faster, reaching 60% at 28 days due to 55 vol.% of calcium-rich aluminosilicates, but further reaction was slower and 15 vol.% of phases, the silica-rich ones, did not react.

  3. A new quantification method based on SEM-EDS to assess fly ash composition and study the reaction of its individual components in hydrating cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdziński, Paweł T.; Dunant, Cyrille F.; Haha, Mohsen Ben; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Calcareous fly ashes are high-potential reactive residues for blended cements, but their qualification and use in concrete are hindered by heterogeneity and variability. Current characterization often fails to identify the dominant, most reactive, amorphous fraction of the ashes. We developed an approach to characterize ashes using electron microscopy. EDS element composition of millions of points is plotted in a ternary frequency plot. A visual analysis reveals number and ranges of chemical composition of populations: silicate, calcium-silicate, aluminosilicate, and calcium-rich aluminosilicate. We quantified these populations in four ashes and followed their hydration in two Portland-ash systems. One ash reacted at a moderate rate: it was composed of 70 vol.% of aluminosilicates and calcium-silicates and reached 60% reaction at 90 days. The other reacted faster, reaching 60% at 28 days due to 55 vol.% of calcium-rich aluminosilicates, but further reaction was slower and 15 vol.% of phases, the silica-rich ones, did not react

  4. Mineralogy and microstructure of two Mexican Portland cements for the confinement of radioactive waste; Mineralogia y microestructura de dos cementos mexicanos Portland para el confinamiento de desechos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Campus El Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca Km. 15.5, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Badillo A, V. E.; Ramirez S, J. R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Nava E, N., E-mail: nasiega_181@hotmail.com [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The cementitious materials are involved in the different stages of radioactive waste management because they are used for the waste immobilization in the container, as well as filling in the spaces between containers vaults and also as engineering barrier and construction material in civil construction site. Therefore, is necessary to have a study of commercial cement available nationwide involving solid timely analysis in order to identify which phases are responsible for confinement of radionuclides, if considered the most reactive phase -CSH- or called secondary phases. In this research the hydration products of cement are presented as well as its importance in the nuclear industry. The analysis and observation of the cement clinker and the hydration products on the manufactured pulps with two commercial cements resistant to sulphates was realized using the observation technique of solid X-ray diffraction and nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Fluorescence. The results show the presence of calcium silicate hydrates in the amorphous phase and the presence of ettringite crystals and portlandite sheets is appreciated. The abundant iron phase called tetra calcium ferro aluminate has been identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (Author)

  5. Effect of the cement type on compatibility with carboxylate super plasticisers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundyra-Oracz, G.; Kurdowski, W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical study was conducted to gain a fuller understanding of the interactions taking place in cement superplasticiser systems. To this end, two clinkers of clinkers of known chemical and phase composition were prepared in this study to gain insight into such interactions. One contained no tricalcium aluminate (C1), while the other had a 9% C 3 A content (C2). These clinkers were ground to approximately 340 m 2 /kg and blended with gypsum only or gypsum and Klein compound (3CaOx3Al 2 O 3 xCaSO 4 ) (1, 2). Sufficient compound was added to C1 to ensure the formation of about the same amount of ettringite after 0.5 and 1 h of hydration as found in cement C2 + gypsum. The admixture used was a carboxylate superplasticiser. Rheology measurements showed that while paste yield stress was correlated to ettringite formation, no such simple relationship was observed for plastic viscosity. Plastic viscosity depended on the total hydrates formed, i.e., not only as ettringite but also as C-S-H gel. The findings revealed that in clinkers with very low sulfate and potassium contents, the rheology of carboxylate-containing cement paste is primarily controlled by ettringite formation. (Author) 15 refs.

  6. Thermodynamic properties of Portland cement hydrates in the system CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-CaSO4-CaCO3-H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matschei, Thomas; Lothenbach, Barbara; Glasser, Fredrik P.

    2007-01-01

    A database is presented for commonly-encountered cement substances including C-S-H, Ca(OH) 2 , selected AFm, AFt and hydrogarnet compositions as well as solid solutions. The AFm compositions include straetlingite. The data were obtained for the most part from experiment and many of the predicted reactions were confirmed by focussed experiments. The temperature-dependence of the thermodynamic data for the above phases, determined partly from experiment and partly from thermodynamic estimations, are also tabulated in the range 1 deg. C to 99 deg. C. Relative to previous databases, sulfate AFm is shown to have a definite range of stability range at 25 deg. C thus removing long-standing doubts about its stability in normal hydrated cement pastes. Carbonate is shown to interact strongly with stabilisation of AFm across a broad range of temperatures and, at low temperatures, to substitute into AFt. The new database enables the ultimate hydrate mineralogy to be calculated from chemistry: most solid assemblages, the persistence of C-S-H apart, correspond closely to equilibrium. This realisation means that hydrate assemblages can be controlled. The development of a thermodynamic approach also enables a fresh look at how mineralogical changes occur in response to environmentally-conditioned reactions; several papers showing applications are cited

  7. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6......Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...

  8. Leach characterization of cement encapsulated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Scheetz, B.E.; Wakeley, L.D.; Barnes, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix encapsulation of defense nuclear waste as well as intermediate-level commercial wastes within a low-temperature cementitious composite were investigated. The cements for this study included both as-received and modified calcium silicate and calcium aluminate cements. Specimens were prepared following conventional formulation techniques designed to produce dense monoliths, followed by curing at 60 0 C. An alternative preparation procedure is contrasted in which the specimens were ''warm'' pressed in a uniaxial press at 150 0 C at 50,000 psi for 0.5 h. Specimens of the waste/cement composites were leached in deionized water following three different procedures which span a wide range of temperatures and solution saturation conditions. Aluminate and compositionally adjusted silicate cements exhibited a better retentivity for Cs and Sr than did the as-received silicate cement. 15 refs

  9. Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchheim, A. P.

    2011-02-21

    This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C3A or 3CaO·Al2O 3) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C3A or Na2Ca8Al6O18), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C3A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C3A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C3A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C3A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Calcium aluminates potential for endodontics and orthopedics applications; Aluminatos de calcio e seu potencial para aplicacao em endodontia e ortopedia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.L. dos; Andrade, T.L.; Oliveira, I.R., E-mail: ivonero@univap.br [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pandolfelli, V.C. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The mostly used material in the areas of endodontics (MTA, mineral trioxide aggregate) and bone reconstruction (PMMA, polymethyl methacrylate) present some limiting properties requiring thus changes in their compositions as well as the development of alternative materials. In this context, a novel biomaterial-based calcium aluminate cement (CAC) has been studied in order to keep the positive properties and clinical applications of MTA and PMMA, overcoming some their disadvantages. Recent studies involving the use of CAC are based on commercial products consisting of a mixture of phases. Improvements can be attained by searching the synthesis routes of CAC aiming the proper balance between the phases and the control of impurities that may impair its performance in applications in the areas of health. By the optimization of the CAC phases production, this article aims to present their characterization based on hydration temperature; working time and setting time; pH, ions solubilization and dissolution in contact with water and different solutions of simulated body fluid. The results indicated the CA phase as the most suitable for application in the areas of health. (author)

  11. Lithium aluminates and tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Palacios G, O.; Bosch G, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this work it is studied the crystalline structure of lithium aluminates prepared by three different methods, namely: solid state reaction, humid reaction and sol-gel reaction. The analysis methods are the X-ray diffractometry and the scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This study is realized as in original materials as in irradiated materials at the TRIGA Mark reactor, to correlate the synthesis method with response of these materials to the mixed irradiation of nuclear reactor. (Author)

  12. Optimization of a Strontium Aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bone, Alexandria N. [Maryville College, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Strontium aluminate with Eu2+ and Dy3+ has been at the forefront of emerging applications for storage phosphors since its discovery in 1996. In this study, the emission intensity and luminescence lifetime of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ were enhanced by partial substitution of Ca2+ into Sr2+ sites in the matrix.

  13. Considerations on the mechanical behavior and hydration process supersulphated cement (CSS) formulated with phosphogypsum; Consideracoes sobre a resistencia mecanica e o processo de hidratacao de cimentos supersulfatados (CSS) formulados com fosfogesso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracioli, Bruna; Varela, Maxwell Vinicius Favero; Beutler, Cheila Sirlene; Frare, Andreza; Luz, Caroline Angulski da; Pereira Filho, Jose Ilo, E-mail: maxwell@alunos.utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: cheila.beutler@gmail.com, E-mail: andreza2694@hotmail.com, E-mail: ilofilho@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: angulski@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Pato Branco, PR (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Supersulfated Cements (SSC) are composed from blast furnace slag (90%), calcium sulfate (10-20%) and a small amount of alkali activator (up 5%). Gypsum is a conventional source of calcium sulfate, however, it can be replaced by phosphogypsum (PG), a byproduct from the production of phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) with similar chemical and mineralogical composition of the gypsum. In Brazil, the production of this material is about 4.5 million tons per year. Because the SSC contains a higher calcium sulfate content (20%) in relation to Portland cement, a higher consumption of phosphogypsum is possible. The goal of this study was to investigate the phosphogypsum (PG) as an alternative source of calcium sulfate in order to obtain CSS. In addition to use of PG, the effects of both calcium sulfate and alkali activator content on the process of hydration were investigated. The results showed that SSC made with phosphogypsum met the minimum compressive strength required by the European standard for SSC (EN 15743/2010). Low heat of hydration rates mainly influenced by the low alkali activator content was observed. The excess of alkali activator (KOH) had different influences according to calcium sulfate content. In pastes made with low content (10%), 0.8% of KOH reduced the compressive strength, while in those with a high calcium sulfate content (20%) the high alkaline content resulted in the instability of ettringite. (author)

  14. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy Study of Cubic and Orthorhombic C3A and Their Hydration Products in the Presence of Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rheinheimer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the microstructural differences and phase characterization of pure phases and hydrated products of the cubic and orthorhombic (Na-doped polymorphs of tricalcium aluminate (C3A, which are commonly found in traditional Portland cements. Pure, anhydrous samples were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and X-ray diffraction (XRD and demonstrated differences in the chemical and mineralogical composition as well as the morphology on a micro/nano-scale. C3A/gypsum blends with mass ratios of 0.2 and 1.9 were hydrated using a water/C3A ratio of 1.2, and the products obtained after three days were assessed using STXM. The hydration process and subsequent formation of calcium sulfate in the C3A/gypsum systems were identified through the changes in the LIII edge fine structure for Calcium. The results also show greater Ca LII binding energies between hydrated samples with different gypsum contents. Conversely, the hydrated samples from the cubic and orthorhombic C3A at the same amount of gypsum exhibited strong morphological differences but similar chemical environments.

  15. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  16. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  17. Boundary conditions for diffusion in the pack-aluminizing of nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L. L.; Menon, N. B.

    1973-01-01

    The surface compositions of nickel specimens coated for various lengths of time in aluminizing packs at 2000 F were studied, in order to obtain information about the kinetics of the pack-cementation process in the formation of aluminide coatings. The results obtained indicate that the surface compositions of the coated nickel specimens are independent of time, at least for time between 0.5 and 20 hrs. Another important observation is that the specimens gained weight during the coating process.

  18. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  19. Influence of chemical and physical characteristics of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) on their hydration behavior and potential suitability for soil stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peethamparan, Sulapha; Olek, Jan; Lovell, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of CKDs with a given soil depends on the chemical and physical characteristics of the CKDs. Hence, the characterization of CKDs and their hydration products may lead to better understanding of their suitability as soil stabilizers. In the present article, four different CKD powders are characterized and their hydration products are evaluated. A detailed chemical (X-ray diffraction), thermogravimetric and morphological (scanning electron microscope) analyses of both the CKD powders and the hydrated CKD pastes are presented. In general, high free-lime content (∼ 14-29%) CKDs, when reacted with water produced significant amounts of calcium hydroxide, ettringite and syngenite. These CKDs also developed higher unconfined compressive strength and higher temperature of hydration compared to CKDs with lower amounts of free-lime. An attempt was made to qualitatively correlate the performance of CKD pastes with the chemical and physical characteristics of the original CKD powders and to determine their potential suitability as soil stabilizers. To that effect a limited unconfined compressive strength testing of CKD-treated kaolinite clays was performed. The results of this study suggest that both the compressive strength and the temperature of hydration of the CKD paste can give early indications of the suitability of particular CKD for soil stabilization

  20. The effect of chemically adjusting cement compositions on leachabilities of waste ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.W.; Scheetz, B.E.; Roy, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The chemical composition of both portland and aluminate cements was adjusted by adding amorphous silica. In the case of portland cement, the object was to react with excess portlandite and obtain an overall composition compatible with C-S-H gel or C-S-H gel + silica at low temperatures, and to obtain the tobermorite composition in order to be in equilibrium with this phase at temperatures above normal ambient. In the case of aluminate cement, the object was to be in equilibrium with more silica-rich phases. These silica-adjusted cements were used to make composites with nuclear waste forms. Leach tests showed that the silica-adjusted composites were chemically more stable than those made with as-received cement. Leach rates were lower in the case of the adjusted cements for Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Gd, Al, and Si. Only Na in the case of both portland and aluminate cements, and Mg and U in the case of aluminate cements, had greater leach rates in adjusted cements. Adjusting the composition of cements with silica is concluded to be beneficial when making composites to encapsulate nuclear waste forms

  1. Effect of the cement type on compatibility with carboxylate super plasticisers; Influencia de la naturaleza del cemento en la compatibilidad con aditivos superplastificantes basados en carboxilatos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundyra-Oracz, G.; Kurdowski, W.

    2011-07-01

    An empirical study was conducted to gain a fuller understanding of the interactions taking place in cement superplasticiser systems. To this end, two clinkers of clinkers of known chemical and phase composition were prepared in this study to gain insight into such interactions. One contained no tricalcium aluminate (C1), while the other had a 9% C{sub 3}A content (C2). These clinkers were ground to approximately 340 m{sup 2}/kg and blended with gypsum only or gypsum and Klein compound (3CaO{center_dot}3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaSO{sub 4}) (1, 2). Sufficient compound was added to C1 to ensure the formation of about the same amount of ettringite after 0.5 and 1 h of hydration as found in cement C2 + gypsum. The admixture used was a carboxylate superplasticiser. Rheology measurements showed that while paste yield stress was correlated to ettringite formation, no such simple relationship was observed for plastic viscosity. Plastic viscosity depended on the total hydrates formed, i.e., not only as ettringite but also as C-S-H gel. The findings revealed that in clinkers with very low sulfate and potassium contents, the rheology of carboxylate-containing cement paste is primarily controlled by ettringite formation. (Author) 15 refs.

  2. Hydration of tricalcium aluminate in the presence of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triviño Vázquez, F.

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Not availabePara el estudio del comportamiento del cemento Portland tiene una importancia fundamental el conocimiento de la hidratación del aluminato tricálcico, por ser uno de sus componentes que primero se hidrata y porque se le achacan la mayoría de los defectos que sufre la pasta de cemento; tales son: retracciones, contracciones, fenómenos exotérmicos y sensibilidad a agentes exteriores de tipo químico. En lo que sigue se estudia por métodos fisicoquímicos la hidratación del aluminato tricálcico junto con el yeso, ya que éste se emplea como regulador del fraguado en los cementos Portland.

  3. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    and. P G PAL. Department of Ceramic Technology, Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, ... in both the forms affects the densification process. Along ..... Education Quality Improvement Program (TEQIP) Fund of Govt.

  4. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, J.E.; Husson, B.; Sarramone, N.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the processes applied to MSWI fly ash with a view to reusing it safely in cement-based materials. Part 1 presents two stabilization processes and Part 2 deals with the use of the two treated fly ashes (TFA) in mortars. Two types of binder were used: an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) containing more than 95% clinker (CEM I 52.5R) and a binary blend cement composed of 70% ground granulated blast furnace slag and 30% clinker (CEM III-B 42.5N). In this first part, two stabilization processes are presented: the conventional process, called 'A', based on the washing, phosphation and calcination of the ash, and a modified process, called 'B', intended to eliminate metallic aluminum and sulfate contained in the ash. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the two TFA were comparable. The main differences observed were those expected, i.e. TFA-B was free of metallic aluminum and sulfate. The mineralogical characterization of the two TFAs highlighted the presence of large amounts of a calcium aluminosilicate phase taking two forms, a crystalline form (gehlenite) and an amorphous form. Hydration studies on pastes containing mixed TFA and calcium hydroxide showed that this phase reacted with calcium hydroxide to form calcium aluminate hydrates. This formation of hydrates was accompanied by a hardening of the pastes. These results are very encouraging for the reuse of such TFA in cement-based materials because they can be considered as pozzolanic additions and could advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based materials. Finally, leaching tests were carried out to evaluate the environmental impact of the two TFAs. The elements which were less efficiently stabilized by process A were zinc, cadmium and antimony but, when the results of the leaching tests were compared with the thresholds of the European landfill directive, TFA-A could nevertheless be accepted at landfills for non

  5. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, J.E. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions (L.M.D.C.), INSA-UPS, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)]. E-mail: aubert@insa-toulouse.fr; Husson, B. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions (L.M.D.C.), INSA-UPS, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Sarramone, N. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions (L.M.D.C.), INSA-UPS, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2006-08-25

    This paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the processes applied to MSWI fly ash with a view to reusing it safely in cement-based materials. Part 1 presents two stabilization processes and Part 2 deals with the use of the two treated fly ashes (TFA) in mortars. Two types of binder were used: an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) containing more than 95% clinker (CEM I 52.5R) and a binary blend cement composed of 70% ground granulated blast furnace slag and 30% clinker (CEM III-B 42.5N). In this first part, two stabilization processes are presented: the conventional process, called 'A', based on the washing, phosphation and calcination of the ash, and a modified process, called 'B', intended to eliminate metallic aluminum and sulfate contained in the ash. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the two TFA were comparable. The main differences observed were those expected, i.e. TFA-B was free of metallic aluminum and sulfate. The mineralogical characterization of the two TFAs highlighted the presence of large amounts of a calcium aluminosilicate phase taking two forms, a crystalline form (gehlenite) and an amorphous form. Hydration studies on pastes containing mixed TFA and calcium hydroxide showed that this phase reacted with calcium hydroxide to form calcium aluminate hydrates. This formation of hydrates was accompanied by a hardening of the pastes. These results are very encouraging for the reuse of such TFA in cement-based materials because they can be considered as pozzolanic additions and could advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based materials. Finally, leaching tests were carried out to evaluate the environmental impact of the two TFAs. The elements which were less efficiently stabilized by process A were zinc, cadmium and antimony but, when the results of the leaching tests were compared with the thresholds of the European landfill directive, TFA-A could nevertheless be accepted at

  6. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  7. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr_3Al_2O_6 and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  8. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  9. Hydration kinetics study of class G oil-well cement and olivine nano-silica mixtures at 20–60 °C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quercia Bianchi, G.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Sobolev, K.; Shah, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the heat evolution of standard density slurries (1.89 g/cm3) of Class G oil-well cement and olivine nano-silica additions (0.5–2.0 % bwoc), cured under different temperatures (20–60 °C) and atmospheric pressure, were examined by isothermal calorimetry. Under isothermal and isobaric

  10. Characterization of cement-stabilized Cd wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Diez, J.; Madrid, J.; Macias, A.

    1996-01-01

    Portland cement affords both physical and chemical immobilization of cadmium. The immobilization has been studied analyzing the pore fluid of cement samples and characterizing the solid pastes by X-ray diffraction. The influence of cadmium on the cement hydration and on its mechanical properties has been also studied by isothermal conduction calorimetry and by the measure of strength and setting development. Finally, the effect of cement carbonation on the immobilization of cadmium has been analyzed

  11. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe : [Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  12. Corrosion of Spiral Rib Aluminized Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Large diameter, corrugated steel pipes are a common sight in the culverts that run alongside many Florida roads. Spiral-ribbed aluminized pipe (SRAP) has been widely specified by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for runoff drainage. Th...

