WorldWideScience

Sample records for alternative landfill cover

  1. Evaluation of the odour reduction potential of alternative cover materials at a commercial landfill

    OpenAIRE

    Solan, Patrick J.; Dodd, V. A.; Curran, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of virgin soils and traditional landfill covers are not only costly and increasingly becoming scarce, but they also reduce the storage capacity of landfill. The problem can be overcome by the utilisation of certain suitable waste streams as alternative landfill covers. The objective of this study was to assess the suitability of Construction & Demolition fines (C&D), Commercial & Industrial fines (C&I) and woodchip (WC) as potential landfill cover materials in terms of odour ...

  2. 75 FR 6597 - Determination to Approve Alternative Final Cover Request for the Lake County, MT Landfill...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... requirements, Waste treatment and disposal. ] Dated: January 15, 2010. Carol Rushin, Acting Regional... to approve an alternative final cover for the Lake County landfill, a municipal solid waste landfill... Act of 1976 (RCRA), as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA),...

  3. Bio-tarp alternative daily cover prototypes for methane oxidation atop open landfill cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L; Besnard, Fabien; Bogner, Jean; Hilger, Helene

    2011-05-01

    Final landfill covers are highly engineered to prevent methane release into the atmosphere. However, methane production begins soon after waste placement and is an unaddressed source of emissions. The methane oxidation capacity of methanotrophs embedded in a "bio-tarp" was investigated as a means to mitigate methane release from open landfill cells. The bio-tarp would also serve as an alternative daily cover during routine landfill operation. Evaluations of nine synthetic geotextiles identified two that would likely be suitable bio-tarp components. Pilot tarp prototypes were tested in continuous flow systems simulating landfill gas conditions. Multilayered bio-tarp prototypes consisting of alternating layers of the two geotextiles were found to remove 16% of the methane flowing through the bio-tarp. The addition of landfill cover soil, compost, or shale amendments to the bio-tarp increased the methane removal up to 32%. With evidence of methane removal in a laboratory bioreactor, prototypes were evaluated at a local landfill using flux chambers installed atop intermediate cover at a landfill. The multilayered bio-tarp and amended bio-tarp configurations were all found to decrease landfill methane flux; however, the performance efficacy of bio-tarps was not significantly different from controls without methanotrophs. Because highly variable methane fluxes at the field site likely confounded the test results, repeat field testing is recommended under more controlled flux conditions. PMID:21354776

  4. 75 FR 50930 - Final Determination To Approve Alternative Final Cover Request for the Lake County, Montana Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... cover for the Lake County landfill, a municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) owned and operated by Lake... approve in the Federal Register on February 10, 2010, (75 FR 6597) Lake County's site-specific flexibility... install an alternative final landfill cover that meets the requirements of 40 CFR 258.60(b). The...

  5. Evaluation of the odour reduction potential of alternative cover materials at a commercial landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solan, P J; Dodd, V A; Curran, T P

    2010-02-01

    The availability of virgin soils and traditional landfill covers are not only costly and increasingly becoming scarce, but they also reduce the storage capacity of landfill. The problem can be overcome by the utilisation of certain suitable waste streams as alternative landfill covers. The objective of this study was to assess the suitability of Construction & Demolition fines (C&D), Commercial & Industrial fines (C&I) and woodchip (WC) as potential landfill cover materials in terms of odour control. Background odour analysis was conducted to determine if any residual odour was emitted from the cover types. It was deemed negligible for the three materials. The odour reduction performance of each of the materials was also examined on an area of an active landfill site. A range of intermediate cover compositions were also studied to assess their performance. Odour emissions were sampled using a Jiang hood and analysed. Results indicate that the 200 mm deep combination layer of C&D and wood chip used on-site is adequate for odour abatement. The application of daily cover was found to result in effective reduction allowing for the background odour of woodchip. PMID:19786346

  6. Alternative landfill cover technology demonstration at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karr, L.A.; Harre, B. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States); Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Surface covers to control water infiltration to waste buried in landfills will be the remediation alternative of choice for most hazardous and sanitary landfills operated by the Department of Defense. Although surface covers are the least expensive method of remediation for landfills, they can still be expensive solutions. Conventional wisdom suggests that landfill capping technology is well developed as evidenced by the availability of EPA guidance for designing and constructing what has become known as the {open_quotes}RCRA Cap{close_quotes}. In practice, however, very little testing of the RCRA cap, or any other design, has been done to evaluate how effective these designs are in limiting infiltration of water into waste. This paper describes a low cost alternative to the {open_quotes}RCRA Cap{close_quotes} that is being evaluated at Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Kaneohe Bay. This study uses an innovative, simple and inexpensive concept to manipulate the fate of water falling on a landfill. The infiltration of water through the cap will be controlled by combining the evaporative forces of vegetation to remove soil water, with engineered structures that limit infiltration of precipitation into the soil. This approach relies on diverting enough of the annual precipitation to runoff, so that the water that does infiltrate into the soil can easily be removed by evapotranspiration.

  7. Alternative landfill cover technology demonstration at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface covers to control water infiltration to waste buried in landfills will be the remediation alternative of choice for most hazardous and sanitary landfills operated by the Department of Defense. Although surface covers are the least expensive method of remediation for landfills, they can still be expensive solutions. Conventional wisdom suggests that landfill capping technology is well developed as evidenced by the availability of EPA guidance for designing and constructing what has become known as the open-quotes RCRA Capclose quotes. In practice, however, very little testing of the RCRA cap, or any other design, has been done to evaluate how effective these designs are in limiting infiltration of water into waste. This paper describes a low cost alternative to the open-quotes RCRA Capclose quotes that is being evaluated at Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Kaneohe Bay. This study uses an innovative, simple and inexpensive concept to manipulate the fate of water falling on a landfill. The infiltration of water through the cap will be controlled by combining the evaporative forces of vegetation to remove soil water, with engineered structures that limit infiltration of precipitation into the soil. This approach relies on diverting enough of the annual precipitation to runoff, so that the water that does infiltrate into the soil can easily be removed by evapotranspiration

  8. Landfill Top Covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    however, top covers may be the only environmental protection measure. In some landfill regulations (for instance the Subtitle D landfills receiving municipal solid waste in the USA) it is required to minimize infiltration into the waste layers. Therefore top covers containing liner components such as......The purpose of the final cover of a landfill is to contain the waste and to provide for a physical separation between the waste and the environment for protection of public health. Most landfill covers are designed with the primary goal to reduce or prevent infiltration of precipitation into the...... landfill in order to minimize leachate generation. In addition the cover also has to control the release of gases produced in the landfill so the gas can be ventilated, collected and utilized, or oxidized in situ. The landfill cover should also minimize erosion and support vegetation. Finally the cover is...

  9. Field performance of alternative landfill covers vegetated with cottonwood and eucalyptus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Musagasa, Jubily; Yuan, Lei; Chanton, Jeff; Tawfiq, Kamal; Rockwood, Donald; Licht, Louis

    2012-01-01

    A field study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill covers to control percolation into the waste. Performance of one conventional cover was compared to that of two evapotranspiration (ET) tree covers, using large (7 x 14 m) lined lysimeters at the Leon County Solid Waste management facility in Tallahassee, Florida. Additional unlined test sections were also constructed and monitored in order to compare soil water storage, soil temperature, and tree growth inside lysimeters and in unlined test sections. The unlined test sections were in direct contact with landfill gas. Surface runoff on the ET covers was a small proportion of the water balance (1% of precipitation) as compared to 13% in the conventional cover. Percolation in the ET covers averaged 17% and 24% of precipitation as compared to 33% in the conventional cover. On average, soil water storage was higher in the lined lysimeters (429 mm) compared to unlined test sections (408 mm). The average soil temperature in the lysimeters was lower than in the unlined test sections. The average tree height inside the lysimeters was not significantly lower (8.04 mfor eucalyptus and 7.11 mfor cottonwood) than outside (8.82 m for eucalyptus and 8.01 m for cottonwood). ET tree covers vegetated with cottonwood or eucalyptus are feasible for North Florida climate as an alternative to GCL covers. PMID:22574380

  10. Gas permeability of biochar-amended clay: potential alternative landfill final cover material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2016-04-01

    Compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as an alternative landfill final cover material in this study. Biochar has long been proposed to promote crop growth, mitigate odor emission, and promote methane oxidation in field soils. However, previous studies showed that soil-gas permeability was increased upon biochar application, which will promote landfill gas emission. The objective of the present study is to investigate the possibility of using compacted BAC as an alternative material in landfill final cover by evaluating its gas permeability. BAC samples were prepared by mixing 425-μm-sieved peanut shell biochar with kaolin clay in different ratios (0, 5, 10, and 15 %, w/w) and compacting at different degrees of compactions (DOC) (80, 85, and 90 %) with an optimum water content of 35 %. The gas permeability of the BACs was measured by flexible wall gas permeameter and the microstructure of the BACs was analyzed by SEM with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that the effects of biochar content on BAC gas permeability is highly dependent on the DOC. At high DOC (90 %), the gas permeability of BAC decreases with increasing biochar content due to the combined effect of the clay aggregation and the inhibition of biochar in the gas flow. However, at low DOC (80 %), biochar incorporation has no effects on gas permeability because it no longer acts as a filling material to the retard gas flow. The results from the present study imply that compacted BAC can be used as an alternative final cover material with decreased gas permeability when compared with clay. PMID:26092359

  11. Alternative Landfill Cover and Monitoring Systems for Landfills in Arid Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 2000, a performance monitoring facility was constructed adjacent to the mixed waste disposal unit U-3ax/bl at the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site. This facility consists of eight drainage lysimeters measuring 10 feet in diameter, 8 feet deep, and backfilled with native soil. The lysimeters have three different surface treatments: two were left bare, two were revegetated with native species, and two were allowed to revegetate with invader species (two are reserved for future studies). The lysimeters are instrumented with an array of soil water content and soil water potential sensors and have sealed bottoms so that any drainage can be measured. All sensors are working properly and indicate that the bare lysimeters are the wettest, as expected. The vegetated lysimeters, both seeded and those allowed to revegetate with invader species, are significantly drier than the bare cover treatments. No drainage has occurred in any of the lysimeters. The Accelerated Site Technology Deployment program under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology provided the funding for this project with the objective of reducing the uncertainty associated with the performance of monolayer-evapotranspiration waste covers in arid regions such as the one deployed at U-3ax/bl

  12. Landfill covers for dry environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-scale landfill cover field test is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is intended to compare and document the performance of alternative landfill cover technologies of various costs and complexities for interim stabilization and/or final closure of landfills in arid and semi-arid environments. Test plots of traditional designs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency for both RCRA Subtitle open-quote C close-quote and open-quote D close-quote regulated facilities have been constructed side-by-side with the alternative covers and will serve as baselines for comparison to these alternative covers. The alternative covers were designed specifically for dry environments. The covers will be tested under both ambient and stressed conditions. All covers have been instrumented to measure water balance variables and soil temperature. An on-site weather station records all pertinent climatological data. A key to acceptance of an alternative environmental technology is seeking regulatory acceptance and eventual permitting. The lack of acceptance by regulatory agencies is a significant barrier to development and implementation of innovative cover technologies. Much of the effort on this demonstration has been toward gaining regulatory and public acceptance

  13. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

  14. Water balance relationships in four alternative cover designs for radioactive and mixed waste landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results are presented from a field study to evaluate the relative hydrologic performance of various landfill capping technologies installed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Four cover designs (two Los Alamos capillary barrier designs, one modified EPA RCRA design, and one conventional design) were installed in large lysimeters instrumented to monitor the fate of natural precipitation between 01 January 1990 and 20 September 1993. After 45 months of study, results showed that the cover designs containing barrier layers were effective in reducing deep percolation as compared to a simple soil cap design. The RCRA cover, incorporating a clay hydraulic barrier, was the most effective of all cover designs in controlling percolation but was not 100% effective. Over 90% of all percolation and barrier lateral flow occurred during the months of February through May of each year, primarily as a result of snow melt, early spring rains and low evapotranspiration. Gravel mulch surface treatments (70--80% coverage) were effective in reducing runoff and erosion. The two plots receiving gravel mulch treatments exhibited equal but enhanced amounts of evapotranspiration despite the fact that one plot was planted with additional shrubs

  15. Deployment of an alternative cover and final closure of the Mixed Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); McVey, Michael David (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Borns, David James

    2003-06-01

    An alternative cover design consisting of a monolithic layer of native soil is proposed as the closure path for the Mixed Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The proposed design would rely upon soil thickness and evapotranspiration to provide long-term performance and stability, and would be inexpensive to build and maintain. The proposed design is a 3-ft-thick, vegetated soil cover. The alternative cover meets the intent of RCRA Subtitle C regulations in that: (a) water migration through the cover is minimized; (b) maintenance is minimized by using a monolithic soil layer; (c) cover erosion is minimized by using erosion control measures; (d) subsidence is accommodated by using a ''soft'' design; and (e) the permeability of the cover is less than or equal to that of natural subsurface soil present. Performance of the proposed cover is integrated with natural site conditions, producing a ''system performance'' that will ensure that the cover is protective of human health and the environment. Natural site conditions that will produce a system performance include: (a) extremely low precipitation and high potential evapotranspiration; (b) negligible recharge to groundwater; (c) an extensive vadose zone; (d) groundwater approximately 500 ft below the surface; and (e) a versatile, native flora that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance.

  16. GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS) IN LANDFILL COVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low permeability, compacted clay linters are commonly required as a barrier to water infiltration in landfill covers. elatively new material, known as geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), has been proposed as an alternative to a compacted clay liner. CL has the practical advantages of ...

  17. EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND CAPILLARY BARRIER FINAL LANDFILL COVERS FACT SHEET

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fact sheet provides an overview of two alternative landfill cover designs. It briefly describes advantages and limitations, performance, costs, design and site considerations, and monitoring parameters associated with these cover designs. The document also includes 20 site ...

  18. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  19. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collaborated on the design and monitoring of an alternative cover for the Monticello uranium mill tailings disposal cell, a Superfund site in southeastern Utah. Ground-water recharge is naturally limited at sites like Monticello where thick, fine-textured soils store precipitation until evaporation and plant transpiration seasonally return it to the atmosphere. The cover at Monticello uses local soils and a native plant community to mimic the natural soil water balance. The cover is fundamentally an evapotranspiration (ET) design with a capillary barrier. A 3-hectare drainage lysimeter was embedded in the cover during construction of the disposal cell in 2000. The lysimeter consists of a geo-membrane liner below the capillary barrier that directs percolation water to a monitoring system. Soil water storage is determined by integration of point water content measurements. Meteorological parameters are measured nearby. Plant cover, shrub density, and leaf area index (LAI) are monitored annually. The cover performed well over the 7-year monitoring period (2000-2007). The cumulative percolation was 4.2 mm (0.6 mm yr-1), satisfying an EPA goal of an average percolation of -1. Almost all percolation can be attributed to the exceptionally wet winter and spring of 2004-2005 when soil water content slightly exceeded the water storage capacity of the cover. The diversity, percent cover, and LAI of vegetation increased over the monitoring period, although the density of native shrubs that extract water from deeper in the cover has remained less than revegetation targets. DOE and EPA are applying the monitoring results to plan for long-term surveillance and maintenance and to evaluate alternative cover designs for other waste disposal sites. (authors)

  20. Models for hydrologic design of evapotranspiration landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Victor L; Gimon, Dianna M; Bonta, James V; Howell, Terry A; Malone, Robert W; Williams, Jimmy R

    2005-09-15

    The technology used in landfill covers is changing, and an alternative cover called the evapotranspiration (ET) landfill cover is coming into use. Important design requirements are prescribed by Federal rules and regulations for conventional landfill covers but not for ET landfill covers. There is no accepted hydrologic model for ET landfill cover design. This paper describes ET cover requirements and design issues, and assesses the accuracy of the EPIC and HELP hydrologic models when used for hydrologic design of ET covers. We tested the models against high-quality field measurements available from lysimeters maintained by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Coshocton, Ohio, and Bushland, Texas. The HELP model produced substantial errors in estimating hydrologic variables. The EPIC model estimated ET and deep percolation with errors less than 7% and 5%, respectively, and accurately matched extreme events with an error of less than 2% of precipitation. The EPIC model is suitable for use in hydrologic design of ET landfill covers. PMID:16201652

  1. Natural attenuation of biogas in landfill covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the risk evaluation of uncontrolled biogas emissions from landfills, the process of natural attenuation in landfill covers assumes a very important role. The capacity of biogas oxidation in the cover soils seems to be the most important control to mitigate the biogas emission during the aftercare period when the biogas collection system might fail. In the present paper laboratory experiences on lab columns to study the biogas oxidation are discussed

  2. The impact of daily covers on sidewall leakage in landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, A. L. [Villanova Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering, PA (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Typically, sanitary landfills are covered by 15 cm of locally available soil on a daily basis. This practice is intended to limit short term negative effects of the waste material on the above-ground environment such as odor, fire, or vermin attraction. Daily placement of compacted soil creates low hydraulic conductivity stratifying layers within the landfill which, in due course, may result in side-slope seepage, decreased stability and decreased efficiency of methane gas venting. The expense of soil acquisitions and the the diminishing availability of landfill space increases the need for alternative materials to replace the daily cover. This paper examines the the threat of sidewall landfill leakage for a hypothetical landfill with traditional soil cover and an alternative daily cover, to demonstrate that the threat of sidewall leakage is real and can be decreased with the use of alternative material as the daily cover such as crushed glass, sludge from waste-water treatment plants, industrial waste, foams and various geosynthetics. At the same time, results of the modelling study showed that with proper drainage sidewall seepage will not occur even with a daily cover that has a hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude smaller than the waste, despite positive pressure building up on top of the daily cover. These results imply that the threat of sidewall leakage is minimal, and while alternative daily cover material would help to reduce it even further, their use is most likely to be the result of economic, not technical, considerations. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  3. MATERIALS FOR THE FINAL COVER OF SANITARY LANDFILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Kovačić

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the selection of materials for the sea¬ling layer in the final cover of sanitary landfills. The sealing la¬yer is the most critical component of the final cover. Its role is to minimize percolation of water through the final cover. Ma¬terials used for the construction of the sealing layer are either of mineral origin (compacted clay or geosynthetic (geomem¬brane. They are most often used in combination creating com¬posite liners. Recently alternative materials are also used like paper mill sludge or discarded swelling clay.

  4. Modeling of H2S migration through landfill cover materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Powell, Jon; Jain, Pradeep; Townsend, Timothy

    2014-01-15

    The emission of H2S from landfills in the United States is an emergent problem because measured concentrations within the waste mass and in ambient air have been observed at potentially unsafe levels for on-site workers and at levels that can cause a nuisance and potentially deleterious health impacts to surrounding communities. Though recent research has provided data on H2S concentrations that may be observed at landfills, facility operators and landfill engineers have limited predictive tools to anticipate and plan for potentially harmful H2S emissions. A one-dimensional gas migration model was developed to assist engineers and practitioners better evaluate and predict potential emission levels of H2S based on four factors: concentration of H2S below the landfill surface (C0), advection velocity (v), H2S effective diffusion coefficient (D), and H2S adsorption coefficient of landfill cover soil (μ). Model simulations indicated that H2S migration into the atmosphere can be mitigated by reducing H2S diffusion and advection or using alternative cover soils with a high H2S adsorption coefficient. Laboratory column experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the four parameters on H2S migration in cover soils and to calculate the adsorption coefficient of different cover materials. The model was validated by comparing results with laboratory column experiments. Based on the results, the laboratory column provides an effective way to estimate the H2S adsorption coefficient, which can then be incorporated into the developed model to predict the depth of cover soil required to reduce emitted H2S concentrations below a desired level. PMID:24316799

  5. Migration barrier covers for radioactive and mixed waste landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration barrier cover technology will likely serve as the remediation alternative of choice for most of DOE's radioactive and mixed waste landfills simply because human and ecological risks can be effectively managed without the use of more expensive alternatives. However, very little testing and evaluation has been done, either before or after installation, to monitor how effective they are in isolating waste or to develop data that can be used to evaluate model predictions of long term performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory has investigated the performance of a variety of landfill capping alternatives since 1981 using large field lysimeters to monitor the fate of precipitation falling on the cap surface. The objective of these studies is to provide the risk manager with a variety of field tested capping designs, of various complexities and costs, so that design alternatives can be matched to the need for hydrologic control at the site. Four different landfill cap designs, representing different complexities and costs, were constructed at Hill Air Force Base (AFB) in October and November, 1989. The designs were constructed in large lysimeters and instrumented to provide estimates of all components of water balance including precipitation, runoff (and soil erosion), infiltration, leachate production, evapotranspiration, and capillary/hydraulic barrier flow. The designs consisted of a typical soil cover to serve as a baseline, a modified EPA RCRA cover, and two versions of a Los Alamos design that contained erosion control measures, an improved vegetation cover to enhance evapotranspiration, and a capillary barrier to divert downward flow of soil water. A comprehensive summary of the Hill AFB demonstration will be available in October 1993, when the project is scheduled to terminate

  6. EVALUATION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL COVER DESIGNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The HELP (Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance) Model was used to evaluate the hydrologic behavior of a series of one-, two-, and three-layer cover designs for municipal solid waste landfill cover designs were chosen to isolate the effects of features such as surface veg...

  7. Planning document for the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy and Department of Defense are faced with the closure of thousands of decommissioned radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste landfills as a part of ongoing Environmental Restoration activities. Regulations on the closure of hazardous and radioactive waste landfills require the construction of a ''low-permeability'' cover over the unit to limit the migration of liquids into the underlying waste. These landfills must be maintained and monitored for 30 years to ensure that hazardous materials are not migrating from the landfill. This test plan is intended as an initial road map for planning, designing, constructing, evaluating, and documenting the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD). It describes the goals/ objectives, scope, tasks, responsibilities, technical approach, and deliverables for the demonstration

  8. Characterization of H2S removal and microbial community in landfill cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Wei, Xiao-Meng; Su, Yao; He, Ruo

    2015-12-01

    H2S is a source of odors at landfills and poses a threat to the surrounding environment and public health. In this work, compared with a usual landfill cover soil (LCS), H2S removal and biotransformation were characterized in waste biocover soil (WBS), an alternative landfill cover material. With the input of landfill gas (LFG), the gas concentrations of CH4, CO2, O2, and H2S, microbial community and activity in landfill covers changed with time. Compared with LCS, lower CH4 and H2S concentrations were detected in the WBS. The potential sulfur-oxidizing rate and sulfate-reducing rate as well as the contents of acid-volatile sulfide, SO4(2-), and total sulfur in the WBS and LCS were all increased with the input of LFG. After exposure to LFG for 35 days, the sulfur-oxidizing rate of the bottom layer of the WBS reached 82.5 μmol g dry weight (d.w.)(-1) day(-1), which was 4.3-5.4 times of that of LCS. H2S-S was mainly deposited in the soil covers, while it escaped from landfills to the atmosphere. The adsorption, absorption, and biotransformation of H2S could lead to the decrease in the pH values of landfill covers; especially, in the LCS with low pH buffer capacity, the pH value of the bottom layer dropped to below 4. Pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene showed that the known sulfur-metabolizing bacteria Ochrobactrum, Paracoccus, Comamonas, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter dominated in the WBS and LCS. Among them, Comamonas and Acinetobacter might play an important role in the metabolism of H2S in the WBS. These findings are helpful to understand sulfur bioconversion process in landfill covers and to develop techniques for controlling odor pollution at landfills. PMID:26206130

  9. Field Performance Of Three Compacted Clay Landfill Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted at sites in subtropical Georgia, seasonal and humid Iowa, and arid southeastern California to evaluate the field hydrology of compacted clay covers for final closure of landfills. Water balance of the covers was monitored with large (10 by 20 m ), instrumen...

  10. Evaluation of simultaneous biodegradation of methane and toluene in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yao; Zhang, Xuan; Wei, Xiao-Meng; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Xia, Fang-Fang; Li, Wei; He, Ruo

    2014-06-15

    The biodegradation of CH4 and toluene in landfill cover soil (LCS) and waste biocover soil (WBS) was investigated with a serial toluene concentration in the headspace of landfill cover microcosms in this study. Compared with the LCS sample, the higher CH4 oxidation activity and toluene-degrading capacity occurred in the WBS sample. The co-existence of toluene in landfill gas would positively or negatively affect CH4 oxidation, mainly depending on the toluene concentrations and exposure time. The nearly complete inhibition of toluene on CH4 oxidation was observed in the WBS sample at the toluene concentration of ∼ 80,000 mg m(-3), which was about 10 times higher than that in the LCS sample. The toluene degradation rates in both landfill covers fitted well with the Michaelis-Menten model. These findings showed that WBS was a good alternative landfill cover material to simultaneously mitigate emissions of CH4 and toluene from landfills to the atmosphere. PMID:24801894

  11. On the performance of capillary barriers as landfill cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, M.; Montenegro, H.

    Landfills and waste heaps require an engineered surface cover upon closure. The capping system can vary from a simple soil cover to multiple layers of earth and geosynthetic materials. Conventional design features a compacted soil layer, which suffers from drying out and cracking, as well as root and animal intrusion. Capillary barriers consisting of inclined fine-over-coarse soil layers are investigated as an alternative cover system. Under unsaturated conditions, the textural contrast delays vertical drainage by capillary forces. The moisture that builds up above the contact will flow downdip along the interface of the layers. Theoretical studies of capillary barriers have identified the hydraulic properties of the layers, the inclination angle, the length of the field and the infiltration rate as the fundamental characteristics of the system. However, it is unclear how these findings can lead to design criteria for capillary barriers. To assess the uncertainty involved in such approaches, experiments have been carried out in a 8 m long flume and on large scale test sites (40 m x 15 m). In addition, the ability of a numerical model to represent the relevant flow processes in capillary barriers has been examined.

  12. Methane emissions from MSW landfill with sandy soil covers under leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    CH 4 emissions and leachate disposal are recognized as the two major concerns in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Recently, leachate recirculation was attempted to accelerate land-filled waste biodegradation and thus enhanced landfill gas generation. Leachate irrigation was also conducted for volume reduction effectively. Nevertheless, the impacts of leachate recirculation and irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions have not been previously reported. A field investigation of landfill CH 4 emissions was conducted on selected sandy soil cover with leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation based on whole year around measurement. The average CH 4 fluxes were 311±903, 207±516, and 565±1460 CH 4 m -2 h -1 from site A without leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, lift B2 with leachate subsurface irrigation, and lift B1 with both leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, respectively. Both gas recovery and cover soil oxidation minimized CH 4 emissions efficiently, while the later might be more pronounced when the location was more than 5 m away from gas recovery well. After covered by additional clay soil layer, CH 4 fluxes dropped by approximately 35 times in the following three seasons compared to the previous three seasons in lift B2. The diurnal peaks of CH 4 fluxes occurred mostly followed with air or soil temperature in the daytimes. The measured CH 4 fluxes were much lower than those of documented data from the landfills, indicating that the influences of leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions might be minimized with the help of a well-designed sandy soil cover. Landfill cover composed of two soil layers (clay soil underneath and sandy soil above) is suggested as a low-cost and effective alternative to minimize CH 4 emissions.

  13. Alternatives for landfill leachate management at the Naameh landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.Leachate generation is an inevitable consequence of solid waste land filling. Leachate is generated as moisture percolates through the waste material, or a successive layers of the landfill are compressed and the initial water content of the refuse is squeezed out of the refuse. The quantity of leachate generation is highly dependent on climatic and hydrologic conditions, site operations and management, internal landfill processes and particularly waste composition. In Lebanon, as in many developing countries, the solid waste fraction of organic nature with high moisture content reaches 70 percent, which will evidently result in elevated generation rates. The uncontrolled infiltration of leachate in the vadoze and the subsequent contamination of soil and ground water resources is considered as the most adverse environmental impact associated with landfills. this paper describes leachate management options that will eliminate or minimize such an impact. the applicability of these options at the Naameh landfill will be evaluated. Relevant biological and physico-chemical treatment processes will be discussed as an economic of their feasibility in Lebanon and leachate recirculation will be emphasized as an economic management option. Finally, a methodology for leachate storage tank sizing will be presented to ensure the proper operation of an overall management plan involving leachate recirculation

  14. Closure Alternatives for Municipal Waste Landfills.Study Case: Municipal Waste Landfill Medias,Sibiu County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHĂIESCU R.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades, the environmental impact produced by municipal solid wastes has received specialattention. All new EU countries are involved in the process of implementation of the European Council Directive31/99/EC on the landfill of waste in the European Union. As consequence National legislation, adapted to fit the EUrequirements, focuses on integrated waste management and environmental control of municipal solid waste landfills,from start-up to closure and assimilation into the environment. In Romania, by Government decision, HG 349/2005,was established the obligatoriness of closing unconform waste landfills located in urban areas starting at July 2009. Asconsequence the owner of municipal waste landfill Medias started the proceedings of closure for the landfill. The aim ofthis study is to compare, from an environmental point of view, different alternatives for the closure of the municipalsolid waste landfill Somard-Medias (Romania.

  15. Standard and alternative landfill capping design in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered capping systems are in most cases an indispensable and often the only efficient component required by the long-term safety concept for landfills, mine tailings tips and contaminated land. In Germany the composite liner is the main component of standard landfill cappings for municipal and hazardous waste landfills and the compacted clay liner (CCL) for landfills for inert or low-contamination waste. The composite liner is a technically highly effective but very expensive system. Research and experience has given rise to concern about the proper long-term performance of a conventional single CCL as a landfill capping. Therefore, alternative capping systems are discussed and applied for landfills and for the containment of contaminated sites. This paper gives an overview on various alternative engineered cappings and suitable systems for capping reflecting the state of the art and the expert view in Germany. According to the European Council Directive on the landfill of waste an impermeable mineral layer is recommended for the surface sealing of non-hazardous landfills and a composition of artificial sealing liner and impermeable mineral layer for hazardous landfills. In both cases a drainage layer thickness of at least 0.5 m is suggested. These recommendations should be interpreted flexibly and to some extent modified in the light of the experience and results presented in this paper

  16. The effects of daily cover soils on shear strength of municipal solid waste in bioreactor landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Sahadat; Haque, Mohamed A

    2009-05-01

    Bioreactor landfills are operated to enhance refuse decomposition, gas production, and waste stabilization. The major aspect of bioreactor landfill operation is the recirculation of collected leachate back through the refuse mass. Due to the accelerated decomposition and settlement of solid waste, bioreactor landfills are gaining popularity as an alternative to the conventional landfill. The addition or recirculation of leachate to accelerate the waste decomposition changes the geotechnical characteristics of waste mass. The daily cover soils, usually up to 20-30% of total MSW volumes in the landfill, may also influence the decomposition and shear strength behavior of MSW. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of daily covers soils on the shear strength properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) in bioreactor landfills with time and decomposition. Two sets of laboratory-scale bioreactor landfills were simulated in a laboratory, and samples were prepared to represent different phases of decomposition. The state of decomposition was quantified by methane yield, pH, and volatile organic content (VOC). Due to decomposition, the matrix structure of the degradable solid waste component was broken down and contributed to a significant decrease in the reinforcing effect of MSW. However, the daily cover soil, a non-degradable constituent of MSW, remains constant. Therefore, the interaction between daily cover soil particles and MSW particles will affect shear strength behavior. A number of triaxial tests were performed to evaluate the shear strength of MSW. The test results indicated that the shear strength of MSW was affected by the presence of cover soils. The friction angle of MSW with the presence of cover soil is higher than the friction angle of MSW without any cover soils. The friction angle of MSW increased from 27 degrees to 30 degrees due to the presence of cover soils for Phase 1 samples. The increased strength was attributed to the friction nature

  17. Analysis of Vegetative on Six Different Landfill Cover Profiles in an Arid Environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; McClellan, Yvonne; Reavis, Bruce A.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Newman, Gretchen; Wolters, Gale

    2005-05-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs was constructed and monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle 'D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle 'C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for arid environments. The demonstration was intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. A portion of this project involves the characterization of vegetation establishment and growth on the landfill covers. The various prototype landfill covers were expected to have varying flux rates (Dwyer et al 2000). The landfill covers were further expected to influence vegetation establishment and growth, which may impact site erosion potential and long-term site integrity. Objectives of this phase were to quantify the types of plants occupying each site, the percentage of ground covered by these plants, the density (number of plants per unit area) of plants, and the plant biomass production. The results of this vegetation analysis are presented in this report.3 DRAFT07/06/14AcknowledgementsWe would like to thank all technical and support staff from Sandia and the USDA Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Station not included in the authors' list of this document for their valuable contributions to this research. We would also like to acknowledge the Department of Energy's Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area for funding this work.4

  18. An Interactive Real-time Decision Support System for Leachate Irrigation on Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Landfill disposal is still the most common and economical practice for municipal solid waste in most countries. However, heavily polluted leachate generated by excess rainwater percolating through the landfill waste is the major drawback of this practice. Evapotranspiration (ET) cover systems are increasingly being used as alternative cover systems to minimize percolation by evapotranspiration. Leachate recirculation is one of the least expensive options for leachate treatment. The combination of ET cover systems and leachate recirculation can be an economical and environment-friendly practice for landfill leachate management. An interactive real-time decision support system is being developed to better manage leachate irrigation using historical and forecasting weather data, and real time soil moisture data. The main frame of this system includes soil water modules, and plant-soil modules. An inverse simulation module is also included to calibrate certain parameters based on observed data when necessary. It would be an objectives-oriented irrigation management tool to minimize landfill operation costs and negative environmental impacts.

  19. Microbial mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from landfill cover soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Woo

    Landfills are one of the major sources of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential (GWP) ˜23 times higher than that of carbon dioxide (CO2). Although some effective strategies have been formulated to prevent methane emissions from large landfills, many landfills allow methane to be freely emitted to the atmosphere. In such situations, it is often proposed to stimulate methanotrophs, a group of bacteria that consume methane, in the cover soil to prevent fugitive methane emissions. Several factors, however, must be addressed to make such a biogenic removal mechanism effective. First, methanotrophic activity can be inhibited by nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) that are commonly found in landfill soil gas. Second, although methanotrophs can be easily stimulated with the addition of nitrogenous fertilizers, biogenic production of nitrous oxide with a GWP ˜296 times higher than that of carbon dioxide, is also stimulated. To consider these issues, two general areas of research were performed. First, a dimensionless number was developed based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics that describes the effects of the presence of multiple NMOCs on methanotrophic growth and survival. This model was validated via experimental measurements of methanotrophic growth in the presence of varying amounts of NMOCs. Second, the effects of nutrient amendments on methane oxidation and nitrous oxide production were examined by constructing soil microcosms using landfill cover soils. Here, it was shown that the addition of ammonium in the presence of phenylacetylene stimulated methane oxidation but inhibited nitrous oxide production. Furthermore, to understand the methanotrophic community structure and activity in response to these amendments, DNA microarray and transcript analyses were performed. The results indicated the predominance of Type II methanotrophs but that Type I methanotrophs responded more significantly to these amendments. Also, substantial activity

  20. EVALUATION OF HYDROLOGIC MODELS IN THE DESIGN OF STABLE LANDFILL COVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study evaluates the utility of two hydrologic models in designing stable landfill cover systems. The models evaluated were HELP (Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance) and CREAMS (Chemicals, Runoff, and Erosion from Agricultural Management Systems). Studies of paramet...

  1. Experimental study and simulations of infiltration in evapotranspiration landfill covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-xian ZHANG

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Various cover systems have been designed for landfill sites in order to minimize infiltration (percolation into the underlying waste. This study evaluated the soil water balance performance of evapotranspiration covers (ET covers and simulated percolation in the systems using the active region model (ARM. Experiments were conducted to measure water flow processes and water balance components in a bare soil cover and different ET covers. Results showed that vegetation played a critical role in controlling the water balance of the ET covers. In soil profiles of 60-cm depth with and without vegetation cover, the maximum soil water storage capacities were 97.2 mm and 62.8 mm, respectively. The percolation amount in the bare soil was 2.1 times that in the vegetation-covered soil. The ARM simulated percolation more accurately than the continuum model because it considered preferential flow. Numerical simulation results also indicated that using the ET cover system was an effective way of removing water through evapotranspiration, thus reducing percolation.

  2. Experimental study and simulations of infiltration in evapotranspiration landfill covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-xian ZHANG; Zhan-yu ZHANG; Kang WANG

    2009-01-01

    Various cover systems have been designed for landfill sites in order to minimize infiltration (percolation) into the underlying waste.This study evaluated the soil water balance performance of evapotranspiration covers (ET covers) and simulated percolation in the systems using the active region model (ARM).Experiments were conducted to measure water flow processes and water balance components in a bare soil cover and different ET covers.Results showed that vegetation played a critical role in controlling the water balance of the ET covers.In soil profiles of 60-cm depth with and without vegetation cover,the maximum soil water storage capacities were 97.2 mm and 62.8 mm,respectively.The percolation amount in the bare soil was 2.1 times that in the vegetation-covered soil.The ARM simulated percolation more accurately than the continuum model because it considered preferential flow.Numerical simulation results also indicated that using the ET cover system was an effective way of removing water through evapotranspiration,thus reducing percolation.

  3. Effects of earthworm cast and powdered activated carbon on methane removal capacity of landfill cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyoung; Lee, Incheol; Cho, Changhwan; Sung, Kijune

    2008-01-01

    Landfill gases could be vented through a layer of landfill cover soil that could serve as a biofilter to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide and water. Properly managed landfill cover soil layers may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills. In the present study, the effects of earthworm cast and powdered activated carbon (PAC) on the CH4 removal capacity of the landfill cover soil was investigated. For this purpose, column and batch tests were conducted using three different materials: typical landfill cover soil, landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast, and landfill cover soil amended with PAC. The maximum CH4 removal rate of the columns filled with landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast was 14.6mol m(-2)d(-1), whereas that of the columns filled with typical landfill cover soil was 7.4mol m(-2)d(-1). This result shows that amendment with earthworm cast could stimulate the CH4-oxidizing capacity of landfill cover soil. The CH4 removal rate of the columns filled with landfill cover soil amended with PAC also showed the same removal rate, but the vertical profile of gas concentrations in the columns and the methanotrophic population measured in the microbial assay suggested that the decrease of CH4 concentration in the columns is mainly due to sorption. Based on the results from this study, amendment of landfill cover soil with earthworm cast and PAC could improve its CH4 removal capacity and thus achieve a major reduction in atmospheric CH4 emission as compared with the same landfill cover soil without any amendment. PMID:17764722

  4. Parametric analyses of evapotranspiration landfill covers in humid regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural soils are more durable than almost all man-made materials. Evapotranspiration (ET covers use vegetated soil layers to store water until it is either evaporated from the soil surface or transpired through vegetation. ET covers rely on the water storage capacity of soil layer, rather than low permeability materials, to minimize percolation. While the use of ET covers in landfills increased over the last decade, they were mainly used in arid or semi-arid regions. At present, the use of ET covers has not been thoroughly investigated in humid areas. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of ET covers in humid areas where there is an annual precipitation of more than 800 mm. Numerical analyses were carried out to investigate the influences of cover thickness, soil type, vegetation level and distribution of precipitation on performance of ET covers. Performance and applicability of capillary barriers and a new-type cover were analyzed. The results show that percolation decreases with an increasing cover thickness and an increasing vegetation level, but the increasing trend becomes unclear when certain thickness or LAI (leaf area index is reached. Cover soil with a large capability of water storage is recommended to minimize percolation. ET covers are significantly influenced by distribution of precipitation and are more effective in areas where rainy season coincides with hot season. Capillary barriers are more efficient than monolithic covers. The new cover is better than the monolithic cover in performance and the final percolation is only 0.5% of the annual precipitation.

  5. Activity and structure of methanotrophic communities in landfill cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Julia; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente

    2009-10-01

    The composition of the methanotrophic community in soil covers on five landfills in Northern and Eastern Germany was investigated by means of diagnostic microarray and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), both targeting the pmoA gene of methanotrophs. Physical and chemical properties of the 15 sampled soil profiles varied greatly, thus providing for very different environmental conditions. The potential methane oxidation activity, assessed using undisturbed soil cores, varied between 0.2 and 28 µg CH4 gdw (-1)  h(-1) , the latter amounting to 426 g CH4 m(-2)  h(-1) . Total nitrogen was found to be the soil variable correlating most strongly with methanotrophic activity. Explaining close to 50% of the observed variability, this indicates that on the investigated sites activity and thus abundance of methanotrophs may have been nitrogen-limited. Variables that enhance organic matter and thus nitrogen accumulation, such as field capacity, also positively impacted methanotrophic activity. In spite of the great variability of soil properties and different geographic landfill location, both microarray and T-RFLP analysis suggested that the composition of the methanotrophic community on all five sites, in all profiles and across all depths was similar. Methylocystis, Methylobacter and Methylococcus species, including Methylococcus-related uncultivated methanotrophs, were predominantly detected among type II, Ia and Ib methanotrophs, respectively. This indicates that the high methane fluxes typical for landfill environments may be the most influential driver governing the community composition, or other variables not analysed in this study. Principal component analysis suggested that community diversity is most influenced by the site from which the samples were taken and second, from the location on the individual sites, i.e. the soil profile. Landfill and individual profiles reflect the combined impact of all effective variables, including

  6. LANDFILL GAS CONSUMPTION IN RHIZOSPHERE OF ALTERNATIVE LANDFILL COVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two identical 12 ft by 12 ft by 12 ft, polished stainless steel, insulated Environmental Chambers, located within the Testing and Evaluation (T&E) Facility, incorporate unique design features. Each chamber is equipped with 16 light fixtures containing a total of 32 light bulb...

  7. Digested sewage sludge solidification by converter slag for landfill cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung-Ho; Cho, Jin-Kyu; Yim, Soobin

    2005-04-01

    A new technology for solidification of digested sewage sludge referred to as converter slag solidification (CSS) has been developed using converter slag as the solidifying agent and quick lime as the solidifying aid. The CSS technology was investigated by analyzing the physicochemical properties of solidified sludge and determining its microstructural characteristics. The feasibility of using solidified sludge as a landfill cover material was considered in the context of the economical recycling of waste. Sludge solidified using the CSS technology exhibited geotechnical properties that are appropriate for replacing currently used cover soil. Microscopic analyses using XRD, SEM and EDS revealed that the main hydrated product of solidification was CSH (CaO . SiO2 . nH2O), which may play an important role in the effective setting process. Negligible leaching of heavy metals from the solidified sludge was observed. The solidification process of the hydrated sludge, slag and quicklime eliminated the coliform bacteria. Recycled sewage sludge solidified using CCS technology could be used as an effective landfill cover. PMID:15763091

  8. Fly ash in landfill top covers - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännvall, E; Kumpiene, J

    2016-01-01

    Increase of energy recovery from municipal solid waste by incineration results in the increased amounts of incineration residues, such as fly ash, that have to be taken care of. Material properties should define whether fly ash is a waste or a viable resource to be used for various applications. Here, two areas of potential fly ash application are reviewed: the use of fly ash in a landfill top cover either as a liner material or as a soil amendment in vegetation layer. Fly ashes from incineration of three types of fuel are considered: refuse derived fuel (RDF), municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and biofuel. Based on the observations, RDF and MSWI fly ash is considered as suitable materials to be used in a landfill top cover liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plant studies, could be considered suitable for the vegetation layer of the top cover. Responsible application of MSWI ashes is, however, warranted in order to avoid element accumulation in soil and elevation of background values over time. PMID:26701627

  9. Modified sewage sludge as temporary landfill cover material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the feasibility of modified sewage sludge as landfill cover material and its performance in a complex landfill environment, strength and hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted. The permeability requirements for daily and interim covers were analyzed first. Based on saturated-unsaturated seepage calculations, it is suggested that approximately 1.0 × 10-4 cm/s and 1.0 × 10-5 cm/s are the appropriate values for the hydraulic conductivities of daily and interim covers, respectively. The strength and permeability requirements of the mixtures, when used as an interim cover, can be met at a sludge:lime:cement:silt:tire-derived aggregate (TDA weight ratio of 100:15:5:70:15. Results also demonstrate that the solid content ratio of modified sewage sludge, which should be greater than 60% when modified sewage sludge is used as a temporary cover material, is crucial to both strength and hydraulic performance. In addition, as the duration of soaking of modified sewage sludge in synthetic leachate increases, the unconfined compressive strength increases, and the hydraulic conductivity decreases slightly or fluctuates between 1.0 × 10-5 cm/s and 1.0 × 10-6 cm/s, still meeting the requirements for an interim cover. The reduction in hydraulic conductivity of modified sewage sludge under the effect of synthetic leachate, as well as the long-term and environmental performance of the modified sewage sludge, should be examined in future studies.

  10. Temporal variability of soil gas composition in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Julia; Rachor, Ingke; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    In order to assess the temporal variability of the conditions for the microbial oxidation of methane in landfill cover soils and their driving variables, gas composition at non-emissive and strongly emissive locations (hotspots) was monitored on a seasonal, daily and hourly time scale on an old, unlined landfill in northern Germany. Our study showed that the impact of the various environmental factors varied with the mode of gas transport and with the time scale considered. At non-emissive sites, governed by diffusive gas transport, soil gas composition was subject to a pronounced seasonal variation. A high extent of aeration, low methane concentrations and a high ratio of CO(2) to CH(4) were found across the entire depth of the soil cover during the warm and dry period, whereas in the cool and moist period aeration was less and landfill gas migrated further upward. Statistically, variation in soil gas composition was best explained by the variation in soil temperature. At locations dominated by advective gas transport and showing considerable emissions of methane, this pattern was far less pronounced with only little increase in the extent of aeration during drier periods. Here, the change of barometric pressure was found to impact soil gas composition. On a daily scale under constant conditions of temperature, gas transport at both types of locations was strongly impacted by the change in soil moisture. On an hourly scale, under constant conditions of temperature and moisture, gas migration was impacted most by the change in barometric pressure. It was shown that at diffusion-dominated sites complete methane oxidation was achieved even under adverse wintry conditions, whereas at hotspots, even under favorable dry and warm conditions, aerobic biological activity can be limited to the upper crust of the soil. PMID:21074982

  11. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (landfill final cover soil.

  12. Mechanism of H2S removal during landfill stabilization in waste biocover soil, an alterative landfill cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Xia, Fang-Fang; Bai, Yun; Wang, Jing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2012-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is one of the primary contributors to odors at landfills. The mechanism of waste biocover soil (WBS) for H(2)S removal was investigated in simulated landfill systems with the contrast experiment of a landfill cover soil (LCS). The H(2)S removal efficiency was higher than 90% regardless of the WBS or LCS covers. The input of landfill gas (LFG) could stimulate the growth of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria, actinomycete, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the WBS cover, while that caused a decrease of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the populations of actinomycete and fungi in the bottom layer of the LCS cover. As H(2)S inputted, the sulfide content in the WBS cover increased and reached the maximum on day 30. In the LCS cover, the highest soil sulfide content was exhibited in the bottom layer during the whole experiment. After exposure to LFG, the lower pH value and higher sulfate content were observed in the top layer of the WBS cover, while there was not a significant difference in different layers of the LCS cover. The results indicated a more rapid biotransformation between sulfide and sulfate occurred in the WBS cover compared to the LCS. PMID:22459970

  13. Steel slag used in landfill cover liners: laboratory and field tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Inga; Andreas, Lale; Diener, Silvia; Lind, Lotta

    2010-12-01

    Stricter rules for landfilling within the EU have led to the closure of many landfills and a need for large amounts of cover liner materials. Therefore, the potential utilization of mixtures of electric arc furnace slag (EAFS) and ladle slag (LS), which are currently deposited in landfills, as a material for use as landfill liner was investigated. Laboratory analyses showed the mixtures to have similar compression strength to that of high-strength concrete and low hydraulic conductivity (cover liner constructed using EAFS and LS was studied in a 2-year field trial on a landfill for municipal solid waste, in which the average amount of leachate collected from ten lysimeters was only 27 L m(-2) year(-1), easily meeting Swedish criteria for the permeability of covers on non-hazardous waste landfills (≤ 50 L m(-2) year(-1)). Thus, the material seems to have promising potential for use in barrier constructions. PMID:20421245

  14. Hydrologic studies of multilayered landfill covers for closure of waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing engineered barriers. These field experiments were performed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15 and 25%. Field measurements of seepage, precipitation, interflow, runoff, and soil water content were collected in each of the 16 plots representing four slopes each with four cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier. A seepage collection system was installed beneath each cover design to evaluate the influence of slope length on seepage using a series of four metal pans filled with medium gravel that were placed end-to-end in the bottom of each field plot. An automated waterflow datalogging system was used to collect hourly seepage, interflow and runoff data and consisted of 100 100-liter tanks, each of which was equipped with an ultrasonic liquid-level sensor and a motor-operated ball valve used to drain the tank. Soil water content was routinely monitored every six hours at each of 212 locations throughout the 16 plots with time domain reflectrometry (TDR) techniques using an automated and multiplexed measurement system

  15. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags in a landfill cover construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel slags from high-alloyed tool steel production were used in a full scale cover construction of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. In order to study the long-term stability of the steel slags within the final cover, a laboratory experiment was performed. The effect on the ageing process, due to i.e. carbonation, exerted by five different factors resembling both the material characteristics and the environmental conditions is investigated. Leaching behaviour, acid neutralization capacity and mineralogy (evaluated by means of X-ray diffraction, XRD, and thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis, TG/DTA) are tested after different periods of ageing under different conditions. Samples aged for 3 and 10 months were evaluated in this paper. Multivariate data analysis was used for data evaluation. The results indicate that among the investigated factors, ageing time and carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere were able to exert the most relevant effect. However, further investigations are required in order to clarify the role of the temperature.

  16. Landfill cover performance monitoring using time domain reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) systems were installed to monitor soil moisture in two newly constructed landfill covers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Each TDR system includes four vertical arrays with each array consisting of four TDR probes located at depths of 15, 30, 45, and 60 cm. The deepest probes at 60 cm were installed beneath a compacted soil layer to analyze infiltration through the compacted layer. Based on the TDR data, infiltration through the two covers between March and October, 1997 ranged from less than measurable to 1.5 cm. However, due to a prohibition on penetrating the buried waste and resulting limits on probe placement depths, deeper percolation was not evaluated. Some of the advantages found in the application of TDR for infiltration monitoring at this site are the relative low cost and rugged nature of the equipment. Also, of particular importance, the ability to collect frequent moisture measurements allows the capture and evaluation of soil moisture changes resulting from episodic precipitation events. Disadvantages include the inability to install the probes into the waste, difficulties in interpretation of infiltration during freeze/thaw periods, and some excessive noise in the data

  17. Adsorption and transport of methane in landfill cover soil amended with waste-wood biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Bala Yamini; Reddy, Krishna R

    2015-08-01

    The natural presence of methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in landfill soils can stimulate the bio-chemical oxidation of CH4 to CO2 and H2O under suitable environmental conditions. This mechanism can be enhanced by amending the landfill cover soil with organic materials such as biochars that are recalcitrant to biological degradation and are capable of adsorbing CH4 while facilitating the growth and activity of MOB within their porous structure. Several series of batch and small-scale column tests were conducted to quantify the CH4 sorption and transport properties of landfill cover soil amended with four types of waste hardwood biochars under different levels of amendment percentages (2, 5 and 10% by weight), exposed CH4 concentrations (0-1 kPa), moisture content (dry, 25% and 75% water holding capacity), and temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C). The linear forms of the pseudo second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model were used to determine the kinetics and the maximum CH4 adsorption capacity of cover materials. The maximum CH4 sorption capacity of dry biochar-amended soils ranged from 1.03 × 10(-2) to 7.97 × 10(-2) mol kg(-1) and exhibited a ten-fold increase compared to that of soil with 1.9 × 10(-3) mol kg(-1). The isosteric heat of adsorption for soil was negative and ranged from -30 to -118 kJ/mol, while that of the biochar-amended soils was positive and ranged from 24 to 440 kJ/mol. The CH4 dispersion coefficients for biochar-amended soils obtained through predictive transport modeling indicated that amending the soil with biochar enhanced the methane transport rates by two orders of magnitude, thereby increasing their potential for enhanced exchange of gases within the cover system. Overall, the use of hardwood biochars as a cover soil amendment to reduce methane emissions from landfills appears to be a promising alternative to conventional soil covers. PMID:25935750

  18. [Depth Profiles of Methane Oxidation Kinetics and the Related Methanotrophic Community in a Simulated Landfill Cover].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi-lin; Zhao, Tian-tao; Gao, Yan-hui; He, Zhi; Yang, Xu; Peng, Xu-ya

    2015-11-01

    Simulated landfill cover with real time online monitoring system was developed using cover soils. Then the system started and the concentrations of bio-gas in various depths were continuously monitored, and it was found that the system ran continually and stably after 2-3 h when methane flux changed. After that, the relationship between regularity of methane oxidation and methane flux in landfill cover was analyzed. The results indicated that concentration of oxygen decreased with increasing methane flux when the depth was deeper than 20 cm, and no obvious correlation between oxygen concentration in landfill cover surface and methane flux, however, methane oxidation rate showed positive correlation with methane flux in various depths (range of R2 was 0.851-0.999). Kinetics of CH4 oxidation in landfill cover was fitted by CH4 -O2 dual-substrate model (range of R2 was 0.902-0.955), the half-saturation constant K(m) increasing with depth was 0.157-0.729 in dynamic condition. Finally, methanotrophs community structure in original cover soil sample and that in simulated landfill cover were investigated by high-throughout sequencing technology, and the statistics indicated that the abundance and species of methanotrophs in simulated landfill cover significantly increased compared with those in original cover soil sample, and type I methanotrophs including Methylobacter and Methylophilaceae and type II methanotrophs Methylocystis were dominant species. PMID:26911022

  19. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily

  20. Earthworm activity in a simulated landfill cover soil shifts the community composition of active methanotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Héry, Marina; Bodrossy, Levente; Singer, Andrew C.; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Thompson, Ian P.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2011-01-01

    Landfills represent a major source of methane into the atmosphere. In a previous study, we demonstrated that earthworm activity in landfill cover soil can increase soil methane oxidation capacity (Héry et al., 2008). In this study, a simulated landfill cover soil mesocosm (1 m x 0.15 m) was used to observe the influence of earthworms (Eisenia veneta) on the active methanotroph community composition, by analyzing the expression of the pmoA gene, which is responsible for methane oxidation. mRN...

  1. Transport and reaction processes affecting the attenuation of landfill gas in cover soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Scheutz, Charlotte;

    2008-01-01

    Methane and trace organic gases produced in landfill waste are partly oxidized in the top 40 cm of landfill cover soils under aerobic conditions. The balance between the oxidation of landfill gases and the ingress of atmospheric oxygen into the soil cover determines the attenuation of emissions of...... emission to the atmosphere. Oxygen supply into the soil column is driven exclusively by diffusion, whereas advection outward offsets part of the diffusive contribution. In the reaction zone, methane consumption reduces the pressure gradient, further decreasing the significance of advection near the top of...

  2. Landfill leachate management in Istanbul: applications and alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calli, Baris; Mertoglu, Bulent; Inanc, Bulent

    2005-05-01

    Treatment alternatives for Istanbul, Komurcuoda Landfill (KL) leachate that is currently transported to the nearest central wastewater treatment plant were comprehensively investigated with laboratory scale experiments. As flow rate of leachate increases parallel to increment in landfilled solid waste, an individual treatment will be needed to reduce the transportation cost and pollution load on central treatment. However, if the leachate is separately treated and discharged to a brook, in that case more stringent discharge standards will be valid and therefore advanced processes in addition to conventional ones should be included. In laboratory scale experiments, the young landfill leachate having BOD5/COD ratio above 0.6 was successfully treated with efficiencies above 90% in upflow anaerobic reactors if pH is kept below free ammonia inhibition level. Subsequently, nitrification of anaerobically treated leachate was performed with rates of about 8.5 mg NH4+-Ng-1 VSS h-1 and efficiencies above 99% were provided with automated pH regulation by using sodium bicarbonate. Furthermore, denitrification rates as high as 8.1 mg NOx-N g-1VSS h-1 was obtained when carbon source was externally supplied. In addition to nitrification and denitrification, air stripping and struvite precipitation were also applied to remove ammonia in leachate and in average 94% and 98% efficiencies were achieved, respectively. Finally, in average 85% of biologically inert COD was successfully removed by using either ozone or Fenton's oxidation. PMID:15811410

  3. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celary, Piotr; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta

    2014-12-01

    Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with flotation sewage sludge, and 45% v/v and 5% v/v, respectively, for precipitation sewage sludge. These combinations allowed for obtaining products with negligible heavy metal leaching levels and hardness similar to commercial glass, which suggests they could be potentially used as construction aggregate substitutes. Incineration of sewage sludge before the vitrification process lead to

  4. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celary, Piotr, E-mail: pcelary@is.pcz.czest.pl; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta, E-mail: jszoltysek@is.pcz.czest.pl

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The possibility of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge was investigated. • Glass cullet was substituted with different wastes of mineral character. • Component ratio in the processed mixtures was optimized. • Environmental safety of the acquired vitrificates was verified. • An alternative management approach of usually landfilled waste was presented. - Abstract: Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with

  5. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The possibility of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge was investigated. • Glass cullet was substituted with different wastes of mineral character. • Component ratio in the processed mixtures was optimized. • Environmental safety of the acquired vitrificates was verified. • An alternative management approach of usually landfilled waste was presented. - Abstract: Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with

  6. Assessing the environmental impact of ashes used in a landfill cover construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travar, I; Lidelöw, S; Andreas, L; Tham, G; Lagerkvist, A

    2009-04-01

    Large amounts of construction materials will be needed in Europe in anticipation for capping landfills that will be closed due to the tightening up of landfill legislation. This study was conducted to assess the potential environmental impacts of using refuse derived fuel (RDF) and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) ashes as substitutes for natural materials in landfill cover designs. The leaching of substances from a full-scale landfill cover test area built with different fly and bottom ashes was evaluated based on laboratory tests and field monitoring. The water that drained off above the liner (drainage) and the water that percolated through the liner into the landfill (leachate) were contaminated with Cl(-), nitrogen and several trace elements (e.g., As, Cu, Mo, Ni and Se). The drainage from layers containing ash will probably require pre-treatment before discharge. The leachate quality from the ash cover is expected to have a minor influence on overall landfill leachate quality because the amounts generated from the ash covers were low, <3-30l (m(2)yr)(-1). Geochemical modelling indicated that precipitation of clay minerals and other secondary compounds in the ash liner was possible within 3 years after construction, which could contribute to the retention of trace elements in the liner in the long term. Hence, from an environmental view point, the placement of ashes in layers above the liner is more critical than within the liner. PMID:19081235

  7. Comparison of Methods to Assess the Fate of Methane in a Landfill-Cover Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, K. E.; Schroth, M. H.; Eugster, W.; Niklaus, P.; Oester, P.; Zeyer, J.

    2008-12-01

    A substantial fraction of the greenhouse gas methane released into the atmosphere is produced in terrestrial environments such as wetlands, rice paddy fields, and landfills. However, the amount of methane that is emitted from these environments is often reduced by microbial methane oxidation, mediated by methanotrophic microorganisms. Methanotrophs are ubiquitous in soils and represent the largest biological sink for methane. We performed a series of field experiments in summer 2008 to compare several state-of- the-art methods to assess the fate of methane in a landfill-cover soil near Liestal (BL), Switzerland. Methods employed included eddy-covariance and field-chamber measurements to quantify net methane flux at the landfill surface. In addition, methane concentrations at the landfill surface were monitored using a portable methane detector. Methane fluxes within the cover soil were estimated from methane-concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements. Additionally, gas push-pull tests were employed for in-situ quantification of methane oxidation in the cover soil. Finally, methane stable-carbon-isotope measurements were conducted to corroborate methane oxidation in the cover soil. Preliminary results indicate that each method provides unique information, and when combined, the data provide detailed insight in the fate of methane in the cover soil. The investigated landfill-cover soil appears to be ordinarily a net sink for methane. However, it can quickly turn into a net source of methane under adverse meteorological conditions.

  8. Removal of halogenated organic compounds in landfill gas by top covers containing zero-valent iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Winther, K.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Transformation of gaseous CCl3F and CCl4 by zero-valent iron was studied in systems unsaturated with water under anaerobic conditionssin an N2 gas and in a landfill gas atmosphere. The transformation was studied in batch as well as flow-through column tests. In both systems, the transformation pr....... During continuous aerobic conditions, the transformation of CCl3F decreased toward zero. Model calculations show that use of zero-valent iron in landfill top covers is a potential treatment technology for emission reduction of halogenated trace compounds from landfills....

  9. Two-year performance by evapotranspiration covers for municipal solid waste landfills in northwest Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► All ET covers produced rates of percolation less than 32 cm yr−1, the maximum allowable rate by the Ohio EPA. ► Dredged sediment provided sufficient water storage and promoted growth by native plant species. ► Native plant mixtures attained acceptable rates of evapotranspiration throughout the growing season. - Abstract: Evapotranspiration (ET) covers have gained interest as an alternative to conventional covers for the closure of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills because they are less costly to construct and are expected to have a longer service life. Whereas ET covers have gained acceptance in arid and semi-arid regions (defined by a precipitation (P) to potential evapotranspiration (PET) ratio less than 0.75) by meeting performance standards (e.g. rate of percolation), it remains unclear whether they are suitable for humid regions (P:PET greater than 0.75). The goal of this project is to extend their application to northwest Ohio (P:PET equals 1.29) by designing covers that produce a rate of percolation less than 32 cm yr−1, the maximum acceptable rate by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). Test ET covers were constructed in drainage lysimeters (1.52 m diameter, 1.52 m depth) using dredged sediment amended with organic material and consisted of immature (I, plants seeded onto soil) or mature (M, plants transferred from a restored tall-grass prairie) plant mixtures. The water balance for the ET covers was monitored from June 2009 to June 2011, which included measured precipitation and percolation, and estimated soil water storage and evapotranspiration. Precipitation was applied at a rate of 94 cm yr−1 in the first year and at rate of 69 cm yr−1 in the second year. During the first year, covers with the M plant mixture produced noticeably less percolation (4 cm) than covers with the I plant mixture (17 cm). However, during the second year, covers with the M plant mixture produced considerably more percolation (10 cm

  10. Evaluation of Landfill Cover Design Options for Waste Disposal Sites in the Coastal Regions of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodwo Beedu Keelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled leachate generation from operational and closed waste disposal sites is a major environmental concern in the coastal regions of Ghana which have abundant surface water and groundwater resources. The Ghana Landfill Guidelines requires the provision of a final cover or capping system as part of a final closure plan for waste disposal sites in the country as a means of minimizing the harmful environmental effects of these emissions. However, this technical manual does not provide explicit guidance on the material types or configuration for landfill covers that would be suitable for the different climatic conditions in the country. Four landfill cover options which are based on the USEPA RCRA-type and evapotranspirative landfill cover design specifications were evaluated with the aid of the HELP computer program to determine their suitability for waste disposal sites located in the Western, Central and Greater Accra regions. The RCRA Subtitle C cover which yielded flux rates of less than 0.001 mm/yr was found to be suitable for the specific climatic conditions. The RCRA Subtitle D cover was determined to be unsuitable due to the production of very large flux rates in excess of 200 mm/yr. The results for the anisotropic barrier and capillary barrier covers were inconclusive. Recommendations for further study include a longer simulation period as well the study of the combined effects of different topsoil vegetative conditions and evaporative zone depths on the landfill water balance. The use of other water balance models such as EPIC, HYDRUS-2D and UNSAT-H for the evaluation of the evapotranspirative landfill cover design options should also be considered.

  11. Design and construction of the multilayer cover for uranium ores landfills in Andujar (Spain) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report shows the design and construction of multilayer cover for the landfill of sterile uranium ores in Andujar Mining (Spain). The main chapters are: 1.- Decommissioning project of Uranium Mining in Andujar (Spain) 2.- Elements and design of cover. 3.- Characteristic material

  12. Stimulation of methane oxidation potential and effects on vegetation growth by bottom ash addition in a landfill final evapotranspiration cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gil Won; Ho, Adrian; Kim, Pil Joo; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-09-01

    The landfilling of municipal solid waste is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4), contributing up to 20% of total anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The evapotranspiration (ET) cover system, an alternative final cover system in waste landfills, has been considered to be a promising way to mitigate CH4 emissions, as well as to prevent water infiltration using vegetation on landfill cover soils. In our previous studies, bottom ash from coal-fired power plants was selected among several industrial residues (blast furnace slag, bottom ash, construction waste, steel manufacture slag, stone powder sludge, and waste gypsum) as the best additive for ET cover systems, with the highest mechanical performance achieved for a 35% (wtwt(-1)) bottom ash content in soil. In this study, to evaluate the field applicability of bottom ash mixed soil as ET cover, four sets of lysimeters (height 1.2m×width 2m×length 6m) were constructed in 2007, and four different treatments were installed: (i) soil+bottom ash (35% wtwt(-1)) (SB); (ii) soil+compost (2% wtwt(-1), approximately corresponding to 40Mgha(-1) in arable field scale) (SC); (iii) soil+bottom ash+compost (SBC); and (iv) soil only as the control (S). The effects of bottom ash mixing in ET cover soil on CH4 oxidation potential and vegetation growth were evaluated in a pilot ET cover system in the 5th year after installation by pilot experiments using the treatments. Our results showed that soil properties were significantly improved by bottom ash mixing, resulting in higher plant growth. Bottom ash addition significantly increased the CH4 oxidation potential of the ET cover soil, mainly due to improved organic matter and available copper concentration, enhancing methanotrophic abundances in soil amended with bottom ash. Conclusively, bottom ash could be a good alternative as a soil additive in the ET cover system to improve vegetation growth and mitigate CH4 emission impact in the waste landfill system. PMID:27067424

  13. VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR WASTE CONTAINMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal of municipal ahd hazardous waste in the United States is primarily accomplished by containment in lined and capped landfills. Evapotranspiration cover systems offer an alternative to conventional landfill cap systems. These covers work on completely different principles ...

  14. Long-term performance of landfill covers - results of lysimeter test fields in Bavaria (Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henken-Mellies, Wolf-Ulrich; Schweizer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted to examine the performance and possible changes in the effectiveness of landfill surface covers. Three different profiles of mineral landfill caps were examined. The results of precipitation and flow measurements show distinct seasonal differences which are typical for middle-European climatic conditions. In the case of the simple landfill cap design consisting of a thick layer of loamy sand, approximately 100-200 L m(-2) of annual seepage into the landfill body occurs during winter season. The three-layer systems of the two other test fields performed much better. Most of the water which percolated through the top soil profile drained sideways in the drainage layer. Only 1-3% of precipitation percolated through the sealing layer. The long-term effectiveness of the mineral sealing layer depended on the ability of the top soil layer to protect it from critical loss of soil water/critical increase of suction. In dry summers there was even a loss in soil water content at the base of the 2.0 m thick soil cover. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of the long-term aspect when assessing the effectiveness of landfill covers: The hydraulic conductivity at the time of construction gives only an initial (minimum) value. The hydraulic conductivity of the compacted clay layer or of the geosynthetic clay liner may increase substantially, if there is no long-lasting protection against desiccation (by a thick soil cover or by a geomembrane). This has to be taken into account in landfill cover design. PMID:20937619

  15. From a Literature Review to an Alternative Treatment System for Landfill Gas and Leachate

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Huang; Michael McGuire; Rui Zhao

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an alternative treatment system for landfill gas and leachate control in order to reduce the energy consumption and disposal cost, using the recycled landfill gas as the combustion promoter for incineration of the leachate. This study starts by providing a literature review to summarize and analyze different approaches being applied to landfill leachate treatment. Subsequently, a conceptual prototype is proposed, which can be built using existing technology by means of tec...

  16. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm-3, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH4 m-2 d-1, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH4 m-2 d-1 and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air

  17. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm(-3), reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1), covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1) and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of

  18. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. → Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. → Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

  19. A water balance study of two landfill cover designs for semiarid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results from several field experiments on methods to control soil erosion, biointrusion, and water infiltration were used to design and test an enhanced landfill cover that improves the ability of the disposal site to isolate buried wastes. The performance of the improved cover design in managing water and biota at the disposal site was compared for 3 yr with that obtained from a more conventional design that has been widely used in the industry. The conventional cover design consisted of 20 cm of sandy loam topsoil over 108 cm of a sandy silt backfill, whereas the improved design consists of 71 cm of topsoil over a minimum of 46 cm of gravel, 91 cm of river cobble, and 38 cm of sandy silt backfill. Each plot was lined with an impermeable liner to allow for mass balance calculation of water dynamics. Results over a 3-yr period, including 2 wet yr, demonstrated that the improved design reduced percolation of water through the landfill cover by a factor of >4 over the conventional design. This decrease in percolation was attributed to a combination of increased evapotranspiration from the plant cover and the effect of a capillary barrier embedded in the enhanced cover profile in diverting water laterally in the cover. The field data are finally discussed in terms of its usefulness for waste management decisions to be made in the future for both new and existing landfills at Los Alamos, NM, and at other semiarid waste disposal sites

  20. [Experiment and numerical simulation of percolation control using evapotranspirative landfill cover system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-shun; Zhao, Hui; Luo, Ji-wu

    2009-01-01

    An Evapotranspirative Landfill Cover (ET Landfill Cover) is a simple and economical percolation control system that involves a monolithic soil layer with a vegetative cover.Percolation control in an ET cover system relies on the storage of moisture within the cover soils during precipitation events and subsequently returns it to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration. Percolation control experiments of a bare soil cover and 5 different ET covers were implemented in comprehensive experimental station of water environment of Wuhan University and the water balance calculation of each cover system was conducted, the results shown that the ET cover of 60 cm loamy soil layer with shrub was the most effective among the 6 experimental disposals. However, the experiments demonstrated 60 cm thick of soil layer was not enough to prevent percolation during rainy season and keep the shrub alive during drought season without irrigation. So the Hydrus 2D was selected to simulate the soil water movement in ET covers with different cover thicknesses, the simulations shown that the optimal ET cover in Wuhan area should be 120-140 cm loamy soil layer with shrub. PMID:19353895

  1. Can soil gas profiles be used to assess microbial CH4 oxidation in landfill covers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Julia; Röwer, Inga Ute; Scharff, Heijo; Roncato, Camila D L; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2011-05-01

    A method is proposed to estimate CH(4) oxidation efficiency in landfill covers, biowindows or biofilters from soil gas profile data. The approach assumes that the shift in the ratio of CO(2) to CH(4) in the gas profile, compared to the ratio in the raw landfill gas, is a result of the oxidation process and thus allows the calculation of the cumulative share of CH(4) oxidized up to a particular depth. The approach was validated using mass balance data from two independent laboratory column experiments. Values corresponded well over a wide range of oxidation efficiencies from less than 10% to nearly total oxidation. An incubation experiment on 40 samples from the cover soil of an old landfill showed that the share of CO(2) from respiration falls below 10% of the total CO(2) production when the methane oxidation capacity is 3.8 μg CH(4)g(dw)(-1)h(-1) or higher, a rate that is often exceeded in landfill covers and biofilters. The method is mainly suitable in settings where the CO(2) concentrations are not significantly influenced by processes such as respiration or where CH(4) loadings and oxidation rates are high enough so that CO(2) generated from CH(4) oxidation outweighs other sources of CO(2). The latter can be expected for most biofilters, biowindows and biocovers on landfills. This simple method constitutes an inexpensive complementary tool for studies that require an estimation of the CH(4) oxidation efficiency values in methane oxidation systems, such as landfill biocovers and biowindows. PMID:21074981

  2. Methane flux and oxidation at two types of intermediate landfill covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane emissions were measured on two areas at a Florida (USA) landfill using the static chamber technique. Because existing literature contains few measurements of methane emissions and oxidation in intermediate cover areas, this study focused on field measurement of emissions at 15-cm-thick non-vegetated intermediate cover overlying 1-year-old waste and a 45-cm-thick vegetated intermediate cover overlying 7-year-old waste. The 45 cm thick cover can also simulate non-engineered covers associated with older closed landfills. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. The arithmetic means of the measured fluxes were 54 and 22 g CH4 m-2 d-1 from the thin cover and the thick cover, respectively. The peak flux was 596 g m-2 d-1 for the thin cover and 330 g m-2 d-1 for the thick cover. The mean percent oxidation was significantly greater (25%) at the thick cover relative to the thin cover (14%). This difference only partly accounted for the difference in emissions from the two sites. Inverse distance weighing was used to describe the spatial variation of flux emissions from each cover type. The geospatial mean flux was 21.6 g m-2 d-1 for the thick intermediate cover and 50.0 g m-2 d-1 for the thin intermediate cover. High emission zones in the thick cover were fewer and more isolated, while high emission zones in the thin cover were continuous and covered a larger area. These differences in the emission patterns suggest that different CH4 mitigation techniques should be applied to the two areas. For the thick intermediate cover, we suggest that effective mitigation of methane emissions could be achieved by placement of individualized compost cells over high emission zones. Emissions from the thin intermediate cover, on the other hand, can be mitigated by placing a compost layer over the entire area

  3. Methane flux and oxidation at two types of intermediate landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Chanton, Jeffery; Powelson, David; Fleiger, Jill; Escoriaza, Sharon; Lei, Yuan; Stern, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Methane emissions were measured on two areas at a Florida (USA) landfill using the static chamber technique. Because existing literature contains few measurements of methane emissions and oxidation in intermediate cover areas, this study focused on field measurement of emissions at 15-cm-thick non-vegetated intermediate cover overlying 1-year-old waste and a 45-cm-thick vegetated intermediate cover overlying 7-year-old waste. The 45 cm thick cover can also simulate non-engineered covers associated with older closed landfills. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. The arithmetic means of the measured fluxes were 54 and 22 g CH(4) m(-2)d(-1) from the thin cover and the thick cover, respectively. The peak flux was 596 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thin cover and 330 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thick cover. The mean percent oxidation was significantly greater (25%) at the thick cover relative to the thin cover (14%). This difference only partly accounted for the difference in emissions from the two sites. Inverse distance weighing was used to describe the spatial variation of flux emissions from each cover type. The geospatial mean flux was 21.6 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thick intermediate cover and 50.0 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thin intermediate cover. High emission zones in the thick cover were fewer and more isolated, while high emission zones in the thin cover were continuous and covered a larger area. These differences in the emission patterns suggest that different CH(4) mitigation techniques should be applied to the two areas. For the thick intermediate cover, we suggest that effective mitigation of methane emissions could be achieved by placement of individualized compost cells over high emission zones. Emissions from the thin intermediate cover, on the other hand, can be mitigated by placing a compost layer over the entire area. PMID:16426833

  4. Effects of biochar amendment on geotechnical properties of landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna R; Yaghoubi, Poupak; Yukselen-Aksoy, Yeliz

    2015-06-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich product obtained when plant-based biomass is heated in a closed container with little or no available oxygen. Biochar-amended soil has the potential to serve as a landfill cover material that can oxidise methane emissions for two reasons: biochar amendment can increase the methane retention time and also enhance the biological activity that can promote the methanotrophic oxidation of methane. Hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength are the most important geotechnical properties that are required for the design of effective and stable landfill cover systems, but no studies have been reported on these properties for biochar-amended landfill cover soils. This article presents physicochemical and geotechnical properties of a biochar, a landfill cover soil and biochar-amended soils. Specifically, the effects of amending 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (of different particle sizes as produced, size-20 and size-40) to soil on its physicochemical properties, such as moisture content, organic content, specific gravity and pH, as well as geotechnical properties, such as hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength, were determined from laboratory testing. Soil or biochar samples were prepared by mixing them with 20% deionised water based on dry weight. Samples of soil amended with 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (w/w) as-is or of different select sizes, were also prepared at 20% initial moisture content. The results show that the hydraulic conductivity of the soil increases, compressibility of the soil decreases and shear strength of the soil increases with an increase in the biochar amendment, and with a decrease in biochar particle size. Overall, the study revealed that biochar-amended soils can possess excellent geotechnical properties to serve as stable landfill cover materials. PMID:25898984

  5. Reuse of MSWI bottom ash mixed with natural sodium bentonite as landfill cover material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Sara; Marchese, Franco; Dominijanni, Andrea; Manassero, Mario

    2013-06-01

    The research described in this study had the aim of evaluating the reuse of incinerator slag, mixed with sodium bentonite, for landfill capping system components. A characterization was performed on pure bottom ash (BA) samples from an incinerator in the north of Italy. The results show that the BA samples had appropriate properties as covers. The compacted dry unit weight of the studied BA (16.2 kN m(-3)) was lower than the average value that characterizes most conventional fill materials and this can be considered advantageous for landfill cover systems, since the fill has to be placed on low bearing capacity ground or where long-term settlement is possible. Moreover, direct shear tests showed a friction angle of 43°, corresponding to excellent mechanical characteristics that can be considered an advantage against failure. The hydraulic conductivity tests indicated a steady-state value of 8 × 10(-10) m s(-1) for a mixture characterized by a bentonite content by weight of 10%, which was a factor 10 better than required by Italian legislation on landfill covers. The results from a swell index test indicated that fine bentonite swelled, even when divalent cations were released by the BA. The leaching behaviour of the mixture did not show any contamination issues and was far better than obtained for the pure BA. Thus, the BA-bentonite mixture qualified as a suitable material for landfill cover in Italy. Moreover, owing to the low release of toxic compounds, the proposed cover system would have no effect on the leachate quality in the landfill. PMID:23478909

  6. Cache CountyCommunity Survey of Future Landfill Alternatives

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson-Smith, Douglas B.; Caplan, A.; Jones, T.; Grijalva, T.

    2003-01-01

    State University in the spring of 2003. The purpose of this survey was to gather scientific information regarding the concerns, perceptions, and preferences of Cache County adults related to various future landfill siting options. The survey was conducted at the request of local officials, the Countywide Service District, and various advisory committees established to make recommendations on a future Cache County landfill site.

  7. A water balance study of four landfill cover designs varying in slope for semiarid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of disposing of radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and to the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose a hazard. In order to achieve this, the performance of a landfill cover design without an engineered barrier (Conventional Design) was compared with three designs containing either a hydraulic barrier (EPA Design) or a capillary barrier (Loam and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier Designs). Water balance parameters were measured since 1991 at six-hour intervals for four different landfill cover designs in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Whereas runoff generally accounted for only 2-3% of the precipitation losses on these designs, similar values for evapotranspiration ranged from 86% to 91%, with increased evapotranspiration occurring with increases in slope. Consequently, interflow and seepage usually decreased with increasing slope for each landfill cover design. Seepage consisted of up to 10% of the precipitation on the Conventional Design, whereas the hydraulic barrier in the EPA Design effectively controlled seepage at all slopes, and both of the capillary designs worked effectively to eliminate seepage at the higher slopes

  8. Performance requirements for design of landfill covers for long term protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance requirements are presented for landfill covers designed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) and the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). Specialized design technology is discussed which addresses the issues of long term isolation of waste materials and integrity of cover components. The basis for the designs are given for UMTRAP and WSSRAP which resulted in the performance requirements established for each project. Performance requirements for each cover component are summarized, together with resulting cover components which meet the requirements

  9. Methane oxidation and degradation of organic compounds in landfill soil covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    -order kinetics and occurred in parallel with the oxidation of methane. TeCM, CFC-11, and CFC-12 were not degradable in presence of oxygen and degradation of these compounds in the oxidative zone in landfill top covers is therefore expected to be limited. However these compounds were found degradable in the......High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero...... anaerobic zone in the lower part of soil columns permeated with artificial landfill gas. The lesser-chlorinated compounds were degraded in the upper oxic zone with overlapping gradients of methane and oxygen. Methane oxidation and degradation of HOCs in the top-soils may play a very important role in...

  10. Chemical properties and biodegradability of waste paper mill sludges to be used for landfill covering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zule, Janja; Cernec, Franc; Likon, Marko

    2007-12-01

    Waste paper mill sludges originating from different effluent treatment and de-inking installations are complex mixtures of inorganic and organic particles. Due to their favourable physico-chemical, and microbiological characteristics, they may be conveniently reused for different purposes as such or after appropriate pretreatment. Sludges from the Slovenian paper industry were extensively tested for their chemical, stability and sealing properties. During the biodegradability tests, evolutions of greenhouse gases CO2, CH4 and H2S as well as the concentrations of released volatile organic acids, such as acetic, propionic, butyric, lactic and glycollic acids as the typical degradation products of organic materials, were measured. Some other important parameters of water leachates such as pH, redox potential, content of starch and leachable ions were also evaluated. The results indicate that most of them can be efficiently applied as alternative hydraulic barrier layers for landfill construction and covering instead of the more expensive clay due to their good geomechanical properties, chemical inertness and microbiological stability. Such replacement brings about considerable economical and ecological benefits as the waste is reprocessed as secondary raw material. PMID:18229748

  11. Assessment of municipal waste compost as a daily cover material for odour control at landfill sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of municipal waste compost as a daily cover material to reduce the odorous emissions associated with landfill surfaces was investigated. Trials were carried out using landfill gas, a certified sulphurous gas mix and ambient air as a control. Odorous gas was passed through portable test column filled with compost at different densities (590 kg/m3 and 740 kg/m3). Gas samples were taken from the inlet, outlet and at varying column depths and examined using a combination of sensory analysis (olfactometry) and a novel analytical method (Transportable Selected Ion Flow Tube - TSIFT). Results for the trials using landfill gas showed a 69% odour reduction (OU/m3) through the column for compost with a bulk density of 590 kg/m3, and a reduction of 97% using compost with a bulk density of 740 kg/m3. TSIFT analysis showed an overall decrease in the concentration of terpenes, and sulphurous compounds in the outlet gas from the column for both bulk densities. No significant trend could be identified for the concentrations at different depths within the column. Results show the ability of compost to reduce landfill odours under differing conditions. The inconclusive data provided by TSIFT analysis may be due to the analysis of compounds that are not contributing to odour, and thus highlights the potential for synergetic effects and the importance of sensory measurement when examining odorous emissions. - Practical measures to improve landfill odour control are investigated

  12. Assessment of municipal waste compost as a daily cover material for odour control at landfill sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, Claire [Integrated Waste Management Centre, Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Longhurst, Philip [Integrated Waste Management Centre, Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.j.longhurst@cranfield.ac.uk; Pollard, Simon [Integrated Waste Management Centre, Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Smith, Richard [Integrated Waste Management Centre, Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Jefferson, Bruce [School of Water Sciences, Cranfield University, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Gronow, Jan [Environment Agency, Science Group - Waste and Remediation, Olton Court, 10 Warwick Road, Olton, Solihull, West Midlands, B92 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-01

    The ability of municipal waste compost as a daily cover material to reduce the odorous emissions associated with landfill surfaces was investigated. Trials were carried out using landfill gas, a certified sulphurous gas mix and ambient air as a control. Odorous gas was passed through portable test column filled with compost at different densities (590 kg/m{sup 3} and 740 kg/m{sup 3}). Gas samples were taken from the inlet, outlet and at varying column depths and examined using a combination of sensory analysis (olfactometry) and a novel analytical method (Transportable Selected Ion Flow Tube - TSIFT). Results for the trials using landfill gas showed a 69% odour reduction (OU/m{sup 3}) through the column for compost with a bulk density of 590 kg/m{sup 3}, and a reduction of 97% using compost with a bulk density of 740 kg/m{sup 3}. TSIFT analysis showed an overall decrease in the concentration of terpenes, and sulphurous compounds in the outlet gas from the column for both bulk densities. No significant trend could be identified for the concentrations at different depths within the column. Results show the ability of compost to reduce landfill odours under differing conditions. The inconclusive data provided by TSIFT analysis may be due to the analysis of compounds that are not contributing to odour, and thus highlights the potential for synergetic effects and the importance of sensory measurement when examining odorous emissions. - Practical measures to improve landfill odour control are investigated.

  13. From a Literature Review to an Alternative Treatment System for Landfill Gas and Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an alternative treatment system for landfill gas and leachate control in order to reduce the energy consumption and disposal cost, using the recycled landfill gas as the combustion promoter for incineration of the leachate. This study starts by providing a literature review to summarize and analyze different approaches being applied to landfill leachate treatment. Subsequently, a conceptual prototype is proposed, which can be built using existing technology by means of technical possibility analysis, whilst economic benefits could be returned through preliminary comparison. With the proposed introduction of a “waste treatment park”, this alternative treatment system could provide a template for leachate and landfill gas control. This study may provide an insight for landfill operators and engineers to promote the transformation from the conceptual framework to the real achievement. Finally, the limitations of the conceptual model and analysis are discussed, laying a foundation for further work.

  14. Closure Alternatives for Municipal Waste Landfills.Study Case: Municipal Waste Landfill Medias,Sibiu County

    OpenAIRE

    R. MIHĂIESCU; L. MUNTEAN; C. BODEA; Cristina MODOI; C. MALOŞ; MIHĂIESCU Tania; V. Arghiuş; Gh. ROŞIAN; Baciu, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, the environmental impact produced by municipal solid wastes has received specialattention. All new EU countries are involved in the process of implementation of the European Council Directive31/99/EC on the landfill of waste in the European Union. As consequence National legislation, adapted to fit the EUrequirements, focuses on integrated waste management and environmental control of municipal solid waste landfills,from start-up to closure and assimilation into the env...

  15. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.W.W.; Chen, Z.K.; Coo, J.L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Chen, R., E-mail: chenrui1005@hotmail.com [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Urban and Civil Engineering for Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explore feasibility of unsaturated clay as a gas barrier in landfill cover. • Gas breakthrough pressure increases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • Gas emission rate decreases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • A 0.6 m-thick clay layer may be sufficient to meet gas emission rate limit. - Abstract: Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas–water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different

  16. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Explore feasibility of unsaturated clay as a gas barrier in landfill cover. • Gas breakthrough pressure increases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • Gas emission rate decreases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • A 0.6 m-thick clay layer may be sufficient to meet gas emission rate limit. - Abstract: Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas–water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different

  17. Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

    2010-09-30

    The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

  18. Predicted performance of clay-barrier landfill covers in arid and semi-arid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, S; Ghanimeh, S; El-Fadel, M

    2007-01-01

    Conventional landfill cover systems for municipal solid waste include low-permeability compacted clay barriers to minimize infiltration into the landfilled waste. Such layers are vulnerable in climates where arid to semi-arid conditions prevail, whereby the clay cover tends to desiccate and crack, resulting in drastically higher infiltration, i.e., lower cover efficiency. To date, this phenomenon, which has been reported in field observations, has not been adequately assessed. In this paper, the performance of a cover system solely relying on a clay barrier was simulated using a numerical finite element formulation to capture changes in the clay layer and the corresponding modified hydraulic characteristics. The cover system was guided by USEPA Subtitle-D minimum requirements and consisted of a clay layer underlying a protective vegetated soil. The intrinsic characteristics of the clay barrier and vegetative soil cover, including their saturated hydraulic conductivities and their soil-water characteristic curves, were varied as warranted to simulate intact or "cracked" conditions as determined through the numerical analyses within the proposed methodology. The results indicate that the levels of percolation through the compromised or cracked cover were up to two times greater than those obtained for intact covers, starting with an intact clay hydraulic conductivity of 10(-5)cm/s. PMID:16987648

  19. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We quantify above- and below-ground CH4 fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. ► We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH4 loading from the waste body. ► Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. ► Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH4 emissions. ► Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH4 loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). However, much of the CH4 produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH4 fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH4 ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH4 into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH4 concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH4 fluxes and CH4 loading were estimated from soil–gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push–pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH4 oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH4 emissions from the test section (daily mean up to ∼91,500 μmol m−2 d−1), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH4 concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 (uptake up to −380 μmol m−2 d−1) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH4 loading over short distances in the cover soil, while

  20. Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane (CH4) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH4 to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH4 oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH4, O2 and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH4 with either Ar or CH4 itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH4 oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8 ± 0.8 h-1 at location 1 and 18.9 ± 0.6 h-1 at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH4 concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH4 concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH4 in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH4 oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH4 oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH4 concentrations were low.

  1. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenauer, Thomas G; Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann; Gerzabek, Martin H

    2011-05-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa+grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa+grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content. PMID:20888746

  2. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C W W; Chen, Z K; Coo, J L; Chen, R; Zhou, C

    2015-10-01

    Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas-water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different climate conditions. The results of experimental study and numerical simulation reveal that as the degree of saturation and thickness of clay increase, the gas breakthrough pressure increases but the gas emission rate decreases significantly. Under a gas pressure of 10 kPa (the upper bound limit of typical landfill gas pressure), a 0.6m or thicker

  3. Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH4 oxidation in landfill soil covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane (CH4), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH4 is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH4 oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH4 (Vmax) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O2 from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O2 and CH4 in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH4 slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O2 decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is influenced by the counter-directional flow rate. Further analysis of other gases in the column, N2 and CO2, may be required to support this hypothesis, but in this paper we propose the possibility that the simulations using the diffusion coefficient of O2 under the natural condition may overestimate the penetration of O2 into the soil cover layer and consequently overestimate the oxidation of CH4

  4. Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH4 oxidation in landfill soil covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, J; Moon, S; Nam, K; Kim, Y-J; Kim, J Y

    2009-02-01

    Methane (CH(4)), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH(4) is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH(4) oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH(4) (V(max)) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O(2) from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O(2) and CH(4) in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH(4) slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O(2) decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is influenced by the counter-directional flow rate. Further analysis of other gases in the column, N(2) and CO(2), may be required to support this hypothesis, but in this paper we propose the possibility that the simulations using the diffusion coefficient of O(2) under the natural condition may overestimate the penetration of O(2) into the soil cover layer and consequently overestimate the oxidation of CH(4). PMID:18804363

  5. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Cover Soils: Effects of Soil Compaction and Water Blockages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Nawagamuwa, U.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric CH4. landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emission , the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the biogas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil , there are few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils. Therefore, the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size and water blockage effects on the gas exchange in t highly compacted final cover soil are largely unknown. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport . In this study, the effects of compaction level and water blockage effects on ka and Dp for two landfill final cover soils were investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final covers in Japan and Sri Lanka. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm) at two different compaction levels (2700 kN/m2 and 600 kN/m2). After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential (pF; pF equals to log(-ɛ) where ɛ is soil-water matric potential in cm H2O) of 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.1, and with air-dried (pF 6.0) and oven-dried (pF 6.9) conditions. Results showed that measured Dp values

  6. Methane oxidation in a boreal climate in an experimental landfill cover composed from mechanically-biologically treated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einola, J-K M; Sormunen, K M; Rintala, J A

    2008-12-15

    The present study evaluated microbial methane (CH4) oxidation in a boreally located outdoor landfill lysimeter (volume 112 m3, height 3.9 m) filled with mechanically-biologically treated waste (MBT residual) and containing a cover layer made from the same MBT residual. The calculations based on gas emission and pore gas measurements showed that, between April and October 2005, a significant proportion (> 96%) of the methane produced (landfill covers in field conditions in a boreal climate. PMID:18823644

  7. N 2O emissions at municipal solid waste landfill sites: Effects of CH 4 emissions and cover soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    Municipal solid waste landfills are the significant anthropogenic sources of N 2O due to the cooxidation of ammonia by methane-oxidizing bacteria in cover soils. Such bacteria could be developed through CH 4 fumigation, as evidenced by both laboratory incubation and field measurement. During a 10-day incubation with leachate addition, the average N 2O fluxes in the soil samples, collected from the three selected landfill covers, were multiplied by 1.75 ( p 0.05). The annual average N 2O flux was 176 ± 566 μg N 2O-N m -2 h -1 ( p mitigate landfill N 2O emissions.

  8. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  9. Spatial variability of soil gas concentration and methane oxidation capacity in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röwer, Inga Ute; Geck, Christoph; Gebert, Julia; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    In order to devise design criteria for biocovers intended to enhance the microbial oxidation of landfill methane it is critical to understand the factors influencing gas migration and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. On an old municipal solid waste landfill in north-western Germany soil gas concentrations (10, 40, 90 cm depth), topsoil methane oxidation capacity and soil properties were surveyed at 40 locations along a 16 m grid. As soil properties determine gas flow patterns it was hypothesized that the variability in soil gas composition and the subsequent methanotrophic activity would correspond to the variability of soil properties. Methanotrophic activity was found to be subject to high spatial variability, with values ranging between 0.17 and 9.80 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1)(.) Considering the current gas production rate of 0.03 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1), the oxidation capacity at all sampled locations clearly exceeded the flux to the cover, and can be regarded as an effective instrument for mitigating methane fluxes. The methane concentration in the cover showed a high spatial heterogeneity with values between 0.01 and 0.32 vol.% (10 cm depth), 22.52 vol.% (40 cm), and 36.85 vol.% (90 cm). The exposure to methane raised the oxidation capacity, suggested by a statistical correlation to an increase in methane concentration at 90 cm depth. Methane oxidation capacity was further affected by the methanotroph bacteria pH optimum and nutrient availability, and increased with decreasing pH towards neutrality, and increased with soluble ion concentration). Soil methane and carbon dioxide concentration increased with lower flow resistance of the cover, as represented by the soil properties of a reduced bulk density, increase in air capacity and in relative ground level. PMID:20943363

  10. Assessing the performance of a cold region evapotranspiration landfill cover using lysimetry and electrical resistivity tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, William E; Munk, Jens; Abichou, Tarek; Barnes, David; Lee, William; Pape, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In order to test the efficacy ofa cold-region evapotranspiration (ET) landfill cover against a conventional compacted clay (CCL) landfill cover, two pilot scale covers were constructed in side-by-side basin lysimeters (20m x 10m x 2m) at a site in Anchorage, Alaska. The primary basis of comparison between the two lysimeters was the percolation of moisture from the bottom of each lysimeter. Between 30 April 2005 and 16 May 2006, 51.5 mm of water percolated from the ET lysimeter, compared to 50.6 mm for the the CCL lysimeter. This difference was not found to be significant at the 95% confidence level. As part of the project, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to measure and map soil moisture in ET lysimeter cross sections. The ERT-generated cross sections were found to accurately predict the onset and duration of lysimeter percolation. Moreover, ERT-generated soil moisture values demonstrated a strong linear relationship to lysimeter percolation rates (R-Squared = 0.92). Consequently, ERT is proposed as a reliable tool for assessing the function of field scale ET covers in the absence of drainage measurement devices. PMID:22574381

  11. PREDICTION/MITIGATION OF SUBSIDENCE DAMAGE TO HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILL COVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristics of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste landfills and of landfilled hazardous wastes have been described to permit development of models and other analytical techniques for predicting, reducing, and preventing landfill settlement and related cove...

  12. Spatial patterns of methane oxidation and methanotrophic diversity in landfill cover soils of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zi-Fang; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wang, Hong-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic CH4 oxidation is an important CH4 sink in landfills. To investigate the distribution and community diversity of methanotrophs and link with soil characteristics and operational parameters (e.g., concentrations of O2, CH4), cover soil samples were collected at different locations and depths from the Mengzi semi-aerobic landfill (SAL) in Yunnan Province of southern China. Specific PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and realtime PCR were used to examine methanotrophs in the landfill cover soils. The results showed that different locations did harbor distinct methanotroph communities. Methanotrophs were more abundant in areas near the venting pipes because of the higher O2 concentrations. The depth of 20-25 cm, where the ratio of the CH4 to O2 was within the range from 1.3 to 8.6, was more conducive to the growth of CH4-oxidizing bacteria. Type II methanotrophs dominated in all samples compared with Type I methanotrophs, as evidenced by the high ratio of Type II to Type I methanotrophic copy numbers (from 1.76 to 11.60). The total copy numbers of methanotrophs detected were similar to other ecosystems, although the CH4 concentration was much higher in SAL cover soil. Methylobacter and Methylocystis were the most abundant Type I and Type II methanotrophs genera, respectively, in the Mengzi SAL. The results suggested that SALs could provide a special environment with both high concentrations of CH4 and O2 for methanotrophs, especially around the vertical venting pipes. PMID:25341468

  13. Determination of environmental factors influencing methane oxidation in a sandy landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J R; Moon, S; Ahn, Y M; Kim, J Y; Nam, K

    2005-01-01

    It is advantageous to use coarse soils as landfill cover because they allow better aeration of the biologically active zone. In this study, therefore, patterns of methane oxidation were investigated under various environmental conditions including soil moisture content, temperature, and the addition of NH4+ in a sandy landfill cover soil. The kinetics of CH4 oxidation was also studied at different moisture contents and temperatures. Soil moisture content of 10% (wt/wt) resulted in the maximum CH4 oxidation rate (19.2-22.4 nmol gsoil DW(-1) min(-1)). A Vmax value was not significantly different when the moisture content was more than 10%, but a Km value increased from 5.23 to 75.24 microM as the moisture content increased. The ratio of Vmax to Km was the highest at 10% moisture content. The CH4 oxidation rate increased as the incubation temperature increased, and Q10 values and optimum temperature were determined to be 2.57-2.69 and 30 degrees C, respectively. Both Vmax and Km values decreased at the temperatures below and above 30 degrees C. The addition of various levels of NH4+ resulted in increased or decreased CH4 oxidation rates, however, the initiation of appreciable CH4 oxidation was delayed with increasing amounts of NH4+ application in all samples tested. Among the environmental variables tested, moisture content control seems to be the most important and an efficient means of managing methane oxidation when sandy soils are used in landfill cover. PMID:15747604

  14. Effects of substrate induced respiration on the stability of bottom ash in landfill cover environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, A; Lovat, E; Persson, K M

    2014-12-01

    The municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash is being increasingly used to construct landfill covers in Sweden. In post-closure, owing to increased cover infiltration, the percolating water can add external organic matter to bottom ash. The addition and subsequent degradation of this external organic matter can affect metal mobility through complexation and change in redox conditions. However, the impacts of such external organic matter addition on bottom ash stability have not been fully evaluated yet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of external organic matter on bottom ash respiration and metal leaching. The samples of weathered bottom ash were mixed with oven dried and digested wastewater sludge (1%-5% by weight). The aerobic respiration activity (AT4), as well as the leaching of metals, was tested with the help of respiration and batch leaching tests. The respiration and heavy metal leaching increased linearly with the external organic matter addition. Based on the results, it was concluded that the external organic matter addition would negatively affect the quality of landfill cover drainage. PMID:25395160

  15. DESIGN CRITERIA OF SOIL-FIBER MIXTURES AS A MATERIAL FOR LANDFILL COVER BARRIER SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Harianto, Tri

    2014-01-01

    The design criteria were introduced in this paper to design a landfill cover barrier layer using the compacted soil-fiber mixture for the future application (i.e. park, residential, etc.). Polypropylene (C3H6) fiber was used as an additive material for soil samples. The soil specimens compacted under the conditions of maximum dry density and optimum water content. In this study, the design objective in using the compacted soil-fiber mixture is to determine the range of fiber conte...

  16. Methane oxidation potential of boreal landfill cover materials: The governing factors and enhancement by nutrient manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maanoja, Susanna T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2015-12-01

    Methanotrophs inhabiting landfill covers are in a crucial role in mitigating CH4 emissions, but the characteristics of the cover material or ambient temperature do not always enable the maximal CH4 oxidation potential (MOP). This study aimed at identifying the factors governing MOPs of different materials used for constructing biocovers and other cover structures. We also tested whether the activity of methanotrophs could be enhanced at cold temperature (4 and 12°C) by improving the nutrient content (NO3(-), PO4(3-), trace elements) of the cover material. Compost samples from biocovers designed to support CH4 oxidation were exhibiting the highest MOPs (4.16 μmol CH4 g dw(-1) h(-1)), but also the soil samples collected from other cover structures were oxidising CH4 (0.41 μmol CH4 g dw(-1) h(-1)). The best predictors for the MOPs were the NO3(-) content and activity of heterotrophic bacteria at 72.8%, which were higher in the compost samples than in the soil samples. The depletion of NO3(-) from the landfill cover material limiting the activity of methanotrophs could not be confirmed by the nutrient manipulation assay at 4°C as the addition of nitrogen decreased the MOPs from 0.090 μmol CH4 g dw(-1) h(-1) to 0.096 μmol CH4 g dw(-1)h(-1)) suggesting that this was attributable to stimulation of the enzymatic activity of the psychrotolerant methanotrophs. PMID:26298483

  17. An analytical model for estimating the reduction of methane emission through landfill cover soils by methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Su, Yao; Wu, Yun; Liu, Weiping; He, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    Landfill is an important source of atmospheric methane (CH4). In this study, the development and partial validation are presented for an analytical model for predicting the reduction of CH4 emission in landfill cover soils by CH4 oxidation. The model combines an analytic solution of a coupled oxygen (O2) and CH4 soil gas transport in landfill covers with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation, including the influences of environmental factors such as cover soil thickness, CH4 oxidation and CH4 production rate. Comparison of soil gas concentration profiles with a soil column experiment is provided for a partial validation, and then this model is applied to predict the reduction of CH4 emission through landfill covers in several other cases. A discussion is provided to illustrate the roles of soil layer thickness, reaction rate constant for CH4 oxidation and CH4 production rate in determining CH4 emissions. The results suggest that the increase of cover soil thickness cannot always increase CH4 oxidation rates or removal efficiency, which becomes constant if the thickness of landfill cover soil is larger than a limit. PMID:25464331

  18. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and

  19. Steel slags in a landfill top cover--experiences from a full-scale experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, L; Diener, S; Lagerkvist, A

    2014-03-01

    A full scale field study has been carried out in order to test and evaluate the use of slags from high-alloy steel production as the construction materials for a final cover of an old municipal landfill. Five test areas were built using different slag mixtures within the barrier layer (liner). The cover consisted of a foundation layer, a liner with a thickness of 0.7 m, a drainage layer of 0.3 m, a protection layer of 1.5 m and a vegetation layer of 0.25 m. The infiltration varied depending on the cover design used, mainly the liner recipe but also over time and was related to seasons and precipitation intensity. The test areas with liners composed of 50% electric arc furnace (EAF) slag and 50% cementitious ladle slag (LS) on a weight basis and with a proper consistence of the protection layer were found to meet the Swedish infiltration criteria of ⩽50 l (m(2)a)(-1) for final covers for landfills for non-hazardous waste: the cumulative infiltration rates to date were 44, 19 and 0.4 l (m(2)a)(-1) for A1, A4 and A5, respectively. Compared to the precipitation, the portion of leachate was always lower after the summer despite high precipitation from June to August. The main reason for this is evapotranspiration but also the fact that the time delay in the leachate formation following a precipitation event has a stronger effect during the shorter summer sampling periods than the long winter periods. Conventional techniques and equipment can be used but close cooperation between all involved partners is crucial in order to achieve the required performance of the cover. This includes planning, method and equipment testing and quality assurance. PMID:24393476

  20. Prediction of long-term erosion from landfill covers in the southwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.E.; Stormont, J.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Erosion is a primary stressor of landfill covers, especially for climates with high intensity storms and low native plant density. Rills and gullies formed by discrete events can damage barrier layers and induce failure. Geomorphologic, empirical and physical modeling procedures are available to provide estimates of surface erosion, but numerical modeling requires accurate representation of the severe rainfall events that generate erosion. The National Weather Service precipitation frequency data and estimates of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60-minute intensity can be statistically combined in a numerical model to obtain long-term erosion estimates. Physically based numerical models using the KINEROS and AHYMO programs have been utilized to predict the erosion from a southwestern landfill or waste containment site with 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 meter per meter surface slopes. Results of AHYMO modeling were within 15 percent of average annual values computed with the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation. However, the estimation of rill and gully formation that primarily degrades cover systems requires quantifying single events. For Southwestern conditions, a single 10-year storm can produce erosion quantifies equal to three times the average annual erosion and a 100-year storm can produce five times the average annual erosion.