  13. Method of producing spherical lithium aluminate particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Medico, R.R.; Baugh, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Spherical particles of lithium aluminate are formed by initially producing aluminium hydroxide spheroids, and immersing the spheroids in a lithium ion-containing solution to infuse lithium ions into the spheroids. The lithium-infused spheroids are rinsed to remove excess lithium ion from the surface, and the rinsed spheroids are soaked for a period of time in a liquid medium, dried and sintered to form lithium aluminate spherical particles. (author)

  14. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  15. Interaction of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement, with alkaline chlorides, analogy with clays; Interaction des silicates de calcium hydrates, principaux constituants du ciment, avec les chlorures d'alcalins. Analogie avec les argiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viallis-Terrisse, H

    2000-10-06

    This work, belonging to a more general study on the structure and reactivity of cement, deals with the experimental and theoretical analysis of the interaction of alkaline chlorides with calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement paste. The interaction of alkaline cations with C-S-H is interfacial, involving both electrostatic and surface complexation mechanisms. The C-S-H surface is constituted of silanol sites, partially dissociated due to the high pH of the interstitial solution. The calcium ions, present in large amounts in the equilibrium solution of C-S-H, constitute potential determining ions for the C-S-H surface. The alkaline ions seem to compete with calcium for the same surface sites. The adsorption isotherms show that caesium presents a better affinity than sodium and lithium for the C-S-H surface. Moreover, solid-state NMR suggests that caesium forms with the surface sites inner-sphere complexes, whereas sodium seems to keep its hydration sphere. These results are in agreement with zeta potential measurements, which let suppose a specific adsorption of caesium ions, and an indifferent behaviour of both other alkaline ions. A model for the C-S-H surface was proposed, from the electric double layer model, and mass action laws expressing the complexation of the different ionic species with the silanol sites. The whole study relies on a structural analogy with smectites, some clays presenting well-known cationic adsorption properties. The structural similarity between both minerals is enhanced by some similarities of reactivity, though significant behaviour differences could also be noted. (author)

  16. Influence of the mineralogical composition of cement in the diffusion of chemical species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, E.

    2015-01-01

    The disposal is the final stage of radioactive waste management. This is essentially placing them in a facility with a reasonable assurance of safety. In this last stage, the ultimate goal is the confinement and isolation of radioactive waste from the human environment for a time period and under conditions such that the release of radionuclides not put in radiation risk to people and the environment. In relation to the storage of radioactive waste of low and medium activity, the final repositories for radioactive waste, based in cement materials are already operating in many countries. The isolation is performed by applying natural or artificial barriers between radioactive waste and man so as to prevent the release of radionuclides to the environment, until they have decreased their toxicity. The cement-based materials are involved in the different stages of the radioactive waste management since they are used for immobilization of waste in the container, container manufacturing and filling the spaces between the containers and vaults container and also as a barrier engineering and construction material in civil engineering. The concrete (cement mix + water + sand + gravel) it is one of the materials used to produce the engineered barrier system and produce containers for radioactive waste. In addition to their mechanical properties (product processing into hydraulic binder after being hydrated), their composition and solubility allow cushion the contact groundwater to ph higher (12.0 - 13.5) during considerable time scales (10 14 - 10 15 years) and it has an active role with the radionuclides confinement present in the radiological inventory of radioactive waste. The study of the microstructures of cement is a constant challenge for specialists working in this area, mainly due to the complex and heterogeneous mineralogical composition. Cement consists of many different phases in order to achieve specific properties such as reactivity properties, setting time

  17. Effects of cement organic additives on the adsorption of uranyl ions on calcium silicate hydrate phases: experimental determination and computational molecular modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androniuk, Iuliia

    2017-01-01

    Cementitious materials are extensively used in the design and construction of radioactive waste repositories. One of the ways to enhance their performance is to introduce organic admixtures into the cement structure. However, the presence of organics in the pore water may affect the radionuclide mobility: organic molecules can form water-soluble complexes and compete for sorption sites. This work was designed to get detailed understanding of the mechanisms of such interactions on the molecular level. The model system has three components. First, pure C-S-H phases with different Ca/Si ratios were chosen as a cement model. Secondly, gluconate (a simple well-described molecule) is selected as a good starting organic additive model to probe the interaction mechanisms on the molecular scale. A more complex system involving poly-carboxylate super-plasticizer (PCE) was also tested. The third, U(VI), is a representative of the actinide radionuclide series. The development of description of the effects of organics for radioactive waste disposal applications was the primary objective of this work. The study of binary systems provides reference data for the investigation of more complex ternary (C-S-H/organic/U(VI)). The interactions are studied by means of both experimental and computational molecular modelling techniques. Data on sorption and desorption kinetics and isotherms for additives and for U(VI) on C-S-H are acquired in this work. In parallel, atomistic models are developed for the interfaces of interest. Structural, energetic, and dynamic aspects of the sorption processes on surface of cement are quantitatively modeled by molecular dynamics technique. (author)

  18. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  19. Impacts of Hydrate Distribution on the Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Seol, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In general, hydrate makes the sediments hydraulically less conductive, thermally more conductive, and mechanically stronger; yet the dependency of these physical properties on hydrate saturation varies with hydrate distribution and morphology. Hydrate distribution in sediments may cause the bulk physical properties of their host sediments varying several orders of magnitude even with the same amount of hydrate. In natural sediments, hydrate morphology is inherently governed by the burial depth and the grain size of the host sediments. Compare with patchy hydrate, uniformly distributed hydrate is more destructive to fluid flow, yet leads to higher gas and water permeability during hydrate dissociation due to the easiness of forming percolation paths. Water and hydrate have similar thermal conductivity values; the bulk thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments depends critically on gas-phase saturation. 60% of gas saturation may result in evident thermal conductivity drop and hinder further gas production. Sediments with patchy hydrate yield lower stiffness than that with cementing hydrate but higher stiffness than that with pore filling and loading bearing hydrate. Besides hydrate distribution, the stress state and loading history also play an important role in the mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments.

  20. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the early hydration of α-tricalcium phosphate/tricalcium silicate composite bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morejon-Alonso, Loreley; Correa, Jose Raul, E-mail: lmorejon@fq.uh.cu [Departamento de Quimica General, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Habana, UH (Cuba); Motisuke, Mariana [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Carrodeguas, Raul Garcia [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Laboratorio de Avaliacao e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais do Nordeste; Santos, Luis Alberto dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Materiais

    2015-01-15

    Bioactivity, osteogenicity and mechanical properties of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) based phosphates cements can be improved by adding tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S); however, the addition of C{sub 3}S delays the precipitation and growth of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). Thus, the aim of this work was the study of in situ setting reaction of α-TCP/C{sub 3}S composite bone cement under high energy X-ray generated by a synchrotron source within the first 72h. The results showed that the addition of C{sub 3}S induces the precipitation of nanosized CDHA at early times depending on the added content. Calculated crystallite sizes showed that the higher the content of C{sub 3}S, the smaller the crystal size at the beginning of the precipitation. These results are different from those obtained by conventional XRD method, suggesting that the proposed technique is a powerful tool in determining the composition and extent of reaction of CPCs surfaces in real time. (author)

  1. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Chae, Sejung R.

    2013-05-22

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three dimensions revealing volumetric details. Scanning transmission X-ray microscope combines high spatial resolution imaging with high spectral resolution of the incident beam to reveal X-ray absorption near edge structure variations in the material nanostructure. Microdiffraction scans the surface of a sample to map its high order reflection or crystallographic variations with a micron-sized incident beam. High pressure X-ray diffraction measures compressibility of pure phase materials. Unique results of studies using the above tools are discussed-a study of pores, connectivity, and morphology of a 2,000 year old concrete using nanotomography; detection of localized and varying silicate chain depolymerization in Al-substituted tobermorite, and quantification of monosulfate distribution in tricalcium aluminate hydration using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy; detection and mapping of hydration products in high volume fly ash paste using microdiffraction; and determination of mechanical properties of various AFm phases using high pressure X-ray diffraction. © 2013 The Author(s).

  2. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  3. Hydration modeling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Al-Mattarneh, Hashem; Mustapha, Kamal N.; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in the last ten years [1,2]. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the

  4. Mise en valeur de l'andalousite dans des betons a haute teneur en alumine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebouillat, Lionel

    alumina with silicon carbide, with and without calcium aluminate cement. For a weight amount of 0% or 4% of ultrafine andalusite, with a 25wt% of coarse andalusite grains base, the theoretical mullitization potential is very nearly reached. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  6. Characterization and quantitative determination of calcium aluminate clinker phases through reflected light microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano Junior, E.; Cunha Munhoz, F.A. da; Splettstoser Junior, J.; Placido, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    The identification and quantitative determination of phases in calcium aluminate clinker is of great importance to the producer, as it enables a better understanding of the cement and concrete properties, specially those concerning setting time and compressive strenght. Polished sections of three electrofused clinkers, one experimental and two industrial, were used to select the most suitable etchings in order to identify by microscopy the main phases (Ca, CA 2 , C 2 AS, C 12 A 7 , α-Al 2 O 3 ). Quantitative phases determinations by reflected light microscopy showed good results when compared to X-ray diffractometry measurements [pt

  7. Analysis of CCRL proficiency cements 151 and 152 using the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullard, Jeffrey W.; Stutzman, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    To test the ability of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software to predict cement hydration properties, characterization of mineralogy and phase distribution is necessary. Compositional and textural characteristics of Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) cements 151 and 152 were determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis followed by computer modeling of hydration properties. The general procedure to evaluate a cement is as follows: (1) two-dimensional SEM backscattered electron and X-ray microanalysis images of the cement are obtained, along with a measured particle size distribution (PSD); (2) based on analysis of these images and the measured PSD, three-dimensional microstructures of various water-to-cement ratios are created and hydrated using VCCTL, and (3) the model predictions for degree of hydration under saturated conditions, heat of hydration (ASTM C186), setting time (ASTM C191), and strength development of mortar cubes (ASTM C109) are compared to experimental measurements either performed at NIST or at the participating CCRL proficiency sample evaluation laboratories. For both cements, generally good agreement is observed between the model predictions and the experimental data

  8. Thermodynamic and structural characteristics of cement minerals at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Meike, A.; Viani, B.E.; Martin, S.; Phillips, B.L.

    1994-05-01

    We have instituted an experimental and including program designed to elucidate the structural and thermodynamic response of cement minerals to elevated temperature. Components of the program involve: (a) synthesis of hydrated Ca-silicates; (b) structural analysis of cement phases induced by heating and dehydration/rehydration; (c) mechanistic and thermodynamic descriptions of the hydration/dehydration behavior of hydrated Ca-silicates as a function of temperature, pressure and relative humidity; (d) study of naturally occurring hydrated Ca-silicates; and (e) measurements of thermodynamic data for hydrated Ca-silicates

  9. Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computation of X-ray powder diffractograms of cement components and its application to phase analysis and hydration performance of OPC cement. Rohan Jadhav N C Debnath. Volume 34 Issue 5 August 2011 pp 1137- ... Keywords. Portland cement; X-ray diffraction; crystal structure; characterization; Rietveld method.

  10. Possibilities of special cements in ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capmas, A.; Bier, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    About 25 years ago, the only way to have confinement material for high temperature applications was to prepare a ceramic by sintering or fusion at high temperature. A new technology came, with the production of Low Cement Castables. This new product was obtained by a careful choice of the granulometry of the aggregates, an optimization of the defloculation of fine particles, including the cement (Calcium Aluminate Cement) and the addition of silica fume. Silica fume brought two improvements: a) a fluidifying effect, due partly to the low sensitivity of viscosity to pH, and partly to the geometric effect of the nicely spherical particle, b) a chemical effect, brought by the reaction of silica and Calcium Aluminate Cement to give a coherent zeolithic structure, through which water could escape during the first firing. From a ceramist point of view, it is interesting to understand how this components, nearly colloidal system mixed in water can be heated up to ceramization without any noticeable change in mechanical characteristics and shrinkage. From a more practical point of view, it is also interesting to realize that some characteristics, usually attributed only to ceramics, also apply with low cement castables technology: high compressive strength, flexural strength, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, impact resistance. (orig.)

  11. Cermet cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  12. The effects of large scale processing on caesium leaching from cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.; Brown, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of large scale processing on the properties of cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste have been investigated. Leach tests have been performed on full-size drums, cores and laboratory samples of cement formulations containing Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement (SRPC) and a blended cement (90% ground granulated blast furnace slag/10% OPC). In addition, development of the cement hydration exotherms with time and the temperature distribution in 220 dm 3 samples have been followed. (author)

  13. Differential thermal, Thermogravimetric and X-ray diffraction investigation of hydration phases in cementitious waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.Y.; Nagy, M.E.; El-Sourougy, M.R.; Zaki, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Hydration phases of cement determine the final properties of the product. Adding other components to the cement paste may alter the final phases formed and affect properties of the hardened products. In this work ordinary portland cement and/or blast furnace slag cement were hardened with low-or intermediate-level radioactive liquid wastes and different additives. Hydration phases were investigated using differential thermal, thermogravimetric, and X-ray diffraction techniques. Low-and intermediate-level liquid wastes were found not to affect the hydration phases of cement. The addition of inorganic exchangers and latex were found to affect the hydration properties of the cement waste system. This resulted in a reduction of compressive strength. On the contrary, addition of epoxy also affected the hydration causing increase in compressive strength. 10 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Microstructure of natural hydrate host sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Kerkar, P.B.; Mahajan, D.; Lindquist, W.B.; Feng, H.

    2007-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in the study of natural gas hydrate because of its potential impact on world energy resources, control on seafloor stability, significance as a drilling hazard and probable impact on climate as a reservoir of a major greenhouse gas. Gas hydrates can (a) be free floating in the sediment matrix (b) contact, but do not cement, existing sediment grains, or (c) actually cement and stiffen the bulk sediment. Seismic surveys, often used to prospect for hydrates over a large area, can provide knowledge of the location of large hydrate concentrations because the hydrates within the sediment pores modify seismic properties. The ability to image a sample at the grain scale and to determine the porosity, permeability and seismic profile is of great interest since these parameters can help in determining the location of hydrates with certainty. We report here on an investigation of the structure of methane hydrate sediments at the grain-size scale using the synchrotron radiation-based computed microtomography (CMT) technique. Work has started on the measurements of the changes occurring as tetrahydrofuran hydrate, a surrogate for methane hydrate, is formed in the sediment

  15. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, D.; McCulloch, C.E.; Angus, M.J.

    1985-06-01

    The kinetics of reaction between cement and clinoptilolite are elucidated and rate equations containing temperature dependent constants derived for this reaction. Variations in clinoptilolite particle size and their consequences to reactivity are assessed. The presence of pozzolanic agents more reactive than clinoptilolite provides sacrificial agents which are partially effective in lowering the clinoptilolite reactivity. Blast furnace slag-cements have been evaluated and the background literature summarized. Experimental studies of the pore fluid in matured slag-cements show that they provide significantly more immobilization for Cs than Portland cement. The distribution of Sr in cemented waste forms has been examined, and it is shown that most of the chemical immobilization potential in the short term is likely to be associated with the aluminate phases. The chemical and structural nature of these are described. Carbonation studies on real cements are summarized. (author)

  16. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, D.; Angus, M.J.; Atkins, M.; Dept. of Chemistry)

    1985-01-01

    A solubility model of the system CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O is developed which takes account of the state of Si polymerization in the solid. Free energies of formations of its bonding hydrogel are tabulated. The internal redox conditions in cements have been measured; in particular, slags lower the Esub(eta) relative to OPC. The fate of Sr and U in cement systems has been determined; Sr is incorporated in the aluminate phases, while U 6+ is precipitated as Ca-U-O-H 2 O phases. Lowering the internal Esub(eta) reduces U solubility. Studies of the carbonation of slag-cement blends are reported. (author)

  17. Hidratação do óxido de magnésio em presença de alumina hidratável Magnesium oxide hydration in presence of hydratable alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Salomão

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminas hidratáveis são compostos obtidos a partir da calcinação incompleta da gibsita Al(OH3, que podem reagir com água e possuem ação ligante em suspensões cerâmicas. A substituição do cimento de aluminato de cálcio pelas aluminas hidratáveis em concretos refratários contendo óxido de magnésio (MgO pode gerar diversos benefícios em relação às propriedades termomecânicas e refratariedade. No entanto, os efeitos da combinação desses materiais e suas conseqüências para a hidratação do MgO ainda não foram investigados sistemicamente. Neste trabalho, quatro fontes de MgO e aluminas hidratáveis foram combinadas em diferentes proporções e hidratados simultaneamente. Após investigações utilizando difração de raios X, termogravimetria e expansão volumétrica aparente, verificou-se que a relação MgO/Al2O3 e as diferenças de reatividade de cada matéria prima podem afetar significativamente o processo de hidratação. Além disso, foi observado que essa combinação pode ser utilizada como uma interessante técnica anti-hidratação para o MgO.The substitution of calcium aluminate cement by hydratable aluminas in MgO-containing refractory castables can afford several benefits for these materials mechanical properties and refractoriness. Nevertheless, the way that hydratable aluminas affects MgO hydration and its consequences were not yet systemically explored. In the present work, four sources of magnesia and alumina were combined at different ratios and hydrated simultaneously. They were investigated by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and apparent volumetric expansion measurements. It was found that the magnesia/alumina ratio and the differences of reactivity of each raw material can greatly affect both hydration processes, generating different hydrated compounds. It was also verified that this combination can be suitably used as powerful MgO anti-hydration technique.

  18. Sulfate resistance of nanosilica contained Portland cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batilov, Iani B.

    Soils, sea water and ground water high in sulfates are commonly encountered hostile environments that can attack the structure of concrete via chemical and physical mechanisms which can lead to costly repairs or replacement. Sulfate attack is a slow acting deteriorative phenomenon that can result in cracking, spalling, expansion, increased permeability, paste-to-aggregate bond loss, paste softening, strength loss, and ultimately, progressive failure of concrete. In the presented research study, Portland cement (PC) mortars containing 1.5% to 6.0% nanosilica (nS) cement replacement by weight were tested for sulfate resistance through full submersion in sodium sulfate to simulate external sulfate attack. Mortars with comparable levels of cement replacement were also prepared with microsilica (mS). Three cement types were chosen to explore nS' effectiveness to reduce sulfate expansion, when paired with cements of varying tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and Blaine fineness, and compare it to that of mS. Mortars were also made with combined cement replacement of equal parts nS and mS to identify if they were mutually compatible and beneficial towards sulfate resistance. Besides sulfate attack expansion of mortar bars, the testing program included investigations into transport and microstructure properties via water absorption, sulfate ion permeability, porosimetry, SEM with EDS, laser diffraction, compressive strength, and heat of hydration. Expansion measurements indicated that mS replacement mortars outperformed both powder form nS, and nS/mS combined replacement mixtures. A negative effect of the dry nS powder replacement attributed to agglomeration of its nanoparticles during mixing negated the expected superior filler, paste densification, and pozzolanic activity of the nanomaterial. Agglomerated nS was identified as the root cause behind poor performance of nS in comparison to mS for all cement types, and the control when paired with a low C3A sulfate resistant

  19. Lithium aluminate spheroids prepared by emulsion procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, A.G.; DiBello, P.M.; Zaleski, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Lithium aluminate powders were prepared by emulsion evaporation method. The procedure involved preparation of water-in-oil emulsion, with the aqueous phase being a solution of Li and Al nitrates. The mixed salts precursor crystallized to gamma-LiAlO 2 at 700C. Single phase LiAlO 2 occurred as μm spherical particles with average crystallite size of 81 angstrom and surface area of 14 M 2 /g. After prolonged heating at 900C, the aluminate powder crystallite size grew by 5 times with a reduction in particle porosity. The emulsion technique promotes close control of particle size and shape of product and the technique facilitates chemical reaction of constituents and sinterability of resulting product

  20. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  1. Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Haecker, C.J.; Jensen, O.M.

    1999-10-01

    The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary porosity percolation, diffusivity, chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, internal relative humidity evolution, and interfacial transition zone microstructure. The effects of flocculation and dispersion of the cement particles in the starting microstructures on resultant properties are also briefly evaluated. The computer simulations are conducted using two cement particle size distributions that bound those commonly in use today and three different water-to-cement ratios: 0.5, 0.3, and 0.246. For lower water-to-cement ratio systems, the use of coarser cements may offer equivalent or superior performance, as well as reducing production costs for the manufacturer.