  1. Modelling of stable isotope fractionation by methane oxidation and diffusion in landfill cover soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to measure biological methane oxidation in landfill cover soils that is gaining increased interest is the measurement of stable isotope fractionation in the methane. Usually to quantify methane oxidation, only fractionation by oxidation is taken into account. Recently it was shown that neglecting the isotope fractionation by diffusion results in underestimation of the methane oxidation. In this study a simulation model was developed that describes gas transport and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. The model distinguishes between 12CH4, 13CH4, and 12CH3D explicitly, and includes isotope fractionation by diffusion and oxidation. To evaluate the model, the simulations were compared with column experiments from previous studies. The predicted concentration profiles and isotopic profiles match the measured ones very well, with a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 1.7 vol% in the concentration and a RMSD of 0.8 per mille in the δ13C value, with δ13C the relative 13C abundance as compared to an international standard. Overall, the comparison shows that a model-based isotope approach for the determination of methane oxidation efficiencies is feasible and superior to existing isotope methods

  2. Prediction of long-term erosion from landfill covers in the southwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erosion is a primary stressor of landfill covers, especially for climates with high intensity storms and low native plant density. Rills and gullies formed by discrete events can damage barrier layers and induce failure. Geomorphologic, empirical and physical modeling procedures are available to provide estimates of surface erosion, but numerical modeling requires accurate representation of the severe rainfall events that generate erosion. The National Weather Service precipitation frequency data and estimates of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60-minute intensity can be statistically combined in a numerical model to obtain long-term erosion estimates. Physically based numerical models using the KINEROS and AHYMO programs have been utilized to predict the erosion from a southwestern landfill or waste containment site with 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 meter per meter surface slopes. Results of AHYMO modeling were within 15 percent of average annual values computed with the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation. However, the estimation of rill and gully formation that primarily degrades cover systems requires quantifying single events. For Southwestern conditions, a single 10-year storm can produce erosion quantifies equal to three times the average annual erosion and a 100-year storm can produce five times the average annual erosion

  3. Field note: comparative efficacy of a woody evapotranspiration landfill cover following the removal of aboveground biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, William; Munk, Jens; Byrd, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Woody vegetation cultivated for moisture management on evapotranspiration (ET) landfill covers could potentially serve a secondary function as a biomass crop. However, research is required to evaluate the extent to which trees could be harvested from ET covers without significantly impacting their moisture management function. This study investigated the drainage through a six-year-old, primarily poplar/cottonwood ET test cover for a period of one year following the harvest of all woody biomass exceeding a height of 30 cm above ground surface. Results were compared to previously reported drainage observed during the years leading up to the coppice event. In the first year following coppice, the ET cover was found to be 93% effective at redirecting moisture during the spring/summer season, and 95% effective during the subsequent fall/winter season. This was slightly lower than the 95% and 100% efficacy observed in the spring/summer and fall/winter seasons, respectively, during the final measured year prior to coppice. However, the post-coppice efficacy was higher than the efficacy observed during the first three years following establishment of the cover. While additional longer-term studies are recommended, this project demonstrated that woody ET covers could potentially produce harvestable biomass while still effectively managing aerial moisture. PMID:25254294

  4. Performance evaluation of intermediate cover soil barrier for removal of heavy metals in landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Anegawa, Aya; Endo, Kazuto; Yamada, Masato; Ono, Yusaku; Ono, Yoshiro

    2008-11-01

    This pilot-scale study evaluated the use of intermediate cover soil barriers for removing heavy metals in leachate generated from test cells for co-disposed fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators, ash melting plants, and shredder residue. Cover soil barriers were mixtures of Andisol (volcanic ash soil), waste iron powder, (grinder dust waste from iron foundries), and slag fragments. The cover soil barriers were installed in the test cells' bottom layer. Sorption/desorption is an important process in cover soil bottom barrier for removal of heavy metals in landfill leachate. Salt concentrations such as those of Na, K, and Ca in leachate were extremely high (often greater than 30 gL(-1)) because of high salt content in fly ash from ash melting plants. Concentrations of all heavy metals (nickel, manganese, copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium) in test cell leachates with a cover soil barrier were lower than those of the test cell without a cover soil barrier and were mostly below the discharge limit, probably because of dilution caused by the amount of leachate and heavy metal removal by the cover soil barrier. The cover soil barriers' heavy metal removal efficiency was calculated. About 50% of copper, nickel, and manganese were removed. About 20% of the zinc and boron were removed, but lead and cadmium were removed only slightly. Based on results of calculation of the Langelier saturation index and analyses of core samples, the reactivity of the cover soil barrier apparently decreases because of calcium carbonate precipitation on the cover soil barriers' surfaces. PMID:18842283

  5. Use of a biologically active cover to reduce landfill methane emissions and enhance methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jennifer C; Chanton, Jeff; Abichou, Tarek; Powelson, David; Yuan, Lei; Escoriza, Sharon; Bogner, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Biologically-active landfill cover soils (biocovers) that serve to minimize CH4 emissions by optimizing CH4 oxidation were investigated at a landfill in Florida, USA. The biocover consisted of 50 cm pre-composted yard or garden waste placed over a 10-15 cm gas distribution layer (crushed glass) over a 40-100 cm interim cover. The biocover cells reduced CH4 emissions by a factor of 10 and doubled the percentage of CH4 oxidation relative to control cells. The thickness and moisture-holding capacity of the biocover resulted in increased retention times for transported CH4. This increased retention of CH4 in the biocover resulted in a higher fraction oxidized. Overall rates between the two covers were similar, about 2g CH4 m(-2)d(-1), but because CH4 entered the biocover from below at a slower rate relative to the soil cover, a higher percentage was oxidized. In part, methane oxidation controlled the net flux of CH4 to the atmosphere. The biocover cells became more effective than the control sites in oxidizing CH4 3 months after their initial placement: the mean percent oxidation for the biocover cells was 41% compared to 14% for the control cells (p<0.001). Following the initial 3 months, we also observed 29 (27%) negative CH4 fluxes and 27 (25%) zero fluxes in the biocover cells but only 6 (6%) negative fluxes and 22 (21%) zero fluxes for the control cells. Negative fluxes indicate uptake of atmospheric CH4. If the zero and negative fluxes are assumed to represent 100% oxidation, then the mean percent oxidation for the biocover and control cells, respectively, for the same period would increase to 64% and 30%. PMID:17005386

  6. Responses of oxidation rate and microbial communities to methane in simulated landfill cover soil microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Ruan, Aidong; Jiang, Chenjing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2008-10-01

    CH4 oxidation capacities and microbial community structures developed in response to the presence of CH4 were investigated in two types of landfill cover soil microcosms, waste soil (fine material in stabilized waste) and clay soil. CH4 emission fluxes were lower in the waste soil cover over the course of the experiment. After exposure to CH4 flow for 120 days, the waste soil developed CH4 oxidation capacity from 0.53 to 11.25-13.48micromol CH4gd.w.(-1)h(-1), which was ten times higher than the clay soil. The topsoils of the two soil covers were observed dried and inhibited CH4 oxidation. The maximum CH4 oxidation rate occurred at the depth of 10-20cm in the waste soil cover (the middle layer), whereas it took place mainly at the depth of 20-30cm in the clay soil cover (the bottom layer). The amounts of the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarks 16:1omega8c and 18:1omega8c for type I and II methanotrophs, respectively, showed that type I methanotrophic bacteria predominated in the clay soil, while the type II methanotrophic bacteria were abundant in the waste soil, and the highest population in the middle layer. The results also indicated that a greater active methanotrophic community was developed in the waste soil relative to the clay soil. PMID:18294841

  7. Effect of bio-cover equipped with a novel passive air diffusion system on methane emission reduciton from landfill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, W.J.; Mou, Zishen

    2011-01-01

    Based on the aerothermodynamic principles, a kind of breathing bio-cover system was designed to enhance oxygen (O2) supply efficiency and methane (CH4) oxidation capacity. The research showed that O2 concentration (v/v) considerably increased throughout whole profiles of the microcosm (1m) equipped...... with passive air diffusion system (MPADS). When the simulated landfill gas SLFG flow was 771 and 1028 gm−3 d−1, the O2 concentration in MPADS increased gradually and tended to be stable at the atmospheric level after 10 days. The CH4 oxidation rate was 100% when the SLFG flow rate was no more than 1285 gm−3 d......−1, which also was confirmed by the mass balance calculations. The breathing bio-cover system with in situ self-oxygen supply can address the problem of O2 insufficient in conventional landfill bio-cover. The proposed system presents high potential for improving CH4 emission reduction in landfills....

  8. Capping as an alternative for remediating radioactive and mixed waste landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the regulatory and technical issues concerning the use of capping as a containment strategy for radioactive and hazardous waste. Capping alternatives for closure of landfills is not just an engineering problem, but rather involves complex physical, biological, and chemical processes requiring a multidisciplinary approach to develop designs that will work over the long haul and are cost-effective. Much of the information has been distilled from regulatory and guidance documents and a compilation of research activities on waste disposal, contaminant transport processes, and technology development for landfills that has been conducted over the last 21 years

  9. Characterization of methane oxidation by a methanotroph isolated from a landfill cover soil, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Yi, Taewoo; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Park, Hyunjung; Ryu, Hee Wook; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-07-01

    A methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated from the enriched culture of a landfill cover soil. The closest relative of the isolate, designated M6, is Methylocystis sp. Based on a kinetic analysis, the maximum specific methane oxidation rate and saturation constant were 4.93 mmol·g--dry cell weight--1·h⁻¹ and 23 microM, respectively. This was the first time a kinetic analysis was performed using pure methanotrophic culture. The methane oxidation by M6 was investigated in the presence of aromatic (m- and p-xylene and ethylbenzene) or sulfur (hydrogen sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, methanthiol) compounds. The methane oxidation was inhibited by the presence of aromatic or sulfur compounds. PMID:21791963

  10. N2O emissions from municipal solid waste landfills with selected infertile cover soils and leachate subsurface irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the field investigations into the effects of cover soils and leachate subsurface irrigation on N2O emissions from municipal solid waste landfills. Landfill Site A and Site B, covered with carefully chosen infertile soils, were selected to monitor their diurnal and seasonal variations of N2O emissions. The annual average N2O flux was 469 ± 796 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 in Site B with leachate subsurface irrigation, three times that of Site A without leachate irrigation. When an additional soil containing lower contents of carbon and nitrogen was introduced to cover part of Site B, its N2O fluxes decreased by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared with the left area of Site B. This suggested that carefully selected cover soils could substantially reduce N2O emissions even under leachate subsurface irrigation. Statistical analysis proved that the availabilities of soil moisture and mineralized nitrogen were the key parameters controlling landfill N2O emissions. - N2O emissions from municipal solid waste landfills can be substantially reduced by using carefully selected infertile cover soils even under leachate subsurface irrigation

  11. Methane oxidation in landfill cover soils, is a 10% default value reasonable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, Jeffrey P; Powelson, David K; Green, Roger B

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed literature results from 42 determinations of the fraction of methane oxidized and 30 determinations of methane oxidation rate in a variety of soil types and landfill covers. Both column measurements and in situ field measurements were included. The means for the fraction of methane oxidized on transit across the soil covers ranged from 22 to 55% from clayey to sandy material. Mean values for oxidation rate ranged from 3.7 to 6.4 mol m(-2) d(-1) (52-102 g m(-2) d(-1)) for the different soil types. The overall mean fraction oxidized across all studies was 36% with a standard error of 6%. The overall mean oxidation rate across all studies was 4.5 mol m(-2) d(-1) +/- 1.0 (72 +/- 16 g m(-2)d(-1)). For the subset of 15 studies conducted over an annual cycle the fraction of methane oxidized ranged from 11 to 89% with a mean value of 35 +/- 6%, nearly identical to the overall mean. Nine of these studies were conducted in north Florida at 30 degrees N latitude and had a fraction oxidized of 27 +/- 4%. Five studies were conducted in northern Europe ( approximately 50-55 degrees N) and exhibited an average of 54 +/- 14%. One study, conducted in New Hampshire, had a value of 10%. The results indicate that the fraction of methane oxidized in landfill greater than the default value of 10%. Of the 42 determinations of methane oxidation reported, only four report values of 10% or less. PMID:19244486

  12. Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, Km, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

  13. In-Situ Quantification of Methanotrophic Activity in a Landfill Cover Soil Using Gas Push-Pull Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, K. E.; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Schroth, M. H.; Zeyer, J.

    2007-12-01

    Landfills are both a major anthropogenic source and a sink for the greenhouse gas CH4. Methanogenic bacteria produce CH4 during the anaerobic digestion of landfill waste, whereas, methanotrophic bacteria consume CH4 as it is transported through a landfill cover soil. Methanotrophs are thought to be ubiquitous in soils, but typically exist in large numbers at oxic/anoxic interfaces, close to anaerobic methane sources but exposed to oxygen required for metabolism. Accurate in-situ quantification of the sink strength of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils is needed for global carbon balances and for local emissions mitigation strategies. We measured in-situ CH4 concentrations at 30, 60, and 100 cm depth at 18 evenly spaced locations across a landfill cover soil. Furthermore, we performed Gas Push-Pull Tests (GPPTs) to estimate in-situ rates of methanotrophic activity in the cover soil. The GPPT is a gas-tracer test in which a gas mixture containing CH4, O2, and non-reactive tracer gases is injected (pushed) into the soil followed by extraction (pull) from the same location. Quantification of CH4 oxidation rates is based upon comparison of the breakthrough curves of CH4 and tracer gases. We present the results of a series of GPPTs conducted at two locations in the cover soil to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of this technique to quantify methanotrophic activity. Additional GPPTs were performed with a methanotrophic inhibitor in the injection gas mixture to confirm the appropriate choice of tracers to quantify CH4 oxidation. Estimated CH4 oxidation rate constants indicate that the cover soil contains a highly active methanotrophic community.

  14. Degradation of C2-C15 volatile organic compounds in a landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Liccioli, Caterina; Moretti, Sandro; Nisi, Barbara

    2009-07-15

    The composition of non-methane volatile organic compounds (hereafter VOCs) in i) the cover soil, at depths of 30, 50 and 70 cm, and ii) gas recovery wells from Case Passerini landfill site, (Florence, Italy) was determined by GC-MS. The study, based on the analysis of interstitial gases sampled along vertical profiles within the cover soil, was aimed to investigate the VOC behaviour as biogas transits from a reducing to a relatively more oxidizing environment. A total of 48 and 63 different VOCs were identified in the soil and well gases, respectively. Aromatics represent the dominant group (71.5% of total VOC) in soil gases, followed by alkanes (6.8%), ketones (5.7%), organic acids (5.2%), aldehydes (3.0%), esters (2.6%), halogenated compounds (2.1%) and terpenes (1.3%). Cyclics, heterocyclics, S-bearing compounds and phenols are cover soil shows significant variations: alkanes, aromatics and cyclics decrease at decreasing depth, whereas an inverse trend is displayed by the O-bearing species. Total VOC and CH(4) concentrations at a depth of 30 cm in the soil are comparable, inferring that microbial activity is likely affecting VOCs at a very minor extent with respect to CH(4). According to these considerations, to assess the biogas emission impact, usually carried out on the sole basis of CO(2) and CH(4) emission rates, the physical-chemical behaviour of VOCs in the cover soil, regulating the discharge of these highly contaminant compounds in ambient air, has to be taken into account. The soil vertical distribution of these species can be used to better evaluate the efficiency of oxidative capability of intermediate and final covers. PMID:19446310

  15. Preliminary engineering evaluation of remedial action alternatives for the Middlesex Municipal Landfill, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this document are to summarize existing radiological conditions necessitating remedial action at the Middlesex Municipal Landfill (MML) site, and to describe and compare alternative courses of remedial action considered feasible at this time. This document is intended to provide the information needed to support selection of a remedial action to be implemented at the MML site. Four remedial action alternatives for the MML site were identified by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) and approved by DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office for evaluation in this document. They are: Alternative 1 - surveillance and monitoring; Alternative 2 - minimal action; Alternative 3 - in-situ stabilization; and Alternative 4 - decontamination and restoration. Chemical characterization of the landfill is underway to establish the presence, if any, of hazardous substances within the excavation area and to determine the safety requirements for excavation associated with Alternatives 3 and 4. For each of the above alternatives, conceptual engineering was performed, occupational health effects evaluated, and a cost estimate prepared. Costs and advantages and disadvantages of each were compared and evaluated. Table 1-1 summarizes these comparisons. 14 references, 6 figures, 9 tables

  16. Ageing landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Östman, Monica

    2008-01-01

    In Sweden, a large number of closed landfills containing a mixture of household waste and waste from industries and other sources exist. These landfills originate from a time when regulations were less strict and contain large amounts of organic material derived from household waste, plus large amounts of metals. This partly decomposed organic material can contribute to the stability of the landfill by retaining metals. When landfills are closed they are covered to create strictly anaerobic c...

  17. Seasonal greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide) from engineered landfills: daily, intermediate, and final California cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Jean E; Spokas, Kurt A; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Compared with natural ecosystems and managed agricultural systems, engineered landfills represent a highly managed soil system for which there has been no systematic quantification of emissions from coexisting daily, intermediate, and final cover materials. We quantified the seasonal variability of CH, CO, and NO emissions from fresh refuse (no cover) and daily, intermediate, and final cover materials at northern and southern California landfill sites with engineered gas extraction systems. Fresh refuse fluxes (g m d [± SD]) averaged CH 0.053 (± 0.03), CO 135 (± 117), and NO 0.063 (± 0.059). Average CH emissions across all cover types and wet/dry seasons ranged over more than four orders of magnitude (cover types, including both final covers, averaging cover (50 cm) had the highest CH fluxes. For both the intermediate (50-100 cm) and final (>200 cm) cover materials, below which methanogenesis was well established, the variability in gaseous fluxes was attributable to cover thickness, texture, density, and seasonally variable soil moisture and temperature at suboptimal conditions for CH oxidation. Thin daily covers (30 cm local soil) and fresh refuse generally had the highest CO and NO fluxes, indicating rapid onset of aerobic and semi-aerobic processes in recently buried refuse, with rates similar to soil ecosystems and windrow composting of organic waste. This study has emphasized the need for more systematic field quantification of seasonal emissions from multiple types of engineered covers. PMID:21546687

  18. Atmospheric emissions and attenuation of non-methane organic compounds in cover soils at a French landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, C; Bogner, J; Chanton, J P; Blake, D; Morcet, M; Aran, C; Kjeldsen, P

    2008-01-01

    In addition to methane (CH(4)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)), landfill gas may contain more than 200 non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) including C(2+)-alkanes, aromatics, and halogenated hydrocarbons. Although the trace components make up less than 1% v/v of typical landfill gas, they may exert a disproportionate environmental burden. The objective of this work was to study the dynamics of CH(4) and NMOCs in the landfill cover soils overlying two types of gas collection systems: a conventional gas collection system with vertical wells and an innovative horizontal gas collection layer consisting of permeable gravel with a geomembrane above it. The 47 NMOCs quantified in the landfill gas samples included primarily alkanes (C(2)-C(10)), alkenes (C(2)-C(4)), halogenated hydrocarbons (including (hydro)chlorofluorocarbons ((H)CFCs)), and aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs). In general, both CH(4) and NMOC fluxes were all very small with positive and negative fluxes. The highest percentages of positive fluxes in this study (considering all quantified species) were observed at the hotspots, located mainly along cell perimeters of the conventional cell. The capacity of the cover soil for NMOC oxidation was investigated in microcosms incubated with CH(4) and oxygen (O(2)). The cover soil showed a relatively high capacity for CH(4) oxidation and simultaneous co-oxidation of the halogenated aliphatic compounds, especially at the conventional cell. Fully substituted carbons (TeCM, PCE, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, HFC-134a, and HCFC-141b) were not degraded in the presence of CH(4) and O(2). Benzene and toluene were also degraded with relative high rates. This study demonstrates that landfill soil covers show a significant potential for CH(4) oxidation and co-oxidation of NMOCs. PMID:18032020

  19. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills – An experimental simulation in lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Tested engineered covers as surrogate to gas extraction during and after in situ aeration. ► Examined how covers influence gas emissions, water balance and leachate generation. ► Investigated effect of top covers on air-distribution in waste mass during aeration. ► We suggest criteria and cover design to meet the demands during and after aeration. ► Such cover systems may offer greenhouse gas emission reduction also after active aeration. - Abstract: Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 × 2 × 3 m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH4 loadings up to 300 l CH4/m2 d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability even at 100% water holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, the more cohesive, mineral soil cover was expected to cause a notably uniform distribution of the injected air within

  20. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills - An experimental simulation in lysimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrad, Marlies [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Huber-Humer, Marion, E-mail: marion.huber-humer@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested engineered covers as surrogate to gas extraction during and after in situ aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined how covers influence gas emissions, water balance and leachate generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated effect of top covers on air-distribution in waste mass during aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We suggest criteria and cover design to meet the demands during and after aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such cover systems may offer greenhouse gas emission reduction also after active aeration. - Abstract: Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH{sub 4} loadings up to 300 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability

  1. Temperatures In Compost Landfill Covers As Result Of Methane Oxidation And Compost Respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Merono, A. R.; Pedersen, Rasmus Broen; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the temperature on methane (CH4) oxidation and respiration in compost sampled at a full scale biocover implemented at Klintholm landfill exhibiting high temperatures. Compost material was collected at Klintholm landfill and incubated with and without CH4 i...

  2. Using pilot test data to refine an alternative cover design in northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smesrud, Jason K; Benson, Craig H; Albright, William H; Richards, James H; Wright, Shannon; Israel, Tim; Goodrich, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Two instrumented test sections were constructed in summer 1999 at the Kiefer Landfill near Sacramento, California to test the hydraulic performance of two proposed alternative final covers. Both test sections simulated monolithic evapotranspiration (ET) designs that differed primarily in thickness. Both were seeded with a mix of two perennial and one annual grass species. Oleander seedlings were also planted in the thicker test section. Detailed hydrologic performance monitoring of the covers was conducted from 1999 through 2005, The thicker test section met the performance criterion (average percolation of cover system for full-scale application. The decommissioning study showed that properties of the soils changed over the monitoring period (saturated hydraulic conductivity and water holding capacity increased, density decreased) and that the perennial grasses and shrubs intended for the cover were out-competed by annual species with shallower roots and lesser capacity for water uptake. Of these changes, reduced ET from the shallow-rooted annual vegetation is believed to be the primary cause for the high percolation rate from the thinner test section. Hydrologic modeling suggests that the target hydraulic performance can be achieved using an ET cover with similar thickness to the thin test section if perennial vegetation species observed in surrounding grasslands can be established. This finding underscores the importance of establishing and maintaining the appropriate vegetation on ET covers in this climate. PMID:22574382

  3. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills--an experimental simulation in lysimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G

    2012-12-01

    Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 × 2 × 3m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH(4) loadings up to 300 lCH(4)/m(2)d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability even at 100% water holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, the more cohesive, mineral soil cover was expected to cause a notably uniform distribution of the injected air within the waste layer. Laboratory results also revealed sufficient air permeability of the soil materials (TS-F and SS-Z) placed in lysimeter C. However, at higher compaction density SS-Z became impermeable at 100% WHC. Methane emissions from the reference lysimeter with the smaller substrate cover (12-52 g CH(4)/m(2)d) were significantly higher than fluxes from the other lysimeters (0-19 g CH(4)/m(2)d) during in situ aeration. Regarding water balance, lysimeters covered with

  4. Landfill cover revegetation using organic amendments and cobble mulch in the arid southwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AGUILAR,RICHARD; DWYER,STEPHEN F.; REAVIS,BRUCE A.; NEWMAN,GRETCHEN CARR; LOFTIN,SAMUEL R.

    2000-02-01

    biomass production in the irrigated control plots over that produced in the non-irrigated control plots. This surprising result was probably due to the cumulative effects of other factors that influenced the initial establishment and production of plants in the plots (e.g., plant species competition, seed germination delay times, differences in nutrient release and availability). Variation within individual plots, and among the three replicate plots associated with each treatment, rendered many of the recorded differences in vegetation establishment and production statistically insignificant. However, after two complete growing seasons the highest total plant foliar cover and the greatest biomass production and plant species diversity occurred in the cobble-mulched plots. These results suggest that cobble-mulch may be the desired amendment in re-vegetated arid landfill covers if the principal objectives are to quickly establish vegetation cover, stabilize the site from erosion, and increase water usage by plants, thereby reducing the potential for leaching and contaminant movement from the landfill's waste-bearing zone.

  5. Estimation on the self recovery behavior of low-conductivity layer in landfill final cover by laboratory conductivity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O; Park, J

    2006-11-01

    This study examined the application of a Self Recovering Sustainable Layer (SRSL) as a landfill final cover. Low-conductivity layers in landfill covers are known to have problems associated with cracking as a result of the differential settlement or climatic changes. A SRSL is defined as a layer with chemical properties that reduces the increased hydraulic conductivity resulting from cracking by forming low-conductivity precipitates of chemicals contained in the layer. In this study, the formation of precipitates was confirmed using a batch test, spectroscopic analysis and mineralogical speciation tests. The possibility of secondary contamination due to the chemicals used for recovery was evaluated using a leaching test. A laboratory conductivity test was performed on a single layer composed of each chemical as well as on a 2-layer system. The recovery performance of the SRSL was estimated by developing artificial cracks in the specimens and observing the change in hydraulic conductivity as a function of time. In the laboratory conductivity test, the hydraulic conductivity of a 2-layer system as well as those of the individual layers that comprise the 2-layer system was estimated. In addition sodium ash was found to enhance the reduction in conductivity. A significant increase in conductivity was observed after the cracks developed but this was reduced with time, which indicated that the SRSL has a proper recovering performance. In conclusion, a SRSL can be used as a landfill final cover that could maintain low-conductivity even after the serious damages due to settlement. PMID:17203605

  6. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and Their Effect on Methane Generation, Oxidation, and Emission from Soils Covering Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Mei, C.; Yazdani, R.; Han, B.; Mostafid, M.

    2013-12-01

    Soils covering landfills mitigate gas emissions from degrading refuse, particularly emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. To enhance the oxidative capacity of these soils, materials with high organic matter are proposed for landfill covers, e.g., compost and aged greenwaste. We report field tests of these materials in pilot-scale test cells. While moisture conditions and gas transport were initially uniform, after one year significant spatial variability of gas flow developed that was associated with spatially variable dry bulk density and volumetric water content. For a test cell with organic matter content of 38%, a single-domain porous medium model was adequate for describing water retention and continuum modeling was capable of describing spatially variable gas flow and methane oxidation. A second test cell with organic matter of 61% was best described as a dual-domain porous medium, and continuum modeling was inadequate for describing spatially variable gas flow. Here, the dual-domain medium resulted in significant subgrid scale variability in moisture conditions that affected gas transport and methane oxidation. The results from these field tests suggest that proposed one-dimensional models of gas transport and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils may be inadequate for soils composed of high organic matter that require dual-domain models for water retention.

  7. A Probabilistic Model and Software Tool for Evaluating the Long-Term Performance of Landfill Covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A probabilistic model and software tool has been developed to assist in the selection, design, and monitoring of long-term covers for contaminated subsurface sites. The software platform contains multiple modules that can be used to simulate relevant features, events, and processes that include water flux through the cover, source-term release, vadose-zone transport, saturated-zone transport, gas transport, and exposure pathways. The component models are integrated into a probabilistic total-system performance-assessment model within a drag-and-drop software platform. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses can be conducted that yield the following primary benefits: (1) quantification of uncertainty in the simulated performance metrics; (2) identification of parameters most important to performance; and (3) comparison of alternative designs to optimize cost and performance. A case study has been performed using the Monticello Mill Tailings Site in Utah to illustrate the important features and benefits of the modeling approach and software

  8. Environmental conditions for alternative tree cover states in high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abis, Beniamino; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Previous analysis of the vegetation cover from remote sensing revealed the existence of three alternative modes in the frequency distribution of boreal tree cover: a sparsely vegetated treeless state, a savanna-like state, and a forest state. Identifying which are the regions subject to multimodality, and assessing which are the main factors underlying their existence, is important to project future change of natural vegetation cover and its effect on climate. We study the impact on the forest cover fraction distribution of seven globally-observed environmental factors: mean annual rainfall, mean minimum temperature, growing degree days above 0, permafrost distribution, soil moisture, wildfire occurrence frequency, and thawing depth. Through the use of generalised additive models, regression trees, and conditional histograms, we find that the main factors determining the forest distribution in high latitudes are: permafrost distribution, mean annual rainfall, mean minimum temperature, soil moisture, and wildfire frequency. Additionally, we find differences between regions within the boreal area, such as Eurasia, Eastern North America, and Western North America. Furthermore, using a classification based on these factors, we show the existence and location of alternative tree cover states under the same climate conditions in the boreal region. These are areas of potential interest for a more detailed analysis of land-atmosphere interactions.

  9. 75 FR 8986 - Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Campo Regional Landfill...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... the project proposes to use alternative landfill design and cover, it requires a site-specific... Regional Landfill Project on the Campo Indian Reservation, San Diego County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Indian... sublease for the proposed Campo Regional Landfill Project (proposed action) on the Campo Indian...

  10. Field-Scale Stable-Isotope Probing of Active Methanotrophs in a Landfill-Cover Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, M. H.; Henneberger, R.; Chiri, E.

    2012-12-01

    The greenhouse gas methane (CH4) is an important contributor to global climate change. While its atmospheric concentration is increasing, a large portion of produced CH4 never reaches the atmosphere, but is consumed by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). The latter are ubiquitous in soils and utilize CH4 as sole source of energy and carbon. Among other methods, MOB may be differentiated based on characteristic phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). Stable-isotope probing (SIP) on PLFA has been widely applied to identify active members of MOB communities in laboratory incubation studies, but results are often difficult to extrapolate to the field. Thus, novel field-scale approaches are needed to link activity and identity of MOB in their natural environment. We present results of field experiments in which we combined PLFA-SIP with gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) to label active MOB at the field-scale while simultaneously quantifying CH4 oxidation activity. During a SIP-GPPT, a mixture of reactive (here 13CH4, O2) and non-reactive tracer gases (e.g., Ar, Ne, He) is injected into the soil at a location of interest. Thereafter, gas flow is reversed and the gas mixture diluted with soil air is extracted from the same location and sampled periodically. Rate constants for CH4 oxidation can be calculated by analyzing breakthrough curves of 13CH4 and a suitable non-reactive tracer gas. SIP-GPPTs were performed in a landfill-cover soil, and feasibility of this novel approach was tested at several locations along a gradient of MOB activity and soil temperature. Soil samples were collected before and after SIP-GPPTs, total PLFA were extracted, and incorporation of 13C in the polar lipid fraction was analyzed. Potential CH4 oxidation rates derived from SIP-GPPTs were similar to those derived from regular GPPTs (using unlabeled CH4) performed at the same locations prior to SIP-GPPTs, indicating that application of 13CH4 did not adversely affect bacterial CH4 oxidation rates. Rates

  11. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions. PMID:25475118

  12. Monitoring the performance of an alternative cover using caisson lysimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Smith, G.M.; Mushovic, P.S.

    2004-02-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8, collaborated on a series of field lysimeter studies to design and monitor the performance of an alternative cover for a uranium mill tailings disposal cell at the Monticello, Utah, Superfund Site. Because groundwater recharge is naturally limited at Monticello in areas with thick loess soils, DOE and EPA chose to design a cover for Monticello using local soils and a native plant community to mimic this natural soilwater balance. Two large drainage lysimeters fabricated of corrugated steel culvert lined with high-density polyethylene were installed to evaluate the hydrological and ecological performance of an alternative cover design constructed in 2000 on the disposal cell. Unlike conventional, lowpermeability designs, this cover relies on (1) the water storage capacity of a 163-cm soil “sponge” layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to retain precipitation while plants are dormant and (2) native vegetation to remove precipitation during the growing season. The sponge layer consists of a clay loam subsoil compacted to 1.65 g/cm2 in one lysimeter and a loam topsoil compacted to 1.45 g/cm2 in the other lysimeter, representing the range of as-built conditions constructed in the nearby disposal cell cover. About 0.1 mm of drainage occurred in both lysimeters during an average precipitation year and before they were planted, an amount well below the EPA target of <3.0 mm/yr. However, the cover with less compacted loam topsoil sponge had a 40% greater water storage capacity than the cover with overly compacted clay loam subsoil sponge. The difference is attributable in part to higher green leaf area and water extraction by plants in the loam topsoil. The lesson learned is that seemingly subtle differences in soil types, sources, and compaction can result in salient differences in performance. Diverse, seeded communities of

  13. Use of the time domain reflectrometry in hydraulic studies of multilayered landfill covers for closure of waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing hydraulic and capillary engineered barriers. Seepage is being evaluated as a function of slope length for each plot, as well as interflow, runoff, and precipitation, using an automated water flow datalogging system that routinely collects hourly data. Soil water content within these 16 field plots has been routinely monitored four times a day since November 1991 using time domain reflectrometry techniques with an automated and multiplexed measurement system. Volumetric water content is measured with a pair of 60-cm-long waveguides at each of 212 locations. One set of waveguides was emplaced vertically in four locations in every soil layer to determine soil water inventory in each field plot. A second set of waveguides was emplaced horizontally in several soil layers to provide a more detailed picture of soil water dynamics close to soil layer interfaces. Field data is presented showing pulses of soil water moving through the soil and engineered barriers with high temporal and spatial resolution

  14. Concrete disposal vaults - An alternative to hazardous waste/mixed waste earthen landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste (HW/MW) Disposal Facility is a new facility planned for on site processing and disposal of existing and future solid hazardous and/or mixed wastes generated at Savannah River Site (SRS). The first phase of the project is the completion of engineered above grade concrete disposal vaults which are to be permitted as hazardous waste disposal facilities and designed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and appropriate U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The RCRA minimum performance standards promulgated in 40 CFR 264 and 265 are based on double lined earthen landfills. The regulations allow for alternative design and operational practices provided that the alternative design and operating practices, together with location characteristics, will prevent the migration of any hazardous constituents into the groundwater or surface water at least as effectively as the specified double lined earthen system. The engineered concrete vault structure for SRS is designed to comply and/or exceed the performance standards of the RCRA regulations and the associated RCRA technical guidance documents issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (author)

  15. Ammonium-dependent regulation of aerobic methane-consuming bacteria in landfill cover soil by leachate irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lü; Pinjing He; Min Guo; Na Yang; Liming Shao

    2012-01-01

    The impacts of landfill leachate irrigation on methane oxidation activities and methane-consuming bacteria populations were studied by incubation of landfill cover soils with leachate and (NH4)2SO4 solution at different ammonium concentrations.The community structures and abundances of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were examined by PCRDGGE and real-time PCR.Compared with the pure (NH4)2SO4 solution,leachate addition was found to have a positive effect on methane oxidation activity.In terms of the irrigation amount,ammonium in leachate was responsible for the actual inhibition of leachate.The extent of inhibitory effect mainly depended on its ammonium concentration.The suppression of the predominant methaneconsuming bacteria,type Ⅰ MOB,was responsible for the decreased methane oxidation activity by ammonium inhibition.Methaneconsuming bacteria responded diversely in abundance to ammonium.The abundance of type Ⅰ MOB decreased by fivefold; type Ⅱ MOB showed stimulation response of fivefold magnification upon the first addition but lessened to be lower than the original level after the second addition; the amount of AOB was stimulated to increase for 20-30 times gradually.Accumulated nitrate from nitrification strengthened the ammonium inhibition on type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ MOB,as a result,repetitive irrigation was unfavorable for methane oxidation.

  16. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  17. Biodegradation of methane, benzene, and toluene by a consortium MBT14 enriched from a landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyunjung; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    In this study, landfill cover soil was used as an inoculum source to enrich a methane, benzene, and toluene-degrading consortium MBT14. Under a single substrate, the maximum degradation rates of methane, benzene and toluene were 1.96, 0.15, and 0.77 mmole g-DCW(-1) h(-1), respectively. Although the coexistence of benzene and toluene inhibited the methane degradation rates, the consortium was able to simultaneously degrade methane, benzene and toluene. Methane had an insignificant effect on benzene or toluene degradation. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing analysis, Cupriavidus spp. are dominant in the consortium MBT14. The combined results of this study indicate that the consortium MBT 14 is a promising bioresource for removing CH(4), benzene, and toluene from a variety of environments. PMID:23245302

  18. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  19. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites

  20. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, Praneeth; Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Nagamori, Masanao; Moldrup, Per; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, ρ(b), and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D(p)/D(o), ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k(a)) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting ρ(b) values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm(-3). Results showed that D(p) and k(a) values for the '+gravel' fraction (soil-air content (ε), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D(p)/D(f), the ratio of measured D(p) to D(p) in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k(a)/k(a)(,pF4.1), the ratio of measured k(a) to k(a) at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content (ε) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D(p)(ε/f) and k(a)(ε/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D(p) and P for k(a)). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to ρ(b) values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D(p) and k(a) for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models. PMID:21813272

  1. Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. → Higher values of Dp and ka exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content (ε). → Recent power law models for Dp (WLR) and ka (RPL) were modified. → Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density (ρb). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, ρb, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (Dp/Do, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (ka) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting ρb values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm-3. Results showed that Dp and ka values for the '+gravel' fraction (p and ka was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity Dp/Df, the ratio of measured Dp to Dp in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability ka/ka,pF4.1, the ratio of measured ka to ka at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content (ε) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for Dp(ε/f) and ka(ε/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for Dp and P for ka). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to ρb values, and the effects of dry bulk density on Dp and ka for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

  2. Feasibility of biochar application on a landfill final cover-a review on balancing ecology and shallow slope stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun-Wen; Wong, James Tsz-Fung; Ng, Charles Wang-Wai; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Due to the increasing concerns on global warming, scarce land for agriculture, and contamination impacts on human health, biochar application is being considered as one of the possible measures for carbon sequestration, promoting higher crop yield and contamination remediation. Significant amount of researches focusing on these three aspects have been conducted during recent years. Biochar as a soil amendment is effective in promoting plant performance and sustainability, by enhancing nutrient bioavailability, contaminants immobilization, and microbial activities. The features of biochar in changing soil physical and biochemical properties are essential in affecting the sustainability of an ecosystem. Most studies showed positive results and considered biochar application as an effective and promising measure for above-mentioned interests. Bio-engineered man-made filled slope and landfill slope increasingly draw the attention of geologists and geotechnical engineers. With increasing number of filled slopes, sustainability, low maintenance, and stability are the major concerns. Biochar as a soil amendment changes the key factors and parameters in ecology (plant development, soil microbial community, nutrient/contaminant cycling, etc.) and slope engineering (soil weight, internal friction angle and cohesion, etc.). This paper reviews the studies on the production, physical and biochemical properties of biochar and suggests the potential areas requiring study in balancing ecology and man-made filled slope and landfill cover engineering. Biochar-amended soil should be considered as a new type of soil in terms of soil mechanics. Biochar performance depends on soil and biochar type which imposes challenges to generalize the research outcomes. Aging process and ecotoxicity studies of biochar are strongly required. PMID:26452652

  3. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 8, Appendix F, Landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community`s solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a ``transition`` document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

  4. Data Summary of Municipal Solid Waste Management Alternatives. Volume VIII: Appendix F - Landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    While the preceding appendices have focused on the thermochemical approaches to managing municipal solid waste (MSW), this appendix and those that follow on composting and anaerobic digestion address more of the bioconversion process technologies. Landfilling is the historical baseline MSW management option central to every community's solid waste management plan. It generally encompasses shredfills, balefills, landfill gas recovery, and landfill mining. While landfilling is virtually universal in use, it continues to undergo intense scrutiny by the public and regulators alike. Most recently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its final rule on criteria for designing, operating, monitoring, and closing municipal solid waste landfills. While the Federal government has established nationwide standards and will assist the States in planning and developing their own practices, the States and local governments will carry out the actual planning and direct implementation. The States will also be authorized to devise programs to deal with their specific conditions and needs. While the main body of this appendix and corresponding research was originally prepared in July of 1991, references to the new RCRA Subtitle D, Part 258 EPA regulations have been included in this resubmission (908). By virtue of timing, this appendix is, necessarily, a transition'' document, combining basic landfill design and operation information as well as reference to new regulatory requirements. Given the speed with which landfill practices are and will be changing, the reader is encouraged to refer to Part 258 for additional details. As States set additional requirements and schedules and owners and operators of MSW landfills seek to comply, additional guidance and technical information, including case studies, will likely become available in the literature.

  5. Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH4) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH4 and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH4 oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 deg. C without any NMOCs the Vmax value was 35.0 μg CH4h-1gwetwt-1. This value was reduced to 19.1 μg CH4h-1gwetwt-1 when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH4 in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated.

  6. Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Muna; Warith, Mostafa; Fernandes, Leta

    2010-02-01

    In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH4) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH4 and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH4 oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 degrees C without any NMOCs the V(max) value was 35.0 microg CH4 h(-1)gwet wt(-1). This value was reduced to 19.1 microg CH4 h(-1) gwet wt(-1) when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH4 in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated. PMID:19896356

  7. Effect of substrate interaction on oxidation of methane and benzene in enriched microbial consortia from landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyunjung; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of methane and benzene during oxidation in enriched methane-oxidizing consortium (MOC) and in benzene-oxidizing consortium (BOC) from landfill cover soil was characterized. Oxidation of both methane and benzene occurred in the MOC due to the coexistence of bacteria responsible for benzene oxidation, as well as methanotrophs, whereas in the BOC, only benzene was oxidized, not methane. Methane oxidation rates in the MOC were decreased with increasing benzene/methane ratio (mol/mol), indicating its methane oxidation was inhibited by the benzene coexistence. Benzene oxidation rates in the MOC, however, were increased with increasing benzene/methane ratio. The benzene oxidation in the BOC was not affected by the coexistence of methane or by the ratio of methane/benzene ratio (mol/mol). No effect of methane or benzene was found on the dynamics of functional genes, such as particulate methane monooxygenase and toluene monooxygenase, in association with oxidation of methane and benzene in the MOC and BOC. PMID:21847790

  8. Estudos sobre a oxidação aeróbia do metano na cobertura de três aterros sanitários no Brasil Studies on the aerobic methane oxidation at three sanitary landfills covers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Echevenguá Teixeira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A oxidação biológica e aeróbia do metano em materiais de cobertura de aterros de resíduos sólidos urbanos é uma das alternativas para se minimizarem as emissões dos gases de efeito estufa. Este artigo tem como objetivo avaliar a oxidação biológica do metano em material de cobertura de três aterros brasileiros (dois municipais e uma célula experimental. O trabalho consistiu na coleta de amostras dos solos, as quais foram caracterizadas através de ensaios geotécnicos e microbiológicos. Em laboratório, avaliou-se o consumo de metano de uma amostra de cada aterro. Os resultados revelaram a presença de bactérias metanotróficas e consumo de metano em laboratório, o que sugere que exista uma relação inversa entre o grau de saturação no momento da coleta e o número de bactérias metanotróficas.The biological and aerobic oxidation of methane within the soil cover of municipal solid waste landfills is one an alternative to minimize emissions of greenhouse effect gases. This study aims at assess the biological oxidation of methane within the final cover of three landfills in Brazil (two municipal ones and one experimental cell. The soil samples obtained from the landfill cover were characterized by geotechnical and microbiological tests. In the laboratory the consumption of methane from each sample were evaluated. The results revealed the presence of methanotrophic bacteria and consumption of methane in the laboratory was observed, which also suggest that there is an inverse relation between the degree of saturation at the time of sampling and the number of methanotrophic bacteria.

  9. Methane oxidation in homogenous soil covers of landfills: a finite – element analysis of the influence of gas diffusion coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Zygmunt M; Stępniewski W.

    2000-01-01

    Methane produced in municipal landfills covered with a soil layer diffuses to the atmosphere. Counterdiffusion of oxygen down the soil creates an oxic zone where biochemical oxidation of methane by methanotrophic microorganisms can take place. Oxidation is possible only in that part of the oxic zone where both the substrates, i.e., methane ond oxygen are present simultanously. Biochemical oxidation of methane is governed by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The solution of the equation system compri...

  10. Landfill gas: development guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Guide produced as part of the UK DTI's New and Renewable Energy Programme provides information which forms a framework enabling landfill gas to be exploited fully as a renewable energy resource. The eight chapters cover the resource base of landfill gas in the UK in the wider context, the technology for energy recovery from landfill gas, the utilisation options for landfill gas, the various project development arrangements and their implementation, the assessment of a site's landfill gas resource, the factors which influence the project economies, financing aspects and the management of project liabilities and finally the national waste disposal policy and required consents followed by the overall process for project mobilisation. (UK)

  11. Alternatives to Conventional Construction Materials on Landfills. A Guide; Alternativa konstruktionsmaterial paa deponier. Vaegledning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rihm, Thomas; Rogbeck, Yvonne; Svedberg, Bo; Eriksson, Maria

    2009-03-15

    Before a landfill can be sited, an application for a permit from the authorities is required. Already in the application process the consequences concerning impact on human health and on the environment must be described, including descriptions of e.g. bottom liners and capping constructions. Since there is a long period of time between when the permit is given and when the capping will be carried out, it is common practice, either to postpone decisions concerning capping details, or to delegate the decisions to the supervisory authorities to be made at a later stage. All constructions must however be approved by the authorities before they can be carried out. A construction must fulfil the demands for its function. For the capping this means that the percolation through it must be low, even in a long time perspective. A construction may not in itself cause adverse environmental effects, e.g. leaching of hazardous substances from the construction material. Thus, there are functional as well as environmental demands. Beside the functional demands given in the Swedish legislation, notably in the ordinance on landfilling, the construction must be physically stable, also in a long time perspective. The materials in the construction must have sufficient strength, and may not change over time, e.g. due to degradation, which could lead to malfunction. Demands on environmental behaviour can be divided into two parts. Humans and animals must be kept from direct contact with dangerous substances including dermal contact, inhalation of dust or gases and oral intake of soil, plants or berries. Secondly, dangerous substances may not be spread with surface or ground water to an extent that could lead to adverse effects on human health or on the environment. The impact on the environment is not only depending of the materials being used, but also on the construction design, where in the landfill the construction is situated and, not least, how the landfill is located. It is

  12. Alternative solutions for the bio-denitrification of landfill leachates using pine bark and compost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrified leachate may still require an additional bio-denitrification step, which occurs with the addition of often-expensive chemicals as carbon source. This study explores the applicability of low-cost carbon sources such as garden refuse compost and pine bark for the denitrification of high strength landfill leachates. The overall objective is to assess efficiency, kinetics and performance of the substrates in the removal of high nitrate concentrations. Garden refuse and pine bark are currently disposed of in general waste landfills in South Africa, separated from the main waste stream. A secondary objective is to assess the feasibility of re-using green waste as by-product of an integrated waste management system. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests and leaching columns packed with immature compost and pine bark. Biologically treated leachate from a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) with nitrate concentrations of 350, 700 and 1100 mgN/l were used for the trials. Preliminary results suggest that, passed the acclimatization step (40 days for both substrates), full denitrification is achieved in 10-20 days for the pine bark and 30-40 days for the compost.

  13. Alternative solutions for the bio-denitrification of landfill leachates using pine bark and compost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering. School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban, 4041 (South Africa); Pisano, Giulia [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering. School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban, 4041 (South Africa); Oxarango, Laurent [LTHE (UMR 5564 CNRS/INPG/IRD/UJF), Universite de Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-06-15

    Nitrified leachate may still require an additional bio-denitrification step, which occurs with the addition of often-expensive chemicals as carbon source. This study explores the applicability of low-cost carbon sources such as garden refuse compost and pine bark for the denitrification of high strength landfill leachates. The overall objective is to assess efficiency, kinetics and performance of the substrates in the removal of high nitrate concentrations. Garden refuse and pine bark are currently disposed of in general waste landfills in South Africa, separated from the main waste stream. A secondary objective is to assess the feasibility of re-using green waste as by-product of an integrated waste management system. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests and leaching columns packed with immature compost and pine bark. Biologically treated leachate from a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) with nitrate concentrations of 350, 700 and 1100 mgN/l were used for the trials. Preliminary results suggest that, passed the acclimatization step (40 days for both substrates), full denitrification is achieved in 10-20 days for the pine bark and 30-40 days for the compost.

  14. Significance analysis of the leachate level in a solid waste landfill in a coastal zone using total water balance and slope stability alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Ja-Kong; Do, Nam-Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    The K site near Seoul began landfilling in 1992. The landfilled wastes include municipal solid waste (66.4%), construction residues (20.4%), water and wastewater sludges (trace levels), and hazardous waste (trace levels). The water content of the municipal solid waste is very high (47.3%); as a result, the leachate level (average E.L.) of the landfill, the design value of which is 7.0 m, was measured at 10.3 m in January 1995 and is increasing. The increase of leachate level in the landfill site causes a problem with slope stability. The leachate level at each disposal stage divided by the intermediate cover layer was calculated with the HELP (Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance) model and calibrated with the data measured from February 1993 to June 1995. Also, the hydraulic conductivities of the waste layer and the intermediate cover layer in each stage were calibrated continuously with HELP model analysis. To verify these results, the total water balance in the landfill site was calculated using the infiltration rate calculated from HELP modeling. The leachate level was E.L. 10.0 m, which was close to the measured leachate level. To estimate the change of the leachate level in the future, the total water balances with different leachate discharge rates of 3,000, 3,500, and 5,000 m{sup 3}/day were analyzed. When the leachate discharge rate was 5,000 ton/day and the initial water content was decreased below 25%, the average leachate level was 10.8 m. This result satisfies the safety factor requirements (=1.3) for landfill slope stability. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Sanitary landfill local-scale flow and transport modeling in support of alternative concentrations limit demonstrations, Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, V.A.; Beach, J.A.; Statham, W.H.; Pickens, J.F. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1993-02-19

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina which is currently operated and managed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Sanitary Landfill (Sanitary Landfill) at the SRS is located approximately 2,000 feet Northwest of Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) on an approximately 70 acre site located south of Road C between the SRS B-Area and UTRC. The Sanitary Landfill has been receiving wastes since 1974 and operates as an unlined trench and fill operation. The original landfill site was 32 acres. This area reached its capacity around 1987 and a Northern Expansion of 16 acres and a Southern Expansion of 22 acres were added in 1987. The Northern Expansion has not been used for waste disposal to date and the Southern Expansion is expected to reach capacity in 1992 or 1993. The waste received at the Sanitary Landfill is predominantly paper, plastics, rubber, wood, metal, cardboard, rags saturated with degreasing solvents, pesticide bags, empty cans, and asbestos in bags. The landfill is not supposed to receive any radioactive wastes. However, tritium has been detected in the groundwater at the site. Gross alpha and gross beta are also evaluated at the landfill. The objectives of this modeling study are twofold: (1) to create a local scale Sanitary Landfill flow model to study hydraulic effects resulting from capping the Sanitary Landfill; and (2) to create a Sanitary Landfill local scale transport model to support ACL Demonstrations for a RCRA Part B Permit Renewal.

  16. Sanitary landfill local-scale flow and transport modeling in support of alternative concentrations limit demonstrations, Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina which is currently operated and managed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Sanitary Landfill (Sanitary Landfill) at the SRS is located approximately 2,000 feet Northwest of Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) on an approximately 70 acre site located south of Road C between the SRS B-Area and UTRC. The Sanitary Landfill has been receiving wastes since 1974 and operates as an unlined trench and fill operation. The original landfill site was 32 acres. This area reached its capacity around 1987 and a Northern Expansion of 16 acres and a Southern Expansion of 22 acres were added in 1987. The Northern Expansion has not been used for waste disposal to date and the Southern Expansion is expected to reach capacity in 1992 or 1993. The waste received at the Sanitary Landfill is predominantly paper, plastics, rubber, wood, metal, cardboard, rags saturated with degreasing solvents, pesticide bags, empty cans, and asbestos in bags. The landfill is not supposed to receive any radioactive wastes. However, tritium has been detected in the groundwater at the site. Gross alpha and gross beta are also evaluated at the landfill. The objectives of this modeling study are twofold: (1) to create a local scale Sanitary Landfill flow model to study hydraulic effects resulting from capping the Sanitary Landfill; and (2) to create a Sanitary Landfill local scale transport model to support ACL Demonstrations for a RCRA Part B Permit Renewal

  17. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pin-jing; QU Xian; SHAO Li-ming; LEE Duu-jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste(MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95%(61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas.

  18. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pin-Jing; Qu, Xian; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste (MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95% (61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas. PMID:20050569

  19. ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF LANDFILLING MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the most important method of municipalsolid waste disposal in China. Landfill sites are always set up in mountain valley, on plain or beside seashore. A complete landfill consists of base system, cover system, and leachate collection and gas extraction system. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art landfilling technology in China and collection discusses research projects for engineers.

  20. Decision support system to select cover systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this technology is to provide risk managers with a defensible, objective way to select capping alternatives for remediating radioactive and mixed waste landfills. The process of selecting containment cover technologies for mixed waste landfills requires consideration of many complex and interrelated technical, regulatory, and economic issues. A Decision Support System (DSS) is needed to integrate the knowledge of experts from scientific, engineering, and management disciplines to help in selecting the best capping practice for the site

  1. Improving the aeration of critical fine-grained landfill top cover material by vegetation to increase the microbial methane oxidation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Sonja; Brunke, Paul; Gebert, Julia; Jager, Johannes

    2011-05-01

    The natural methane oxidation potential of methanotrophic bacteria in landfill top covers is a sustainable and inexpensive method to reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Basically, the activity of methanotrophic bacteria is limited by the availability of oxygen in the soil. A column study was carried out to determine whether and to what extent vegetation can improve soil aeration and maintain the methane oxidation process. Tested soils were clayey silt and mature compost. The first soil is critical in light of surface crusting due to vertical erosion of an integral part of fine-grained material, blocking pores required for the gas exchange. The second soil, mature compost, is known for its good methane oxidation characteristics, due to high air-filled porosity, favorable water retention capacity and high nutrient supply. The assortment of plants consisted of a grass mixture, Canadian goldenrod and a mixture of leguminous plants. The compost offered an excellent methane oxidation potential of 100% up to a CH(4)-input of 5.6l CH(4)m(-2)h(-1). Whereas the oxidation potential was strongly diminished in the bare control column filled with clayey silt even at low CH(4)-loads. By contrast the planted clayey silt showed an increased methane oxidation potential compared to the bare column. The spreading root system forms secondary macro-pores, and hence amplifies the air diffusivity and sustain the oxygen supply to the methanotrophic bacteria. Water is produced during methane oxidation, causing leachate. Vegetation reduces the leachate by evapotranspiration. Furthermore, leguminous plants support the enrichment of soil with nitrogen compounds and thus improving the methane oxidation process. In conclusion, vegetation is relevant for the increase of oxygen diffusion into the soil and subsequently enhances effective methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. PMID:21169005

  2. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. ► Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. ► Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. ► Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society’s interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

  3. Methane Emissions from Icelandic Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Guðrún Meyvantsdóttir 1982

    2014-01-01

    Landfilling of biodegradable organic waste results in the generation of methane, along with other gases. If the gas is not collected through a recovery system, it will migrate through pores in the landfill cover and be released into the atmosphere, where it contributes to the global greenhouse gas budget. This study presents the first direct measurements of CH4 emissions from Icelandic landfill surface-covers. The main objective was to obtain evidence on the occurrence and scale of CH4 emissi...

  4. Landfill gas from environment to energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas is an alternative source of energy which can be commercially exploited wherever municipal solid wastes are disposed of in sanitary landfills. In this context, it was decided to launch a comprehensive study on the subject of energy valorization of landfill gas. The main topics dealt with in the study, which is supported by a comprehensive literature survey and six detailed case-studies, include; (i) the environmental impact of landfill gas, (ii) the process of landfill gas genesis and the technology of landfill gas control by its exploitation, (iii) the monitoring of landfill gas emissions, (iv) the policies and legal aspects of landfill gas in the European Community and in the world, (v) the estimation of landfill gas potentials and economics of landfill gas control and exploitation, (vi) the status of landfill gas exploitation in the European Community and in the world. (authors). refs., figs., tabs

  5. Evaluation of respiration in compost landfill biocovers intended for methane oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedicone, Alessio; Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost alternative approach to reduce landfill gas (LFG) emissions is to integrate compost into the landfill cover design in order to establish a biocover that is optimized for biological oxidation of methane (CH4). A laboratory and field investigation was performed to quantify respiration in...... throughout the compost layer, and CO2 concentrations exceeded 20% at a depth of 40cm below the surface of the biowindow. Overall, the results showed that respiration of compost material placed in biowindows might generate significant CO2 emissions. In landfill compost covers, methanotrophs carrying out CH4...... an experimental compost biocover in terms of oxygen (O2) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) production and emission rates. O2 consumption and CO2 production rates were measured in batch and column experiments containing compost sampled from a landfill biowindow at Fakse landfill in Denmark. Column...

  6. Landfilling: Hydrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Beaven, R.

    Landfill hydrology deals with the presence and movement of water through a landfill. The main objective in landfill hydrology is usually to predict leachate generation, but the presence and movement of water in a landfill also affect the degradation of the waste, the leaching of pollutants and the...... geotechnical stability of the fill. Understanding landfill hydrology is thus important for many aspects of landfill, in particular siting, design and operation. The objective of this chapter is to give a basic understanding of the hydrology of landfills, and to present ways to estimate leachate quantities...... under specific circumstances. Initially a general water balance equation is defined for a typical landfill, and the different parts of the water balance are discussed. A separate section discusses water flow and the hydrogeology of landfilled wastes and considers the impact of water short-circuiting. In...

  7. Landfilling: Hydrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Beaven, R.

    under specific circumstances. Initially a general water balance equation is defined for a typical landfill, and the different parts of the water balance are discussed. A separate section discusses water flow and the hydrogeology of landfilled wastes and considers the impact of water short-circuiting. In......Landfill hydrology deals with the presence and movement of water through a landfill. The main objective in landfill hydrology is usually to predict leachate generation, but the presence and movement of water in a landfill also affect the degradation of the waste, the leaching of pollutants and the...

  8. Potential application of biocover soils to landfills for mitigating toluene emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yao; Pei, Junshen; Tian, Baohu; Fan, Fengxi; Tang, Mengling; Li, Wei; He, Ruo

    2015-12-15

    Biocover soils have been demonstrated to be a good alternative cover material to mitigate CH4 emission from landfills. To evaluate the potential of biocover soil in mitigating emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) from landfills, simulated cover soil columns with the influx of toluene (chosen as typical of NMVOCs) concentrations of 102-1336 mg m(-3) in the presence or absence of the major landfill gas components (i.e., CH4 and CO2) were conducted in this study. In the two experimental materials (waste biocover soils (WBS) and landfill cover soils (LCS)), higher toluene reduction was observed in WBS with respect to LCS. After the introduction of landfill gas, an increase of microbial diversity and relative abundance of toluene-degrading bacteria and methanotrophs occurred in WBS. To illustrate the role of toluene-degrading activity in mitigating toluene emissions through landfill covers, an analytical model was developed by incorporating the steady-state vapor transport with the first-order kinetics of aerobic biodegradation limited by O2 availability. This study demonstrated that biocover soils have great potential in applying to landfills for mitigating toluene emission to the atmosphere. PMID:26073517

  9. 40 CFR 270.21 - Specific part B information requirements for landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... under § 270.14(b)(5); (d) A description of how each landfill, including the liner and cover systems... engineering report describing the final cover which will be applied to each landfill or landfill cell at... each landfill or landfill cell; (b) Detailed plans and an engineering report describing how...

  10. Alternative treatment for septic tank sludge: co-digestion with municipal solid waste in bioreactor landfill simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, R; den Hamer, D; Komboi, J; Lubberding, H J; Gijzen, H J

    2009-02-01

    Co-disposal of septic tank sludge had a positive effect on the municipal solid waste (MSW) stabilisation process in Bioreactor Landfill simulators. Co-disposal experiments were carried out using the Bioreactor Landfill approach aiming to solve the environmental problems caused by indiscriminate and inadequate disposal of MSW and especially of septic tank sludge. The simulator receiving septic tank sludge exhibited a 200 days shorter lag-phase as compared to the 350 days required by the control simulator to start the exponential biogas production. Additionally, the simulator with septic sludge apparently retained more moisture (>60% w/w), which enhanced the overall conversion of organic matter hence increasing the biogas production (0.60 m3 biogas kg(-1)VS(converted)) and removal efficiency of 60% for VS from the simulator. Alkaline pH values (pH>8.5) did not inhibit the biogas production; moreover it contributed to reduce partially the negative effects of NH(4)(+) (>2 g L(-1)) due to NH(3) volatilisation thus reducing the nitrogen content of the residues. Associated risks and hazards with septage disposal were practically eliminated as total coliform and faecal coliform contents were reduced by 99% and 100%, respectively at the end of the experiment. These results indicate that co-disposal has two direct benefits, including the safe and environmentally sound disposal of septic tank sludge and an improvement of the overall performance of the Bioreactor Landfill by increasing moisture retention and supplying a more acclimatised bacterial population. PMID:18400366

  11. Landfill Construction and Capacity Expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andre, F.J.; Cerda, E.

    2003-01-01

    We study the optimal capacity and lifetime of landfills taking into account their sequential nature.Such an optimal capacity is characterized by the so-called Optimal Capacity Condition.Particular versions of this condition are obtained for two alternative settings: first, if all the landfills are t

  12. Hydro-mechanical improvement of the cap cover of a surface landfill for low and intermediate level radioactive waste short life time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study related to the Manche storage center (CSM), one of the first landfill in the world dedicated to low and intermediate radioactive waste short-live time. The researches considered in this thesis supported by industrial companies, focus on the hydraulic study of cap cover materials of the site, and their hydro-mechanical improvement. The aim is to improve their impermeability in order to be substituted to the geo-membrane as cap cover liner. A specification imposed by Andra was to consider a solution of the re-use of the in situ material by adding of additive. The initial material is a sandy silt, a material with a significant proportion of fines. In the literature there are many studies on the mechanical improvement of fine materials (applications to road infrastructure) and the treatment of sandy materials by adding a fine fraction (constitution of waterproof barriers). On the other hand there are very few studies on the impermeability improvement of fine soils. A physical tests campaign on treated materials with bentonite was carried out at various treatment rates. The results showed that the addition of additive induces a decrease in optimum dry unit weight for a normal Proctor compaction energy and increases their optimum water content. In addition, the susceptibility to erosion, internal or external, observed during oedo-permeameter test was assessed from various stability criteria available in the literature. Unlike the treatment of soil for road embankments, the increase of the material stiffness is not wanted and flexibility is preferred what is observed with the treatment tested. The comparative hydraulic conductivity of the untreated and treated materials were measured. In this study different devices (oedo-permeameter, permeameters, triaxial device) were used. The influence of the treatment rate of the material on the decrease of the hydraulic conductivity was observed. Four large scale experimentations were designed; they should be monitored

  13. Landfill gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the UK Government's initiative for stimulating renewable energy through the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO), the UK landfill gas industry has more than trebled in size in just 4 years. As a result, UK companies are now in a strong position to offer their skills and services overseas. Ireland, Greece and Spain also resort heavily to disposal to landfill. Particularly rapid growth of the landfill gas market is expected in the OECD-Pacific and NAFTA areas. The article explains that landfill gas is a methane-rich mixture produced by anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes in landfills: under optimum conditions, up to 500 cubic meters of gas can be obtained from 1 tonne of biodegradable waste. Data on the number and capacity of sites in the UK are given. The Landfill Gas Association runs courses to counteract the skills shortage in the UK, and tailored courses for overseas visitors are planned

  14. Bioreactor landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; XING Kai; Anthony Adzomani

    2004-01-01

    Following the population expansion, there is a growing threat brought by municipal solid waste (MSW) against environment and human health. Sanitary landfill is the most important method of MSW disposal in China. In contrast to the conventional landfill, this paper introduces a new technique named bioreactor landfill (BL). Mechanisms, operation conditions as well as the advantages and disadvantages of BL are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Availability and properties of materials for the Fakse Landfill biocover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Methane produced in landfills can be oxidized in landfill covers made of compost; often called biocovers. Compost materials originating from seven different sources were characterized to determine their methane-oxidizing capacity and suitability for use in a full-scale biocover at Fakse Landfill in......-cost and effective method for comparing compost sources for suitability of use in landfill biocovers....

  16. Design document for landfill capping Prototype Decision Support System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of the Prototype Decision Support System for shallow land burial project is to ''Develop a Decision Support System tool which incorporates simulation modeling and multi-objective decision theory for the purpose of designing and evaluating alternative trench cap designs for mixed waste landfill covers. The goal is to improve the quality of technical information used by the risk manager to select landfill cover designs while taking into account technological, economical, and regulatory factors.'' The complexity of the technical and non-technical information, and how the information varies in importance across sites, points to the need for decision analysis tools that provide a common basis for integrating, synthesizing, and valuing the decision input. Because the cost of remediating thousands of contaminated DOE sites is projected to be in the 10's--100's of billions of dollars, methods will be needed to establish cleanup priorities and to help in the selection and evaluation of cost effective remediation alternatives. Even at this early stage in DOE's cleanup program, it is certain that capping technologies will be heavily relied upon to remediate the 3000+ landfills on DOE property. Capping is favored in remediating most DOE landfills because, based on preliminary baseline risk assessments, human and ecological risks are considered to be low at most of these sites and the regulatory requirements for final closure of old landfills can be met using a well designed cap to isolate the buried waste. This report describes a program plan to design, develop, and test a decision support system (DSS) for assisting the DOE risk manager in evaluating capping alternatives for radioactive and hazardous waste landfills. The DOE DSS will incorporate methods for calculating, integrating and valuing technical, regulatory, and economic criteria

  17. The experience of recovery the sanitary landfills by vegetable cover: the Chile application; Experiencias de reinsercion de vertederos mediante la implantacion de una cubierta vegetal: caso Chileno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaeta, J. A.; Espinace, R.; Szanto, M.; Palma, J.

    1999-08-01

    On the topic of the recovery of impacted areas for pouring of solid residuals, it doesn`t exist worldwide level an only solution, but rather they exist varied technological tendencies, levels of development of the knowledge and criterions in order to face the topic. It is possible to define several alternatives of reintegration and different uses that one could give to a vegetable cover. Between them, one could mention: entertaining users or floors of foundation of construction, forests and possible uses and agricultural uses. (Author)

  18. Controlling landfill processes; Kaatopaikan prosessien ohjaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroueh, U.M. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    The present landfills contain high amounts of biodegradable wastes and are remarkable sources of greenhouse gases and water pollutants. In near future at least in the European Union landfilling of only pre-treated municipal solid waste (mechanical biological treated waste, ashes) will be allowed in order to significantly reduce environmental pollution from landfills. However, both in the present and future landfills new measures are needed to more efficiently prevent environmental pollution from landfills. In the present research we studied and developed procedures and technologies to follow and to control various processes in the present and future landfills. The work was carried out in the field conditions in two present landfills and in the future pilot landfills. It was shown, e.g. that industrial process control manners including on line measurements of water quality and pc-control of water recirculation can be applied in the landfills and that fibre optic cable technology can be used in the landfill to measure temperature and moisture profiles. Also factors affecting the greenhouse gas and leaching potential of organic material, nutrients and metals of different waste types was demonstrated. The methane oxidizing cover layers were shown to have capacity to significantly reduce methane emission both from the present and future landfills even at temperatures down to 2-5 deg C. Several factors to be used in the design of future landfills were also established. Finally, all the produced knowledge and technology will be used to present concepts for operating different types of landfills. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of methane oxidation activity in waste biocover soil during landfill stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wang, Jing; Xia, Fang-Fang; Mao, Li-Juan; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Biocover soil has been demonstrated to have high CH(4) oxidation capacity and is considered as a good alternative cover material to mitigate CH(4) emission from landfills, yet the response of CH(4) oxidation activity of biocover soils to the variation of CH(4) loading during landfill stabilization is poorly understood. Compared with a landfill cover soil (LCS) collected from Hangzhou Tianziling landfill cell, the development of CH(4) oxidation activity of waste biocover soil (WBS) was investigated using simulated landfill systems in this study. Although a fluctuation of influent CH(4) flux occurred during landfill stabilization, the WBS covers showed a high CH(4) removal efficiency of 94-96% during the entire experiment. In the LCS covers, the CH(4) removal efficiencies varied with the fluctuation of CH(4) influent flux, even negative ones occurred due to the storage of CH(4) in the soil porosities after the high CH(4) influent flux of ~137 gm(-2) d(-1). The lower concentrations of O(2) and CH(4) as well as the higher concentration of CO(2) were observed in the WBS covers than those in the LCS covers. The highest CH(4) oxidation rates of the two types of soil covers both occurred in the bottom layer (20-30 cm). Compared to the LCS, the WBS showed higher CH(4) oxidation activity and methane monooxygenase activity over the course of the experiment. Overall, this study indicated the WBS worked well for the fluctuation of CH(4) influent flux during landfill stabilization. PMID:22776254

  20. Town of Edinburg landfill reclamation demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill reclamation is the process of excavating a solid waste landfill to recover materials, reduce environmental impacts, restore the land resource, and, in some cases, extend landfill life. Using conventional surface mining techniques and specialized separation equipment, a landfill may be separated into recyclable material, combustible material, a soil/compost fraction and residual waste. A landfill reclamation demonstration project was hosted at the Town of Edinburg municipal landfill in northwest Saratoga County. The report examines various separation techniques employed at the site and appropriate uses for reclaimed materials. Specifications regarding engineered work plans, health and safety monitoring, and contingency preparedness are discussed. Major potential applications and benefits of using landfill reclamation technology at existing landfills are identified and discussed. The research and development aspect of the report also examines optimal screening technologies, site selection protocol and the results of a test burn of reclaimed waste at a waste-to-energy facility. Landfill reclamation costs are developed, and economic comparisons are made between reclamation costs and conventional landfill closure costs, with key criteria identified. The results indicate that, although dependent on site-specific conditions and economic factors, landfill reclamation can be a technically and economically feasible alternative or companion to conventional landfill closure under a range of favorable conditions. Feasibility can be determined only after an investigation of the variety of landfill conditions and reclamation options

  1. Environmental impact assessment on the construction and operation of municipal solid waste sanitary landfills in developing countries: China case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Na; Damgaard, Anders; Lü, Fan;

    2014-01-01

    of mineral materials. To test the influences of different landfill C&O approaches on environmental impacts, six baseline alternatives were assessed through sensitivity analysis. If geomembranes and geonets were utilized to replace daily and intermediate soil covers and gravel drainage systems, respectively......An inventory of material and energy consumption during the construction and operation (C&O) of a typical sanitary landfill site in China was calculated based on Chinese industrial standards for landfill management and design reports. The environmental impacts of landfill C&O were evaluated through......, the environmental burdens of C&O could be mitigated by between 2% and 27%. During the LCA of landfill C&O, the research scope or system boundary has to be declared when referring to material consumption values taken from the literature; for example, the misapplication of data could lead to an underestimation...

  2. Results from a full scale application of ashes and other residuals in the final cover construction of the Tveta landfill; Utvaerdering av fullskaleanvaendning av askor och andra restprodukter vid sluttaeckning av Tveta Aatervinningsanlaeggning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tham, Gustav (Telge AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden)); Andreas, Lale (Luleaa Univ. of Technology, Luleaa (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    In 2000 Telge Aatervinning - a waste management and recycling company - started investigating ashes from incineration of industrial and biowaste waste. The company was given a permit from the Swedish Environmental Court to cover four hectares of the house hold waste landfill area. In 2006 the company received an unlimited permit to cover the remaining part of the landfill when the works end some thirty years later. Ashes were used the first time in 1966 for testing. Literature studies indicated the ashes can have a low hydraulic conductivity under certain conditions. In 1999 collaboration started with the Division of Waste Science and Technology at Luleaa University of Technology. Residuals from household and industrial waste were subject to investigation. Initially, biowaste incineration products were subject to testing and were later extended to other waste products, e.g. sludge, contaminated soils, foundry, and compost material. Several different sub-fractions of ashes were included in the investigation e.g. bottom and fly ash, various slag products after up-grading including dewatering, separation and sifting. Subsequently, a complete covering system of a landfill consists of residuals. Six test areas were outlined in order to give a good representation for cover construction in flat and steep areas with different compositions of liner material. The results show that in all areas the hydraulic conductivity construction yields less then 50 liters per square meters and years and can be less the than 5 liters in a repository for hazardous waste if required. In accordance with literature data the field observations show the liner material constructed only by ash material under certain conditions can form a monolithic structure due to very slow processes thus indicating small pore volumes that unable water air to interact with other media. The concept of using ash can be related to natural analogues of volcanic ashes and has been used in old defence walls and other

  3. Controlling landfill processes; Kaatopaikan prosessien ohjaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sormunen, K.; Rintala, J.; Einola, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Mroueh, U.M.; Laine- Ylijoki, J.; Kaartinen, T.; Wahlstroem, M. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland); Ettala, M. [Matti Ettala Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop methods to control the processes occurring in the present and future landfills in order to enhance waste stabilisation and to minimise the emission to atmosphere and water. The process control (operation as bioreactor) is studied in three test sites in actual landfills, which have been instrumented for monitoring the process conditions. Besides operating the landfills as bioreactor also the greenhouse gas emissions are measured as well as the potential for methane oxidation in landfill cover. Also the characteristics of the wastes to be landfilled in the future have been studied. (orig.)

  4. Landfill gas-fired power plant pays cost of operating landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on recovery of energy from refuse that has become increasingly attractive in the past decade. The continuing urbanization of our society has created major challenges in the disposal of our waste products. Because of public concern over the potential presence of toxins, and for other environmental reasons, management and regulation of active and inactive landfills have become much more stringent and costly. Palos Verdes landfill, owned jointly by the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts and Los Angeles County, is located about three miles from the Pacific Ocean in the city of Rolling Hills Estates, Calif. The landfill was closed in 1980. The garbage was covered with six to eight feet of soil, and the area was landscaped. Part of this area has already been developed as the South Coast Botanical Gardens and Ernie Howlett Park. The remainder is scheduled to become a golf course. As refuse decays within a landfill, the natural anaerobic biological reaction generates a low-Btu methane gas along with carbon dioxide, known as landfill gas (LFG). The gas also contains other less desirable trace components generated by the decomposing garbage. Uncontrolled, these gases migrate to the surface and escape into the atmosphere where they generate environmental problems, including objectionable odors. The Sanitation Districts have installed a matrix of gas wells and a gas collection system to enable incineration of the gas in flares. This approach reduced aesthetic, environmental and safety concerns. However, emissions from the flares were still a problem. The Sanitation Districts then looked at alternatives to flaring the gas, one of which was electrical generation. Since the Sanitation Districts have no on-site use for thermal energy, power generation for use in the utility grid was deemed the most feasible alternative

  5. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m3 CH4/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH4/(m2 h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC

  6. Methane oxidation at low temperatures in soil exposed to landfill gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mette; Linderød, L.; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    soil moisture regimes, At 2 degreesC the methane oxidation rates were 0.005 to 0.17 mu mol g(-1) h(-1), and calculations showed that it was possible to oxidize all the produced methane at older landfills, even during the winter. Therefore, methane oxidation in top covers of landfills is an alternative...... cannot be extrapolated to soils exposed to high methane concentrations. Four sandy soils with different organic matter content (1-9% w/w) from two landfills in Denmark were investigated in batch experiments in the laboratory to determine the response of methane oxidation at low temperatures and different...... to gas recovery at smaller and older landfills in northern Europe. Equations have been developed that describe the dependency of temperature and soil moisture content for each soil. The oxidation rates depended significantly on the soils (and thereby organic matter content), temperature, and soil...

  7. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO2 levels: The added value of the isotope (δ13C and δ18O CO2; δ13C and δD CH4) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. ► The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. ► Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO2 concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O of CO2; δ13C and δD of CH4) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO2 levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH4 oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH4 is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH4 oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. δ13C of CO2 samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  8. Caracterização do solo de cobertura de aterros encerrados com ferramentas (geoestatísticas Characterization of soil covers in closed landfill sites with (geostatistical tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inúmeros trabalhos abordam a elaboração de estratégias amostrais e a aplicação de ferramentas (geoestatísticas no estudo de atributos do solo. Entretanto, são escassos os trabalhos envolvendo a aplicação desta abordagem no monitoramento de solos construídos sobre aterros encerrados de resíduos sólidos urbanos. Este estudo mostra que a densidade amostral necessária para tornar possível o uso da geoestatística em tais casos, elevaria os custos operacionais. A melhor alternativa é a utilização dos métodos de estatística multivariada (análise de componentes principais e de agrupamento para definição de zonas homogêneas de manejo. Os atributos que melhor explicam a estrutura da variabilidade do solo construído são o teor de areia (ou argila, a saturação por bases e o pH, todos relacionados com a contaminação do solo com chorume e o adequado desenvolvimento da vegetação.Several studies address the development of sampling strategies and implementation of (geostatistical tools in the study of soil properties. However, there is a lack of studies in the application of such approach to monitor soil covers in closed landfill sites of urban solid waste. This study shows that the sampling density needed to make possible the use of geostatistics in such cases would raise operational costs. The best alternative is the use of multivariate statistics methods (principal components and cluster analysis to define homogeneous management zones. The soil attributes that best explain the structure of soil variability are sand (or clay content, base saturation and pH, all related with soil contamination by leachate and with the proper development of vegetation.

  9. Environmental impact assessment on the construction and operation of municipal solid waste sanitary landfills in developing countries: China case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Damgaard, Anders; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming; Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; He, Pin-Jing

    2014-05-01

    An inventory of material and energy consumption during the construction and operation (C&O) of a typical sanitary landfill site in China was calculated based on Chinese industrial standards for landfill management and design reports. The environmental impacts of landfill C&O were evaluated through life cycle assessment (LCA). The amounts of materials and energy used during this type of undertaking in China are comparable to those in developed countries, except that the consumption of concrete and asphalt is significantly higher in China. A comparison of the normalized impact potential between landfill C&O and the total landfilling technology implies that the contribution of C&O to overall landfill emissions is not negligible. The non-toxic impacts induced by C&O can be attributed mainly to the consumption of diesel used for daily operation, while the toxic impacts are primarily due to the use of mineral materials. To test the influences of different landfill C&O approaches on environmental impacts, six baseline alternatives were assessed through sensitivity analysis. If geomembranes and geonets were utilized to replace daily and intermediate soil covers and gravel drainage systems, respectively, the environmental burdens of C&O could be mitigated by between 2% and 27%. During the LCA of landfill C&O, the research scope or system boundary has to be declared when referring to material consumption values taken from the literature; for example, the misapplication of data could lead to an underestimation of diesel consumption by 60-80%. PMID:24656422

  10. INPP Landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to propose the basic design for final disposal of Very Low Level Radioactive Waste (VLLW) produced at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant and at other small waste producers in Lithuania. Considering the safety for the environment, as well as the construction costs, it has been decided that the repository will be of a landfill type based on the same design principles as similar authorised facilities in other countries. It has also been decided that the location of the landfill shall be in the vicinity of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP)

  11. Greenhouse gas emissions through cap barriers of landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourc, J.P.; Staub, M.; Simonin, R. [Grenoble Univ. (France). LTHE

    2009-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the environmental impacts of landfill cap covers used to produce biogas. The sensitivity of the environmental performance of landfills on biogas collection and recovery systems as well as on cap cover characteristics was investigated. The study examined both soil and geosynthetic landfill cap covers used to maintain impermeability at landfill sites as well as to enable biogas recovery. Two types of cap cover were discussed: (1) a cover that enabled passive wetting of the landfill wastes through rainfall; and (2) an impermeable cap used to control leachate recirculation. The environmental impacts of both caps were discussed. The study showed that landfill cap covers are a significant means of sequestering greenhouse gases (GHGs).

  12. Power generation from landfill gas workshop discussion of Session 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discussion following presentations on financing landfill gas projects for power generation and the quality of landfill gas for utilisation in internal combustion engines is reported. Topics covered include the use of landfill gas in external combustion engines, the use of oil-free engines, such as gas turbines, and guarantees required by financiers. (UK)

  13. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of landfills as an in situ biological treatment system represents an alternative for source area remediation with a significant cost saving. The specific objective of this research is to investigate the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of the landfill ecosystem for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The research was conducted in two complementary systems: simulated landfill bioreactors and batch degradation experiment in serum bottles. Refuse samples excavated from a landfill were tested in laboratory bioreactors designed and operated to facilitate refuse decomposition under landfilling conditions. Each bioreactor was operated with leachate recirculation and gas collection. Target CAHs, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), were added to selected reactors and maintained at 20 μM each in leachate to simulate the effect of long-term exposure of refuse microorganisms to CAHs on the degradation potential of these chemicals in landfills. At two different stages of refuse decomposition, active refuse decomposition representing young landfills and maturation phase representing aged landfills, anaerobic microbial cultures were derived from selected bioreactors and tested in serum bottles for their abilities to biodegrade target CAHs. Results of this study suggest that landfills have an intrinsic reductive dechlorination capacity for PCE and TCE. The decomposition of refuse, a source of complex organics, enhances reductive dechlorination by the refuse cultures tested in this study. In addition, the test results suggest that it may be possible to develop engineering strategies to promote both CAHs degradation and refuse decomposition in landfills. (author)

  14. Wood ash amendment to biogas reactors as an alternative to landfilling? A preliminary study on changes in process chemistry and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podmirseg, Sabine M; Seewald, Martin S A; Knapp, Brigitte A; Bouzid, Ourdia; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Peyret, Pierre; Insam, Heribert

    2013-08-01

    Wood ash addition to biogas plants represents an alternative to commonly used landfilling by improving the reactor performance, raising the pH and alleviating potential limits of trace elements. This study is the first on the effects of wood ash on reactor conditions and microbial communities in cattle slurry-based biogas reactors. General process parameters [temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, ammonia, volatile fatty acids, carbon/nitrogen (C/N), total solids (TS), volatile solids, and gas quantity and quality] were monitored along with molecular analyses of methanogens by polymerase chain reaction- denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and modern microarrays (archaea and bacteria). A prompt pH rise was observed, as was an increase in C/N ratio and volatile fatty acids. Biogas production was inhibited, but recovered to even higher production rates and methane concentration after single amendment. High sulphur levels in the wood ash generated hydrogen sulphide and potentially hampered methanogenesis. Methanosarcina was the most dominant methanogen in all reactors; however, diversity was higher in ash-amended reactors. Bacterial groups like Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were favoured, which could improve the hydrolytic efficiency of the reactors. We recommend constant monitoring of the chemical composition of the used wood ash and suggest that ash amendment is adequate if added to the substrate at a rate low enough to allow adaptation of the microbiota (e.g. 0.25 g g(-1) TS). It could further help to enrich digestate with important nutrients, for example phosphorus, calcium and magnesium, but further experiments are required for the evaluation of wood ash concentrations that are tolerable for anaerobic digestion. PMID:23831776

  15. The Future Through the Past: The Use of Analog Sites for Design Criteria and Long Term Performance Assessment of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; Young, M. H.; Edwards, S. C.; Rawlinson, S. E.

    2002-02-26

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. At the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers are the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. The project is funded through the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area of the U.S. Department of Energy. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two sites are relatively recently disturbed (within the last 50 years) and have been selected to evaluate processes and changes on ET covers for the early period after active cover maintenance is discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end of the compliance period (1,000 years or more); both surfaces are abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites are being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified, and the mode of disturbance to help set baseline conditions. Similar to other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time.

  16. The Future Through the Past: The Use of Analog Sites for Design Criteria and Long Term Performance Assessment of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. At the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers are the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. The project is funded through the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area of the U.S. Department of Energy. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two sites are relatively recently disturbed (within the last 50 years) and have been selected to evaluate processes and changes on ET covers for the early period after active cover maintenance is discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end of the compliance period (1,000 years or more); both surfaces are abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites are being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified, and the mode of disturbance to help set baseline conditions. Similar to other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time

  17. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widory, D., E-mail: d.widory@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G. [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Bour, O. [INERIS, Parc Technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  18. The co-oxidation of methane and dichloromethane in landfill bio-cover[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, E.; Albanna, M.; Fernandes, L.; Warith, M. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Solid waste landfills are responsible for 13 per cent of the annual global anthropogenic methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions. Landfill bio-cover systems using methanotrophic bacteria to oxidize CH{sub 4} to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and water (H{sub 2}O) is a cost effective solution for the attenuation of these fugitive greenhouse gases (GHGs). This study analyzed the affect of dichloromethane (DCM), a volatile organic compound (VOC), on the rate of methane oxidation at several environmental conditions. Compost from Trail Road, a municipal landfill in Ottawa, was used in batch experiments. Gas chromatography was used to measure the concentrations of CH{sub 4} in the absence of DCM, and under varying DCM concentrations and atmospheric temperatures. The oxidation of DCM by the methanotrophs in the presence as well as absence of CH{sub 4} was also observed, and their oxidation rates determined. The study showed that the presence of DCM plays a very significant role on the oxidative capacity of CH{sub 4} under closed conditions on a laboratory scale. The study also showed that it will be important to restrict the type of waste that can be dumped in landfills. Controlling the industrial waste of non-methane organic carbon (NMOC) dumped into municipal landfills is crucial if CH{sub 4} is to be oxidized by a bio-cover. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Organic farming and cover crops as an alternative to mineral fertilizers to improve soil physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez de Cima, Diego; Luik, Anne; Reintam, Endla

    2015-10-01

    For testing how cover crops and different fertilization managements affect the soil physical properties in a plough based tillage system, a five-year crop rotation experiment (field pea, white potato, common barley undersown with red clover, red clover, and winter wheat) was set. The rotation was managed under four different farming systems: two conventional: with and without mineral fertilizers and two organic, both with winter cover crops (later ploughed and used as green manure) and one where cattle manure was added yearly. The measurements conducted were penetration resistance, soil water content, porosity, water permeability, and organic carbon. Yearly variations were linked to the number of tillage operations, and a cumulative effect of soil organic carbon in the soil as a result of the different fertilization amendments, organic or mineral. All the systems showed similar tendencies along the three years of study and differences were only found between the control and the other systems. Mineral fertilizers enhanced the overall physical soil conditions due to the higher yield in the system. In the organic systems, cover crops and cattle manure did not have a significant effect on soil physical properties in comparison with the conventional ones, which were kept bare during the winter period. The extra organic matter boosted the positive effect of crop rotation, but the higher number of tillage operations in both organic systems counteracted this effect to a greater or lesser extent.

  20. Alternative systems of covering the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste storage at Sallying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current concept of managing the low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes produced during the operation of Cernavoda NPP provides their final disposal underground in the Sallying repository located within the NPP exclusion area. The safety requirements of the disposal imposed adopting of efficient natural and engineered systems to prevent population and environment exposure for at least 300 years time. Preliminary studies on the Sallying site showed that geological formations can prevent release radioisotopes in Eocene and Baramine aquifers both by their composition and structures. On the other hand investigation of the potential factors which could affect the long term stability of the repository showed that soil erosion due to climatic factors and soil degradation produced by animals burrowing underground drifts could rise the probability of environment contamination. These factors could enhance the escape of 14C and 3H radionuclides in the environment and a rise of water infiltration rate into the repository. A technical solution aiming at diminishing these effects specific to superficial or low-depth repositories appear to be a system of covering technical barriers as well as minimizing the effects of biointrusion. The paper analyses several geo textile membranes (polyesters and rubber) as well as soils compositions (loess, clay, sand, gravel) as technical a natural covering solutions. The studies and the experiments carried out led to the following four conclusions. 1. Without a multilayer covering system the saturation degree of the loess above the repository keeps low values varying between 20% and 25%. Although, the humidity increases considerably at the interface with the repository's concrete, so that within 0.5 m it reaches a saturation degree of 96%. The concrete block having a compact and fine structure directs laterally the water flow what entails a slight increase of humidity. 2. The capillary barriers keep the humidity in the upper part of

  1. Landfills, landfill, Published in 2004, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Landfills dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2004. It is described as 'landfill'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  2. Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily activities at the Hanford Site generate sanitary solid waste (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) that is transported to and permanently disposed of at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill. This permit application describes the manner in which the solid Waste Landfill will be operated under Washington State Department of Ecology Minimum Functional Standards for Solid Waste Handling, Washington Administrative Code 173-304. The solid Waste Landfill is owned by the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations Office and is used for disposal of solid waste generated at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The jurisdictional health department's permit application form for the Solid Waste Landfill is provided in Chapter 1.0. Chapter 2.0 provides a description of the Hanford Site and the Solid Waste Landfill and reviews applicable locational, general facility, and landfilling standards. Chapter 3.0 discusses the characteristics and quantity of the waste disposed of in the Solid Waste Landfill. Chapter 4.0 reviews the regional and site geology and hydrology and the groundwater and vadose zone quality beneath the landfill. Chapters 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 contain the plan of operation, closure plan, and postclosure plan, respectively. The plan of operation describes the routine operation and maintenance of the Solid Waste Landfill, the environmental monitoring program, and the safety and emergency plans. Chapter 5.0 also addresses the operational cover, environmental controls, personnel requirements, inspections, recordkeeping, reporting, and site security. The postclosure plan describes requirements for final cover maintenance and environmental monitoring equipment following final closure. Chapter 8.0 discusses the integration of closure and postclosure activities between the Solid Waste Landfill and adjacent Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 76 refs., 48 figs, 15 tabs

  3. Landfill site selection for municipal solid wastes in mountainous areas with landslide susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Mahnaz; Homaee, Mehdi; Falamaki, Amin

    2016-06-01

    Several cities across the world are located in mountainous and landslide prone areas. Any landfill siting without considering landslide susceptibility in such regions may impose additional environmental adversity. This study was aimed to propose a practical method for selecting waste disposal site that accounts for landslide exposure. The proposed method was applied to a city which is highly proneness to landslide due to its geology, morphology, and climatic conditions. First, information on the previously occurred landslides of the region was collected. Based on this information, proper landslide causative factors were selected and their thematic maps were prepared. Factors' classes were then standardized in 0-1 domain, and thematic layers were weighted by using analytical hierarchy process (AHP). The landslide susceptibility map was prepared afterwards. Unsuitable areas for landfill location were masked in GIS environment by Boolean method, retaining sufficient areas for further evaluation. Nine remaining alternatives were selected through comprehensive field visits and were ranked by using AHP. Consequently, 17 factors in three environmental, economical, and social perspectives were employed. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the stability of the alternatives ranking with respect to variations in criterion weights. Based on the obtained landslide susceptible map, nearly 36 % of the entire region is proneness to landslide. The prepared Boolean map indicates that potential areas for landfill construction cover 11 % of the whole region. The results further indicated that if landslide susceptible areas are not considered in landfill site selection, the potential landfill sites would become more than twice. It can be concluded that if any of these landslide prone sites are selected for landfilling, further environmental disaster would be terminated in the future. It can be further concluded that the proposed method could reasonably well be adjusted to

  4. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein

    1999-01-11

    ''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. Mixed waste landfill corrective measures study final report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-03-01

    The Mixed Waste Landfill occupies 2.6 acres in the north-central portion of Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The landfill accepted low-level radioactive and mixed waste from March 1959 to December 1988. This report represents the Corrective Measures Study that has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the study was to identify, develop, and evaluate corrective measures alternatives and recommend the corrective measure(s) to be taken at the site. Based upon detailed evaluation and risk assessment using guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department, the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories recommend that a vegetative soil cover be deployed as the preferred corrective measure for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The cover would be of sufficient thickness to store precipitation, minimize infiltration and deep percolation, support a healthy vegetative community, and perform with minimal maintenance by emulating the natural analogue ecosystem. There would be no intrusive remedial activities at the site and therefore no potential for exposure to the waste. This alternative poses minimal risk to site workers implementing institutional controls associated with long-term environmental monitoring as well as routine maintenance and surveillance of the site.

  6. Mixed waste landfill corrective measures study final report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mixed Waste Landfill occupies 2.6 acres in the north-central portion of Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The landfill accepted low-level radioactive and mixed waste from March 1959 to December 1988. This report represents the Corrective Measures Study that has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the study was to identify, develop, and evaluate corrective measures alternatives and recommend the corrective measure(s) to be taken at the site. Based upon detailed evaluation and risk assessment using guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department, the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories recommend that a vegetative soil cover be deployed as the preferred corrective measure for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The cover would be of sufficient thickness to store precipitation, minimize infiltration and deep percolation, support a healthy vegetative community, and perform with minimal maintenance by emulating the natural analogue ecosystem. There would be no intrusive remedial activities at the site and therefore no potential for exposure to the waste. This alternative poses minimal risk to site workers implementing institutional controls associated with long-term environmental monitoring as well as routine maintenance and surveillance of the site

  7. Thermal canopy photography in forestry - an alternative to optical cover photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nölke N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hemispherical canopy photography is a widely used technique to observe crown-related forest variables. However, standardization of this technique remains challenging, as exposure and threshold settings continue to constitute the main sources of variation of such photographs. This paper, therefore, presents a new method to overcome standardization issues by using thermal canopy photography. With a thermal camera, images are produced which are not critically limited in their dynamic range so that photographic exposure becomes irrelevant. Moreover, the high temperature contrast between “sky” and “non-sky”, resulting from extreme low sky temperatures, facilitates the unambiguous selection of a threshold which separates “sky” from “non-sky” pixels. For our comparison, we have taken canopy images with a high-resolution thermal camera (VarioCam hr head [Infratec, Dresden, Germany] and an optical camera (Nikon D70s. The correlation of canopy closure values derived from the image pairs was r = 0.98. Our findings thus show that thermal canopy photography is a promising and simple to use alternative to optical canopy photography, because it limits possible sources of variability, since exposure settings and threshold definition cease to be an issue.

  8. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO₂ levels: the added value of the isotope (δ¹³C and δ¹⁸O CO₂; δ¹³C and δD CH₄) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widory, D; Proust, E; Bellenfant, G; Bour, O

    2012-09-01

    We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach (δ¹³C and δ¹⁸O of CO₂; δ¹³C and δD of CH₄) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO₂ levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH₄ oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH₄ is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH₄ oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. δ¹³C of CO₂ samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:22608681

  9. Assessing the market opportunities of landfill mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, D J; Achterkamp, M C; de Visser, B J

    2004-01-01

    Long-term estimates make clear that the amount of solid waste to be processed at landfills in the Netherlands will sharply decline in coming years. Major reasons can be found in the availability of improved technologies for waste recycling and government regulations aiming at waste reduction. Consequently, market size for companies operating landfills shrinks. Among the companies facing the problem is the Dutch company Essent. Given the expected market conditions, it looks for alternative business opportunities. Landfill mining, i.e., the recycling of existing landfills, is considered one of them. Proceeds of landfill mining are related to, for example, recycled materials available for re-use, regained land, and possibilities for a more efficient operation of a landfill. The market for landfill mining is of a considerable size--there are about 3800 landfills located in the Netherlands. Given market size the company faces the dilemma of how to explore this market, i.e., select the most profitable landfills in a fast and efficient way. No existing methods or tools could be found to do so. Therefore, to answer to the problem posed, we propose a step-wise research method for market exploration. The basic idea behind the method is to provide an adequate, cost-saving and timely answer by relying on a series of quick scans. Relevant aspects of a mining project concern the proceeds of regained land and recyclables, the costs of the mining operation and the associated business and environmental risks. The method has been tested for its practical use in a pilot study. The pilot study addressed 147 landfills located in the Dutch Province of Noord-Brabant. The study made clear how method application resulted in the selection of a limited number of high potential landfills in a few weeks, involving minimal research costs. PMID:15381231

  10. Elimination of sulphur odours at landfills by bioconversion and the corona discharge plasma technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fangfang; Liu, Xin; Kang, Ying; He, Ruo; Wu, Zucheng

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) contributes a lot to odours at landfills, which is a threat to the environment and the health of the staff therein. To mitigate its emission, the bioconversion within landfill cover soils (LCSs) was introduced. H2S emission and concentration both in the field air above the landfill and in microcosm testing were surveyed. Results indicated that H2S emission and concentration in the landfill varied with landfill seasons and sites. There existed relationship between H2S concentration and fluxes spatially and temporally. To characterize and assess the spatial and temporal diversity of sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the LCSs, the terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was employed. Using the functional genes of dsrB and soxB, SOB, including Halothiobacillus, Rhodothalassium, Paracocccus, Allochromatium, and Thiobacillus, and SRB, including Desulfovibrio, Syntrophobacter, Desulfomonile and Desulfobacca, were identical and exhibited the dominant role in the LCSs. By employing an alternative available corona reactor, more than 90% removal efficiencies of sulphides were demonstrated, suggesting that the LCSs for eliminating odours in a lower concentration would be feasible. PMID:25244028

  11. The implementation of artificial neural networks to model methane oxidation in landfill soil covers[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, A.; Albanna, M.; Warith, M. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The disposal of solid waste significantly contributes to the total anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}), a greenhouse gas that negatively affects climate change. The oxidation of methane in landfill bio-covers takes place through the use of methanotrophic bacteria which provides a sink for methane. The rate at which methane is biologically oxidized depends on several parameters. This study provided a better understanding of the oxidation of methane in landfill soil covers through modeling methane oxidation with artificial neural networks (ANNs). An ANN was trained and tested to model methane oxidation in various batch scale systems for 3 types of soils. Input data consisted of temperature, moisture content, soil composition and the nutrient content added to the system. Model results were in good agreement with experimental results reported by other researchers. It was concluded that the use of ANNs to model methane oxidation in batch scale bio-covers can address the large number of complicated physical and biochemical processes that occur within the landfill bio-cover. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  12. Evapotranspiration (ET) covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Steve; Myers, Bill; Fiedler, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) cover systems are increasingly being used at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, hazardous waste landfills, at industrial monofills, and at mine sites. Conventional cover systems use materials with low hydraulic permeability (barrier layers) to minimize the downward migration of water from the surface to the waste (percolation), ET cover systems use water balance components to minimize percolation. These cover systems rely on soil to capture and store precipitation until it is either transpired through vegetation or evaporated from the soil surface. Compared to conventional membrane or compacted clay cover systems, ET cover systems are expected to cost less to construct. They are often aesthetic because they employ naturalized vegetation, require less maintenance once the vegetative system is established, including eliminating mowing, and may require fewer repairs than a barrier system. All cover systems should consider the goals of the cover in terms of protectiveness, including the pathways of risk from contained material, the lifecycle of the containment system. The containment system needs to be protective of direct contact of people and animals with the waste, prevent surface and groundwater water pollution, and minimize release of airborne contaminants. While most containment strategies have been based on the dry tomb strategy of keeping waste dry, there are some sites where adding or allowing moisture to help decompose organic waste is the current plan. ET covers may work well in places where complete exclusion of precipitation is not needed. The U.S. EPA Alternative Cover Assessment Program (ACAP), USDOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others have researched ET cover design and efficacy, including the history of their use, general considerations in their design, performance, monitoring, cost, current status, limitations on their use, and project specific examples. An on-line database has been developed with information

  13. Emission of phthalates and phthalate alternatives from vinyl flooring and crib mattress covers: the influence of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yirui; Xu, Ying

    2014-12-16

    Emissions of phthalates and phthalate alternatives from vinyl flooring and crib mattress covers were measured in a specially designed chamber. The gas-phase concentrations versus time were measured at four different temperatures, that is, 25, 36, 45, and 55 °C. The key parameter that controls the emissions (y0, gas-phase concentration in equilibrium with the material phase) was determined, and the emissions were found to increase significantly with increasing temperature. Both the material-phase concentration (C0) and the chemical vapor pressure (Vp) were found to have great influence on the value of y0. The measured ratios of C0 to y0 were exponentially proportional to the reciprocal of temperature, in agreement with the van't Hoff equation. A emission model was validated at different temperatures, with excellent agreement between model calculations and chamber observations. In residential homes, an increase in the temperature from 25 to 35 °C can elevate the gas-phase concentration of phthalates by more than a factor of 10, but the total airborne concentration may not increase that much for less volatile compounds. In infant sleep microenvironments, an increase in the temperature of mattress can cause a significant increase in emission of phthalates from the mattress cover and make the concentration in the infant's breathing zone about four times higher than that in the bulk room air, resulting in potentially high exposure. PMID:25419579

  14. Assessing the opportunities of landfill mining

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, D.J. van der; Achterkamp, M.C.; Visser, B.J. de

    2003-01-01

    Long-term estimates make clear that the amount of solid waste to be processed at landfills in the Netherlands will sharply decline in coming years. Major reasons can be found in the availability of improved technologies for waste recycling and government regulations aiming at waste reduction. Consequently, market size for companies operating landfills shrinks. Among the companies facing the problem is the Dutch company Essent. Given the expected market conditions, it looks for alternative bus...

  15. Landfill life expectancy with waste reduction/minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although some minimally acceptable practices are presently undertaken at most landfills to protect human health and safety and the environment, a key question remains. How much effort and resources should be expended to slow the fill-rate of a landfill? The answer depends on the performance and costs of the technical options available, the difficulty and cost of acquiring additional landfill space, and the consequences for remaining landfill lifetime of current and future actions. Toward this end, the paper (1) presents a method for projecting the remaining life of a landfill, including the alternative lifetimes associated with life extension measures; (2) presents a case study of the low-level waste landfill at Los Alamos National Lab.; and (3) illustrates a procedure for determining which measures become cost-effective to adopt as a landfill's space declines

  16. Landfilling: Environmental Issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Manfredi, Simone; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Waste disposed of in a landfill is by its nature different from the material found in the surroundings of the landfill and thereby the landfill may potentially affect the surrounding environment. This may be in terms of attracting or repelling flora and fauna from the area and through the emission...

  17. Landfilling: Concepts and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Scharff, H.; Hjelmar, O.

    2011-01-01

    Landfilling of waste historically has been the main management route for waste, and in many parts of the world it still is. Landfills have developed from open polluting dumps to modern highly engineered facilities with sophisticated control measures and monitoring routines. However, in spite of a...... landfilling are described in Chapter 10.2 while specific types of landfilling technology are described in Chapter 10.5 (mineral waste landfill), Chapter 10.6 (reactor landfill) and Chapter 10.7 (pretreated waste landfill).......Landfilling of waste historically has been the main management route for waste, and in many parts of the world it still is. Landfills have developed from open polluting dumps to modern highly engineered facilities with sophisticated control measures and monitoring routines. However, in spite of all...... new approaches and technological advancement the landfill still is a long lasting accumulation of waste in the environment. Much of current landfill design and technology has been introduced as a reaction to problems encountered at actual landfills. The solution was in many cases sought in isolation...

  18. Economic feasibility of hydrogen enrichment for reducing NOx emissions from landfill gas power generation alternatives: A comparison of the levelized cost of electricity with present strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on recent research showing that hydrogen enrichment can lower NOx emissions from landfill gas combustion below future NOx emission control standards imposed by both federal and California state regulations, an investigation was performed to compare the levelized cost of electricity of this technology with other options. In this cost study, a lean-burn reciprocating engine with no after-treatment was the baseline case to compare six other landfill gas-to-energy projects. These cases include a lean burn engine with selective catalytic reduction after treatment, a lean-burn microturbine, and four variations on an ultra-lean-burn engine utilizing hydrogen enrichment with each case using a different method of hydrogen production. Only hydrogen enrichment with an in-stream autothermal fuel reformer was shown to be potentially cost-competitive with current strategies for reaching the NOx reduction target in IC engines. - Highlights: ► Levelized cost of electricity for hydrogen enriched combustion was compared. ► Various ultra-lean-burn engines and microturbines with hydrogen were analyzed. ► Combustion with an autothermal fuel reformer was potentially cost-competitive.

  19. Scenarios selection for a simple concept landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scenarios are used to deal with uncertainty on the evolution of complex systems. The scenario selection methodologies also have to provide a basis for reflexion and traceability of the reasoning. A scenario selection method has been developed for the case of disposal of uranium mill tailings in a landfill site. In the case of a simple concept landfill, a methodology that fulfils these requirements has been developed. It distinguishes on the one hand the landfill evolution, and on the other hand, the human behavior evolution. It is based on three steps: (i) characterization of the landfill itself, in order to define situations leading to releases of radionuclides, (ii) characterization of the human behavior in order to define situations leading to intrusions, and (iii) characterization of the interfaces between the two subsystems, in order to identify situations which could lead to a radiological risk for man. The method, applied to performance assessment for landfill of uranium mill tailings, has led to one reference scenario, and five altered scenarios taking into account specific landfill evolutions such as loss of covering or loss of integrity of the dike, and human intrusions such as housing on the site of landfill or excavation of the site. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  20. Prediction of landfill leachate amount using HELP model Case study: Semnan landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghavidel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Objectives:. Owing to the non-seperated municipal solid wastes the leachate form in land fills contain high amounts of heavy metalls and toxic substances Hence, leachate treatment is a serious problem. In order to design leachate treatment and collection systems, estimation of quality and quantity of leachate is of high necessity. Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP Model was used to estimate leachate generation in the lined landfill cells for a variety of conditions. The HELP program is a quasi-two-dimensional hydrologic model for conducting water balance analysis of landfills, cover systems, and other solid waste containment facilities. In this paper HELP program is used to predict leachate generating in Semnan landfill after its operational life."nMaterials and Methods: HELP model use weather, soil and design data to estimate leachate quantity. The meteorological data were obtained from semnan Atmospheric Data Centre. Soil mechanics examinations in the landfill area were applied to achieve soil data. In addition, design parameters were based on Semnan landfill design specifications. Semnan landfill capacity is designed so as to accommodate municipal solid wastes generated during the next 25 years."nResults: In this study result indicated that precipitation and evapotranspiration has the most influenced on leachate generation increase and decrease, respectively. 82% of annual precipitation isn't percolated into Semnan landfill due to evapotranspiration. HELP Model simulations were indicated that the maximum and average value of leachate height above barrier layer is 36 and 3mm,respectively."nConclusion: Semnan landfill is designed under minimum standard condition. Therefore, low height of leachate generated is due to area weather. The precipitation amount is low while the evapotranspiration amount is high in this area. High evapotranspiration is due to high temperature and solar radiation in Semnan

  1. Reduction of methane emission from landfills using bio-mitigation systems – from lab tests to full scale implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    open or closed bed biofilter systems. The objective of this paper is to describe the relationship between research on process understanding of the oxidation of landfill gas contained methane and the up-scale to full bio-mitigation systems implemented at landfills. The oxidation of methane is controlled......Landfills are significant sources of methane, which contributes to climate change. As an alternative to mitigation by gas utilization systems, bio-mitigation systems may be implemented. Such systems are based on microbial methane oxidation in full surface biological covers, so-called biocovers, or...... by several environmental factors such as soil texture, temperature, soil moisture content, methane and oxygen supply, and nutrients, and both soils and compost materials have been shown to exhibit high methane oxidation rates. For compost materials high methane oxidation is observed even during cold...