  2. Low porosity portland cement pastes based on furan polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darweesh, H.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of three different types of Furan polymers on the porosity, mechanical properties, mechanism of hydration and microstructure of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) pastes was investigated. The results showed that mixing the OPC with Furan polymers, the standard water of consistency of the different cement pastes decreases and therefore the setting times (initial and final) are shortened. The total porosity of the hardened cement pastes decreased, while the mechanical properties improved and enhanced at all curing ages of hydration compared with those of the pure OPC pastes. The hydration process with Furan polymers proceeded according to the following decreasing order: F.ac. > F.ph. > F.alc. > OPC

  3. Estimation and measurement of porosity change in cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eunyong; Jung, Haeryong; Kwon, Ki-jung; Kim, Do-Gyeum

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to understand the porosity change of cement pastes. The cement pastes were prepared using commercially available Type-I ordinary Portland cement (OPC). As the cement pastes were exposed in water, the porosity of the cement pastes sharply increased; however, the slow decrease of porosity was observed as the dissolution period was extended more than 50 days. As expected, the dissolution reaction was significantly influenced by w/c ratio and the ionic strength of solution. A thermodynamic model was applied to simulate the porosity change of the cement pastes. It was highly influenced by the depth of the cement pastes. There was porosity increase on the surface of the cement pastes due to dissolution of hydration products, such as portlandite, ettringite, and CSH. However, the decrease of porosity was estimated inside the cement pastes due to the precipitation of cement minerals. (author)

  4. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, S.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of hydrated cement systems are described. The behaviour of slag-based cement is described with a view to predicting their long term pH, Esub(n) and mineralogical balance. Modelling studies which enable the prediction at long ages of cement composites are advanced and a base model of the CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O system presented. The behaviour of U and I in cements is explored. The tolerance of cement systems for a wide range of miscellaneous waste stream components and environmental hazards is described. The redox potential in cements is effectively lowered by irradiation. (author)

  5. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  6. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  7. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.; Gordon, L.E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste

  8. The Mechanism of Disintegration of Cement Concrete at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocius Vytautas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a composite material composed of a binder, aggregates, water and additives. Mixing of cement with water results in a number of chemical reactions known as cement hydration. Heating of concrete results in dehydration processes of cement minerals and new hydration products, which disintegrate the microstructure of concrete. This article reviews results of research conducted with Portland and alumina cement with conventional and refractory concrete aggregates. In civic buildings such common fillers as gravel, granite, dolomite or expanded clay are usually used. It is important to point out the differences between fillers because they constitute the majority of the concrete volume.

  9. Influence of the mineralogical composition of cement in the diffusion of chemical species; Influencia de la composicion mineralogica del cemento en la difusion de especies quimicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, E.

    2015-07-01

    The disposal is the final stage of radioactive waste management. This is essentially placing them in a facility with a reasonable assurance of safety. In this last stage, the ultimate goal is the confinement and isolation of radioactive waste from the human environment for a time period and under conditions such that the release of radionuclides not put in radiation risk to people and the environment. In relation to the storage of radioactive waste of low and medium activity, the final repositories for radioactive waste, based in cement materials are already operating in many countries. The isolation is performed by applying natural or artificial barriers between radioactive waste and man so as to prevent the release of radionuclides to the environment, until they have decreased their toxicity. The cement-based materials are involved in the different stages of the radioactive waste management since they are used for immobilization of waste in the container, container manufacturing and filling the spaces between the containers and vaults container and also as a barrier engineering and construction material in civil engineering. The concrete (cement mix + water + sand + gravel) it is one of the materials used to produce the engineered barrier system and produce containers for radioactive waste. In addition to their mechanical properties (product processing into hydraulic binder after being hydrated), their composition and solubility allow cushion the contact groundwater to ph higher (12.0 - 13.5) during considerable time scales (10{sup 14} - 10{sup 15} years) and it has an active role with the radionuclides confinement present in the radiological inventory of radioactive waste. The study of the microstructures of cement is a constant challenge for specialists working in this area, mainly due to the complex and heterogeneous mineralogical composition. Cement consists of many different phases in order to achieve specific properties such as reactivity properties

  10. THE MECHANISM OF BONDING PARTICLES DISTENSILIMANITA SODIUM ALUMINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the filler (distensillimanit or binder (sodium aluminate after mixing them to form a mold wash, drying the paint and removing water of crystallization. The conclusion of the sodium aluminate suitability as a foundry binder paints.

  11. Characteristics and properties of oil-well cements auditioned with blast furnace slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.; Palacios, M.; Puertas, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper addresses the alkali activation of Portland cements containing blast furnace slag (20 and 30% by cement weight) with a view to the possible use of these materials in oil well construction. The hydration studies conducted showed that in cement/slag blends, the sodium silicate activator partially inhibited the dissolution of the silicate phases in the Portland cement, retarding cement hydration and reducing the precipitation of reaction products. Due to such partial inhibition, the cement/slag blends had significantly lower mechanical strength than Portland cements hydrated with water. 2 9Si and 2 7Al MAS NMR and BSE/EDX studies, in turn, showed that the CSH gel forming in the alkali-activated cement/slag pastes contained Al in tetrahedral positions and low Ca/Si ratios. (Author) 29 refs.

  12. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  13. Thermal analysis of cement pastes with superabsorbent polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Lukosiute, Irena

    2013-01-01

    Thermal analysis of cement systems is very helpful in the understanding of many different properties of cementitious compounds, both for the original reacting compounds, and also for the resulting hydration products. Superabsorbent polymers can be added to cement systems with many different reasons......, so it is relevant that fundamental knowledge of this new compound on the development of hydration is well understood [1-3]. This paper reports research on thermal analysis of cement pastes with superabsorbent polymers. We have studied several parameters: the concentration of SAP in the system......, the effect of particle size distribution, and their influence on the hydration process with focus on cement-silica systems. This is done at different thermodynamic conditions, so the energy of activation in the different systems can be accessed. This paper provides information relevant to hydration modelling...

  14. Freezing temperature protection admixture for Portland cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A number of experimental admixtures were compared to Pozzutec 20 admixture for their ability to protect fresh concrete from freezing and for increasing the rate of cement hydration at below-freezing temperatures. The commercial accelerator and low-te...

  15. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.A.; Glasser, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  16. Prediction of chloride ingress and binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Nielsen, Erik Pram; Herforth, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work on an analytical model for predicting the ingress rate of chlorides in cement-based materials. An integral part of this is a thermodynamic model for predicting the phase equilibria in hydrated Portland cement. The model’s ability to predict chloride binding...... in Portland cement pastes at any content of chloride, alkalis, sulfates and carbonate was verified experimentally and found to be equally valid when applied to other data in the literature. The thermodynamic model for predicting the phase equilibria in hydrated Portland cement was introduced into an existing...... Finite Difference Model for the ingress of chlorides into concrete which takes into account its multi-component nature. The “composite theory” was then used to predict the diffusivity of each ion based on the phase assemblage present in the hydrated Portland cement paste. Agreement was found between...

  17. Portland cement hydration: study of various techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triviño Vázquez, F.

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLa complejidad de la química del cemento es motivo de que aún hoy día permanezcan sin aclarar muchos procesos que transcurren durante el fraguado y posterior endurecimiento de la pasta. La industria de la construcción precisa de un conocimiento técnico más sólido, ya que al saber el modo de actuar de los componentes de la pasta del cemento puede conseguir de este material: facilidad y economía en su empleo, resistencias mecánicas elevadas e inalterabilidad y duración en las obras realizadas. Cualquier nuevo conocimiento sobre la química de la pasta, por ello, suele tener inmediata aplicación o sirve como base para ulteriores investigaciones, que en su día darán nuevas propiedades prácticas al cemento o incluso a otros materiales diferentes. El comportamiento de la pasta durante las primeras 24 horas ha sido el motivo de este estudio. Se efectuaron medidas térmicas, de conductividad, de contenidos de productos solubles en agua, de productos cristalinos y de variaciones de solicitación de agua, por los métodos que veremos a continuación.

  18. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabits, George [Trabits Group, LLC, Wasilla, AK (United States)

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  19. Structure investigations on Portland cement paste by small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragolici, C.A.; Lin, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrated Portland cement is a very complex material. Cement paste consists of many crystalline and non-crystalline phases in various ranges of sizes (μm and nm scale). The crystalline phases are embedded in amorphous phases of hydration products. We investigated the structural changes of hydrating phases in a time interval up to 18 days, at Budapest Neutron Center's SANS spectrometer. The small angle neutron scattering of Portland cements prepared with a various water-to-cement ratios, gave us information about the microstructure changes in the material. Fractals were a suitable way for structure modelling. Some comments regarding the opportunity of using the most common models are pointed out. (authors)

  20. Topics in cement and concrete research

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwers, Jos; Russel, M.I.; Basheer, P.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper addresses several topics in regard to the sustainable design and use of concrete. First, major features concerning the sustainable aspects of the material concrete are summarised. Then the major constituent, from an environmental point of view, cement is discussed in detail, particularly the hydration and application of slag cement. The intelligent combining of mineral oxides, which are found in clinker, slag, fly ashes etc., is designated as mineral oxide engineering. It re...

  1. Influence of carbonation on the acid neutralization capacity of cements and cement-solidified/stabilized electroplating sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quanyuan; Zhang, Lina; Ke, Yujuan; Hills, Colin; Kang, Yanming

    2009-02-01

    Portland cement (PC) and blended cements containing pulverized fuel ash (PFA) or granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) were used to solidify/stabilize an electroplating sludge in this work. The acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of the hydrated pastes increased in the order of PC > PC/GGBS > PC/PFA. The GGBS or PFA replacement (80 wt%) reduced the ANC of the hydrated pastes by 30-50%. The ANC of the blended cement-solidified electroplating sludge (cement/sludge 1:2) was 20-30% higher than that of the hydrated blended cement pastes. Upon carbonation, there was little difference in the ANC of the three cement pastes, but the presence of electroplating sludge (cement/sludge 1:2) increased the ANC by 20%. Blended cements were more effective binders for immobilization of Ni, Cr and Cu, compared with PC, whereas Zn was encapsulated more effectively in the latter. Accelerated carbonation improved the immobilization of Cr, Cu and Zn, but not Ni. The geochemical code PHREEQC, with the edited database from EQ3/6 and HATCHES, was used to calculate the saturation index and solubility of likely heavy metal precipitates in cement-based solidification/stabilization systems. The release of heavy metals could be related to the disruption of cement matrices and the remarkable variation of solubility of heavy metal precipitates at different pH values.

  2. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  3. A cement based syntactic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Muthyala, Venkata D.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cement based syntactic foam core was proposed and experimentally investigated for composite sandwich structures. This was a multi-phase composite material with microballoon dispersed in a rubber latex toughened cement paste matrix. A trace amount of microfiber was also incorporated to increase the number of mechanisms for energy absorption and a small amount of nanoclay was added to improve the crystal structure of the hydrates. Three groups of cement based syntactic foams with varying cement content were investigated. A fourth group of specimens containing pure cement paste were also prepared as control. Each group contained 24 beam specimens. The total number of beam specimens was 96. The dimension of each beam was 30.5 cm x 5.1 cm x 1.5 cm. Twelve foam specimens from each group were wrapped with plain woven 7715 style glass fabric reinforced epoxy to prepare sandwich beams. Twelve cubic foam specimens, three from each group, with a side length of 5.1 cm, were also prepared. Three types of testing, low velocity impact test and four-point bending test on the beam specimens and compression test on the cubic specimens, were conducted to evaluate the impact energy dissipation, stress-strain behavior, and residual strength. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was also used to examine the energy dissipation mechanisms in the micro-length scale. It was found that the cement based syntactic foam has a higher capacity for dissipating impact energy with an insignificant reduction in strength as compared to the control cement paste core. When compared to a polymer based foam core having similar compositions, it was found that the cement based foam has a comparable energy dissipation capacity. The developed cement based syntactic foam would be a viable alternative for core materials in impact-tolerant composite sandwich structures

  4. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    burden of proof because with few exceptions, much less is known about their ability chemically to immobilise waste species and their long- term durability relative to Portland cement in a range of natural environments. It is concluded that the most robust of these alternative formulations are based on calcium aluminate and sulfoaluminate cements, on magnesium phosphate and on geopolymers. (author)

  5. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasser, F. P. [University of Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    burden of proof because with few exceptions, much less is known about their ability chemically to immobilise waste species and their long- term durability relative to Portland cement in a range of natural environments. It is concluded that the most robust of these alternative formulations are based on calcium aluminate and sulfoaluminate cements, on magnesium phosphate and on geopolymers. (author)

  6. The shrinkage of hardening cement paste and mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de G.D.; Kreijger, P.C.; Niël, E.M.M.G.; Slagter, J.C.; Stein, H.N.; Theissing, E.M.; Wallendael, van M.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is an abstract from the report of the commission B10: "The influence of the shrinkage of cement on the shrink-age of concrete", of the Netherlands Committee for Concrete Research. Measurements of pulse velocity, volume shrinkage and heat of hydration on hardening portland cement support

  7. Solidification and performance of cement doped with phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Krishnan, S.

    1991-01-01

    Treating mixed hazardous wastes using the solidification/stabilization technology is becoming a critical element in waste management planning. The effect of phenol, a primary constituent in many hazardous wastes, on the setting and solidification process of Type I Portland cement was evaluated. The leachability of phenol from solidified cement matrix (TCLP test) and changes in mechanical properties were studied after curing times up to 28 days. The changes in cement hydration products due to phenol were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) powder technique. Results show that phenol interferes with initial cement hydration by reducing the formation of calcium hydroxide and also reduces the compressive strength of cement. A simple model has been proposed to quantify the phenol leached from the cement matrix during the leachate test

  8. Effect of polymers on the nanostructure and on the carbonation of calcium silicate hydrates: a scanning transmission X-ray microscopy study

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, J.; Chae, S.; Chou, K. W.; Tyliszczak, T.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of organic polymers (polyethylene glycol and hexadecyltrimethylammonium) on structures of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) which is the major product of Portland cement hydration. Increased surface areas

  9. Using bio-based polymers for curing cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlopasa, J.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Picken, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Curing is the process of controlling the rate and extent of moisture loss from the surface of cement based materials. It is the final stage in the production of cement-based materials and it is the essential part for achieving continuous hydration of cement, while avoiding cracking due to drying

  10. The influence of cellulose nanocrystal additions on the performance of cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizheng Cao; Pablo Zavaterri; Jeff Youngblood; Robert Moon; Jason Weiss

    2015-01-01

    The influence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) addition on the performance of cement paste was investigated. Our mechanical tests show an increase in the flexural strength of approximately 30% with only 0.2% volume of CNCs with respect to cement. Isothermal calorimetry (IC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) show that the degree of hydration (DOH) of the cement paste...

  11. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  12. Effects of the wet air on the properties of the lanthanum oxide and lanthanum aluminate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jin Hyung; Choi, Doo Jin

    2006-01-01

    Lanthanum oxide and lanthanum aluminate thin films were deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown films were stored in wet ambient and dry ambient for days and annealed after storage and also the structural and the electrical properties of the films were investigated. As the storage time increased, the La 2 O 3 films stored in wet ambient showed rapid reaction with moisture and the properties degraded. In case of the LAO films, although the thickness of the film also increased during hydration, the properties of the film did not so much changed due to the role of the incorporated aluminum. The LAO films showed better hydration resistance characteristics and so more suitable for conventional wet cleaning process in semiconductor fabrication

  13. Influence of Cements Containing Calcareous Fly Ash as a Main Component Properties of Fresh Cement Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołaszewski, Jacek; Kostrzanowska-Siedlarz, Aleksandra; Ponikiewski, Tomasz; Miera, Patrycja

    2017-10-01

    The main goal of presented research was to examine usability of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) from technological point of view. In the paper the results of tests concerning the influence of CEM II and CEM IV cements containing fly ash (W) on rheological properties, air content, setting times and plastic shrinkage of mortars are presented and discussed. Moreover, compatibility of plasticizers with cements containing fly ash (W) was also studied. Additionally, setting time and hydration heat of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) were determined. In a broader aspect, the research contributes to promulgation of the possibility of using calcareous fly ash (W) in cement and concrete technology, what greatly benefits the environment protection (utilization of waste fly ash). Calcareous fly ash can be used successfully as the main component of cement. Cements produced by blending with processed fly ash or cements produced by interginding are characterized by acceptable technological properties. In respect to CEM I cements, cements containing calcareous fly ash worsen workability, decrease air content, delay setting time of mixtures. Cements with calcareous fly ash show good compatibility with plasticizers.

  14. The formation reaction of calcium hexa-aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuganova, S.Kh.; Sirajiddinov, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The formation reaction of CaAl 12 O 19 at interaction of calcium oxide and aluminium in solid form has been studied. Some physical-chemical characteristics of calcium hexa-aluminate are given. (author)

  15. Properties of lithium aluminate for application as an OSL dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twardak, A.; Bilski, P.; Marczewska, B.; Lee, J.I.; Kim, J.L.; Gieszczyk, W.; Mrozik, A.; Sądel, M.; Wróbel, D.

    2014-01-01

    Several samples of undoped and carbon or copper doped lithium aluminate (LiAlO 2 ) were prepared in an attempt to achieve a material, which can be applicable in optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry. All investigated samples are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation and show good reproducibility. The undoped and copper doped samples exhibit sensitivity several times higher than that of Al 2 O 3 :C, while sensitivity of the carbon doped samples is lower. The studied samples exhibit significant fading, but dynamics of signal loss is different for differently doped samples, what indicates a possibility of improving this characteristic by optimizing dopant composition. - Highlights: • OSL properties of lithium aluminate for personal dosimetry. • Doping influence on OSL fading of lithium aluminate. • Application of lithium aluminate in thermal neutron measurements

  16. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H.O.; Rust, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls. (orig.)

  17. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H. O.; Rust, D. R.

    1987-03-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls.

  18. Low Temperature Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedovskaya, E.G.; Gabelkov, S.V.; Litvinenko, L.M.; Logvinkov, D.S.; Mironova, A.G.; Odejchuk, M.A.; Poltavtsev, N.S.; Tarasov, R.V.

    2006-01-01

    The low-temperature synthesis of magnesium-aluminum spinel is carried out by a method of thermal decomposition in combined precipitated hydrates. The fine material of magnesium-aluminium spinel with average size of coherent dispersion's area 4...5 nanometers is obtained. Magnesium-aluminum spinel and initial hydrates were investigated by methods of the differential thermal analysis, the x-ray phase analysis and measurements of weight loss during the dehydration and thermal decomposition. It is established that synthesis of magnesium-aluminum spinel occurs at temperature 300 degree C by method of the x-ray phase analysis

  19. Conditioning of radioactive waste solutions by cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vejmelka, P.; Rudolph, G.; Kluger, W.; Koester, R.