  2. Back to nature: A more natural alternative to the PTFE covered stent: Twenty-two years in the making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Richard R

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of easily deployed covered stents has made PCI safer. The homemade venous and PTFE covered stent were effective but not practical for sealing perforations. The novel pericardial covered stent graft goes back to a more natural covering and is more easily deployed. PMID:26994981

  3. USE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS AS BIOCHEMICAL REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) from the nation is managed predominantly in anitary landfills. ue to the physical, chemical and biological makeup f he aste he landfill acts as a biochemical reactor and degrades the organic matter. urrent practices are to use covers and liners as engi...

  4. Assessment of the Spatial Variability in Leachate Migration from an Old Landfill Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Winther, Pia;

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of the pollution of groundwater from old landfills have in most cases focused on delineating the pollution plume and only in very few cases on the landfill as a source to groundwater pollution. Landfills often cover large areas. Spatial variations in leachate composition may have...... great impact on the location of the main pollution plume in the downstream aquifer. Grindsted landfill in Denmark was investigated by sampling leachate beneath the landfill and in groundwater at the borders of the landfill. A pronounced variability in leachate quality and leakage patterns from the...

  5. The aspects of fire safety at landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshina Tat'yana Anatol'evna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting with 2008 and till 2013 there have been alarm messages about fires occurring at landfill places in Russia. Landfill fires are especially dangerous as they emit dangerous fumes from the combustion of the wide range of materials within the landfill. Subsurface landfill fires, unlike typical fires, cannot be put out with water. The article includes the analysis of the sources and causes of conflagrations at landfills. There maintains the necessity to eliminate the reasons, which cause the fires. There are quantification indices of environmental, social and economic effects of fires at landfills all over Russia. Surface fires generally burn at relatively low temperatures and are characterized by the emission of dense white smoke and the products of incomplete combustion. The smoke includes irritating agents, such as organic acids and other compounds. Higher temperature fires can cause the breakdown of volatile compounds, which emit dense black smoke. Surface fires are classified as either accidental or deliberate. For the ecologic security there is a need in the execution of proper hygienic requirements to the content of the places as well as international recommendations. In addition to the burning and explosion hazards posed by landfill fires, smoke and other by-products of landfill fires also present a health risk to firefighters and others exposed to them. Smoke from landfill fires generally contains particulate matter (the products of incomplete combustion of the fuel source, which can aggravate pre-existing pulmonary conditions or cause respiratory distress and damage ecosystem. The monitoring of conducting preventive inflamings and transition to alternative, environment friendly methods of waste disposal is needed.

  6. The Department of Energy's involvement with power generation from landfill gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the UK Dept. of Energy's involvement with landfill gas since the early days of landfill gas exploitation to the present. Topics covered include resource assessment, abstraction and management technology, and emissions and environmental studies. The future programme is also outlined and the current status of the Non-Fossil Fuels obligation in landfill gas is described. (UK)

  7. 78 FR 14773 - U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit-Landfill Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... Covers (i) Landfill Control Systems For purposes of participation in the Toolkit, ``United States... International Trade Administration U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit--Landfill Standards AGENCY... landfill environmental standards. The Department of Commerce continues to develop the web-based...

  8. Quantification of methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills using the mobile tracer dispersion method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    chosen to represent the different stages of the lifetime of a landfill, including open, active, and closed covered landfills, as well as those with and without gas extraction for utilisation or flaring. Measurements also included landfills with biocover for oxidizing any fugitive methane. Methane...... emission rates ranged from 2.6 to 60.8 kg h(-1), corresponding to 0.7-13.2 g m(-2) d(-1), with the largest emission rates per area coming from landfills with malfunctioning gas extraction systems installed, and the smallest emission rates from landfills closed decades ago and landfills with an engineered...... biocover installed. Landfills with gas collection and recovery systems had a recovery efficiency of 41-81%. Landfills where shredder waste was deposited showed significant methane emissions, with the largest emission from newly deposited shredder waste. The average methane emission from the landfills was...

  9. Geosynthetic applications in landfill design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are designed to contain waste and to provide protection against discharges of leachate into the environment. Main components of a landfill include a liner system, a leachate collection system, and a cover system. Traditional designs have typically incorporated clay soils for containment and sands with embedded piping for leachate collection. As a result of recent advances in design, geosynthetic materials are now widely used for components. While these materials present cost and feasibility advantages, they also pose significant challenges in stability evaluations, handing during installation, and quality assurance. This paper presents an overview of applications of geosynthetics in design and construction, including: Advantages, disadvantages, design criteria, possible economic benefits of various systems, and related construction considerations. 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Characterization of an old municipal landfill (Grindsted, Denmark) as a groundwater pollution source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Grundtvig, Aase; Winther, Pia;

    1998-01-01

    Investigations into the pollution of groundwater from old landfill have, in most cases, focused on delineating the pollution plume rather than on the landfill as a source of groundwater pollution. Landfills often cover large areas and spatial variations in leachate composition within the landfill...... variations in leachate composition are very important for locating the main source of the groundwater pollution and for selection of cost-effective remedial action activities.......Investigations into the pollution of groundwater from old landfill have, in most cases, focused on delineating the pollution plume rather than on the landfill as a source of groundwater pollution. Landfills often cover large areas and spatial variations in leachate composition within the landfill...... were evaluated. A pronounced variability in leachate composition was observed in the 31 leachate wells installed through the waste. The spatial variability was analysed by statistical methods, and a semivariogram model was able to describe the variability both on small and large scale. The spatial...

  11. Space monitoring of municipal solid waste landfills in Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skakova, Olga; Shagarova, Lyudmila

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are special facilities designed for waste isolation and disposal ensuring sanitary and epidemiological safety of population. A solid waste landfill is a complex object with its own specific features. Modern remote-sensing methods are an indispensable source of information for the analysis of space images of solid waste landfills in Kazakhstan. Space monitoring of solid waste landfills includes the following tasks: 1. Identification and mapping of landfill areas according to the data of remote earth sensing. 2. Studying of energy and structural characteristics of landfills based on remote sensing data. 3. Analysis of the state of landfills based on a comparison of current and archive remote sensing data. Space monitoring of territories of municipal solid waste landfills uses modern computer technologies. They include satellite imagery combined with sub-satellite research, as well as other sources of information used for identification and mapping of landfill territories. Investigation of municipal solid waste landfills requires targeted survey of landfill areas, remote sensing using operational and archival data including theoretical foundations of physical optics and statistical data. Processing of digital satellite information uses methods of pattern recognition, automated image processing and correlation analysis. Based on spectral energy and textural characteristics of municipal solid waste landfills obtained by remote sensing methods, the technology of space monitoring of landfill areas, including landfill recognition and characterization of solid waste landfills from remote observations was developed. Monitoring of MSW landfills uses satellite images of ultrahigh and medium spatial resolution. Medium-resolution images are used to determine temperature, vegetation cover and soil degradation. High-resolution images are used to detect landfills, to determine forms of soil degradation, to calculate geometrical parameters, and

  12. Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill permit application. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both nonhazardous and nonradioactive sanitary solid waste are generated at the Hanford Site. This permit application describes the manner in which the Solid Waste Landfill will be operated. A description is provided of the landfill, including applicable locational, general facility, and landfilling standards. The characteristics and quantity of the waste disposed of are discussed. The regional and site geology and hydrology and the groundwater and vadose zone quality beneath the landfill are reviewed. A plan is included of operation, closure, and postclosure. This report addresses the operational cover, environmental controls, personnel requirements, inspections, recordkeeping, reporting, and site security. The integration of closure and postclosure activities between the Solid Waste Landfill and adjacent Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill is discussed

  13. Emissions and leachate recycling at Seutula landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    for the changes in landfill are to build a new horizontal gas collection pipe system to make the gas collecting system more effective. Also the leachate recirculation system should be built more effective and the recirculation pipes should be dug into the ground to allow the use of the system also in wintertime. It would be good to pay more attention to optimize the gas collection. Using biogas as a fuel for vehicles would be a good alternative especially in summertime when there is no other use for it. (orig.)

  14. Methane oxidation kinetics of bio-cover sewage sludge modified by coal ash for landfill%垃圾填埋场覆盖材料改性污泥的甲烷氧化动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 赵玲; 尹平河; 肖娟宜; 黄思明

    2012-01-01

    在实验室模拟条件下,以粉煤灰改性污泥为垃圾填埋场生物覆盖材料,分析了初始甲烷浓度、初始氧气浓度对甲烷氧化效率的影响,并测定了甲烷氧化动力学方程及动力学参数,旨在为材料实际工程应用提供理论依据.结果表明:初始CH4、O2浓度制约生物覆盖材料的甲烷氧化效率,初始CH4、O2浓度越高,材料甲烷氧化能力越强;甲烷氧化过程符合2级动力学方程-dV(CH4)/dt=kV(CH4)V(O2);利用Michaelis-Menten模型得出覆盖层材料的最大氧化速率Vmax为2.54 μmol g-1h-1,半速常数Km为0.49 μmol.%In this study, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out to examine the effects of initial methane and oxygen contents on methane oxidation efficiency in landfill bio-cover sewage sludge, and the kinetic equation and corresponding parameters were also determined, aiming to provide scientific basis for the practical engineering application. The results showed that the methane and oxygen contents strongly affected the methane oxidation efficiency. The higher methane and oxygen contents resulted in stronger methane oxidation efficiency. The kinetics of methane oxidation was - dV( CH4)/di = kV{ CH4 ) V( 02) , which fit the second-order reaction. As calculated from Michaelis-Menten equation, the largest methane oxidation rate ( Kmax ) was 2. 54 μmol g ‐ 1h‐ 1, and the half saturation constant ( Km ) was found at 0. 49 μmol.

  15. Evaluation of respiration in compost landfill biocovers intended for methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedicone, Alessio; Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-05-01

    A low-cost alternative approach to reduce landfill gas (LFG) emissions is to integrate compost into the landfill cover design in order to establish a biocover that is optimized for biological oxidation of methane (CH(4)). A laboratory and field investigation was performed to quantify respiration in an experimental compost biocover in terms of oxygen (O(2)) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) production and emission rates. O(2) consumption and CO(2) production rates were measured in batch and column experiments containing compost sampled from a landfill biowindow at Fakse landfill in Denmark. Column gas concentration profiles were compared to field measurements. Column studies simulating compost respiration in the biowindow showed average CO(2) production and O(2) consumption rates of 107 ± 14 gm(-2)d(-1) and 63 ± 12 gm(-2)d(-1), respectively. Gas profiles from the columns showed elevated CO(2) concentrations throughout the compost layer, and CO(2) concentrations exceeded 20% at a depth of 40 cm below the surface of the biowindow. Overall, the results showed that respiration of compost material placed in biowindows might generate significant CO(2) emissions. In landfill compost covers, methanotrophs carrying out CH(4) oxidation will compete for O(2) with other aerobic microorganisms. If the compost is not mature, a significant portion of the O(2) diffusing into the compost layer will be consumed by non-methanotrophs, thereby limiting CH(4) oxidation. The results of this study however also suggest that the consumption of O(2) in the compost due to aerobic respiration might increase over time as a result of the accumulation of biomass in the compost after prolonged exposure to CH(4). PMID:21292472

  16. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  17. REQUIREMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILL DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND CLOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This publication contains edited versions of the material presented at ten Technology Transfer seminars conducted in 1988 on this subject. Sections are included on design of clay and flexible membrane liners, leachate collector systems, and landfill covers. Construction quality a...

  18. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consists of page replacements for the Y-12 industrial waste landfill. The cover page is to replace the old page, and a new set of text pages are to replace the old ones. A replacement design drawing is also included

  19. Generating CO2-credits through landfill in situ aeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are some of the major anthropogenic sources of methane emissions worldwide. The installation and operation of gas extraction systems for many landfills in Europe and the US, often including technical installations for energy recovery, significantly reduced these emissions during the last decades. Residual landfill gas, however, is still continuously produced after the energy recovery became economically unattractive, thus resulting in ongoing methane emissions for many years. By landfill in situ aeration these methane emissions can be widely avoided both, during the aeration process as well as in the subsequent aftercare period. Based on model calculations and online monitoring data the amount of avoided CO2-eq. can be determined. For an in situ aerated landfill in northern Germany, acting as a case study, 83-95% (depending on the kind and quality of top cover) of the greenhouse gas emission potential could be reduced under strictly controlled conditions. Recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has approved a new methodology on the 'Avoidance of landfill gas emissions by in situ aeration of landfills' (). Based on this methodology landfill aeration projects might be considered for generation of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) in the course of CDM projects. This paper contributes towards an evaluation of the potential of landfill aeration for methane emissions reduction.

  20. Bioreactor landfill technology in municipal solid waste treatment: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Mudhoo, Ackmez

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, due to an advance in knowledge of landfill behaviour and decomposition processes of municipal solid waste, there has been a strong thrust to upgrade existing landfill technologies for optimizing these degradation processes and thereafter harness a maximum of the useful bioavailable matter in the form of higher landfill gas generation rates. Operating landfills as bioreactors for enhancing the stabilization of wastes is one such technology option that has been recently investigated and has already been in use in many countries. A few full-scale implementations of this novel technology are gaining momentum in landfill research and development activities. The publication of bioreactor landfill research has resulted in a wide pool of knowledge and useful engineering data. This review covers leachate recirculation and stabilization, nitrogen transformation and corresponding extensive laboratory- and pilot-scale research, the bioreactor landfill concept, the benefits to be derived from this bioreactor landfill technology, and the design and operational issues and research trends that form the basis of applied landfill research. PMID:20578971

  1. Assessment of the Spatial Variability in Leachate Migration from an Old Landfill Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Winther, Pia; Rügge, Kirsten; Pedersen, Jørn K.; Skov, Bent Henning; Foverskov, Anja; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    Investigations of the pollution of groundwater from old landfills have in most cases focused on delineating the pollution plume and only in very few cases on the landfill as a source to groundwater pollution. Landfills often cover large areas. Spatial variations in leachate composition may have...... great impact on the location of the main pollution plume in the downstream aquifer. Grindsted landfill in Denmark was investigated by sampling leachate beneath the landfill and in groundwater at the borders of the landfill. A pronounced variability in leachate quality and leakage patterns from the...... landfill was observed. Also variations in local groundwater flow directions were found. These observations are very important for delineation of the groundwater pollution and for proper choice of remedial action activities, related both to the plume and to the landfill....

  2. Aerially seeding cover crops in the northern US Corn Belt: Limitations, future research needs, and alternative practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introducing cover crops into the corn-soybean rotation is one way to improve soil quality and reduce soil and nutrient losses. However, successful establishment after harvest of the main crop is highly unpredictable as a result of the short growing season in the northern US Corn Belt. Aerial applica...

  3. Landfill gas management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of landfill gas (LFG) is the inevitable consequence of the disposal of any biodegradable waste in a landfill. While controlled landfill techniques provide an environmentally acceptable method for disposing of the community's solid waste at a significant lower cost than other methods, there is a need to control LFG to minimise environmental impact and possible public safety hazards. This paper presents a brief discussion of the mechanisms of LFG formation, its composition and factors affecting its generation rate. The total contribution to greenhouse gases directly attributable to landfill gas (mainly CH4 and CO2) is estimated at 1.4% but it is considered to be potentially a controlable source. 6 refs., 1 tab

  4. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with

  5. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion

  6. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeremy W F; Crest, Marion; Barlaz, Morton A; Spokas, Kurt A; Kerman, Anna; Yuan, Lei

    2012-12-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers. PMID:22884579

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 9/17/2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

    2002-05-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 5 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 5 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 05-16-01, Landfill; 06-08-01, Landfill; 06-15-02, Sanitary Landfill; 06-15-03, Sanitary Landfill; 12-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 20-15-01, Landfill; 23-15-03, Disposal Site. Located between Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 5 consists of unlined landfills used in support of disposal operations between 1952 and 1992. Large volumes of solid waste were produced from the projects which used the CAU 5 landfills. Waste disposed in these landfills may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. During the 1992 to 1995 time frame, the NTS was used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. Instead of managing solid waste at one or two disposal sites, the practice on the NTS was to dispose of solid waste in the vicinity of the project. A review of historical documentation, process knowledge, personal interviews, and inferred activities associated with this CAU identified the following as potential contaminants of concern: volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range organics), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Metals, plus nickel and zinc. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution

  8. Sustainable Approach for Landfill Management at Final Processing Site Cikundul in Sukabumi City, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Darwati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main problem of landfill management in Indonesia is the difficulty in getting a location for Final Processing Sites (FPS due to limited land and high land prices. Besides, about 95% of existing landfills are uncontrolled dumping sites, which could potentially lead to water, soil and air pollution. Based on data from the Ministry of Environment (2010, The Act of the Republic of Indonesia Number 18 Year 2008 Concerning Solid Waste Management, prohibits open dumping at final processing sites and in ratification, the Local Governments have to convert the open dump sites into controlled or sanitary landfill. The Research Institute for Human Settlements has been conducting multi-year researches related to the rehabilitation of dumpsites toward sustainable landfill. The research methods are literature reviews, experiments, laboratory analysis and field observations. A pilot model of dumpsite rehabilitation was carried out in 2010 at the Final Processing Site at Cikundul in Sukabumi City, consisting of (1 mining landfill (2 construction of landfill cells in a former mining area with a semi aerobic landfill and an anaerobic landfill and (3 landfill operations using decomposed material from landfill mining as a soil cover. The purpose of the study is to develop a sustainable approach for landfill management and rehabilitation through landfill mining and implementation of semi aerobic landfill. Findings in the construction of landfill mining indicate that (1 the construction of landfill mining is constrained by leachate that is trapped in a pile of waste, therefore, the leachate needs to be pumped to leachate treatment installations, (2 the volume of waste excavation is expanding due to the high plastic content of about 26% in landfills (3 the potency of decomposed materials from landfill mining is 40–83% for landfill operations or greening.. The performance of landfill systems shows that leachate quality of semi aerobic landfill tends to be lower

  9. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić; Dubravko Domitrović; Želimir Veinović

    2007-01-01

    Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs) composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the lo...

  10. Feasibility of biological aerated filters (BAFs) for treating landfill leachate.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, Tom; Pollard, Simon J. T.; Cartmell, Elise

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia can be removed from landfill leachate through aerobic biological processes. The biological aerated filter (BAF) combines biological treatment and subsequent biomass separation in one reactor providing a small footprint alternative to conventional systems. Leachate from an operational landfill was found to be aerobically treatable using the OECD recommended Modified Zahn- Wellens test. This leachate was used as feed to a pilot-scale BAF at influent COD and ammoniacal-...

  11. Public health and landfill sites

    OpenAIRE

    Staines, Anthony; Crowley, D.; Bruen, M.; O'Connor, P.

    2004-01-01

    Landfill management is a complex discipline, requiring very high levels of organisation, and considerable investment. Until the early 1990’s most Irish landfill sites were not managed to modern standards. Illegal landfill sites are, of course, usually not managed at all. Landfills are very active. The traditional idea of ‘put it in the ground and forget about it’ is entirely misleading. There is a lot of chemical and biological activity underground. This produces complex changes in the che...

  12. Approaches to assess biocover performance on landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber-Humer, M; Röder, S; Lechner, P

    2009-07-01

    Methane emissions from active or closed landfills can be reduced by means of methane oxidation enhanced in properly designed landfill covers, known as "biocovers". Biocovers usually consist of a coarse gas distribution layer to balance gas fluxes placed beneath an appropriate substrate layer. The application of such covers implies use of measurement methods and evaluation approaches, both during the planning stage and throughout the operation of biocovers in order to demonstrate their efficiency. Principally, various techniques, commonly used to monitor landfill surface emissions, can be applied to control biocovers. However, particularly when using engineered materials such as compost substrates, biocovers often feature several altered, specific properties when compared to conventional covers, e.g., respect to gas permeability, physical parameters including water retention capacity and texture, and methane oxidation activity. Therefore, existing measuring methods should be carefully evaluated or even modified prior to application on biocovers. This paper discusses possible strategies to be applied in monitoring biocover functionality. On the basis of experiences derived from investigations and large-scale field trials with compost biocovers in Austria, an assessment approach has been developed. A conceptual draft for monitoring biocover performance and recommendations for practical application are presented. PMID:19282167

  13. Performance-based Criteria for the Control of GCBs in Landfill Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Guyonnet, D; Touze, N.; Didier, G.; Norotte, V.; Pothier, C.; Blanc, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    While geosynthetic clay barriers (GCBs) are commonly used in landfill applications, it is well known that their hydraulic properties may deteriorate over time as a result of ion exchange following contact with various types of fluids (rainwater that has percolated through a landfill cover, landfill leachate, etc.). The potential for evolution of GCB hydraulic properties is typically assessed using oedopermeameter (oedometer permeability tests), but such tests are very timeconsuming and there ...

  14. Landfill Mining of Shredder Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jette Bjerre; Hyks, Jiri; Shabeer Ahmed, Nassera;

    In Denmark, shredder residues (SR) are classified as hazardous waste and until January 2012 the all SR were landfilled. It is estimated that more than 1.8 million tons of SR have been landfilled in mono cells. This paper describes investigations conducted at two Danish landfills. SR were excavated...

  15. The influence of atmospheric pressure on landfill methane emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane (CH4) emissions to the atmosphere in the United States. However, few measurements of whole landfill CH4 emissions have been reported. Here, we present the results of a multi-season study of whole landfill CH4 emissions using atmospheric tracer methods at the Nashua, New Hampshire Municipal landfill in the northeastern United States. The measurement data include 12 individual emission tests, each test consisting of 5-8 plume measurements. Measured emissions were negatively correlated with surface atmospheric pressure and ranged from 7.3 to 26.5 m3 CH4 min-1. A simple regression model of our results was used to calculate an annual emission rate of 8.4x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These data, along with CH4 oxidation estimates based on emitted landfill gas isotopic characteristics and gas collection data, were used to estimate annual CH4 generation at this landfill. A reported gas collection rate of 7.1x106 m3 CH4 year-1 and an estimated annual rate of CH4 oxidation by cover soils of 1.2x106 m3 CH4 year-1 resulted in a calculated annual CH4 generation rate of 16.7x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These results underscore the necessity of understanding a landfill's dynamic environment before assessing long-term emissions potential

  16. Landfill mining: A critical review of two decades of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We analyze two decades of landfill mining research regarding trends and topics. ► So far landfill mining has mainly been used to solve waste management issues. ► A new perspective on landfills as resource reservoirs is emerging. ► The potential of resource extraction from landfills is significant. ► We outline several key challenges for realization of resource extraction from landfills. - Abstract: Landfills have historically been seen as the ultimate solution for storing waste at minimum cost. It is now a well-known fact that such deposits have related implications such as long-term methane emissions, local pollution concerns, settling issues and limitations on urban development. Landfill mining has been suggested as a strategy to address such problems, and in principle means the excavation, processing, treatment and/or recycling of deposited materials. This study involves a literature review on landfill mining covering a meta-analysis of the main trends, objectives, topics and findings in 39 research papers published during the period 1988–2008. The results show that, so far, landfill mining has primarily been seen as a way to solve traditional management issues related to landfills such as lack of landfill space and local pollution concerns. Although most initiatives have involved some recovery of deposited resources, mainly cover soil and in some cases waste fuel, recycling efforts have often been largely secondary. Typically, simple soil excavation and screening equipment have therefore been applied, often demonstrating moderate performance in obtaining marketable recyclables. Several worldwide changes and recent research findings indicate the emergence of a new perspective on landfills as reservoirs for resource extraction. Although the potential of this approach appears significant, it is argued that facilitating implementation involves a number of research challenges in terms of technology innovation, clarifying the conditions for

  17. LCA and economic evaluation of landfill leachate and gas technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Manfredi, Simone; Merrild, Hanna Kristina;

    2011-01-01

    significant amount of landfill gas. Leachate controls may include bottom liners and leachate collection systems as well as leachate treatment prior to discharge to surface water. Gas controls may include oxidizing top covers, gas collection systems with flares or gas utilization systems for production of......-effective in reducing the impact from a conventional landfill. This was done by modeling landfills ranging from a simple open dump to highly engineered conventional landfills with energy recovery in form of heat or electricity. The modeling was done in the waste LCA model EASEWASTE. The results showed drastic...... improvements for most impact categories. Global warming went from an impact of 0.1 person equivalent (PE) for the dump to −0.05 PE for the best design. Similar improvements were found for photochemical ozone formation (0.02 PE to 0.002 PE) and stratospheric ozone formation (0.04 PE to 0.001 PE).For the toxic...

  18. Environmental Planning Strategies for Optimum Solid Waste Landfill Siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of environmental planning tools for optimum solid waste landfill siting taking into account all environmental implications was carried out by applying Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) to enhance the research information obtained from initial analysis using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The objective of this study is to identify the most eco-friendly landfill site by conducting a LCA analysis upon 5 potential GIS generated sites which incorporated eleven important criteria related to the social, environmental, and economical factors. The LCA analysis utilized the daily distance covered by collection trucks among the 5 selected landfill sites to generate inventory data on total energy usage for each landfill sites. The planning and selection of the potential sites were facilitated after conducting environmental impact analysis upon the inventory data which showed the least environmental impact. (author)

  19. Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: The semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakley, Stewart M., E-mail: soakley@csuchico.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Chico State University, California State University, Chico, CA 95929 (United States); Jimenez, Ramon, E-mail: rjimenez1958@yahoo.com [Public Works, Municipality of Villanueva, Cortes (Honduras)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open dumping is the most common form of waste disposal in neglected small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Semi-mechanized landfills can be a sustainable option for small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the theory of design and operation of semi-mechanized landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Villanueva, Honduras has operated its semi-mechanized landfill for 15 years. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cost of operation is US$4.60/ton with a land requirement of 0.2m{sup 2}/person-year. - Abstract: Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country's total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1-3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in

  20. Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: The semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Open dumping is the most common form of waste disposal in neglected small cities. ► Semi-mechanized landfills can be a sustainable option for small cities. ► We present the theory of design and operation of semi-mechanized landfills. ► Villanueva, Honduras has operated its semi-mechanized landfill for 15 years. ► The cost of operation is US$4.60/ton with a land requirement of 0.2m2/person-year. - Abstract: Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country’s total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1–3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in Villanueva has operated for 15 years, using a total land area of approximately 11 ha for a population that grew from 23,000 to 48,000, with

  1. Financing landfill gas projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of financing landfill gas projects in the UK in the last few years are discussed. The approach of the author in setting up a company to finance such projects in the power generation field and a separate company to design and supply turnkey packages is reported. (UK)

  2. Note on liners for containment of Leachate in sanitary landfills to enhance sustainable environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGE, O.O

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Leachate from waste degradation creep to neighboring natural soil and water bodies in undersigned landfills and impairs the quality of environment expose to man. This paper deals with the selection of materials for sealing layers in sanitary landfills. This layer is the most critical component of landfills top and bottom covers. Commonly used liners in sanitary landfills are compacted natural low permeability clayey soils, geosynthetic materials or combination of the two. Geotechnical conditions for natural soils to be useful as liners are also presented.

  3. Environmental risks and problems of the optimal management of an oil shale semi-coke and ash landfill in Kohtla-Järve, Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallner, Leo; Gavrilova, Olga; Vilu, Raivo

    2015-08-15

    The main wastes of the Estonian shale oil industry - oil shale semi-coke and ashes - are deposited in landfills. The Kohtla-Järve oil shale semi-coke and ash landfill, which is likely the largest of its kind in the World, was started in 1938. The environmental risks connected with the landfill were assessed and prioritized. The most significant hazard to human health is emission of harmful landfill gases and the water contamination in the local river network is harmful for aqueous organisms. The spatial expansion of subsurface contamination predicted by the groundwater transport model completed is practically insignificant from the viewpoint of health services. The landfill's leachates must be captured and purified, and the closed part of the landfill should be covered by greenery. The partial landfill capping recently executed is useless. The EU Landfill Directive requirements imposed on the hydraulic resistance of geological barriers cannot prevent the leakage of contaminants from a landfill. PMID:25930241

  4. Observations on the methane oxidation capacity of landfill soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, Jeffrey; Abichou, Tarek; Langford, Claire; Spokas, Kurt; Hater, Gary; Green, Roger; Goldsmith, Doug; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of CH(4) loading to a landfill cover in the control of CH(4) oxidation rate (gCH(4)m(-2)d(-1)) and CH(4) oxidation efficiency (% CH(4) oxidation) in a field setting. Specifically, we wanted to assess how much CH(4) a cover soil could handle. To achieve this objective we conducted synoptic measurements of landfill CH(4) emission and CH(4) oxidation in a single season at two Southeastern USA landfills. We hypothesized that percent oxidation would be greatest at sites of low CH(4) emission and would decrease as CH(4) emission rates increased. The trends in the experimental results were then compared to the predictions of two differing numerical models designed to simulate gas transport in landfill covers, one by modeling transport by diffusion only and the second allowing both advection and diffusion. In both field measurements and in modeling, we found that percent oxidation is a decreasing exponential function of the total CH(4) flux rate (CH(4) loading) into the cover. When CH(4) is supplied, a cover's rate of CH(4) uptake (gCH(4)m(-2)d(-2)) is linear to a point, after which the system becomes saturated. Both field data and modeling results indicate that percent oxidation should not be considered as a constant value. Percent oxidation is a changing quantity and is a function of cover type, climatic conditions and CH(4) loading to the bottom of the cover. The data indicate that an effective way to increase the % oxidation of a landfill cover is to limit the amount of CH(4) delivered to it. PMID:20889326

  5. Control and monitoring of landfill gas underground migration at the City of Montreal sanitary landfill site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed paper covers the various aspects of control and monitoring of potential landfill gas (LFG) migration through soil voids or rock fractures at the City of Montreal sanitary landfill site. It depicts the social, geographical and geological context and presents a brief history of the landfill site. It describes the LFG collecting system and LFG migration monitoring equipment and programs. Finally it presents monitoring data taken over last few years. The landfill site is located in a well populated urban area. Since 1968, about 33 million metric tons of domestic and commercial waste have been buried in a former limestone quarry. Because of houses and buildings in the vicinity, 100 m in some locations, LFG underground migration is a major risk. LFG could indeed infiltrate buildings and reach explosive concentrations. So it must be controlled. The City of Montreal acquired the site in 1988 and has progressively built a LFG collecting system, composed of more than 288 vertical wells, to pump out of the landfill 280 million m3 of gas annually. To verify the efficiency of this system to minimize LFG underground migration, monitoring equipment and programs have also been designed and put into operation. The monitoring network, located all around the landfill area, is composed of 21 well nests automated to monitor presence of gas in the ground in real time. In addition, 55 individual wells, where manual measurements are made, are also available. To complete the monitoring program, some measurements are also taken in buildings, houses and underground utilities in the neighborhood of the site. Monitoring data show that LFG underground migration is well controlled. They also indicate significant decrease of migration over the years corresponding to improvements to the LFG collecting system

  6. Innovative in situ treatment approach for DOE Savannah River Site Sanitary Landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursuant to a settlement agreement reached between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site will be closed. This paper addresses the approach used to select the innovative in situ treatment alternative for the groundwater and the vadose zone associated with the landfill

  7. Evaluating Gas Emissions From Landfills – Which Methodologies Can Be Used?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Many methodologies exist to measure whole landfill methane emission as alternatives to imprecise estimation of the methane emission using existing landfill gas generation models. An overview of the different measurement methodologies is given, and suggestions to the most promising methodologies a...

  8. [Nitrous oxide emissions from municipal solid waste landfills and its measuring methodology: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Shao-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of three major greenhouse gases and the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Landfilling is the major approach for the treatment and disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW), while MSW landfills can be an important anthropogenic source for N2O emissions. Measurements at lab-scale and full-scale landfills have demonstrated that N2O can be emitted in substantial amounts in MSW landfills; however, a large variation in reported emission values exists. Currently, the mechanisms of N2O production and emission in landfills and its contribution to global warming are still lack of sufficient studies. Meanwhile, obtaining reliable N2O fluxes data in landfills remains a question with existing in-situ measurement techniques. This paper summarized relevant literature data on this issue and analyzed the potential production and emission mechanisms of N2O in traditional anaerobic sanitary landfill by dividing it into the MSW buried and the cover soil. The corresponding mechanisms in nitrogen removal bioreactor landfills were analyzed. Finally, the applicability of existing in-situ approaches measuring N2O fluxes in landfills, such as chamber and micrometeorological methods, was discussed and areas in which further research concerning N2O emissions in landfills was urgently required were proposed as well. PMID:25223043

  9. Detection and quantification of methane leakage from landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Aake; Maartensson, Stig-Goeran (Univ. of Gaevle, Gaevle (Sweden)); Meijer, Jan-Erik; Rosqvist, Haakan (NSR AB, Helsingborg (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this project was to detect gas leakage and to measure and quantify methane emission from landfills using modern remote sensing techniques. In this project, a handheld laser instrument and an IR camera were used. The overall objective was to develop cost-effective methods for detecting and quantifying methane emissions from landfills. There are many methods available for measuring the methane concentration in air, both from close-up and from long distances. Combined with the use of a tracer gas, the methane emission from entire landfills can be measured relatively accurately. A number of methods are used to detect leakage from parts of landfill surfaces, but there are few methods for quantifying leakage from sub-zones. Field measurements with the laser instrument and the IR camera were carried out at seven Swedish landfills and two landfills in France. The investigated surfaces at the Swedish landfills were divided into different zones, such as top surface, slope, crest and toe of slope. The field measurements in France were taken over entire landfills. The methane emission varied between the different landfills in the project, and also between the different landfill zones. The results from repeated field measurements indicated that a landfill with a final cap and a successful gas recovery system produces barely measurable emissions. The weak points at a landfill are generally slopes, including crests and toes of slopes. Where the covering of the waste is inadequate, leakage often occurs at lift joints and in areas where waste protrudes through the cover. Other weak points are deficiencies in the gas recovery system. Leachate systems can lead landfill gas and thereby cause methane leakage. Along with wind velocity and variations in atmospheric pressure, moisture content in the ground is an important factor that affects methane emissions from landfill surfaces. Results from field measurements of the same feature/surface at different points in time and

  10. Enhanced landfill mining - a future perspective of landfilling

    OpenAIRE

    GEYSEN, D; Jones, P.; Van Acker, K; Van Passel, S.; Crabs, M.; Eyckmans, J; De Blonde, M.; Vrancken, K.; Laenen, B.; Laevers, P.; Ballard, M.; Bijnens, S.; Sips, K.; Umans, L.; Roos, J.

    2009-01-01

    Governments and co-operations are aware of the fact that more sustainable consumption and production practices are required. Efforts are being made to produce less waste while increasing the recycling ratio. Concurrently, it is of importance to place landfilling in a sustainable context. The present paper discusses a novel concept where a landfill is no longer considered as a final solution but rather as a ‘temporary storage place, awaiting future valorisation’. Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM...

  11. Comparison between controlled landfill reactor and conditioned landfill bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Chen, Wan-Zhi; Song, Fu-Zhong; Li, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Qing

    2004-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. The laboratory-scale simulators of landfill reactors treating municipal solid wastes were studied, the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation, nutrient balance, pH value, moisture content and temperature on the rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) biodegradation were determined, and it indicated the optimum pH value, moisture content and temperature decomposing MSW. The results of waste biodegradation were compared with that of the leachate-recirculated landfill simulator and conservative sanitary landfill simulator. In the control experiment the antitheses of a decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was shown. An obvious enhancement of effective disposal from conservative sanitary landfill (CSL) simulator, to the leachate-recirculated landfill (LRL) simulator and to the conditioned bioreactor landfill (CBL) simulator would be noted, through displaying the compared results of solid waste settlement, heavy metal concentration in leachate, methane production rate, biogas composition, BOD and COD as well as their ratio. PMID:15559832

  12. Comparison between controlled landfill reactor and conditioned landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feng; CHEN Wan-zhi; SONG Fu-zhong; LI Xiao-peng; ZHANG Guo-qing

    2004-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. The results of laboratory-scale simulators of landfill reactors treating municipal solid wastes were studied, the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation, nutrient balance, pH value, moisture content and temperature on the rate of municipal solid waste(MSW) biodegradation were determined, and it indicated the optimum pH value, moisture content and temperature can used to decompose MSW. The results of waste biodegradation were compared with that of the simulators of the leachate-recirculated landfill and conservative sanitary landfill. In the control experiment the antitheses of a decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was shown, and heavy metals concentration was observed. An obvious enhancement of effective disposal from simulator of conservative sanitary landfill(CSL), to that of leachate-recirculated landfill(LRL) and to that of conditioned bioreactor landfill(CBL) would be noted, through displaying the compared results of solid waste settlement, heavy metal concentration in leachate, methane production rate, biogas composition, BOD and COD as well as their ratio.

  13. Assessing methods to estimate emissions of non-methane organic compounds from landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saquing, Jovita M.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Yazdani, Ramin;

    2014-01-01

    The non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emission rate is used to assess compliance with landfill gas emission regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). A recent USEPA Report (EPA/600/R-11/033) employed a ratio method to estimate speciated NMOC emissions (i.......e., individual NMOC emissions): speciated NMOC emissions=measured methane (CH4) emission multiplied by the ratio of individual NMOCs concentration relative to CH4 concentration (CNMOCs/CCH4) in the landfill header gas. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficacy of the ratio method in...... estimating speciated NMOC flux from landfills; (2) determine for what types of landfills the ratio method may be in error and why, using recent field data to quantify the spatial variation of (CNMOCs/CCH4) in landfills; and (3) formulate alternative models for estimating NMOC emissions from landfills for...

  14. Hazardous waste site assessment: Inactive landfill, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an investigation of an inactive landfill (Pit 6) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300. The primary objectives were to: collect and review background information pertaining to past waste disposal practices and previous environmental characterization studies; conduct a geophysical survey of the landfill area to locate the buried wastes; conduct a hydrogeologic investigation to provide additional data on the rate and direction of groundwater flow, the extent of any groundwater contamination, and to investigate the connection, if any, of the shallow groundwater beneath the landfill with the local drinking water supply; conduct a risk assessment to identify the degree of threat posed by the landfill to the public health and environment; compile a preliminary list of feasible long-term remedial action alternatives for the landfill; and develop a list of recommendations for any interim measures necessary at the landfill should the long-term remedial action plan be needed

  15. Landfill methane emission mitigation – How to construct and document a full‐scale biocover system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Landfills receiving organic wastes produce biogas (landfill gas – LFG) containing methane (CH4). Landfills are significant sources of methane, which contributes to climate change. As an alternative to gas utilization systems or as a follow‐on technology when a gas utilization system gets non......‐cost‐effective, bio‐mitigation systems may be implemented. Bio‐mitigation systems are defined here as systems based on microbial removal processes implemented at landfills to reduce emission of methane (or other harmful substances). In respect to CH4, experiments have documented that a very high methane oxidation...... rate can be obtained in soils, compost and other materials, high enough to significant reduce the methane emission from landfills. The process has been scaled up by DTU Environment to a full‐scale implemented technology at two Danish landfills. Now the Danish government has decided to establish bio...

  16. Quantitative option analysis for implementation and management of landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerestecioğlu, Merih

    2016-09-01

    The selection of the most feasible strategy for implementation of landfills is a challenging step. Potential implementation options of landfills cover a wide range, from conventional construction contracts to the concessions. Montenegro, seeking to improve the efficiency of the public services while maintaining affordability, was considering privatisation as a way to reduce public spending on service provision. In this study, to determine the most feasible model for construction and operation of a regional landfill, a quantitative risk analysis was implemented with four steps: (i) development of a global risk matrix; (ii) assignment of qualitative probabilities of occurrences and magnitude of impacts; (iii) determination of the risks to be mitigated, monitored, controlled or ignored; (iv) reduction of the main risk elements; and (v) incorporation of quantitative estimates of probability of occurrence and expected impact for each risk element in the reduced risk matrix. The evaluated scenarios were: (i) construction and operation of the regional landfill by the public sector; (ii) construction and operation of the landfill by private sector and transfer of the ownership to the public sector after a pre-defined period; and (iii) operation of the landfill by the private sector, without ownership. The quantitative risk assessment concluded that introduction of a public private partnership is not the most feasible option, unlike the common belief in several public institutions in developing countries. A management contract for the first years of operation was advised to be implemented, after which, a long term operating contract may follow. PMID:27354014

  17. Phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leachate emissions from landfill sites are of concern, primarily due to their toxic impact when released unchecked into the environment, and the potential for landfill sites to generate leachate for many hundreds of years following closure. Consequently, economically and environmentally sustainable disposal options are a priority in waste management. One potential option is the use of soil-plant based remediation schemes. In many cases, using either trees (including short rotation coppice) or grassland, phytoremediation of leachate has been successful. However, there are a significant number of examples where phytoremediation has failed. Typically, this failure can be ascribed to excessive leachate application and poor management due to a fundamental lack of understanding of the plant-soil system. On balance, with careful management, phytoremediation can be viewed as a sustainable, cost effective and environmentally sound option which is capable of treating 250 m3 ha-1 yr-1. However, these schemes have a requirement for large land areas and must be capable of responding to changes in leachate quality and quantity, problems of scheme establishment and maintenance, continual environmental monitoring and seasonal patterns of plant growth. Although the fundamental underpinning science is well understood, further work is required to create long-term predictive remediation models, full environmental impact assessments, a complete life-cycle analysis and economic analyses for a wide range of landfill scenarios

  18. From California dreaming to California data: Challenging historic models for landfill CH4 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Spokas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Improved quantification of diverse CH4 sources at the urban scale is needed to guide local GHG mitigation strategies in the Anthropocene. Herein, we focus on landfill CH4 emissions in California, challenging the current IPCC methodology which focuses on a climate dependency for landfill CH4 generation (methanogenesis, but does not explicitly consider climate or soil dependencies for emissions. Relying on a comprehensive California landfill database, a field-validated process-based model for landfill CH4 emissions (CALMIM, and select field measurements at 10 California sites with a variety of methods, we support the contrary position: Limited climate dependency for methanogenesis, but strong climate dependency for landfill CH4 emissions. Contrary to the historic IPCC empirical model for methanogenesis with kinetic constants related to climate, we demonstrate a simpler and more robust linear empirical relationship (r2 = 0.85; n=128 between waste mass and landfill biogas recovery [126 × 10-6 Nm3 CH4 hr-1 Mgwaste-1]. More interestingly, there are no statistically significant relationships with climate, site age, or status (open/closed for landfill biogas recovery. The current IPCC methodology does not consider soil or climate drivers for gaseous transport or seasonal methanotrophy in different cover soils. On the other hand, we illustrate strong climate and soil dependencies for landfill emissions—e.g., average intermediate cover emissions below 20 g CH4 m-2 d-1 when the site’s mean annual precipitation is >500 mm y-1. Thereby, for the California landfill CH4 inventory, the highest-emitting sites shift from landfills containing the largest mass of waste to sites dominated by intermediate cover types having a reduced rate of soil CH4 oxidation during the annual cycle. These differences have profound implications for developing more realistic, science-based urban and regional scale GHG inventories for landfill CH4 while reducing

  19. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID's success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories' Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque's and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ''dry'' soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Nineteenth Avenue Landfill, Phoenix, AZ. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 213-acre Nineteenth Avenue Landfill is in an industrial area of Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona. State permitted landfill operations were conducted from 1957 to 1979 during which time approximately nine million cubic yards of municipal refuse, solid and liquid industrial wastes, and some medical wastes and materials containing low levels of radioactivity were deposited in the landfill. The State ordered the landfill closed in 1979 due to the periodic inundation of the landfill by flood waters from the Salt River Channel. Subsequently, the city covered the site with fill, stockpiled soil for final capping, installed ground water monitoring wells, built berms around the landfill, and installed a methane gas collection system. The remedial action is designed to mitigate threats resulting from flooding of the landfill, which has occurred intermittently since 1965. The primary contaminants of concern in the soil/refuse include VOCs such as toluene and xylenes

  1. Pathway analysis for a contaminated landfill in Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Middlesex Municipal Landfill is located in Middlesex, New Jersey, about 29 km southwest of Newark, New Jersey. It is one of several properties in the Borrough of Middlesex and Township of Piscataway that have been identified as being radioactively contaminated as a result of work that was carried out on various uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores at the Middlesex Sampling Plant. Most of the contaminated properties have been cleaned up and the contaminated materials are being stored in a large interim storage pile at the sampling plant site. In 1948, during some renovations at the sampling plant, about 4,600 m/sup 3/ of excess soil contaminated with uranium ore was apparently transported and disposed in the landfill gully area next to Bound Brook. In 1961, the Atomic Energy Commission removed about 500 m/sup 3/ of near-surface radioactively contaminated material from the landfill and covered the area with 0.6 m of clean soil. From 1961 to 1974 (when the landfill was closed), an additional 2.4 to 3.0 m of fill material was placed in the landfill. Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the U.S. Department of Energy began excavating contaminated materials from the landfill in 1984. A total of 16,000 m/sup 3/ of landfill materials covering a 0.2-ha area was excavated, of which 11,000 m/sup 3/ was contaminated and has been transported to the nearby sampling plant site for interim storage

  2. Landfill mining: a critical review of two decades of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krook, Joakim; Svensson, Niclas; Eklund, Mats

    2012-03-01

    Landfills have historically been seen as the ultimate solution for storing waste at minimum cost. It is now a well-known fact that such deposits have related implications such as long-term methane emissions, local pollution concerns, settling issues and limitations on urban development. Landfill mining has been suggested as a strategy to address such problems, and in principle means the excavation, processing, treatment and/or recycling of deposited materials. This study involves a literature review on landfill mining covering a meta-analysis of the main trends, objectives, topics and findings in 39 research papers published during the period 1988-2008. The results show that, so far, landfill mining has primarily been seen as a way to solve traditional management issues related to landfills such as lack of landfill space and local pollution concerns. Although most initiatives have involved some recovery of deposited resources, mainly cover soil and in some cases waste fuel, recycling efforts have often been largely secondary. Typically, simple soil excavation and screening equipment have therefore been applied, often demonstrating moderate performance in obtaining marketable recyclables. Several worldwide changes and recent research findings indicate the emergence of a new perspective on landfills as reservoirs for resource extraction. Although the potential of this approach appears significant, it is argued that facilitating implementation involves a number of research challenges in terms of technology innovation, clarifying the conditions for realization and developing standardized frameworks for evaluating economic and environmental performance from a systems perspective. In order to address these challenges, a combination of applied and theoretical research is required. PMID:22083108

  3. Conceptual engineered cover design for the solar evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located outside of Denver, Colorado, operated several lined Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP) from 1953 until 1986 for the disposal of liquid radioactive and hazardous waste. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has signed an Interagency Agreement with the Colorado Department of Health and the US Environmental Protection Agency, agreeing to close the SEP through an Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action accelerated program. The DOE is considered an alternative: to consolidate contaminated liner materials, debris, and soil media under an engineered cover. The regulatory agencies may approve this alternative if DOE demonstrates that it would protect human health and the environment for a 1,000-yr period as required by the Colorado hazardous landfill siting regulations. The DOE utilized research results from the Hanford and Los Alamos sites to design an engineered cover for the SEP that would fulfill the regulatory requirements. This paper presents the conceptual design of the engineered cover

  4. Measuring Water in Bioreactor Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B.; Gallagher, V. N.; Imhoff, P. T.; Yazdani, R.; Chiu, P.

    2004-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. Maintaining optimal moisture conditions for waste degradation is perhaps the most important operational parameter in bioreactor landfills. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, methods are required to measure water within solid waste. However, there is no reliable method that can measure moisture content simply and accurately in the heterogeneous environment typical of landfills. While well drilling and analysis of solid waste samples is sometimes used to determine moisture content, this is an expensive, time-consuming, and destructive procedure. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone --- the partitioning tracer test (PTT) --- was evaluated for measuring water in solid waste in a full-scale bioreactor landfill in Yolo County, CA. Two field tests were conducted in different regions of an aerobic bioreactor landfill, with each test measuring water in ≈ 250 ft3 of solid waste. Tracers were injected through existing tubes inserted in the landfill, and tracer breakthrough curves were measured through time from the landfill's gas collection system. Gas samples were analyzed on site using a field-portable gas chromatograph and shipped offsite for more accurate laboratory analysis. In the center of the landfill, PTT measurements indicated that the fraction of the pore space filled with water

  5. Landfill gas management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas produced from solid waste landfills is one of the most significant sources of anthropogenic methane in Canada. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is 24.5 times more powerful than carbon dioxide by weight in terms of global climate change. Landfill gas recovery plays an important role in Canada's commitment to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by the year 2000 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Landfill gas is a potentially harmful emission that can be converted into a reliable environmentally-sustainable energy source used to generate electricity, fuel industries and heat buildings. The recovery and utilization of landfill gas is a win-win situation which makes good sense from local, regional and global perspectives. It provides the benefits of (1) reducing the release of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming; (2) limiting odors; (3) controlling damage to vegetation; (4) reducing risks from explosions, fires and asphyxiation; (5) converting a harmful emission into a reliable energy source; and (6) creating a potential source of revenue and profit. Canadian landfills generate about 1 million tons of methane every year; the equivalent energy of 9 million barrels of oil (eight oil super tankers), or enough energy to meet the annual heating needs of more than half a million Canadian homes. Currently, twenty-seven facilities recover and combust roughly 25% of the methane generated by Canadian landfills producing about 3.2 PJ (1015 Joules) of energy including 80 MW of electricity and direct fuel for nearby facilities (e.g., cement plants, gypsum board manufacturers, recycling facilities, greenhouses). This paper reviews landfill gas characteristics; environmental, health and safety impacts; landfill gas management in Canada; the costs of landfill gas recovery and utilization systems; and on-going projects on landfill gas utilization and flaring

  6. Modelling the behaviour of mechanical biological treatment outputs in landfills using the GasSim model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, S M; Bateson, T; Gronow, J R; Voulvoulis, N

    2010-03-15

    The pretreatment of the biodegradable components of municipal solid waste (MSW) has been suggested as a method of reducing landfill gas emissions. Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is the technology being developed to provide this reduction in biodegradability, either as an alternative to source segregated collection or for dealing with residual MSW which still contains high levels of biodegradable waste. The compost like outputs (CLOs) from MBT plants can be applied to land as a soil conditioner; treated to produce a solid recovered fuel (SRF) or landfilled. In this study the impact that landfilling of these CLOs will have on gaseous emissions is investigated. It is important that the gas production behaviour of landfilled waste is well understood, especially in European member states where the mitigation of gaseous emissions is a legal requirement. Results of an experiment carried out to characterise the biodegradable components of pretreated biowastes have been used with the GasSim model to predict the long term emissions behaviour of landfills accepting these wastes, in varying quantities. The landfill directive also enforces the mitigation of potential methane emissions from landfills, and the ability of landfill operators to capture gaseous emissions from low emitting landfills of the future is discussed, as well as new techniques that could be used for the mitigation of methane generation. PMID:20092874

  7. Performance of paper mill sludges as landfill capping material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moo-Young, H.K. Jr. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Zimmie, T.F. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The high cost of waste containment has sparked interest in low cost and effective strategies of containing wastes. Paper mill sludges have been effectively used as the impermeable barrier in landfill covers. Since paper mill sludges are viewed as a waste material, the sludge is given to the landfill owner at little or no cost. Thus, when a clay soil is not locally available to use as the impermeable barrier in a cover system, paper sludge barriers can save $20,000 to $50,000 per acre in construction costs. This study looks at the utilization and performance of blended and primary paper sludge as landfill capping material. To determine the effectiveness of paper sludge as an impermeable barrier layer, test pads were constructed to simulate a typical landfill cover with paper sludge and clay as the impermeable barrier and were monitored for infiltration rates for five years. Long-term hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the leachate generation rates of the test pads indicate that paper sludge provides an acceptable hydraulic barrier.