    1992-02-01

    For the cementation of the low and intermediate level evaporator concentrates resulting from the reprocessing of spent fuel numerous experiments were performed to optimize the waste form composition and to characterize the final waste form. Concerning the cementation process, properties of the waste/cement suspension were investigated. These investigations include the dependence of viscosity, bleeding, setting time and hydration heat from the waste cement slurry composition. For the characterization of the waste forms, the mechanical, thermal and chemical stability were determined. For special cases detailed investigations were performed to determine the activity release from waste packages under defined mechanical and thermal stresses. The investigations of the interaction of the waste forms with aqueous solutions include the determination of the Cs/Sr release, the corrosion resistance and the release of actinides. The Cs/Sr release was determined in dependence of the cement type, additives, setting time and sample size. (orig./DG) [de

  20. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  1. The C-S-H gel of Portland cement mortars: Part I. The interpretation of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyses from scanning electron microscopy, with some observations on C-S-H, AFm and AFt phase compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famy, C.; Brough, A.R.; Taylor, H.F.W.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalyses of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel in Portland cement pastes rarely represent single phases. Essential experimental requirements are summarised and new procedures for interpreting the data are described. These include, notably, plots of Si/Ca against other atom ratios, 3D plots to allow three such ratios to be correlated and solution of linear simultaneous equations to test and quantify hypotheses regarding the phases contributing to individual microanalyses. Application of these methods to the C-S-H gel of a 1-day-old mortar identified a phase with Al/Ca=0.67 and S/Ca=0.33, which we consider to be a highly substituted ettringite of probable composition C 6 A 2 S-bar 2 H 34 or {Ca 6 [Al(OH) 6 ] 2 ·24H 2 O}(SO 4 ) 2 [Al(OH) 4 ] 2 . If this is true for Portland cements in general, it might explain observed discrepancies between observed and calculated aluminate concentrations in the pore solution. The C-S-H gel of a similar mortar aged 600 days contained unsubstituted ettringite and an AFm phase with S/Ca=0.125

  2. Mechanoluminescence of Dy doped strontium aluminate nanophosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ravi, E-mail: rvsharma65@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govt. Arts and Commerce Girls College, Raipur, C.G. 492001 (India); Bisen, D.P. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Chandra, B.P. [Department of Postgraduate Studies and Research in Physics and Electronics, Rani Durgavati University, Jabalpur 482001 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Nanosized strontium aluminate phosphors activated with Dy{sup 3+} were prepared by a combustion method. Nanophosphor was prepared by this method at reaction temperatures as low as 600 °C. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope analysis was used to characterize the prepared product. The monoclinic phase was observed in the XRD pattern. The particle size of the samples was calculated around 35 nm. The SEM images show irregular shape of the prepared nanophosphor. Two peaks were found in the mechanoluminescence (ML) response curve plotted between time and ML intensity. The H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} added strontium aluminate phosphors activated with Dy show more bright ML peak as compared to the powders of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} without H{sub 3}BO{sub 3.} It was found that the PL and ML intensity increases with increasing concentration of Dy, it becomes maximum for 3% of Dy. The photoluminescence emission shows two intense fluorescence transitions peaks at 498 nm and 583 nm, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} in the blue and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} in the yellow-orange wavelength region. - Highlights: • Combustion synthesis route is used to prepare the SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Dy {sup 3+} nanophosphors. • The size of the synthesized sample was found to be in the nano-meter range. • The mechanoluminescence of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy {sup 3+} nanophosphors is studied. • The photoluminescence of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Dy {sup 3+} nanophosphors showed blue-shift as compared to bulk. • Effect of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} on the mechanoluminescence of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} was studied.

  3. Preparation of iron-modified portland cement adsorbent and the investigation of its decolorization performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Huifeng; Li, Yang; Li, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    The ordinary portland cement was modified by ferric salt impregnation method. Through the technologies of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the physicochemical properties of modified cement were detected and analyzed. It was found that after the modification, the main constituents of raw cement, tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate had been depleted, and the new crystal mineral of antarcticite replaced them. The iron precipitates and cement hydration products calcium silicate hydrate gel mainly existed in the form of amorphous on modified cement. The results of BET specific surface determination showed that the modified cement particles had mesoporous distribution. The results of adsorption experiment revealed modified cement exhibited excellent adsorption performance on reactive brilliant blue KNR. The combination mechanism between modified cement and adsorbate was mainly electrostatic interaction. The adsorption process satisfied with the pseudo-second order kinetics model, and the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous endothermic process.

  4. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal; Caracterizacao de cimentos experimentais com finalidade endodontica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia, E-mail: alana.mxd@hotmail [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba (UEPB), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  5. Suitability of alumina cements for the cementation of boreholes under corrosive conditions, especially at the press fitting of CO{sub 2}; Eignung von Tonerdezementen fuer die Bohrlochzementierung unter korrosiven Bedingungen, insbesondere bei CO{sub 2}-Einpressung. Literaturstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, J.; Sieber, R. (comps.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bauchemie

    2011-07-15

    Calcium aluminate cements, also called aluminate cements, are special cements based on calcium aluminates. In construction (especially in dry-mix mortars), they are valued for their remarkably higher acid and corrosion resistance compared to Portland cement. Their high temperature resistance especially qualifies them for refractory cements which are used e.g. as liners in cement rotary kilns. The worldwide production of calcium aluminate cements adds up to about 3 million tons. In oil well cementing, calcium aluminate cements have first been used at the beginning of the 90ies, in fact initially for geothermal wells. Applications in permafrost soils as well as fire-flooding wells came later. The reason for the use in geothermal wells. Applications in permafrost soils as well as fire-flooding wells came later. The reason for the use in geothermal wells were severe problems with API Portland cements affected by hot, carbonic acid rich formation brines. With support from the companies Unocal and Halliburton, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) developed a special cement based on 60 parts by weight of calcium aluminate cement and 40 parts ASTM class F fly ash. This binder is notably CO{sub 2} resistant when mixed with a 25 wt.% Na-polyphosphate solution. Laboratory tests and field applications conclude that this cement is resistant to CO{sub 2} corrosion at temperatures up to 300 C for over 20 years. In 1997, for the first time numerous geothermal wells have been cemented using this cement. They are intact to this day. When this cement hardens at room temperature, amorphous reaction products are formed and the reaction is incomplete. However, at higher temperatures hydroxyapatite, boehmite, Na-P-zeolite, analcime or katoite are formed as crystalline reaction products. The CO{sub 2} resistance of this cement is due to specific chemical reactions. In contact with hot alkaline carbonate solutions, analcime converts to cancrinite, and CO{sub 2} is incorporated into

  6. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO42, Ca3(AsO42, and Na2HAsO4.

  7. Gas hydrate concentration and characteristics within Hydrate Ridge inferred from multicomponent seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Sen, Mrinal K.; Bangs, Nathan L.

    2007-12-01

    A seismic experiment composed of streamer and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) surveys was conducted in the summer of 2002 at southern Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, to map the gas hydrate distribution within the hydrate stability zone. Gas hydrate concentrations within the reservoir can be estimated with P wave velocity (Vp); however, we can further constrain gas hydrate concentrations using S wave velocity (Vs), and use Vs through its relationship to Vp (Vp/Vs) to reveal additional details such as gas hydrate form within the matrix (i.e., hydrate cements the grains, becomes part of the matrix frame or floats in pore space). Both Vp and Vs can be derived simultaneously by inverting multicomponent seismic data. In this study, we use OBS data to estimate seismic velocities where both gas hydrate and free gas are present in the shallow sediments. Once Vp and Vs are estimated, they are simultaneously matched with modeled velocities to estimate the gas hydrate concentration. We model Vp using an equation based on a modification of Wood's equation that incorporates an appropriate rock physics model and Vs using an empirical relation. The gas hydrate concentration is estimated to be up to 7% of the rock volume, or 12% of the pore space. However, Vp and Vs do not always fit the model simultaneously. Vp can vary substantially more than Vs. Thus we conclude that a model, in which higher concentrations of hydrate do not affect shear stiffness, is more appropriate. Results suggest gas hydrates form within the pore space of the sediments and become part of the rock framework in our survey area.

  8. Influence of Lithium Carbonate on C3A Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Han

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium salts, known to ameliorate the effects of alkali-silica reaction, can make significant effects on cement setting. However, the mechanism of effects on cement hydration, especially the hydration of C3A which is critical for initial setting time of cement, is rarely reported. In this study, the development of pH value of pore solution, conductivity, thermodynamics, and mineralogical composition during hydration of C3A with or without Li2CO3 are investigated. The results demonstrate that Li2CO3 promotes C3A hydration through high alkalinity, due to higher activity of lithium ion than that of calcium ion in the solution and carbonation of C3A hydration products resulted from Li2CO3. Li2CO3 favors the C3A hydration in C3A-CaSO4·2H2O-Ca(OH2-H2O hydration system and affects the mineralogical variation of the ettringite phase(s.

  9. Development of alkali activated cements and concrete mixture design with high volumes of red mud

    OpenAIRE

    Krivenko, Pavel; Kovalchuk, Oleksandr; Pasko, Anton; Croymans, Tom; Hutt, Mikael; Lutter, Guillaume; Vandevenne, Niels; Schreurs, Sonja; Schroeyers, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    Dedicated cement compositions were formulated to enable the incorporation of large volume fractions of red mud in alkali activated cements, taking into account the role of the aluminosilicate phase in the processes of hydration and hardening. High volume red mud alkali activated cements were synthesized using a proper combination of red mud, low basic aluminosilicate compounds with a glass phase (blast-furnace slag) and additives selected from high-basic Ca-containing cements with a crystalli...

  10. Performance on Water Stability of Cement-Foamed Asphalt Cold Recycled Mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Li Junxiao; Fu Wei; Zang Hechao

    2018-01-01

    Through designing the mixture proportion of foamed asphalt cold in-place recycled mixture combined with the water stability experiment, it shows that the addition of cement can obviously improve foamed asphalt mixture’s water stability and the best cement admixture is between 1% ~ 2%; Using digital imaging microscope and SEM technology, the mechanism of increasing on the intensity of foamed asphalt mixture resulted by adding cement was analyzed. It revealed that the cement hydration products ...

  11. Studies of the setting behavior of cement suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, G.; Luo, S.; Vejmelka, P.; Koester, R.

    1983-10-01

    The design of process for cementation of radioactive waste solutions is determined not only by the quality of the final product but also by the behavior of the cement grout before and during setting. For these reasons quantitative investigations were performed on the characteristics of the cement suspensions considered for solidification of intermediate-level liquid wastes which are composed mainly of cement, bentonite, simulated waste solution, and water. Particular interest was given to the differences in behavior of the various types of cement. The parameters investigated include viscosity, bleeding, volume change during setting, influence of compacting by vibration, time of setting, heat of hydration. At the end of the report the merits and drawbacks of the different cements are tabulated. These data may serve as a decision aid in selecting an appropriate type of cement

  12. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  13. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  15. Properties of backfilling material for solidifying miscellaneous waste using recycled cement from waste concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Atsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Konishi, Masao; Iwamoto, Yoshiaki; Yoshikane, Toru; Koie, Toshio; Nakashima, Yoshio.

    1997-01-01

    A large reduction of total radioactive waste is expected, if recycled cement from the waste concrete of decommissioned nuclear power plants would be able to be used the material for backfilling mortar among the miscellaneous waste. In this paper, we discuss the hydration, strength and consistency of recycled cement compared with normal portland cement. The strength of recycled cement mortar is lower than that of normal portland cement mortar on the same water to cement ratio. It is possible to obtain the required strength to reduce the water to cement ratio by using of high range water-reducing AE agent. According to reducing of water to cement ratio, the P-type funnel time of mortar increase with the increase of its viscosity. However, in new method of self-compactability for backfilling mortar, it became evident that there was no difference between the recycled cement and normal portland cement on the self-compactability. (author)

  16. Incorporation of tv tube glass waste in aluminous porcelain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, J.N.F.; Santos, T.F.; Paes Junior, H.R. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full test: This work analyzes the reuse of TV tube glass waste as a method to provide alternative raw material for aluminous porcelain, through of replacement of natural sodic feldspar by up to 30 wt.%. Aluminous porcelain formulations containing TV tube glass waste were pressed and fired in air at 1300 deg C using a fast-firing cycle. Ceramic pieces were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, linear shrinkage, apparent density, apparent porosity, water absorption, and electrical resistivity. XRD and SEM results indicated that all aluminous porcelain pieces are composed essentially of mullite, quartz, and ?-alumina embedded in a vitreous matrix. The results also showed that the aluminous porcelain pieces containing TV tube glass waste presented low water absorption values between 0.42 and 0.45 %, apparent density between 2.44 and 2.46 g/cm3, and volume electrical resistivity between 1.91 and 2.93 x 1011 ?.cm. Thus, the TV tube glass waste could be used into aluminous porcelain formulations, in the range up to 30 wt.%, as a replacement for traditional flux material (sodic feldspar). (author)

  17. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orosco, Pablo; Barbosa, Lucía; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl 2 –N 2 flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al 2 O 3 (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl 2 atmosphere of the MgO–Al 2 O 3 mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C

  18. A influência do tipo de cimento no desempenho de concretos avançados formulados a partir do método de dosagem computacional The influence of cement type on the performance of advanced concretes designed by computing mix proportion technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. de Castro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ao se produzir uma mistura de concreto, especialmente de alto desempenho, a primeira escolha a ser feita é quanto ao tipo de cimento a ser empregado, o que faz deste ligante um material essencial para a produção desses materiais. As características reológicas de formulações de concretos de alto desempenho estão relacionadas com a hidratação dos aluminatos do cimento, enquanto o desenvolvimento da resistência mecânica é dependente dos silicatos hidratados formados. Assim, variações nas características do cimento influenciam as propriedades dos concretos, sendo observados comportamentos distintos para misturas produzidas com diferentes cimentos. O presente artigo visa avaliar a influência do tipo de cimento sobre o desempenho de concretos especiais aplicados na construção civil, dosados a partir de um método computacional. As propriedades no estado fresco foram avaliadas medindo-se o índice de fluidez e determinando-se o comportamento reológico do material. No estado endurecido, a resistência mecânica foi avaliada pelos ensaios de compressão uniaxial, tração por compressão diametral e flexão em 3 pontos, enquanto o módulo de elasticidade foi avaliado pelos métodos estático e dinâmico. Comparando-se todas as propriedades medidas, verifica-se que os concretos produzidos com cimento Portland apresentaram desempenhos superiores ao do concreto produzido com cimento aluminoso, sendo o cimento Portland de alta resistência inicial ainda mais eficiente que o cimento Portland composto com escória para a produção de misturas de alto desempenho e até os 28 dias de idade.When a concrete is produced, especially a high performance one, the first concern is the cement type to be used, making this binder an essential compound. The rheological properties of high performance concretes are related to the hydration of cement aluminates phase, whereas the development of mechanical strength depends on the hydrated silicates formed

  19. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de; Bezerra, U.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  20. Study of thermocycling effect on the bond strength between an aluminous ceramic and a resin cement Estudo do efeito da ciclagem térmica na resistência da união adesiva entre uma cerâmica aluminizada e um cimento resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta Filho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on the bond strength between Procera AllCeram (Nobel-Biocare and a resin cement (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nine ceramic blocks with dimensions of 5x6x6mm were conditioned at one face with Rocatec System (Espe. After, they were luted with Panavia F to composite resin blocks (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. The nine groups formed by ceramic, cement and composite resin were split up obtaining 75 samples with dimensions of 12x1x1mm and adhesive surface presenting 1mm²±0.1mm² of area. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=25: G1 - 14 days in distilled water at 37ºC; G2 - 6,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s; G3 - 12,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s. The samples were tested in a universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. The results indicated that mean values of rupture tension (MPa of G1 (10.71 ± 3.54 did not differ statistically (p Este trabalho avaliou o efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência adesiva entre a cerâmica aluminizada (Procera AllCeram, Nobel-Biocare e um cimento resinoso (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nove blocos de cerâmica, com dimensões de 5x6x6mm, foram condicionados em uma de suas faces com o Sistema Rocatec (ESPE. A seguir foram cimentados a blocos de resina composta (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. Os conjuntos cerâmica-cimento-resina foram cortados em 75 corpos-de-prova com formato retangular com dimensões de 12x1x1mm e superfície adesiva apresentando 1mm² ± 0,1mm². Os corpos-de-prova foram divididos em três grupos (n=25: G1 - 14 dias em água destilada a 37ºC, G2 - 6000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC e G3 - 12000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC. Os corpos-de-prova foram ensaiados sob velocidade de 1mm/min em máquina de ensaio universal (EMIC. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente com os testes de Anova e Tukey e indicaram que os valores médios de tensão de rupturas (MPa de G1 (10,71 ± 3

  1. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David L.; Fedosseev, Alexander M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier

  2. Accelerated ageing of blended cements for use in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quillin, K.; Duerden, S.L.; Majumdar, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    An accelerated experimental technique has been developed to study the long term hydration of blended cements that may be used in radioactive waste disposal. This technique has been used to investigate the hydration reactions of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) blended with blast furnace slag (ggbs) or pulverised fuel ash (pfa). The effects of high sulphate-bearing and high carbonate-bearing ground waters on the compounds formed on hydration was also investigated. Solid/solution compositional data has been collected during the course of the hydration process and this can be used in the validation of models for the properties of cements. Thomsonite, afwillite, a tobermorite-like phase and thaumasite have been found in addition to the expected cement hydration products and need to be considered in modelling studies of cement hydration. The pH of ground waters reacted with OPC/pfa blends on hydration at 90 o C fell below 8. This is lower than the value required to inhibit the corrosion of steel canisters in a repository. The pH in ground waters reacted with OPC and OPC/ggbs mixes remained above 11, although if the ground waters reacted with OPC/ggbs blends were periodically replaced the pH eventually fell below 10. The experimental procedure could be adapted to test the specific cement and ground water compositions relevant to the design of an underground repository over a range of experimental conditions. (author)

  3. Basalt waste added to Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Melanda Mendes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement is widely used as a building material and more than 4.3 billion tons were produced in 2014, with increasing environmental impacts by this industry, mainly through CO2 emissions and consumption of non-removable raw materials. Several by-products have been used as raw materials or fuels to reduce environmental impacts. Basaltic waste collected by filters was employed as a mineral mixture to Portland cement and two fractions were tested. The compression strength of mortars was measured after 7 days and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Electron Diffraction Scattering (EDS were carried out on Portland cement paste with the basaltic residue. Gains in compression strength were observed for mixtures containing 2.5 wt.% of basaltic residue. Hydration products observed on surface of basaltic particles show the nucleation effect of mineral mixtures. Clinker substitution by mineral mixtures reduces CO2 emission per ton of Portland cement.

  4. Influence of lead on stabilization/solidification by ordinary Portland cement and magnesium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Shuai; Dai, Jian-Guo; Wang, Lei; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi Sun

    2018-01-01

    Inorganic binder-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) of Pb-contaminated soil is a commonly used remediation approach. This paper investigates the influences of soluble Pb species on the hydration process of two types of inorganic binders: ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC). The environmental leachability, compressive strength, and setting time of the cement products are assessed as the primary performance indicators. The mechanisms of Pb involved in the hydration process are analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), hydration heat evolution, and thermogravimetric analyses. Results show that the presence of Pb imposes adverse impact on the compressive strength (decreased by 30.4%) and the final setting time (prolonged by 334.7%) of OPC, but it exerts much less influence on those of MKPC. The reduced strength and delayed setting are attributed to the retarded hydration reaction rate of OPC during the induction period. These results suggest that the OPC-based S/S of soluble Pb mainly depends on physical encapsulation by calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) gels. In contrast, in case of MKPC-based S/S process, chemical stabilization with residual phosphate (pyromorphite and lead phosphate precipitation) and physical fixation of cementitious struvite-K are the major mechanisms. Therefore, MKPC is a more efficient and chemically stable inorganic binder for the Pb S/S process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of calcium aluminates on the big solar furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurakhmanov, A. A.; Paizullakhanov, M. S.; Akhadov, Zh.

    2012-01-01

    The processes of synthesizing calcium aluminate in the flow of concentrated solar radiation on Large Solar Furnace are studied. It is shown that the synthesis of calcium aluminate takes place through a process of melting of a mixture of aluminum oxides and calcium (Al 2 O 3 + CaO). At values of power of the concentrated flow of 200 W/cm 2 , thermodynamic conditions for melting of the materials studied were implemented. Full fusion penetration is achieved at a power flow of 400 W/cm 2 . The resulting material exhibits high mechanical properties (the modulus of rupture upon bending is 40 MPa). (author)

  6. Oxidation behavior and compositional analysis of aluminized superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, F.A.; Nawaz, F.

    2003-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation behavior of superalloy specimens used for the manufacture of turbine blades has been examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fine-probe spot and line scan EDS microanalysis techniques. The performance of aluminized coating applied to the specimens has also been examined. It was observed that complex oxides are formed in both coated and uncoated specimens. However the coated specimens revealed a greater stability of gamma phase and integrity of aluminized coating as compared with uncoated specimens. The microchemical and microstructural changes that occurred during oxidation have been analyzed to examine characteristics of oxide layers. (author)

  7. Effect of aluminizing on hardenability of steel (S45C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayitno, D.; Sugiarto, R.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of research is to know the effect of aluminizing on hardenability of steel (S45C). The research methodologies were as follows. The Steels (S45C) were machined into the Jominy test samples. Next the samples were preheating at 700 ° C for 30 minutes and then the samples were dipped into the molten of aluminium for 3 minutes as a hot dip aluminizng method. The aluminium molten was 700 ° C. Then the samples were cooled into room temperatures. Finally the samples were into the jominy tested. The results show that the aluminizing (include the preheating process) increases the hardenability of steel (S45C).

  8. Physicochemical changes of cements by ground water corrosion in radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras R, A.; Badillo A, V. E.; Robles P, E. F.; Nava E, N.

    2009-10-01

    Knowing that the behavior of cementations materials based on known hydraulic cement binder is determined essentially by the physical and chemical transformation of cement paste (water + cement) that is, the present study is essentially about the cement paste evolution in contact with aqueous solutions since one of principal risks in systems security are the ground and surface waters, which contribute to alteration of various barriers and represent the main route of radionuclides transport. In this research, cements were hydrated with different relations cement-aqueous solution to different times. The pastes were analyzed by different solid observation techniques XRD and Moessbauer with the purpose of identify phases that form when are in contact with aqueous solutions of similar composition to ground water. The results show a definitive influence of chemical nature of aqueous solution as it encourages the formation of new phases like hydrated calcium silicates, which are the main phases responsible of radionuclides retention in a radioactive waste storage. (Author)

  9. Cement Pastes and Mortars Containing Nitrogen-Doped and Oxygen-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Martínez-Alanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement pastes and mortars based on ordinary Portland cement containing nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Nx or oxygen-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Ox are investigated. To incorporate MWCNTs into the cementitious matrix, the as-produced carpets are dispersed over periods of 1 and 2 hours in distilled water at pH levels of 1 and 7. The cement pastes are prepared by adding 0.1 wt% of MWCNTs to cement powder, followed by characterization with SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD at an early age (first hours of hydration. The mortars are mechanically characterized during the hydration process for a period of 28 days. SEM characterization of cement pastes revealed that the carbon nanotubes are well incorporated in the cementitious matrix, with the hydrated cement grains interconnected by long carbon nanotubes. XRD characterizations demonstrated that, during the hydration of cement pastes, different peaks emerged that were associated with ettringite, hydrated calcium silicate, and calcium hydroxide, among other structures. Results of the compressive strength measurements for mortars simultaneously mixed with MWCNT-Nx and MWCNT-Ox reached an increment of approximately 30% in compressive strength. In addition, density functional theory calculations were performed in nitrogen-doped and oxygen-functionalized carbon nanotubes interacting with a cement grain.

  10. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  11. Characteristics and properties of oil-well cements auditioned with blast furnace slag; Cementos petroleros con adicion de escoria de horno alto. Caracteristicas y propiedades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.; Palacios, M.; Puertas, F.

    2011-07-01

    The present paper addresses the alkali activation of Portland cements containing blast furnace slag (20 and 30% by cement weight) with a view to the possible use of these materials in oil well construction. The hydration studies conducted showed that in cement/slag blends, the sodium silicate activator partially inhibited the dissolution of the silicate phases in the Portland cement, retarding cement hydration and reducing the precipitation of reaction products. Due to such partial inhibition, the cement/slag blends had significantly lower mechanical strength than Portland cements hydrated with water. {sup 2}9Si and {sup 2}7Al MAS NMR and BSE/EDX studies, in turn, showed that the CSH gel forming in the alkali-activated cement/slag pastes contained Al in tetrahedral positions and low Ca/Si ratios. (Author) 29 refs.

  12. Radionuclide and metal sorption on cement and concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Ochs, Michael; Wang, Lian

    2016-01-01

    Cementitious materials are being widely used as solidification/stabilisation and barrier materials for a variety of chemical and radioactive wastes, primarily due to their favourable retention properties for metals, radionuclides and other contaminants. The retention properties result from various mineral phases in hydrated cement that possess a high density and diversity of reactive sites for the fixation of contaminants through a variety of sorption and incorporation reactions. This book presents a state of the art review and critical evaluation of the type and magnitude of the various sorption and incorporation processes in hydrated cement systems for twenty-five elements relevant for a broad range of radioactive and industrial wastes. Effects of cement evolution or ageing on sorption/incorporation processes are explicitly evaluated and quantified. While the immobilisation of contaminants by mixing-in during hydration is not explicitly addressed, the underlying chemical processes are similar. A quantitativ...

  13. Cement stabilization of road pavement materials: laboratory testing programme phase 1

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available . There is no doubt that both conditioning time and material temperature during the early stages of hydration of the cement affect the compacted density and unconfined compressive strength and indirect tensile strength (these three are obviously interrelated...

  14. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications.

  15. Utilization of waste glass in ECO-cement: Strength properties and microstructural observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, Konstantin; Tuerker, Pelin; Soboleva, Svetlana; Iscioglu, Gunsel

    2007-01-01

    Waste glass creates a serious environmental problem, mainly because of the inconsistency of the waste glass streams. The use of waste glass as a finely ground mineral additive (FGMA) in cement is a promising direction for recycling. Based on the method of mechano-chemical activation, a new group of ECO-cements was developed. In ECO-cement, relatively large amounts (up to 70%) of portland cement clinker can be replaced with waste glass. This report examines the effect of waste glass on the microstructure and strength of ECO-cement based materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations were used to observe the changes in the cement hydrates and interface between the cement matrix and waste glass particles. According to the research results, the developed ECO-cement with 50% of waste glass possessed compressive strength properties at a level similar to normal portland cement

  16. Comparison of setting time and temperature hydration in mortar with substituent ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.A.; Alves, L.S.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The workability of mortar is determined mainly by the kinetics of hydration of the hydraulic binder, the process of gelation / hydration of this material in aqueous solutions is significantly influenced by the presence of additives. As a result, this work aims at studying changes in setting time and temperature of hydration of mortars with 10, 15 and 30% of Portland cement replaced by residues of porcelain and ceramic bricks. The influence of these residues in the cement hydration process was studied by testing takes time, temperature, hydration and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that the mortar setting time not changed significantly since the temperature of hydration has a minor variation on what is preferred because it reduces the microcracks created in mortar during drying.(author)

  17. Formulating a low-alkalinity cement for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coumes, C. Cau Dit; Courtois, S.; Leclercq, S.; Bourbon, X.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-annual research program has been launched in January 2003 by CEA, EDF and ANDRA in order to formulate and characterize low-alkalinity and low-heat cements which would be compatible with an underground waste repository environment. Four types of bindings have been investigated: binary blends of Portland cement and silica fume or metakaolin, as well as ternary blends of Portland cement, fly ash and silica fume or metakaolin. Promising results have been obtained with a mixture comprising 37.5% Portland cement, 32.5% silica fume, and 30% fly ash: pH of water in equilibrium with fully hydrated cement is below 11. Moreover, silica fume compensates for the low reactivity of fly ash, while fly ash allows to reduce water demand, heat release, and dimensional variations of cement pastes and mortars. (authors)

  18. Formulating a low-alkalinity cement for radioactive waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coumes, C. Cau Dit; Courtois, S.; Leclercq, S.; Bourbon, X

    2004-07-01

    A multi-annual research program has been launched in January 2003 by CEA, EDF and ANDRA in order to formulate and characterize low-alkalinity and low-heat cements which would be compatible with an underground waste repository environment. Four types of bindings have been investigated: binary blends of Portland cement and silica fume or metakaolin, as well as ternary blends of Portland cement, fly ash and silica fume or metakaolin. Promising results have been obtained with a mixture comprising 37.5% Portland cement, 32.5% silica fume, and 30% fly ash: pH of water in equilibrium with fully hydrated cement is below 11. Moreover, silica fume compensates for the low reactivity of fly ash, while fly ash allows to reduce water demand, heat release, and dimensional variations of cement pastes and mortars. (authors)

  19. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Crawford, R.W.; McCulloch, C.E.; Angus, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Tobermorite and xonotlite, two synthetic calcium silicate hydrates, improve the Cs retention of cement matrices for Cs, when incorporated at the 6 to 10% level. A kinetic and mechanistic scheme is presented for the reaction of fine grained, Cs-loaded clinoptilolite with cement. The Magnox waste form reacts quickly with cement, leading to an exchange of carbonate between waste form and cement components. Carbonation of cements leads to a marked improvement in their physical properties of Cs retentivity. Diffusion models are presented for cement systems whose variable parameters can readily be derived from experimental measurements. Predictions about scaled-up behaviour of large immobilized masses are applied to extrapolation of laboratory scale results to full-size masses. (author)

  20. Portland blended cements: demolition ceramic waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trezza, M.A.; Zito, S.; Tironi, A.; Irassar, E.F.; Rahhal, V.F.

    2017-01-01

    Demolition ceramic wastes (DCWs) were investigated in order to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious materials in Portland Blended Cements (PBCs). For this purpose, three ceramic wastes were investigated. After characterization of the materials used, the effect of ceramic waste replacement (8, 24 and 40% by mass) was analyzed. Pozzolanic activity, hydration progress, workability and compressive strength were determined at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the ground wastes behave as filler at an early age, but as hydration progresses, the pozzolanic activity of ceramic waste contributes to the strength requirement. [es

  1. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  2. Electrical transport properties of calcium and barium aluminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, R.; Hoefsloot, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and ionic transport numbers have been measured of barium and calcium aluminates with composition CaO·nAl2O3 (n=7/12, 1, 2, 6) and 0.82 BaO·6Al2O3. At room temperatures these compounds are insulators, but at high temperatures mixed conductivity is observed. Ionic transport

  3. Gas sensing behaviour of cerium oxide and magnesium aluminate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gas sensing behaviour of cerium oxide and magnesium aluminate composites ... A lone pairof the electron state was identified from the electro paramagnetic ... carbon monoxide (CO) (at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 bar) and ethanol (at 50 and 100 ppm) was ... The magnitude of the temperature varied linearly regardless of the gas ...

  4. On structural, optical and dielectric properties of zinc aluminate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reports on the dielectric properties of this material is very rarely found in literature. ... C placed on a heating man- ... and dielectric loss of the material using the equation ε = ε tan δ, ..... ble mechanism of a.c. conduction in zinc aluminate particles.

  5. Investigation of tritium release and retention in lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J.P.; Tistchenko, S.; Botter, F.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium release from lithium aluminate, although previously investigated by both in-reactor and ex-reactor experiments, remains poorly understood. Agreement between experiments is lacking, and the mechanisms responsible for tritium release from lithium aluminate are under debate. In an effort to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of tritium release from lithium ceramics, we have investigated tritium release from pure lithium aluminate and lithium aluminate doped with impurities. The results of these experiments on large grain size material indicate that after anneals at low temperature, a large fraction of the tritium present before the anneal remains in the sample. We have modeled this behavior based on first-order release from three types of sites. At the lowest temperature, the release is dominated by one site, while the tritium in the other sites is retained in the solid. Adding magnesium dopant to the ceramic appears to alter the distribution of tritium between the sites. This addition decreases the fraction of tritium released at 777 degree C, while increasing the fractions released at 538 and 950 degree C. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of two commercial cements and its evolution in function of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez B, O.

    2014-01-01

    Mineralogical evolution of Portland cement is studied during hydration process using materials characterization techniques as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (Sem) in order to analyze the changes in the various cement minerals as alite, belite, celite, during processing to the hydrated phases of tobermorite gel, portlandite and ettringite, respectively, in the cement paste setting at different ages (3, 7 and 28 days). It was found that the hydration process occurs differently in each mineral because of their reaction rates or changes they experience in their crystals during processing of anhydrous to hydrated phase. You may notice changes in the appearance of the dough as you go hydration and the formation of tobermorite gel, portlandite and ettringite. (Author)

  7. Effects of Static Magnetic Fields on the Physical, Mechanical, and Microstructural Properties of Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Soto-Bernal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental study carried out to comprehend the physical, mechanical, and microstructural behavior of cement pastes subjected to static magnetic fields while hydrating and setting. The experimental methodology consisted in exposing fresh cement pastes to static magnetic fields at three different magnetic induction strengths: 19.07, 22.22, and 25.37 Gauss. The microstructural characterization makes evident that there are differences in relation to amount and morphology of CSH gel; the amount of CSH is larger and its morphology becomes denser and less porous with higher magnetostatic induction strengths; it also shows the evidence of changes in the mineralogical composition of the hydrated cement pastes. The temperature increasing has no negative effects over the cement paste compressive strength since the magnetostatic field affects the process of hydration through a molecular restructuring process, which makes cement pastes improve microstructurally, with a reduced porosity and a higher mechanical strength.

  8. Ecologically safe process for sulfo-aluminizing of steel parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plyatsuk L. D.

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present technical solution refers to the field of electrophysical and electrochemical processing of parts, in particular, to the electroerosion alloying (EEA of the surfaces of steel parts with aluminum (aluminizing and sulfur (sulfidizing, and it can be used to treat the surfaces of heat-treated steel parts in order to increase their hardness, wear resistance, to prevent frictional seizure and improve the resistance to atmospheric corrosion. When aluminizing steel parts with the use of the method of electroerosion alloying (EEA by aluminum electrode at discharge energy Wp = 0.52–6.8 J and productivity of 1.0–3.0 cm2 / min, before the EEA process by an aluminum electrode, to the surface of the part to be aluminized, there is applied a consistency substance containing sulfur and aluminum powder, and thereafter, not having waited for drying of the consistency substance, the process of aluminizing by the EEL method with an aluminum electrode is carried out, and the consistency substance should have the aluminum powder content of not more than 56 %. There have been carried out metallographic and durametric analyses of the features of the surface layers made of carbon steels after simultaneous aluminizing and sulfidizing them by the EEA method. It is shown that the structure of the layer consists of three portions, namely, a “white” layer, a diffusion zone and a base metal. Such qualitative surface layer parameters as thickness, “white” layer and transition zone microhardness values, and also roughness increase with increasing discharge energy. The “white” layer continuity for all the investigated discharge energies of Wp = 0.52, 2.60 and 6.80 J is 100 %.

  9. Lunar cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  10. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  11. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  12. Effect of conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of phosphate monomer-based cement on zirconia ceramic in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Balducci, Ivan; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the durability of bond strength between a resin cement and aluminous ceramic submitted to various surface conditioning methods. Twenty-four blocks (5 X 5 X 4 mm 3) of a glass-in filtrated zirconia-alumina ceramic (inCeram Zirconia Classic) were randomly

  13. Immobilisation of heavy metal in cement-based solidification/stabilisation: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.Y.; Tyrer, M.; Hills, C.D.; Yang, X.M.; Carey, P.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy metal-bearing waste usually needs solidification/stabilization (s/s) prior to landfill to lower the leaching rate. Cement is the most adaptable binder currently available for the immobilisation of heavy metals. The selection of cements and operating parameters depends upon an understanding of chemistry of the system. This paper discusses interactions of heavy metals and cement phases in the solidification/stabilisation process. It provides a clarification of heavy metal effects on cement hydration. According to the decomposition rate of minerals, heavy metals accelerate the hydration of tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) and Portland cement, although they retard the precipitation of portlandite due to the reduction of pH resulted from hydrolyses of heavy metal ions. The chemical mechanism relevant to the accelerating effect of heavy metals is considered to be H + attacks on cement phases and the precipitation of calcium heavy metal double hydroxides, which consumes calcium ions and then promotes the decomposition of C 3 S. In this work, molecular models of calcium silicate hydrate gel are presented based on the examination of 29 Si solid-state magic angle spinning/nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS/NMR). This paper also reviews immobilisation mechanisms of heavy metals in hydrated cement matrices, focusing on the sorption, precipitation and chemical incorporation of cement hydration products. It is concluded that further research on the phase development during cement hydration in the presence of heavy metals and thermodynamic modelling is needed to improve effectiveness of cement-based s/s and extend this waste management technique

  14. Characterization of surrogate radioactive cemented waste: a laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiset, J.F.; Lastra, R.; Bilodeau, A.; Bouzoubaa

    2011-01-01

    Portland cement is commonly used to stabilize intermediate and low level of radioactive wastes. The stabilization/solidification process needs to be well understood as waste constituents can retard or activate cement hydration. The objectives of this project were to prepare surrogate radioactive cemented waste (SRCW), develop a comminution strategy for SRCW, determine its chemical characteristics, and develop processes for long term storage. This paper emphasizes on the characterization of surrogate radioactive cemented waste. The SRCW produced showed a high degree of heterogeneity mainly due to the method used to add the solution to the host cement. Heavy metals such as uranium and mercury were not distributed uniformly in the pail. Mineralogical characterization (SEM, EDS) showed that uranium is located around the rims of hydrated cement particles. In the SRCW, uranium occurs possibly in the form of a hydrated calcium uranate.The SEM-EDS results also suggest that mercury occurs mainly in the form of HgO although some metallic mercury may be also present as a result of partial decomposition of the HgO. (author)

  15. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH) 2 , Al (OH) 3 and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs + from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes

  16. E-modulus evolution and its relation to solids formation of pastes from commercial cements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Azenha, Miguel; Geiker, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Models for early age E-modulus evolution of cement pastes are available in the literature, but their validation is limited. This paper provides correlated measurements of early age evolution of E-modulus and hydration of pastes from five commercial cements differing in limestone content. A recently...

  17. Influence of ultrasonic radiation on the amorphous zeolite - Portland cement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakevicius, L.; Vaiciukyniene, D.; Demcenko, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the investigation of influence of an amorphous synthetic zeolite with inserted $Ca^{2+}$ ions additive (ASZ) on the hydration temperature of Portland cement paste. In this investigation the sonicated Portland cement paste is compared to the non-sonicated paste; and then the

  18. The analysis and comparison of the ions present in the pore water of different cement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolliffe, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    Cementation is currently the main encapsulation route for the safe disposal of intermediate level radioactive waste. By analysis of the pore solutions extracted from hardened cement pastes any potential interactions between the cement matrix and/or the disposal container can be identified. The effect of hydration time on three different blended cement systems has been assessed by analysing the water extracted from the pore voids within the hardened cement pastes by use of a high force hydraulic press. The pH, redox potential, anion and cation concentrations were measured using standard analytical techniques. The results showed that as the cement systems hydrated the volume of pore water extracted decreased, causing a reduction in the ionic species released into solution. The strongly basic pore waters contained mainly potassium and sodium hydroxide and this feature needs to be taken into account when modelling radionuclide migration. (author)

  19. Literature survey on phase composition of hardened cement paste containing fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Taku; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature survey is to collect the knowledge on the effect of fly ash in hardened cement paste and the information about evaluation of physicochemical performance based on phase composition of hardened cement paste. The performance of hardened cement paste containing fly ash is affected by the property of fly ash, hydration of cement and pozzolanic reaction of fly ash. Some properties of fly ash such as density and chemical composition are reflected in phase composition, showing the progress of cement hydration and pozzolanic reaction. Therefore clarification of the relationship of phase composition and performance will lead to appropriate evaluation of the property of fly ash. The amount of pore, chemical shrinkage, pore solution, compressive strength, Young modulus and alkali silica reaction have relations to the phase composition of hardened cement paste. It is considered as future subject to clarify the relationship of phase composition and performance for various properties of fly ash. (author)

  20. Synthesis and physical and chemical properties of poly-hydro-aluminates and poly-halogen-aluminates metals of II A group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudoydodov, B.O.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is investigation of conditions and mechanism of passing of formation reactions of aluminum hydrides, poly-hydride-aluminates and poly-halogen-aluminates of alkaline-earth metals and magnesium and studying of their physical and chemical properties

  1. Assessment of cement durability in repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.G.A.; Vicente, R.; Isiko, V.L.K.; Miyamoto, H.; Marumo, J.T.; Gobbo, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed at investigating the durability of cement paste under nuclear waste repository conditions using accelerated tests. Cement paste samples are examined after being exposed to the environmental conditions that are expected to prevail in the repository environment and the results are compared with those obtained with unexposed specimens or specimens exposed to reference conditions. The following exposure conditions were selected: a) Immersion in salt solution, distilled water, or kept in dry storage; b) Room temperature (20 C. degrees) or high temperature (60 C. degrees); c) Immersion time of 30 days or 60 days (not for dry storage); d) Irradiation to a dose of (400 kGy) or background radiation (0 kGy). After exposure to the stressing conditions, the effects of each factor on the cement paste samples were observed by changes in their characteristics. Compressive strength tests were performed on all samples and some of them were investigated in terms of changes in mineralogy by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). With the results obtained so far it was possible to point out the following conclusions. First, after a period of immersion in water, cement paste samples further hydrated and presented higher mechanical resistance, as expected. Secondly, dry storage did not allow a complete hydration as a consequence of pore water evaporation. High temperatures intensified this process and led to the ettringite decomposition to meta-ettringite. Thirdly, higher temperature accelerated hydration kinetics and promoted higher mechanical resistance in samples kept under immersion. Fourthly, the irradiation dose applied was unable to change the mineralogy of cement paste samples and fifthly, no statistically significant differences were observed between 30 or 60 days exposure time, for the test conditions

  2. In-situ Mechanical Manipulation of Wellbore Cements as a Solution to Leaky Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupresan, D.; Radonjic, M.; Heathman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement provides casing support, zonal isolation, and casing protection from corrosive fluids, which are essential for wellbore integrity. Cements can undergo one or more forms of failure such as debonding at cement/formation and cement/casing interface, fracturing and defects within cement matrix. Failures and defects within cement will ultimately lead to fluids migration, resulting in inter-zonal fluid migration and premature well abandonment. There are over 27,000 abandoned oil and gas wells only in The Gulf of Mexico (some of them dating from the late 1940s) with no gas leakage monitoring. Cement degradation linked with carbon sequestration can potentially lead to contamination of fresh water aquifers with CO2. Gas leaks can particularly be observed in deviated wells used for hydraulic fracking (60% leakage rate as they age) as high pressure fracturing increases the potential for migration pathways. Experimental method utilized in this study enables formation of impermeable seals at interfaces present in a wellbore by mechanically manipulating wellbore cement. Preliminary measurements obtained in bench scale experiments demonstrate that an impermeable cement/formation and cement/casing interface can be obtained. In post-modified cement, nitrogen gas flow-through experiments showed complete zonal isolation and no permeability in samples with pre-engineered microannulus. Material characterization experiments of modified cement revealed altered microstructural properties of cement as well as changes in mineralogical composition. Calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), the dominant mineral in hydrated cement which provides low permeability of cement, was modified as a result of cement pore water displacement, resulting in more dense structures. Calcium hydroxide (CH), which is associated with low resistance of cement to acidic fluids and therefore detrimental in most wellbore cements, was almost completely displaced and/or integrated in CSH as a result of

  3. Hydration Experiments and Physical Observations at 193 K and 243 K for Mg-Sulfates Relevant to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Carey, J. W.