  8. Performance of paper mill sludges as landfill capping material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high cost of waste containment has sparked interest in low cost and effective strategies of containing wastes. Paper mill sludges have been effectively used as the impermeable barrier in landfill covers. Since paper mill sludges are viewed as a waste material, the sludge is given to the landfill owner at little or no cost. Thus, when a clay soil is not locally available to use as the impermeable barrier in a cover system, paper sludge barriers can save $20,000 to $50,000 per acre in construction costs. This study looks at the utilization and performance of blended and primary paper sludge as landfill capping material. To determine the effectiveness of paper sludge as an impermeable barrier layer, test pads were constructed to simulate a typical landfill cover with paper sludge and clay as the impermeable barrier and were monitored for infiltration rates for five years. Long-term hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the leachate generation rates of the test pads indicate that paper sludge provides an acceptable hydraulic barrier

  9. Product specific emissions from municipal solid waste landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Exner, Stephan; Jørgensen, Anne-Mette; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    1998-01-01

    different countries, composition of the product and physical/chemical/biological properties of waste product components) and output data (e.g. estimated emissions to atmosphere and water) are given for a fictive waste product made of representative types of components (toluene, cellulose, polyvinylchloride...... is significantly reduced in the presence of landfill top-cover, landfill gas combustion units and leachate treatment units. Generally, the sensitivity analysis shows good agreement between the relative proportions of various types of emissions (based on properties of the waste and properties of......This paper presents and verifies the computer tool LCA-LAND for estimation of emissions from specific waste products disposed in municipal solid waste landfills in European countries for use in the inventory analysis of LCA. Examples of input data (e.g. distribution of the waste product in...

  10. Characteristics of Leachate at Sukawinatan Landfill, Palembang, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Yusmartini, Eka; Setiabudidaya, Dedi; Ridwan; Marsi; Faizal

    2013-04-01

    Landfill (TPA) Sukawinatan Palembang is an open dumping system which covers an area of 25 hectares. This system may bring an environmental damage to the surrounding area because it does not provide leachate treatment. Leachate is the landfill waste that dissolves many compounds that contain pollutants from both organic substances and heavy metal origin. This paper presents the results of laboratory analysis on samples of leachate as well as shallow groundwater from the surrounding area. The results were compared to established quality standards to evaluate whether the leachate has influenced the quality of the shallow groundwater in the surrounding area. The results show that there are some indications that the quality of groundwater has been polluted by the leachate of both organic substances and heavy metals produced by the Sukawinatan landfill.

  11. Nitrification of Landfill Leachate by Biofilm Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Clabaugh, Matthew McConnell

    2001-01-01

    NITRIFICATION OF LANDFILL LEACHATE BY BIOFILM COLUMNS by Matthew M. Clabaugh J.T. Novak, Chairman Department of Environmental Engineering (ABSTRACT) Landfill leachate characteristics vary depending on the operation type of the landfill and the age of the landfill. At landfills operated as bioreactors, where leachate recirculation is practiced, leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations may accumulate to extremely higher levels than during single pass leaching, thereby requi...

  12. A national landfill methane budget for Sweden based on field measurements, and an evaluation of IPCC models

    OpenAIRE

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey; Adolfsson, Rolf; Galle, Bo; Svensson, Bo H.

    2011-01-01

    Seven Swedish landfills were investigated from 2001 to 2003. On each landfill, a measure of the total methane production was calculated from data on: (1) methane emissions (leakage); (2) methane oxidation and (3) from gas recovery. Methane emissions were determined via a tracer gas (N2O) release-based remote sensing method. N2O and CH4 were measured with an Fourier Transform infrared detector at a distance of more than 1 km downwind from the landfills. Methane oxidation in the landfill cover...

  13. A national landfill methane budget for Sweden based on field measurements, and an evaluation of IPCC models

    OpenAIRE

    Borjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey; Adolfsson, Rolf; Galle, Bo; Svensson, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Seven Swedish landfills were investigated from 2001 to 2003. On each landfill, a measure of the total methane production was calculated from data on: (1) methane emissions (leakage); (2) methane oxidation and (3) from gas recovery. Methane emissions were determined via a tracer gas (N2O) release-based remote sensing method. N2O and CH4 were measured with an Fourier Transform infrared detector at a distance of more than 1 km downwind from the landfills. Methane oxidation in the landfill covers...

  14. Landfill Mining: Prospecting metal in Gärstad landfill

    OpenAIRE

    Tanha, Ariana; Zarate, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    All processes in society produce waste. In nature, the waste is normally used as a resource for another process, but in human societies waste is often discarded. These discarded materials end up in places for depositing waste known as landfills. The increase in population, and humans’ tendency to improve their quality of life, has led to an increase in consumption of material. More material consumption means generating more waste, and more waste means bigger landfills. The increasing size of ...

  15. Landfill gas issues affecting the design and operation of waste to energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common location for waste to energy (WTE) facilities is adjacent to an existing landfill. This is an appropriate place to site WTE facilities, given that solid waste is already directed to the landfill site, and bypass refuse and ash generated by the WTE facility can readily be disposed at the existing landfill. Often, however, the existing landfill is unlined, and is generating landfill gas (LFG) in sufficient quantities and pressures to create lateral LFG migration. Such LFG migration must be addressed in the design of the WTE facility. LFG is composed of approximately equal parts of methane and carbon dioxide. Since methane is explosive under certain conditions, its accumulation within onsite structures must be controlled. Alternatives for LFG migration control include perimeter extraction systems, and active and passive subslab systems for individual facility buildings. In this paper advantages and disadvantages of the various control system types are discussed. LFG control and safety during plant construction also are addressed

  16. Potential for enhanced phytoremediation of landfills using biosolids--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Owens, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Despite the use of recyclable materials increasing worldwide, waste disposal to landfill remains the most common method of waste management because it is simple and relatively inexpensive. Although landfill disposal is an effective waste management system, if not managed correctly, a number of potential detrimental environmental impacts have been identified including soil and ground water contamination, leachate generation, and gas emissions. In particular, improper post-closure treatment of landfills or deterioration of the conventional clay landfill capping were shown to result in land degradation which required remediation to secure contaminants within the landfill site. Phytoremediation is an attractive technology for landfill remediation, as it can stabilize soil and simultaneously remediate landfill leachate. In addition, landfill phytoremediation systems can potentially be combined with landfill covers (Phytocapping) for hydrological control of infiltrated rainfall. However, for the successful application of any phytoremediation system, the effective establishment of appropriate, desired vegetation is critical. This is because the typically harsh and sterile nature of landfill capping soil limits the sustainable establishment of vegetation. Therefore, the physicochemical properties of landfill capping soils often need to be improved by incorporating soil amendments. Biosolids are a common soil amendment and will often meet these demanding conditions because they contain a variety of plant nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphate, potassium, as well as a large proportion of organic matter. Such amendment will also ameliorate the physical properties of the capping soils by increasing porosity, moisture content, and soil aggregation. Contaminants which potentially originate from biosolids will also be remediated by activities congruent with the establishment of plants and bacteria. PMID:19939550

  17. Landfill gas: planning and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no legislation in the UK that relates directly to landfill gas. However, various pieces of legislation do exist which control all aspects of landfill and therefore, indirectly, landfill gas. This legislation includes Planning Acts, The Control of Pollution Act, Health and Safety at Work Acts, and Public Health Acts, and affects landfill gas throughout the life of the site - from planning stage to long after the last load has been deposited and restoration has been carried out. Responsibility for ensuring compliance with these various Acts lies with a variety of Authorities, including Plannning Authorities, Waste Disposal Authorities, and Environmental Health Authorities. Responsibility for actual compliance with the Acts lies with the operator, for active sites, and the landowner in the case of closed sites. (author)

  18. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons[tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional

  19. Tracer method to measure landfill gas emissions from leachate collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredenslund, Anders M; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes a method developed for quantification of gas emissions from the leachate collection system at landfills and present emission data measured at two Danish landfills with no landfill gas collection systems in place: Fakse landfill and AV Miljø. Landfill top covers are often designed to prevent infiltration of water and thus are made from low permeable materials. At such sites a large part of the gas will often emit through other pathways such as the leachate collection system. These point releases of gaseous constituents from these locations cannot be measured using traditional flux chambers, which are often used to measure gas emissions from landfills. Comparing tracer measurements of methane (CH(4)) emissions from leachate systems at Fakse landfill and AV Miljø to measurements of total CH(4) emissions, it was found that approximately 47% (351 kg CH(4) d(-1)) and 27% (211 kg CH(4) d(-1)), respectively, of the CH(4) emitting from the sites occurred from the leachate collection systems. Emission rates observed from individual leachate collection wells at the two landfills ranged from 0.1 to 76 kg CH(4) d(-1). A strong influence on emission rates caused by rise and fall in atmospheric pressure was observed when continuously measuring emission from a leachate well over a week. Emission of CH(4) was one to two orders of magnitude higher during periods of decreasing pressure compared to periods of increasing pressure. PMID:20378325

  20. Utilization of ashes as construction materials in landfills; Askanvaendning i deponier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tham, Gustav [Telge AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Ifwer, Karin [AaF-Process AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    Large amounts of material will be needed to cover landfill sites in Sweden and other EU states over the next ten years. It is estimated that more than one hundred million tons of material will be required in Sweden alone in order to comply with the EU Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC). Suitable natural materials to be used in landfill cover constructions are not available on site. This report summarises the present use of secondary construction material in waste management with a focus on incineration ash. Information from eleven landfill sites has been compiled and includes the practical experience of using ash as the primary material in landfill cover. Other applications of using ash on landfill sites are also discussed. According to Swedish law, a complete cover of a landfill site consists of five different layers, each having its own specific function. The permeability of the total cover should then satisfy the permeability requirements of 50 litres per square meter and year for non-hazardous waste landfill sites and 5 litres per square meter and year for those with hazardous waste. The main purpose of this report is to describe how ash is used in the different layers and discuss the advantages or disadvantages of the techniques applied. Various landfill sites have submitted information ranging from small test areas on a pilot scale to full scale application of techniques on several hectares. Each project is part of the general Vaermeforsk research program for 2003-2005, Environmentally proper use of ash. The overall results show that incineration ash is a suitable material for use in liner constructions, either alone, or mixed with sewage sludge. Data from water percolating below the liner has indicated that the liners can meet permeability requirements. Special techniques for applying the various layers have been described. It is important to have materials readily available for an area, in order to avoid long period of exposure to dry or wet weather. Some

  1. LCA and economic evaluation of landfill leachate and gas technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Anders; Manfredi, Simone; Merrild, Hanna; Stensøe, Steen; Christensen, Thomas H

    2011-07-01

    Landfills receiving a mix of waste, including organics, have developed dramatically over the last 3-4 decades; from open dumps to engineered facilities with extensive controls on leachate and gas. The conventional municipal landfill will in most climates produce a highly contaminated leachate and a significant amount of landfill gas. Leachate controls may include bottom liners and leachate collection systems as well as leachate treatment prior to discharge to surface water. Gas controls may include oxidizing top covers, gas collection systems with flares or gas utilization systems for production of electricity and heat. The importance of leachate and gas control measures in reducing the overall environmental impact from a conventional landfill was assessed by life-cycle-assessment (LCA). The direct cost for the measures were also estimated providing a basis for assessing which measures are the most cost-effective in reducing the impact from a conventional landfill. This was done by modeling landfills ranging from a simple open dump to highly engineered conventional landfills with energy recovery in form of heat or electricity. The modeling was done in the waste LCA model EASEWASTE. The results showed drastic improvements for most impact categories. Global warming went from an impact of 0.1 person equivalent (PE) for the dump to -0.05 PE for the best design. Similar improvements were found for photochemical ozone formation (0.02 PE to 0.002 PE) and stratospheric ozone formation (0.04 PE to 0.001 PE). For the toxic and spoiled groundwater impact categories the trend is not as clear. The reason for this was that the load to the environment shifted as more technologies were used. For the dump landfill the main impacts were impacts for spoiled groundwater due to lack of leachate collection, 2.3 PE down to 0.4 PE when leachate is collected. However, at the same time, leachate collection causes a slight increase in eco-toxicity and human toxicity via water (0.007 E to 0

  2. GlobeLand30 as an alternative fine-scale global land cover map: Challenges, possibilities, and implications for developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokar Arsanjani, Jamal; Tayyebi, A.; Vaz, E.

    2016-01-01

    regional land cover maps for some areas such as Europe and North America has been greatly developed and very few temporal datasets exist, lack of such data for some regions specifically developing countries is evident. Although it seems global land cover maps such as MODIS could be a solution for mapping...... limited land cover information such as developing countries. In this study, we look at GlobeLand30 of 2010 for Iran in order to find out the accuracy of this dataset as well as its implications. By having looked at 6 selected study sites around larger cities representing dissimilar eco-regions covering......Global land cover maps are a vital source for mapping our globe into a set of thematic types. They have been extensively used as a basis layer for a large number of applications including ecosystem services, environmental planning, climate change, hydrological processes and policy making. While...

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Critical Factors for the Climate Impact of Landfill Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laner, David; Cencic, Oliver; Svensson, Niclas; Krook, Joakim

    2016-07-01

    Landfill mining has been proposed as an innovative strategy to mitigate environmental risks associated with landfills, to recover secondary raw materials and energy from the deposited waste, and to enable high-valued land uses at the site. The present study quantitatively assesses the importance of specific factors and conditions for the net contribution of landfill mining to global warming using a novel, set-based modeling approach and provides policy recommendations for facilitating the development of projects contributing to global warming mitigation. Building on life-cycle assessment, scenario modeling and sensitivity analysis methods are used to identify critical factors for the climate impact of landfill mining. The net contributions to global warming of the scenarios range from -1550 (saving) to 640 (burden) kg CO2e per Mg of excavated waste. Nearly 90% of the results' total variation can be explained by changes in four factors, namely the landfill gas management in the reference case (i.e., alternative to mining the landfill), the background energy system, the composition of the excavated waste, and the applied waste-to-energy technology. Based on the analyses, circumstances under which landfill mining should be prioritized or not are identified and sensitive parameters for the climate impact assessment of landfill mining are highlighted. PMID:27282202

  4. Landfill gas management facilities design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-03-15

    In British Columbia, municipal solid waste landfills generate over 1000 tonnes of methane per year; landfill gas management facilities are required to improve the environmental performance of solid waste landfills. The aim of this document, developed by the British Columbia Ministry of the Environment, is to provide guidance for the design, installation, and operation of landfill gas management facilities to address odor and pollutant emissions issues and also address health and safety issues. A review of technical experience and best practices in landfill gas management facilities was carried out, as was as a review of existing regulations related to landfill gas management all over the world. This paper provides useful information to landfill owners, operators, and other professionals for the design of landfill gas management facilities which meet the requirements of landfill gas management regulations.

  5. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Chanton, Jeffrey;

    2011-01-01

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH4) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called “biocovers”) to enhance biological...... oxidation of CH4. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH4 emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH4 oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000m2 were integrated into the existing cover at the 12ha site. To increase CH4 load to...... the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH4 was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of...

  6. Microbial methane oxidation processes and technologies for mitigation of landfill gas emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bogner, J.E.;

    2009-01-01

    Landfill gas containing methane is produced by anaerobic degradation of organic waste. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas and landfills are one of the major anthropogenic sources of atmospheric methane. Landfill methane may be oxidized by methanotrophic microorganisms in soils or waste materials...... utilizing oxygen that diffuses into the cover layer from the atmosphere. The methane oxidation process, which is governed by several environmental factors, can be exploited in engineered systems developed for methane emission mitigation. Mathematical models that account for methane oxidation can be used to...

  7. Aerobic in-vessel composting versus bioreactor landfilling using life cycle inventory models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabaraban, Maria T.I. [Xavier University, Ateneo de Cagayan, Chemical Engineering, Cagayan de Oro City (Philippines); Khire, Milind V. [Michigan State University, Civil and Environmental Engineering, A135 Engineering Research Complex, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alocilja, Evangelyn C. [Michigan State University, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, 204 Farrall Hall, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Potential environmental impacts associated with aerobic in-vessel composting and bioreactor landfilling were assessed using life cycle inventory (LCI) tool. LCI models for solid waste management (SWM) were also developed and used to compare environmental burdens of alternative SWM scenarios. Results from the LCI models showed that the estimated energy recovery from bioreactor landfilling was about 9.6 megajoules (MJ) per kilogram (kg) of waste. Air emissions from in-vessel composting contributed to a global warming potential (GWP) of 0.86 kg of CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kg of waste, compared to 1.54 kg of CO{sub 2}-equivalent from bioreactor landfill. Waterborne emissions contributing to aquatic toxicity is less coming from in-vessel composting than from bioreactor landfilling. However, emissions to air and water that contribute to human toxicity are greater for the composting option than for the landfill option. Full costs for in-vessel composting is about 6 times greater than for the landfilling alternative. Integration of individually collected commingled recyclables, yard wastes, and residual wastes with windrow composting and bioreactor landfilling produces airborne and waterborne emissions with the least environmental effects among the alternatives considered. It also yields greater energy savings due to the conversion of the landfill gas (LFG) to electrical energy than the option that diverts yard waste, food waste and soiled paper for aerobic in-vessel composting. However, this scenario costs 68% more than that where the commingled collection of wastes is integrated with in-vessel composting and conventional landfilling, owing to increased collection costs. (orig.)

  8. Performance analysis of energy recovery in an Italian municipal solid waste landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to assess the techno-economic viability of the use of fuel cell as an alternative technology for landfill gas energy recovery. The case of an Italian municipal solid waste landfill is analyzed. The landfill was opened in 1998 and in 2001 the energy recovery facility started operation. The current landfill gas conversion system is based on internal combustion engine technology. However, the drawbacks of internal combustion engine in terms of conversion efficiency and air emissions are widely acknowledged. Some authors have proposed molten carbonate fuel cell as one of the most interesting solution for landfill gas energy recovery for the near future. Fuel cells have proven capable of providing superior energy efficiency and environmental performance, but their widespread use is constrained by the capital cost required. Using actual data from the landfill, a comparison between the current energy recovery system and a hypothetical alternative solution based on molten carbonate fuel cell is performed. The analysis assesses the cost-effectiveness of the two solutions, considering also some environmental externalities usually not included in traditional economic assessment. The main strengths and weaknesses of the two landfill gas energy recovery systems are highlighted and some new insights into molten carbonate fuel cell overall sustainability are provided.

  9. Determination of the coefficient of uranium and thorium distribution in phosphogypsum for their use in sanitary landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Marcos Vinicius A.; Hama, Naruhiko; Jacomino, Vanusa M. F.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q.; Cota, Stela D. S., E-mail: mvmarchesi@hotmail.com, E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.br, E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.br, E-mail: ana.ladeira@cdtn.br, E-mail: naruhikohama@hotmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do; Taddei, Maria Helena, E-mail: pmarcos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas

    2013-07-01

    Phosphogypsum is a byproduct from the production of phosphoric acid, and contain radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids from phosphate rock. It represents a risk to the environment if improperly stored. Because it is composed mainly of dihydrated calcium sulphate, phosphogypsum can be used in anaerobic environments such as those found in landfills to accelerate microbial processes of decomposition of municipal solid waste and thus increase the life of these facilities. One of the options of your application being studied is the use of phosphogypsum replacing the covers of soil/clay in landfills. Besides reducing the demand for soil and clay, this application would be an alternative to disposal of the waste, since the alternatives are not sufficient for more than five million tons produced per year in Brazil. To ensure the safety of this application, the potential environmental impact of contaminants in phosphogypsum should be evaluated. The rate of leaching of contaminants are being studied by determining the coefficient of distribution of the contaminants in the phosphogypsum. Batch tests were performed by mixing different proportions of slurry and phosphogypsum. This work presents the results for the chain of uranium and natural thorium.

  10. Determination of the coefficient of uranium and thorium distribution in phosphogypsum for their use in sanitary landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum is a byproduct from the production of phosphoric acid, and contain radionuclides, heavy metals and metalloids from phosphate rock. It represents a risk to the environment if improperly stored. Because it is composed mainly of dihydrated calcium sulphate, phosphogypsum can be used in anaerobic environments such as those found in landfills to accelerate microbial processes of decomposition of municipal solid waste and thus increase the life of these facilities. One of the options of your application being studied is the use of phosphogypsum replacing the covers of soil/clay in landfills. Besides reducing the demand for soil and clay, this application would be an alternative to disposal of the waste, since the alternatives are not sufficient for more than five million tons produced per year in Brazil. To ensure the safety of this application, the potential environmental impact of contaminants in phosphogypsum should be evaluated. The rate of leaching of contaminants are being studied by determining the coefficient of distribution of the contaminants in the phosphogypsum. Batch tests were performed by mixing different proportions of slurry and phosphogypsum. This work presents the results for the chain of uranium and natural thorium

  11. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  12. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal

  13. The implications of alternative developer decision-making strategies on land-use and land-cover in an agent-based land market model

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, D C; Sun, S.; Filatova, T.; Magliocca, N.; Huang, Q; Brown, D. G.; Riolo, R.; R. Seppelt; et al

    2012-01-01

    Land developers play a key role in land-use and land cover change, as they directly make land development decisions and bridge the land and housing markets. Developers choose and purchase land from rural land owners, develop and subdivide land into parcel lots, build structures on lots, and sell houses to residential households. Developers determine the initial landscaping states of developed parcels, affecting the state and future trajectories of residential land cover, as well as land marke...

  14. Mercury air-borne emissions from 5 municipal solid waste landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. G.; Feng, X.; Li, P.; Liang, L.; Tang, S. L.; Wang, S. F.; Fu, X. W.; Qiu, G. L.; Shang, L. H.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed study on atmospheric mercury emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in China is necessary to understand mercury behavior in this source category, simply because China disposes of bulk MSW by landfilling and a large quantity of mercury enters into landfills. Between 2003 and 2006, mercury airborne emissions through different pathways, as well as mercury speciation in landfill gas (LFG) were measured at 5 MSW landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China. The results showed that mercury content in the substrate fundamentally affected the magnitude of mercury emissions, resulting in the highest emission rate (as high as 57 651 ng Hg m-2 h-1) at the working face and in un-covered waste areas, and the lowest measured at soil covers and vegetation areas (less than 20 ng Hg m-2 h-1). Meteorological parameters, especially solar radiation, influenced the diurnal pattern of mercury surface-air emissions. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) in LFG varied from 2.0 to 1406.0 ng m-3, monomethyl mercury (MMHg) and dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in LFG averaged at 1.93 and 9.21 ng m-3, and accounted for 0.51% and 1.79% of the TGM in the LFG, respectively. Total mercury emitted from the five landfills ranged from 17 to 3285 g yr-1, with the highest from the working face, then soil covering, and finally the vent pipes.

  15. Assessing the Role of Renewable Energy Policies in Landfill Gas Energy Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shanjun; Kyul Yoo, Han; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Palmer, Karen; Macauley, Molly K.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas and has a global warming potential at least 28 times as high as carbon dioxide. Municipal solid waste landfills are reported to be the third-largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, responsible for 18 percent of emissions in 2011. Capturing landfill gas for use as an energy source for electricity or heat produces alternative energy as well as environmental benefits. A host of federal and state policies encourag...

  16. Vinča landfill leachate characteristics prediction by the leaching method

    OpenAIRE

    Ćalić Nataša D.; Ristić Mirjana Đ.

    2006-01-01

    Under the newly implemented waste management policy in European Union countries, sanitary landfilling constitutes the fourth and the least preferred of the alternative management options for the disposal of solid urban wastes. Landfills generate emissions over long periods, often longer than a lifetime. The longest lasting emission is leachate: leachate production and management is now recognized as one of the greatest problems associated with the environmentally sound operation of sanitary l...

  17. A study of the structure in solid wastes and some implications for fluid flow in landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Caicedo, D.

    2013-01-01

    The search for alternative landfill operation and management strategies has triggered the development of the concept of a landfill as a bioreactor. The application of the concept requires the recirculation of liquids and hence a better understanding of fluid flow and transport processes that are strongly controlled by the physical structure of the media. It is generally accepted that as a result of the deposition in progressive layers, compaction and heterogeneity; solid waste develops a stro...

  18. State-of-the-art synthetic membrane for capping landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very Low Density Polyethylene (VLDPE) has emerged as a superior capping material for landfill closures. Landfills must be capped by a material which will undergo substantial deformation in areas of localized settlement prior to rupture. Methane and hydrogen sulfide gases must be contained and directed to collection points without permeating the landfill cap. Vegetative growth in the cover sods will be protected by the gas impermeability of the geosynthetic membrane. VLDPE compounded with carbon black is minimally affected by radiation and is inert to ultraviolet rays. This property sustains VLDPE's ability to retard gas permeation at levels superior to other geosynthetics. Cover soil stability on long cap slopes in all weather conditions is crucial. It has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in full-scale, on-site test conditions that VLDPE exhibits friction characteristics equaling or exceeding other synthetics used for this purpose without diminishing physical and chemical properties. Large-scale, multiaxial stress tests have demonstrated the ability of VLDPE to deflect substantially in all directions of a potential settlement area. Only PVC can equal the elastic deformation properties of VLDPE, but PVC is more gas-permeable susceptible to degradation due to natural soil radiation or ultraviolet light and heat. Test results are presented to illustrate these points. The geosynthetic cap membrane must prevent water percolation into the landfill to prevent the formation of hazardous leachates. The use of a VLDPE cap reduces the depth of cap soils, thus increasing landfill volume. The economics and reduction in long-term liabilities of closure costs are enhanced by the use of VLDPE in the cap system. Since the expected half-life of polyethylene exceeds hundreds of years, the inclusion of VLDPE in the cap system will provide pollution security for many generations

  19. Evaluation Of Landfill Gas Decay Constant For Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Operated As Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediction of the rate of gas production from bioreactor landfills is important to optimize energy recovery and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions. Landfill gas (LFG) composition and flow rate were monitored for four years for a conventional and two bioreactor landfill landfil...

  20. Landfill aeration for emission control before and during landfill mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello; Heerenklage, Joern; Pivato, Alberto; Ritzkowski, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The landfill of Modena, in northern Italy, is now crossed by the new high velocity railway line connecting Milan and Bologna. Waste was completely removed from a part of the landfill and a trench for the train line was built. With the aim of facilitating excavation and further disposal of the material extracted, suitable measures were defined. In order to prevent undesired emissions into the excavation area, the aerobic in situ stabilisation by means of the Airflow technology took place before and during the Landfill Mining. Specific project features involved the pneumatic leachate extraction from the aeration wells (to keep the leachate table low inside the landfill and increase the volume of waste available for air migration) and the controlled moisture addition into a limited zone, for a preliminary evaluation of the effects on process enhancement. Waste and leachate were periodically sampled in the landfill during the aeration before the excavation, for quality assessment over time; the evolution of biogas composition in the landfill body and in the extraction system for different plant set-ups during the project was monitored, with specific focus on uncontrolled migration into the excavation area. Waste biological stability significantly increased during the aeration (waste respiration index dropped to 33% of the initial value after six months). Leachate head decreased from 4 to 1.5m; leachate recirculation tests proved the beneficial effects of moisture addition on temperature control, without hampering waste aerobization. Proper management of the aeration plant enabled the minimization of uncontrolled biogas emissions into the excavation area. PMID:26445364

  1. Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the performance of the Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test data, an evaluation of applicability, conclusions, recommendations, and related information for implementation of this remediation technology at the SRS Sanitary Landfill

  2. Vinča landfill leachate characteristics prediction by the leaching method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćalić Nataša D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the newly implemented waste management policy in European Union countries, sanitary landfilling constitutes the fourth and the least preferred of the alternative management options for the disposal of solid urban wastes. Landfills generate emissions over long periods, often longer than a lifetime. The longest lasting emission is leachate: leachate production and management is now recognized as one of the greatest problems associated with the environmentally sound operation of sanitary landfills. These liquid wastes can cause considerable pollution problems by contacting the surrounding soil, ground or surface waters and, are therefore considered major pollution hazards unless precautionary measures are implemented. Landfill leachate characterization is a critical factor in establishing a corresponding effective management strategy or treatment process. This paper summarizes leachate quality indicators, and investigates the temporal variation of leachate quality from municipal solid waste. The toxicity of leachates from the municipal solid waste landfill "Vinca" in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia, was characterized using toxicity characteristics leaching procedures (TCLP. The "Vinca" landfill was established in 1978 as one of several municipal landfills. Since the 1990-ies the "Vinca" landfill has been the only operating landfill servicing the Belgrade Metropolitan area, the biggest city in Serbia, with 1,576,124 inhabitants in the larger-city area, and 1,273,651 inhabitants in the inner-city area. The total average amount of solid wastes deposited in the landfill is estimated to be 1100 tons/day. The landfill site is not lined and the tributary flows through the centre of the site-in some places directly under the mass of refuse. No consideration has been given to the protection of ground waters, surface runoff or drainage. Local authorities plan to expand the landfill by 0.4 km2 to a total of 1.3 km Chemical analysis was performed on the

  3. Astronomy on a Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-09-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 15,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

  4. Qualitative Research and Evaluation of Landfill Leachate

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Kačinskaja; Kristina Bazienė; Saulius Vasarevičius

    2013-01-01

    Currently, depositing municipal waste in landfills is the dominating method in Lithuania. A large amount of landfill leachate is the main environmental problem. Municipal waste landfill leachate is characterized by high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) containing a number of heavy metals and concentration of organic compounds. The colmatation of landfill leachate collection systems is another burning problem that occurs due to certain characteristics of leachate such as suspended solids, an in...

  5. An AEM survey of a leaking landfill

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, D

    2005-01-01

    This study presents results obtained from a remarkably small-scale helicopter airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of a closed landfill. The landfill, occupying a former quarry, is situated among shallow, worked-out coal seams (pillar and stall workings) and was located over at least two mineshafts that occupied the quarry floor. The landfill was known to be leaking from an extensive borehole investigation that took place in the 1970’s, when the landfill was active. Redevelopment issues and ...

  6. Environmental upgrading of a landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article refers to an experimental study concerning the vegetative upgrading of a closed-down landfill (once used for industrial waste disposal). The aim was to check the possibility of reconstructing or aiding the natural growth of a vegetation in keeping with the surrounding area, in a tried environment such as that of landfills. The original idea contained in the approved project - which meant to generically upgrade the territory by planting species belonging to the grassy layer, shrubs and trees - has, with time, undergone some changes. On the basis of both the knowledge acquired during management and of a more accurate analysis of the territory, the experiment was preferred to aim at finding out which were the species, both continental and Mediterranean, able to gradually adjust to the surrounding landscape, leaving to natural selection the task to decide which species were more suitable to the upgrading of closed-down landfills, and which planting technique was more effective

  7. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi; Chen, D.

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling of...... the ashes. Leaching test, however, must be selected carefully to provide information relevant for the actual disposal scenario and for evaluating the benefits of pre-treating the residues prior to landfilling. This paper describes research at the Technical University of Denmark addressing some of...... these issues focusing on pH-development in landfilled residues, effects of leaching test conditions on Cr leaching and effects of pre-treatment with FeSO4....

  8. Monitoring of landfill influences on groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Mihael Brenčič

    2004-01-01

    Landfills of waste present serious threat to groundwater. To prevent groundwater pollution from landfill monitoring is performed. Rule of groundwater pollution monitoring from dangerous substances implements principles in Slovene legislation. In everyday practice certain questions arose since validity of the rule. These questions are about responsible parties in monitoring, groundwater distribution in space, target groundwater units, characterization level of the landfill and its surroundings...

  9. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  10. Subsurface investigation in Sarimukti landfill using DC resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirana, Kartika Hajar; Susanto, Kusnahadi; Susilawati, Anggie

    2015-09-01

    Layering process in landfill will produce leachate that produced by the entry of a mixture of rain water or ground water into the piles solid waste. In Sarimukti landfill, leachate from landfill channeled through a pipe to the leachate pond that planted beneath the soil surface. If the pipe is leaking, the leachate will contaminate the surrounding soil and may also to contaminate groundwater. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate subsurface conditions. One type of subsurface investigation can be determined by measuring the resistivity by using DC resistivity method. Resistivity measured in Sarimukti landfill with semigriding design including 8 lines perpendicular to each other. The result show there is resistivity contrast of materials, such as the solid waste, soil, water content that is predicted as leachate, and methane gas. The range of resistivity values are from 1 Ωm to 500 Ωm with variations of depth in according to line lenght. The resistivity values respectively: leachate is 1 to 10 Ωm; Wet soil is 10 to 100 Ωm; wet waste is 100 to 400 Ωm; gas is > 400 Ωm. Then, leachate was found at depth of 25 meters and wet soil is predicted as aquifer layer with 70 meters depth. The resistivity of aquifer layer is 1 to 20 Ωm and covered by silt clay as clay cap. Thus, it can predicted that leachate not seep into the aquifer layer.

  11. Water hyacinth system for municipal landfill leachate treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gendy, A.S.; Biswas, N.; Bewtra, J.K. [Univ. of Windsor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-06-15

    Batch experiments were conducted in a green house environment to investigate the ability of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) to treat municipal landfill leachate. The experiments were carried out on leachate samples collected from Essex-Windsor Regional Landfill, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Three leachate dilutions were used in the study. In addition to plant growth, leachate constituents such as pH, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia, total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), nitrate, reactive phosphate, total iron, potassium and chloride were also determined. These parameters were analyzed at different times covering the duration of the experiments. The experimental data showed that water hyacinth system was capable of reducing total nitrogen in the leachate. The pH level remained around 8.0. High consumption of alkalinity during the first three weeks was observed, which could be attributed to nitrification of ammonia. Ammonia nitrogen and total reactive phosphate were removed completely, whereas potassium and chloride remained unchanged. Landfill leachate has a negative impact on plant growth. As the concentration of leachate increases, its toxicity increases resulting in the decrease in the growth of water hyacinth. Water hyacinth system seems to be a promising technology for treating municipal landfill leachate. However, additional studies are required to investigate the system tolerance for some pollutants that might be present in leachate at wide ranges of concentrations such as salinities, hydrogen ion concentration, and heavy metals. (author)

  12. Gradient packing bed bio-filter for landfill methane mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Sim Yan May, Jane; Rajasekar, Balasubramanian

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the suitability of various biogenic materials for development of a gradient packed bed bio-filter to mitigate the methane (CH4) emission from landfills. Five different biogenic materials (windrow compost-WC; vermicompost-VC; landfill top cover-LTC; landfill bottom soil-LBS; and river soil sediment-SS) were screened. Among these materials, the VC showed a better CH4 oxidation potential (MOP) of 12.6μg CH4 gdw(-1)h(-1). Subsequently, the VC was used as a packing material along with wood chips in proto-type bio-filters. Wood chips were mixed at 5-15% to form three distinct gradients in a test bio-filter. Under the three different CH4 loading rates of 33, 44 and 55 gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), the achieved MOPs were 31, 41, and 47gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), respectively. The gradient packed bed bio-filter is effective for landfill CH4 mitigation than the conventional bio-filter as the latter shows gas channeling effects with poor MOPs. PMID:26883060

  13. Availability and properties of materials for the Fakse Landfill biocover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Methane produced in landfills can be oxidized in landfill covers made of compost; often called biocovers. Compost materials originating from seven different sources were characterized to determine their methane-oxidizing capacity and suitability for use in a full-scale biocover at Fakse Landfill in Denmark. Methane oxidation rates were determined in batch incubations. Based on material availability, characteristics, and the results of batch incubations, five of the seven materials were selected for further testing in column incubations. Three of the best performing materials showed comparable average methane oxidation rates: screened garden waste compost, sewage sludge compost, and an unscreened 4-year old garden waste compost (120, 112, and 108 gm(-2)d(-1), respectively). On the basis of these results, material availability and cost, the unscreened garden waste compost was determined to be the optimal material for the biocover. Comparing the results to criteria given in the literature it was found that the C/N ratio was the best indicator of the methane oxidation capacity of compost materials. The results of this work indicate that batch incubations measuring methane oxidation rates offer a low-cost and effective method for comparing compost sources for suitability of use in landfill biocovers. PMID:21185710

  14. Water hyacinth system for municipal landfill leachate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch experiments were conducted in a green house environment to investigate the ability of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) to treat municipal landfill leachate. The experiments were carried out on leachate samples collected from Essex-Windsor Regional Landfill, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Three leachate dilutions were used in the study. In addition to plant growth, leachate constituents such as pH, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia, total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), nitrate, reactive phosphate, total iron, potassium and chloride were also determined. These parameters were analyzed at different times covering the duration of the experiments. The experimental data showed that water hyacinth system was capable of reducing total nitrogen in the leachate. The pH level remained around 8.0. High consumption of alkalinity during the first three weeks was observed, which could be attributed to nitrification of ammonia. Ammonia nitrogen and total reactive phosphate were removed completely, whereas potassium and chloride remained unchanged. Landfill leachate has a negative impact on plant growth. As the concentration of leachate increases, its toxicity increases resulting in the decrease in the growth of water hyacinth. Water hyacinth system seems to be a promising technology for treating municipal landfill leachate. However, additional studies are required to investigate the system tolerance for some pollutants that might be present in leachate at wide ranges of concentrations such as salinities, hydrogen ion concentration, and heavy metals. (author)

  15. PCB in the air during landfilling of a contaminated lake sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremle, G.; Larsson, P.

    We studied PCB concentration in the air during the build-up of a landfill of PCB-contaminated sediment. A small lake was remediated and the sediment (150 000 m 3 containing about 400 kg PCB) deposited in a nearby landfill. PCB concentration in the air was elevated during landfilling and the extent was determined by the amount of sediment handled and the temperature. The air was enriched in more volatile PCB congeners compared to the deposited sediment, suggesting volatilization as the major transport process in addition to particle transport. The PCB concentration in air showed an exponential decline with distance from the centre of the landfill, with a one order of magnitude decrease 350 m from the centre. At a distance of 850 m from the centre about 5% of the elevated PCB level remained, which was significantly higher when compared to the reference concentration (15 km from the landfill). The PCB congener pattern changed gradually from the landfill centre to the reference. After the landfill was closed and the contaminated, dewatered sediment covered by uncontaminated soil, PCB levels and pattern were similar to that of the reference.

  16. Selection of MSW landfill site for Konya, Turkey using GIS and multi-criteria evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nas, Bilgehan; Cay, Tayfun; Iscan, Fatih; Berktay, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Landfill is a common solution for the final disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) in Turkey. Landfill siting is an extremely difficult task to accomplish because the site selection process depends on different factors and regulations. To ensure that an appropriate site is chosen, a systematic process should be developed and followed. Unsuccessful landfill siting is typically the result of strong public opposition. In this study, candidate sites for an appropriate landfill area in Cumra County of Konya City are determined by using the integration of geographic information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria evaluation (MCE). ArcGIS 9.0 software and its extensions were used as the GIS tool since it is able to perform suitability analysis using MCE analysis. To identify appropriate landfill areas in the Cumra district, eight input map layers including proximity to municipal and local wells and irrigational canals, distance from transportation routes and rails, distance from archaeological sites, distance from urban areas, land use/land cover, and land slope are used in constraint mapping. A final map was generated which identifies regions showing suitability for the location of the landfill site. According to the map, 6.8% of the study area is most suitable, 15.7% is suitable, 10.4% is moderately suitable, 25.8% is poorly suitable, and 41.3% is unsuitable. At the end of the analyses, three candidate sites are determined. The selection of the final MSW landfill site, however, requires further field research. PMID:19169836

  17. Evaluation and selection of decision-making methods to assess landfill mining projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Robert; Baumgartner, Rupert J; Vorbach, Stefan; Ragossnig, Arne; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-09-01

    For the first time in Austria, fundamental technological and economic studies on recovering secondary raw materials from large landfills have been carried out, based on the 'LAMIS - Landfill Mining Austria' pilot project. A main focus of the research - and the subject of this article - was to develop an assessment or decision-making procedure that allows landfill owners to thoroughly examine the feasibility of a landfill mining project in advance. Currently there are no standard procedures that would sufficiently cover all the multiple-criteria requirements. The basic structure of the multiple attribute decision making process was used to narrow down on selection, conceptual design and assessment of suitable procedures. Along with a breakdown into preliminary and main assessment, the entire foundation required was created, such as definitions of requirements to an assessment method, selection and accurate description of the various assessment criteria and classification of the target system for the present 'landfill mining' vs. 'retaining the landfill in after-care' decision-making problem. Based on these studies, cost-utility analysis and the analytical-hierarchy process were selected from the range of multiple attribute decision-making procedures and examined in detail. Overall, both methods have their pros and cons with regard to their use for assessing landfill mining projects. Merging these methods or connecting them with single-criteria decision-making methods (like the net present value method) may turn out to be reasonable and constitute an appropriate assessment method. PMID:26123349

  18. Evaluation of sludge management alternatives in Istanbul metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, M; Erdim, E; Kinaci, C; Akca, L

    2005-01-01

    The main concern of this paper was to predict the sludge quantities generated from 18 wastewater treatment plants, which were stated to be established in the "Istanbul Water Supply, Sewerage and Drainage, Sewage Treatment and Disposal Master Plan", 10 of which are in operation at present. Besides this, obtaining the required data to compare various treatment schemes was another goal of the study. Especially, the estimation of the sludge quantity in the case of enhanced primary sedimentation was of importance. Wastewater sludge management strategies were discussed in order to develop suggestions for Istanbul Metropolitan city. Within this context, the wastewater treatment facilities, mentioned in the Master Plan that had been completed by 2000, were evaluated in terms of sludge production rates, locations and technical and management aspects. Disposal alternatives of the wastewater treatment sludge were also evaluated in this study. Using of the dewatered sludge as a landfill cover material seems the best alternative usage. Up to the year of 2040, the requirement of cover material for landfills in Istanbul will be met by the dewatered sludge originated from wastewater treatment plants in the region. PMID:16114625

  19. Landfill gas cleanup for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    EPRI is to test the feasibility of using a carbonate fuel cell to generate electricity from landfill gas. Landfills produce a substantial quantity of methane gas, a natural by-product of decaying organic wastes. Landfill gas, however, contains sulfur and halogen compounds, which are known contaminants to fuel cells and their fuel processing equipment. The objective of this project is to clean the landfill gas well enough to be used by the fuel cell without making the process prohibitively expensive. The cleanup system tested in this effort could also be adapted for use with other fuel cells (e.g., solid oxide, phosphoric acid) running on landfill gas.

  20. Quantifying capital goods for waste landfilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Stentsøe, Steen; Willumsen, Hans Christian;

    2013-01-01

    to approximately 260 kg per tonne of waste landfilled. The environmental burdens from the extraction and manufacturing of the materials used in the landfill, as well as from the construction of the landfill, were modelled as potential environmental impacts. For example, the potential impact on global warming was 2.......5 kg carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents or 0.32 milli person equivalents per tonne of waste. The potential impacts from the use of materials and construction of the landfill are low-to-insignificant compared with data reported in the literature on impact potentials of landfills in operation...

  1. Final closure cover for a Hanford radioactive mixed waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides a preliminary design for a RCRA mixed waste landfill final closure cover. The cover design was developed by a senior class design team from Seattle University. The design incorporates a layered design of indigenous soils and geosynthetics in a layered system to meet final closure cover requirements for a landfill as imposed by the Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303 implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

  2. Landfill gas generation assessment procedure guidance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-03-15

    Landfill gas (LFG) at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills is generated as a result of physical, chemical, and microbial processes occurring within the waste. The purpose of this guidelines document was to provide a procedure for the assessment of LFG generation at MSW landfills in British Columbia and to provide guidelines for landfill owners and operators to comply with the 2008 British Columbia landfill gas management regulation. The study used a regulatory-based model. This paper outlined the requirement to complete a landfill gas generation assessment. It included previous landfill gas generation assessments as well as information on historical waste tonnage, projected waste tonnage, waste characteristics, meteorological data, and water addition. Landfill gas generation parameter selection was also discussed in terms of waste categorization; methane generation potential; landfill gas generation rate; and water addition factor. Other topics that were addressed included landfill gas and methane generation estimate; landfill gas generation assessment reporting; and a solid waste composition study. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig., 6 appendices.

  3. Landfill gas powers brick production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshalls plc produce high-quality facing bricks using tunnel kilns at the company's Stairfoot Brickworks site, in the UK. The company extracts clay from the adjacent quarries, which are subsequently filled with domestic waste. In 1981 Marshalls decided to exploit the landfill gas (LFG) resource 'on its doorstep'. (author)

  4. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi;

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling of...

  5. Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Land Cover database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State of Kansas. The database was compiled from a digital classification of Landsat Thematic...

  6. Waste management in the Irkutsk Region, Siberia, Russia: environmental assessment of current practice focusing on landfilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Rechberger, Helmut; Christensen, Thomas H

    2014-05-01

    The municipal waste management system of the region of Irkutsk is described and a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed to assess the environmental performance of the system. Annually about 500 000 tons of waste are managed. The waste originates from three sources: household waste (27%), commercial waste (23%) and office & institutional waste (44%). Other waste of unknown composition constitutes 6%. Only 3% of the waste is recycled; 97% of the municipal waste is disposed of at the old Alexandrovsky landfill. The environmental impact from the current system is dominated by the landfill, which has no gas or leachate collection system. The global warming contribution is due to the emission of methane of the order of 420 000 tons CO2-equivalents per year. Collection and transport of the waste are insignificant compared with impacts from the landfill. As the old landfill runs out of capacity in a few years, the LCA modelling showed that introduction of a new and modern landfill with gas and leachate collection could improve the performance of the waste management system significantly. Collection of landfill gas and utilization for 30 years for electricity production (gas turbine) would reduce the global warming completely and result in a net saving of 100 000 CO2-equivalents per year due to storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill beyond 100 years. Considering other first-order degradation rates for the landfilled organic matter did not overtly affect the results, while assumptions about the top cover oxidation of methane significantly affected the results. This shows the importance of controlling the gas escape from the landfill. PMID:24692457

  7. The Application Of Biofilter System For Reduction Of Methane Emissions From Modern Sanitary Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K.; Park, S.

    2007-12-01

    Increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) caused by anthropogenic activities has been related to global climate change. Methane, the second most important GHG after CO2, is 21 times more effective at trapping heat than CO2. Therefore, methane emission control is of utmost importance for global warming reduction. To minimize leachate production and protect groundwater resources, modern sanitary landfills are equipped with composite covers and gas collection systems. Methane from modern sanitary landfills is vented directly to the atmosphere, except for some of the largest landfills where it is recovered as energy and burned at the site. However, the efficiency of energy recovery systems in larger landfills is reduced as the amount of CH4 generated from landfill begins to decrease. In this study, the performance of a lab-scale model biofilter system was investigated to treat CH4 gas emitted from modern sanitary landfills by conducting batch and column experiments using landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast as the filter bed medium. From the batch experiments to measure the influence of moisture content and temperature of the filter medium on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system, the optimum moisture content and temperature were found to be 10-15% by weight and 25-35°C, respectively. The column experiment was conducted to measure the influence of inlet CH4 concentration and CH4 loading rate on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system. As the inlet CH4 concentration decreased, the percentage of CH4 oxidized increased. Up to a CH4 loading rate of 2785 g CH4 m3 h- 1 (EBRT = 7.7 min), the CH4 removal efficiency of the biofilter was able to reach 100%. Based on the results of the study, the installation of a properly managed biofilter system should be capable of achieving a reduction in atmospheric CH4 emissions from modern sanitary landfills at low CH4 generation stage.

  8. Landfill methane oxidation across climate types in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, Jeffrey; Abichou, Tarek; Langford, Claire; Hater, Gary; Green, Roger; Goldsmith, Doug; Swan, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers was determined by stable isotope analyses over 37 seasonal sampling events at 20 landfills with intermediate covers over four years. Values were calculated two ways: by assuming no isotopic fractionation during gas transport, which produces a conservative or minimum estimate, and by assuming limited isotopic fractionation with gas transport producing a higher estimate. Thus bracketed, the best assessment of mean oxidation within the soil covers from chamber captured emitted CH(4) was 37.5 ± 3.5%. The fraction of CH(4) oxidized refers to the fraction of CH(4) delivered to the base of the cover that was oxidized to CO(2) and partitioned to microbial biomass instead of being emitted to the atmosphere as CH(4) expressed as a percentage. Air samples were also collected at the surface of the landfill, and represent CH(4) from soil, from leaking infrastructure, and from cover defects. A similar assessment of this data set yields 36.1 ± 7.2% oxidation. Landfills in five climate types were investigated. The fraction oxidized in arid sites was significantly greater than oxidation in mediterranean sites, or cool and warm continental sites. Sub tropical sites had significantly lower CH(4) oxidation than the other types of sites. This relationship may be explained by the observed inverse relationship between cover loading and fractional CH(4) oxidation. PMID:21133420

  9. FLORIDA HAZARDOUS WASTE AND SANITARY LANDFILL REPORT, COUNTY DATA. GENERATOR DATA AND CHARACTERISTICS OF SANITARY LANDFILLS. PART 6. COUNTIES: LAKE, LEE, LEON, LEVY, LIBERTY, MADISON, MANATEE, MARION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report provides data on the use of sanitary landfills (Subtitle D facilities) for hazardous waste disposal in Florida by small quantity generators. It consists of eleven parts including a part called Study Area Data which contains the data aggregated across the counties cover...

  10. Simulated evapotranspiration from a landfill irrigated with landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evapotranspiration from a landfill area, irrigated with leachate water, was simulated with the SOIL model. Three different types of vegetation (bare soil, grass ley, and willow) were used both with and without irrigation. The highest simulated evapotranspiration (604 mm) during the growing season was found from an irrigated willow stand with a high interception capacity. The lowest evapotranspiration (164 mm) was found from the bare soil. The relatively high evapotranspiration from the willow was probably caused by the high LAI (Leaf Area Index) and the low aerodynamic resistance within the willow stand. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce most of the leakage water from a landfill by irrigation of willow stands. 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier

  12. Landfill gas management and end use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas, like sewer and marsh gas, is a biogas. It is generated by the biological decomposition of organic matter in solid waste landfills. Once gas production begins, it can continue for 30 to 50 years or more, until all of the organic matter is completely decomposed. The evolution of landfill gas management in the United States began in the 1970s because of the concerns for health and safety. Over the years, there have been many documented cases of loss of human life or serious injury caused by explosions or accumulations of landfill-derived gases. The federal Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) established the first federal regulatory performance criteria requiring landfill owners and operators to control the escape of landfill gas. These regulations have led to the installation of hundreds of gas control systems at landfill sites across the country. Landfill gas recovery, however, has also been demonstrated to be a profitable venture. The success that the landfill gas recovery industry experienced in the 1970s, 1980s, and, hopefully, in the 1990s, has proven that it is possible to use our landfills in a beneficial manner, while reducing our country's dependence on foreign oil

  13. Remediation of Tenorm Landfill Near TPP Plomin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: TPP Plomin is 125 MW coal power plant located at the end of Plomin bay in Istria region of Croatia. It started operation in 1970 using coal from local mines from nearby Rasa area. The coal is with high content of sulfur and with high radioactivity, mainly due to increased concentrations of uranium-238 and radium-226. In a vicinity of TPP Plomin slag/ash landfill was set up. Present volume of repository is 850.000 m3. Repository is placed on downstream section of the Bizac stream, along the contact zone of proluvial fan of the Boljuncica river. Bottom of the repository is numulite limestone, so characteristics of karst hydrology are present. Radioactivity of coal as well as deposited slag/ash were monitored regularly. Several in situ gamma dose rate measurements on the pile were performed also. For uranium-238 measured concentration was typically 70-2500 Bq/kg (mean value 550 Bq/kg) and for radium-226 from 90-3200 Bq/kg (mean value 800 Bq/kg). During last decade due to public concern local coal was 'diluted' with imported varieties with low radioactivity contents, and recently local mines were closed and only imported coals are used. Measurements are showing that the pile is having pronouncedly uneven distribution of radioactivity concentration. There are no engineering barriers surrounding pile protecting bottom of the repository or the sides. Top of the pile is partially covered with soil and vegetation. The owner of the TPP Plomin is preparing restoration of the landfill. Our Agency prepared guidelines consulting EU directives and IAEA BSS for the restoration project since TENORM waste is not directly regulated by Croatian law. Several interventions are proposed. (author)

  14. Hydrogeology and historical assessment of a classic sequential-land use landfill site, Illinois, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Colin J.; Vagt, Peter J.