    2006-03-01

    Hydration of kieserite and amorphous Mg-sulfate at 243 K progresses along simple pathways involving only hexahydrite and kieserite. Kieserite forms a duricrust-like cement, but the anhydrous precursor does not.

  4. A Study on the Manufacturing Properties of Crack Self-Healing Capsules Using Cement Powder for Addition to Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wang Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated crack self-healing capsules using cement powder for mixing into cement composites and evaluated the properties of the capsule manufacturing process in this study. The manufacture of the self-healing capsules is divided into core production processing of granulating cement in powder form and a coating process for creating a wall on the surfaces of the granulated cement particles. The produced capsules contain unhardened cement and can be mixed directly with the cement composite materials because they are protected from moisture by the wall material. Therefore, the untreated cement is present in the form of a capsule within the cement composite, and hydration can be induced by moisture penetrating the crack surface in the event of cracking. In the process of granulating the cement, it is important to obtain a suitable consistency through the kneading agent and to maintain the moisture barrier performance of the wall material. We can utilize the results of this study as a basis for advanced self-healing capsule technology for cement composites.

  5. Characterization of films formed by the aluminizing of T91 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria Cala, J. A.; Conde Rodríguez, G. R.; Y Peña Ballesteros, D.; Laverde Cataño, D.; Quintero Rangel, L. S.

    2017-12-01

    The aluminizing of a T91 martensitic ferritic steel was carried out by a novel modification to the traditional technique of packed cementation, with the objective of producing a diffusion coating of aluminum in a shorter time and operating cost, from a technique that allows the reuse of powder packaging and which the coating of metal parts with complex shapes can be secured. As an aluminum source, commercial foil is used to wrap the piece to be coated, while the powder packaging contains aluminum oxide Al2O3 and an activating salt, ammonium chloride NH4Cl. During the deposition process of the coating, the NH4Cl is decomposed by reacting with foil, and thus, aluminum halides can be transferred to the metallic substrate, which deposit aluminum on the T91 steel surface while Al2O3 can be recycled for subsequent processes. The results of the diffractograms and micrographs indicated the strong influence of temperature, exposure time and ammonium chloride concentration in the formation and growth evolution of a stable coating of iron-aluminum and iron-aluminum-nickel on the T91 steel surface, which was effectively deposited at a temperature of 700°C and an exposure period of 9 hours. The coating formed on the T91 steel surface could play a protective role towards the material by acting as a physical barrier between the alloy and other corrosive species in high temperature operated systems.

  6. Microstructure of aluminized coating on a Ni-Cr alloy after annealing treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.-L.; Gan Dershin

    2008-01-01

    The effects of annealing on the microstructure of first stage (high-Al activity pack) aluminized coating on Ni-15Cr alloy prepared by pack cementation method were analyzed by transmission electron microscope. The coating consists of a thin layer of γ'-Ni 3 Al, an interfacial zone of mixed β-NiAl and α-Cr, and a thick outer zone of β-NiAl (A layer) and mixed β-NiAl and α-Cr (B layer). Martensitic transformation was observed in the β-NiAl grains in the interfacial zone. Parallel crystallographic relationship was found at the γ/γ' interface in the substrate and the α/β interface in the interfacial zone. Cr 2 Al was found to precipitate in the β-NiAl and α-Cr grains in the B layer of the outer zone. The formation mechanisms of the coating layers, the precipitates, and the observed crystallographic relationships are discussed

  7. The effect of temperature rise on microstructural properties of cement-based materials : Correlation of experimental data and a simulation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the influence of stray current flow on temperature rise in hardening cement-based materials and consequently altered cement hydration. To simulate stray current, different levels of electrical current were applied to cement paste and mortar specimens immediately after casting.

  8. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  9. Solidification of metallic aluminum on magnesium phosphate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahalle, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste using cement. More particularly, it aims at assessing the chemical compatibility between metallic aluminum and mortars based on magnesium phosphate cement. The physical and chemical processes leading to setting and hardening of the cement are first investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TGA) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ("3"1P and "1"1B MAS-NMR) are first used to characterize the solid phases formed during hydration, while inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analysis (ICP-AES), electrical conductometry and pH measurements provide information on the pore solution composition. Then, the corrosion of metallic aluminum in magnesium phosphate mortars is studied by monitoring the equilibrium potential and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Magnesium phosphate cement is prepared from a mix of magnesium oxide (MgO) and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KH_2PO_4). In the presence of water, hydration occurs according to a dissolution - precipitation process. The main hydrate is K-struvite (MgKPO_4.6H_2O). Its precipitation is preceded by that of two transient phases: phosphorrosslerite (MgHPO_4.7H_2O) and Mg_2KH(PO_4)_2.15H_2O. Boric acid retards cement hydration by delaying the formation of cement hydrates. Two processes may be involved in this retardation: the initial precipitation of amorphous or poorly crystallized minerals containing boron and phosphorus atoms, and/or the stabilization of cations (Mg"2"+, K"+) in solution. As compared with a Portland cement-based matrix, corrosion of aluminum is strongly limited in magnesium phosphate mortar. The pore solution pH is close to neutrality and falls within the passivation domain of aluminum. Corrosion depends on several parameters: it is promoted by a water-to-cement ratio (w/c) significantly higher than the chemical water demand of cement (w/c = 0.51), and by the addition of boric

  10. Phase transformations in lithium aluminates irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, L.M.; Delfin L, A.; Urena N, F.; Basurto, R.; Bosch, P.

    2003-01-01

    The lithium aluminate like candidate to be used in the coverings producers of tritium in the fusion nuclear reactors, presents high resistance to the corrosion to the one to be stuck to structural materials as special steels. However, the crystallographic changes that take place in the cover that is continually subjected to irradiation with neutrons, can alter its resistance to the corrosion. In this work the changes of crystalline structure are shown that they present two types of nano structures of lithium aluminates, subjected to an average total dose 7.81 x 10 8 Gy in the fixed irradiation system of capsules of the one TRIGA Mark lll nuclear reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The studied nano structures presented only phase transformations without formation of amorphous material. (Author)

  11. Ligantes hidráulicos e a hidratação de óxido de magnésio em concretos refratários Hydraulic binders and magnesium oxide hydration in refractory castables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Salomão

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A presença de cimento de aluminato de cálcio e alumina hidratável pode afetar significativamente o comportamento de hidratação do óxido de magnésio (MgO em suspensões aquosas. Entre outros efeitos, destaca-se a formação do composto conhecido como hidrotalcita (Mg6Al2(CO3(OH16·(4H2O, que pode potencializar ou inibir os danos causados pela hidratação do MgO, dependendo da quantidade em que é gerado. Este trabalho investigou como a presença desses ligantes afeta a hidratação do MgO e suas conseqüências em formulações de concretos refratários usando testes de hidratação-desidratação, medidas de pH, expansão volumétrica aparente, resistência à tração por compressão diametral e porosidade. Por meio de comparações com composições de referência sem-ligante e sem-ligante-e-sem-MgO, foi verificado que os efeitos danosos da hidratação do MgO podem ser significativamente reduzidos por meio do ajuste do tipo e do teor de ligante aos concretos.The presence of calcium aluminate cement and hydratable alumina can significantly modify the magnesia sinter hydration behavior in aqueous suspensions. As a consequence of these studies, the present paper investigates how these binders content could affect magnesia hydration in refractory castables using hydration-dehydration tests, pH, AVE, mechanical strength and porosity measurements. Besides this, because for these materials the aspects related to mechanical strength, porosity and refractoriness also must be taken into account, binder-free, magnesia-free and magnesia-and-binder-free samples were also tested as references. It was found out that the deleterious effects of magnesia hydration can be greatly minimized by the binder content.

  12. Age and geochemistry of Alumine's Ignimbrites, Neuquen province, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagorio, Silvia; Massaferro, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    Geochemical and geochronological data from Alumine riolitic welded tuffs are analysed. Minor elements show enrichment in Rb, Th and K and depletion in Nb, Ti, P and Sr. La/Yb ratios are low. The geochemical features are consistent with a volcanic arc genesis. The radiometric data obtained by K/Ar method point out a Paleocene age for these rocks, allowing to correlate them with the Ventana Formation or the equivalent Auca Pan Formation. (author)

  13. Tritium extraction from neutron-irradiated lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, F.

    1995-01-01

    Lithium aluminate is being strongly considered as a breeder material because of its thermophysical, chemical and mechanical stability at high temperatures and its favorable irradiation behavior. Furthermore, it is compatible with other blanket and structural materials. In this work, the effects of calcination temperature during preparation, extraction temperature and sweep gas composition were observed. Lithium aluminate prepared by four different methods, was neutron irradiated for 30 minutes at a flux of 10 12 -10 13 n/cm 2 s in the TRIGA Mark III reactor at Salazar, Mexico; and the tritium extraction rate was measured. Calcination temperature do not affect the tritium extraction rate. However, using high calcination temperature, gamma lithium aluminate was formed. The tritium extraction at 600 Centigrade degrees was lower than at 800 Centigrade degrees and the tritium amount extracted by distillation of the solid sample was higher. The sweep gas composition showed that tritium extraction was less with Ar plus 0.5 % H 2 that with Ar plus 0.1 % H 2 . This result was contrary to expected, where the tritium extraction rate could be higher when hydrogen is added to the sweep gas. Probably this effect could be attributed to the gas purity. (Author)

  14. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  15. Inhibited Aluminization of an ODS FeCr Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for fusion energy applications both for compatibility with liquid Pb-Li and to form an alumina layer that acts as a tritium permeation barrier. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are a structural material candidate for commercial reactor concepts expected to operate above 600 C. Aluminizing was conducted in a laboratory scale chemical vapor deposition reactor using accepted conditions for coating Fe- and Ni-base alloys. However, the measured mass gains on the current batch of ODS Fe-14Cr were extremely low compared to other conventional and ODS alloys. After aluminizing at two different Al activities at 900 C and at 1100 C, characterization showed that the ODS Fe-14Cr specimens formed a dense, primarily AlN layer that prevented Al uptake. This alloy batch contained a higher (> 5000 ppma) N content than the other alloys coated and this is the most likely reason for the inhibited aluminization. Other factors such as the high O content, small (∼ 140 nm) grain size and Y-Ti oxide nano-clusters in ODS Fe-14Cr also could have contributed to the observed behavior. Examples of typical aluminide coatings formed on conventional and ODS Fe- and Ni-base alloys are shown for comparison.

  16. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  17. Electronic structure calculations of calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterne, P.A.; Meike, A.

    1995-11-01

    Many phases in the calcium-silicate-hydrate system can develop in cement exposed over long periods of time to temperatures above 25 C. As a consequence, chemical reactions involving these phases can affect the relative humidity and water chemistry of a radioactive waste repository that contains significant amounts of cement. In order to predict and simulate these chemical reactions, the authors are developing an internally consistent database of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrate structures. The results of first principles electronic structure calculations on two such phases, wollastonite (CaSiO 3 ) and xonotlite (Ca 6 Si 6 O 17 (OH) 2 ), are reported here. The calculated ground state properties are in very good agreement with experiment, providing equilibrium lattice parameters within about 1--1.4% of the experimentally reported values. The roles of the different types of oxygen atoms, which are fundamental to understanding the energetics of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrates are briefly discussed in terms of their electronic state densities. The good agreement with experiment for the lattice parameters and the consistency of the electronic density of states features for the two structures demonstrate the applicability of these electronic structure methods in calculating the fundamental properties of these phases

  18. Micropore Structure of Cement-Stabilized Gold Mine Tailings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Kyu Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mine tailings have often to be stabilized by mixing them with cementing agents. In this study, the pore structure of gold tailings stabilized with Portland cement was evaluated by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry. The investigation was conducted on samples prepared with different fractions of tailings and cement as well as on samples activated with elevated temperature curing and chemical (CaCl2 addition. It was observed that all mixed samples exhibit a mono-modal pore size distribution, indicating that the cement-stabilized tailings are characterized by a single-porosity structure. The results also showed that the higher fraction of tailings and cement leads to a dense and finer pore structure. The total porosity of mixture samples decreases with increasing curing temperature and CaCl2 concentration due to the acceleration of hydration reaction.

  19. Effect of supplementary cementing materials on the concrete corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia de Gutierrez, R.

    2003-01-01

    Failure of concrete after a period of years, less than the life expected for which it was designed, may be caused by the environment to which it has been exposed or by a variety of internal causes. The incorporation of supplementary materials has at the Portland cement the purpose of improving the concrete microstructure and also of influence the resistance of concrete to environmental attacks. Different mineral by-products as ground granulated blast furnaces slag (GGBS), silica fume (SF), meta kaolin (MK), fly ash (FA) and other products have been used as supplementary cementing materials. This paper is about the behavior of concrete in the presence of mineral additions. Compared to Portland cements, blended cements show lower heat of hydration, lower permeability, greater resistance to sulphates and sea water. These blended cements find the best application when requirements of durability are regarded as a priority specially on high performance concrete: (Author) 11 refs

  20. Physical properties and rock physics models of sediment containing natural and laboratory-formed methane gas hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Pecher, I.A.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of shear strength and acoustic velocity (p-wave) measurements performed on: (1) samples containing natural gas hydrate from the Mallik 2L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories; (2) reconstituted Ottawa sand samples containing methane gas hydrate formed in the laboratory; and (3) ice-bearing sands. These measurements show that hydrate increases shear strength and p-wave velocity in natural and reconstituted samples. The proportion of this increase depends on (1) the amount and distribution of hydrate present, (2) differences, in sediment properties, and (3) differences in test conditions. Stress-strain curves from the Mallik samples suggest that natural gas hydrate does not cement sediment grains. However, stress-strain curves from the Ottawa sand (containing laboratory-formed gas hydrate) do imply cementation is present. Acoustically, rock physics modeling shows that gas hydrate does not cement grains of natural Mackenzie Delta sediment. Natural gas hydrates are best modeled as part of the sediment frame. This finding is in contrast with direct observations and results of Ottawa sand containing laboratory-formed hydrate, which was found to cement grains (Waite et al. 2004). It therefore appears that the microscopic distribution of gas hydrates in sediment, and hence the effect of gas hydrate on sediment physical properties, differs between natural deposits and laboratory-formed samples. This difference may possibly be caused by the location of water molecules that are available to form hydrate. Models that use laboratory-derived properties to predict behavior of natural gas hydrate must account for these differences.

  1. Moisture desorption out of portland cement under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugak, E.B.; Denisov, A.V.; Muzalevskij, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the results of measuring residual water content and water losses of the basic hydrated mine rals of clinker and cement stone irradiated at three different reactors. Structural parameters of the binding agent and binding water quantity are calculated on the basis of binding agent physical model and are compared with the experimental data

  2. E-modulus evolution and its relation to solids formation of pastes from commercial cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Lino; Azenha, Miguel; Geiker, Mette; Figueiras, Joaquim

    2012-01-01

    Models for early age E-modulus evolution of cement pastes are available in the literature, but their validation is limited. This paper provides correlated measurements of early age evolution of E-modulus and hydration of pastes from five commercial cements differing in limestone content. A recently developed methodology allowed continuous monitoring of E-modulus from the time of casting. The methodology is a variant of classic resonant frequency methods, which are based on determination of the first resonant frequency of a composite beam containing the material. The hydration kinetics — and thus the rate of formation of solids — was determined using chemical shrinkage measurements. For the cements studied similar relationships between E-modulus and chemical shrinkage were observed for comparable water-to-binder ratio. For commercial cements it is suggested to model the E-modulus evolution based on the amount of binder reacted, instead of the degree of hydration.

  3. Application progress of solid 29Si, 27Al NMR in the research of cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Chunhua; Wang Xijian; Li Dongxu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an effective method for the research of cement-based materials. Now it focuses on using solid 29 Si and 27 Al NMR to research the hydration structure of the cement-based materials in cement chemistry. Purpose: A theoretical guidance is proposed for solid 29 Si and 27 Al NMR technology used in cement chemistry research. Methods: We reviewed the application of solid 29 Si and 27 Al NMR in the cement-based materials and analyzed the problem among the researches. Results: This paper introduced an fundamental, relevant-conditions and basic parameters of NMR, and studied the technical parameters of solid 29 Si and 27 Ai NMR together with the relationship among the hydration structure of cement based material. Moreover, this paper reviewed the related domestic and overseas achievements in the research of hydration structure of the cement-based materials using solid 29 Si and 27 Al NMR. Conclusion: There were some problems in the research on cement-based materials by technology of solid 29 Si and 27 Al NMR. NMR will promote the Hydration theory of cement-based material greatly. (authors)

  4. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  5. Study of P-350 cement setting kinetic by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duque Fernández, Gabriel L.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic study of cement setting process is presented in this paper A new method which allows the microscopic research of the evolution of the cement hydration applied to the study of three P-350 cuban cements is used. The initial and final values of the specific surfaces of the hydration products and cement were obtained, and the different periods of the hydration process of cement pastes were characterized. The influence of the cement phase composition on the surface development of the hydrated cement stone is discussed.

    En el presente trabajo se presenta el estudio de la cinética del proceso de fraguado del cemento empleando un método novedoso que permite investigar microscópicamente la evolución de la hidratación del cemento, el cual fue aplicado al estudio de tres cementos cubanos P-350. Se obtuvieron los valores iniciales y finales de las superficies específicas de los productos de hidratación y del cemento. Se caracterizaron los diferentes períodos del proceso de hidratación de las pastas de cemento. Se muestra la influencia de la composición fásica del cemento sobre el desarrollo superficial de la pasta hidratada.

  6. Radiological impact of cement, concrete and admixtures in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinchon-Paya, S.; Piedecausa, B.; Hurtado, S.; Sanjuan, M.A.; Chinchon, S.