    1990-05-01

    The Blackwell site in northeastern Illinois was a classic sequential-use project combining land reclamation, a sanitary landfill, and a recreational park. This paper adds a recent assessment of leachate generation and groundwater contamination to the site's unfinished record. Hydrogeological studies show that (1) the landfill sits astride an outwash aquifer and a till mound, which are separated from an underlying dolomite aquifer by a thin, silty till; (2) leachate leaks from the landfill at an estimated average rate between 48 and 78 m3/d; (3) the resultant contaminant plume is virtually stagnant in the till but rapidly diluted in the outwash aquifer, so that no off-site contamination is detected; (4) trace VOC levels in the dolomite probably indicate that contaminants have migrated there from the landfill-derived plume in the outwash. Deviations from the original landfill concepts included elimination of a leachate collection system, increased landfill size, local absence of a clay liner, and partial use of nonclay cover. The hydrogeological setting was unsuitable for the landfill as constructed, indicating the importance of detailed geological consideration in landfill and land-use planning.

  15. Methanotrophs and methanotrophic activity in engineered landfill biocovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Benichou, S; Jugnia, Louis-B; Greer, Charles W; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2009-09-01

    The dynamics and changes in the potential activity and community structure of methanotrophs in landfill covers, as a function of time and depth were investigated. A passive methane oxidation biocover (PMOB-1) was constructed in St-Nicéphore MSW Landfill (Quebec, Canada). The most probable number (MPN) method was used for methanotroph counts, methanotrophic diversity was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of the pmoA gene and the potential CH(4) oxidation rate was determined using soil microcosms. Results of the PMOB-1 were compared with those obtained for the existing landfill cover (silty clay) or a reference soil (RS). During the monitoring period, changes in the number of methanotrophic bacteria in the PMOB-1 exhibited different developmental phases and significant variations with depth. In comparison, no observable changes over time occurred in the number of methanotrophs in the RS. The maximum counts measured in the uppermost layer was 1.5x10(9) cells g dw(-1) for the PMOB-1 and 1.6x10(8) cells g dw(-1) for the RS. No distinct difference was observed in the methanotroph diversity in the PMOB-1 or RS. As expected, the potential methane oxidation rate was higher in the PMOB-1 than in the RS. The maximum potential rates were 441.1 and 76.0 microg CH(4) h(-1) g dw(-1) in the PMOB and RS, respectively. From these results, the PMOB was found to be a good technology to enhance methane oxidation, as its performance was clearly better than the starting soil that was present in the landfill site. PMID:19477627

  16. Surface emission of landfill gas from solid waste landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Won; Shin, Ho-Chul

    The surface emission of landfill gas (LFG) was studied to estimate the amount of LFG efflux from solid waste landfills using an air flux chamber. LFG efflux increased as atmospheric temperature increased during the day, and the same pattern for the surface emission was observed for the change of seasons. LFG efflux rate decreased from summer through winter. The average LFG efflux rates of winter, spring and summer were 0.1584, 0.3013 and 0.8597 m 3 m -2 h -1 respectively. The total amount of surface emission was calculated based on the seasonal LFG efflux rate and the landfill surface area. From the estimates of LFG generation, it is expected that about 30% of the generated LFG may be released through the surface without extraction process. As forced extraction with a blower proceeded, the extraction well pressure decreased from 1100 to -100 mm H 2O, and the LFG surface efflux decreased markedly above 80%. Thus, the utilization of LFG by forced extraction would be the good solution for global warming and air pollution by LFG.

  17. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the location and the obeying function, GCLs have to fulfill certain conditions. A legislated compatibility criterion has to be proven by various laboratory tests. In the paper are presented the results of direct shear and chemical compatibility tests of GCLs as well as the results of permeability measurement of kaolin clay (the paper is published in Croatian .

  18. Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Steven

    2012-11-15

    The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parish’s ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report

  19. Landfill reduction experience in The Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharff, Heijo, E-mail: h.scharff@afvalzorg.nl

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • ‘Zero waste’ initiatives never consider risks, side effects or experience of achieved low levels of landfill. • This paper provides insight into what works and what not. • Where strong gradients in regulations and tax occur between countries, waste will find its way to landfills across borders. • Strong landfill reduction can create a fierce competition over the remaining waste to be landfilled resulting in losses. • At some point a public organisation should take responsibility for the operation of a ‘safety net’ in waste management. - Abstract: Modern waste legislation aims at resource efficiency and landfill reduction. This paper analyses more than 20 years of landfill reduction in the Netherlands. The combination of landfill regulations, landfill tax and landfill bans resulted in the desired landfill reduction, but also had negative effects. A fierce competition developed over the remaining waste to be landfilled. In 2013 the Dutch landfill industry generated €40 million of annual revenue, had €58 million annual costs and therefore incurred an annual loss of €18 million. It is not an attractive option to prematurely end business. There is a risk that Dutch landfill operators will not be able to fulfil the financial obligations for closure and aftercare. Contrary to the polluter pays principle the burden may end up with society. EU regulations prohibiting export of waste for disposal are in place. Strong differentials in landfill tax rate between nations have nevertheless resulted in transboundary shipment of waste and in non-compliance with the self-sufficiency and proximity principles. During the transformation from a disposal society to a recycling society, it is important to carefully plan required capacity and to guide the reorganisation of the landfill sector. At some point, it is no longer profitable to provide landfill services. It may be necessary for public organisations or the state to take responsibility for the

  20. Landfill reduction experience in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ‘Zero waste’ initiatives never consider risks, side effects or experience of achieved low levels of landfill. • This paper provides insight into what works and what not. • Where strong gradients in regulations and tax occur between countries, waste will find its way to landfills across borders. • Strong landfill reduction can create a fierce competition over the remaining waste to be landfilled resulting in losses. • At some point a public organisation should take responsibility for the operation of a ‘safety net’ in waste management. - Abstract: Modern waste legislation aims at resource efficiency and landfill reduction. This paper analyses more than 20 years of landfill reduction in the Netherlands. The combination of landfill regulations, landfill tax and landfill bans resulted in the desired landfill reduction, but also had negative effects. A fierce competition developed over the remaining waste to be landfilled. In 2013 the Dutch landfill industry generated €40 million of annual revenue, had €58 million annual costs and therefore incurred an annual loss of €18 million. It is not an attractive option to prematurely end business. There is a risk that Dutch landfill operators will not be able to fulfil the financial obligations for closure and aftercare. Contrary to the polluter pays principle the burden may end up with society. EU regulations prohibiting export of waste for disposal are in place. Strong differentials in landfill tax rate between nations have nevertheless resulted in transboundary shipment of waste and in non-compliance with the self-sufficiency and proximity principles. During the transformation from a disposal society to a recycling society, it is important to carefully plan required capacity and to guide the reorganisation of the landfill sector. At some point, it is no longer profitable to provide landfill services. It may be necessary for public organisations or the state to take responsibility for the

  1. Vegetation and moisture performance on a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-equivalent landfill cap at the Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills, as defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) can receive waste materials from commercial and industrial operations, residences, and other sources. Sanitary landfills that are used to dispose of solid waste require a landfill cover that meets RCRA requirements to prevent leaching of water through buried wastes and to isolate the waste for a period of 30 years. The purpose of a RCRA landfill cover is to 'protect public health, to prevent land, air, and water pollution, and conserve the state's natural, economic, and energy resources' (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-304). The hypothesis of this study were as follows: (1) amending soil nitrogen would enhance perennial grass biomass; (2) the amount of biomass produced by commercially-available wheatgrass species would be similar to bluebunch wheatgrass; and (3) the vegetative biomass, as required by WAC-173-304, would not be produced in a semiarid climate

  2. LANDFILL LEACHATES PRETREATMENT BY OZONATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Leszczyński

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the application of ozonation processes for stabilized landfill leachate treatment was investigated. The leachate came from a municipal sanitary landfill located nearby Bielsk Podlaski. The average values of its main parameters were: pH 8.23; COD 870 mgO2/dm3; BOD 90 mgO2/dm3; NH4+ 136.2 mgN/dm3; UV254 absorbance 0.312 and turbidity 14 NTU. The ozone dosages used were in the range of 115.5 to 808.5 mgO3/dm3 of the leachate. The maximum COD, color and UV254 absorbance removal wa.5 mgO3/dm3. After oxidation, the ratio of BOD/COD was increased from 0.1 up to 0.23.

  3. Seismic analysis of Industrial Waste Landfill 4 at Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This calculation was to seismically evaluate Landfill IV at Y-12 as required by Tennessee Rule 1200-1-7-04(2) for seismic impact zones. The calculation verifies that the landfill meets the seismic requirements of the Tennessee Division of Solid Waste, ''Earthquake Evaluation Guidance Document.'' The theoretical displacements of 0.17 in. and 0.13 in. for the design basis earthquake are well below the limiting seimsic slope stability design criteria. There is no potential for liquefaction due to absence of chohesionless soils, or for loss or reduction of shear strength for the clays at this site as result of earthquake vibration. The vegetative cover on slopes will most likely be displaced and move during a large seismic event, but this is not considered a serious deficiency because the cover is not involved in the structural stability of the landfill and there would be no release of waste to the environment

  4. Growing trees on completed sanitary landfills. [Nyssa sylvatica, Picea abies, Ginkgo biloba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, I.A.; Gilman, E.F.; Flower, F.B.

    1983-01-01

    A 10-year old completed landfill in New Jersey consisting of 9 m (depth) of refuse covered with 15-25 cm of soil was cleared of debris and vegetation and covered with 30 cm of subsoil and 15-25 cm of topsoil. Nineteen coniferous and broadleaved species were planted on the landfill and on a control site in 1975, and trees were maintained and growth and condition monitored over 4 years. On the basis of shoot length and stem area increase, the most successful of the surviving trees were Nyssa sylvatica, Picea abies and Ginkgo biloba, in decreasing order of tolerance. Tolerance of landfill conditions appeared to be greatest in those species with low water requirements, a slow growth rate, high acid tolerance and a shallow root system. (Refs. 11).

  5. Modelling tracer dispersion from landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Carpentieri, M.; Giambini, P; Corti, A.

    2008-01-01

    Several wind tunnel experiments of tracer dispersion from reduced-scale landfill models are presented in this paper. Different experimental set-ups, hot-wire anemometry, particle image velocimetry and tracer concentration measurements were used for the characterisation of flow and dispersion phenomena nearby the models. The main aim of these experiments is to build an extensive experimental data set useful for model validation purposes. To demonstrate the potentiality of the experimental data...

  6. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste. At...

  7. The environmental implications of landfill gas control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the implications for landfill gas control of the Environmental Protection Bill in relation to proposed, existing and closed sites. If the Bill is enacted in its present form these changes will have far reaching implications on the waste management industry and especially those involved in landfill gas monitoring and control. The paper describes the requirements for the management of landfill gas both on and around landfill sites before, during and after the cessation of waste disposal operations. It describes the duties of Waste Regulation Authorities (WRAs) under the Bill in relation to landfill gas including their duties in relation to closed sites. The paper concludes that when the WRAs fulfill these duties the risk of further incidents occurring with landfill gas will be significantly reduced. (author)

  8. Landfill gas in the Dutch perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until 1986 landfill gas had a considerable value because of the relative high energy prices. It appeared also that landfill gas was formed in large quantities. However after the collapse of the energy prices in 1986 many new landfill gas projects were delayed or stopped. Recently, the gas emissions on landfills have attracted attention again, but now because of various environmental aspects. With respect to landfill management a well controlled gas extraction seems to be necessary. Utilisation of the gas is still favourable for economic reasons and because of energy savings. The Dutch policy for the next ten years will be reduction of the amount of waste by prevention and recycling. The organic fraction of the municipal solid waste (refuse from vegetables, fruit and garden), obtained by separation in households, will be composted. The other part will be burnt in incinerators. Only the remaining inert refuse will be deposited on landfills. (author)

  9. Control of PCDDs/PCDFs, PCBs and PAHs emissions in exhaust of landfill gas fed engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idczak, F.; Dengis, P.; Duchateau, P.; Petitjean, S. [ISSeP, Liege (Belgium)

    2004-09-15

    Wallonia in Belgium, like many countries around the world, planned to reduce amounts of waste generated by human activity and stored in landfills. Since they experienced a couple of crisis situations in the past, both with former and presently used landfill sites, authorities launched a demanding landfill monitoring program which covers now 9 out of the 10 major sites. Biogas produced in these landfills are collected and eliminated in two different ways. Either simply burned in a flare, or, when the methane grade and flow are high enough, the biogas can be burned in electricity producing engines. This later use represents an energy recovery from the waste. In the context of difficulty for landfill sites to be accepted by the public (the well-known NIMBY phenomenon), the question has been raised whether combustion of the biogas did not entail production of dioxins and other polyaromatic compounds. For the exhaust gases of engines operated with biogas, a check on the presence of dioxins and associated organic pollutants, composed of three different runs or days of sampling for each of 5 landfill sites was performed upon demand of responsible authorities.

  10. Biochemical Lignin Related Processes in Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Ayesha

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how the key features of bioreactor landfills; increased temperature, moisture and microbial activity, affect the biological stability of the landfill material. In the first part of the study the solubilization and degradation of lignin in paper exposed to these bioreactor landfill conditions are explored. The solubility of the lignin in paper was observed at different temperatures and over 27 weeks at 55°C and the anaerobic bioconversion of offi...

  11. Aerobic Biostabilization of Old MSW Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    M. C. Zanetti

    2008-01-01

    Many years after the end of the cultivation phase, landfills may generate intense odours, toxic and explosive gases and heavily-polluted leachate. A wide-spreading trend in the management of MSW landfills is represented by the forced aeration of wastes in order to achieve the stabilization, reducing the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled sites (old landfills which can be definitely considered as contaminated sites) and the management costs of controlled and working facilities. One ...

  12. Mitigating methane emissions and air intrusion in heterogeneous landfills with a high permeability layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoojin; Imhoff, Paul T; Augenstein, Don; Yazdani, Ramin

    2011-05-01

    Spatially variable refuse gas permeability and landfill gas (LFG) generation rate, cracking of the soil cover, and reduced refuse gas permeability because of liquid addition can all affect CH(4) collection efficiency when intermediate landfill covers are installed. A new gas collection system that includes a near-surface high permeability layer beneath the landfill cover was evaluated for enhancing capture of LFG and mitigating CH(4) emissions. Simulations of gas transport in two-dimensional domains demonstrated that the permeable layer reduces CH(4) emissions up to a factor of 2 for particular spatially variable gas permeability fields. When individual macrocracks formed in the cover soil and the permeable layer was absent, CH(4) emissions increased to as much as 24% of the total CH(4) generated, double the emissions when the permeable layer was installed. CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil was also much more uniform when the permeable layer was present: local percentages of CH(4) oxidized varied between 94% and 100% across the soil cover with the permeable layer, but ranged from 10% to 100% without this layer for some test cases. However, the permeable layer had a minor effect on CH(4) emissions and CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil when the ratio of the gas permeability of the cover soil to the mean refuse gas permeability ≤ 0.05. The modeling approach employed in this study may be used to assess the utility of other LFG collection systems and management practices. PMID:20880688

  13. Alternation of secondary metabolites and quality attributes in Valencia Orange fruit ( Citrus sinensis ) as influenced by storage period and edible covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, M M; Sharifani, M; Daraei Garmakhany, A; Seifi, E

    2015-04-01

    Flavonoids (FGs) are a large group of polyphenolic compounds with low molecular weight, found in free and glycozidic forms in plants. Citrus fruits can be used as a food supplement containing hesperidin and flavonoids to prevent infections and boost the immune system in human body. The aim of this study was the investigation of the effect of clove oil and storage period on the amount of hesperidin and naringin component in orange peel (cv. Valencia). Four treatments including clove oil (1 %), wax, mixture of wax-clove oil, control and storage period were applied. Treated fruits were stored at 7 °C and 85 % relative humidity for 3 months and naringin, hesperidin, antioxidant activity, total pheenolic compounds, TSS, Vitamin C, fruits weight loss, pH, acidity and carbohydrates content were measured every 3 weeks. The amount of hesperidin and naringin was determined using high performance liquid chromatography at the detection wavelength of 285 nm. Antioxidant activity was measured using the 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl-hydrate (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. Total phenolic compounds were measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu micro method. Results showed that naringin and hesperidin were decreased during storage. Different treatment only had significant effect on the amount of hesperidin while storage period affected both of narigin and hesperidin. Results of correlation study, indicated strong relation between antioxidant activity and amount of naringin and hesperidin during storage time. However, at the end of storage period, the amount of hesperidin and naringin were diminished independent of different covers. Probably anaerobic condition caused such reduction. Results showed that the amount of TSS, fruit hardness, weight loss, total sugar and fructose content were increased during storage period while total acidity, pH and glucose content showed descending trend during storage periods. In conclusion, hesperidin and naringin of peels can be used as

  14. Comparison Of Four Landfill Gas Models Using Data From Four Danish Landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob G.; Mou, Zishen; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Data about type and quantity of waste disposed in four Danish landfills was collected and used on four different landfill gas generation models. This was done to compare the output data in order to evaluate the performance of the four landfill gas models when used on Danish waste types, and to co...

  15. Landfill Barrier-Overview and Prospect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Liange; Zhao Yongsheng

    2000-01-01

    Landfill is the primary method of waste disposal. The increasing attention focused on the effect of landfill on environment prompts the development of environmental sound landfill system. As the key parts of landfill, the barrier system can provide impermeabilization of leachate and prevent biogas from escaping intotheenvironment. In recent years, the technology pertaining the barrier system developed rapidly. In this paper, new materials used in liners and new concept of barrier construction are reviewed; the mechanisms of leachate through clay liner and geomembrane, the calculation of leaks through liner and the effect of freezing/thaw on liner are discussed.

  16. Congenital anomalies and proximity to landfill sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of congenital anomalies in proximity to municipal landfill sites in the Eastern Region (counties Dublin, Kildare, Wicklow) was examined by small area (district electoral division), distance and clustering tendancies in relation to 83 landfills, five of which were major sites. The study included 2136 cases of congenital anomaly, 37,487 births and 1423 controls between 1986 and 1990. For the more populous areas of the region 50% of the population lived within 2-3 km of a landfill and within 4-5 km for more rural areas. In the area-level analysis, the standardised prevalence ratios, empirical and full Bayesian modelling, and Kulldorff\\'s spatial scan statistic found no association between the residential area of cases and location of landfills. In the case control analysis, the mean distance of cases and controls from the nearest landfill was similar. The odds ratios of cases compared to controls for increasing distances from all landfills and major landfills showed no significant difference from the baseline value of 1. The kernel and K methods showed no tendency of cases to cluster in relationship to landfills. In conclusion, congenital anomalies were not found to occur more commonly in proximity to municipal landfills.

  17. Imaging and characterization of heterogeneous landfills using geophysical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantaki, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays many countries use landfilling for the management of their waste or for treating old landfills. Emissions from landfills can be harmful to the environment and to human health, making the stabilization of landfills a priority for the landfill communities. Estimation of the emission potential for determination of the aftercare period and improvement of the treatment technologies for the minimization of the aftercare period are examples of problems landfill research groups are now facin...

  18. Does Size Really Matter? Landfill Scale Impacts on Property Values

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jong Seok; Missios, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The economic advantage of constructing and operating large-scale landfills over small-scale landfills has been used to justify regional landfills as a solution to the municipal waste disposal problem. In addition to the dampening effects on social efforts to divert waste away from landfills, higher external costs of larger landfills may in fact offset the private cost advantages. In this study, the negative effects of a landfill that are capitalized in property values of houses located in the...

  19. Pricing landfill externalities: Emissions and disamenity costs in Cape Town, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The paper estimates landfill externalities associated with emissions, disamenities and transport. → Transport externalities vary from 24.22 to 31.42 Rands per tonne. → Costs of emissions (estimated using benefits transfer) vary from 0.07 to 28.91 Rands per tonne. → Disamenities (estimated using hedonic pricing) vary from 0.00 to 57.46 Rands per tonne. → Overall, external costs for urban landfills exceed those of a regional landfill. - Abstract: The external (environmental and social) costs of landfilling (e.g. emissions to air, soil and water; and 'disamenities' such as odours and pests) are difficult to quantify in monetary terms, and are therefore not generally reflected in waste disposal charges or taken into account in decision making regarding waste management options. This results in a bias against alternatives such as recycling, which may be more expensive than landfilling from a purely financial perspective, but preferable from an environmental and social perspective. There is therefore a need to quantify external costs in monetary terms, so that different disposal options can be compared on the basis of their overall costs to society (financial plus external costs). This study attempts to estimate the external costs of landfilling in the City of Cape Town for different scenarios, using the benefits transfer method (for emissions) and the hedonic pricing method (for disamenities). Both methods (in particular the process of transferring and adjusting estimates from one study site to another) are described in detail, allowing the procedures to be replicated elsewhere. The results show that external costs are currently R111 (in South African Rands, or approximately US$16) per tonne of waste, although these could decline under a scenario in which energy is recovered, or in which the existing urban landfills are replaced with a new regional landfill.

  20. Leachate impacts on groundwater: modeling generation and transport at the naameh landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.Although municipal solid waste is now managed through integrated schemes that rank land filling as one of the least favorable options for disposal, this management alternative continues to be the most economic and attractive in the vast majority of cases. An inevitable consequence of the practice of solid waste disposal in landfills is the generation, refuse characteristics and land filling operations. Leachate migration away from the landfill boundaries and its subsequent release into the surrounding environment, present serious environmental concerns at both existing and new facilities particularly in relation to surface and ground water pollution. While numerous mathematical models have been developed to simulate processes governing leachate occurrence and behavior in landfills and their potential migration away from landfill boundaries, none have been applied at former quarries converted to waste disposal facilities. The objective of this research work is to calibrate and apply mathematical models to predict the generation, fate and transport of leachate at a former quarry landfill facility (the Naameh landfill site). The site offers unique characteristics in that it is the first quarry converted to a landfill in Lebanon and is planned to have refuse depth in excess of one hundred meters, making it one of the deepest in the world. The modeling estimates leachate quantity in order to control its associated environmental impacts, particularly on ground water wells down gradient of the site. The sensitivity of leachate generation to meteorological, operation and design parameters was assessed. Guidance for leachate control, recirculation and collection to minimize these impacts is also provided. The fate and transport of contaminants released from the landfill to the subsurface was modeled. A sensitivity analysis with respect to geological properties of the site was conducted. Worst case scenarios were investigated as well

  1. Benthic Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic cover (habitat) maps are derived from aerial imagery, underwater photos, acoustic surveys, and data gathered from sediment samples. Shallow to...

  2. Yolo County's Accelerated Anaerobic and Aerobic Composting (Full-Scale Controlled Landfill Bioreactor) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, R.; Kieffer, J.; Akau, H.; Augenstein, D.

    2002-12-01

    elimination of methane production and acceleration of waste decomposition. In the first phase of this project a 12-acre module that contains a 9.5-acre anaerobic cell and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell has been constructed and filled with over 220,000 tons of municipal solid waste. Water and leachate addition began in April 2002 and to date less than 200,000 gallons of liquid has been added to the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell. The waste filling phase of the aerobic cell was completed in June of 2002 and a 12-inches soil cover and 12-inches of greenwaste compost cover was placed on top of the cell. A vacuum will be applied to the piping within the waste to draw air through the landfill. Instrumentations have been installed to monitor the following parameters: waste temperature, moisture, leachate volumes, leachate hydraulic head over the primary liner, leachate composition, gas volumes and composition. A supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system has been installed to monitor and control the operation of the bioreactor cells. Waste samples were taken from each cell for laboratory testing in early June 2002.

  3. Methane from landfills in Sweden. Final report; Metan fraan avfallsupplag i Sverige. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, Jerker [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Galle, Bo; Boerjesson, Gunnar [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies

    2006-01-15

    Three years of measurements has been conducted at seven Swedish landfills, quantifying methane emission, methane oxidation and methane production. The measurements reveal a large span between the sites in terms of gas recovery efficiency, 29-78% during normal operation. The fraction of the totally produced methane that is eventually leaking out to the atmosphere, was found to vary between 21-68%. Regarding methane oxidation, the study shows that of the methane going from the landfill interior towards the atmosphere, 6-43% is oxidised to CO{sub 2} in the different landfill cover soils. The highest methane oxidation was found in closed landfills during summertime, and the lowest at active landfills during wintertime, due to the strong temperature dependence of the oxidation. The equipment developed for methane emission measurements is based on time resolved concentration measurements with FTIR spectroscopy in combination with tracer gas releases from the surface of the landfill. The method has proven to be able to state the methane emission from the landfills with high accuracy, {+-}18% of the emission estimate (95% confidence interval). This is in line with what has been achieved in the literature for fugitive emission sources. The system has also proven to be useful for on site leak search. The precision for the methane production measurement was demonstrated to be high, down to {+-}4.2%. This enables trend studies and verification of improvement measures taken at the landfill sites. In terms of absolute accuracy for the production estimate, a 95%-confidence interval of down to (-6.0%, +6.2%) has been achieved. At times of strong methane oxidation the uncertainties increase, particularly if the emission is high. The gas production at the landfill site is therefore preferably measured during autumn-winter-spring when the temperature and the methane oxidation are low. The methane oxidation has been measured by carbon isotope technique, utilising the enrichment in

  4. Nitrogen removal in the bioreactor landfill system with intermittent aeration at the top of landfilled waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High ammonia concentration of recycled landfill leachate makes it very difficult to treat. In this work, a vertical aerobic/anoxic/anaerobic lab-scale bioreactor landfill system, which was constructed by intermittent aeration at the top of landfilled waste, as a bioreactor for in situ nitrogen removal was investigated during waste stabilization. Intermittent aeration at the top of landfilled waste might stimulate the growth of nitrifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria in the top and middle layers of waste. The nitrifying bacteria population for the landfill bioreactor with intermittent aeration system reached between106 and 108 cells/dry g waste, although it decreased 2 orders of magnitude on day 30, due to the inhibitory effect of the acid environment and high organic matter in the landfilled waste. The denitrifying bacteria population increased by between 4 and 13 orders of magnitude compared with conventional anaerobic landfilled waste layers. Leachate NO3--N concentration was very low in both two experimental landfill reactors. After 105 days operation, leachate NH4+-N and TN concentrations for the landfill reactor with intermittent aeration system dropped to 186 and 289 mg/l, respectively, while they were still kept above 1000 mg/l for the landfill reactor without intermittent aerobic system. In addition, there is an increase in the rate of waste stabilization as well as an increase of 12% in the total waste settlement for the landfill reactor with intermittent aeration system

  5. Generation of leachate and the flow regime in landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, D.

    1998-06-01

    In this thesis the generation of leachate and the presence and movement of water in landfilled municipal solid waste (MSW) is investigated. The precipitation-leachate discharge relationship for landfills was found to be dominated by evaporation, accumulation in the soil cover, accumulation in the solid waste and fast gravitational flow in a network of channels. The flow regime is governed by the heterogeneity of the internal geometry of the landfill, which is characterized by a discrete structure, significant horizontal stratification, structural voids, impermeable surfaces, and low capillarity. Also the boundary conditions, that is the water input pattern, has shown to be important for the flow process. Based on this, landfilled waste can be conceptualized as a dual domain medium, consisting of a channel domain and a matrix domain. The matrix flow is slow and diffusive, whereas the channel flow is assumed to be driven solely by gravity and to take place as a thin viscous film on solid surfaces. A kinematic wave model for unsaturated infiltration and internal drainage in the channel domain is presented. The model employs a two-parameter power expression as macroscopic flux law. Solutions were derived for the cases when water enters the channel domain laterally and when water enters from the upper end. The model parameters were determined and interpreted in terms of the internal geometry of the waste medium by fitting the model to one set of infiltration and drainage data derived from a large scale laboratory experiment under transient conditions. The model was validated using another set of data from a sequence of water input events and was shown to perform accurately. A solute transport model was developed by coupling a simple piston flux expression and a mobile-immobile conceptualization of the transport domains with the water flow model. Breakthrough curves derived from steady and transient tracer experiments where interpreted with the model. The transport

  6. Mercury air-borne emissions from 5 municipal solid waste landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. G. Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study on atmospheric mercury emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW landfills in China is necessary to understand mercury behavior in this source category, simply because China disposes of bulk MSW by landfilling and a large quantity of mercury enters into landfills. Between 2003 and 2006, mercury airborne emissions through different pathways, as well as mercury speciation in landfill gas (LFG were measured at 5 MSW landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China. The results showed that mercury content in the substrate fundamentally affected the magnitude of mercury emissions, resulting in the highest emission rate (as high as 57 651 ng Hg m−2 h−1 at the working face and in un-covered waste areas, and the lowest measured at soil covers and vegetation areas (less than 20 ng Hg m−2 h−1. Meteorological parameters, especially solar radiation, influenced the diurnal pattern of mercury surface-air emissions. Total gaseous mercury (TGM in LFG varied from 2.0 to 1406.0 ng m−3, monomethyl mercury (MMHg and dimethyl mercury (DMHg in LFG averaged at 1.93 and 9.21 ng m−3, and accounted for 0.51% and 1.79% of the TGM in the LFG, respectively. Total mercury emitted from the five landfills ranged from 17 to 3285 g yr−1, with the highest from the working face, then soil covering, and finally the vent pipes.

  7. Imaging scatterers in landfills using seismic interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantaki, L.A.; Dragnov, D.S.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Ghose, R.

    2013-01-01

    A significant problem with landfills is their aftercare period. A landfill is considered to be safe for the environment only after a relatively long period of time. Until it reaches such a condition, it has to be periodically treated. Not only are treatments very expensive, but they could be dangero

  8. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 30CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppor...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SPECIAL TYPES OF LANDFILLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality was monitored for one year at a hillfill, a balefill, a millfill, a strip mine landfill, and a permitted sanitary landfill to determine the impact of each on water quality. The leachate generated by the hillfill was the strongest during initial decomposition. Howeve...

  10. Ecotoxicological investigations on landfill leachates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A battery of different bioassays are set up in order to characterize and determine the risk potential of landfill leachates and defined fractions. The following four project phases can be identified: 1) setting up of the tests, 2) development of a fractioning method, 3) application of the tests to fractions of leachate, 4) chemical analysis of toxic leachate fractions. Selection of the tests, which are described in detail, was preceeded by thorough bibligraphic studies. The tests are currently being used on reference substances. Preliminary testing regarding fractioning and chemical analysis is being done. (orig.)

  11. GIS application in the spatial analysis of illegal landfills in big cities: A case study of Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paunović Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the attempt to map and analyze spatial distribution of illegal landfills in the City of Belgrade. To make this happen the main tasks were to form the geospatial database of illegal landfills in the study area and to analyze the patterns in their spatial distribution. The data on the landfill locations were obtained from the Agency of Environmental Protection of the Republic of Serbia, while the ArcGIS software was used for their spatial analysis. The City of Belgrade, respectively the public utility companies use five landfills, which cover up the area of 89 ha. On the other hand, in the study area there are 223 illegal landfills. The spatial analysis showed two patterns: (1 increasing of the number of illegal landfills with distancing from the city urban center, and (2 increasing of their number with distancing from the municipal centers. This paper also showed that there is landfill clustering, or that their spatial distribution is not random. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176008

  12. Sustainable landfilling in tropical conditions: comparison between open and closed cell approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, C; Karthikeyan, Obuli P; Park, K H

    2011-04-01

    Two landfill test cells were constructed in a tropical climate using locally available low-cost materials. One cell was operated without a cover on the municipal solid waste to simulate 'open landfill' conditions and the other cell was covered to create 'closed landfill' conditions. Both test cells were monitored over a period of 290 days under rainy, dry and artificial wetting conditions. Due to the relatively high compaction density of waste in the closed test cell, the substrate settlement was gradual and comparatively lower than in the open test cell. Multiple top covers in the closed test cell resulted in significant run-off of incident precipitation during the rainy season, which delayed the waste stabilization and subsequently produced a lesser volume of leachate. On the other hand, operation of the open test cell was found to be advantageous in terms of leachate management and substrate settlement along with waste stabilization pattern. Infiltration of rain-water into the waste mass leached out the maximum organic pollutants and oxidized the nitrogen content, which is deemed to be a benefit of operating an open cell landfill under tropical conditions. Artificial wetting during dry periods by recirculation of stored leachate notably accelerated the waste stabilization and secondary substrate settlement in the open test cell. The continuous monitoring of ground-water quality from the site showed only seasonal variations. PMID:20855353

  13. Environmental risks of farmed and barren alkaline coal ash landfills in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposal of coal combustion residues (CCR) has led to a significant consumption of land in the West Balkan region. In Tuzla (Bosnia and Herzegovina) we studied previously soil-covered (farmed) and barren CCR landfills including management practises, field ageing of CCR and the transfer of trace elements into crops, wild plants and wastewaters. Soil tillage resulted in mixing of cover soil with CCR. Medicago sativa showed very low Cu:Mo ratios (1.25) which may cause hypocuprosis in ruminants. Total loads of inorganic pollutants in the CCR transport water, but not pH (∼12), were below regulatory limits of most EU countries. Arsenic concentrations in CCR transport water were -1 whereas reductive conditions in an abandoned landfill significantly enhanced concentrations in leachates (44 μg l-1). The opposite pattern was found for Cr likely due to large initial leaching of CrVI. Public use of landfills, including farming, should be based on a prior risk assessment due to the heterogeneity of CCR. - Uncontrolled farming and tillage of previously soil-covered coal ash landfills resulted in exposure of ash on the surface

  14. Emissions of air-borne mercury from five municipal solid waste landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.-G. Li

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available China disposes of bulk Municipal Solid Waste (MSW by landfilling, resulting in a large quantity of mercury that enters landfills through waste. A detailed study on atmospheric mercury emissions from MSW landfills in China is necessary to understand mercury behavior from this source. Between 2003 and 2006, mercury airborne emissions through different pathways, as well as mercury speciation in Landfill Gas (LFG were measured at 5 MSW landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China. The results showed that mercury content in the substrate increased the magnitude of mercury emissions, with the highest emission rate measured at the working face and in uncovered waste areas, and the lowest measured near soil covers and vegetated areas. Meteorological parameters, especially solar radiation, influenced the diurnal pattern of mercury surface-air emissions. Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM in LFG varied from 2.0 to 1406.0 ng m−3, Monomethyl Mercury (MMHg and Dimethyl Mercury (DMHg in LFG averaged at 1.93 and 9.21 ng m−3, and accounted for 0.51% and 1.79% of the TGM in the LFG, respectively. Total mercury emitted from the five landfills ranged from 17 to 3300 g yr−1, with the highest from the working face, then soil covering, and finally the vent pipes.

  15. Emissions of air-borne mercury from five municipal solid waste landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.-G.; Feng, X.; Li, P.; Liang, L.; Tang, S.-L.; Wang, S.-F.; Fu, X.-W.; Qiu, G.-L.; Shang, L.-H.

    2010-04-01

    China disposes of bulk Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) by landfilling, resulting in a large quantity of mercury that enters landfills through waste. A detailed study on atmospheric mercury emissions from MSW landfills in China is necessary to understand mercury behavior from this source. Between 2003 and 2006, mercury airborne emissions through different pathways, as well as mercury speciation in Landfill Gas (LFG) were measured at 5 MSW landfills in Guiyang and Wuhan, China. The results showed that mercury content in the substrate increased the magnitude of mercury emissions, with the highest emission rate measured at the working face and in uncovered waste areas, and the lowest measured near soil covers and vegetated areas. Meteorological parameters, especially solar radiation, influenced the diurnal pattern of mercury surface-air emissions. Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) in LFG varied from 2.0 to 1406.0 ng m-3, Monomethyl Mercury (MMHg) and Dimethyl Mercury (DMHg) in LFG averaged at 1.93 and 9.21 ng m-3, and accounted for 0.51% and 1.79% of the TGM in the LFG, respectively. Total mercury emitted from the five landfills ranged from 17 to 3300 g yr-1, with the highest from the working face, then soil covering, and finally the vent pipes.

  16. Evaluation of the Oedometer Tests of Municipal Landfill Waste Material

    OpenAIRE

    Imre Emőke; Firgi Tibor; Telekes Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the ongoing research is (i) to develop a new biodegradation landfill technique so that the landfill gas production could be controlled and the utilisation of the landfill gas could economically be optimized, (ii) to plan the energy utilisation of the landfill including individual and combined solutions (solar, wind, geothermal energy, energy storage using methanol etc.). [1, 2, 3

  17. Evaluation of the Oedometer Tests of Municipal Landfill Waste Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Emőke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the ongoing research is (i to develop a new biodegradation landfill technique so that the landfill gas production could be controlled and the utilisation of the landfill gas could economically be optimized, (ii to plan the energy utilisation of the landfill including individual and combined solutions (solar, wind, geothermal energy, energy storage using methanol etc.. [1, 2, 3

  18. Long term monitoring of leachate flux into drainage pipes of MSW landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münnich, Kai; Bauer, Jan; Fricke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of leachate quality and quantity is an essential part of the monitoring of landfills in the different phases during their lifespan. These measurements allow the evaluation of the decomposition processes in the landfill and the efficiency of technical installations for the reduction of the leachate generation. Normally the measurements are made at the outlet of larger sections of the landfill or at the overall landfill. An identification of smaller parts with different biological or hydraulic behaviour within the landfill section is not possible in that case. In the framework of a long-term research project concerning the monitoring of landfills, different devices for small-scale identification of the leachate discharge were developed at the Technical University of Braunschweig. The device allows a measurement of the leachate discharge inside a single drainage pipe having a length up to 375  m. The measurements showed the influence of changes in operation. It was found that the discharge in the pipes and the efficiency of the drainage system was strongly influenced by deformations and torsion of the high-density polyethylene pipes and unequal settlements of the subsoil. The discharge of leachate in the drainage system was, as expected, very non-uniform and in parts the leachate was not flowing inside the pipes, but rather in the surrounding gravel layer. Furthermore, large differences in leachate quality may occur, whereas the differences in discharge volume are small. With the developed system it is possible to control the efficiency and the functioning of top cover systems for landfills. PMID:21030425

  19. An Assessment of the Disposal of Petroleum Industry NORM in Nonhazardous Landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnish, John J.; Blunt, Deborah, L.; Haffenden, Rebecca A.; Herbert, Jennifer; Pfingston, Manjula; Smith, Karen P.; Williams, Gustavious P.

    1999-10-12

    In this study, the disposal of radium-bearing NORM wastes in nonhazardous landfills in accordance with the MDEQ guidelines was modeled to evaluate potential radiological doses and resultant health risks to workers and the general public. In addition, the study included an evaluation of the potential doses and health risks associated with disposing of a separate NORM waste stream generated by the petroleum industry--wastes containing lead-210 (Pb-210) and its progeny. Both NORM waste streams are characterized in Section 3 of this report. The study also included reviews of (1) the regulatory constraints applicable to the disposal of NORM in nonhazardous landfills in several major oil and gas producing states (Section 2) and (2) the typical costs associated with disposing of NORM, covering disposal options currently permitted by most state regulations as well as the nonhazardous landfill option (Section 4).

  20. Effective monitoring of landfills: flux measurements and thermography enhance efficiency and reduce environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Despite the various positions towards the impact of methane on global warming, there is a general agreement about the fact that methane from landfill represents about 23% of the total anthropogenic CH4 released to the atmosphere. Despite the importance of this topic, no internationally accepted protocol exists to quantify the leakage of biogas from the landfill cover. To achieve this goal, this paper presents a field method based on accumulation chamber flux measurements. In addition, the results obtained from a nine-year-long monitoring activity on an Italian municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill are presented. The connection between such flux measurements of biogas release and thermal anomalies detected by infrared radiometry is also discussed. The main overall benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase in the recovered energy from the landfill site by means of an optimal collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of waste. (paper)

  1. Dioxin and furan emissions from landfill gas-fired combustion units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1990 Federal Clean Air Act Amendments require the development of maximum achievable control technology standards (MACT) for sources of hazardous air pollutants, including landfill gas-fired combustion sources. The Industrial Combustion Coordinated Rulemaking (ICCR) Federal Advisory Committee is a group of stakeholders from the public and private sector whose charge is to develop recommendations for a unified set of federal toxic air emissions regulations. Specifically, the group will establish MACT standards for industrial-commercial-institutional combustion sources. The ICCR proceedings have given rise to considerable interest in potential dioxin and furan emissions from landfill gas-fired combustion units. In order to establish the potential of dioxin and furan emissions from this group of combustion sources, a world-wide literature search was conducted. A total of 22 references were evaluated. The references covered a wide range of test programs, testing methodologies and combustion equipment type. The most abundant data were for landfill gas-fired flares (shrouded and afterburners) and I.C. engines. Because of limitations in obtaining actual test reports with complete lab data and QA/QC results, and a lack of knowledge as to the exact types of waste received at the European landfills, the test data from these sources, for the purposes of this paper, are considered qualitative. The conclusion reached from review of the test data is that there is a potential for dioxin and furan emissions from landfill gas-fired combustion units, but at very low levels for well operated systems

  2. Study of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities exposed to buckeye reclamation landfill drainage wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buckeye Reclamation Landfill (BRL), a Superfund site, incorporates approximately 50 acres of a 658 acre tract of land. The BRL consists of past underground mining voids, including some surface-mined lands, and mine refuse piles from processed bituminous coal. The area was subsequently used as a nonhazardous public and municipal solid waste landfill, and industrial sludge and liquid wastes were also deposited in an impoundment in the northern section of the landfill. The entire landfill area was completely covered with soil and revegetated in the late 1980's and early 1990's. The BRL produces acidic and highly mineralized drainage causing a widespread problem of serious mine drainage pollution in the watershed. A study was undertaken to assess the exposure of pollutants to the macroinvertebrate assemblages and to determine the extent of pollution of the BRL watershed. Samples were collected from ten sites in 1995. Nine systematic and spatial transect samples were taken at each collection site for macroinverbrates with a 595 microm mesh, modified kick net from riffle/run and glide/pool habitats of streams above and below the BRL watershed. All macroinverbrates were identified to the lowest taxonomic level possible. The levels for total Zn ranged from 22--604 microg/L; pH ranged from 4.4 to 8.1. The data distinguished the exposed sites receiving landfill leachates and sedimentation runoff from the less impacted sites

  3. Effective monitoring of landfills: flux measurements and thermography enhance efficiency and reduce environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglini, Raffaele; Raco, Brunella; Scozzari, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Despite the various positions towards the impact of methane on global warming, there is a general agreement about the fact that methane from landfill represents about 23% of the total anthropogenic CH4 released to the atmosphere. Despite the importance of this topic, no internationally accepted protocol exists to quantify the leakage of biogas from the landfill cover. To achieve this goal, this paper presents a field method based on accumulation chamber flux measurements. In addition, the results obtained from a nine-year-long monitoring activity on an Italian municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill are presented. The connection between such flux measurements of biogas release and thermal anomalies detected by infrared radiometry is also discussed. The main overall benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase in the recovered energy from the landfill site by means of an optimal collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of waste.

  4. Geophysical characterization in solid waste landfill for evaluation of geotechnical instability conditioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Del Roveri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The disposal of solid waste can create environmental problems, in addition to the potential risk of instability even in planned geotechnical works, such as provisions in stacks or high ends of the landfill, because they represent mere adjustments in civil engineering works. The Leme city, SP, generates about 35 t/day of municipal waste, that are deposited in a landfill located in the Barro Preto neighborhood. This work conducted a geophysical survey, based on geotechnical instability evidence in area, for analysis of the conditioners that cause on the sides leachate resurgence landfill and its relationship to mass movements and ravines installation in cover soil, with consequent waste exposure. The results indicate horizons of low resistivity connected with resurgence points generated by the organic matter decomposition contained in the waste. Such horizons result in leachate concentration in some places, which, in turn, may lead to loss of cohesion of the materials constituting the residues mass. The results are areas with mass flow by rotational movements, which, together with the surface flow of rainwater, evolves into ravines and exposed residues, preferably at the resurgence point. The leachate flow on the surface affects areas beyond the limits at landfill with direct impact on local agriculture and risk to pedestrians using the highway bordered by the landfill beyond the soil and the local aquifer.

  5. Electrostatic Separation of Biowaste: An Approach for Landfills Reduction in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonchun Lai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leachate and methane production due to the landfilling of biowaste has become an environmental threat. This study targets to investigate the extractability of biowaste from waste mixture as an approach of reduction of solid waste and landfill. A statistical analysis was conducted to analyze the performance of electrostatically waste separation. Individual and interactive effects of independent factors, namely rotation speed; electrical potential and electrodes interval on separation efficiency were assessed. Optimal operational conditions were deduced as 60 rpm rotation speed, 30 kV supply potential and 54 mm electrodes interval. Under these conditions, biowaste separation efficiency of 83.88% was experimentally achieved. Separation efficiency of non-biowaste was 89.51% under same operational condition. These results fitted well with the predicted model. Results in this study conclude the electrostatic separation could be an effective pre-treatment alternative in dealing with leachate and methane problems of landfilled biowaste.

  6. The Impact of Landfills on Residential Property Values

    OpenAIRE

    Alan K. Reichert; Michael Small; Sunil Mohanty

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of five municipal landfills on residential property values in a major metropolitan area (Cleveland, Ohio). The study concludes that landfills will likely have an adverse impact upon housing values when the landfill is located within several blocks of an expensive housing area. The negative impact is between 5.5%-7.3% of market value depending upon the actual distance from the landfill. For less expensive, older areas the landfill effect is ...

  7. Monitoring of landfill influences on groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Brenčič

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Landfills of waste present serious threat to groundwater. To prevent groundwater pollution from landfill monitoring is performed. Rule of groundwater pollution monitoring from dangerous substances implements principles in Slovene legislation. In everyday practice certain questions arose since validity of the rule. These questions are about responsible parties in monitoring, groundwater distribution in space, target groundwater units, characterization level of the landfill and its surroundings, background values in groundwater, table of content of groundwater monitoring plan, quality of groundwater monitoring network, phases of monitoring, maintenance of monitoring network and activation of piezometers.

  8. Landfilling, a bad but inevitable alternative in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many industrial processes release rest materials which sometimes contain components that can be very harmful to the environment. A part of these rest materials can be reused or applied usefully either before or after having been treated. Those rest materials which cannot be handled in this way, are temporarily stored or must be definitely removed. In order to select a suitable removal system and to give a firsthand impression of the possible magnitude of emissions into the environment, it is important that waste materials be physically and chemically qualified. (au)

  9. Evaluation of copper, zinc, and chromium concentration in landfill soil and hospital waste ash of Shahrekord municipal solid waste landfill

    OpenAIRE

    M Hatami Manesh; Mirzaei, M.; M Gholamali Fard; A.R Riyahi Bakhtiyari; Sadeghi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: one of the most important environmental concerns is heavy metals emissions from human activities to natural ecosystems, particularly transfer to soil. The aims of this study were measured the concentrations of Cu, Zn and Cr in landfill soil and hospital waste ash of Shahrekord municipal solid waste landfill. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were collected from three sites: out of the landfill, municipal landfill and hospital landfill. In each site 2, 1, and 1 ...

  10. Operating a fuel cell using landfill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippel, C.E.; Preston, J.L. Jr.; Trocciola, J.; Spiegel, R.

    1996-12-31

    An ONSI PC25{trademark}, 200 kW (nominal capacity) phosphoric acid fuel cell operating on landfill gas is installed at the Town of Groton Flanders Road landfill in Groton, Connecticut. This joint project by the Connecticut Light & Power Company (CL&P) which is an operating company of Northeast Utilities, the Town of Groton, International Fuel Cells (IFC), and the US EPA is intended to demonstrate the viability of installing, operating and maintaining a fuel cell operating on landfill gas at a landfill site. The goals of the project are to evaluate the fuel cell and gas pretreatment unit operation, test modifications to simplify the GPU design and demonstrate reliability of the entire system.

  11. Landfill leachate treatment in rotating biological contactors

    OpenAIRE

    Cortez, Susana

    2010-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Sanitary landfilling is the most used and accepted method to eliminate municipal solid waste worldwide due to its economic advantages. The generation of leachate is an inevitable consequence of this practice. Landfill leachate is a high-strength wastewater with great chemical complexity and diversity. In order to avoid discharges to the environment causing negative impacts to the biota or public health, it must be properly collected an...

  12. Landfill aeration worldwide: Concepts, indications and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Different landfill aeration concepts and accordant application areas are described. ► Examples of full scale projects are provided for Europe, North-America and Asia. ► Major project findings are summarised, including prospects and limitations. ► Inconsistencies between laboratory and full scale results have been elaborated. ► An explanatory approach in connection with the inconsistencies is provided. - Abstract: The creation of sustainable landfills is a fundamental goal in waste management worldwide. In this connection landfill aeration contributes towards an accelerated, controlled and sustainable conversion of conventional anaerobic landfills into a biological stabilized state associated with a minimised emission potential. The technology has been successfully applied to landfills in Europe, North America and Asia, following different strategies depending on the geographical region, the specific legislation and the available financial resources. Furthermore, methodologies for the incorporation of landfill aeration into the carbon trade mechanisms have been developed in recent years. This manuscript gives an overview on existing concepts for landfill aeration; their application ranges and specifications. For all of the described concepts examples from different countries worldwide are provided, including details regarding their potentials and limitations. Some of the most important findings from these aeration projects are summarised and future research needs have been identified. It becomes apparent that there is a great demand for a systematisation of the available results and implications in order to further develop and optimise this very promising technology. The IWWG (International Waste Working Group) Task Group “Landfill Aeration” contributes towards the achievement of this goal.

  13. Nitrifyers in constructed wetlands treating landfill leachates

    OpenAIRE

    Sundberg, Carina

    2008-01-01

    Landfill leachate is produced many years after a landfill site closes. Hence, treatment by “natural methods”, as e.g. constructed wetlands, with low management requirements is attractive. Constructed wetlands usually provide both shallow and deep areas with aerobic and anaerobic zones, which is suitable for nitrification followed by denitrification of the ammonium-rich leachates. Full-scale treatment systems are influenced by climatic variables that affect the microbial community. Also, the o...

  14. Influence of landfills on the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Marešová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The thesis deals with the questions of landfill and controlled dumps technicalrequirements. It describes the current state of the landfill situation in the world and in the Czech Republic. There are mention in detail differences among municipal, hazardous and other waste. The thesis describes conception of a dump, dumps types according to a few various aspects, wastes portion disposal to dumps and constantly decreasing the number of the dumps over the years. There are listed the...