    2011-01-01

    It has been analyzed samples of portland cement (PC) with and without admixtures, samples of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) with different content of Al 2 O 3 and specimens of concrete made with PC and CAC using High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry. The activity concentration index (I) is much less than 0.5 mSv y -1 for all the concrete specimens according to the Radiation protection document 112 of the European Commission. The PC without admixtures (CEM I 52,5 R) and the PC with addition of limestone (CEM II/BL 32,5 N) also have an I value much lower than 0.5 and the PC with the addition of fly ash and blast furnace slag (CEM IV/B (V) 32,5 N and III/A 42.5 N/SR) have an I value close to 0.6. The I value of the CAC used in the manufacture of structural precast concrete is of the order of 1 mSv y -1 . Some of the CAC used in refractory concrete reaches a value close to 2 mSv y -1 . - Highlights: → The activity values (I) of spanish portland cement and admixtures studied are similar to those described by other authors. → For the first time in scientific publications we have shown results of several calcium aluminate cements (CAC). → CAC used in structural concrete has an approximate I value = 1 (similar to blast furnace slag and fly ash). → One type of CAC with Al 2 O 3 content of 51% used in refractory concretes has a value of I = 2.

  7. Study on small-strain behaviours of methane hydrate sandy sediments using discrete element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yanxin; Cheng Yipik [Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London (UCL), Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Xu Xiaomin; Soga, Kenichi [Geotechnical and Environmental Research Group, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-18

    Methane hydrate bearing soil has attracted increasing interest as a potential energy resource where methane gas can be extracted from dissociating hydrate-bearing sediments. Seismic testing techniques have been applied extensively and in various ways, to detect the presence of hydrates, due to the fact that hydrates increase the stiffness of hydrate-bearing sediments. With the recognition of the limitations of laboratory and field tests, wave propagation modelling using Discrete Element Method (DEM) was conducted in this study in order to provide some particle-scale insights on the hydrate-bearing sandy sediment models with pore-filling and cementation hydrate distributions. The relationship between shear wave velocity and hydrate saturation was established by both DEM simulations and analytical solutions. Obvious differences were observed in the dependence of wave velocity on hydrate saturation for these two cases. From the shear wave velocity measurement and particle-scale analysis, it was found that the small-strain mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sandy sediments are governed by both the hydrate distribution patterns and hydrate saturation.

  8. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. Because hydraulic cement requires a chemical hydration reaction for setting and hardening, it is subject to potential interactions between elements in the waste and binder that can retard or prevent solidification. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above its melting point, combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991

  9. Study on evolution of disposal environment due to alteration of cement. Summary report. Commission work report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, K.; Kubo, H.; Kato, T.; Fujita, H.

    2001-02-01

    The study shows effects on performance of the engineered and geological barriers due to alteration of cement including low alkalinity cement. Alteration test of bentonite and crystalline rock was carried out by low alkalinity cement pore water. Leaching of super plasticizer was investigated modeled for the latest period of alteration of cement. Planning a experiment for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was carried out. Application of the cement for shotcrete was investigated. The results described below are obtained. 1. Almost of montmorillonite was solved in Na-K-Ca mixed solution. No alteration was observed in low alkalinity cement. The similar results were obtained for crystalline rock. 2. It is noted that main part of super plasticizer wasn't leachated even in the latest period of leaching of cement. Increment of leaching of super plasticizer wasn't observed corresponding to leaching of cement hydrates. 3. Accelerating test for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was proposed. 4. It was demonstrated that low alkalinity cement was applicable for shotcrete. 5. pH of pore water of cement with highly pozzolanic materials isn't significantly decreased in high temperature. 6. Predictable alteration of barriers due to alteration of cement were pointed out including interaction of bentonite and rock. (author)

  10. Study on evolution of disposal environment due to alteration of cement. Commission work report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, K.; Kubo, H.; Kato, T.; Fujita, H.

    2001-02-01

    The study shows effects on performance of the engineered and geological barriers due to alteration of cement including low alkalinity cement. Alteration test of bentonite and crystalline rock was carried out by low alkalinity cement pore water. Leaching of super plasticizer was investigated modeled for the latest period of alteration of cement. Planning a experiment for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was carried out. Application of the cement for shotcrete was investigated. The results described below are obtained. 1. Almost of montmorillonite was solved in Na-K-Ca mixed solution. No alteration was observed in low alkalinity cement. The similar results were obtained for crystalline rock. 2. It is noted that main part of super plasticizer wasn't leachate even in the latest period of leaching of cement. Increment of leaching of super plasticizer wasn't observed corresponding to leaching of cement hydrates. 3. Accelerating test for corrosion of re-bar in low alkalinity cement was proposed. 4. It was demonstrated that low alkalinity cement was applicable for shotcrete. 5. pH of pore water of cement with highly pozzolanic materials isn't significantly decreased in high temperature. 6. Predictable alteration of barriers due to alteration of cement were pointed out including interaction of bentonite and rock. (author)

  11. Vibrational investigation of calcium-silicate cements for endodontics in simulated body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Paola; Modena, Enrico; Tinti, Anna; Siboni, Francesco; Prati, Carlo; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

    2011-05-01

    Calcium-silicate MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) cements have been recently developed for oral and endodontic surgery. This study was aimed at investigating commercial (White ProRoot MTA, White and Grey MTA-Angelus) and experimental (wTC-Bi) accelerated calcium-silicate cements with regards to composition, hydration products and bioactivity upon incubation for 1-28 days at 37 °C, in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). Deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes during incubation were investigated by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy, and pH measurements. Vibrational techniques disclosed significant differences in composition among the unhydrated cements, which significantly affected the bioactivity as well as pH, and hydration products of the cements. After one day in DPBS, all the cements were covered by a more or less homogeneous layer of B-type carbonated apatite. The experimental cement maintained a high bioactivity, only slightly lower than the other cements and appears a valid alternative to commercial cements, in view of its adequate setting time properties. The bioactivity represents an essential property to favour bone healing and makes the calcium-silicate cements the gold standard materials for root-apical endodontic surgery.

  12. Sustainable Blended Cements-Influences of Packing Density on Cement Paste Chemical Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Yaniv; Peled, Alva

    2018-04-18

    This paper addresses the development of blended cements with reduced clinker amount by partial replacement of the clinker with more environmentally-friendly material (e.g., limestone powders). This development can lead to more sustainable cements with reduced greenhouse gas emission and energy consumption during their production. The reduced clicker content was based on improved particle packing density and surface area of the cement powder by using three different limestone particle diameters: smaller (7 µm, 3 µm) or larger (70 µm, 53 µm) than the clinker particles, or having a similar size (23 µm). The effects of the different limestone particle sizes on the chemical reactivity of the blended cement were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), loss on ignition (LOI), isothermal calorimetry, and the water demand for reaching normal consistency. It was found that by blending the original cement with limestone, the hydration process and the reactivity of the limestone itself were increased by the increased surface area of the limestone particles. However, the carbonation reaction was decreased with the increased packing density of the blended cement with limestone, having various sizes.

  13. Utilization of Iron Ore Tailings as Raw Material for Portland Cement Clinker Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry has for some time been seeking alternative raw material for the Portland cement clinker production. The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of utilizing iron ore tailings (IOT to replace clay as alumina-silicate raw material for the production of Portland cement clinker. For this purpose, two kinds of clinkers were prepared: one was prepared by IOT; the other was prepared by clay as a reference. The reactivity and burnability of raw meal, mineralogical composition and physical properties of clinker, and hydration characteristic of cement were studied by burnability analysis, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and hydration analysis. The results showed that the raw meal containing IOT had higher reactivity and burnability than the raw meal containing clay, and the use of IOT did not affect the formation of characteristic mineralogical phases of Portland cement clinker. Furthermore, the physical and mechanical performance of two cement clinkers were similar. In addition, the use of IOT was found to improve the grindability of clinker and lower the hydration heat of Portland cement. These findings suggest that IOT can replace the clay as alumina-silicate raw material for the preparation of Portland cement clinker.

  14. The sorption and mechanical properties of the modified cement matrix used for conditioning of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, Daniela; Nuculae, Ortenzia; Jinescu, Gheorghita; Duliu, Octavian; Dogaru, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive contaminant sorption onto concrete represents one of the most important retardation mechanisms in engineered barriers such as the conditioning matrix itself, concrete walls and concrete floors. During the life of a disposal facility for radioactive waste, the sorption properties as well as the mechanical properties of the cement are affected by both external and internal processes. The most important sorbing material present in concrete is the hydrated cement. The sorption data obtained for specific cement or cement mixes in general may be used to characterize a given cement type. In order to improve the mechanical and sorption properties of the cement matrix, different additives were used in the laboratory tests. The used additives are known to have good sorption properties. The paper describes the influence of the concentration of additives on the mechanical and sorption properties of the cement matrix. As radioactive contaminants 134 Cs, 60 Co, 3 H, 241 Am were used. (authors)

  15. Producing cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E G

    1923-09-12

    A process and apparatus are described for producing Portland cement in which pulverized shale is successively heated in a series of inclined rotary retorts having internal stirrers and oil gas outlets, which are connected to condensers. The partially treated shale is removed from the lowermost retort by a conveyor, then fed separately or conjointly into pipes and thence into a number of vertically disposed retorts. Each of these retorts may be fitted interiorly with vertical arranged conveyors which elevate the shale and discharge it over a lip, from whence it falls to the bottom of the retorts. The lower end of each casing is furnished with an adjustable discharge door through which the spent shale is fed to a hopper, thence into separate trucks. The oil gases generated in the retorts are exhausted through pipes to condensers. The spent shale is conveyed to a bin and mixed while hot with ground limestone. The admixed materials are then ground and fed to a rotary kiln which is fired by the incondensible gases derived from the oil gases obtained in the previous retorting of the shale. The calcined materials are then delivered from the rotary kiln to rotary coolers. The waste gases from the kiln are utilized for heating the retorts in which the ground shale is heated for the purpose of extracting therefrom the contained hydrocarbon oils and gases.

  16. Methane hydrate induced permeability modification for multiphase flow in unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2011-08-01

    An experimental study was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to capture three-dimensional (3-D) methane hydrate distributions and potential discrete flow pathways in a sand pack sample. A numerical study was also performed to develop and analyze empirical relations that describe the impacts of hydrate accumulation habits within pore space (e.g., pore filling or grain cementing) on multiphase fluid migration. In the experimental study, water was injected into a hydrate-bearing sand sample that was monitored using an X-ray CT scanner. The CT images were converted into numerical grid elements, providing intrinsic sample data including porosity and phase saturations. The impacts of hydrate accumulation were examined by adapting empirical relations into the flow simulations as additional relations governing the evolution of absolute permeability of hydrate bearing sediment with hydrate deposition. The impacts of pore space hydrate accumulation habits on fluid migration were examined by comparing numerical predictions with experimentally measured water saturation distributions and breakthrough curves. A model case with 3-D heterogeneous initial conditions (hydrate saturation, porosity, and water saturation) and pore body-preferred hydrate accumulations best captured water migration behavior through the hydrate-bearing sample observed in the experiment. In the best matching model, absolute permeability in the hydrate bearing sample does not decrease significantly with increasing hydrate saturation until hydrate saturation reaches about 40%, after which it drops rapidly, and complete blockage of flow through the sample can occur as hydrate accumulations approach 70%. The result highlights the importance of permeability modification due to hydrate accumulation habits when predicting multiphase flow through high-saturation, reservoir quality hydrate-bearing sediments.

  17. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  18. Applications of radioactive methods in cement concrete testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinakaran, M.; Vijayaraghavan, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Basic principles regarding the neutron moderation technique and the successful application of this technique for determining the moisture and cement content in hardened concrete are briefly discussed. Since fast neutrons are converted into slow thermal neutrons by elastic scattering in the presence of hydrogen nuclei, it is possible to determine the moisture content in hardened cement concrete using precalibrated relationships. Also since most of the hydrogenous matter in concrete pertains to non-fixed water and hydrated cement compounds, an analysis of slow neutron counts on a sample at different non-fixed moisture contents make the estimation of cement content possible using the mathematical relationship between cement content, degree of hydration and the equivalent moisture content. The method developed is quick, non-destructive, and repeatable at the same time giving better accuracy when compared to conventional chemical methods. Use was also made of gamma ray transmission method for determining the differential density at various depths in a cement concrete pavement making use of cores cut from the pavement. Further, development proposed for determination of density at different depths of pavement in situ is also discussed. (auth.)

  19. Study of damages by neutron irradiation in lithium aluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios G, O.

    1999-01-01

    Lithium aluminates proposed to the production of tritium in fusion nuclear reactors, due to the thermal stability that they present as well as the behavior of the aluminium to the irradiation. As a neutron flux with profile (≅ 14 Mev) of a fusion reactor is not available. A irradiation experiment was designed in order to know the micro and nano structure damages produced by fast and thermal neutrons in two irradiation positions of the fusion nuclear reactor Triga Mark III: CT (Thermal Column) and SIFCA (System of Irradiation Fixed of Capsules). In this work samples of lithium aluminate were characterized by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Two samples were prepared by two methods: a) coalition method and b) peroxide method. This characterization comprised original and irradiated samples. The irradiated sample amounted to 4 in total: one for each preparation method and one for each irradiation position. The object of this analysis was to correlate with the received neutron dose the damages suffered by the samples with the neutron irradiation during long periods (440 H), in their micro and nano structure aspects; in order to understand the changes as a function of the irradiation zone (with thermal and fast neutron flux) and the preparation methods of the samples and having as an antecedent the irradiation in SIFCA position by short times (2h). The obtained results are referred to the stability of γ -aluminate phase, under given conditions of irradiation and defined nano structure arrangement. They also refer to the proposals of growth mechanism and nucleation of new phases. The error associated with the measurement of neutron dose is also discussed. (Author)

  20. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  1. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  2. Aluminized film, seam sealing tests and observations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-16

    The purpose of this work was to investigate various seam sealing techniques, reinforcing methods, fitting installations, seam tolerances and geometric configurations pertinent to an aluminized plastic laminate. The program seeks a successful fabricating method for producing low-diffusion, cylindrical, spar liners to contain pressurized GH{sub 2} and GO{sub 2}. The test plan included: (1) seaming techniques on metallized Mylar film; (2) ``double patches`` for end fittings; (3) stainless steel bulkhead fitting assembly with seals; (4) minimum run tolerance on linear shear seam; (5) peel seam vs. inverted seal seam fabrication.

  3. System and process for aluminization of metal-containing substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2017-12-12

    A system and method are detailed for aluminizing surfaces of metallic substrates, parts, and components with a protective alumina layer in-situ. Aluminum (Al) foil sandwiched between the metallic components and a refractory material when heated in an oxidizing gas under a compression load at a selected temperature forms the protective alumina coating on the surface of the metallic components. The alumina coating minimizes evaporation of volatile metals from the metallic substrates, parts, and components in assembled devices that can degrade performance during operation at high temperature.

  4. System and process for aluminization of metal-containing substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W

    2015-11-03

    A system and method are detailed for aluminizing surfaces of metallic substrates, parts, and components with a protective alumina layer in-situ. Aluminum (Al) foil sandwiched between the metallic components and a refractory material when heated in an oxidizing gas under a compression load at a selected temperature forms the protective alumina coating on the surface of the metallic components. The alumina coating minimizes evaporation of volatile metals from the metallic substrates, parts, and components in assembled devices during operation at high temperature that can degrade performance.

  5. Structural and hydration properties of amorphous tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.; Fukunaga, T.; Shiraishi, Y.; Iwase, K.; Xu, Q.; Oishi, K.; Yatsuyanagi, K.; Yonemura, M.; Itoh, K.; Sugiyama, M.; Ishigaki, T.; Kamiyama, T.; Kawai, M.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical milling was carried out to synthesize amorphous tricalcium silicate (Ca 3 SiO 5 ) sample, where Ca 3 SiO 5 is the most principal component of Portland cement. The partial phase transformation from the crystalline to the amorphous state was observed by X-ray and neutron diffractions. Moreover, it was found that the structural distortion on the Ca-O correlation exists in the milled Ca 3 SiO 5 . The hydration of the milled Ca 3 SiO 5 with D 2 O proceeds as follows: the formation of hydration products such as Ca(OD) 2 rapidly occurs in the early hydration stage, and then proceeds slowly after about 15 h. The induction time for the hydration of the milled Ca 3 SiO 5 is approximately one half shorter than that for the hydration of the unmilled one. This result means that the mechanical milling brings about the chemical activity of Ca 3 SiO 5 for hydration, and may be particularly useful for increasing the reactivity in the early hydration stage

  6. Influences of Steelmaking Slags on Hydration and Hardening of Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanova, A. A.; Dildin, A. N.; Maksimov, S. P.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that the slag of metallurgical production can be used in the construction industry as an active mineral additive for concrete. This approach allows us to solve environmental problems and reduce costs for the production of binder and concrete simultaneously. Most often slag is used in the form of a filler, an active mineral additive or as a part of a binder for artificial conglomerates. The introduction of slag allows one to notice a part of the cement, to obtain concretes that are more resistant to the impact of aggressive sulfate media. The paper shows the possibility of using recycled steel-smelting slags in the construction industry for the production of cement. An assessment was made of their effect on the hydration of the cement stone and hardening of the concrete together with the plasticizer under normal conditions. In the process of work, we used the slag of the Zlatoust Electrometallurgical Factory. Possible limitations of the content of steel-slag slag in concrete because of the possible presence of harmful impurities are shown. It is necessary to enter slag in conjunction with superplasticizers to reduce the flow of water mixing. Slags can be used as a hardening accelerator for cement concrete as they allow one to increase the degree of cement hydration and concrete strength. It is shown that slags can be used to produce fast-hardening concretes and their comparative characteristics with other active mineral additives are given.

  7. Effects of Na4EDTA and EDTA on seeded precipitation of sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕保林; 陈启元; 尹周澜; 胡慧萍

    2010-01-01

    Na4EDTA and EDTA were adopted as new additives to intensify the seeded precipitation process of sodium aluminate solution. The effects of the two additives at certain concentrations on the seeded precipitation rate of sodium aluminate solution, particle size distribution (PSD) and morphology of precipitated gibbsite were investigated using titration method, particle size analyzer and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The results show that the two additives can accelerate the seeded precipitation rate of sodium aluminate solution. At relatively high concentration, the facilitative effect of EDTA on sodium aluminate solution is more obvious than that of Na4EDTA. EDTA makes gibbsite particles thinner than Na4EDTA. The Na+ and H+ result in the different effects on the seeded precipitation rate of sodium aluminate solution in spite of the same EDTA anion in the two additives.

  8. On the effect of mixing on property development of cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Bøhm, Anja; Kjeldsen, Ane Mette

    2006-01-01

    by hand and in a high-speed mixer. Chemical shrinkage was measured to illustrate the effect of mixing on development of hydration. Chloride migration was measured on 28 days old pastes to illustrate the effect of mixing on the hydrated pastes. The present investigation of pastes of white Portland cement...... showed an effect of mixing on the development of chemical shrinkage, i.e. hydration, of pastes with superplasticizer, but without silica fume. Silica fume agglomerates were observed in thin sections of pastes with silica fume and mixed by hand; however no effect on the development of hydration...

  9. Spectroscopic investigation of Ni speciation in hardened cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespa, M; Dähn, R; Grolimund, D; Wieland, E; Scheidegger, A M

    2006-04-01

    Cement-based materials play an important role in multi-barrier concepts developed worldwide for the safe disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cement is used to condition and stabilize the waste materials and to construct the engineered barrier systems (container, backfill, and liner materials) of repositories for radioactive waste. In this study, Ni uptake by hardened cement paste has been investigated with the aim of improving our understanding of the immobilization process of heavy metals in cement on the molecular level. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques were used to determine the local environment of Ni in cement systems. The Ni-doped samples were prepared at two different water/cement ratios (0.4, 1.3) and different hydration times (1 hour to 1 year) using a sulfate-resisting Portland cement. The metal loadings and the metal salts added to the system were varied (50 up to 5000 mg/kg; NO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl-). The XAS study showed that for all investigated systems Ni(ll) is predominantly immobilized in a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase, which was corroborated by DRS measurements. Only a minor extent of Ni(ll) precipitates as Ni-hydroxides (alpha-Ni(OH)2 and beta-Ni(OH)2). This finding suggests that Ni-Al LDH, rather than Ni-hydroxides, is the solubility-limiting phase in the Ni-doped cement system.

  10. An effective medium inversion algorithm for gas hydrate quantification and its application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, S.; Minshull, T.A.; Priest, J.A.; Best, A.I.; Clayton, C.R.I.; Waite, W.F.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of gas hydrate in marine sediments alters their physical properties. In some circumstances, gas hydrate may cement sediment grains together and dramatically increase the seismic P- and S-wave velocities of the composite medium. Hydrate may also form a load-bearing structure within the sediment microstructure, but with different seismic wave attenuation characteristics, changing the attenuation behaviour of the composite. Here we introduce an inversion algorithm based on effective medium modelling to infer hydrate saturations from velocity and attenuation measurements on hydrate-bearing sediments. The velocity increase is modelled as extra binding developed by gas hydrate that strengthens the sediment microstructure. The attenuation increase is modelled through a difference in fluid flow properties caused by different permeabilities in the sediment and hydrate microstructures. We relate velocity and attenuation increases in hydrate-bearing sediments to their hydrate content, using an effective medium inversion algorithm based on the self-consistent approximation (SCA), differential effective medium (DEM) theory, and Biot and squirt flow mechanisms of fluid flow. The inversion algorithm is able to convert observations in compressional and shear wave velocities and attenuations to hydrate saturation in the sediment pore space. We applied our algorithm to a data set from the Mallik 2L–38 well, Mackenzie delta, Canada, and to data from laboratory measurements on gas-rich and water-saturated sand samples. Predictions using our algorithm match the borehole data and water-saturated laboratory data if the proportion of hydrate contributing to the load-bearing structure increases with hydrate saturation. The predictions match the gas-rich laboratory data if that proportion decreases with hydrate saturation. We attribute this difference to differences in hydrate formation mechanisms between the two environments.

  11. Feasibility of using phase change materials to control the heat of hydration in massive concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Khil, Bae-Soo; Chae, Young-Seok; Liang, Qi-Bo; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM), such as a latent heat material (LHM), to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests) were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH)2 · 8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  12. Feasibility of Using Phase Change Materials to Control the Heat of Hydration in Massive Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM, such as a latent heat material (LHM, to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH2·8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  13. BSR and methane hydrates: New challenges for geophysics and rock physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1996-12-31

    It is generally accepted that solid gas hydrates which form within the uppermost few hundred meters of the sea floor are responsible for so-called Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) at continental margins. Gas to solid volumetric ratio in recovered hydrate samples may be as large as 170. Consequently, huge amounts of compressed methane (more than twice all recoverable and nonrecoverable oil, gas, and coal on earth) may exist under earth`s oceans. These hydrates are a potential energy resource, they influence global warming and effect seafloor mechanical stability. It is possible, in principle, to obtain a quantitative estimate of the amount and state of existing hydrates by relating seismic velocity to the volume of gas hydrate in porous sediments. This can be done by linking the elastic properties of hydrated sediments to their internal structure. The authors approach this problem by examining two micromechanical models of hydrate deposition in the pore space: (1) the hydrate cements grain contacts and thus significantly stiffens the sediment; and (2) the hydrate is located away from grain contacts and only weakly affects the stiffness of the sediment frame. To discriminate between the two models the authors use the Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) technique of seismic data processing. This approach allows them to estimate the amount of gas hydrates in the pore space, and also to tell whether the permeability of the hydrated sediment is high or low. The latter is important for determining whether free methane can be trapped underneath a BSR.

  14. Impact of Casing Expansion on the Mechanical and Petro-Physical Properties of Wellbore Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyibo, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of this research is to investigate the applicability of expandable casing technology as a remediation technique for leaky wells resulting in gas migration problems. Micro annulus is usually created at the cement-formation/cement-casing interface or within the cement matrix either due to poor primary cementing or as a result of activities such as temperature and pressure variation or fracturing operations. Recent reports on gas migration in hydraulically fractured wellbores, has raised concerns on the contamination of fresh water aquifers resulting from fluid migration though this flow path. A unique bench-scale physical model which utilizes expandable tubulars in the remediation of micro annular gas flow has been used to simulate expansion of a previously-cemented casing under field-like conditions. Three different designs of cement slurry: regular 16.4 lb. /gal, 16.4 lb. /gal base slurry foamed to 13 lb. /gal and 16.4 lb. /gal cement slurry with 10% salt concentration. Gas flow path (microannulus) was artificially created at the pipe-cement interface by rotating the inner pipe in a pipe inside pipe assembly with cement in the annulus within the first few hours of hydration to create debonding at the cement-casing interface. Nitrogen gas flow-through experiments were performed before and after the expansion to confirm the sealing of the microannulus. The results obtained confirmed the effectiveness of this technique in the complete closure of gas leakage path, providing seal-tight cement-formation interface free of microannulus. The manipulation of the cement sheath during the casing expansion resulted in improved porosity, permeability and the strength of the cement sheath. SEM micrographs revealed decrease in pore size and fracturing of unhydrated cement grains within the cement matrix. This technology has great potential to become one of the leading cement remediation techniques for leaks behind the casing if implemented. Keywords: Wellbore

  15. High-level radioactive waste incorporation into (special) cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Gouda, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A feasibility study has demonstrated that very strong, durable, relatively impermeable cylinders may be prepared by hot pressing combinations of cements with simulated radioactive waste solids. While the properties have not been studied exhaustively, the results suggest an optional method for immobilization and isolation of radioactive waste. Samples prepared with calcium aluminate cements appeared to have properties superior to those with Portland cements. Four simulated radioactive waste compositions having high rare-earth oxide contents, and some containing a large excess of NaNO 3 , were studied. Modest temperatures [423 to 673 K (150 to 400 0 C)] were used for hot pressing at pressures from 178 to 345 MPa. Dense strong very low porosity specimens resulted when mixtures containing from 10 to 50% waste were hot pressed, incorporating also a small percentage of water. In addition, high-strength cement cylinders were prepared with the waste solid (approximately 20 wt% waste) in a separate core and were very resistant to leaching by water near its boiling point. With this configuration, even the NaNO 3 -containing wastes were resistant to leaching by water

  16. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    part of the Ugnu and throughout the West Sak. No hydrate-bearing zones were identified either in recovered core or on well logs. The base of the permafrost was found at about 1260 ft. With the exception of the deepest sands in the West Sak and some anomalous thin, tight zones, all sands recovered (after thawing) are unconsolidated with high porosity and high permeability. At 800 psi, Ugnu sands have an average porosity of 39.3% and geometrical mean permeability of 3.7 Darcys. Average grain density is 2.64 g/cc. West Sak sands have an average porosity of 35.5%, geometrical mean permeability of 0.3 Darcys, and average grain density of 2.70 g/cc. There were several 1-2 ft intervals of carbonate-cemented sandstone recovered from the West Sak. These intervals have porosities of only a few percent and very low permeability. On a well log they appear as resistive with a high sonic velocity. In shallow sections of other wells these usually are the only logs available. Given the presence of gas in Hot Ice No. 1, if only resistivity and sonic logs and a mud log had been available, tight sand zones may have been interpreted as containing hydrates. Although this finding does not imply that all previously mapped hydrate zones are merely tight sands, it does add a note of caution to the practice of interpreting the presence of hydrates from old well information. The methane hydrate stability zone below the Hot Ice No. 1 location includes thick sections of sandstone and conglomerate which would make excellent reservoir rocks for hydrates and below the permafrost zone shallow gas. The Ugnu formation comprises a more sand-rich section than does the West Sak formation, and the Ugnu sands when cleaned and dried are slightly more porous and significantly more permeable than the West Sak.

  18. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  19. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  20. Ultrafine portland cement performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Argiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available By mixing several binder materials and additions with different degrees of fineness, the packing density of the final product may be improved. In this work, ultrafine cement and silica fume mixes were studied to optimize the properties of cement-based materials. This research was performed in mortars made of two types of cement (ultrafine Portland cement and common Portland cement and two types of silica fume with different particle-size distributions. Two Portland cement replacement ratios of 4% and 10% of silica fume were selected and added by means of a mechanical blending method. The results revealed that the effect of the finer silica fume mixed with the coarse cement enhances the mechanical properties and pore structure refinement at a later age. This improvement is somewhat lower in the case of ultrafine cement with silica fume.

  1. Thermophysical properties of blends from Portland and sulfoaluminate-belite cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojumdar, S.C.; Janotka, I.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of mortars with blends consisting of sulfoaluminate-belite cements and ordinary Portland cement made with cement to sand ratio of 1:3 by weight and w/c = 0.5 maintained for 90 days at 20 0 C either at 60% relative humidity - dry air or 100% relative humidity - wet air. The results show insufficient character of hydraulic activity of sulfoaluminate-belite cements. Their quality has been improved. The replacement of 15 wt % of sulfoaluminate-belite cement by ordinary Portland cement influences strength positively and elasticity modulus values as well as hydrated phases and pore structure development of sulfoaluminate-belite/ordinary Portland cement blends relative to pure sulfoaluminate-belite cement systems. The above statements confirm the possible making technologies, when improvements in sulfoaluminate-belite cements quality will be achieved. One would then anticipate the competition in usages between sulfoaluminate-belite/ordinary Portland cement and blast furnace-slag Portland cement systems in the practice. It is important to consider because sulfoaluminate-belite cements are of great advantage from the viewpoint of energy savings and quantity of CO 2 released during their production. Thermal characteristics of the samples were studied by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis from room temperature to 1000 0 C in air atmosphere. Generally, four significant temperature regions on thermogravimetry curves with the respective differential thermal analysis peak temperature for all types of samples are observed (Authors)

  2. Thermodynamic modelling of alkali-activated slag cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Rupert J.; Lothenbach, Barbara; Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic modelling analysis of alkali-activated slag cements is presented. • Thermodynamic database describes zeolites, alkali carbonates, C–(N–)A–S–H gel. • Updated thermodynamic model for Mg–Al layered double hydroxides. • Description of phase assemblages in Na 2 SiO 3 - and Na 2 CO 3 -activated slag cements. • Phase diagrams for NaOH-activated and Na 2 SiO 3 -activated slag cements are simulated. - Abstract: This paper presents a thermodynamic modelling analysis of alkali-activated slag-based cements, which are high performance and potentially low-CO 2 binders relative to Portland cement. The thermodynamic database used here contains a calcium (alkali) aluminosilicate hydrate ideal solid solution model (CNASH-ss), alkali carbonate and zeolite phases, and an ideal solid solution model for a hydrotalcite-like Mg–Al layered double hydroxide phase. Simulated phase diagrams for NaOH- and Na 2 SiO 3 -activated slag-based cements demonstrate the high stability of zeolites and other solid phases in these materials. Thermodynamic modelling provides a good description of the chemical compositions and types of phases formed in Na 2 SiO 3 -activated slag cements over the most relevant bulk chemical composition range for these cements, and the simulated volumetric properties of the cement paste are consistent with previously measured and estimated values. Experimentally determined and simulated solid phase assemblages for Na 2 CO 3 -activated slag cements were also found to be in good agreement. These results can be used to design the chemistry of alkali-activated slag-based cements, to further promote the uptake of this technology and valorisation of metallurgical slags

  3. Dielectric behavior and ac electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline nickel aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurien, Siby; Mathew, Jose; Sebastian, Shajo; Potty, S.N.; George, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel aluminate was prepared by chemical co-precipitation, and nanoparticles having different particle size were obtained by annealing the precursor at different temperatures. The TG/DTA measurements showed thermal decomposition was a three-step process with crystallisation of the spinel phase started at a temperature 420 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the specimen began to crystallise on annealing above 420 deg. C and became almost crystalline at about 900 deg. C. The particle sizes were calculated from XRD. Dielectric properties of nickel aluminate were studied as a function of the frequency of the applied ac signal at different temperatures. It was seen the real dielectric constant ε', and dielectric loss tan δ decreased with frequency of applied field while the ac conductivity increased as the frequency of the applied field increased. The dielectric relaxation mechanism is explained by considering nanostructured NiAl 2 O 4 as a carrier-dominated dielectric with high density of hopping charge carriers. The variation of ε' with different particle size depends on several interfacial region parameters, which change with the average particle size

  4. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  5. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  6. Investigation of magnesium oxychloride cement at the initial hardening stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Averina Galina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the process of variation of magnesium oxychloride cement deformations at the initial hardening stage depending on the activity of magnesium oxide powder which is determined by the parameters of the source material burning. Investigation is focused on magnesium cements obtained from pure magnesium hydroxide. Source materials were burnt at various temperatures with the purpose to obtain magnesium oxide powder with different activity. Regular content of hydrated phases was determined in hardened magnesium cement prepared on the basis of binders with different activity. The study reveals the influence of magnesium oxide powder activity on the process of deformation occurrence in hardened magnesium cement and its tendency to crack formation.

  7. Influence of nano-dispersive modified additive on cement activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazonova, Natalya, E-mail: n.a.sazonova@mail.ru; Badenikov, Artem, E-mail: rector@agta.ru; Ivanova, Elizaveta, E-mail: lisik-iva@mail.ru [Angarsk State Technical University, 60, Tchaykovsky St., 665835, Angarsk (Russian Federation); Skripnikova, Nelli, E-mail: nks2003@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    In the work the influence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the cement activity and the processes of structure formation of the hardened cement paste in different periods of hydration are studied. The changes in the kinetic curves of the sample strength growth modified with SWCNT in amount of 0.01 and 0.0005 % are stipulated by the results of differential scanning colorimetry, scanning electronic and ionic microscopy, X-ray-phase analysis. It was found that the nano-modified additive may increase in the axis compressive strength of the system by 1.4–6.3 fold relatively to the reference samples and may reach 179.6 MPa. It may intensify the hydration process of calcium silicates as well as influence on the matrix of hardened cement paste. The studies are conducted on the structural changes in the hardened cement paste, the time periods of increase and decrease of the compressive strength of the samples, the amount of the calcium hydroxide and tobermorite-like gel as well as the degree of hydration C{sub 3}S and β-C{sub 2}S.

  8. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  9. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  10. Physicochemical changes of cements by ground water corrosion in radioactive waste storage; Evolucion fisicoquimica de los cementos por corrosion de aguas subterraneas en un almacen de desechos radioactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras R, A.; Badillo A, V. E.; Robles P, E. F. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Nava E, N. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: aida.contreras@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    Knowing that the behavior of cementations materials based on known hydraulic cement binder is determined essentially by the physical and chemical transformation of cement paste (water + cement) that is, the present study is essentially about the cement paste evolution in contact with aqueous solutions since one of principal risks in systems security are the ground and surface waters, which contribute to alteration of various barriers and represent the main route of radionuclides transport. In this research, cements were hydrated with different relations cement-aqueous solution to different times. The pastes were analyzed by different solid observation techniques XRD and Moessbauer with the purpose of identify phases that form when are in contact with aqueous solutions of similar composition to ground water. The results show a definitive influence of chemical nature of aqueous solution as it encourages the formation of new phases like hydrated calcium silicates, which are the main phases responsible of radionuclides retention in a radioactive waste storage. (Author)

  11. Developing Low-Clinker Ternary Blends for Indian Cement Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Aritra

    2018-05-01

    In today's scenario cement-concrete has become the backbone of infrastructure development. The use of concrete is increasing day by day and so does cement. One of the major concerns is that the cement manufacturing contributes 7% of total man-made CO2 emission in the environment. At the same time India being a developing country secured the second position in cement production. On the other hand solid waste management is one of the growing problems in India. As we are one of the major contributors in this situation so, the time has come to think about the sustainable alternatives. From various researches it has been observed that the low clinker cement can be suitable option. In the present paper we have tried to develop a low clinker ternary blend for Indian cement industry using the concept of synergetic behavior of fly ash-limestone reaction and formation of more stable monocarboaluminate hydrate and hemicarboaluminate hydrate. 30% fly ash and 15% limestone and 5% gypsum have been used as supplementary cementing material for replacing 50% clinker. The mechanical properties like, compressive strength, have been studied for the fly ash limestone ternary blends cements and the results have been compared with the other controlled blends and ternary blends. The effect of intergrinding of constituent materials has shown a comparable properties which can be used for various structural application. The effect of dolomitic limestone has also been studied in fly ash limestone ternary blends and the result shows the relation between compressive strength and dolomite content is inversely proportional.

  12. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: liuxm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline regions in size of ∼5 nm were found in the amorphous C-A-S-H gel. • A hydration model was proposed to clarify the hydration mechanism. • The developed cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5 nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  13. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline regions in size of ∼5 nm were found in the amorphous C-A-S-H gel. • A hydration model was proposed to clarify the hydration mechanism. • The developed cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5 nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  14. DESIGN OF CEMENT COMPOSITES WITH INCREASED IMPERMEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedyuk Roman Sergeevich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the development of composite binders for producing concrete with improved characteristics of gas, water and vapor permeability. The authors investigate the processes of composite materials formation in order of decreasing scale levels from macro to nanostructures. The criteria for optimization of the volume of dispersed additives in concrete are offered. The authors theoretically studied the technological features of the formation of hydrated cement stone structure. A positive effect of nanodispersed additives on the structure and physico-mechanical properties of cement composite materials are predicted. Thanks to its improved features, such as good ratio of strength and body density, high density and lifetime, the modified concrete may be used when solving various practical tasks of the construction branch.

  15. Why alite stops hydrating below 80% relative humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flatt, Robert J.; Scherer, George W.; Bullard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the hydration of cement paste stops when the relative humidity drops below about 80%. A thermodynamic analysis shows that the capillary pressure exerted at that RH shifts the solubility of tricalcium silicate, so that it is in equilibrium with water. This is a reflection of the chemical shrinkage in this system: according to Le Chatelier's principle, since the volume of the products is less than that of the reactants, a negative (capillary) pressure opposes the reaction.

  16. Modeling Nanomechanical Behavior of Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    coefficient is effective in making the C-S-H matrix stronger. However, increasing packing density also makes the material response more brittle ...16102-16107 Pellenq, R.J. –M and Van Damme, Henri., 2004, Why Does Concrete set?: The nature of Cohesion Forces in hardened Cement-Based...Hydrated Nanocomposites: Concrete, Bone , and Shale. J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 90(9): 2677-2692. Wu, Jianzhong. and John M. Prausnitz. 2002. Generalizations for

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter

  18. Stabilization/solidification of selenium-impacted soils using Portland cement and cement kiln dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Grubb, Dennis G; Reilly, Trevor L

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes were utilized to immobilize selenium (Se) as selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) and selenate (SeO(4)(2-)). Artificially contaminated soils were prepared by individually spiking kaolinite, montmorillonite and dredged material (DM; an organic silt) with 1000 mg/kg of each selenium compound. After mellowing for 7 days, the Se-impacted soils were each stabilized with 5, 10 and 15% Type I/II Portland cement (P) and cement kiln dust (C) and then were cured for 7 and 28 days. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the S/S treatments. At 28 days curing, P doses of 10 and 15% produced five out of six TCLP-Se(IV) concentrations below 10mg/L, whereas only the 15% C in DM had a TCLP-Se(IV) concentration soil-cement slurries aged for 30 days enabled the identification of Se precipitates by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). XRD and SEM-EDX analyses of the Se(IV)- and Se(VI)-soil-cement slurries revealed that the key selenium bearing phases for all three soil-cement slurries were calcium selenite hydrate (CaSeO(3).H(2)O) and selenate substituted ettringite (Ca(6)Al(2)(SeO(4))(3)(OH)(12).26H(2)O), respectively.

  19. Kinetics of strength gain of biocidal cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodin Aleksandr Ivanovich

    Full Text Available Biocorrosion becomes the determinative durability factor of buildings and constructions. Damages of construction materials caused by bacteria, filamentous fungi, actinomycetes constitute a serious danger to the constructions of a building or a structure and to the health of people. Biodeteriorations are typical both in old and new constructions. A great quantity of destruction factors of industrial and residential buildings under the influence of microorganisms was established in practice. Providing products and constructions based on concretes fungicidal and bactericidal properties is an important direction of modern construction material science. The most efficient way to solve this task is creation of biocidal cements. The article presents the results of experimental studies of kinetic dependences of strength gain by biocidal cements by physico-mechanical and physico-chemical analysis methods. The identical velocity character of initial hydration of the developed compositions of biocidal cements is set, as well as a more calm behavior of hardening processes at later terms. It has been established that the compositions of biocidal cements modified by sodium sulfate and sodium fluoride possess the greatest strength.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job