  15. GeoChip-based Analysis of Groundwater Microbial Diversity in Norman Landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Parisi, Victoria; Kang, Sanghoon; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Masoner, Jason; Cozzarelli, Isabelle; Suflita, Joseph; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    The Norman Landfill is a closed municipal solid waste landfill located on an alluvium associated with the Canadian River in Norman, Oklahoma. It has operated as a research site since 1994 because it is typical of many closed landfill sites across the U.S. Leachate from the unlined landfill forms a groundwater plume that extends downgradient approximately 250 m from the landfill toward the Canadian River. To investigate the impact of the landfill leachate on the diversity and functional structure of microbial communities, groundwater samples were taken from eight monitoring wells at a depth of 5m, and analyzed using a comprehensive functional gene array covering about 50,000 genes involved in key microbial processes, such as biogeochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, and bioremediation of organic contaminants and metals. Wells are located within a transect along a presumed flow path with different distances to the center of the leachate plume. Our analyses showed that microbial communities were obviously impacted by the leachate-component from the landfill. The number of genes detected and microbial diversity indices in the center (LF2B) and its closest (MLS35) wells were significantly less than those detected in other more downgradient wells, while no significant changes were observed in the relative abundance (i.e., percentage of each gene category) for most gene categories. However, the microbial community composition or structure of the landfill groundwater did not clearly show a significant correlation with the distance from well LF2B. Burkholderia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were found to be the dominant microbial populations detected in all wells, while Bradyrhizobium sp. and Ralstonia sp. were dominant populations for seven wells except LF2B. In addition, Mantel test and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicate that pH, sulfate, ammonia nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have significant effects on the microbial community structure. The results

  16. Comparison of potential greenhouse gas emissions from disposal of MSW in sanitary landfills vs. waste-to-energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates the US currently generates about 160 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) per year, and this figure will exceed 200 million tons annually by the year 2000. About 80 percent of the MSW will be disposed of in landfills and waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities, both of which generate greenhouse gases, namely methane and carbon dioxide. This paper provides an introductory level analysis of the potential long term greenhouse gas emissions from these two MSW disposal alternatives. Carbon dioxide credits are derived for fossil fuel offset by WTE and methane emissions are converted to equivalent CO2 emissions in order to derive a single emission figure for comparison of the greenhouse contribution of the two disposal strategies. A secondary analysis is presented to compare the net equivalent CO2 emissions from WTE facilities to those from landfills with methane gas recovery, combustion and energy generation. The conclusion is, that for a given amount of MSW, landfilling contributes to the greenhouse effect about 10 times more than a modern Waste-To-Energy facility. Even with 50% of all landfill methane emissions recovered and converted to electricity, the contribution to the greenhouse effect by the landfill alternative is about 6 times greater than the waste-to-energy alternative

  17. Occurrence and treatment efficiency of pharmaceuticals in landfill leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mu-Chen; Chen, Yao Yin; Chiou, Mei-Rung; Chen, Men Yu; Fan, Huan-Jung

    2016-09-01

    Landfill leachates might contain pharmaceuticals due to the expired or unwanted drugs were disposed of at landfills. These pharmaceuticals might pose a threat to soil and groundwater. Therefore, this study investigated the distributions of pharmaceutical residues and toxicities among four typical municipal landfill leachates. Twenty six pharmaceuticals were investigated in this study and fifteen of them were found in all samples from four leachates. In addition, ampicillin and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) were detected in urban landfills (A1 and A2) but were not in rural and suburb landfills (B and C). On the other hand, some compounds were much more abundant in suburb/rural landfill leachates than those in urban landfills including diclofenac, gemfibrozil and amphetamine. Landfill leachate treatment plants could not remove most of the pharmaceuticals effectively. Landfill leachates without proper treatments would have significant adverse health impacts on human and aquatic life. PMID:27026494

  18. Session 7 - discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This discussion session of the 1990 conference on Landfill Gas covered variations in landfill gas composition and atmospheric pressure; the influence of methane on the greenhouse effect; sampling landfill gas; and waste incineration as an alternative to landfilling. (author)

  19. Assessing the disposal of wastes containing NORM in nonhazardous waste landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years, many states have established specific regulations for the management of petroleum industry wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) above specified thresholds. These regulations have limited the number of disposal options available for NORM-containing wastes, thereby increasing the related waste management costs. In view of the increasing economic burden associated with NORM management, industry and regulators are interested in identifying cost-effective disposal alternatives that still provide adequate protection of human health and the environment. One such alternative being considered is the disposal of NORM-containing wastes in landfills permitted to accept only nonhazardous wastes. The disposal of petroleum industry wastes containing radium-226 and lead-210 above regulated levels in nonhazardous landfills was modeled to evaluate the potential radiological doses and associated health risks to workers and the general public. A variety of scenarios were considered to evaluate the effects associated with the operational phase (i.e., during landfill operations) and future use of the landfill property. Doses were calculated for the maximally exposed receptor for each scenario. This paper presents the results of that study and some conclusions and recommendations drawn from it

  20. Evolution on qualities of leachate and landfill gas in the semi-aerobic landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qifei; YANG Yufei; PANG Xiangrui; WANG Qi

    2008-01-01

    To study the characteristics of stabilization in semi-aerobic landfill, large-scale simulated landfill was constructed based on the semi-aerobic landfill theory. Consequently, the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and nitrite nitrogen, and the pH value in leachate, as well as the component contents of landfill gas composition (methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen) in landfill were regularly monitored for 52 weeks. The results showed that COD and ammonia concentrations declined rapidly and did not show the accumulating rule like anaerobic landfill, and remained at about 300 and 100 mg/L, respectively, after 48 weeks. Meanwhile, the descending rate reached 98.9% and 96.9%, respectively. Nitrate concentration increased rapidly after 24 weeks and fluctuated between 220-280 mg/L after 43 weeks. The pH values were below 7 during the first 8 weeks and after that leachates appeared to be alkaline. Carbon dioxide was the main composition in landfill gas and its concentration remained at a high level through the whole stabilization process. The average contents of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and methane varied between 19 vol.%-28 vol.%, 2 vol.%-8 vol.%, and 5 vol.%-13 vol.%, respectively. A relative equilibrium was reached after 48 weeks. The highest temperature in the landfill chamber could amount to 75.8 degrees centigrade.

  1. Environmental assessment of Ammässuo Landfill (Finland) by means of LCA-modelling (EASEWASTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Antti; Manfredi, Simone; Christensen, Thomas H; Anderson, Reetta

    2009-08-01

    The Old Ammässuo Landfill (Espoo, Finland) covers an area of 52 hectares and contains about 10 million tonnes of waste that was landfilled between 1987 and 2007. The majority of this waste was mixed, of which about 57% originated from households. This paper aims at describing the management of the Old Ammässuo Landfill throughout its operational lifetime (1987-2007), and at developing an environmental evaluation based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) using the EASEWASTE-model. The assessment criteria evaluate specific categories of impact, including standard impact categories, toxicity-related impact categories and an impact categorized as spoiled groundwater resources (SGR). With respect to standard and toxicity-related impact categories, the LCA results show that substantial impact potentials are estimated for global warming (GW), ozone depletion (OD), human toxicity via soil (HTs) and ecotoxicity in water chronic (ETwc). The largest impact potential was found for SGR and amounted to 57.6 person equivalent (PE) per tonne of landfilled waste. However, the SGR impact may not be viewed as a significant issue in Finland as the drinking water is mostly supplied from surface water bodies. Overall, the results demonstrate that gas management has great importance to the environmental performance of the Old Ammässuo Landfill. However, several chemicals related to gas composition (especially trace compounds) and specific emissions from on-site operations were not available or were not measured and were therefore taken from the literature. Measurement campaigns and field investigations should be undertaken in order to obtain a more robust and comprehensive dataset that can be used in the LCA-modelling, before major improvements regarding landfill management are finalized. PMID:19423588

  2. Size-resolved culturable airborne bacteria sampled in rice field, sanitary landfill, and waste incineration sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yongju; Park, Jiyeon; Lim, Sung-Il; Hur, Hor-Gil; Kim, Daesung; Park, Kihong

    2010-08-01

    Size-resolved bacterial concentrations in atmospheric aerosols sampled by using a six stage viable impactor at rice field, sanitary landfill, and waste incinerator sites were determined. Culture-based and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods were used to identify the airborne bacteria. The culturable bacteria concentration in total suspended particles (TSP) was found to be the highest (848 Colony Forming Unit (CFU)/m(3)) at the sanitary landfill sampling site, while the rice field sampling site has the lowest (125 CFU/m(3)). The closed landfill would be the main source of the observed bacteria concentration at the sanitary landfill. The rice field sampling site was fully covered by rice grain with wetted conditions before harvest and had no significant contribution to the airborne bacteria concentration. This might occur because the dry conditions favor suspension of soil particles and this area had limited personnel and vehicle flow. The respirable fraction calculated by particles less than 3.3 mum was highest (26%) at the sanitary landfill sampling site followed by waste incinerator (19%) and rice field (10%), which showed a lower level of respiratory fraction compared to previous literature values. We identified 58 species in 23 genera of culturable bacteria, and the Microbacterium, Staphylococcus, and Micrococcus were the most abundant genera at the sanitary landfill, waste incinerator, and rice field sites, respectively. An antibiotic resistant test for the above bacteria (Micrococcus sp., Microbacterium sp., and Staphylococcus sp.) showed that the Staphylococcus sp. had the strongest resistance to both antibiotics (25.0% resistance for 32 microg ml(-1) of Chloramphenicol and 62.5% resistance for 4 microg ml(-1) of Gentamicin). PMID:20623053

  3. Sganzerla Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor da Rosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7917.2014v19n1p158 Neste artigo, realizo uma leitura do cinema de Rogério Sganzerla, desde o clássico O bandido da luz vermelha até os documentários filmados na década de oitenta, a partir de duas noções centrais: cover e over. Para isso, parto de uma controvérsia com o ensaio de Ismail Xavier, Alegorias do subdesenvolvimento, em que o crítico realiza uma leitura do cinema brasileiro da década de sessenta através do conceito de alegoria; depois releio uma série de textos críticos do próprio Sganzerla, publicados em Edifício Sganzerla, procurando repensar as ideias de “herói vazio” ou “cinema impuro” e sugerindo assim uma nova relação do seu cinema com o tempo e a representação; então busco articular tais ideias com certos procedimentos de vanguarda, como a falsificação, a cópia, o clichê e a colagem; e finalmente procuro mostrar que, no cinema de Sganzerla, a partir principalmente de suas reflexões sobre Orson Welles, a voz é usada de maneira a deformar a interpretação naturalista.

  4. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Harbor Distinct Microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, Blake W.; Lyles, Christopher N.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Stevenson, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Landfills are the final repository for most of the discarded material from human society and its “built environments.” Microorganisms subsequently degrade this discarded material in the landfill, releasing gases (largely CH4 and CO2) and a complex mixture of soluble chemical compounds in leachate. Characterization of “landfill microbiomes” and their comparison across several landfills should allow the identification of environmental or operational properties that influence the composition of these microbiomes and potentially their biodegradation capabilities. To this end, the composition of landfill microbiomes was characterized as part of an ongoing USGS national survey studying the chemical composition of leachates from 19 non-hazardous landfills across 16 states in the continental U.S. The landfills varied in parameters such as size, waste composition, management strategy, geography, and climate zone. The diversity and composition of bacterial and archaeal populations in leachate samples were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and compared against a variety of physical and chemical parameters in an attempt to identify their impact on selection. Members of the Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridia, and candidate division OP3 were the most abundant. The distribution of the observed phylogenetic diversity could best be explained by a combination of variables and was correlated most strongly with the concentrations of chloride and barium, rate of evapotranspiration, age of waste, and the number of detected household chemicals. This study illustrates how leachate microbiomes are distinct from those of other natural or built environments, and sheds light on the major selective forces responsible for this microbial diversity. PMID:27148222

  5. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Harbor Distinct Microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, Blake W; Lyles, Christopher N; Suflita, Joseph M; Masoner, Jason R; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Kolpin, Dana W; Stevenson, Bradley S

    2016-01-01

    Landfills are the final repository for most of the discarded material from human society and its "built environments." Microorganisms subsequently degrade this discarded material in the landfill, releasing gases (largely CH4 and CO2) and a complex mixture of soluble chemical compounds in leachate. Characterization of "landfill microbiomes" and their comparison across several landfills should allow the identification of environmental or operational properties that influence the composition of these microbiomes and potentially their biodegradation capabilities. To this end, the composition of landfill microbiomes was characterized as part of an ongoing USGS national survey studying the chemical composition of leachates from 19 non-hazardous landfills across 16 states in the continental U.S. The landfills varied in parameters such as size, waste composition, management strategy, geography, and climate zone. The diversity and composition of bacterial and archaeal populations in leachate samples were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and compared against a variety of physical and chemical parameters in an attempt to identify their impact on selection. Members of the Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridia, and candidate division OP3 were the most abundant. The distribution of the observed phylogenetic diversity could best be explained by a combination of variables and was correlated most strongly with the concentrations of chloride and barium, rate of evapotranspiration, age of waste, and the number of detected household chemicals. This study illustrates how leachate microbiomes are distinct from those of other natural or built environments, and sheds light on the major selective forces responsible for this microbial diversity. PMID:27148222

  6. Radiation treatment of landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of organic substance from landfill leachate by gamma irradiation has been studied by the authors. In this report, the combination of gamma irradiation and activated sludge treatment for this purpose is introduced. The leachate was collected at the reclaimed land in Tokyo Bay. Gamma irradiation was made by a 5 kCi Co-60 source, and the maximum irradiation dose was 6 Mrad. Activated sludge was added to the irradiated and unirradiated samples. After stirring and filtration, COD, TOC and BOD were measured. The amounts of COD and TOC decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. The linear relation between the logarithm of concentration and irradiation time was seen. The amount of BOD increased rapidly with irradiation dose, and reached the maximum (68 mg/l) at the dose of 1.7 Mrad. After the addition of activated sludge, the amount of BOD in the irradiated and unirradiated samples decreased. The amounts of COD and TOC in unirradiated samples did not make appreciable change 8 hours after the addition. These amounts in the irradiated samples stirred with activated sludge decreased. The rate of removal of organic substances was also studied. (Kato, T.)

  7. Review Article: Persistent organic pollutants and landfills - a review of past experiences and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Roland; Watson, Alan; Forter, Martin; Oliaei, Fardin

    2011-01-01

    The landfilling and dumping of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and other persistent hazardous compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohaxane (HCH), polybrominated diphenylether (PBDEs) or perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) can have significant adverse environmental consequences. This paper reviews past experiences with such disposal practices and highlights their unsustainability due to the risks of contamination of ecosystems, the food chain, together with ground and drinking water supplies. The use and associated disposal of POPs have been occurring for over 50 years. Concurrent with the phase-out of some of the most hazardous chemicals, the production of new POPs, such as brominated and fluorinated compounds has increased since the 1990s. These latter compounds are commonly used in a wide range of consumer goods, and as consumer products reach the end of their useful lives, ultimately enter waste recycling and disposal systems, in particular at municipal landfills. Because of their very slow, or lack of degradability, POPs will persist in landfills for many decades and possibly centuries. Over these extended time periods engineered landfill systems and their liners are likely to degrade, thus posing a contemporary and future risk of releasing large contaminant loads to the environment. This review highlights the necessity for alternative disposal methods for POP wastes, including destruction or complete removal from potential environmental release. In addition to such end of pipe solutions a policy change in the use pattern of persistent toxic chemicals is inevitable. In addition, inventories for the location and quantity of POPs in landfills, together with an assessment of their threat to ecosystems, drinking water and food resources are identified as key measures to facilitate appropriate management of risks. Finally the challenges of POP wastes in transition/developing countries, the risk of increased leaching of POPs from

  8. Decision Making on Regional Landfill Site Selection in Hormozgan Province Using Smce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majedi, A. S.; Kamali, B. M.; Maghsoudi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Landfill site selection and suitable conditions to bury hazardous wastes are among the most critical issues in modern societies. Taking several factors and limitations into account along with true decision making requires application of different decision techniques. To this end, current paper aims to make decisions about regional landfill site selection in Hormozgan province and utilizes SMCE technique combined with qualitative and quantitative criteria to select the final alternatives. To this respect, we first will describe the existing environmental situation in our study area and set the goals of our study in the framework of SMCE and will analyze the effective factors in regional landfill site selection. Then, methodological procedure of research was conducted using Delphi approach and questionnaires (in order to determine research validity, Chronbach Alpha (0.94) method was used). Spatial multi-criteria analysis model was designed in the form of criteria tree in SMCE using IL WIS software. Prioritization of respective spatial alternatives included: Bandar Abbas city with total 4 spatial alternatives (one zone with 1st priority, one zone with 3rd priority and two zones with 4thpriority) was considered the first priority, Bastak city with total 3 spatial alternatives (one zone with 2nd priority, one zone with 3rdpriorit and one zone with 4th priority) was the second priority and Bandar Abbas, Minab, Jask and Haji Abad cities were considered as the third priority.

  9. GIS and the Analytic Hierarchy Process for Regional Landfill Site Selection in Transitional Countries: A Case Study From Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenović Vasiljević, Tamara; Srdjević, Zorica; Bajčetić, Ratko; Vojinović Miloradov, Mirjana

    2012-02-01

    The Serbian National Waste Management Strategy for the Period 2010-2019, harmonized with the European Union Directives, mandates new and very strict requirements for landfill sites. To enable analysis of a number of required qualitative and quantitative factors for landfill site selection, the traditional method of site selection must be replaced with a new approach. The combination of GIS and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was selected to solve this complex problem. The Srem region in northern Serbia, being one of the most environmentally sensitive areas, was chosen as a case study. Seventeen factors selected as criteria/sub-criteria were recognized as most important, divided into geo-natural, environmental, social and techno-economic factors, and were evaluated by experts from different fields using an AHP extension in Arc GIS. Weighted spatial layers were combined into a landfill suitability map which was then overlapped with four restriction maps, resulting in a final suitability map. According to the results, 82.65% of the territory of Srem is unsuitable for regional landfill siting. The most suitable areas cover 9.14%, suitable areas 5.24%, while areas with low and very low suitability cover 2.21 and 0.76% of the territory, respectively. Based on these findings, five sites close to two large urban agglomerations were suggested as possible locations for a regional landfill site in Srem. However, the final decision will require further field investigation, a public acceptance survey, and consideration of ownership status and price of the land.

  10. Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline

  11. Heavy metals, salts and organic residues in old solid urban waste landfills and surface waters in their discharge areas: determinants for restoring their impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J; Hernández, A J

    2012-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the state of polluted soils in the main landfills of the Community of Madrid (central Spain), as part of a continuous assessment of the impacts of urban solid waste (USW) landfills that were capped with a layer of soil 20 years ago. Our analysis of this problem has been highly conditioned by the constant re-use of many of the USW landfills, since they have never been the target of any specific restoration plan. Our periodical analysis of cover soils and soils from discharge areas of the landfills indicates soil pollution has worsened over the years. Here, we examined heavy metal, salts, and organic compounds in soil and surface water samples taken from 15 landfills in the Madrid region. Impacts of the landfill soil covers on nematode and plant diversity were also evaluated. These analyses continue to reveal the presence of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cd) in soils, and salts (sulphates, chlorides and nitrates) in soils and surface waters. In addition, non-agricultural organic compounds, mainly aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, often appeared in very high concentrations, and high levels of insecticides such as gamma-HCH (lindane) were also detected in soils. Around 50% of the water samples collected showed chemical demand of oxygen (CDO) values in excess of 150 mg/l. Traces of phenolic compounds were detected in some landfills, some of which exhibited high levels of 2-chlorophenol and pentachlorophenol. All these factors are conditioning both the revegetation of the landfill systems and the remediation of their slopes and terrestrial ecosystems arising in their discharge areas. This work updates the current situation and discusses risks for the health of the ecosystems, humans, domestic animals and wildlife living close to these landfills. PMID:21764209

  12. Landfill pollution control with isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater and surface water contamination by sanitary landfills is being monitored since 1989 in Italy by using isotope techniques combined with chemical analyses. The results obtained are considered mostly satisfactory for identifying sources of contaminants and predicting their behaviour. We present in this work the results of chemical and isotopic measurements performed on rainwater, surface water and groundwater samples, with the aim of investigating the fate of contaminants released from some landfills located near Ancona, Central Italy. The isotope determinations included δ18O, δ2H and tritium (3H). The first objective of these investigations is establishing the background values of the main environmental parameters related to contamination, and obtaining indication about source and residence time (age) of groundwater in the landfill proximity. In particular, the methods used for detecting groundwater and/or surface waters contamination derived from the landfill, are based on the occurrence of tritium activity anomalies and chemical concentration changes. In order to estimate the regional background of environmental tritium in shallow groundwater, we measured the tritium content of monthly rainwater samples collected in stations on the Apennines in proximity of Ancona. The tritium concentration ranged from 3 to 6 TU in winter months (October to April), and reached the maximum values (up to 14 TU) in summer months. The investigations of groundwater and surface water contamination were undertaken on landfills dismissed from 1986 to 1998. The isotopic and chemical monitoring was started one year ago and was carried out on leachates, surface waters and groundwater (the last sampled in several downstream wells). The tritium concentration in leachates can be very high, due to a still active tritium release from the landfill. Tritium values in wells outside of the landfill area, lower than in leachate but higher than the regional background of environmental

  13. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH4) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called 'biocovers') to enhance biological oxidation of CH4. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH4 emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH4 oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m2 were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH4 load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH4 was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH4 emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH4 emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH4 mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers.

  14. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Chanton, Jeffrey; Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH(4)) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH(4) emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called "biocovers") to enhance biological oxidation of CH(4). A full scale biocover system to reduce CH(4) emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH(4) oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m(2) were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH(4) load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH(4) was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH(4) emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH(4) emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH(4) mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers. PMID:21345663

  15. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C1C4 hydrocarbons; the C5-C10 normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials

  16. Ecotoxicological diagnosis of a sealed municipal landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A J; Bartolomé, C; Pérez-Leblic, M I; Rodríguez, J; Alvarez, J; Pastor, J

    2012-03-01

    Assessing the environmental impact of a soil-topped landfill requires an accurate ecotoxicological diagnosis. This paper describes various diagnostic protocols for this purpose and their application to a real case: the urban solid waste (USW) municipal landfill of Getafe (Madrid, Spain). After their initial sealing with soil from the surroundings about 20 years ago, most USW landfills in the autonomous community of Madrid have continued to receive waste. This has hindered precise assessment of their impact on their environment and affected ecosystems. The procedure proposed here overcomes this problem by assessing the situation in edaphic, aquatic and ecological terms. The present study focused on the most influential soil variables (viz. salinity due largely to the presence of anions, and heavy metals and organic compounds). These variables were also determined in surface waters of the wetland most strongly affected by leachates running down landfill slopes. Determinations included the characterization of plant communities and microbial biodiversity. The study was supplemented with a bioassay under controlled conditions in pots containing soil contaminated with variable concentrations of Zn (as ZnCl(2)) intended to assess ecochemical actions in a population of Bromus rubens, which grows profusely in the landfill. PMID:21075508

  17. Optimal locations of landfills and transfer stations in solid waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Beğen, Nilüfer Nur

    2002-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. In the recent years solid waste management has been given an increasing importance due to health factors and environmental concerns. Solid waste management refers to a complex task that covers the collection, transfer, treatment, recycling, resource recovery, and disposal of waste. In this thesis, we investigate the siting aspect of solid waste management for the siting of landfills and transfer stations. We first review the context of ...

  18. Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

    2010-01-07

    The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

  19. Feasibility analysis of remedial scheme of Qilongcun landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yun-ju; LIU Dong-yan; LIU Xin-rong; LI Xiu-lan

    2006-01-01

    Based on hydro-geological of Qilongcun landfill, the transportation mathematical model of leachat was established. The boundaries conditions and replenishment of model were determined. The leachate COD density and the water level were simulated, and the model was identified, and then the right model was defined. The right model was used to simulate leachate COD density in the interior, exterior, and peripheral of landfill. The results show that the COD densities are not high. The pollution is slight in the interior of landfill and is little in the exterior of landfill. They are proving the overburden on top of landfill and drain around the landfill is right. The max. density on the south of landfill shows it is scientific that the cisterns are building on the south of landfill. The paper shows the remediation scheme is feasible.

  20. EVALUATION OF THE COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA LANDFILL MINING DEMONSTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the landfill mining process as demonstrated under the U.S. EPA, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory's Municipal Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program by the Collier County (Florida) Solid Waste Management Department. Landfill mining is the ...

  1. EVALUATION OF COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA LANDFILL MINING DEMONSTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the landfill mining process as demonstrated under the U.S. EPA, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory's Municipal Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program by the Collier County (Florida) Solid Waste Management Department. Landfill mining is the ...

  2. Removal of high concentrated ammonia nitrogen from landfill leachate by landfilled waste layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hui-dong; HE Pin-jing; SHAO Li-ming; LI Guo-jian

    2004-01-01

    The landfill of municipal solid waste(MSW) could be regarded as denitrification reactor and used in ammonia nitrogen biological removal process. In this research, the process was applied to municipal solid waste(MSW) collected in Shanghai, China, which was characterized with high food waste content. The NH4+ removal efficiency in the system of SBR nitrifying reactor followed by fresh and matured landfilled waste layer in series was studied. In the nitrifying reactor, above 90% of NH4+ in leachate was oxidized to NO2- and NO3-. Then high concentrated NO2- and NO3- was removed in the way of denitrification process in fresh landfilled waste layer. At the same time, degradation of fresh landfilled waste was accelerated. Up to the day 120, 136.5 gC/(kg dry waste) and 17.9 gN/(kg dry waste) were produced from waste layer. It accounted for 50.15% and 86.89% of the total carbon and nitrogen content of preliminary fresh waste, which was 4.42 times and 5.17 times higher than that of reference column respectively. After filtering through matured landfilled waste, BOD5 concentration in leachate dropped to below 100 mg/L, which would not affect following nitrification adversely. Because the matured landfilled waste acted as a well methanogenic reactor, 23% of carbon produced accumulatively from fresh landfilled waste degradation was converted into CH4.

  3. Why don’t we mine the landfills?

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Nils

    2013-01-01

    There are many reasons to mine landfills. For example, metals are increasingly shifting location from the Earth’s crust through human society into landfills. These new mines are located closer to the market, in contrast to traditional mines in the countryside where the metals are deep inside the crust requiring huge amounts of energy to be extracted. In addition, metals in the landfill pose a potential threat to humans, nature, and the environment. Despite this, landfills are not commonly min...

  4. A novel approach for environmental evaluation of landfill mining

    OpenAIRE

    Frändegård, Per; Krook, Joakim; Svensson, Niclas; Eklund, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Studies concerning landfill mining have historically focused on reclamation of land space and landfill remediation. A limited number of studies, however, have evaluated landfill mining combined with resource recovery, most of them being pilot studies or projects with little emphasis on resource extraction. This implies that many uncertainties remain related to landfill mining. With a growing interest in environmental concerns around the globe, the environmental evaluation of large-scale proje...

  5. Landfilling: Bottom Lining and Leachate Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Manfredi, Simone; Kjeldsen, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    reducing the environmental risk associated with landfills. This chapter provides information about the materials used in the construction of liners and drainage systems, tools to calculate migrations through liners, as well as information about requirements for lining systems in the European Union (EU) and...... system works together with the overlying leachate management system, also referred to as the leachate collection and removal system (LCRS), which consists of a drainage layer that provides easy horizontal drainage of the leachate to a point of gravitational collection or pumping. Although individual......, or even triple) liners, are extremely effective in preventing leachate from entering into the environment. In addition, the risk of polluting the groundwater at a landfill by any leakage of leachate depends on several factors related to siting of the landfill: distance to the water table, distance to...

  6. Greenhouse effect contributions of US landfill methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The greenhouse effect has recently been receiving a great deal of scientific and popular attention. The term refers to a cause-and-effect relationship in which ''heat blanketing'' of the earth, due to trace gas increases in the atmosphere, is expected to result in global warming. The trace gases are increasing as the result of human activities. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the trace gas contributing most importantly to the ''heat blanketing'' and currently receives the most attention. Less widely recognized has been the high importance of methane (CH4). Methane's contribution to the increased heat blanketing occurring since 1980 is estimated to be over a third as much as that of carbon dioxide. Gas from landfills has in turn been recognized to be a source of methane to the atmospheric buildup. However the magnitude of the landfill methane contribution, and the overall significance of landfill methane to the greenhouse phenomenon has been uncertain and the subject of some debate. (Author)

  7. Landfills in Latin America: Colombian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management and disposal of domestic solid waste are critical issues in urban areas of Latin America. In Colombia, in general, the final destination of this waste is its deposition in landfills. This review aims to provide basic information on general conditions of these sites in major cities of the country. Although existing landfills have diversity of operational problems, those most frequently include an inadequate treatment of the leachates, the emission of unpleasant odors and poor management of solid waste coverage. Although it is necessary to improve the operation and maintenance of landfills, it is also urgent to increase the commitment of Health and Environmental Agencies on programs that reduce waste production and promote the sustainable use of those wastes with economic value.

  8. Landfill gas and the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases are believed to be largely attributable to anthropogenic activities. Atmospheric methane concentrations are currently increasing at a rate of 1% per year. Methane is responsible for almost 20% of current increases in commitment to global warming. Major anthropogenic sources of methane include landfills, coal mining, and the production and distribution of natural gas. Early analysis of the global methane sources indicates potential for stabilization through the prevention/mitigation of some portions of the anthropogenic sources. This paper presents an overview of the current understanding of methane emissions from landfills that contribute to global climate change. The factors affecting landfill emissions are described and the uncertainties are identified. (author)

  9. Hydrolytic enzyme activity in landfilled refuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmisano, A.C.; Schwab, B.S.; Maruscik, D.A. (Environmental Safety Dept., Procter and Gamble Co., Ivorydale Technical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Extracellular hydrolytic enzyme activity was assayed in 28 refuse samples excavated from 14 bore holes in Fesh Kills Landfill, Staten Island, N.Y. Esterases, proteases and amylases were present in all of the samples. Enzyme screening assays utilizing the APIZYM test system showed the incidence of enzymes in the order: Specific phosphatases>esterases>glycosyl hydrolases. Measurement of cellulase by the cellulose-azure test detected activity in two out of 28 samples. Analysis for cellulase activity using the cellulose-azure test on refuse samples from landfills in Naples, Florida, and Tucson, Arizona, also showed a limited distribution of cellulases. Mineralization of [[sup 14]C]cellulose, an independent measure of cellulase activity, ranged from <5 to 23% in a 4-week incubation, which supports a highly variable cellulolytic activity in landfilled refuse. (orig.).

  10. PBTS, MERCURY AND OTHER POLLUTANTS FROM MSW LANDFILLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 60% of municipal solid waste (MSW) is currently sent to a landfill for disposal. In addition, there are over 35,000 closed landfills as well as industrial and Superfund landfills. Concerns have been raised for more than 2 decades about the potential for dioxin/fur...

  11. Landfill gas: energy and environmental issues in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessons learned about landfill gas generation, recovery, and control over the last 10 to 15 years are reviewed. Some major issues that are worthy of discussion include the difficulty of assessing generation rates; the limitations of field testing; the use of modeling; landfill characterization and the expense of landfill gas processing and condensate disposal. (author)

  12. Conceptual model elaboration for the safety assessment of phosphogypsum use in sanitary landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Stela D.; Braga, Leticia T.P.; Jacomino, Vanusa F., E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.b, E-mail: letsteixeira@gmail.co, E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphatic fertilizer production from the beneficiation of phosphate minerals (apatites). Produced in large quantities throughout the world and stored temporally in stacks, the final destination of this product is nowadays a subject of investigation. Due to the presence of radionuclides ({sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K, mainly), possible applications for the phosphogypsum must be verified for radiological safety. The goal of this paper was to elaborate a representative water flow conceptual model of a sanitary landfill for the safety assessment of the impact of using phosphogypsum as a cover material. For this, the ground water flow in variably saturated conditions and solute transport model HYDRUS-2D has been used for simulating the impact in the saturated zone of potential radionuclides leaching. The conceptual model was developed by collecting and analyzing the data from environmental license documentation of municipal sanitary landfills located on the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In order to fulfill the requirements of HDRUS-2D model in terms of the necessary parameters, the physical characteristics and typical configuration of the landfills, as well as the hydrogeological parameters of soils and aquifers related to the local of placement of the landfills, were taken in account for the formulation of the conceptual model. (author)

  13. Conceptual model elaboration for the safety assessment of phosphogypsum use in sanitary landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphatic fertilizer production from the beneficiation of phosphate minerals (apatites). Produced in large quantities throughout the world and stored temporally in stacks, the final destination of this product is nowadays a subject of investigation. Due to the presence of radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K, mainly), possible applications for the phosphogypsum must be verified for radiological safety. The goal of this paper was to elaborate a representative water flow conceptual model of a sanitary landfill for the safety assessment of the impact of using phosphogypsum as a cover material. For this, the ground water flow in variably saturated conditions and solute transport model HYDRUS-2D has been used for simulating the impact in the saturated zone of potential radionuclides leaching. The conceptual model was developed by collecting and analyzing the data from environmental license documentation of municipal sanitary landfills located on the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In order to fulfill the requirements of HDRUS-2D model in terms of the necessary parameters, the physical characteristics and typical configuration of the landfills, as well as the hydrogeological parameters of soils and aquifers related to the local of placement of the landfills, were taken in account for the formulation of the conceptual model. (author)

  14. Characterization of methane, benzene and toluene-oxidizing consortia enriched from landfill and riparian wetland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyunjung; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2010-12-15

    The microbial oxidations of methane (M) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compared with those of M and VOCs alone after enriching soil samples with M and/or VOCs. Landfill cover and riparian wetland soils from which M and VOCs were simultaneously emitted were selected as representative samples. Benzene (B) and toluene (T) were employed as the model VOCs. With the landfill soil consortia, the rate of M oxidation decreased from 4.15-5.56 to 2.26-3.42 μmol g-dry soil(-1)h(-1) in the presence of both B and T, but with the wetland soil consortia the rate of M oxidation (3.09 μmol g-dry soil(-1)h(-1)) in the mixture of M as well as both B and T was similar to that of M alone (3.04 μmol g-dry soil(-1)h(-1)). Compared with the methanotrophic community with M alone, the portion of type II methanotrophs was greater in the landfill consortia; whereas, the proportion in wetland consortia was less in the presence of both B and T. The oxidations of B and T were stimulated by the presence of M with both the landfill and wetland consortia. There were no correlations between the oxidation rate of M and those of B and T with the gene copy numbers of pmoA and tmoA responsible for the oxidations. PMID:20832163

  15. US EPA record of decision review for landfills: Sanitary landfill (740-G), Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a review of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Record of Decision System (RODS) database search conducted to identify Superfund landfill sites where a Record of Decision (ROD) has been prepared by EPA, the States or the US Army Corps of Engineers describing the selected remedy at the site. ROD abstracts from the database were reviewed to identify site information including site type, contaminants of concern, components of the selected remedy, and cleanup goals. Only RODs from landfill sites were evaluated so that the results of the analysis can be used to support the remedy selection process for the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

  16. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed

  17. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  18. Aerobic Biostabilization of Old MSW Landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Zanetti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many years after the end of the cultivation phase, landfills may generate intense odours, toxic and explosive gases and heavily-polluted leachate. A wide-spreading trend in the management of MSW landfills is represented by the forced aeration of wastes in order to achieve the stabilization, reducing the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled sites (old landfills which can be definitely considered as contaminated sites and the management costs of controlled and working facilities. One of the most interesting challenges is the in situ waste aerobic stabilization, obtained by insufflating air into the wastes. The aerobic metabolism is energetically convenient in comparison with the anaerobic one, it is characterized by a higher degradation rate and a temperature increase (like in the compost production. In order to obtain an aerobic biostabilization of waste in landfills, several air injection systems have been developed and applied in the last years, like Biopuster© or AEROflott® patented systems. The feasibility of the application of in situ biostabilization must be evaluated by means of different tests, in order to evaluate the main characteristics of the wastes. The main parameters to be evaluated are the biological stability and the air permeability of the wastes. In March 2006, the biological stability of the wastes located in the Trinitapoli Landfill, Italy, has been evaluated by the Politecnico di Torino. Black Index Test and Static Respirometric Index Test have been performed in the laboratories of the Politecnico. On the basis of the obtained results, the potential biogas production from the examined landfill was estimated together with the potential volume reduction.

  19. Methane mass balance at three landfill sites: What is the efficiency of capture by gas collection systems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many developed countries have targeted landfill methane recovery among greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, since methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Major questions remain with respect to actual methane production rates in field settings and the relative mass of methane that is recovered, emitted, oxidized by methanotrophic bacteria, laterally migrated, or temporarily stored within the landfill volume. This paper presents the results of extensive field campaigns at three landfill sites to elucidate the total methane balance and provide field measurements to quantify these pathways. We assessed the overall methane mass balance in field cells with a variety of designs, cover materials, and gas management strategies. Sites included different cell configurations, including temporary clay cover, final clay cover, geosynthetic clay liners, and geomembrane composite covers, and cells with and without gas collection systems. Methane emission rates ranged from -2.2 to >10,000 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. Total methane oxidation rates ranged from 4% to 50% of the methane flux through the cover at sites with positive emissions. Oxidation of atmospheric methane was occurring in vegetated soils above a geomembrane. The results of these studies were used as the basis for guidelines by the French environment agency (ADEME) for default values for percent recovery: 35% for an operating cell with an active landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, 65% for a temporary covered cell with an active LFG recovery system, 85% for a cell with clay final cover and active LFG recovery, and 90% for a cell with a geomembrane final cover and active LFG recovery

  20. Methane oxidation in Swedish landfills quantified with the stable carbon isotope technique in combination with an optical method for emitted methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey

    2007-10-01

    Methane budgets (production = emissions + oxidation + recovery) were estimated for six landfill sites in Sweden. Methane oxidation was measured in downwind plumes with a stable isotope technique (Chanton, J. P., et al., Environ. Sci Technol. 1999, 33, 3755-3760.) Positions in plumes for isotope sampling as well as methane emissions were determined with an optical instrument (Fourier Transform InfraRed) in combination with N20 as tracer gas (Galle, B., et al., Environ. Sci Technol. 2001, 35, 21-25.) Two landfills had been closed for years prior to the measurements, while four were active. Measurements at comparable soil temperatures showed that the two closed landfills had a significantly higher fraction of oxidized methane (38-42% of emission) relative to the four active landfills (4.6-15% of emission). These results highlight the importance of installing and maintaining effective landfill covers and also indicate that substantial amounts of methane escape from active landfills. Based on these results we recommend that the IPCC default values for methane oxidation in managed landfills could be set to 10% for active sites and 20% for closed sites. Gas recovery was found to be highly variable at the different sites, with values from 14% up to 65% of total methane production. The variance can be attributed to different waste management practices. PMID:17969681

  1. The safe disposal of landfill gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradable wastes deposited in landfill sites are decomposed by microbial activity to produce water and a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide. This gas can migrate from the landfill site presenting hazards and an odor problem. If the gas cannot be commercially utilized it must be disposed of in a safe and economic manner by flaring. This paper briefly outlines the generation of the gas and its potential hazards. The need for gas control is discussed along with methods for the disposal of the extracted gas

  2. Electrocoagulation and decolorization of landfill leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, Zainab Haider; Othman, Mohamed Rozali; Abdullah, Md Pauzi

    2013-11-01

    In this study, several operating conditions such as electrode material, treatment time, applied voltage, Cl□ concentration and PH of solution were tested on treatability of landfill leachate by using electrocoagulation (EC) method. According to the results, EC method can be used efficiently for the treatment of landfill leachate by using proper operating conditions. The best removal rats were obtained when C (rod) electrode as anode, operating time is 120 min, voltage applied is 10 V, NaCl concentration is 5.85 g/L and the raw PH, for these conditions, 70% color removal was obtained.

  3. Assessing the role of renewable energy policies in landfill gas to energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane (CH4) is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas and has a global warming potential at least 28 times as high as carbon dioxide (CO2). In the United States, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills are reported to be the third-largest source of human-made methane emissions, responsible for 18% of methane emissions in 2011. Capturing landfill gas (LFG) for use as an energy source for electricity or heat produces alternative energy as well as environmental benefits. A host of federal and state policies encourage the development of landfill gas to energy (LFGE) projects. This research provides the first systematic economic assessment of the role of these policies on adoption decisions. Results suggest that Renewable Portfolio Standards and investment tax credits have contributed to the development of these projects, accounting for 13 of 277 projects during our data period from 1991 to 2010. These policy-induced projects lead to 10.4 MMTCO2e reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and a net benefit of $41.8 million. - Highlights: • Examine the role of renewable energy policies in landfill gas to energy projects • Renewable Portfolio Standards and investment tax credit had impacts. • Investment tax credit policy is cost-effectiveness in promoting these projects. • Policy-induced projects lead to significant environmental benefits

  4. New techniques for waste water treatment of waste treatment centers and landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaartinen, T.; Eskola, P.; Vestola, E.; Merta, E.; Mroueh, U.-M.

    2009-10-15

    In this research project new techno-economically feasible and eco-efficient techniques for waste water treatment of waste treatment centers and landfills have been developed. In this publication water quality on existing Finnish waste treatment centers and landfills has been reviewed. Examples of segregated water treatment solutions at waste treatment centers and landfills in Finland and abroad have been introduced. Experimental research concentrated on treatment of heavy metal contaminated waters. Studied techniques were biological sulphate reduction and reactive by-product materials as filter media. Both techniques yielded promising results in the treatment of heavy metal bearing waters. Next step of the research should be more precise study on the boundary conditions of the chosen techniques. Good basis for scaling up the treatment techniques from laboratory to pilot-scale plants exists after this research project. In addition an excel-based site-specifically applicable procedure for comparing water management alternatives of waste treatment centers and landfills has been developed. Applying the procedure comparisons on e.g. economy of viable water management options can be made. (orig.)

  5. Empirical gas emission and oxidation measurement at cover soil of dumping site: example from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Basri, Hassan; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; El-Shafie, Ahmed Hussein

    2013-06-01

    Methane (CH₄) is one of the most relevant greenhouse gases and it has a global warming potential 25 times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO₂), risking human health and the environment. Microbial CH₄ oxidation in landfill cover soils may constitute a means of controlling CH₄ emissions. The study was intended to quantify CH₄ and CO₂ emissions rates at the Sungai Sedu open dumping landfill during the dry season, characterize their spatial and temporal variations, and measure the CH₄ oxidation associated with the landfill cover soil using a homemade static flux chamber. Concentrations of the gases were analyzed by a Micro-GC CP-4900. Two methods, kriging values and inverse distance weighting (IDW), were found almost identical. The findings of the proposed method show that the ratio of CH₄ to CO₂ emissions was 25.4 %, indicating higher CO₂ emissions than CH₄ emissions. Also, the average CH₄ oxidation in the landfill cover soil was 52.5 %. The CH₄ and CO₂ emissions did not show fixed-pattern temporal variation based on daytime measurements. Statistically, a negative relationship was found between CH₄ emissions and oxidation (R(2) = 0.46). It can be concluded that the variation in the CH₄ oxidation was mainly attributed to the properties of the landfill cover soil. PMID:23054277

  6. Back-Analyses of Landfill Instability Induced by High Water Level: Case Study of Shenzhen Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ren; Hou, Yujing; Zhan, Liangtong; Yao, Yangping

    2016-01-01

    In June 2008, the Shenzhen landfill slope failed. This case is used as an example to study the deformation characteristics and failure mode of a slope induced by high water levels. An integrated monitoring system, including water level gauges, electronic total stations, and inclinometers, was used to monitor the slope failure process. The field measurements suggest that the landfill landslide was caused by a deep slip along the weak interface of the composite liner system at the base of the landfill. The high water level is considered to be the main factor that caused this failure. To calculate the relative interface shear displacements in the geosynthetic multilayer liner system, a series of numerical direct shear tests were carried out. Based on the numerical results, the composite lining system simplified and the centrifuge modeling technique was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of water levels on landfill instability. PMID:26771627

  7. Operation of landfill bioreactors, or leachate recirculation landfills in cold climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettiaratchi, J.P.A.; Stein, V.B.; Pokhrel, D.; Chandrakanthi, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The major difference between conventional landfills and bioreactor landfills is that the latter are designed, constructed, and operated to promote rapid waste degradation. This paper presents a critical review of the current design and operation practices of landfill bioreactors in relation to leachate management and gas management. The features of the two concepts were also compared. A variety of methods of mixing leachate with waste are required in leachate recirculation, some of which cannot be applied in cold climates. It is imperative to possess an excellent understanding of leachate hydrology within the waste matrix to avoid generating problems associated with leachate ponding, leachate leakage from side-walls or landfill instability during leachate recirculation. The authors pointed out that gas recovery systems in bioreactors should be designed and installed by carefully considering settlement issues and time-dependent changes to gas permeability from changes to waste density and moisture content. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Back-Analyses of Landfill Instability Induced by High Water Level: Case Study of Shenzhen Landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2008, the Shenzhen landfill slope failed. This case is used as an example to study the deformation characteristics and failure mode of a slope induced by high water levels. An integrated monitoring system, including water level gauges, electronic total stations, and inclinometers, was used to monitor the slope failure process. The field measurements suggest that the landfill landslide was caused by a deep slip along the weak interface of the composite liner system at the base of the landfill. The high water level is considered to be the main factor that caused this failure. To calculate the relative interface shear displacements in the geosynthetic multilayer liner system, a series of numerical direct shear tests were carried out. Based on the numerical results, the composite lining system simplified and the centrifuge modeling technique was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of water levels on landfill instability.

  9. Organic production in corn: impact of fertilization with landfill leachate in chemical composition, productivity and concentration of metals in grain

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Ezequiel Risso; Suzy Sayuri Sassamoto Kurokawa; Diva de Souza Andrade; Elisa Yoko Hirooka

    2015-01-01

    The use of landfill leachate in agricultural soils as fertilizer emerges as an alternative for the disposal of this effluent, however presence of heavy metals may be a limiting factor for that use. Fertilization with five doses of landfill leachate (0, 32.7, 65.4, 98.1 and 130.8 m3 ha-1) and urea (120 kg ha-1) was evaluated in productivity, chemical composition and metal content of corn in crops 2010 and 2012. The accumulation of metals in leaf tissue was also evaluated in oats grown in the w...

  10. PERFORMA OKSIDASI METAN PADA REAKTOR KONTINYU DENGAN PENINGKATAN KETEBALAN LAPISAN BIOCOVER LANDFILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opy Kurniasari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available PERFORMANCE OF METHANE OXIDATION IN CONTINUOUS REACTOR BY BIOCOVER LANDFILL FILM THICKNESS IMPROVEMENT. Municipal solid waste (MSW handling in Indonesia is currently highly dependent on landfilling at the final disposal facility (TPA, which generally operated in layer-by-layer basis, allowing the anaerobic (absent of oxygen process. This condition will certainly generate biogas in the form of methane (CH4 and CO2. Methane is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential greater than CO2, and can absorb infrared radiation 23 times more efficient than CO2 in the period of over 100 years. One way that can be done to reduce methane gas from landfills that escape into nature is to oxidize methane by utilizing landfill cover material (biocover as methane-oxidizing microorganism media. Application of compost as landfill cover material is a low-cost approach to reduce emissions so are suitable for developing countries. The compost used in this study was compost landfill mining, which is degraded naturally in landfill. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of biocover to oxidize the methane on a certain layer thickness with a continuous flow conditions. Three column reactors were used, which were made of flexy glass measuring 70 cm in high and 15 cm in diameter. The methane flowed from the bottom of the reactor continuously at a flow rate of 5 ml/minute. The columns were filled with biocover compost landfill mining with layer thickness of 5, 25, 35 and 60 cm. The results showed that the thicker layer of biocover, the higher the efficiency of methane oxidation. The oxidation efficiency obtained in each layer thickness of 15, 25, 35 and 60 cm was 56.43%, 63.69%, 74.58% and 80, 03% respectively, with the rate of oxidation of 0.29 mol m-2 d-1 and the fraction of oxidation of 99%. The oxidation result was supported by the identification of bacteria isolated in this experiment, namely metanotrophic bacteria that have the ability to oxidize

  11. Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelis K. Panteli

    2012-01-10

    Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

  12. Influence of landfill structures on stabilization of fully recycled leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to treat the leachate from two simulating columns by recycling to the columns themselves without being discharged into the enviroment. The columns were employed to simulate anaerobic and semi-aerobic landfills separately. The influence of landfill structure on stabilization of fully recycled leachate was studied. The results show that semi-aerobic landfill structure accelerates the stabilization of leachate recycled. The full recycle of leachate in semi-aerobic landfill is a very feasible and effective technology for leachate treatment with low cost and energy saving especially in arid and rare rainfall regions. Meanwhile, the environmental impact of landfill can be greatly minimized.

  13. Microbiological indication of municipal solid waste landfill non-stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qi-xing; SYLVESTER Runyuzi; YU Ji-yu; ZHANG Qian-ru

    2004-01-01

    Accidental collapse resulted from unstable factors is an important technological problem to be solved in sanitary landfill. Microbiological degradation of organic matters in landfilled solid waste are an important unstable factor. A landfill reactor was thus manufactured and installed to examine quantitative and population dynamics of microorganisms during degradation of landfilled solid waste. It was showed that unstable landfill can be reflected and indicated by microbiological features such as rapidly decreased growth amount of microorganisms, no detection of fungi and actinomyces, and changing the dominant population into methanogenic bacteria and Acinotobacter.

  14. Prediction of landfill leachate amount using HELP model Case study: Semnan landfill

    OpenAIRE

    A Ghavidel; M.J Zoqi

    2011-01-01

    "nBackground and Objectives:. Owing to the non-seperated municipal solid wastes the leachate form in land fills contain high amounts of heavy metalls and toxic substances Hence, leachate treatment is a serious problem. In order to design leachate treatment and collection systems, estimation of quality and quantity of leachate is of high necessity. Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) Model was used to estimate leachate generation in the lined landfill cells for a variety of co...

  15. Measurement of representative landfill gas migration samples at landfill perimeters: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Breda M. Kiernan; Beirne, Stephen; Fay, Cormac; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a fully integrated autonomous system based on existing infrared sensing technology capable of monitoring landfill gas migration (specifically carbon dioxide and methane) at landfill sites. Sampling using the described system was validated against the industry standard, GA2000 Plus hand held device, manufactured by Geotechnical Instruments Inc. As a consequence of repeated sampling during validation experiments, fluctuations in the gas mixtures became ap...

  16. Artificial sweeteners as potential tracers of municipal landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial sweeteners are gaining acceptance as tracers of human wastewater in the environment. The 3 artificial sweeteners analyzed in this study were detected in leachate or leachate-impacted groundwater at levels comparable to those of untreated wastewater at 14 of 15 municipal landfill sites tested, including several closed for >50 years. Saccharin was the dominant sweetener in old (pre-1990) landfills, while newer landfills were dominated by saccharin and acesulfame (introduced 2 decades ago; dominant in wastewater). Cyclamate was also detected, but less frequently. A case study at one site illustrates the use of artificial sweeteners to identify a landfill-impacted groundwater plume discharging to a stream. The study results suggest that artificial sweeteners can be useful tracers for current and legacy landfill contamination, with relative abundances of the sweeteners potentially providing diagnostic ability to distinguish different landfills or landfill cells, including crude age-dating, and to distinguish landfill and wastewater sources. -- Highlights: • Artificial sweeteners detected at 14 of 15 municipal landfill sites. • Concentrations comparable to wastewater even at sites closed for >50 yr. • Saccharin elevated at all sites; potentially diagnostic of landfill impacts. • Potential for age-dating recent (past 2 decades) waste with acesulfame. -- Artificial sweeteners may be useful for tracing landfill leachate contamination and distinguishing it from wastewater impacts

  17. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

  18. New technique for landfill leachate well installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a well installation technique which reduces costs and provides health and safety benefits. The technique was used to install 16 wells in a closed landfill at the CECOS facility in Livingston, Louisiana. It was developed by The Dow Chemical Company which installed more than 200 wells at a PCB-contaminated site in Plaquemine, Louisiana

  19. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  20. Power generation potential using landfill gas from Ontario municipal solid waste landfills. Appendix B2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-six landfill sites have been identified in Ontario with potential gas production rates suitable for recovery and use in power plant applications. If 70% of the gas naturally generated from these sites was collected and utilized, ca 88 MW could be produced in 1991 (declining to 74 MW by 2001) from the gas generated. Assuming the current average generation rate of one tonne per capita, an estimated nine million tonnes of municipal refuse is produced annually in Ontario, and landfilling is expected to continue to play a major role. It is suggested that the level of gas generation identified for the year 1991 will be sustainable given that as old landfills are spent, new ones are built. The accuracy of the prediction depends largely on future government policies regarding incineration, the effects of present waste reduction programs, and approval of new landfill sites. Due to the combined costs of the gas collection system, auxiliary equipment, and gas processing system, installed cost of a landfill-gas fired power plant is high relative to that of conventional natural gas-fired plants. For landfills presently without a gas collection system, the high initial capital investment for gas field test programs and for the installation of a collection system is a barrier that deters municipalities from tapping this energy potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs