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Sample records for alternative factor models

  1. Alternative Factor Models and Heritability of the Short Leyton Obsessional Inventory--Children's Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Janette; Smith, Gillian W.; Shevlin, Mark; O'Neill, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    An alternative models framework was used to test three confirmatory factor analytic models for the Short Leyton Obsessional Inventory-Children's Version (Short LOI-CV) in a general population sample of 517 young adolescent twins (11-16 years). A one-factor model as implicit in current classification systems of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD),…

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Structure of Statistics Anxiety Measure: An Examination of Four Alternative Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bevrani, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to explore the confirmatory factor analysis results of the Persian adaptation of Statistics Anxiety Measure (SAM, proposed by Earp.Method: The validity and reliability assessments of the scale were performed on 298 college students chosen randomly from Tabriz University in Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was carried out to determine the factor structures of the Persian adaptation of SAM.Results: As expected, the second order model provided a better fit to the data than the three alternative models. Conclusions: Hence, SAM provides an equally valid measure for use among college students. The study both expands and adds support to the existing body of math anxiety literature.

  3. Heritability of dimensions of Eysenck's pen model and the alternative five-factor model of personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smederevac Snežana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to estimate the heritability of AFFM and PEN dimensions, including 67 pairs of twins (34 monozygotic and 33 dizygotic of both genders, aged 18 - 44. The heritability has been estimated by the biometric method, two full (ACE and ADE and three reduced (AE, DE and CE models tested for each personality trait. Taking into consideration the AFFM dimensions, additive genetic factors and a non-shared environment contribute the most significantly to the phenotypic variation of activity, sociability and the impulsive sensation seeking; anxiety and aggressiveness are best accounted for by the dominant genetic effects. In the PEN domain, fit indicators suggest that ACE and the reduced AE models provide the best explanation for the phenotypic manifestations of neuroticism, while ACE and CE models account for the variation of L scale. Although the fit indicators calculated for extraversion and psychotic behavior are somewhat problematic, the parameter estimates show that extraversion is best accounted for by the additive genetic variance, shared environmental effects, and the non-shared environment, whereas psychotic behavior is the most adequately explained by both shared and non-shared environmental effects.

  4. Morningness-eveningness, sex, and the Alternative Five Factor Model of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Anna; Gomà-i-Freixanet, Montserrat; Adan, Ana

    2009-08-01

    Recent research on personality and circadian typology indicates that evening-type subjects are more extraverted, impulsive, and novelty-seeking, while morning ones tend to be more introverted, conscientious, agreeable, and emotionally stable. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between circadian typologies on the Zuckerman's Alternative Five Factor Model of personality (AFFM), which has a strong biological basis, controlling for sex and age. A sample of 533 university students (168 men) participated in the study. Results showed that morning-type subjects had significant higher scores than evening-type and neither-type subjects in Activity, and in its subscales General Activity and Work Activity. A significant interaction between circadian typology and sex was found for Neuroticism-Anxiety: morning-type men showed higher scores than evening-type and neither-type, who had the lowest scores. Women presented the opposite pattern: neither-type obtained the highest scores, while morning-type showed the lowest. This is the first time the AFFM has been used in the context of circadian rhythms research. The results suggest that activity is the only trait related to extraversion associated with morningness, while Neuroticism-Anxiety was modulated by sex. These results might help highlight previous results on the association between morningness-eveningness and other models of personality assessment, and they offer new data that calls for further research.

  5. Circadian typology, age, and the alternative five-factor personality model in an adult women sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Anna; Gomà-i-Freixanet, Montserrat; Adan, Ana; Cladellas, Ramon

    2011-10-01

    Research on personality and circadian typology indicates evening-type women are more impulsive and novelty seeking, neither types are more anxious, and morning types tend to be more active, conscientious, and persistent. The purpose of this study is to examine the differences between circadian typologies in the light of the Zuckerman's Alternative Five-Factor Model (AFFM) of personality, which has a strong biological basis, in an adult sample of 412 women 18 to 55 yrs of age. The authors found morning-type women had significant higher scores than evening-type and neither-type women on Activity, and its subscales General Activity and Work Activity. In contrast, evening-type women scored significantly higher than morning-type women on Aggression-Hostility, Impulsive Sensation Seeking, and its subscale Sensation Seeking. In all groups, results were independent of age. These findings are in accordance with those previously obtained in female student samples and add new data on the AFFM. The need of using personality models that are biologically based in the study of circadian rhythms is discussed.

  6. An alternative Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) factor structure of the WAIS-IV: age invariance of an alternative model for ages 70-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niileksela, Christopher R; Reynolds, Matthew R; Kaufman, Alan S

    2013-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) is by the far the most popular intelligence test for the assessment of adults in clinical and neuropsychological practice. Despite a number of studies examining the factor structure of the WAIS-IV from a Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) perspective (Benson, Hulac, & Kranzler, 2010; Ward, Bergman, & Hebert, 2012), a CHC interpretation of the WAIS-IV for individuals ages 70 and above has been absent from the literature. The exclusion of individuals ages 70 and above in previous research is likely due to the absence of several key supplemental subtests used to create a full CHC model. We provide an alternative five-factor CHC model of the WAIS-IV which includes only the subtests administered to individuals ages 70 and above in the standardization sample. Our results show (a) the alternative CHC model fits the data well; (b) this alternative CHC model met criteria for partial strict measurement invariance across the life span (only Similarities showed noninvariance) using strict criteria; (c) the five factors for ages 70-90 measure the same five CHC broad abilities identified in previous analyses reported for ages 16-69; and (d) the five-factor CHC solution for ages 70-90 is valid for the entire WAIS-IV age range and can be used whenever examiners administer the core battery but opt not to administer supplemental subtests.

  7. Loneliness and solitude in adolescence: A confirmatory factor analysis of alternative models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goossens, Luc; Lasgaard, Mathias; Luyckx, Koen

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested a four-factor model of adolescent loneliness and solitude that comprises peer-related loneliness, family loneliness, negative attitude toward solitude, and positive attitude toward solitude. Nine different instruments for a total of 14 scales and derivative subscales were...... of the Loneliness and Aloneness Scale for Children and Adolescents (LACA) is recommended, because the instrument measures all four aspects of the model. Implications for current theories on adolescent loneliness and associated phenomena, such as adolescents' attitude toward being on their own, are briefly discussed....

  8. Janez Rugelj's alternative therapeutic community after the five-factor model of personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judita Bagon

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Alternative Therapeutic Community (ATC of Dr. J. Rugelj is a specific social community consisting of people in distress (always consisting of about 120 people, who have all been handicapped in their lives in one way or another. The group is also specific because of their way towards recovery, i.e., intensively reactivating the mecanisms of healthy life to surmount their psychical and social deficiency. The results of measuring the structure of personality according to BFQ – the "Big Five" model of personality – show that the ATC as a whole achieves lower scores than the normal population on all dimensions and subdimensions. The difference is statistically significant regarding the dimension of Emotional stability as well as the subdimension Emotional control. The ATC is not a uniform group, so the results differ according to the diagnosis. The members with the diagnosis of 'a neurotic' or 'a psychotic' achieve below-average results, while the accompanying members achieve similar results as the control group (selected from the non-members of the ATC. The results of the members diagnosed as 'an alcoholic' are somewhat surprising – they do not differ considerably on any dimension or subdimension from the results achieved by the control group – not even on the Emotional stability scale. As regards the total period of staying in the program, the results of subdimensions remain mostly unchanged. However, during the time spent in the program the results on the subdimensions change: the group which has been in the program for 1 to 2 years generally scores higher than the group of beginners (the difference is statistically significant only for the dimension Emotional control, but the results of the group participating in the program for longer time (more than three years are lower again, until they stabilize in the central position (T=50. The results on theHonesty scale (which may also show positive or negative self-image show no

  9. Convergence, Admissibility, and Fit of Alternative Confirmatory Factor Analysis Models for MTMM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Charles E.; Fan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We compared six different analytic models for multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) data in terms of convergence, admissibility, and model fit to 258 samples of previously reported data. Two well-known models, the correlated trait-correlated method (CTCM) and the correlated trait-correlated uniqueness (CTCU) models, were fit for reference purposes in…

  10. DSM-5 alternative personality disorder model traits as maladaptive extreme variants of the five-factor model: An item-response theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takakuni; Samuel, Douglas B; Pahlen, Shandell; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    Over the past two decades, evidence has suggested that personality disorders (PDs) can be conceptualized as extreme, maladaptive variants of general personality dimensions, rather than discrete categorical entities. Recognizing this literature, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) alternative PD model in Section III defines PDs partially through 25 maladaptive traits that fall within 5 domains. Empirical evidence based on the self-report measure of these traits, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), suggests that these five higher-order domains share a structure and correlate in meaningful ways with the five-factor model (FFM) of general personality. In the current study, item response theory was used to compare the DSM-5 alternative PD model traits to those from a normative FFM inventory (the International Personality Item Pool-NEO [IPIP-NEO]) in terms of their measurement precision along the latent dimensions. Within a combined sample of 3,517 participants, results strongly supported the conclusion that the DSM-5 alternative PD model traits and IPIP-NEO traits are complimentary measures of 4 of the 5 FFM domains (with perhaps the exception of openness to experience vs. psychoticism). Importantly, the two measures yield largely overlapping information curves on these four domains. Differences that did emerge suggested that the PID-5 scales generally have higher thresholds and provide more information at the upper levels, whereas the IPIP-NEO generally had an advantage at the lower levels. These results support the general conceptualization that 4 domains of the DSM-5 alternative PD model traits are maladaptive, extreme versions of the FFM. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Regulation of alternative sigma factor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österberg, Sofia; del Peso-Santos, Teresa; Shingler, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Alternative bacterial sigma factors bind the catalytic core RNA polymerase to confer promoter selectivity on the holoenzyme. The different holoenzymes are thus programmed to recognize the distinct promoter classes in the genome to allow coordinated activation of discrete sets of genes needed for adaptive responses. To form the holoenzymes, the different sigma factors must be available to compete for their common substrate (core RNA polymerase). This review highlights (a) the roles of antisigma factors in controlling the availability of alternative sigma factors and (b) the involvement of diverse regulatory molecules that promote the use of alternative sigma factors through subversion of the domineering housekeeping σ(70). The latter include the nucleotide alarmone ppGpp and small proteins (DksA, Rsd, and Crl), which directly target the transcriptional machinery to mediate their effects.

  12. Alternative Tsunami Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A.; Lyatskaya, I.

    2009-01-01

    The interesting papers by Margaritondo (2005 "Eur. J. Phys." 26 401) and by Helene and Yamashita (2006 "Eur. J. Phys." 27 855) analysed the great Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 using a simple one-dimensional canal wave model, which was appropriate for undergraduate students in physics and related fields of discipline. In this paper, two additional,…

  13. Do different circadian typology measures modulate their relationship with personality? A test using the Alternative Five Factor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph; Gomà-i-Freixanet, Montserrat; Muro, Anna; Knauber, Christina; Adan, Ana

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between personality and circadian typology shows some inconsistent results and it has been hypothesized that the model used to measure personality might have a moderating effect on this relationship. However, it has never been explored if this inconsistency was dependent on the questionnaire used to measure differences in circadian rhythms as well. We explored this issue in a sample of 564 university students (32% men; 19-40 years) using the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire, which is based on an evolutionary-biological approach, in combination with the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM) and the reduced Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (rMEQ). Both questionnaires detected differences between circadian typologies in Sociability (highest in evening types; ET) and Impulsive Sensation-Seeking scales (highest in ET), while the CSM also detected differences in Activity (lowest in ET) and Aggression-Hostility (highest in ET). Further, both questionnaires detected differences between circadian typologies in the subscales General Activity (morning types [MT] higher than ET), Impulsivity (ET highest) and Sensation-Seeking (highest in ET). Differences between circadian typologies/groups in the subscales Parties (highest in ET) and Isolation Intolerance (lowest in MT) were only detected by the rMEQ. The CSM clearly separated evening types from neither and morning types while the rMEQ showed that neither types are not intermediate but closer to evening types in General Activity and Isolation Intolerance, and closer to morning types in Impulsive Sensation-Seeking, Parties, Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking. The obtained results indicate that the relationship between circadian typology and personality may be dependent on the instrument used to assess circadian typology. This fact may help to explain some of the conflicting data available on the relationship between these two concepts.

  14. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit...... statebased on an idealized mechanical model to be adapted to the original limit state by the model correction factor. Reliable approximations are obtained by iterative use of gradient information on the original limit state function analogously to previous response surface approaches. However, the strength...... of the model correction factor method, is that in simpler form not using gradient information on the original limit state function or only using this information once, a drastic reduction of the number of limit state evaluation is obtained together with good approximations on the reliability. Methods...

  15. Scaled Quantum Mechanical scale factors for vibrational calculations using alternate polarized and augmented basis sets with the B3LYP density functional calculation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, C R; Brown, N R; Dunbar, R A; Harness, M D; Nguyen, K; Oyewole, O; Collier, W B

    2015-06-15

    The Scaled Quantum Mechanical (SQM) method of scaling calculated force constants to predict theoretically calculated vibrational frequencies is expanded to include a broad array of polarized and augmented basis sets based on the split valence 6-31G and 6-311G basis sets with the B3LYP density functional. Pulay's original choice of a single polarized 6-31G(d) basis coupled with a B3LYP functional remains the most computationally economical choice for scaled frequency calculations. But it can be improved upon with additional polarization functions and added diffuse functions for complex molecular systems. The new scale factors for the B3LYP density functional and the 6-31G, 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p), 6-31G+(d,p), 6-31G++(d,p), 6-311G, 6-311G(d), 6-311G(d,p), 6-311G+(d,p), 6-311G++(d,p), 6-311G(2d,p), 6-311G++(2d,p), 6-311G++(df,p) basis sets are shown. The double d polarized models did not perform as well and the source of the decreased accuracy was investigated. An alternate system of generating internal coordinates that uses the out-of plane wagging coordinate whenever it is possible; makes vibrational assignments via potential energy distributions more meaningful. Automated software to produce SQM scaled vibrational calculations from different molecular orbital packages is presented.

  16. Towards an Alternative Development Model in Suriname

    OpenAIRE

    Dougal Martin

    2002-01-01

    This study advocates the adoption of an alternative development model in Suriname. Suriname adopted a state-centered and inward-looking development model in the early 1980s, although elements of the model had been present long before that time.

  17. The alternative sigma factor B modulates virulence gene expression in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model but does not influence kidney gene expression pattern of the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depke, Maren; Burian, Marc; Schäfer, Tina; Bröker, Barbara M; Ohlsen, Knut; Völker, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and are an increasing threat not only in hospital settings. The expression of the staphylococcal virulence factor repertoire is known to be affected by the alternative sigma factor B (SigB). However, its impact during infection still is a matter of debate. Kidney tissues of controls or mice infected with S. aureus HG001 or its isogenic sigB mutant were analyzed by transcriptome profiling to monitor the host response, and additionally expression of selected S. aureus genes was monitored by RT-qPCR. Direct transcript analysis by RT-qPCR revealed significant SigB activity in all mice infected with the wild-type strain, but not in its isogenic sigB mutant (p<0.0001). Despite a clear-cut difference in the SigB-dependent transcription pattern of virulence genes (clfA, aur, and hla), the host reaction to infection (either wild type or sigB mutant) was almost identical. Despite its significant activity in vivo, loss of SigB did neither have an effect on the outcome of infection nor on murine kidney gene expression pattern. Thus, these data support the role of SigB as virulence modulator rather than being a virulence determinant by itself.

  18. Alternative dimensional models of personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widiger, Thomas A; Simonsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The recognition of the many limitations of the categorical model of personality disorder classification has led to the development of quite a number of alternative proposals for a dimensional classification. The purpose of this article is to suggest that future research work toward the integration...... of these alternative proposals within a common hierarchical structure. An illustration of a potential integration is provided using the constructs assessed within existing dimensional models. Suggestions for future research that will help lead toward a common, integrative dimensional model of personality disorder...

  19. Alternative Sigma Factors and Their Roles in Bacterial Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kazmierczak, Mark J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2005-01-01

    Sigma factors provide promoter recognition specificity to RNA polymerase holoenzyme, contribute to DNA strand separation, and then dissociate from the core enzyme following transcription initiation. As the regulon of a single sigma factor can be composed of hundreds of genes, sigma factors can provide effective mechanisms for simultaneously regulating expression of large numbers of prokaryotic genes. One newly emerging field is identification of the specific roles of alternative sigma factors...

  20. Alternative Local Development models from the periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lopez Oropeza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As neoliberal capitalism continues to fail on reducing inequities, and continues to fail on fulfilling its promise of a kind of “development” that would allow impoverished men and women to improve their situation and be able to experience a “freedom” which would empower them with new and better opportunities to vanish their many types of “poverties”, new and alternative models raise, presenting a different and inclusive type of development which intends to respond to their particular situations of exclusion and build on an alternative model.

  1. Factoring, a Financing Alternative for Romanian Exporters During Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Dugan Silvia; Pepenel Madelaine-Lorelai

    2011-01-01

    Factoring, a product used in dynamic business environments worldwide, is a quick solution for the issue of working capital locked in the loan provider, ensuring a productive use of financial resources. During the economic crisis and given the very limited access to traditional financing schemes, factoring may be a suitable alternative for some companies in Romania, particularly those operating in the provision of goods or services. Factoring is therefore a solution to short-term finance compa...

  2. Perceived game realism: a test of three alternative models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbens, Wannes

    2013-01-01

    Perceived realism is considered a key concept in explaining the mental processing of media messages and the societal impact of media. Despite its importance, little is known about its conceptualization and dimensional structure, especially with regard to digital games. The aim of this study was to test a six-factor model of perceived game realism comprised of simulational realism, freedom of choice, perceptual pervasiveness, social realism, authenticity, and character involvement and to assess it against an alternative single- and five-factor model. Data were collected from 380 male digital game users who judged the realism of the first-person shooter Half-Life 2 based upon their previous experience with the game. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to investigate which model fits the data best. The results support the six-factor model over the single- and five-factor solutions. The study contributes to our knowledge of perceived game realism by further developing its conceptualization and measurement.

  3. Alternative models for academic family practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarnall Kimberly SH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Future of Family Medicine Report calls for a fundamental redesign of the American family physician workplace. At the same time, academic family practices are under economic pressure. Most family medicine departments do not have self-supporting practices, but seek support from specialty colleagues or hospital practice plans. Alternative models for academic family practices that are economically viable and consistent with the principles of family medicine are needed. This article presents several "experiments" to address these challenges. Methods The basis of comparison is a traditional academic family medicine center. Apart of the faculty practice plan, our center consistently operated at a deficit despite high productivity. A number of different practice types and alternative models of service delivery were therefore developed and tested. They ranged from a multi-specialty office arrangement, to a community clinic operated as part of a federally-qualified health center, to a team of providers based in and providing care for residents of an elderly public housing project. Financial comparisons using consistent accounting across models are provided. Results Academic family practices can, at least in some settings, operate without subsidy while providing continuity of care to a broad segment of the community. The prerequisites are that the clinicians must see patients efficiently, and be able to bill appropriately for their payer mix. Conclusion Experimenting within academic practice structure and organization is worthwhile, and can result in economically viable alternatives to traditional models.

  4. Alternative business models for flood risk management infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh Claire

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the next 100 years, it is estimated that England will need £30.6-1bn annual investment to manage flood and coastal erosion risk. Given constraints on central government spending following the 2008 financial crisis, the full burden of this is unlikely to be met by government alone. There is therefore a need to consider the potential for alternative business models for flood risk management infrastructure. An infrastructure business model describes how value is created, delivered and captured over the life cycle of the infrastructure system – this includes but is not limited to funding and financing. Alternative business models are starting to emerge across a range of infrastructure sectors, predominantly motivated by two key factors: (i mainstream approaches do not deliver the benefits that communities want, (ii tax payer funds are too constrained to deliver all the infrastructure investment that is sought. This paper presents and discusses a number of alternative business models for flood risk management infrastructure. Those currently under consideration focus on funding and financing, important though these issues are, it is only by capturing social, environmental and other values of infrastructure will flood risk stakeholders be able to identify approaches that are best suited to deliver their objectives and for alternative business models to emerge in practise.

  5. A hybrid of fuzzy FMEA-AHP to determine factors affecting alternator failure causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kiani Aslani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to determine factors influencing alternator failure causes. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA is one of the first systematic techniques for failure analysis based on three factors including Probability (P, Severity (S and Detection (D. Traditional FMEA method considers equal weights for all three factors, however, in read-world cases; one may wish to consider various weights. The proposed study develops a mathematical model to determine optimal weights based on analytical hierarchy process technique. The implementation of the proposed study has been demonstrated for a read-world case study of alternator failure causes.

  6. An Alternating Direction Algorithm for Matrix Completion with Nonnegative Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yangyang; Wen, Zaiwen; Zhang, Yin

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel algorithm for the nonnegative matrix factorization and completion problem, which aims to find nonnegative matrices X and Y from a subset of entries of a nonnegative matrix M so that XY approximates M. This problem is closely related to the two existing problems: nonnegative matrix factorization and low-rank matrix completion, in the sense that it kills two birds with one stone. As it takes advantages of both nonnegativity and low rank, its results can be superior than those of the two problems alone. Our algorithm is applied to minimizing a non-convex constrained least-squares formulation and is based on the classic alternating direction augmented Lagrangian method. Preliminary convergence properties and numerical simulation results are presented. Compared to a recent algorithm for nonnegative random matrix factorization, the proposed algorithm yields comparable factorization through accessing only half of the matrix entries. On tasks of recovering incomplete grayscale and hypers...

  7. Alternative time representation in dopamine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, François; Kalaska, John F; Bengio, Yoshua

    2010-02-01

    Dopaminergic neuron activity has been modeled during learning and appetitive behavior, most commonly using the temporal-difference (TD) algorithm. However, a proper representation of elapsed time and of the exact task is usually required for the model to work. Most models use timing elements such as delay-line representations of time that are not biologically realistic for intervals in the range of seconds. The interval-timing literature provides several alternatives. One of them is that timing could emerge from general network dynamics, instead of coming from a dedicated circuit. Here, we present a general rate-based learning model based on long short-term memory (LSTM) networks that learns a time representation when needed. Using a naïve network learning its environment in conjunction with TD, we reproduce dopamine activity in appetitive trace conditioning with a constant CS-US interval, including probe trials with unexpected delays. The proposed model learns a representation of the environment dynamics in an adaptive biologically plausible framework, without recourse to delay lines or other special-purpose circuits. Instead, the model predicts that the task-dependent representation of time is learned by experience, is encoded in ramp-like changes in single-neuron activity distributed across small neural networks, and reflects a temporal integration mechanism resulting from the inherent dynamics of recurrent loops within the network. The model also reproduces the known finding that trace conditioning is more difficult than delay conditioning and that the learned representation of the task can be highly dependent on the types of trials experienced during training. Finally, it suggests that the phasic dopaminergic signal could facilitate learning in the cortex.

  8. Candidiasis: predisposing factors, prevention, diagnosis and alternative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Natália; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Barros, Lillian; Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-06-01

    Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic yeast infection. Candida species and other microorganisms are involved in this complicated fungal infection, but Candida albicans continues to be the most prevalent. In the past two decades, it has been observed an abnormal overgrowth in the gastrointestinal, urinary and respiratory tracts, not only in immunocompromised patients, but also related to nosocomial infections and even in healthy individuals. There is a widely variety of causal factors that contribute to yeast infection which means that candidiasis is a good example of a multifactorial syndrome. Due to rapid increase in the incidence in these infections, this is the subject of numerous studies. Recently, the focus of attention is the treatment and, above all, the prevention of those complications. The diagnosis of candidiasis could become quite complicated. Prevention is the most effective "treatment," much more than eradication of the yeast with antifungal agents. There are several aspects to consider in the daily routine that can provide a strength protection. However, a therapeutic approach is necessary when the infection is established, and therefore, other alternatives should be explored. This review provides an overview on predisposition factors, prevention and diagnosis of candidiasis, highlighting alternative approaches for candidiasis treatment.

  9. Warped Alternatives to Froggatt-Nielsen Models

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer, Abhishek M

    2013-01-01

    We consider Randall-Sundrum set up (RS) to be a theory of flavour, as an alternative to Froggatt-Nielsen models instead of as a solution to the hierarchy problem. We consider a modified RS framework between the Planck scale and the GUT scale. This also alleviates constraints from flavour physics. Fermion masses and mixing angles are fit at the GUT scale. The ranges of the bulk mass parameters are determined using a $\\chi^2$ fit taking in to consideration the variation in $\\mathcal{O}(1)$ parameters. In the hadronic sector, the heavy top quark requires large bulk mass parameters localising the right handed top quark close to the IR brane. Two cases of neutrino masses are considered (a) Planck scale lepton number violation and (b) Dirac neutrino masses. Contrary to the case of weak scale RS models, both these cases give reasonable fits to the data, with the Planck scale lepton number violation fitting slightly better compared to the Dirac case. In the Supersymmetric version, the fits are not significantly diffe...

  10. Warped alternatives to Froggatt-Nielsen models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2013-07-01

    We consider the Randall-Sundrum (RS) setup to be a theory of flavor, as an alternative to Froggatt-Nielsen models instead of as a solution to the hierarchy problem. The RS framework is modified by taking the low-energy brane to be at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale. This also alleviates constraints from flavor physics. Fermion masses and mixing angles are fit at the GUT scale. The ranges of the bulk mass parameters are determined using a χ2 fit taking into consideration the variation in O(1) parameters. In the hadronic sector, the heavy top quark requires large bulk mass parameters localizing the right-handed top quark close to the IR brane. Two cases of neutrino masses are considered: (a) Planck scale lepton number violation and (b) Dirac neutrino masses. Contrary to the case of weak scale RS models, both these cases give reasonable fits to the data, with the Planck scale lepton number violation fitting slightly better compared to the Dirac case. In the supersymmetric version, the fits are not significantly different except for the variation in tan⁡β. If the Higgs superfields and the supersymmetry breaking spurion are localized on the same brane, then the structure of the sfermion masses are determined by the profiles of the zero modes of the hypermultiplets in the bulk. Trilinear terms have the same structure as the Yukawa matrices. The resultant squark spectrum is around ˜2-3TeV required by the light Higgs mass to be around 125 GeV and to satisfy the flavor violating constraints.

  11. SR 97. Alternative models project. Stochastic continuum modelling of Aberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widen, H. [Kemakta AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Walker, D. [INTERA KB/DE and S (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    As part of studies into the siting of a deep repository for nuclear waste, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has commissioned the Alternative Models Project (AMP). The AMP is a comparison of three alternative modelling approaches to bedrock performance assessment for a single hypothetical repository, arbitrarily named Aberg. The Aberg repository will adopt input parameters from the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in southern Sweden. The models are restricted to an explicit domain, boundary conditions and canister location to facilitate the comparison. The boundary conditions are based on the regional groundwater model provided in digital format. This study is the application of HYDRASTAR, a stochastic continuum groundwater flow and transport-modelling program. The study uses 34 realisations of 945 canister locations in the hypothetical repository to evaluate the uncertainty of the advective travel time, canister flux (Darcy velocity at a canister) and F-ratio. Several comparisons of variability are constructed between individual canister locations and individual realisations. For the ensemble of all realisations with all canister locations, the study found a median travel time of 27 years, a median canister flux of 7.1 x 10{sup -4} m/yr and a median F-ratio of 3.3 x 10{sup 5} yr/m. The overall pattern of regional flow is preserved in the site-scale model, as is reflected in flow paths and exit locations. The site-scale model slightly over-predicts the boundary fluxes from the single realisation of the regional model. The explicitly prescribed domain was seen to be slightly restrictive, with 6% of the stream tubes failing to exit the upper surface of the model. Sensitivity analysis and calibration are suggested as possible extensions of the modelling study.

  12. A proposal for a novel impact factor as an alternative to the JCR impact factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zu-Guo; Zhang, Chun-Ting

    2013-12-03

    One disadvantage of the JCR impact factor, the most commonly used assessment tool for ranking and evaluating scientific journals, is its inability in distinguishing among different shapes of citation distribution curves, leading to unfair evaluation of journals in some cases. This paper aims to put forward an alternative impact factor (IF') that can properly reflect citation distributions. The two impact factors are linearly and positively correlated, and have roughly the same order of magnitude. Because of the ability of IF' in distinguishing among different shapes of citation distribution curves, IF' may properly reflect the academic performance of a scientific journal in a way that is different from the JCR impact factor with some unique features that reward journals with highly cited papers. Therefore, it is suggested that IF' could be used to complement the JCR impact factor.

  13. A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiby, P.N.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

  14. Alternative Instructional Models for IVN Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    This handbook identifies the instructional models found to be effective for distance education using the Interactive Video Network (IVN) system. Each model is summarized briefly and followed by specific suggestions for the use of the model over the IVN system. For each model, information is given on instructor responsibility prior to, during, and…

  15. Comparison of alternate personality models in psychopathology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floros, Georgios D; Stogiannidou, Ariadni; Giouzepas, Ioannis; Garyfallos, Georgios D

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed the results from the parallel application of two alternate personality models, the Zuckerman-Kuhlman trait model and Bond's Defense Styles, in a sample of 268 Greek medical students (172 women, M age = 22.0 yr., SD = 1.1; 95 men, M age = 22.3 yr., SD = 1.2) in relation to psychopathological symptoms, so as to clarify whether this practice yielded accurate results while avoiding shared variance. Data from both models are cross-checked with canonical correlation analysis to validate whether there was significant conceptual overlap between them that would mean that their parallel use is an ineffective research practice. Following this analysis, factors from both models are utilized to predict variance in sample psychopathology, so as to compare their relative usefulness. Results indicated that the two models did not share a significant amount of variance, while a combination of personality aspects from both models, including Impulsive Sensation-Seeking, Neuroticism-Anxiety, Aggression-Hostility, and Sociability traits and Maladaptive Action, Image Distorting, and Adaptive Action defense styles, predicted high variance in psychopathology symptoms.

  16. Supermodeling by Synchronization of Alternative SPEEDO Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Gregory; Selten, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The supermodeling approach, wherein different imperfect models of the same objective process are dynamically combined in run-time to reduce systematic error, is tested using SPEEDO - a primitive equation atmospheric model coupled to the CLIO ocean model. Three versions of SPEEDO are defined by parameters that differ in a range that arguably mimics differences among state-of-the-art climate models. A fourth model is taken to represent truth. The "true" ocean drives all three model atmospheres. The three models are also connected to one another at every level, with spatially uniform nudging coefficients that are trained so that the three models, which synchronize with one another, also synchronize with truth when data is continuously assimilated, as in weather prediction. The SPEEDO supermodel is evaluated in weather-prediction mode, with nudging to truth. It is found that the supemodel performs better than any of the three models and marginally better than the best weighted average of the outputs of the three models run separately. To evaluate the utility for climate projection, parameters corresponding to green house gas levels are changed in truth and in the three models. The supermodel formed with inter-model connections from the present-CO2 runs no longer give the optimal configuration for the supermodel in the doubled-CO2 realm, but the supermodel with the previously trained connections is still useful as compared to the separate models or averages of their outputs. In ongoing work, a training algorithm is examined that attempts to match the blocked-zonal index cycle of the SPEEDO model atmosphere to truth, rather than simply minimizing the RMS error in the various fields. Such an approach comes closer to matching the model attractor to the true attractor - the desired effect in climate projection - rather than matching instantaneous states. Gradient descent in a cost function defined over a finite temporal window can indeed be done efficiently. Preliminary

  17. Prediction of survival with alternative modeling techniques using pseudo values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Ploeg (Tjeerd); F.R. Datema (Frank); R.J. Baatenburg de Jong (Robert Jan); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The use of alternative modeling techniques for predicting patient survival is complicated by the fact that some alternative techniques cannot readily deal with censoring, which is essential for analyzing survival data. In the current study, we aimed to demonstrate that pseudo

  18. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor G

  19. Big bang nucleosynthesis - The standard model and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    The standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation of the big bang cosmological model is reviewed, and alternate models are discussed. The standard model is shown to agree with the light element abundances for He-4, H-2, He-3, and Li-7 that are available. Improved observational data from recent LEP collider and SLC results are discussed. The data agree with the standard model in terms of the number of neutrinos, and provide improved information regarding neutron lifetimes. Alternate models are reviewed which describe different scenarios for decaying matter or quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities. The baryonic density relative to the critical density in the alternate models is similar to that of the standard model when they are made to fit the abundances. This reinforces the conclusion that the baryonic density relative to critical density is about 0.06, and also reinforces the need for both nonbaryonic dark matter and dark baryonic matter.

  20. Bayesian Factor Analysis as a Variable-Selection Problem: Alternative Priors and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhao-Hua; Chow, Sy-Miin; Loken, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Factor analysis is a popular statistical technique for multivariate data analysis. Developments in the structural equation modeling framework have enabled the use of hybrid confirmatory/exploratory approaches in which factor-loading structures can be explored relatively flexibly within a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) framework. Recently, Muthén & Asparouhov proposed a Bayesian structural equation modeling (BSEM) approach to explore the presence of cross loadings in CFA models. We show that the issue of determining factor-loading patterns may be formulated as a Bayesian variable selection problem in which Muthén and Asparouhov's approach can be regarded as a BSEM approach with ridge regression prior (BSEM-RP). We propose another Bayesian approach, denoted herein as the Bayesian structural equation modeling with spike-and-slab prior (BSEM-SSP), which serves as a one-stage alternative to the BSEM-RP. We review the theoretical advantages and disadvantages of both approaches and compare their empirical performance relative to two modification indices-based approaches and exploratory factor analysis with target rotation. A teacher stress scale data set is used to demonstrate our approach.

  1. Modeling Equity for Alternative Water Rate Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, R.; Mjelde, J.

    2011-12-01

    The rising popularity of increasing block rates for urban water runs counter to mainstream economic recommendations, yet decision makers in rate design forums are attracted to the notion of higher prices for larger users. Among economists, it is widely appreciated that uniform rates have stronger efficiency properties than increasing block rates, especially when volumetric prices incorporate intrinsic water value. Yet, except for regions where water market purchases have forced urban authorities to include water value in water rates, economic arguments have weakly penetrated policy. In this presentation, recent evidence will be reviewed regarding long term trends in urban rate structures while observing economic principles pertaining to these choices. The main objective is to investigate the equity of increasing block rates as contrasted to uniform rates for a representative city. Using data from four Texas cities, household water demand is established as a function of marginal price, income, weather, number of residents, and property characteristics. Two alternative rate proposals are designed on the basis of recent experiences for both water and wastewater rates. After specifying a reasonable number (~200) of diverse households populating the city and parameterizing each household's characteristics, every household's consumption selections are simulated for twelve months. This procedure is repeated for both rate systems. Monthly water and wastewater bills are also computed for each household. Most importantly, while balancing the budget of the city utility we compute the effect of switching rate structures on the welfares of households of differing types. Some of the empirical findings are as follows. Under conditions of absent water scarcity, households of opposing characters such as low versus high income do not have strong preferences regarding rate structure selection. This changes as water scarcity rises and as water's opportunity costs are allowed to

  2. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing in Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor RNP-4F during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetherson, Rebecca A; Strock, Stephen B; White, Kristen N; Vaughn, Jack C

    2006-04-26

    The 5'- and 3'-UTR regions in pre-mRNAs play a variety of roles in controlling eukaryotic gene expression, including translational modulation. Here we report the results of a systematic study of alternative splicing in rnp-4f, which encodes a Drosophila spliceosomal assembly factor. We show that most of the nine introns are constitutively spliced, but several patterns of alternative splicing are observed in two pre-mRNA regions including the 5'-UTR. Intron V is shown to be of recent evolutionary origin and is infrequently spliced, resulting in generation of an in-frame stop codon and a predicted truncated protein lacking a nuclear localization signal, so that alternative splicing regulates its subcellular localization. Intron 0, located in the 5'-UTR, is subject to three different splicing decisions in D. melanogaster. Northern analysis of poly(A+) mRNAs reveals two differently sized rnp-4f mRNA isoforms in this species. A switch in relative isoform abundance occurs during mid-embryo stages, when the larger isoform becomes more abundant. This isoform is shown to represent intron 0 unspliced mRNA, whereas the smaller transcript represents the product of alternative splicing. Comparative genomic analysis predicts that intron 0 is present in diverse Drosophila species. Intron 0 splicing results in loss of an evolutionarily conserved stem-loop constituting a potential cis-regulatory element at the 3'-splice site. A model is proposed for the role of this element both in 5'-UTR alternative splicing decisions and in RNP-4F translational modulation. Preliminary evidences in support of our model are discussed.

  3. Legitimacy as an Operational Factor: An Alternative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-23

    Stephen E. O’Rear Lieutenant Colonel, United States Air Force A paper submitted to the Faculty of the Naval War College in partial... Nietzsche , are but a few of those who have sought simple answers to complex questions regarding the nature of life, religion, and morality among other...failure to achieve the desired end state .”8 This paper presents a dissenting opinion, offering an alternative analysis that legitimacy is best viewed as

  4. Alternative Dark Energy Models: An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S

    2004-01-01

    A large number of recent observational data strongly suggest that we live in a flat, accelerating Universe composed of $\\sim$ 1/3 of matter (baryonic + dark) and $\\sim$ 2/3 of an exotic component with large negative pressure, usually named {\\bf Dark Energy} or {\\bf Quintessence}. The basic set of experiments includes: observations from SNe Ia, CMB anisotropies, large scale structure, X-ray data from galaxy clusters, age estimates of globular clusters and old high redshift galaxies (OHRG's). Such results seem to provide the remaining piece of information connecting the inflationary flatness prediction ($\\Omega_{\\rm{T}} = 1$) with astronomical observations. Theoretically, they have also stimulated the current interest for more general models containing an extra component describing this unknown dark energy, and simultaneously accounting for the present accelerating stage of the Universe. An overlook in the literature shows that at least five dark energy candidates have been proposed in the context of general re...

  5. An alternative to the cosmological 'concordance model'

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchard, A; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sarkar, S; Blanchard, Alain; Douspis, Marian; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Sarkar, Subir

    2003-01-01

    Precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background by WMAP are believed to have established a flat Lambda-dominated universe, seeded by nearly scale-invariant adiabatic primordial fluctuations. However by relaxing the hypothesis that the fluctuation spectrum can be described by a single power law, we demonstrate that an Einstein-de Sitter universe with ZERO cosmological constant can fit the data as well as the best concordance model. Moreover unlike a $\\Lambda$-dominated universe, such an universe has no strong integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, so is in better agreement with the low quadrupole seen by WMAP. The main problem is that the Hubble constant is required to be rather low: H_0 ~ 46 km/s/Mpc; we discuss whether this can be consistent with observations. Furthermore for universes consisting only of baryons and cold dark matter, the amplitude of matter fluctuations on cluster scales is too high, a problem which seems generic. However, an additional small contribution (Omega_X \\sim 0.1) of matter which...

  6. FACTORINGALTERNATIVE OF SHORT-TERM FINANCING FOR COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Barbuta-Misu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, had been created formidable conditions for encouraging the factoring business, because using this instrument of investment and financing have grown the economic and financial stability of the company and generated a more efficient management of accounts receivable by the policy of claims recovering. Also, the factoring may be considered both a commercial and financial activity. The essential role of the factoring companies is given by taking the place of company in activities that are not referring exclusively to the commercial field. Given the importance of this financing operation, in this paper are presented different ways of defining, their importance, advantages and disadvantages for the company, the return for the factoring of accounts receivables and the real cost of factoring.

  7. A hierarchical model for ordinal matrix factorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paquet, Ulrich; Thomson, Blaise; Winther, Ole

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a hierarchical probabilistic model for ordinal matrix factorization. Unlike previous approaches, we model the ordinal nature of the data and take a principled approach to incorporating priors for the hidden variables. Two algorithms are presented for inference, one based...... on Gibbs sampling and one based on variational Bayes. Importantly, these algorithms may be implemented in the factorization of very large matrices with missing entries. The model is evaluated on a collaborative filtering task, where users have rated a collection of movies and the system is asked to predict...... their ratings for other movies. The Netflix data set is used for evaluation, which consists of around 100 million ratings. Using root mean-squared error (RMSE) as an evaluation metric, results show that the suggested model outperforms alternative factorization techniques. Results also show how Gibbs sampling...

  8. Modeling the Effects of Harvest Alternatives on Mitigating Oak Decline in a Central Hardwood Forest Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J Wang

    Full Text Available Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak

  9. Modeling the Effects of Harvest Alternatives on Mitigating Oak Decline in a Central Hardwood Forest Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen J; He, Hong S; Spetich, Martin A; Shifley, Stephen R; Thompson Iii, Frank R; Fraser, Jacob S

    2013-01-01

    Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition) would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak decline.

  10. An Alternative Approach for Nonlinear Latent Variable Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooijaart, Ab; Bentler, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in nonlinear latent variable models. Since the seminal paper of Kenny and Judd, several methods have been proposed for dealing with these kinds of models. This article introduces an alternative approach. The methodology involves fitting some third-order moments in addition to the means and…

  11. Prediction of survival with alternative modeling techniques using pseudo values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd van der Ploeg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of alternative modeling techniques for predicting patient survival is complicated by the fact that some alternative techniques cannot readily deal with censoring, which is essential for analyzing survival data. In the current study, we aimed to demonstrate that pseudo values enable statistically appropriate analyses of survival outcomes when used in seven alternative modeling techniques. METHODS: In this case study, we analyzed survival of 1282 Dutch patients with newly diagnosed Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC with conventional Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. We subsequently calculated pseudo values to reflect the individual survival patterns. We used these pseudo values to compare recursive partitioning (RPART, neural nets (NNET, logistic regression (LR general linear models (GLM and three variants of support vector machines (SVM with respect to dichotomous 60-month survival, and continuous pseudo values at 60 months or estimated survival time. We used the area under the ROC curve (AUC and the root of the mean squared error (RMSE to compare the performance of these models using bootstrap validation. RESULTS: Of a total of 1282 patients, 986 patients died during a median follow-up of 66 months (60-month survival: 52% [95% CI: 50%-55%]. The LR model had the highest optimism corrected AUC (0.791 to predict 60-month survival, followed by the SVM model with a linear kernel (AUC 0.787. The GLM model had the smallest optimism corrected RMSE when continuous pseudo values were considered for 60-month survival or the estimated survival time followed by SVM models with a linear kernel. The estimated importance of predictors varied substantially by the specific aspect of survival studied and modeling technique used. CONCLUSIONS: The use of pseudo values makes it readily possible to apply alternative modeling techniques to survival problems, to compare their performance and to search further for promising

  12. Increased dosage of Dyrk1A alters alternative splicing factor (ASF)-regulated alternative splicing of tau in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Chunlei; Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Gu, Xiaosong; Wegiel, Jerzy; Zhou, Jianhua; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2008-10-17

    Two groups of tau, 3R- and 4R-tau, are generated by alternative splicing of tau exon 10. Normal adult human brain expresses equal levels of them. Disruption of the physiological balance is a common feature of several tauopathies. Very early in their life, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) develop Alzheimer-type tau pathology, the molecular basis for which is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dyrk1A, a kinase encoded by a gene in the DS critical region, phosphorylates alternative splicing factor (ASF) at Ser-227, Ser-234, and Ser-238, driving it into nuclear speckles and preventing it from facilitating tau exon 10 inclusion. The increased dosage of Dyrk1A in DS brain due to trisomy of chromosome 21 correlates to an increase in 3R-tau level, which on abnormal hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau results in neurofibrillary degeneration. Imbalance of 3R- and 4R-tau in DS brain by Dyrk1A-induced dysregulation of alternative splicing factor-mediated alternative splicing of tau exon 10 represents a novel mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration and may help explain early onset tauopathy in individuals with DS.

  13. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewde, Nehemiah; Gorham, Ronald D; Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection.

  14. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive.

  15. Grasses use an alternatively wired bHLH transcription factor network to establish stomatal identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissig, Michael T.; Abrash, Emily; Bettadapur, Akhila; Bergmann, Dominique C.

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, epidermal valves facilitating plant–atmosphere gas exchange, represent a powerful model for understanding cell fate and pattern in plants. Core basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulating stomatal development were identified in Arabidopsis, but this dicot’s developmental pattern and stomatal morphology represent only one of many possibilities in nature. Here, using unbiased forward genetic screens, followed by analysis of reporters and engineered mutants, we show that stomatal initiation in the grass Brachypodium distachyon uses orthologs of stomatal regulators known from Arabidopsis but that the function and behavior of individual genes, the relationships among genes, and the regulation of their protein products have diverged. Our results highlight ways in which a kernel of conserved genes may be alternatively wired to produce diversity in patterning and morphology and suggest that the stomatal transcription factor module is a prime target for breeding or genome modification to improve plant productivity. PMID:27382177

  16. Grasses use an alternatively wired bHLH transcription factor network to establish stomatal identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissig, Michael T; Abrash, Emily; Bettadapur, Akhila; Vogel, John P; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2016-07-19

    Stomata, epidermal valves facilitating plant-atmosphere gas exchange, represent a powerful model for understanding cell fate and pattern in plants. Core basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulating stomatal development were identified in Arabidopsis, but this dicot's developmental pattern and stomatal morphology represent only one of many possibilities in nature. Here, using unbiased forward genetic screens, followed by analysis of reporters and engineered mutants, we show that stomatal initiation in the grass Brachypodium distachyon uses orthologs of stomatal regulators known from Arabidopsis but that the function and behavior of individual genes, the relationships among genes, and the regulation of their protein products have diverged. Our results highlight ways in which a kernel of conserved genes may be alternatively wired to produce diversity in patterning and morphology and suggest that the stomatal transcription factor module is a prime target for breeding or genome modification to improve plant productivity.

  17. ALTERNATING DIRECTION FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR SOME REACTION DIFFUSION MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江成顺; 刘蕴贤; 沈永明

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with some nonlinear reaction - diffusion models. To solve this kind of models, the modified Laplace finite element scheme and the alternating direction finite element scheme are established for the system of patrical differential equations. Besides, the finite difference method is utilized for the ordinary differential equation in the models. Moreover, by the theory and technique of prior estimates for the differential equations, the convergence analyses and the optimal L2- norm error estimates are demonstrated.

  18. Testing alternative models of climate-mediated extirpations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, E.A.; Chris, R.A.Y.; Mote, P.W.; Wilkening, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Biotic responses to climate change will vary among taxa and across latitudes, elevational gradients, and degrees of insularity. However, due to factors such as phenotypic plasticity, ecotypic variation, and evolved tolerance to thermal stress, it remains poorly understood whether losses should be greatest in populations experiencing the greatest climatic change or living in places where the prevailing climate is closest to the edge of the species' bioclimatic envelope (e.g., at the hottest, driest sites). Research on American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in montane areas of the Great Basin during 1994-1999 suggested that 20th-century population extirpations were predicted by a combination of biogeographic, anthropogenic, and especially climatic factors. Surveys during 2005-2007 documented additional extirpations and within-site shifts of pika distributions at remaining sites. To evaluate the evidence in support of alternative hypotheses involving effects of thermal stress on pikas, we placed temperature sensors at 156 locations within pika habitats in the vicinity of 25 sites with historical records of pikas in the Basin. We related these time series of sensor data to data on ambient temperature from weather stations within the Historical Climate Network. We then used these highly correlated relationships, combined with long-term data from the same weather stations, to hindcast temperatures within pika habitats from 1945 through 2006. To explain patterns of loss, we posited three alternative classes of direct thermal stress: (1) acute cold stress (number of days below a threshold temperature); (2) acute heat stress (number of days above a threshold, temperature); and. (3) chronic heat stress (average summer temperature). Climate change was defined as change in our thermal metrics between two 31-y.r periods: 1945-1975 and 1976-2006. We found that patterns of persistence were well predicted by metrics of climate. Our best models suggest some effects of climate change

  19. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, P. [Madrid Univ. Autonoma and IFT, UAM/CSIC, E-28049 (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  20. Academic and Behavioral Planning Through an Alternative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Nancy E.; Dworkin, Yehoash S.

    1978-01-01

    Suggests an alternative universe in which failure is identified as a systems concern, instead of a human breakdown. The model presents successful behavior in terms of growth in process efficiency, rather than the +/- (right/wrong) matrix associated with achievement orientation. (Editor)

  1. Rethinking borders in a mobile world: An alternative model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier; Retaillé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    national borders. The second section elaborates the fundamentals of an alternative model that is not reliant, as is classical spatial analysis, on points, lines and surfaces to represent movement. The article then presents three types of limits: the confines, the threshold and the horizon, which result...

  2. Alternative cokriging model for variable-fidelity surrogate modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Zhong Hua; Zimmermann, Ralf; Goertz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    An alternative approach for the construction of the cokriging covariance matrix is developed and a more practical cokriging method in the context of surrogate-based analysis and optimization is proposed. The developed cokriging method is validated against an analytical problem and applied to cons...

  3. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, Richard; Bod'ová, Katarína; Nosek, Jozef; Tomáška, L'ubomír

    2014-03-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of biological, chemical, and physical subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres—nucleoprotein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes consisting of tandemly repeated DNA sequences and a specialized set of proteins. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady-state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulas for expected size distributions of telomeres that demonstrate the key role played by the J factor, a quantitative measure of bending of polymers. The results are in agreement with experimental data and point out interesting phenomena: an appearance of very long telomeric circles if the total telomere density exceeds a critical value (excess mass) and a nonlinear response of the telomere size distributions to the amount of telomeric DNA in the system. The results can be of general importance for understanding dynamics of telomeres in telomerase-independent systems as this mode of telomere maintenance is similar to the situation in tumor cells lacking telomerase activity. Furthermore, due to its universality, the model may also serve as a prototype of an interaction between linear and circular DNA structures in various settings.

  4. Examining Pedestrian Injury Severity Using Alternative Disaggregate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya

    2013-01-01

    to the choice of these models. The empirical analysis reveals that detailed road user characteristics such as crime history of drivers and momentary activities of road users at the time of the accident provides an interesting insight in the injury severity analysis. Likewise, the alternative analytical...... specification of the models reveals that some of the conventionally employed fixed parameters injury severity models could underestimate the effect of some important behavioral attributes of the accidents. For instance, the standard ordered logit model underestimated the marginal effects of some...

  5. Empirical testing of alternative price spread models in the South African maize market

    OpenAIRE

    Faminow, Merle D.; Laubscher, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Reduced-form price spread models have been recently utilized by Wohlgenant and Mullen, and Thompson and Lyon to evaluate the economic factors affecting the marketing margins for agricultural products. Drawing on Gardner, Heien, Buse and Brandow, Waugh, Tomek and Robinson, and others they specify alternative retail-farm price spread models and attempt to determine which best fit the data in the context of underlying theoretical rationale. This paper continues in the spirit of Wohlgenant and Mu...

  6. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the

  7. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the

  8. Comparison of Alternative Gravity Models in Dwarf Galaxy Rotation Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Justin; Saintable, Taylor; O'Brien, James

    2017-01-01

    Galactic rotation curves have proven to be the testing ground for dark matter bounds in spiral galaxies of all morphologies. Dwarf Galaxies serve as an increasingly interesting testing ground of rotation curve dynamics due to their increased stellar formation and typically rising rotation curve. These galaxies usually are not dominated by typical stellar structure and mostly terminate at small radial distances. This, coupled with the fact that Cold Dark Matter theories such as NFW (∧ CDM) struggle with the universality of galactic rotation curves, allow for exclusive features of alternative gravitational models to be analyzed. Here, we present a thorough application of alternative gravitational models (conformal gravity and MOND) to a 2010 dwarf galaxy sample from Swaters et al. An analysis and discussion of the results of the fitting procedure of the two alternative gravitational models are explored. We posit here that both the Conformal Gravity and MOND can provide an accurate description of the galactic dynamics without the need for copious dark matter.

  9. Building Better Ecological Machines: Complexity Theory and Alternative Economic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jess Bier

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer models of the economy are regularly used to predict economic phenomena and set financial policy. However, the conventional macroeconomic models are currently being reimagined after they failed to foresee the current economic crisis, the outlines of which began to be understood only in 2007-2008. In this article we analyze the most prominent of this reimagining: Agent-Based models (ABMs. ABMs are an influential alternative to standard economic models, and they are one focus of complexity theory, a discipline that is a more open successor to the conventional chaos and fractal modeling of the 1990s. The modelers who create ABMs claim that their models depict markets as ecologies, and that they are more responsive than conventional models that depict markets as machines. We challenge this presentation, arguing instead that recent modeling efforts amount to the creation of models as ecological machines. Our paper aims to contribute to an understanding of the organizing metaphors of macroeconomic models, which we argue is relevant conceptually and politically, e.g., when models are used for regulatory purposes.

  10. An innovation resistance factor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Salwa Mohd Ishak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The process and implementation strategy of information technology in construction is generally considered through the limiting prism of theoretical contexts generated from innovation diffusion and acceptance. This research argues that more attention should be given to understanding the positive effects of resistance. The study develops a theoretical framing for the Integrated Resistance Factor Model (IRFM. The framing uses a combination of diffusion of innovation theory, technology acceptance model and social network perspective. The model is tested to identify the most significant resistance factors using Partial Least Square (PLS technique. All constructs proposed in the model are found to be significant, valid and consistent with the theoretical framework. IRFM is shown to be an effective and appropriate model of user resistance factors. The most critical factors to influence technology resistance in the online project information management system (OPIMS context are: support from leaders and peers, complexity of the technology, compatibility with key work practices; and pre-trial of the technology before it is actually deployed. The study provides a new model for further research in technology innovation specific to the construction industry.

  11. Method for exploiting bias in factor analysis using constrained alternating least squares algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2008-12-30

    Bias plays an important role in factor analysis and is often implicitly made use of, for example, to constrain solutions to factors that conform to physical reality. However, when components are collinear, a large range of solutions may exist that satisfy the basic constraints and fit the data equally well. In such cases, the introduction of mathematical bias through the application of constraints may select solutions that are less than optimal. The biased alternating least squares algorithm of the present invention can offset mathematical bias introduced by constraints in the standard alternating least squares analysis to achieve factor solutions that are most consistent with physical reality. In addition, these methods can be used to explicitly exploit bias to provide alternative views and provide additional insights into spectral data sets.

  12. Shared Care of Young Children: Alternative Models to Monotropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter K.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews evidence for assertions related to the monotropism hypothesis and examines causal factors that might constrain the number of satisfactory caretaker relationships provided for young children. Two models of constraint derived from the earlier work of Bowlby and others are rejected; two models based on more recent theory are considered worth…

  13. An alternative model of cancer cell growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Jayant S

    2007-04-01

    I propose an alternative model of cancer in which metastasis need not all arise out of spread from the "original" tumour. The model assumes that cancer cells arise from stem cells that best grow in the organ of their differentiation. When the internal milieu allows it they also grow at other sites as well, thus complementing the conventional (spreading) metastatic process. Several phenomena in the natural history of cancer, especially breast cancer, that challenge the conventional model, fit well after inclusion of the new model. These are (a) a very modest benefit of screening (b) frequent sparing of lungs from haematogenous metastasis (c) presence of occult cancers in autopsy studies (d) only a modest effect of local treatment (e) relative ineffectiveness of high-dose chemotherapy (f) constant time between surgery and peak of hazard of relapse irrespective of stage of the tumour. All these phenomena are much easier to explain when one rejects the dogma that all metastasis arise only from the primary tumour. This paper is aimed only to suggest an alternative perspective of natural history of solid tumours--to stimulate research on the complex internal milieu that allows cancer cells to develop in new light.

  14. Outcome modelling strategies in epidemiology: traditional methods and basic alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Sander; Daniel, Rhian; Pearce, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Controlling for too many potential confounders can lead to or aggravate problems of data sparsity or multicollinearity, particularly when the number of covariates is large in relation to the study size. As a result, methods to reduce the number of modelled covariates are often deployed. We review several traditional modelling strategies, including stepwise regression and the 'change-in-estimate' (CIE) approach to deciding which potential confounders to include in an outcome-regression model for estimating effects of a targeted exposure. We discuss their shortcomings, and then provide some basic alternatives and refinements that do not require special macros or programming. Throughout, we assume the main goal is to derive the most accurate effect estimates obtainable from the data and commercial software. Allowing that most users must stay within standard software packages, this goal can be roughly approximated using basic methods to assess, and thereby minimize, mean squared error (MSE).

  15. Life cycle models of conventional and alternative-fueled automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Heather Louise

    This thesis reports life cycle inventories of internal combustion engine automobiles with feasible near term fuel/engine combinations. These combinations include unleaded gasoline, California Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, alcohol and gasoline blends (85 percent methanol or ethanol combined with 15 percent gasoline), and compressed natural gas in spark ignition direct and indirect injection engines. Additionally, I consider neat methanol and neat ethanol in spark ignition direct injection engines and diesel fuel in compression ignition direct and indirect injection engines. I investigate the potential of the above options to have a lower environmental impact than conventional gasoline-fueled automobiles, while still retaining comparable pricing and consumer benefits. More broadly, the objective is to assess whether the use of any of the alternative systems will help to lead to the goal of a more sustainable personal transportation system. The principal tool is the Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Analysis model which includes inventories of economic data, environmental discharges, and resource use. I develop a life cycle assessment framework to assemble the array of data generated by the model into three aggregate assessment parameters; economics, externalities, and vehicle attributes. The first step is to develop a set of 'comparable cars' with the alternative fuel/engine combinations, based on characteristics of a conventional 1998 gasoline-fueled Ford Taurus sedan, the baseline vehicle for the analyses. I calculate the assessment parameters assuming that these comparable cars can attain the potential thermal efficiencies estimated by experts for each fuel/engine combination. To a first approximation, there are no significant differences in the assessment parameters for the vehicle manufacture, service, fixed costs, and the end-of-life for any of the options. However, there are differences in the vehicle operation life cycle components and the state of technology

  16. SR 97 - Alternative models project. Discrete fracture network modelling for performance assessment of Aberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dershowitz, B.; Eiben, T. [Golder Associates Inc., Seattle (United States); Follin, S.; Andersson, Johan [Golder Grundteknik KB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    As part of studies into the siting of a deep repository for nuclear waste, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has commissioned the Alternative Models Project (AMP). The AMP is a comparison of three alternative modeling approaches for geosphere performance assessment for a single hypothetical site. The hypothetical site, arbitrarily named Aberg is based on parameters from the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in southern Sweden. The Aberg model domain, boundary conditions and canister locations are defined as a common reference case to facilitate comparisons between approaches. This report presents the results of a discrete fracture pathways analysis of the Aberg site, within the context of the SR 97 performance assessment exercise. The Aberg discrete fracture network (DFN) site model is based on consensus Aberg parameters related to the Aespoe HRL site. Discrete fracture pathways are identified from canister locations in a prototype repository design to the surface of the island or to the sea bottom. The discrete fracture pathways analysis presented in this report is used to provide the following parameters for SKB's performance assessment transport codes FARF31 and COMP23: * F-factor: Flow wetted surface normalized with regards to flow rate (yields an appreciation of the contact area available for diffusion and sorption processes) [TL{sup -1}]. * Travel Time: Advective transport time from a canister location to the environmental discharge [T]. * Canister Flux: Darcy flux (flow rate per unit area) past a representative canister location [LT{sup -1}]. In addition to the above, the discrete fracture pathways analysis in this report also provides information about: additional pathway parameters such as pathway length, pathway width, transport aperture, reactive surface area and transmissivity, percentage of canister locations with pathways to the surface discharge, spatial pattern of pathways and pathway discharges, visualization of pathways, and

  17. Model for the ready definition and approximate comparison of alternative high voltage transmission systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    A model of generic overhead transmission systems in the range of 362 to 1200 kV ac, and +-400 to +-800 kV dc is developed. Such generic systems are to include (a) transmission from generation to load, and (b) interconnection of two large integrated systems, with and without the existence of an underlying, lower voltage network in either case. The model provides a means whereby an engineer with some experience in power systems planning can make a reconnaissance study of alternatives within a relatively short span of time and with fair accuracy. Given an amount of power to be transferred over a specified distance, the model can be used: to define the workable alternatives in terms of voltages, number of lines, series compensation, and certain other factors affecting transfer capability; to delineate other salient features of the selected alternatives, notably shunt compensation requirements; and to compare the alternatives in terms of potentially relevant benefits and costs. The significant properties of the model, the basis and assumptions necessary to its formulation, instructions for its use, and inherent limitations upon the accuracy to be expected are described.

  18. Convergence analysis of the alternating RGLS algorithm for the identification of the reduced complexity Volterra model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laamiri, Imen; Khouaja, Anis; Messaoud, Hassani

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we provide a convergence analysis of the alternating RGLS (Recursive Generalized Least Square) algorithm used for the identification of the reduced complexity Volterra model describing stochastic non-linear systems. The reduced Volterra model used is the 3rd order SVD-PARAFC-Volterra model provided using the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and the Parallel Factor (PARAFAC) tensor decomposition of the quadratic and the cubic kernels respectively of the classical Volterra model. The Alternating RGLS (ARGLS) algorithm consists on the execution of the classical RGLS algorithm in alternating way. The ARGLS convergence was proved using the Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) method. It is noted that the algorithm convergence canno׳t be ensured when the disturbance acting on the system to be identified has specific features. The ARGLS algorithm is tested in simulations on a numerical example by satisfying the determined convergence conditions. To raise the elegies of the proposed algorithm, we proceed to its comparison with the classical Alternating Recursive Least Squares (ARLS) presented in the literature. The comparison has been built on a non-linear satellite channel and a benchmark system CSTR (Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor). Moreover the efficiency of the proposed identification approach is proved on an experimental Communicating Two Tank system (CTTS).

  19. The Swedish model: an alternative to macroeconomic policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRE GUEDES VIANA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper describes the main details of the Swedish economic model, which began to be structured on the 1930s and achieved its consolidation on the 1950s. The Swedish model is characterized by a macroeconomic policy which provides price stability, fiscal results for selective industrial policies and social active policies, the latter being recognized as a wide universal welfare state. This combination, which contradicts the traditional economic prescriptions, has been successful given the country was agrarian and underdeveloped until the beginni.ng of 20th century and achieved a high social-economic development level on the 1970s. Afterwards, we present the Swedish experiment as an alternative to macroeconomic management, especially due to its uniqueness.

  20. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veitzer, Seth A., E-mail: veitzer@txcorp.com; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan, E-mail: madhusnk@txcorp.com; Stoltz, Peter H., E-mail: phstoltz@txcorp.com; Beckwith, Kristian R. C., E-mail: beckwith@txcorp.com [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H{sup −} source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H{sup −} ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two

  1. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H- source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H- ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD models

  2. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  3. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, Richard; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres---nucleo-protein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulae f...

  4. The Infinite Hierarchical Factor Regression Model

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, Piyush

    2009-01-01

    We propose a nonparametric Bayesian factor regression model that accounts for uncertainty in the number of factors, and the relationship between factors. To accomplish this, we propose a sparse variant of the Indian Buffet Process and couple this with a hierarchical model over factors, based on Kingman's coalescent. We apply this model to two problems (factor analysis and factor regression) in gene-expression data analysis.

  5. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, C.S. [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Toxicológicas e Bromatológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I. [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-02

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  6. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Bitencourt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3, propylthiouracil (PTU or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4 levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg. Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01. In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32% were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  7. Alternative sigma factors in the free state are equilibrium mixtures of open and compact conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raha, Paromita; Chattopadhyay, Suranjana; Mukherjee, Srijata; Chattopadhyay, Ruchira; Roy, Koushik; Roy, Siddhartha

    2010-11-16

    Conformational switching upon core RNA polymerase binding is an integral part of functioning of bacterial sigma factors. Here, we have studied dynamical features of two alternative sigma factors. A study of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrodynamic measurements in Escherichia coli σ(32) suggest a compact shape like those found in complex with anti-sigma factors. On the other hand, the fluorescence anisotropy of probes attached to different regions of the protein and previous hydrogen exchange measurements suggest significant internal flexibility, particularly in the C-terminal half and region 1. In a homologous sigma factor, σ(F) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, emission spectra and fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the single tryptophan (W112) and probes placed in different regions suggest a compact conformation for a major part of the N-terminal half encompassing region 2 and the flexible C-terminal half. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements suggest significant flexibility in the C-terminal half and region 1, as well. Thus, free alternative sigma factors may be in equilibrium between two conformations: a compact one in which the promoter interacting motifs are trapped in the wrong conformation and another less abundant one with a more open and flexible conformation. Such flexibility may be important for promoter recognition and interaction with many partner proteins.

  8. Alternative Reimbursement Models: Bundled Payment and Beyond: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, A Seth; Bassano, Amy; Wiggins, Stephen; Froimson, Mark I

    2016-06-01

    The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative was begun in January 2013 by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through its Innovation Center authority, which was created by the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). The BPCI program seeks to improve health-care delivery and to ultimately reduce costs by allowing providers to enter into prenegotiated payment arrangements that include financial and performance accountability for a clinical episode in which a risk-and-reward calculus must be determined. BPCI is a contemporary 3-year experiment designed to test the applicability of episode-based payment models as a viable strategy to transform the CMS payment methodology while improving health outcomes. A summary of the 4 models being evaluated in the BPCI initiative is presented in addition to the awardee types and the number of awardees in each model. Data from one of the BPCI-designated pilot sites demonstrate that strategies do exist for successful implementation of an alternative payment model by keeping patients first while simultaneously improving coordination, alignment of care, and quality and reducing cost. Providers will need to embrace change and their areas of opportunity to gain a competitive advantage. Health-care providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, health-care professionals at post-acute care institutions, and product suppliers, all have a role in determining the strategies for success. Open dialogue between CMS and awardees should be encouraged to arrive at a solution that provides opportunity for gainsharing, as this program continues to gain traction and to evolve.

  9. Alternative source models of very low frequency events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Agnew, D.C.; Schwartz, S.Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present alternative source models for very low frequency (VLF) events, previously inferred to be radiation from individual slow earthquakes that partly fill the period range between slow slip events lasting thousands of seconds and low-frequency earthquakes (LFE) with durations of tenths of a second. We show that VLF events may emerge from bandpass filtering a sum of clustered, shorter duration, LFE signals, believed to be the components of tectonic tremor. Most published studies show VLF events occurring concurrently with tremor bursts and LFE signals. Our analysis of continuous data from Costa Rica detected VLF events only when tremor was also occurring, which was only 7% of the total time examined. Using analytic and synthetic models, we show that a cluster of LFE signals produces the distinguishing characteristics of VLF events, which may be determined by the cluster envelope. The envelope may be diagnostic of a single, dynamic, slowly slipping event that propagates coherently over kilometers or represents a narrowly band-passed version of nearly simultaneous arrivals of radiation from slip on multiple higher stress drop and/or faster propagating slip patches with dimensions of tens of meters (i.e., LFE sources). Temporally clustered LFE sources may be triggered by single or multiple distinct aseismic slip events or represent the nearly simultaneous chance occurrence of background LFEs. Given the nonuniqueness in possible source durations, we suggest it is premature to draw conclusions about VLF event sources or how they scale.

  10. Alternative management structures for municipal waste collection services: The influence of economic and political factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plata-Díaz, Ana María, E-mail: amplata@ugr.es; Zafra-Gómez, José Luis, E-mail: jlzafra@ugr.es; Pérez-López, Gemma, E-mail: gemmapl@ugr.es; López-Hernández, Antonio Manuel, E-mail: alopezh@ugr.es

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We analyzed the factors that influence on the restructuring of MSW services. • We evaluated five different alternatives for public and private service. • Our analysis covers a broad time horizon, 2002–2010. • We used a conditional fixed-effects logistic regression as the evaluation method. • Municipalities tend to contract out the MSW service in the presence of high costs and fiscal stress. - Abstract: Identifying and characterising the factors that determine why a local authority opts for a particular way of managing its waste collection service is an important issue, warranting research interest in the field of municipal solid waste (MSW) management. This paper presents empirical evidence spanning a broad time horizon (2002–2010) showing that economic and political factors impact in different ways on the provision of waste management services. We examine five alternatives in this area, including public and private service delivery formulas and, within each field, individual and joint options. Our findings highlight the importance of the service cost and that of the various indicators of fiscal stress as determinant factors of management decisions regarding the provision of MSW management services.

  11. Alternative sigma factor σH activates competence gene expression in Lactobacillus sakei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Solveig

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative sigma factors trigger various adaptive responses. Lactobacillus sakei, a non-sporulating meat-borne bacterium, carries an alternative sigma factor seemingly orthologous to σH of Bacillus subtilis, best known for its contribution to the initiation of a large starvation response ultimately leading to sporulation. As the role of σH-like factors has been little studied in non-sporulating bacteria, we investigated the function of σH in L. sakei. Results Transcription of sigH coding for σH was hardly affected by entry into stationary phase in our laboratory conditions. Twenty-five genes potentially regulated by σH in L. sakei 23 K were revealed by genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of sigH overexpression and/or quantitative PCR analysis. More than half of them are involved in the synthesis of a DNA uptake machinery linked to genetic competence, and in DNA metabolism; however, σH overproduction did not allow detectable genetic transformation. σH was found to be conserved in the L. sakei species. Conclusion Our results are indicative of the existence of a genetic competence state activated by σH in L. sakei, and sustain the hypothesis that σH-like factors in non sporulating Firmicutes share this common function with the well-known ComX of naturally transformable streptococci.

  12. Regulation of splicing factors by alternative splicing and NMD is conserved between kingdoms yet evolutionarily flexible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareau, Liana F; Brenner, Steven E

    2015-04-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and NMD, one might expect this regulation to have originated in an early SR gene and persisted as duplications expanded the SR family. But in fact, unproductive splicing of most human SR genes arose independently (Lareau et al. 2007). This paradox led us to investigate the origin and proliferation of unproductive splicing in SR genes. We demonstrate that unproductive splicing of the splicing factor SRSF5 (SRp40) is conserved among all animals and even observed in fungi; this is a rare example of alternative splicing conserved between kingdoms, yet its effect is to trigger mRNA degradation. As the gene duplicated, the ancient unproductive splicing was lost in paralogs, and distinct unproductive splicing evolved rapidly and repeatedly to take its place. SR genes have consistently employed unproductive splicing, and while it is exceptionally conserved in some of these genes, turnover in specific events among paralogs shows flexible means to the same regulatory end.

  13. A Two-Factor Model of Temperament

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, David E.; Rothbart, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    The higher order structure of temperament was examined in two studies using the Adult Temperament Questionnaire. Because previous research showed robust levels of convergence between Rothbart’s constructs of temperament and the Big Five factors, we hypothesized a higher order two-factor model of temperament based on Digman’s higher order two-factor model of personality traits derived from factor analysis of the Big Five factors. Study 1 included 258 undergraduates. Digman’s model did not fit ...

  14. Big bang nucleosynthesis: The standard model and alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Big bang nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the big bang cosmological model. This paper reviews the standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation and shows how it fits the light element abundances ranging from He-4 at 24% by mass through H-2 and He-3 at parts in 10(exp 5) down to Li-7 at parts in 10(exp 10). Furthermore, the recent large electron positron (LEP) (and the stanford linear collider (SLC)) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. Alternate scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conlusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, omega(sub b) remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the conclusion that omega(sub b) approximately equals 0.06. This latter point is the driving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming omega(sub total) = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since omega(sub visible) is less than omega(sub b).

  15. A qualitative model for strategic analysis of organizations. Application and alternative proposal on a study case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Ferro Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The strategic analysis of organizations is based on the internal and external environments, in order to identify positive and negative variables and factors. The interrelation and timing of these strategic forces are essential to create alternative solutions that tend to achieve the organizational objectives.The normative prospective has theorical and methodological foundations to create a desired future and from it, be able to identify impelling and restraining forces that have influence on the particular problematic situation (go from the current situation to a better one in a certain time.The aim of this article is to analyze on a strategic way a real case with a normative-prospective model that considers the temporal dynamics of the factors impact and variables in time allowing to suggest alternative solutions.Semi-structured interviews were performed with all the employees of this case and structured observations and workshops with the commercial and general management.In consequence, with the results, the desired, current and improved situations were built. Additionally, forces were identified classified and appreciated and lastly solutions were suggested. With the proposed prospective method, alternative solutions could be constructed in order to settle temporary organizational objectives. No constraints were found to use the current method in other cases.Keywords: Strategic forces, Normative prospective, Problematic situations, Strategies

  16. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  17. Height and wavelength of alternate bars in rivers: Modelling vs. laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaapen, M.A.F.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Vriend, de H.J.; Harten, van A.

    2001-01-01

    Alternate bars are large wave patterns in sandy beds of rivers and channels. The crests and troughs alternate between the banks of the channel. These bars, which move downstream several meters per day, reduce the navigability of the river. Recent modelling of alternate bars has focused on stability

  18. An alternative tectonic model for the Yarlung Zangbo suture zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The new field investigations along the Yarlung Zangbo ophiolites zone show that these series underwent low green-schist metamorphism and were then fractured and occurred as slabs in tectonic melanges,without regional tectonic polarity.No large shear zone in north-south direction has been identified between ophiolite bodies and flysch layers on both side and a conformable contact relationship can be observed locally between them.A great mass of tectonic mélange has been substantiated as submarine olistolith bodies.The Mesozoic sedimentary facies and its evolution in both north and south of the ophiolite zone are corresponding in time.The ophiolite zone has often been divided into parallel branches,separated by narrow flysch slats.There is also a similarity of the Paleozoic and the basement of the High Himalaya,Lhasa and Qiangtang Terranes,and they are distinctly different from those of the Indian continent.The geologic information does not warrant a postulate that the Himalaya and Tibet were once separated by a great ocean;it is therefore consistent with an alternative tectonic model by back-arc basin collapse with its juvenile narrow oceanic crust.The real plate tectonic suture,the Neotethys might be covered under the Miocene Siwalik molasse in the southern slope of the High Himalaya range.Based on the new model,the Neotethyan ocean floor was subducted beneath the Asia since the Late Triassic.The outer continental margin of Eurasia was split from the Lhasa Terrane so that a back-arc basin came into existence.Hemi-pelagic and deep sea sediments were deposited before the Late Cretaceous flysch sedimentation,with the linear juvenile oceanic crust when back-arc volcanism occurred in the Gandese region.The Yarlung Zangbo back-arc basin was eventually eliminated when the High Himalayas were sutured onto Eurasia.The ocean floor lightly underthrusted to north and south sides,sediments of the basin were deformed as fold-thrusting.The Neotethys was eliminated during the

  19. Alternative sigma factor RpoN and its modulation protein YhbH are indispensable for Erwinia amylovora virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, Veronica; Li, Wenting; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    In Erwinia amylovora, ECF (extracytoplasmic functions) alternative sigma factor HrpL regulates the transcription of hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-type III secretion system (T3SS) genes by binding to a consensus sequence known as the hrp box in hrp gene promoters. In turn, the expression of hrpL has been proposed to be positively controlled by alternative sigma factor 54 (σ(54)) (RpoN) and HrpS, a member of the σ(54) enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs). However, the function of RpoN has not been characterized genetically in E. amylovora. In this study, we investigated the role of RpoN, a nitrogen limitation sigma factor, and its modulation protein YhbH, a novel ribosome-associated protein, in E. amylovora virulence. Our results showed that mutations in hrpS, hrpL, rpoN and yhbH, but not yfiA and rmf3, resulted in a nonpathogenic phenotype on immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Consistently, the expression of T3SS genes, including hrpL, dspE, hrpN and hrpA, was barely detected in hrpS, hrpL, rpoN and yhbH mutants. These mutants were also not capable of eliciting a hypersensitive response (HR) on tobacco; however, the overexpression of hrpL using an inducible promoter rescued the HR-eliciting abilities of these mutants. These results suggest that a sigma factor cascade exists in the regulatory networks of E. amylovora and regulates important virulence factors. On the basis of this study and previously reported data, a model is proposed for the regulation of T3SS in E. amylovora.

  20. Testing multi-alternative decision models with non-stationary evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eTsetsos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has investigated the process of integrating perceptual evidence towards a decision, converging on a number of sequential sampling choice models, such as variants of race and diffusion models and the non-linear leaky competing accumulator (LCA model. Here we study extensions of these models to multi-alternative choice, considering how well they can account for data from a psychophysical experiment in which the evidence supporting each of the alternatives changes dynamically during the trial, in a way that creates temporal correlations. We find that participants exhibit a tendency to choose an alternative whose evidence profile is temporally anti-correlated with (or dissimilar from that of other alternatives. This advantage of the anti-correlated alternative is well accounted for in the LCA, and provides constraints that challenge several other models of multi-alternative choice.

  1. The bifactor model of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS)--an alternative measurement model of burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, V; Adám, Sz; Szabó, M; Szigeti, R; Urbán, R

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the construct validity of the Hungarian language version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). A sample of 653 healthcare professionals (420 physicians and 233 nurses and nursing assistants) completed the MBI-HSS. A series of confirmatory factor analyses showed that a hierarchical bifactor model including a global burnout factor and three specific factors of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment had the closest fit to the data, compared with an alternative second-order three-factor hierarchical model as well as to non-hierarchical one-factor, two-factor, three-factor, four-factor and five-factor models. However, only the global burnout factor and the specific personal accomplishment factor explained a considerable unique proportion of variance in observed scores. Our study confirms the validity of the MBI-HSS and suggests an alternative structural model, which may contribute to further understanding of the burnout construct.

  2. The Construct Validity of Scores on the Ways of Coping Questionnaire: Confirmatory Analysis of Alternative Factor Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, Regina M.

    1998-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate alternative factor structures, based on previous exploratory factor analyses and coping dimensions derived from the theory of R. Lazarus, for the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (S. Folkman and R. Lazarus, 1988). Results from responses of 654 college graduates provide little support for the factor…

  3. Factors Associated With Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Usher

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic functional bowel condition, which has substantial impact on quality of life and use of healthcare services. Patients often report using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for symptom management despite limited evidence to support its use. Psychological factors have been shown to be important in both influencing CAM use and as avenues of intervention to assist in managing IBS symptoms. Therefore, this review assessed prevalence of and psychological factors associated with CAM use by people with IBS. Method: Five electronic databases (including AMED, EMBASE and PsychINFO were searched for studies that examined both the extent of and the reasons for CAM use. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Prevalence of CAM use ranged from 9% to 38%. CAM use was associated with psychosocial factors, including concerns about conventional medical care (i.e., the perceived harmful effects of medication, perception that conventional medicine had failed, and lack of satisfaction with conventional care and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings identify psychological factors associated with CAM use which could be targeted through psychologically oriented management strategies for those affected with IBS.

  4. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Identification of problems and alternative approaches. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multi-disciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The final phase of the project focused on identification of the most significant human factors problems with respect to safe and effective operation of the teletherapy system and an identification and assessment of alternative approaches for resolving the problems. This report presents the findings of this final phase.

  5. Extensive alternative splicing of the repressor element silencing transcription factor linked to cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Lin Chen

    Full Text Available The repressor element silencing transcription factor (REST is a coordinate transcriptional and epigenetic regulator which functions as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene depending on cellular context, and a truncated splice variant REST4 has been linked to various types of cancer. We performed a comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing (AS of REST by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and PCR amplification of cDNAs from various tissues and cell lines with specific primers. We identified 8 novel alternative exons including an alternate last exon which doubles the REST gene boundary, along with numerous 5'/3' splice sites and ends in the constitutive exons. With the combination of various splicing patterns (e.g. exon skipping and alternative usage of the first and last exons that are predictive of altered REST activity, at least 45 alternatively spliced variants of coding and non-coding mRNA were expressed in a species- and cell-type/tissue-specific manner with individual differences. By examining the repertoire of REST pre-mRNA splicing in 27 patients with kidney, liver and lung cancer, we found that all patients without exception showed differential expression of various REST splice variants between paired tumor and adjacent normal tissues, with striking cell-type/tissue and individual differences. Moreover, we revealed that exon 3 skipping, which causes no frame shift but loss of a domain essential for nuclear translocation, was affected by pioglitazone, a highly selective activator of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ which contributes to cell differentiation and tumorigenesis besides its metabolic actions. Accordingly, this study demonstrates an extensive AS of REST pre-mRNA which redefines REST gene boundary and structure, along with a general but differential link between REST pre-mRNA splicing and various types of cancer. These findings advance our understanding of the complex, context-dependent regulation of

  6. Skewed factor models using selection mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyoung-Moon

    2015-12-21

    Traditional factor models explicitly or implicitly assume that the factors follow a multivariate normal distribution; that is, only moments up to order two are involved. However, it may happen in real data problems that the first two moments cannot explain the factors. Based on this motivation, here we devise three new skewed factor models, the skew-normal, the skew-tt, and the generalized skew-normal factor models depending on a selection mechanism on the factors. The ECME algorithms are adopted to estimate related parameters for statistical inference. Monte Carlo simulations validate our new models and we demonstrate the need for skewed factor models using the classic open/closed book exam scores dataset.

  7. Alternative Models of Service, Centralized Machine Operations. Phase II Report. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Management Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was conducted to determine if the centralization of playback machine operations for the national free library program would be feasible, economical, and desirable. An alternative model of playback machine services was constructed and compared with existing network operations considering both cost and service. The alternative model was…

  8. From Geocentric to Heliocentric Model of the Universe, and the Alternative Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Chiu

    2005-01-01

    A recent study (Liu, 2005a, 2005b) revealed a limited number of alternative models of the universe held by young students in Taiwan and in Germany. In line with the previous findings, these alternative models frequently fall into two groups: earth-centred and sun-centred views, which draw a correspondence to the ideas in the European history of…

  9. Dynamic Factor Models for the Volatility Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Wel, Michel; Ozturk, Sait R.; Dijk, Dick van

    The implied volatility surface is the collection of volatilities implied by option contracts for different strike prices and time-to-maturity. We study factor models to capture the dynamics of this three-dimensional implied volatility surface. Three model types are considered to examine desirable...... features for representing the surface and its dynamics: a general dynamic factor model, restricted factor models designed to capture the key features of the surface along the moneyness and maturity dimensions, and in-between spline-based methods. Key findings are that: (i) the restricted and spline......-based models are both rejected against the general dynamic factor model, (ii) the factors driving the surface are highly persistent, (iii) for the restricted models option Delta is preferred over the more often used strike relative to spot price as measure for moneyness....

  10. Structural basis by which alternative splicing confers specificity in fibroblast growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Brian K; Igarashi, Makoto; Eliseenkova, Anna V; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Sher, Ifat; Ron, Dina; Aaronson, Stuart A; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2003-03-04

    Binding specificity between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) is essential for mammalian development and is regulated primarily by two alternatively spliced exons, IIIb ("b") and IIIc ("c"), that encode the second half of Ig-like domain 3 (D3) of FGFRs. FGF7 and FGF10 activate only the b isoform of FGFR2 (FGFR2b). Here, we report the crystal structure of the ligand-binding portion of FGFR2b bound to FGF10. Unique contacts between divergent regions in FGF10 and two b-specific loops in D3 reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing provides FGF10-FGFR2b specificity. Structure-based mutagenesis of FGF10 confirms the importance of the observed contacts for FGF10 biological activity. Interestingly, FGF10 binding induces a previously unobserved rotation of receptor Ig domain 2 (D2) to introduce specific contacts with FGF10. Hence, both D2 and D3 of FGFR2b contribute to the exceptional specificity between FGF10 and FGFR2b. We propose that ligand-induced conformational change in FGFRs may also play an important role in determining specificity for other FGF-FGFR complexes.

  11. Dimensionless factors for an alternating-current non-thermal arc plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Yuan; Li, Xiao-Song; Liu, Jin-Bao; Liu, Jing-Lin; Li, He-Ping; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2016-12-01

    A gliding arc discharge, as a source of warm plasma combining advantages of both thermal and cold plasmas, would have promising application prospects in the fields of fuel conversion, combustion enhancement, material synthesis, surface modifications, pollution control, etc. In order to gain insight into the features of an alternating-current gliding arc discharge plasma, three dimensionless factors, i.e., the extinction span (ψ), current lag (δ), and heating lag (χ) factors are proposed in this letter based on the measured waveforms of the discharge voltage and current in an AC gliding arc discharge plasma. The influences of the driving frequency of the power supply (f) on these three dimensionless parameters are investigated experimentally with the explanations on the physical meanings of these factors. The experimental results show that a higher value of f would lead to the lower values of ψ and δ, as well as a higher value of χ. These experimental phenomena indicate a lower threshold ignition voltage of the discharges, a lower current-growth inertia of the gliding arcs and a larger relative thermal inertia of the plasmas with increase the driving frequency of the power supply in the operating parameter range studied in this letter.

  12. The Interaction of Language-Specific and Universal Factors During the Acquisition of Morphophonemic Alternations With Exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer-Henney, Dinah; Kügler, Frank; van de Vijver, Ruben

    2015-09-01

    Using the artificial language paradigm, we studied the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations with exceptions by 160 German adult learners. We tested the acquisition of two types of alternations in two regularity conditions while additionally varying length of training. In the first alternation, a vowel harmony, backness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix. This process is grounded in substance (phonetic motivation), and this universal phonetic factor bolsters learning a generalization. In the second alternation, tenseness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix vowel. This process is not based in substance, but it reflects a phonotactic property of German and our participants benefit from this language-specific factor. We found that learners use both cues, while substantive bias surfaces mainly in the most unstable situation. We show that language-specific and universal factors interact in learning.

  13. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A; Roth, Frederick P; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2014-04-11

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases.

  14. Developing a Hierarchical Decision Model to Evaluate Nuclear Power Plant Alternative Siting Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingga, Marwan Mossa

    A strong trend of returning to nuclear power is evident in different places in the world. Forty-five countries are planning to add nuclear power to their grids and more than 66 nuclear power plants are under construction. Nuclear power plants that generate electricity and steam need to improve safety to become more acceptable to governments and the public. One novel practical solution to increase nuclear power plants' safety factor is to build them away from urban areas, such as offshore or underground. To date, Land-Based siting is the dominant option for siting all commercial operational nuclear power plants. However, the literature reveals several options for building nuclear power plants in safer sitings than Land-Based sitings. The alternatives are several and each has advantages and disadvantages, and it is difficult to distinguish among them and choose the best for a specific project. In this research, we recall the old idea of using the alternatives of offshore and underground sitings for new nuclear power plants and propose a tool to help in choosing the best siting technology. This research involved the development of a decision model for evaluating several potential nuclear power plant siting technologies, both those that are currently available and future ones. The decision model was developed based on the Hierarchical Decision Modeling (HDM) methodology. The model considers five major dimensions, social, technical, economic, environmental, and political (STEEP), and their related criteria and sub-criteria. The model was designed and developed by the author, and its elements' validation and evaluation were done by a large number of experts in the field of nuclear energy. The decision model was applied in evaluating five potential siting technologies and ranked the Natural Island as the best in comparison to Land-Based, Floating Plant, Artificial Island, and Semi-Embedded plant.

  15. Modeling the Concept of Number: What are the Alternatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Norma G.

    1985-01-01

    The use of a variety of models to develop number concepts is advocated. Four models are discussed, with illustrations: the cardinal number of a set, Cuisenaire rods, the number line, and the Papy Minicomputer. (MNS)

  16. Alternative Splicing of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor IgIII Loops in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Holzmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of the IgIII loop of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs 1–3 produces b- and c-variants of the receptors with distinctly different biological impact based on their distinct ligand-binding spectrum. Tissue-specific expression of these splice variants regulates interactions in embryonic development, tissue maintenance and repair, and cancer. Alterations in FGFR2 splicing are involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition that produces invasive, metastatic features during tumor progression. Recent research has elucidated regulatory factors that determine the splice choice both on the level of exogenous signaling events and on the RNA-protein interaction level. Moreover, methodology has been developed that will enable the in depth analysis of splicing events during tumorigenesis and provide further insight on the role of FGFR 1–3 IIIb and IIIc in the pathophysiology of various malignancies. This paper aims to summarize expression patterns in various tumor types and outlines possibilities for further analysis and application.

  17. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Grammatikakis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2 mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7 of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation.

  18. The Journal Impact Factor: Moving Toward an Alternative and Combined Scientometric Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Nurmashev, Bekaidar; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Udovik, Elena E; Baryshnikov, Aleksandr A; Kitas, George D

    2017-02-01

    The Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is a single citation metric, which is widely employed for ranking journals and choosing target journals, but is also misused as the proxy of the quality of individual articles and academic achievements of authors. This article analyzes Scopus-based publication activity on the JIF and overviews some of the numerous misuses of the JIF, global initiatives to overcome the 'obsession' with impact factors, and emerging strategies to revise the concept of the scholarly impact. The growing number of articles on the JIF, most of which are in English, reflects interest of experts in journal editing and scientometrics toward its uses, misuses, and options to overcome related problems. Solely displaying values of the JIFs on the journal websites is criticized by experts as these average metrics do not reflect skewness of citation distribution of individual articles. Emerging strategies suggest to complement the JIFs with citation plots and alternative metrics, reflecting uses of individual articles in terms of downloads and distribution of related information through social media and networking platforms. It is also proposed to revise the original formula of the JIF calculation and embrace the concept of the impact and importance of individual articles. The latter is largely dependent on ethical soundness of the journal instructions, proper editing and structuring of articles, efforts to promote related information through social media, and endorsements of professional societies.

  19. On an Estimation Method for an Alternative Fractionally Cointegrated Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlini, Federico; Łasak, Katarzyna

    In this paper we consider the Fractional Vector Error Correction model proposed in Avarucci (2007), which is characterized by a richer lag structure than models proposed in Granger (1986) and Johansen (2008, 2009). We discuss the identification issues of the model of Avarucci (2007), following...

  20. The Money-Creation Model: An Alternative Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Mark; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents a teaching model that is consistent with the traditional approach to demonstrating the expansion and contraction of the money supply. Suggests that the model provides a simple and convenient visual image of changes in the monetary system. Describes the model as juxtaposing the behavior of the moneyholding public with that of the…

  1. Modeling Alternative Assessment for Pre-Service Middle Level Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenfuss, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    College assessment models for our future middle school teachers must be varied, on-going, engaging, equitable and empowering. Traditional assessments do not often model the critical components of what makes assessment appropriate for middle level students. To provide the appropriate model for future middle level teachers, the establishment of…

  2. Contextual and psychological factors shaping evaluations and acceptability of energy alternatives : Integrated review and research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perlaviciute, Goda; Steg, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable energy transitions will be hampered without sufficient public support. Hence, it is important to understand what drives public acceptability of (sustainable) energy alternatives. Evaluations of specific costs, including risks, and benefits of different energy alternatives have been linke

  3. Structure formation in modified gravity models alternative to dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K

    2006-01-01

    We study structure formation in phenomenological models in which the Friedmann equation receives a correction of the form $H^{\\alpha}/r_c^{2-\\alpha}$, which realize an accelerated expansion without dark energy. In order to address structure formation in these model, we construct simple covariant gravitational equations which give the modified Friedmann equation with $\\alpha=2/n$ where $n$ is an integer. For $n=2$, the underlying theory is known as a 5D braneworld model (the DGP model). Thus the models interpolate between the DGP model ($n=2, \\alpha=1$) and the LCDM model in general relativity ($n \\to \\infty, \\alpha \\to 0$). Using the covariant equations, cosmological perturbations are analyzed. It is shown that in order to satisfy the Bianchi identity at a perturbative level, we need to introduce a correction term $E_{\\mu \

  4. A sugarcane R2R3-MYB transcription factor gene is alternatively spliced during drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinlong; Ling, Hui; Ma, Jingjing; Chen, Yun; Su, Yachun; Lin, Qingliang; Gao, Shiwu; Wang, Hengbo; Que, Youxiong; Xu, Liping

    2017-01-01

    MYB transcription factors of the R2R3-MYB family have been shown to play important roles in many plant processes. A sugarcane R2R3-MYB gene (ScMYB2) and its two alternative forms of transcript (ScMYB2S1 and ScMYB2S2) were identified in this study. The deduced protein of ScMYB2S1 is a typical plant R2R3-MYB protein, while ScMYB2S2 encodes a truncated protein. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that ScMYB2S1 is suppressed under PEG-simulated drought stress in sugarcane, while ScMYB2S2 is induced at later treatment stage. A senescence symptom was observed when ScMYB2S1 was injected into tobacco leaves mediated by Agrobacterium, but no symptom for ScMYB2S2. Further investigation showed that the expression levels of 4 senescence-associated genes, NtPR-1a, NtNYC1, NtCAT3 and NtABRE, were markedly induced in tobacco leaves after ScMYB2S1-injection, while they were not sensitive to ScMYB2S2-injection. Moreover, MDA and proline were also investigated after injection. Similarly, MDA and proline levels were induced by ABA and ScMYB2S1, while inhibited by ScMYB2S2. We propose that ScMYB2, by alternatively splicing two transcripts (ScMYB2S1 and ScMYB2S2), is involved in an ABA-mediated leaf senescence signaling pathway and play positive role in respond to drought-induced senescence in sugarcane. The results of this study provide information for further research in sugarcane stress processes. PMID:28167824

  5. Perspectives in the use of tannins as alternative to antimicrobial growth promoter factors in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Leandro M; Chacana, Pablo A; Dominguez, Johana E; Fernandez Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics have been included in the formulation of feed for livestock production for more than 40 years as a strategy to improve feed conversion rates and to reduce costs. The use of antimicrobials as growth-promoting factors (AGP) in sub-therapeutic doses for long periods is particularly favorable for the selection of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms. In the last years, global concern about development of antimicrobial resistance and transference of resistance genes from animal to human strains has been rising. Removal of AGP from animal diets involves tremendous pressure on the livestock and poultry farmers, one of the main consequences being a substantial increase in the incidence of infectious diseases with the associated increase in the use of antibiotics for therapy, and concomitantly, economic cost. Therefore, alternatives to AGP are urgently needed. The challenge is to implement new alternatives without affecting the production performances of livestock and avoiding the increase of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms. Plant extracts and purified derived substances are showing promising results for animal nutrition, either from their efficacy as well as from an economical point of view. Tannins are plant derived compounds that are being successfully used as additives in poultry feed to control diseases and to improve animal performance. Successful use of any of these extracts as feed additives must ensure a product of consistent quality in enough quantity to fulfill the actual requirements of the poultry industry. Chestnut (hydrolysable) and Quebracho (condensed) tannins are probably the most readily available commercial products that are covering those needs. The present report intends to analyze the available data supporting their use.

  6. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  7. Evaluating Alternate Biokinetic Models for Trace Pollutant Cometabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Binning, Philip John; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of cometabolic biodegradation kinetics can improve our understanding of the relevant microbial reactions and allow us to design in situ or in-reactor applications of cometabolic bioremediation. A variety of models are available, but their ability to describe experimental data ...... different parameter sets to simulate each experiment. Parameter nonuniqueness was likely to be due to the parameter correlation. These results suggest that the cometabolic models must be further developed if they are to reliably simulate experimental and operational data....

  8. Hybrid Models of Alternative Current Filter for Hvdc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufa Ruslan A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a hybrid simulation concept of HVDC, the developed hybrid AC filter models, providing the sufficiently full and adequate modeling of all single continuous spectrum of quasi-steady-state and transient processes in the filter, are presented. The obtained results suggest that usage of the hybrid simulation approach is carried out a methodically accurate with guaranteed instrumental error solution of differential equation systems of mathematical models of HVDC.

  9. A Bayesian Alternative for Multi-objective Ecohydrological Model Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Marshall, L. A.; Sharma, A.; Ajami, H.

    2015-12-01

    Process-based ecohydrological models combine the study of hydrological, physical, biogeochemical and ecological processes of the catchments, which are usually more complex and parametric than conceptual hydrological models. Thus, appropriate calibration objectives and model uncertainty analysis are essential for ecohydrological modeling. In recent years, Bayesian inference has become one of the most popular tools for quantifying the uncertainties in hydrological modeling with the development of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Our study aims to develop appropriate prior distributions and likelihood functions that minimize the model uncertainties and bias within a Bayesian ecohydrological framework. In our study, a formal Bayesian approach is implemented in an ecohydrological model which combines a hydrological model (HyMOD) and a dynamic vegetation model (DVM). Simulations focused on one objective likelihood (Streamflow/LAI) and multi-objective likelihoods (Streamflow and LAI) with different weights are compared. Uniform, weakly informative and strongly informative prior distributions are used in different simulations. The Kullback-leibler divergence (KLD) is used to measure the dis(similarity) between different priors and corresponding posterior distributions to examine the parameter sensitivity. Results show that different prior distributions can strongly influence posterior distributions for parameters, especially when the available data is limited or parameters are insensitive to the available data. We demonstrate differences in optimized parameters and uncertainty limits in different cases based on multi-objective likelihoods vs. single objective likelihoods. We also demonstrate the importance of appropriately defining the weights of objectives in multi-objective calibration according to different data types.

  10. Evaluation of the impact of planning alternative strategies on urban metabolism with the ACASA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, S.; Casula, M.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K. T.; Spano, D.

    2011-12-01

    A crucial point in urban sustainable development is to evaluate the impact that future planning alternatives has on the main factors affecting the citizens liveableness, as the development of the urban heat island or the carbon emissions level. Recent advances in bio-physical sciences have led to new methods and models to estimate energy, water, and carbon fluxes. Also, several studies have addressed urban metabolism issues, but few have integrated the development of numerical tools and methodologies for the analysis of fluxes between a city and its environment with its validation and application in terms of future development alternatives. Over the past several years and most recently within the European Project "BRIDGE", CMCC tested the ACASA (Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm) land-surface model over agricultural ecosystems (grapes), wild vegetation (forests and Mediterranean maquis), and urban (Florence) or mixed urban/vegetated land (Helsinki). Preliminary results show success in adapting the model to mixed urban systems in each of the main fluxes of interest. The model was improved to adapt it for urban environment, and key parameterizations of leaf-facet scale interactions permit separate accounting of both biogenic and anthropogenic flux sources and sinks, and allow for easy scenario building for simulations designed to test changes in land use or urban planning. In this way, sustainable planning strategies are proposed based on quantitative assessments of energy, water, and carbon fluxes. In this research, three planning alternatives accounting for an increase in urbanization intensity were tested by ACASA in Helsinki (Finland) for the year 2008. Helsinki is located at a high latitude and is characterized by a rapid urbanization that requires a substantial amount of energy for heating. The model behavior for the baseline and alternatives scenarios (i.e., urban classes with low, mid, and high residential intensity) during the entire year was

  11. A framework for quantifying net benefits of alternative prognostic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapsomaniki, Eleni; White, Ian R.; Wood, Angela M.; Thompson, Simon G.

    2012-01-01

    New prognostic models are traditionally evaluated using measures of discrimination and risk reclassification, but these do not take full account of the clinical and health economic context. We propose a framework for comparing prognostic models by quantifying the public health impact (net benefit) o

  12. An Alternative Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, Peter J.

    Birnbaum's three-parameter logistic function has become a common basis for item response theory modeling, especially within situations where significant guessing behavior is evident. This model is formed through a linear transformation of the two-parameter logistic function in order to facilitate a lower asymptote. This paper discusses an…

  13. Stochastic Greybox Modeling of an Alternating Activated Sludge Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus Fogtmann; Munk-Nielsen, T.; Tychsen, P.;

    Summary of key findings We found a greybox model for state estimation and control of the BioDenitro process based on a reduced ASM1. We then applied Maximum Likelihood Estimation on measurements from a real full-scale waste water treatment plant to estimate the model parameters. The estimation me...

  14. The DSM-5 dimensional trait model and five-factor models of general personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Whitney L; Widiger, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    The current study tests empirically the relationship of the dimensional trait model proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) with five-factor models of general personality. The DSM-5 maladaptive trait dimensional model proposal included 25 traits organized within five broad domains (i.e., negative affectivity, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, and psychoticism). Consistent with the authors of the proposal, it was predicted that negative affectivity would align with five-factor model (FFM) neuroticism, detachment with FFM introversion, antagonism with FFM antagonism, disinhibition with low FFM conscientiousness and, contrary to the proposal; psychoticism would align with FFM openness. Three measures of alternative five-factor models of general personality were administered to 445 undergraduates along with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5. The results provided support for the hypothesis that all five domains of the DSM-5 dimensional trait model are maladaptive variants of general personality structure, including the domain of psychoticism.

  15. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  16. System Identification by Dynamic Factor Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Heij (Christiaan); W. Scherrer; M. Destler

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThis paper concerns the modelling of stochastic processes by means of dynamic factor models. In such models the observed process is decomposed into a structured part called the latent process, and a remainder that is called noise. The observed variables are treated in a symmetric way, so

  17. Application of Decision Alternatives Evaluation Models to the Selection of Computer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson AKPOJARO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The selection of a computer system is a process dependent on many factors and irrespective of how the process proceeds; ultimately the monetary factors will play a major role. It is important to recognize the initial costs of the acquisition of the new hardware and the immediate attendance software, and also the continuing costs associated with the maintenance of hardware, software and upgrading devices that must be budgeted for to continue the infusion of viable applications. However, the selection of a given computer system from a choice set is becoming a difficult task following the proliferation of computer brands by various computer manufactures. This paper reviews different computer systems selection methodologies, draws from this background, and provides alternative models with illustrative examples to assist organizations, individual consumers or prospective buyers in arriving at specification or configurations that meet their established needs or requirements. The paper helps to educate the consumers or prospective buyers on the selection criteria and evaluation procedures for analyzing proposal submitted by vendors. The selection models adopted in this paper are evaluated using the weighted values of the different attributes submitted by vendors.

  18. Technicolour and other Beyond the Standard Model alternatives in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The expected signal sensitivity of the rho_TC -> W+Z decay channel is studied for the CMS detector, under the Technicolour "Straw Man" model. It shows a signal discovery potential at integrated luminosities starting from Ldt =~ 4fb^-1. Secondly, the CMS discovery potential of the heavy Majorana neutrino N_e and the right-handed gauge boson W_R is demonstrated, under the minimal LR symmetric model, at an early stage of the low luminosity running.

  19. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  20. Role of six single nucleotide polymorphisms, risk factors in coronary disease, in OLR1 alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, J Ramón; Tilgner, Hagen; Iannone, Camilla; Guigó, Roderic; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-06-01

    The OLR1 gene encodes the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1), which is responsible for the cellular uptake of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), foam cell formation in atheroma plaques and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Alternative splicing (AS) of OLR1 exon 5 generates two protein isoforms with antagonistic functions in Ox-LDL uptake. Previous work identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium that influence the inclusion levels of OLR1 exon 5 and correlate with the risk of cardiovascular disease. Here we use minigenes to recapitulate the effects of two allelic series (Low- and High-Risk) on OLR1 AS and identify one SNP in intron 4 (rs3736234) as the main contributor to the differences in exon 5 inclusion, while the other SNPs in the allelic series attenuate the drastic effects of this key SNP. Bioinformatic, proteomic, mutational and functional high-throughput analyses allowed us to define regulatory sequence motifs and identify SR protein family members (SRSF1, SRSF2) and HMGA1 as factors involved in the regulation of OLR1 AS. Our results suggest that antagonism between SRSF1 and SRSF2/HMGA1, and differential recognition of their regulatory motifs depending on the identity of the rs3736234 polymorphism, influence OLR1 exon 5 inclusion and the efficiency of Ox-LDL uptake, with potential implications for atherosclerosis and coronary disease.

  1. Alternative sigma factor sigmaH modulates prophage integration and excision in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Tao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The prophage is one of the most important components of variable regions in bacterial genomes. Some prophages carry additional genes that may enhance the toxicity and survival ability of their host bacteria. This phenomenon is predominant in Staphylococcus aureus, a very common human pathogen. Bioinformatics analysis of several staphylococcal prophages revealed a highly conserved 40-bp untranslated region upstream of the int gene. A small transcript encoding phage integrase was identified to be initiated from the region, demonstrating that the untranslated region contained a promoter for int. No typical recognition sequence for either sigma(A or sigma(B was identified in the 40-bp region. Experiments both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that sigma(H recognized the promoter and directed transcription. Genetic deletion of sigH altered the int expression, and subsequently, the excision proportion of prophage DNAs. Phage assays further showed that sigH affected the ability of spontaneous lysis and lysogenization in S. aureus, suggesting that sigH plays a role in stabilizing the lysogenic state. These findings revealed a novel mechanism of prophage integration specifically regulated by a host-source alternative sigma factor. This mechanism suggests a co-evolution strategy of staphylococcal prophages and their host bacteria.

  2. Health, Islam and Alternative Capitalism. Three possible Key Factors in Developing Somaliland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Zizzola

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to investigate the socio, political and economic dynamics that have occurred in Somaliland in the last decades. Even though this country is still unrecognized by the international community, Somaliland’s economy has undertaken an enduring growth, above all in the private entrepreneurial sector. The author argues that religion has had an important role in the Somali cultural and social identification. According to this assumption, the article analyzes the Islamic factor by showing how it has led to the creation of many alternative connections supported by mutual trust and religious solidarity among involved communities. These connections are somehow fulfilling the absence of political legitimacy while progressively substituting conventional routes of intra-national negotiation, like diplomacy. To confirm this tendency, specific arguments are drawn from Somaliland’s health sector. The health care system is considered a preferential index to evaluate the level of national development. Above all, the private non-profit sector gives some evidence of the Somali capacity of running competitive private businesses while multiplying simultaneously their resources and suppliers with a consequent increase in autonomy and efficiency. This successful compromise bears the fruits of Somali engagement and can be identified by their inexhaustible adaptability to adverse conditions and their ability to avoid, not deny, the rational rules imposed by external actors and their ostensible, insurmountable interests.

  3. Global analysis of Salmonella alternative sigma factor E on protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Overall, Christopher C; Johnson, Rudd C; Kidwai, Afshan S; McDermott, Jason E; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric D; Adkins, Joshua N

    2015-04-03

    The alternative sigma factor E (σ(E)) is critical for response to extracytoplasmic stress in Salmonella. Extensive studies have been conducted on σ(E)-regulated gene expression, particularly at the transcriptional level. Increasing evidence suggests however that σ(E) may indirectly participate in post-transcriptional regulation. In this study, we conducted sample-matched global proteomic and transcriptomic analyses to determine the level of regulation mediated by σ(E) in Salmonella. Samples were analyzed from wild-type and isogenic rpoE mutant Salmonella cultivated in three different conditions: nutrient-rich and conditions that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that 30% of the observed proteome was regulated by σ(E) combining all three conditions. In different growth conditions, σ(E) affected the expression of a broad spectrum of Salmonella proteins required for miscellaneous functions. Those involved in transport and binding, protein synthesis, and stress response were particularly highlighted. By comparing transcriptomic and proteomic data, we identified genes post-transcriptionally regulated by σ(E) and found that post-transcriptional regulation was responsible for a majority of changes observed in the σ(E)-regulated proteome. Further, comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data from hfq mutant of Salmonella demonstrated that σ(E)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation was partially dependent on the RNA-binding protein Hfq.

  4. A framework for quantifying net benefits of alternative prognostic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapsomaniki, Eleni; White, Ian R; Wood, Angela M

    2012-01-01

    reduction interventions. We extend previous work in this area by quantifying net benefits in life years, thus linking prognostic performance to health economic measures; by taking full account of the occurrence of events over time; and by considering estimation and cross-validation in a multiple-study......New prognostic models are traditionally evaluated using measures of discrimination and risk reclassification, but these do not take full account of the clinical and health economic context. We propose a framework for comparing prognostic models by quantifying the public health impact (net benefit......) of the treatment decisions they support, assuming a set of predetermined clinical treatment guidelines. The change in net benefit is more clinically interpretable than changes in traditional measures and can be used in full health economic evaluations of prognostic models used for screening and allocating risk...

  5. Modeling mixtures of thyroid gland function disruptors in a vertebrate alternative model, the zebrafish eleutheroembryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, Benedicte; Barata, Carlos [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA, CSIC), Jordi Girona, 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Raldúa, Demetrio, E-mail: drpqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA, CSIC), Jordi Girona, 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Maladies Rares: Génétique et Métabolisme (MRGM), University of Bordeaux, EA 4576, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2013-06-01

    Maternal thyroxine (T4) plays an essential role in fetal brain development, and even mild and transitory deficits in free-T4 in pregnant women can produce irreversible neurological effects in their offspring. Women of childbearing age are daily exposed to mixtures of chemicals disrupting the thyroid gland function (TGFDs) through the diet, drinking water, air and pharmaceuticals, which has raised the highest concern for the potential additive or synergic effects on the development of mild hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy. Recently we demonstrated that zebrafish eleutheroembryos provide a suitable alternative model for screening chemicals impairing the thyroid hormone synthesis. The present study used the intrafollicular T4-content (IT4C) of zebrafish eleutheroembryos as integrative endpoint for testing the hypotheses that the effect of mixtures of TGFDs with a similar mode of action [inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO)] was well predicted by a concentration addition concept (CA) model, whereas the response addition concept (RA) model predicted better the effect of dissimilarly acting binary mixtures of TGFDs [TPO-inhibitors and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-inhibitors]. However, CA model provided better prediction of joint effects than RA in five out of the six tested mixtures. The exception being the mixture MMI (TPO-inhibitor)-KClO{sub 4} (NIS-inhibitor) dosed at a fixed ratio of EC{sub 10} that provided similar CA and RA predictions and hence it was difficult to get any conclusive result. There results support the phenomenological similarity criterion stating that the concept of concentration addition could be extended to mixture constituents having common apical endpoints or common adverse outcomes. - Highlights: • Potential synergic or additive effect of mixtures of chemicals on thyroid function. • Zebrafish as alternative model for testing the effect of mixtures of goitrogens. • Concentration addition seems to predict better the effect of

  6. The Confidence Model: An Alternative Approach to Alleviating Communication Apprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Arden K.

    Recognizing that each student is different in terms of communication apprehension and needed skills, the confidence model attempts to provide instruction in anxiety reduction and skill development, combining the features of both the behavior therapy and the rhetoritherapy theories of communication apprehension. The rational emotive therapy used in…

  7. Modeling the interaction of DNA with alternating fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bergues-Pupo, Ana Elisa; Falo, Fernando; 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.022703

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of a THz field on thermal properties of DNA molecules. A Peyrard- Bishop-Dauxois model with the inclusion of a solvent interaction term is considered. The THz field is included as a sinusoidal driven force in the equation of mo tion. We show how under certain field and system parameters, melting transition and bubble formation are modified.

  8. COMBINING SOURCES IN STABLE ISOTOPE MIXING MODELS: ALTERNATIVE METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable isotope mixing models are often used to quantify source contributions to a mixture. Examples include pollution source identification; trophic web studies; analysis of water sources for soils, plants, or water bodies; and many others. A common problem is having too many s...

  9. Development and Validation of Linear Alternator Models for the Advanced Stirling Convertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metscher, Jonathan F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Two models of the linear alternator of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) have been developed using the Sage 1-D modeling software package. The first model relates the piston motion to electric current by means of a motor constant. The second uses electromagnetic model components to model the magnetic circuit of the alternator. The models are tuned and validated using test data and also compared against each other. Results show both models can be tuned to achieve results within 7 of ASC test data under normal operating conditions. Using Sage enables the creation of a complete ASC model to be developed and simulations completed quickly compared to more complex multi-dimensional models. These models allow for better insight into overall Stirling convertor performance, aid with Stirling power system modeling, and in the future support NASA mission planning for Stirling-based power systems.

  10. Animal welfare versus food quality: factors influencing organic consumers' preferences for alternatives to piglet castration without anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Astrid; Hamm, Ulrich

    2013-10-01

    Surgical piglet castration without pain relief has been banned in organic farming in the EU since the beginning of 2012. Alternative methods therefore need to be implemented that improve animal welfare and solve the underlying problem of boar taint. This paper explores German organic consumers' preferences for piglet castration without pain relief and three alternative methods. In an innovative approach using a multi-criteria decision making procedure, qualitative data from focus group discussions were compared with quantitative results from Vickrey auctions. Overall, participants preferred all alternatives to castration without pain relief. Different aspects influenced willingness-to-pay for the methods. Animal welfare was important for the evaluation of castration without pain relief and castration with anaesthesia. Food safety played a major role for willingness-to-pay for immunocastration, while taste and, to some extent, animal welfare were dominant factors for fattening of boars. These differences should be considered when communicating the alternatives.

  11. The alternative Iranian model of living renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonico, Francis L

    2012-09-01

    The experience of the Iranian model should be carefully considered by those who suggest a pilot trial of a regulated market in organ sales. Mahdavi-Mazdeh's candid report makes clear that a fixed price as the basis of regulation is not possible. Iran is proceeding with an independent program of deceased organ donation in cities such as Shiraz. Mahdavi-Mazdeh's report is encouraging for the prospect of a revitalized expansion of deceased donation.

  12. Personality disorders in DSM-5: emerging research on the alternative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Benson, Kathryn T; Busch, Alexander J; Skodol, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    The current categorical classification of personality disorders, originally introduced in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III), has been found to suffer from numerous shortcomings that hamper its usefulness for research and for clinical application. The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group for DSM-5 was charged with developing an alternative model that would address many of these concerns. The developed model involved a hybrid dimensional/categorical model that represented personality disorders as combinations of core impairments in personality functioning with specific configurations of problematic personality traits. The Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association did not accept the Task Force recommendation to implement this novel approach, and thus this alternative model was included in Sect. III of the DSM-5 among concepts requiring additional study. This review provides an overview of the emerging research on this alternative model, addressing each of the primary components of the model.

  13. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Turner

    Full Text Available It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP, would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  14. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nancy A; Sartain, Sarah E; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  15. Alternative DFN model based on initial site investigations at Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcel, C. [Itasca Consultants, Ecully (France); Davy, S.A.P.; Bour, O.; Dreuzy, J.R. de [Geosciences, Rennes (France)

    2004-12-01

    In this report, we provide a first-order analysis of the fracture network at the Simpevarp site. The first order model is the fracture distribution function, noted, fdf, which provides the number of fractures having a given orientation and length, and belonging to a given volume of observation. The first-order distribution model does not describe higher-order correlation between fracture parameters, such as a possible dependency of fracture length distribution with orientations. We also check that most of the information is contained in this 1st-order distribution model, and that dividing the fracture networks into different sets do not bring a better statistical description. The fracture distribution function contains 3 main distributions: the probability distribution of fracture orientations, the dependency on the size of the sampling domain that may exhibit non-trivial scaling in case of fractal correlations, and the fracture-length density distribution, which appears to be well fitted by a power law. The main scaling parameters are the fractal dimension and the power-law exponent of the fracture length distribution. The former was found to be about equal to the embedding dimension, meaning that fractal correlations are weak and can be neglected in the DFN model. The latter depends on geology, that is either lithology or grain size, with values that ranges from 3.2 for granite-like outcrops to 4 for diorite or monzodiorite outcrops, as well as for the large-scale lineament maps. When analyzing the consistency of the different datasets (boreholes, outcrops, lineament maps), we found that two different DFNs can be described: the first one is derived from the fdf of the outcrop with fine-grained size lithology, and is valid across all scales investigated in this study, from the highly-fractured cores to large-scale maps; the second one is derived from the fdf of the outcrops with coarse-grained size lithology, and is found consistent with cores that present the

  16. A STUDY ON LIMITATION OF GOVERNMENT INITIATIVE MODEL FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLE (AFV PROMOTION IN CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byunghun Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chinese responsibility for reducing Greenhouse Gas or carbon dioxide emission increases continuously. Chinese government suggested two targets; Alternative Fuel Vehicle output volume 500 thousand and AFV market share 5% by the end of 2011. However any of two targets did not come true. Therefore this study accessed the question, ‘why Chinese government initiative model for AFV promotion has been so poor?’ This study reviewed the transition process for AFV policies in China and made a structural analysis for three key policies since 2009. As a result the number of articles for related industries or factor endowments was relatively more than firm strategy or demand conditions. Also this study accessed the AFV strategy of Six SOEs from the perspective of social responsibility. Six SOEs have more concentrated on electric vehicle rather than hybrid vehicle with following the government leadership. However major EV or HEV models of them mostly were made by Joint Ventures being under control of foreign makers and the JVs have actually controlled over AFV business. So the limitation of Chinese government initiative model resulted from supplier-centric approach with targeting for public transportation and institution consumer, and it caused a failure to create the demand conditions of general customers.

  17. Hydrodynamic Lyapunov modes and strong stochasticity threshold in the dynamic XY model: an alternative scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Liu; Radons, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Crossover from weak to strong chaos in high-dimensional Hamiltonian systems at the strong stochasticity threshold (SST) was anticipated to indicate a global transition in the geometric structure of phase space. Our recent study of Fermi-Pasta-Ulam models showed that corresponding to this transition the energy density dependence of all Lyapunov exponents is identical apart from a scaling factor. The current investigation of the dynamic XY model discovers an alternative scenario for the energy dependence of the system dynamics at SSTs. Though similar in tendency, the Lyapunov exponents now show individually different energy dependencies except in the near-harmonic regime. Such a finding restricts the use of indices such as the largest Lyapunov exponent and the Ricci curvatures to characterize the global transition in the dynamics of high-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. These observations are consistent with our conjecture that the quasi-isotropy assumption works well only when parametric resonances are the dominant sources of dynamical instabilities. Moreover, numerical simulations demonstrate the existence of hydrodynamical Lyapunov modes (HLMs) in the dynamic XY model and show that corresponding to the crossover in the Lyapunov exponents there is also a smooth transition in the energy density dependence of significance measures of HLMs. In particular, our numerical results confirm that strong chaos is essential for the appearance of HLMs.

  18. Promoting and Supporting Scientific Argumentation in the Classroom: The Evaluate-Alternatives Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an instructional model that science teachers can use to promote and support student engagement in scientific argumentation. This model is called the evaluate-alternatives instructional model and it is grounded in current research on argumentation in science education (e.g., Berland and Reiser 2009; McNeill and Krajcik 2006;…

  19. Factors Associated with Student Resilience: Perspectives of Graduates of Alternative Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkoski, Staci M.; Bullock, Lyndal M.; Gable, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Many students with emotional and behavioral disorders placed in alternative education settings lack resilience and are likely to experience failure in school and beyond without carefully designed intervention programs. Although researchers have examined both resilience in children and youth and their placement in alternative education settings,…

  20. Modeling of Alternative Compositions of Recycled Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkijan, Varužan

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, a significant part of postconsumed wrought aluminum scrap is still used for the production of comparatively cheaper cast alloys, in that way losing an important part of the potential added value. The share of postconsumed scrap in wrought aluminum alloys could be increased either by sorting to fractions with the required chemical composition and/or by broadening the standard compositional tolerance limits of alloying elements. The first solution requires hand or automatic sorting of postconsumed scrap as alloys or groups of alloys to the degree of separation sufficient to enable the blending of standard compositions of wrought alloys; the second solution is much more radical, predicting changes in the existing standards for wrought aluminum alloys toward nonstandard alloys but yet having properties acceptable for customers. In this case, the degree of separation of incoming postconsumed scrap required is much less demanding. The model presented in this work enables the design of optimal (standard and nonstandard recycling-friendly) compositions and properties of wrought aluminum alloys with significantly increased amounts of postconsumed scrap. The following two routes were modeled in detail: (I) the blending of standard and nonstandard compositions of wrought aluminum alloys starting from postconsumed aluminum scrap sorted to various degrees simulated by the model and (II) changing the initial standard composition of wrought aluminum alloys to nonstandard "recycling-friendly" ones, with broader concentration tolerance limits of alloying elements and without influencing the selected alloy properties, specified in advance. The applied algorithms were found to be very useful in the industrial design of both procedures: (I) the computation of the required chemical composition of the scrap streams obtained by sorting (or, in other words, the postconsumed scrap sorting level), necessary for achieving the standard wrought alloy composition and (II) the

  1. Modeling the impacts of alternative fertilization methods on nitrogen loading in rice production in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zheng; Sha, Zhimin; Liu, Yibo; Wu, Shuhang; Zhang, Hanlin; Li, Changsheng; Zhao, Qi; Cao, Linkui

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) loss from paddy fields is an important source of agricultural non-point source pollution that leads to eutrophication of water bodies and degradation of water quality. The impacts of alternative N fertilizer management practices on N loading (N loss through runoff and leaching) from paddy fields in Shanghai were assessed using a process-based biogeochemical model, DNDC. The results indicated that the current fertilization rate in paddy fields of Shanghai (300kgN/ha) exceeds the actual rice demand and has led to substantial N loading of 1142±276kg. The combined application of urea at 150kgN/ha and organic manure at 100kgN/ha was identified as the best fertilization method for rice cultivation in Shanghai; this application maintained optimal rice yields and significantly reduced N loading to 714±151kg in comparison with the current fertilization rate. A sensitivity test was conducted with various input parameters, and the results indicated that fertilization, precipitation and soil properties were the most sensitive factors that regulate N loss from paddy fields. The variability of soil properties, especially SOC led to high uncertainties in the simulated results. Therefore, the local climate conditions and soil properties should be taken into account in the identification of the best management practice (BMP) for rice cultivation, given the high spatially heterogeneous N loading values across all towns used in the simulation. The DNDC model is an effective approach for simulating and predicting N loading in paddy fields under alternative agricultural management practices.

  2. Matrix Model for Choosing Green Marketing Sustainable Strategic Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Sitnikov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Green marketing examines the symbiotic role played by marketing in ensuring sustainable business, exploring issues concerning the environment and the way strategic decisions can influence it. At present, the environmental issues concern more and more the competitive approach any organization can implement. Based on this approach, organizations can gain competitive advantage by managing environmental variables and by developing and implementing green marketing strategies. Considering the importance and impact of green marketing, by using theoretical concepts and defining a set of research directions, the paper and the research conducted were focused on creating a matrix model for choosing the optimal green marketing strategy, oriented towards competitive advantage. The model is based on the correlation that can be established among the generic strategies of competitive advantage, the variables of extended marketing mix (7Ps and the green marketing strategy matrix. There are also analyzed the implications that may be generated within a company by the adoption of a green marketing strategy and its role in promoting the environmental benefits of products.

  3. The transcription factor PU.1 promotes alternative macrophage polarization and asthmatic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Lee, Yong Gyu; Zhu, Jimmy; Karpurapu, Manjula; Chung, Sangwoon; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Xiao, Lei; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W

    2015-12-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is involved in regulation of macrophage differentiation and maturation. However, the role of PU.1 in alternatively activated macrophage (AAM) and asthmatic inflammation has yet been investigated. Here we report that PU.1 serves as a critical regulator of AAM polarization and promotes the pathological progress of asthmatic airway inflammation. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, conditional PU.1-deficient (PU/ER(T)(+/-)) mice displayed attenuated allergic airway inflammation, including decreased alveolar eosinophil infiltration and reduced production of IgE, which were associated with decreased mucous glands and goblet cell hyperplasia. The reduced asthmatic inflammation in PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice was restored by adoptive transfer of IL-4-induced wild-type (WT) macrophages. Moreover, after treating PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice with tamoxifen to rescue PU.1 function, the allergic asthmatic inflammation was significantly restored. In vitro studies demonstrate that treatment of PU.1-deficient macrophages with IL-4 attenuated the expression of chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym-1) and resistin-like molecule alpha 1 (Fizz-1), two specific markers of AAM polarization. In addition, PU.1 expression in macrophages was inducible in response to IL-4 challenge, which was associated with phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, DRA challenge in sensitized mice almost abrogated gene expression of Ym-1 and Fizz-1 in lung tissues of PU/ER(T)(+/-) mice compared with WT mice. These data, all together, indicate that PU.1 plays a critical role in AAM polarization and asthmatic inflammation.

  4. Schools as Sanctuaries: A Systematic Review of Contextual Factors Which Contribute to Student Retention in Alternative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Eva; Salmon, Nancy; Murphy, Carol-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Early school leaving is an international concern. Previous research indicates that the school context contributes to early school leaving. This systematic review is aimed to gather marginalised young peoples' perceptions concerning contextual factors that contributed to and interfered with their decisions to stay in alternative education.…

  5. Alternative sigma factor SigK has a role in stress tolerance of group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsten, Elias; Kirk, David; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2013-06-01

    The role of the alternative sigma factor SigK in cold and osmotic stress tolerance of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 was demonstrated by induction of sigK after temperature downshift and exposure to hyperosmotic conditions and by impaired growth of the sigK mutants under the respective conditions.

  6. Model correction factor method for system analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Johannesen, Johannes M.

    2000-01-01

    The Model Correction Factor Method is an intelligent response surface method based on simplifiedmodeling. MCFM is aimed for reliability analysis in case of a limit state defined by an elaborate model. Herein it isdemonstrated that the method is applicable for elaborate limit state surfaces on which...

  7. Editors View the Continuous Publication Model as a Satisfactory Alternative for Open Access LIS Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hayman

    2014-09-01

    provided 16 potential reasons for using a discrete-issue model, and 13 potential reasons for using a rolling-volume model. Respondents from both groups were asked to mark all reasons that applied for their respective journals. The survey also included questions about whether the journal had ever used the alternate publishing model, the editor’s satisfaction with their current model, and the likelihood of the journal switching to the alternate publishing model in the foreseeable future. Main Results – The authors collected complete responses from 21 of the original 29 journals invited to participate in the study, a response rate of 72%. For the 12 journals that identified as using discrete issues, ease of production workflow (91.7%, clear production deadlines (75.0%, and journal publicity and promotion (75.0% were the three most common reasons for using a discrete-issue model. For the nine journals using rolling volumes, improved production workflow (77.8%, decreased dependence on production deadlines (77.8%, and increased speed of research dissemination (66.7% were the three most common reasons cited for using a rolling-volume model. Findings show that overall satisfaction with a journal’s particular publication model was a common factor regardless of publishing model in use, though only the rolling-volume editors unanimously reported being very satisfied with their model. This high satisfaction rate is reflected in editors’ positions that they were very unlikely to switch away from the rolling-volume method. While a majority of editors of discrete-issue journals also reported being very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with their current model, the mixed responses to whether they would contemplate switching to the alternate model suggests that awareness of the benefits of rolling-volume publishing is increasing. Conclusion – Researchers discovered a greater incidence of rolling-volume model journals with open access LIS journals than anticipated, suggesting that

  8. Continuous utility factor in segregation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Parna; Sen, Parongama

    2016-02-01

    We consider the constrained Schelling model of social segregation in which the utility factor of agents strictly increases and nonlocal jumps of the agents are allowed. In the present study, the utility factor u is defined in a way such that it can take continuous values and depends on the tolerance threshold as well as the fraction of unlike neighbors. Two models are proposed: in model A the jump probability is determined by the sign of u only, which makes it equivalent to the discrete model. In model B the actual values of u are considered. Model A and model B are shown to differ drastically as far as segregation behavior and phase transitions are concerned. In model A, although segregation can be achieved, the cluster sizes are rather small. Also, a frozen state is obtained in which steady states comprise many unsatisfied agents. In model B, segregated states with much larger cluster sizes are obtained. The correlation function is calculated to show quantitatively that larger clusters occur in model B. Moreover for model B, no frozen states exist even for very low dilution and small tolerance parameter. This is in contrast to the unconstrained discrete model considered earlier where agents can move even when utility remains the same. In addition, we also consider a few other dynamical aspects which have not been studied in segregation models earlier.

  9. The natural alternative: protozoa as cellular models for Legionella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease occurs following infection by the Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Normally resident in fresh-water sources, Legionella are subject to predation by eukaryotic phagocytes such as amoeba and ciliates. To counter this, L. pneumophila has evolved a complex system of effector proteins which allow the bacteria to hijack the phagocytic vacuole, hiding and replicating within their erstwhile killers. These same mechanisms allow L. pneumophila to hijack another phagocyte, lung-based macrophages, which thus avoids a vital part of the immune system and leads to infection. The course of infection can be divided into five main categories: pathogen uptake, formation of the replication-permissive vacuole, intracellular replication, host cell response, and bacterial exit. L. pneumophila effector proteins target every stage of this process, interacting with secretory, endosomal, lysosomal, retrograde and autophagy pathways, as well as with mitochondria. Each of these steps can be studied in protozoa or mammalian cells, and the knowledge gained can be readily applied to human pathogenicity. Here we describe the manner whereby L. pneumophila infects host protozoa, the various techniques which are available to analyse these processes and the implications of this model for Legionella virulence and the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease.

  10. A model for sigma factor competition in bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Marco; Klumpp, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Sigma factors control global switches of the genetic expression program in bacteria. Different sigma factors compete for binding to a limited pool of RNA polymerase (RNAP) core enzymes, providing a mechanism for cross-talk between genes or gene classes via the sharing of expression machinery. To analyze the contribution of sigma factor competition to global changes in gene expression, we develop a theoretical model that describes binding between sigma factors and core RNAP, transcription, non-specific binding to DNA and the modulation of the availability of the molecular components. The model is validated by comparison with in vitro competition experiments, with which excellent agreement is found. Transcription is affected via the modulation of the concentrations of the different types of holoenzymes, so saturated promoters are only weakly affected by sigma factor competition. However, in case of overlapping promoters or promoters recognized by two types of sigma factors, we find that even saturated promoters are strongly affected. Active transcription effectively lowers the affinity between the sigma factor driving it and the core RNAP, resulting in complex cross-talk effects. Sigma factor competition is not strongly affected by non-specific binding of core RNAPs, sigma factors and holoenzymes to DNA. Finally, we analyze the role of increased core RNAP availability upon the shut-down of ribosomal RNA transcription during the stringent response. We find that passive up-regulation of alternative sigma-dependent transcription is not only possible, but also displays hypersensitivity based on the sigma factor competition. Our theoretical analysis thus provides support for a significant role of passive control during that global switch of the gene expression program.

  11. The asset pricing model of musharakah factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Shahril; Omar, Mohd; Lazam, Norazliani Md

    2015-02-01

    The existing three-factor model developed by Fama and French for conventional investment was formulated based on risk-free rates element in which contradict with Shariah principles. We note that the underlying principles that govern Shariah investment were mutual risk and profit sharing between parties, the assurance of fairness for all and that transactions were based on an underlying asset. In addition, the three-factor model did not exclude stock that was not permissible by Shariah such as financial services based on riba (interest), gambling operator, manufacture or sale of non-halal products or related products and other activities deemed non-permissible according to Shariah. Our approach to construct the factor model for Shariah investment was based on the basic tenets of musharakah in tabulating the factors. We start by noting that Islamic stocks with similar characteristics should have similar returns and risks. This similarity between Islamic stocks was defined by the similarity of musharakah attributes such as business, management, profitability and capital. These attributes define factor exposures (or betas) to factors. The main takeaways were that musharakah attributes we chose had explain stock returns well in cross section and were significant in different market environments. The management factor seemed to be responsible for the general dynamics of the explanatory power.

  12. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets - Fleet Compliance Annual Report: Model Year 2015, Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state government and alternative fuel provider fleets, pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. Covered fleets may meet their EPAct requirements through one of two compliance methods: Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. For model year (MY) 2015, the compliance rate with this program for the more than 3011 reporting fleets was 100%. More than 294 fleets used Standard Compliance and exceeded their aggregate MY 2015 acquisition requirements by 8% through acquisitions alone. The seven covered fleets that used Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2015 petroleum use reduction requirements by 46%.

  13. Understanding and modeling alternating tangential flow filtration for perfusion cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William; Scully, Jennifer; Zhang, Di; Feng, Gang; Lavengood, Mathew; Condon, Jason; Knighton, John; Bhatia, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Alternating tangential flow (ATF) filtration has been used with success in the Biopharmaceutical industry as a lower shear technology for cell retention with perfusion cultures. The ATF system is different than tangential flow filtration; however, in that reverse flow is used once per cycle as a means to minimize fouling. Few studies have been reported in the literature that evaluates ATF and how key system variables affect the rate at which ATF filters foul. In this study, an experimental setup was devised that allowed for determination of the time it took for fouling to occur for given mammalian (PER.C6) cell culture cell densities and viabilities as permeate flow rate and antifoam concentration was varied. The experimental results indicate, in accordance with D'Arcy's law, that the average resistance to permeate flow (across a cycle of operation) increases as biological material deposits on the membrane. Scanning electron microscope images of the post-run filtration surface indicated that both cells and antifoam micelles deposit on the membrane. A unique mathematical model, based on the assumption that fouling was due to pore blockage from the cells and micelles in combination, was devised that allowed for estimation of sticking factors for the cells and the micelles on the membrane. This model was then used to accurately predict the increase in transmembane pressure during constant flux operation for an ATF cartridge used for perfusion cell culture.

  14. Modelling silviculture alternatives for managing Pinus pinea L. forest in North-East Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqu-Nicalau, M.; Rio, M. del; Calama, R.; Montero, G.

    2011-07-01

    A yield model was developed to simulate silviculture alternatives for Pinus pinea L. in north-east Spain (Catalonia). The model uses several functions to estimate the main silvicultural parameters at stand level and a disaggregation system to predict diameter distributions. From a network of 75 temporary plots a system of equations to predict stand variables was simultaneously fitted for two stand density types, namely low and high density stands, using the three stage least-squares method (3SLS). The diameter distributions were estimated by the Weibull distribution function using the parameter recovery method (PRM) and the method of moments. Based on this yield model, two silviculture alternatives were simulated for each stand density type and site class, resulting in 16 silviculture scenarios. The yield model and silviculture alternatives offer a management tool and a guide for the sustainable forest management of even aged Pinus pinea forests in this region. (Author) 56 refs.

  15. An alternative method for modeling the size distribution of top wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanjun; You, Shibing

    2016-09-01

    The Pareto distribution has been widely applied in modeling the distribution of wealth, as well as top incomes, cities and firms. However, recent evidence has shown that the Pareto distribution is not consistent with many situations in which it was previously considered applicable. We propose an alternative method for estimating the upper tail distribution of wealth and suggest a new Lorenz curve for building models to provide such estimates. Applying our new models to the Forbes World's Billionaire Lists, we show that they significantly outperform the Pareto Lorenz curve as well as some other popular alternatives.

  16. Factor Copula Models for Replicated Spatial Data

    KAUST Repository

    Krupskii, Pavel

    2016-12-19

    We propose a new copula model that can be used with replicated spatial data. Unlike the multivariate normal copula, the proposed copula is based on the assumption that a common factor exists and affects the joint dependence of all measurements of the process. Moreover, the proposed copula can model tail dependence and tail asymmetry. The model is parameterized in terms of a covariance function that may be chosen from the many models proposed in the literature, such as the Matérn model. For some choice of common factors, the joint copula density is given in closed form and therefore likelihood estimation is very fast. In the general case, one-dimensional numerical integration is needed to calculate the likelihood, but estimation is still reasonably fast even with large data sets. We use simulation studies to show the wide range of dependence structures that can be generated by the proposed model with different choices of common factors. We apply the proposed model to spatial temperature data and compare its performance with some popular geostatistics models.

  17. Being Both: An Integrated Model of Art Therapy and Alternative Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This viewpoint proposes a model of art therapy integrated into an alternative art education program. Because of the pressure to meet educational standards, school systems may be less likely to support clinical programs that take students out of their classes. A blended model of art therapy and art education that utilizes effective strategies from…

  18. GY SAMPLING THEORY AND GEOSTATISTICS: ALTERNATE MODELS OF VARIABILITY IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the sampling theory developed by Pierre Gy, sample variability is modeled as the sum of a set of seven discrete error components. The variogram used in geostatisties provides an alternate model in which several of Gy's error components are combined in a continuous mode...

  19. An Alternative Bayesian Approach to Structural Breaks in Time Series Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van den Hauwe (Sjoerd); R. Paap (Richard); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new approach to deal with structural breaks in time series models. The key contribution is an alternative dynamic stochastic specification for the model parameters which describes potential breaks. After a break new parameter values are generated from a so-called baseline pr

  20. Alternative Models of Entrance Exams and Access to Higher Education: The Case of the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecny, Tomas; Basl, Josef; Myslivecek, Jan; Simonova, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The study compares the potential effects of a university admission exam model based on program-specific knowledge and an alternative model relying on general study aptitude (GSA) in the context of a strongly stratified educational system with considerable excess of demand over supply of university education. Using results of the "Sonda…

  1. Progressive collapse analysis using updated models for alternate path analysis after a blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskew, Edward; Jang, Shinae; Bertolaccini, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Progressive collapse is of rising importance within the structural engineering community due to several recent cases. The alternate path method is a design technique to determine the ability of a structure to sustain the loss of a critical element, or elements, and still resist progressive collapse. However, the alternate path method only considers the removal of the critical elements. In the event of a blast, significant damage may occur to nearby members not included in the alternate path design scenarios. To achieve an accurate assessment of the current condition of the structure after a blast or other extreme event, it may be necessary to reduce the strength or remove additional elements beyond the critical members designated in the alternate path design method. In this paper, a rapid model updating technique utilizing vibration measurements is used to update the structural model to represent the real-time condition of the structure after a blast occurs. Based upon the updated model, damaged elements will either have their strength reduced, or will be removed from the simulation. The alternate path analysis will then be performed, but only utilizing the updated structural model instead of numerous scenarios. After the analysis, the simulated response from the analysis will be compared to failure conditions to determine the buildings post-event condition. This method has the ability to incorporate damage to noncritical members into the analysis. This paper will utilize numerical simulations based upon a unified facilities criteria (UFC) example structure subjected to an equivalent blast to validate the methodology.

  2. Modeling alternatives for basin-level hydropower development: 1. Optimization methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shoou-Yuh; Liaw, Shu-Liang; Railsback, Steven F.; Sale, Michael J.

    1992-10-01

    Development of multiple hydroelectric projects at navigation dams on large river systems can result in a number of environmental impacts, including potential reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. This study presents a method for generating hydropower development alternatives for evaluation by planners by quantifying the trade-offs between water quality and power generation. This method employs a Streeter-Phelps model to simulate DO and the bounded implicit enumeration algorithm to solve an optimization model formulated to maximize hydroelectric energy production. A portion of the upper Ohio River basin was selected to illustrate the methodology. The results indicate that various alternatives that meet the specified DO constraints can be generated efficiently. These alternatives are nearly optimal solutions with respect to the modeled objectives but are different with respect to decision variables.

  3. Aging Successfully: A Four-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Yen, Tung-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to validate a model for a successful aging process and examine the gender differences in the aging process. Three hundred twelve participants who were 65 or older completed a Taiwan Social Change Survey that measures four factors that define successful aging process: including physical, psychological, social support, and…

  4. Alternatives to the Markovian Model for the Tubulent Refractive Index in Lightwave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, D G; Perez, Dario G.; Zunino, Luciano

    2003-01-01

    We discuss in this letter the markovian model and its limitations when applied to model the turbulent refractive index in lightwave propagation. Not being aware are these limitations usually leads to severe mistakes as we will point out here. It is widely known the index is a passive scalar field; moreover, with our actual knowledge about these quantities we will propose an alternative stochastic process to the markovian model.

  5. Sociocognitive Factors and Perceived Consequences Associated with Alternative Forms of Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitman, Abby L.; Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N.; Stamates, Amy L.; Lau-Barraco, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Popular media have highly publicized alternative forms of alcohol use (e.g., eyeballing, inhaling alcohol vapor) among college students as a growing concern, possibly associated with severe health risks. Formative research indicates rarity of use. Participants and Methods: College students (Study 1: n = 411; Study 2: n = 687) completed…

  6. The conserved splicing factor SUA controls alternative splicing of the developmental regulator ABI3 in Arabidopsis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugliani, M.; Brambilla, V.; Clerkx, E.J.M.; Koornneef, M.; Soppe, W.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) is a major regulator of seed maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We detected two ABI3 transcripts, ABI3- and ABI3-ß, which encode full-length and truncated proteins, respectively. Alternative splicing of ABI3 is developmentally regulated, and the ABI3-ß transcript a

  7. Testing alternative ground water models using cross-validation and other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many methods can be used to test alternative ground water models. Of concern in this work are methods able to (1) rank alternative models (also called model discrimination) and (2) identify observations important to parameter estimates and predictions (equivalent to the purpose served by some types of sensitivity analysis). Some of the measures investigated are computationally efficient; others are computationally demanding. The latter are generally needed to account for model nonlinearity. The efficient model discrimination methods investigated include the information criteria: the corrected Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and generalized cross-validation. The efficient sensitivity analysis measures used are dimensionless scaled sensitivity (DSS), composite scaled sensitivity, and parameter correlation coefficient (PCC); the other statistics are DFBETAS, Cook's D, and observation-prediction statistic. Acronyms are explained in the introduction. Cross-validation (CV) is a computationally intensive nonlinear method that is used for both model discrimination and sensitivity analysis. The methods are tested using up to five alternative parsimoniously constructed models of the ground water system of the Maggia Valley in southern Switzerland. The alternative models differ in their representation of hydraulic conductivity. A new method for graphically representing CV and sensitivity analysis results for complex models is presented and used to evaluate the utility of the efficient statistics. The results indicate that for model selection, the information criteria produce similar results at much smaller computational cost than CV. For identifying important observations, the only obviously inferior linear measure is DSS; the poor performance was expected because DSS does not include the effects of parameter correlation and PCC reveals large parameter correlations. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  8. Network simulation using the simulation language for alternate modeling (SLAM 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S.; Morris, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    The simulation language for alternate modeling (SLAM 2) is a general purpose language that combines network, discrete event, and continuous modeling capabilities in a single language system. The efficacy of the system's network modeling is examined and discussed. Examples are given of the symbolism that is used, and an example problem and model are derived. The results are discussed in terms of the ease of programming, special features, and system limitations. The system offers many features which allow rapid model development and provides an informative standardized output. The system also has limitations which may cause undetected errors and misleading reports unless the user is aware of these programming characteristics.

  9. Alternative Models to Deliver Developmental Math: Issues of Use and Student Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiewicz, Holly; Ngo, Federick; Fong, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Changing how community colleges deliver developmental education has become a key policy lever to increase student achievement. Alternative development education models reduce the amount of time a student spends in remediation, provide students with supplemental instruction and support, and contextualize content to align with student…

  10. Alternating Renewal Process Models for Behavioral Observation: Simulation Methods, Software, and Validity Illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustejovsky, James E.; Runyon, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Direct observation recording procedures produce reductive summary measurements of an underlying stream of behavior. Previous methodological studies of these recording procedures have employed simulation methods for generating random behavior streams, many of which amount to special cases of a statistical model known as the alternating renewal…

  11. An Alternative Counseling Model for Alcohol Abuse in College: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, B. Grant; Curry, Jennifer; Freeman, Mark S.; Kuch, Tyson H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstinence education remains a prevailing approach for addressing college student alcohol abuse. This case study illustrates an alternative method of intervening that combines motivational interviewing, harm reduction, and a brief solution-focused model. The counseling approach illustrated emphasizes reduction in, rather than abstinence from,…

  12. The New Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders: Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeffrey S.; Risler, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the new alternative "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", fifth edition (DSM-5) model for personality disorders (PDs) as it is seen by its creators and critics. Method: Follow the DSM revision process by monitoring the American Psychiatric Association website and the publication of pertinent journal…

  13. Argumentation, Dialogue Theory, and Probability Modeling: Alternative Frameworks for Argumentation Research in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, E. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Toulmin's model of argumentation, developed in 1958, has guided much argumentation research in education. However, argumentation theory in philosophy and cognitive science has advanced considerably since 1958. There are currently several alternative frameworks of argumentation that can be useful for both research and practice in education. These…

  14. Technical Note: Alternative in-stream denitrification equation for the INCA-N model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, J. R.; Birgand, F.; Burchell, M. R., II; Lepistö, A.; Rankinen, K.; Granlund, K.

    2014-04-01

    The Integrated Catchment model for Nitrogen (INCA-N) is a semi-distributed, process based model that has been used to model the impacts of land use, climate, and land management changes on hydrology and nitrogen loading. An observed problem with the INCA-N model is reproducing low nitrate-nitrogen concentrations during the summer growing season in some catchments. In this study, the current equation used to simulate the rate of in-stream denitrification was replaced with an alternate equation that uses a mass transfer coefficient and the stream bottom area. The results of simulating in-stream denitrification using the two different methods were compared for a one year simulation period of the Yläneenjoki catchment in Finland. The alternate equation (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency = 0.61) simulated concentrations during the periods of the growing season with the lowest flow that were closer to the observed concentrations than the current equation (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency = 0.60), but the results were mixed during other portions of the year. The results of the calibration and validation of the model using the two equations show that the alternate equation will simulate lower nitrate-nitrogen concentrations during the growing season when compared to the current equation, but promote investigation into other errors in the model that may be causing inaccuracies in the modeled concentrations.

  15. Clinical Utility of the DSM-5 Alternative Model of Personality Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel...... (involving a comparison of presenting problems, history, and diagnoses) and used to formulate treatment considerations. We also considered 6 specific personality disorder types that could be derived from the profiles as defined in the DSM-5 Section III criteria. Results. Using the LPFS and PID-5, we were...... evaluation generally supported the utility for clinical purposes of the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders in Section III of the DSM-5, although it also identified some areas for refinement....

  16. Modeling Relational Data via Latent Factor Blockmodel

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Sheng; Gallinari, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of modeling relational data, which appear in many applications such as social network analysis, recommender systems and bioinformatics. Previous studies either consider latent feature based models but disregarding local structure in the network, or focus exclusively on capturing local structure of objects based on latent blockmodels without coupling with latent characteristics of objects. To combine the benefits of the previous work, we propose a novel model that can simultaneously incorporate the effect of latent features and covariates if any, as well as the effect of latent structure that may exist in the data. To achieve this, we model the relation graph as a function of both latent feature factors and latent cluster memberships of objects to collectively discover globally predictive intrinsic properties of objects and capture latent block structure in the network to improve prediction performance. We also develop an optimization transfer algorithm based on the general...

  17. Scale Factor Self-Dual Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    dS, U Camara; Sotkov, G M

    2015-01-01

    We implement a conformal time scale factor duality for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, which is consistent with the weak energy condition. The requirement for self-duality determines the equations of state for a broad class of barotropic fluids. We study the example of a universe filled with two interacting fluids, presenting an accelerated and a decelerated period, with manifest UV/IR duality. The associated self-dual scalar field interaction turns out to coincide with the "radiation-like" modified Chaplygin gas models. We present an equivalent realization of them as gauged K\\"ahler sigma models (minimally coupled to gravity) with very specific and interrelated K\\"ahler- and super-potentials. Their applications in the description of hilltop inflation and also as quintessence models for the late universe are discussed.

  18. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    AA NUREG -0711,Rev. 2 Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model 20081009191 I i m To] Bi U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of...Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG -series publications and other NRC records at NRC’s Public Electronic Reading Room at...http://www.nrc.qov/readinq-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG -series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant

  19. The Omitted Factor in Risk Management: Corporate Foreign Debt as an Alternative to Currency Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    Empirical surveys on exchange rate risk management in non-financial companies focus on the use of currency derivatives while omitting the use of corporate debt denominated in foreign currency ("foreign debt") even though the latter in risk management terms is identical to one or a series of forward...... contracts. This empirical study of the risk management practices of non-financial companies shows (1) that foreign debt is an important alternative to the use of currency derivatives, (2) that the relative importance of foreign debt compared to currency derivatives increases the longer the hedging horizon...

  20. Resveratrol, by modulating RNA processing factor levels, can influence the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Andrea Markus

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing defects can contribute to, or result from, various diseases, including cancer. Aberrant mRNAs, splicing factors and other RNA processing factors have therefore become targets for new therapeutic interventions. Here we report that the natural polyphenol resveratrol can modulate alternative splicing in a target-specific manner. We transfected minigenes of several alternatively spliceable primary mRNAs into HEK293 cells in the presence or absence of 1, 5, 20 and 50 µM resveratrol and measured exon levels by semi-quantitative PCR after separation by agarose gel electrophoresis. We found that 20 µg/ml and 50 µg/ml of resveratrol affected exon inclusion of SRp20 and SMN2 pre-mRNAs, but not CD44v5 or tau pre-mRNAs. By Western blotting and immunofluorescence we showed that this effect may be due to the ability of resveratrol to change the protein level but not the localization of several RNA processing factors. The processing factors that increased significantly were ASF/SF2, hnRNPA1 and HuR, but resveratrol did not change the levels of RBM4, PTBP1 and U2AF35. By means of siRNA-mediated knockdown we depleted cells of SIRT1, regarded as a major target of resveratrol, and showed that the effect on splicing was not dependent on SIRT1. Our results suggest that resveratrol might be an attractive small molecule to treat diseases in which aberrant splicing has been implicated, and justify more extensive research on the effects of resveratrol on the splicing machinery.

  1. An alternative factorization of the quantum harmonic oscillator and two-parameter family of self-adjoint operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos-Olalla, Rafael, E-mail: olalla@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Reyes, Marco A., E-mail: marco@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-10-01

    We introduce an alternative factorization of the Hamiltonian of the quantum harmonic oscillator which leads to a two-parameter self-adjoint operator from which the standard harmonic oscillator, the one-parameter oscillators introduced by Mielnik, and the Hermite operator are obtained in certain limits of the parameters. In addition, a single Bernoulli-type parameter factorization, which is different from the one introduced by M.A. Reyes, H.C. Rosu, and M.R. Gutiérrez [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 2145], is briefly discussed in the final part of this work. -- Highlights: ► Factorizations with operators which are not mutually adjoint are presented. ► New two-parameter and one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operators are introduced. ► Their eigenfunctions are two- and one-parameter deformed Hermite functions.

  2. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Muñoz; Daniella Santos Muñoz; Aleksey Zimin; Yorke, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm) for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-r...

  3. Public participation and rural management of Brazilian waters: an alternative to the deficit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Luís Piolli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge deficit model with regard to the public has been severely criticized in the sociology of the public perception of science. However, when dealing with public decisions regarding scientific matters, political and scientific institutions insist on defending the deficit model. The idea that only certified experts, or those with vast experience, should have the right to participate in decisions can bring about problems for the future of democracies. Through a type of "topography of ideas", in which some concepts from the social studies of science are used in order to think about these problems, and through the case study of public participation in the elaboration of the proposal of discounts in the fees charged for rural water use in Brazil, we will try to point out an alternative to the deficit model. This alternative includes a "minimum comprehension" of the scientific matters involved in the decision on the part of the participants, using criteria judged by the public itself.

  4. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Muñoz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-regulated genes. An example is illustrative. A rewiring has been reported by Hogues et al. that RAP1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae substitutes for TBF1/CBF1 in Candida albicans for ribosomal RP genes. There one transcription factor substitutes for another on some collection of genes. Such a substitution is referred to as a “rewiring”. We agree with this finding of rewiring as far as it goes but the situation is more complicated. Many transcription factors can regulate a gene and our algorithm finds that in this example a “team” (or collection of three transcription factors including RAP1 substitutes for TBF1 for 19 genes. The switch occurs for a branch of the phylogenetic tree containing 10 species (including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while the remaining 13 species (Candida albicans are regulated by TBF1. Conclusions To gain insight into more general evolutionary mechanisms, we have created a mathematical algorithm that finds such general switching events and we prove that it converges. Of course any such computational discovery should be validated in the biological tests. For each branch of the phylogenetic tree and each gene module, our algorithm finds a sub-group of co-regulated genes and a team of transcription factors that substitutes for another team of transcription factors. In most cases the signal will be small but in some cases we find a strong signal of switching. We report our findings for 23 Ascomycota fungi species.

  5. Suppression of the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway by the chromatin remodelling factor ATRX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, David; Jelinska, Clare; Xella, Barbara; Ayyub, Helena; Scott, Caroline; Mitson, Matthew; Taylor, Stephen; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2015-07-06

    Fifteen per cent of cancers maintain telomere length independently of telomerase by the homologous recombination (HR)-associated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. A unifying feature of these tumours are mutations in ATRX. Here we show that expression of ectopic ATRX triggers a suppression of the pathway and telomere shortening. Importantly ATRX-mediated ALT suppression is dependent on the histone chaperone DAXX. Re-expression of ATRX is associated with a reduction in replication fork stalling, a known trigger for HR and loss of MRN from telomeres. A G-quadruplex stabilizer partially reverses the effect of ATRX, inferring ATRX may normally facilitate replication through these sequences that, if they persist, promote ALT. We propose that defective telomere chromatinization through loss of ATRX promotes the persistence of aberrant DNA secondary structures, which in turn present a barrier to DNA replication, leading to replication fork stalling, collapse, HR and subsequent recombination-mediated telomere synthesis in ALT cancers.

  6. Space station crew safety alternatives study. Volume 3: Safety impact of human factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockoff, L. A.; Raasch, R. F.; Peercy, R. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The first 15 years of accumulated space station concepts for Initial Operational Capability (IOC) during the early 1990's was considered. Twenty-five threats to the space station are identified and selected threats addressed as impacting safety criteria, escape and rescue, and human factors safety concerns. Of the 25 threats identified, eight are discussed including strategy options for threat control: fire, biological or toxic contamination, injury/illness, explosion, loss of pressurization, radiation, meteoroid penetration and debris. Of particular interest here is volume three (of five volumes) pertaining to the safety impact of human factors.

  7. Two functional domains conserved in major and alternate bacterial sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stragier, P; Parsot, C; Bouvier, J

    1985-07-22

    Sequences of the sigma factors of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were aligned with the sequences of two sigma-like proteins, HtpR, involved in the expression of heat-shock genes in E. coli, and SpoIIG, necessary for endospore formation in B. subtilis. An internal region is highly conserved in the four proteins and is proposed to be involved in binding of sigma factors to core RNA polymerase. The carboxy-terminal part of the four proteins presents the characteristic structure found in several prokaryotic DNA-binding proteins and is proposed to be involved in promoter recognition.

  8. Fluorescence Spectra of Model Compounds for Light-emitting Alternating Copolymers in Heterogeneous Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the fluorescence spectra of model compounds of light-emitting alternating copolymers, M (TPA-PPV) and M (TPA-PAV) (Scheme 1) were studied and the effect of KNO3 on the interaction between model compounds and ionic micelle-water interface was also investigated. It is found that (I) The fluorescence changes of M (TPA-PPV) are related to the state of CTAB and SDS solution. (II) Aggregated state can be formed in M (TPA-PAV) solution at low concentration of CTAB. (III) Higher concentration of KNO3 may affect the interaction between model compounds and ionic micelle-water interface.

  9. Inhibition of the alternative complement activation pathway in traumatic brain injury by a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody: a randomized placebo-controlled study in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holers V Michael

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posttraumatic response to traumatic brain injury (TBI is characterized, in part, by activation of the innate immune response, including the complement system. We have recently shown that mice devoid of a functional alternative pathway of complement activation (factor B-/- mice are protected from complement-mediated neuroinflammation and neuropathology after TBI. In the present study, we extrapolated this knowledge from studies in genetically engineered mice to a pharmacological approach using a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody. This neutralizing antibody represents a specific and potent inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in mice. Methods A focal trauma was applied to the left hemisphere of C57BL/6 mice (n = 89 using a standardized electric weight-drop model. Animals were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: (1 Systemic injection of 1 mg monoclonal anti-factor B antibody (mAb 1379 in 400 μl phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at 1 hour and 24 hours after trauma; (2 Systemic injection of vehicle only (400 μl PBS, as placebo control, at identical time-points after trauma. Sham-operated and untreated mice served as additional negative controls. Evaluation of neurological scores and analysis of brain tissue specimens and serum samples was performed at defined time-points for up to 1 week. Complement activation in serum was assessed by zymosan assay and by murine C5a ELISA. Brain samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL histochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR. Results The mAb 1379 leads to a significant inhibition of alternative pathway complement activity and to significantly attenuated C5a levels in serum, as compared to head-injured placebo-treated control mice. TBI induced histomorphological signs of neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis in the injured brain hemisphere of placebo-treated control mice for up to 7 days. In contrast, the

  10. Atmospheric emissions modeling of energetic biomass alternatives using system dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szarka, N. [University of Leoben (Austria). Chair of System Analysis and Environmental Engineering; University of Concepcion (Chile). Environmental Sciences Center; Kakucs, O.; Wolfbauer, J. [University of Leoben (Austria). Chair of System Analysis and Environmental Engineering; Bezama, A. [University of Concepcion (Chile). Environmental Sciences Center

    2008-01-15

    To simulate the quantitative effects of regional biomass alternatives for energetic purpose (BfE) on air pollutant emissions, a system dynamics model was developed and applied for the EuRegion Austrian-Hungarian cross-border area. The dynamic simulation program Vensim{sup R} was used to build an overall regional model with economic, social and environmental sectors. Within this model, the here-introduced regional air pollution sub-model (RegAir) includes the important human-made emissions of 10 pollutants resulting from all relevant source sectors within the region investigated. Emissions from activities related to biomass production, transport, conversion and final energy consumption were built in detail. After building and calibrating the RegAir model, seven quantitative test scenarios were defined and implemented into the world. Through the scenarios simulation, effects on air emissions were followed and compared over time. The results of these simulations show a significant reduction of CO{sub 2} emission, especially in cases where fossil fuel displacement in heating devices is achieved on the largest scale. On the contrary, traditional air pollutants increase by most BfE options. The results of the RegAir model simulations of BfE alternatives over two decades provide useful quantifications of various air emissions and identify the less pollutant BfE alternatives in the dynamic context of the relevant air pollution sources of the region. After minor structural modification and appropriate calibration, RegAir can be applied to other regions as well. However, it is stated that, to finally decide on the overall most-appropriate options at a regional level, other environmental as well as economic and social effects must be taken into consideration, being the latter the goal of the mentioned overall regional model which serves as a model frame to the RegAir tool. (author)

  11. The Animal Model Determines the Results of Aeromonas Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandro; Saraceni, Paolo R.; Merino, Susana; Figueras, Antonio; Tomás, Juan M.; Novoa, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The selection of an experimental animal model is of great importance in the study of bacterial virulence factors. Here, a bath infection of zebrafish larvae is proposed as an alternative model to study the virulence factors of Aeromonas hydrophila. Intraperitoneal infections in mice and trout were compared with bath infections in zebrafish larvae using specific mutants. The great advantage of this model is that bath immersion mimics the natural route of infection, and injury to the tail also provides a natural portal of entry for the bacteria. The implication of T3SS in the virulence of A. hydrophila was analyzed using the AH-1::aopB mutant. This mutant was less virulent than the wild-type strain when inoculated into zebrafish larvae, as described in other vertebrates. However, the zebrafish model exhibited slight differences in mortality kinetics only observed using invertebrate models. Infections using the mutant AH-1ΔvapA lacking the gene coding for the surface S-layer suggested that this protein was not totally necessary to the bacteria once it was inside the host, but it contributed to the inflammatory response. Only when healthy zebrafish larvae were infected did the mutant produce less mortality than the wild-type. Variations between models were evidenced using the AH-1ΔrmlB, which lacks the O-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the AH-1ΔwahD, which lacks the O-antigen LPS and part of the LPS outer-core. Both mutants showed decreased mortality in all of the animal models, but the differences between them were only observed in injured zebrafish larvae, suggesting that residues from the LPS outer core must be important for virulence. The greatest differences were observed using the AH-1ΔFlaB-J (lacking polar flagella and unable to swim) and the AH-1::motX (non-motile but producing flagella). They were as pathogenic as the wild-type strain when injected into mice and trout, but no mortalities were registered in zebrafish larvae. This study demonstrates

  12. Modelling the effect of an alternative host population on the spread of citrus Huanglongbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'A. Vilamiu, Raphael G.; Ternes, Sonia; Laranjeira, Francisco F.; de C. Santos, Tâmara T.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to model the spread of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) considering the presence of a population of alternative hosts (Murraya paniculata). We developed a compartmental deterministic mathematical model for representing the dynamics of HLB disease in a citrus orchard, including delays in the latency and incubation phases of the disease in the plants and a delay period on the nymphal stage of Diaphorina citri, the insect vector of HLB in Brazil. The results of numerical simulations indicate that alternative hosts should not play a crucial role on HLB dynamics considering a typical scenario for the Recôncavo Baiano region in Brazil . Also, the current policy of removing symptomatic plants every three months should not be expected to significantly hinder HLB spread.

  13. Partially Compensatory Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models: Two Alternate Model Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Partially compensatory models may capture the cognitive skills needed to answer test items more realistically than compensatory models, but estimating the model parameters may be a challenge. Data were simulated to follow two different partially compensatory models, a model with an interaction term and a product model. The model parameters were…

  14. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain); Azanza, María J., E-mail: mjazanza@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B{sub 0}≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f{sub M}=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons.

  15. Model and algorithm of optimizing alternate traffic restriction scheme in urban traffic network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐光明; 史峰; 刘冰; 黄合来

    2014-01-01

    An optimization model and its solution algorithm for alternate traffic restriction (ATR) schemes were introduced in terms of both the restriction districts and the proportion of restricted automobiles. A bi-level programming model was proposed to model the ATR scheme optimization problem by aiming at consumer surplus maximization and overload flow minimization at the upper-level model. At the lower-level model, elastic demand, mode choice and multi-class user equilibrium assignment were synthetically optimized. A genetic algorithm involving prolonging codes was constructed, demonstrating high computing efficiency in that it dynamically includes newly-appearing overload links in the codes so as to reduce the subsequent searching range. Moreover, practical processing approaches were suggested, which may improve the operability of the model-based solutions.

  16. Statistical Mechanical Models of Integer Factorization Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Chihiro H.; Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    We formulate the integer factorization problem via a formulation of the searching problem for the ground state of a statistical mechanical Hamiltonian. The first passage time required to find a correct divisor of a composite number signifies the exponential computational hardness. The analysis of the density of states of two macroscopic quantities, i.e., the energy and the Hamming distance from the correct solutions, leads to the conclusion that the ground state (correct solution) is completely isolated from the other low-energy states, with the distance being proportional to the system size. In addition, the profile of the microcanonical entropy of the model has two peculiar features that are each related to two marked changes in the energy region sampled via Monte Carlo simulation or simulated annealing. Hence, we find a peculiar first-order phase transition in our model.

  17. Development of Galleria mellonella as an Alternative Infection Model for the Burkholderia cepacia Complex▿

    OpenAIRE

    Seed, Kimberley D.; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia is an important bacterial genus with a complex taxonomy that contains species of both ecological and pathogenic importance, including nine closely related species collectively termed the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). In order to more thoroughly investigate the virulence of this bacterial complex of microorganisms, alternative infection models would be useful. To this end, we have adapted and developed the use of the Galleria mellonella wax moth larvae as a host for examinin...

  18. Expression analysis of an evolutionarily conserved alternative splicing factor, Sfrs10, in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Krishna Priya Karunakaran

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population. Hypoxic stress created in the micro-environment of the photoreceptors is thought to be the underlying cause that results in the pathophysiology of AMD. However, association of AMD with alternative splicing mediated gene regulation is not well explored. Alternative Splicing is one of the primary mechanisms in humans by which fewer protein coding genes are able to generate a vast proteome. Here, we investigated the expression of a known stress response gene and an alternative splicing factor called Serine-Arginine rich splicing factor 10 (Sfrs10. Sfrs10 is a member of the serine-arginine (SR rich protein family and is 100% identical at the amino acid level in most mammals. Immunoblot analysis on retinal extracts from mouse, rat, and chicken showed a single immunoreactive band. Further, immunohistochemistry on adult mouse, rat and chicken retinae showed pan-retinal expression. However, SFRS10 was not detected in normal human retina but was observed as distinct nuclear speckles in AMD retinae. This is in agreement with previous reports that show Sfrs10 to be a stress response gene, which is upregulated under hypoxia. The difference in the expression of Sfrs10 between humans and lower mammals and the upregulation of SFRS10 in AMD is further reflected in the divergence of the promoter sequence between these species. Finally, SFRS10+ speckles were independent of the SC35+ SR protein speckles or the HSF1+ stress granules. In all, our data suggests that SFRS10 is upregulated and forms distinct stress-induced speckles and might be involved in AS of stress response genes in AMD.

  19. Merging Alternate Remotely-Sensed Soil Moisture Retrievals Using a Non-Static Model Combination Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokhyeon Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is an important variable in the coupled hydrologic and climate system. In recent years, microwave-based soil moisture products have been shown to be a viable alternative to in situ measurements. A popular way to measure the performance of soil moisture products is to calculate the temporal correlation coefficient (R against in situ measurements or other appropriate reference datasets. In this study, an existing linear combination method improving R was modified to allow for a non-static or nonstationary model combination as the basis for improving remotely-sensed surface soil moisture. Previous research had noted that two soil moisture products retrieved using the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA and Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM algorithms from the same Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2 sensor are spatially complementary in terms of R against a suitable reference over a fixed period. Accordingly, a linear combination was proposed to maximize R using a set of spatially-varying, but temporally-fixed weights. Even though this approach showed promising results, there was room for further improvements, in particular using non-static or dynamic weights that take account of the time-varying nature of the combination algorithm being approximated. The dynamic weighting was achieved by using a moving window. A number of different window sizes was investigated. The optimal weighting factors were determined for the data lying within the moving window and then used to dynamically combine the two parent products. We show improved performance for the dynamically-combined product over the static linear combination. Generally, shorter time windows outperform the static approach, and a 60-day time window is suggested to be the optimum. Results were validated against in situ measurements collected from 124 stations over different continents. The mean R of the dynamically-combined products was found to be 0.57 and 0

  20. Application of the Denitrification-Decomposition Model to Predict Carbon Dioxide Emissions under Alternative Straw Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Straw retention has been shown to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2 emission from agricultural soils. But it remains a big challenge for models to effectively predict CO2 emission fluxes under different straw retention methods. We used maize season data in the Griffith region, Australia, to test whether the denitrification-decomposition (DNDC model could simulate annual CO2 emission. We also identified driving factors of CO2 emission by correlation analysis and path analysis. We show that the DNDC model was able to simulate CO2 emission under alternative straw retention scenarios. The correlation coefficients between simulated and observed daily values for treatments of straw burn and straw incorporation were 0.74 and 0.82, respectively, in the straw retention period and 0.72 and 0.83, respectively, in the crop growth period. The results also show that simulated values of annual CO2 emission for straw burn and straw incorporation were 3.45 t C ha−1 y−1 and 2.13 t C ha−1 y−1, respectively. In addition the DNDC model was found to be more suitable in simulating CO2 mission fluxes under straw incorporation. Finally the standard multiple regression describing the relationship between CO2 emissions and factors found that soil mean temperature (SMT, daily mean temperature (Tmean, and water-filled pore space (WFPS were significant.

  1. Alternative model of the Antonov problem: Generalization with the presence of a mass spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, L.; García, S. Gómez; Guzmán, F.

    2009-01-01

    We extend the quasiergodic model proposed as an alternative version of the Antonov isothermal model [L. Velazquez and F. Guzman, Phys. Rev. E 68, 066116 (2003)] by including the incidence of a mass spectrum. We propose an iterative procedure inspired by the Newton-Raphson method to solve the resulting nonlinear structure equations. As an example of application, we assume the existence of a mass spectrum with a standard Salpeter form, dN=Cdm/mα . We analyze consequences of this realistic ingredient on the system thermodynamical behavior and perform a quantitative description of the mass segregation effect.

  2. Alternate model of Chladni figures for the circular homogenous thin plate case with open boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Mandujano, H. A.; Mijares-Bernal, G.; Ordoñez-Casanova, E. G.

    2015-01-01

    The wave equation is a direct but a complex approach to solve analytically for the Chladni figures, mainly because of the complications that non-smooth and open boundary conditions impose. In this paper, we present an alternate solution model based on the principle of Huygens-Fresnel and on the ideas of Bohr for the hydrogen atom. The proposed model has been implemented numerically and compared, with good agreement, to our own experimental results for the case of a thin homogenous circular plate with open boundaries.

  3. Evaluating environmental and economic consequences of alternative pest management strategies: results of modeling workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard L.; Andrews, Austin K.; Auble, Gregor T.L.; Ellison, Richard A.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.; McNamee, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) needs a comprehensive method to evaluate the human health and environmental effects of alternative agricultural pest management strategies. This project explored the utility of Adaptive Environmental Assessment (AEA) techniques for meeting this need. The project objectives were to produce models for environmental impact analysis, improve communications, identify research needs and data requirements, and demonstrate a process for resolving conflicts. The project was structured around the construction (in an initial 2 1/2-day workshop) and examination (in a second 2 1/2-day workshop) of a simulation model of a corn agroecosystem.

  4. Sound absorption coefficient in situ: an alternative for estimating soil loss factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Rosane; Meletti de Abreu, Marco Henrique; Okada, Rafael Yuri; Soares, Paulo Fernando; GranhenTavares, Célia Regina

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the sound absorption coefficient and factors of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was determined in a section of the Maringá Stream basin, Paraná State, by using erosion plots. In the field, four erosion plots were built on a reduced scale, with dimensions of 2.0×12.5m. With respect to plot coverage, one was kept with bare soil and the others contained forage grass (Brachiaria), corn and wheat crops, respectively. Planting was performed without any type of conservation practice in an area with a 9% slope. A sedimentation tank was placed at the end of each plot to collect the material transported. For the acoustic system, pink noise was used in the measurement of the proposed monitoring, for collecting information on incident and reflected sound pressure levels. In general, obtained values of soil loss confirmed that 94.3% of material exported to the basin water came from the bare soil plot, 2.8% from the corn plot, 1.8% from the wheat plot, and 1.1% from the forage grass plot. With respect to the acoustic monitoring, results indicated that at 16kHz erosion plot coverage type had a significant influence on the sound absorption coefficient. High correlation coefficients were found in estimations of the A and C factors of the USLE, confirming that the acoustic technique is feasible for the determination of soil loss directly in the field.

  5. An alternative to evaluate the efficiency of in vitro culture medium using a logistic regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Furtado Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of a culture medium for the in vitro culture of a species is performed using its physical and/or chemical properties. However, the analysis of the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate its quality. In this sense, this work presents an alternative using a logistic model to evaluate the culture medium to be used in vitro. The probabilities provided by this model will be used as a medium evaluator index. The importance of this index is based on the formalization of a statistical criterion for the selection of the adequate culture medium to be used on in vitro culture without excluding its physical and/or chemical properties. To demonstrate this procedure, an experiment determining the ideal medium for the in vitro culture of primary explants of Ipeca [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot. Stokes] was evaluated. The differentiation of the culture medium was based on the presence and absence of the growth regulator BAP (6-benzilaminopurine. A logistic model was adjusted as a function of the weight of fresh and dry matter. Minimum, medium and maximum probabilities obtained with this model showed that the culture medium containing BAP was the most adequate for the explant growth. Due to the high discriminative power of these mediums, detected by the model, their use is recommended as an alternative to select culture medium for similar experiments.

  6. Clinical utility of the DSM-5 alternative model of personality disorders: six cases from practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel instruments assess level of personality impairment and pathological traits. Objective. A number of studies have supported the psychometric qualities of the LPFS and the PID-5, but the utility of these instruments in clinical assessment and treatment has not been extensively evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of this alternative model of personality disorders. Method. We administered the LPFS and the PID-5 to psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with personality disorders and other nonpsychotic disorders. The personality profiles of six characteristic patients were inspected (involving a comparison of presenting problems, history, and diagnoses) and used to formulate treatment considerations. We also considered 6 specific personality disorder types that could be derived from the profiles as defined in the DSM-5 Section III criteria. Results. Using the LPFS and PID-5, we were able to characterize the 6 cases in a meaningful and useful manner with regard to understanding and treatment of the individual patient and to match the cases with 6 relevant personality disorder types. Implications for ease of use, communication, and psychotherapy are discussed. Conclusion. Our evaluation generally supported the utility for clinical purposes of the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders in Section III of the DSM-5, although it also identified some areas for refinement. (Journal of Psychiatric Practice 2015;21:3-25).

  7. Input-constrained model predictive control via the alternating direction method of multipliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Leo Emil; Frison, Gianluca; Andersen, Martin S.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm, based on the alternating direction method of multipliers, for the convex optimal control problem arising in input-constrained model predictive control. We develop an efficient implementation of the algorithm for the extended linear quadratic control problem (LQCP......) with input and input-rate limits. The algorithm alternates between solving an extended LQCP and a highly structured quadratic program. These quadratic programs are solved using a Riccati iteration procedure, and a structure-exploiting interior-point method, respectively. The computational cost per iteration...... is quadratic in the dimensions of the controlled system, and linear in the length of the prediction horizon. Simulations show that the approach proposed in this paper is more than an order of magnitude faster than several state-of-the-art quadratic programming algorithms, and that the difference in computation...

  8. Modeling alternation to synchrony with inhibitory coupling: a neuromorphic VLSI approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymbalyuk, G S; Patel, G N; Calabrese, R L; DeWeerth, S P; Cohen, A H

    2000-10-01

    We developed an analog very large-scale integrated system of two mutually inhibitory silicon neurons that display several different stable oscillations. For example, oscillations can be synchronous with weak inhibitory coupling and alternating with relatively strong inhibitory coupling. All oscillations observed experimentally were predicted by bifurcation analysis of a corresponding mathematical model. The synchronous oscillations do not require special synaptic properties and are apparently robust enough to survive the variability and constraints inherent in this physical system. In biological experiments with oscillatory neuronal networks, blockade of inhibitory synaptic coupling can sometimes lead to synchronous oscillations. An example of this phenomenon is the transition from alternating to synchronous bursting in the swimming central pattern generator of lamprey when synaptic inhibition is blocked by strychnine. Our results suggest a simple explanation for the observed oscillatory transitions in the lamprey central pattern generator network: that inhibitory connectivity alone is sufficient to produce the observed transition.

  9. The effect of alternative work arrangements on women's well-being: a demand-control model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloway, E K; Gottlieb, B H

    1998-01-01

    The growth of women's participation in the labor force and evidence of the conflict they experience between job and family demands have spurred many employers to introduce alternative work arrangements such as flextime, job sharing, and telecommuting. Drawing on data gained from a sample of women (N = 998) in two large Canadian organizations, this study evaluates two mediational models of the impact of alternative work arrangements on women's stress and family role competence. Specifically, it tests and finds support for the hypotheses that (a) work arrangements involving scheduling flexibility (telecommuting and flextime) promote these aspects of women's well-being by increasing their perceived control over their time, and (b) arrangements involving reduced hours of employment (part-time employment and job sharing) promote well-being by reducing perceived job overload. Discussion of these findings centers on their implications for employed women, their employers, and future research.

  10. Human factors engineering program review model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  11. Symbolic Models for Nonlinear Time-Varying Time-Delay Systems via Alternating Approximate Bisimulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pola, Giordano; Di Benedetto, Maria Domenica

    2010-01-01

    Time-delay systems are an important class of dynamical systems that provide a solid mathematical framework to deal with many application domains of interest. In this paper we focus on nonlinear control systems with unknown and time-varying delay signals and we propose one approach to the control design of such systems, which is based on the construction of symbolic models. Symbolic models are abstract descriptions of dynamical systems in which one symbolic state and one symbolic input correspond to an aggregate of states and an aggregate of inputs. We first introduce the notion of incremental input-delay-to-state stability and characterize it by means of Liapunov-Krasovskii functionals. We then derive sufficient conditions for the existence of symbolic models that are shown to be alternating approximately bisimilar to the original system. Further results are also derived which prove the computability of the proposed symbolic models in a finite number of steps.

  12. Reliability of Summed Item Scores Using Structural Equation Modeling: An Alternative to Coefficient Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating reliability using structural equation modeling (SEM) that allows for nonlinearity between factors and item scores. Assuming the focus is on consistency of summed item scores, this method for estimating reliability is preferred to those based on linear SEM models and to the most commonly reported estimate of…

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model to study senescence of host defense and the prevention by immunonutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Tomomi; Ikeda, Takanori; Hoshino, Kaori; Shibamura, Ayumi; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Whether nutritional control can retard senescence of immune function and decrease mortality from infectious diseases has not yet been established; the difficulty of establishing a model has made this a challenging topic to investigate. Caenorhabditis elegans has been extensively used as an experimental system for biological studies. Particularly for aging studies, the worm has the advantage of a short and reproducible life span. The organism has also been recognized as an alternative to mammalian models of infection with bacterial pathogens in this decade. Hence we have studied whether the worms could be a model host in the fields of immunosenescence and immunonutrition. Feeding nematodes lactic acid bacteria (LAB) resulted in increases in average life span of the nematodes compared to those fed Escherichia coli strain OP50, a standard food bacteria. The 7-day-old nematodes fed LAN from age 3 days were clearly endurable to subsequent salmonella infection compared with nematodes fed OP50 before the salmonella infection. The worm could be a unique model to study effects of food factors on longevity and host defense, so-called immunonutrition. Then we attempted to establish an immunosenescence model using C. elegans. We focused on the effects of worm age on the Legionella infection and the prevention by immunonutrition. No significant differences in survival were seen between 3-day-old worms fed OP50 and 3-day-old worms infected with virulent Legionella strains. However, when the worms were infected from 7.5 days after hatching, the virulent Legionella strains were obviously nematocidal for the worms' immunosenescence. In contrast, nematodes fed with bifidobacteria prior to Legionella infection were resistant to Legionella. C. elegans could act as a unique alternative host for immunosenescence and resultant opportunistic infection, and immunonutrition researches.

  14. An information theoretic approach to select alternate subsets of predictors for data-driven hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, R.; Galelli, S.; Karakaya, G.; Ahipasaoglu, S. D.

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the uncertainty associated to the presence of multiple subsets of predictors yielding data-driven models with the same, or similar, predictive accuracy. To handle this uncertainty effectively, we introduce a novel input variable selection algorithm, called Wrapper for Quasi Equally Informative Subset Selection (W-QEISS), specifically conceived to identify all alternate subsets of predictors in a given dataset. The search process is based on a four-objective optimization problem that minimizes the number of selected predictors, maximizes the predictive accuracy of a data-driven model and optimizes two information theoretic metrics of relevance and redundancy, which guarantee that the selected subsets are highly informative and with little intra-subset similarity. The algorithm is first tested on two synthetic test problems and then demonstrated on a real-world streamflow prediction problem in the Yampa River catchment (US). Results show that complex hydro-meteorological datasets are characterized by a large number of alternate subsets of predictors, which provides useful insights on the underlying physical processes. Furthermore, the presence of multiple subsets of predictors-and associated models-helps find a better trade-off between different measures of predictive accuracy commonly adopted for hydrological modelling problems.

  15. Testing alternative uses of electromagnetic data to reduce the prediction error of groundwater models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse Christensen, Nikolaj; Christensen, Steen; Ferre, Ty Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    In spite of geophysics being used increasingly, it is often unclear how and when the integration of geophysical data and models can best improve the construction and predictive capability of groundwater models. This paper uses a newly developed HYdrogeophysical TEst-Bench (HYTEB) that is a collection of geological, groundwater and geophysical modeling and inversion software to demonstrate alternative uses of electromagnetic (EM) data for groundwater modeling in a hydrogeological environment consisting of various types of glacial deposits with typical hydraulic conductivities and electrical resistivities covering impermeable bedrock with low resistivity (clay). The synthetic 3-D reference system is designed so that there is a perfect relationship between hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity. For this system it is investigated to what extent groundwater model calibration and, often more importantly, model predictions can be improved by including in the calibration process electrical resistivity estimates obtained from TEM data. In all calibration cases, the hydraulic conductivity field is highly parameterized and the estimation is stabilized by (in most cases) geophysics-based regularization. For the studied system and inversion approaches it is found that resistivities estimated by sequential hydrogeophysical inversion (SHI) or joint hydrogeophysical inversion (JHI) should be used with caution as estimators of hydraulic conductivity or as regularization means for subsequent hydrological inversion. The limited groundwater model improvement obtained by using the geophysical data probably mainly arises from the way these data are used here: the alternative inversion approaches propagate geophysical estimation errors into the hydrologic model parameters. It was expected that JHI would compensate for this, but the hydrologic data were apparently insufficient to secure such compensation. With respect to reducing model prediction error, it depends on the type

  16. Complement factor B expression profile in a spontaneous uveitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Stangassinger, Manfred; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2010-12-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis serves as a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. Unpredictable relapses and ongoing inflammation in the eyes of diseased horses as well as in humans lead to destruction of the retina and finally result in blindness. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to inflammation and retinal degeneration are not well understood. An initial screening for differentially regulated proteins in sera of uveitic cases compared to healthy controls revealed an increase of the alternative pathway complement component factor B in ERU cases. To determine the activation status of the complement system, sera were subsequently examined for complement split products. We could demonstrate a significant higher concentration of the activation products B/Ba, B/Bb, Bb neoantigen, iC3b and C3d in uveitic condition compared to healthy controls, whereas for C5b-9 no differences were detected. Additionally, we investigated complement activation directly in the retina by immunohistochemistry, since it is the main target organ of this autoimmune disease. Interestingly, infiltrating cells co-expressed activated factor Bb neoantigen, complement split product C3d as well as CD68, a macrophage marker. In this study, we could demonstrate activation of the complement system both systemically as well as in the eye, the target organ of spontaneous recurrent uveitis. Based on these novel findings, we postulate a novel role for macrophages in connection with complement synthesis at the site of inflammation.

  17. Alternative business models for establishing fast-charging stations - Part 2; Alternative forretningsmodeller for etablering av hurtigladestasjoner - Del 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    This section of the report describes and evaluates potential business models for fast-charging stations. Business models are developed on the basis of market development for electric vehicles and electric vehicle usage patterns analyzed in Part 1 of the project. This report describes a series of models in both the early and maturity stage, where we have distinguished between different user segments and payment models. With the estimated trends in the car fleet and charger use, the prerequisites for profitable quick charging in the downtown area are good, while, due to high construction contribution, you must have a relatively high proportion of subscriptions and a high charge rate to obtain adequate finances in the corridor points.(auth)

  18. Regional on-road vehicle running emissions modeling and evaluation for conventional and alternative vehicle technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H Christopher; Zhai, Haibo; Rouphail, Nagui M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a methodology for estimating high-resolution, regional on-road vehicle emissions and the associated reductions in air pollutant emissions from vehicles that utilize alternative fuels or propulsion technologies. The fuels considered are gasoline, diesel, ethanol, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, hydrogen, and electricity. The technologies considered are internal combustion or compression engines, hybrids, fuel cell, and electric. Road link-based emission models are developed using modal fuel use and emission rates applied to facility- and speed-specific driving cycles. For an urban case study, passenger cars were found to be the largest sources of HC, CO, and CO(2) emissions, whereas trucks contributed the largest share of NO(x) emissions. When alternative fuel and propulsion technologies were introduced in the fleet at a modest market penetration level of 27%, their emission reductions were found to be 3-14%. Emissions for all pollutants generally decreased with an increase in the market share of alternative vehicle technologies. Turnover of the light duty fleet to newer Tier 2 vehicles reduced emissions of HC, CO, and NO(x) substantially. However, modest improvements in fuel economy may be offset by VMT growth and reductions in overall average speed.

  19. The Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum: Factors That Limit its Production and Alternatives for its Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toca-Ramirez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambystoma mexicanum is an amphibian endemic to Xochimilco Lake in Mexico City. It has been declared in danger of extinction and is under special protection. Some chemical contaminants in the water are extremely high and could be the cause of its high mortality rate in certain areas of Xochimilco. In order to preserve this species it will not only be necessary and fundamental to prohibit fishing axolotls in their natural state, a market study and nutritional chemical analysis will also be necessary in order to establish the organoleptic properties and level of acceptance before a taste panel; that is to say, get to know more about the specie in order to give the product added value offering its meat as an unconventional delicacy. This way the creation of farms that will help its conservation will be justified. On the other hand it is important to mention that the axolotls are very important in scientific research. Since it serves as an amphibious model for many physiological and morphological processes that explain the regenerative process that this species possess. The objective of this study is to emphasize the advantages that the Ambystoma mexicanum has with the intention to rationally exploit these attributes in order to achieve its conservation.

  20. Endothelial cell processing and alternatively spliced transcripts of factor VIII: potential implications for coagulation cascades and pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Shovlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII deficiency leads to haemophilia A. Conversely, elevated plasma levels are a strong predictor of recurrent venous thromboemboli and pulmonary hypertension phenotypes in which in situ thromboses are implicated. Extrahepatic sources of plasma FVIII are implicated, but have remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemistry of normal human lung tissue, and confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and ELISA quantification of conditioned media from normal primary endothelial cells were used to examine endothelial expression of FVIII and coexpression with von Willebrand Factor (vWF, which protects secreted FVIII heavy chain from rapid proteloysis. FVIII transcripts predicted from database mining were identified by RT-PCR and sequencing. FVIII mAb-reactive material was demonstrated in CD31+ endothelial cells in normal human lung tissue, and in primary pulmonary artery, pulmonary microvascular, and dermal microvascular endothelial cells. In pulmonary endothelial cells, this protein occasionally colocalized with vWF, centered on Weibel Palade bodies. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells secreted low levels of FVIII and vWF to conditioned media, and demonstrated cell surface expression of FVIII and vWF Ab-reacting proteins compared to an isotype control. Four endothelial splice isoforms were identified. Two utilize transcription start sites in alternate 5' exons within the int22h-1 repeat responsible for intron 22 inversions in 40% of severe haemophiliacs. A reciprocal relationship between the presence of short isoforms and full-length FVIII transcript suggested potential splice-switching mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pulmonary endothelium is confirmed as a site of FVIII secretion, with evidence of synthesis, cell surface expression, and coexpression with vWF. There is complex alternate transcription initiation from the FVIII gene. These findings provide a

  1. Alternative model for assessment administration and analysis: An example from the E-CLASS

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R; Hobbs, Robert D; Aiken, John M; Welch, Nathan M; Lewandowski, H J

    2016-01-01

    The primary model for dissemination of conceptual and attitudinal assessments that has been used within the physics education research (PER) community is to create a high quality, validated assessment, make it available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model also provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof-of-concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges t...

  2. Second-order stochastic differential equation model as an alternative for the ALT and CALT models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, J.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The paper first discusses the autoregressive latent trajectory (ALT) model and presents in detail its improved version, the continuous-time autoregressive latent trajectory (CALT) model. Next, serious problems related to the linear components in the ALT and CALT models are dealt with. As an alternat

  3. 29 CFR 2520.104-48 - Alternative method of compliance for model simplified employee pensions-IRS Form 5305-SEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative method of compliance for model simplified employee pensions-IRS Form 5305-SEP. 2520.104-48 Section 2520.104-48 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Provisions Applicable to Both Reporting and Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104-48 Alternative method...

  4. Symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices in a nineteen-vertex model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagendorf, Christian; Morin-Duchesne, Alexi

    2016-05-01

    The nineteen-vertex model of Fateev and Zamolodchikov on a periodic lattice with an anti-diagonal twist is investigated. Its inhomogeneous transfer matrix is shown to have a simple eigenvalue, with the corresponding eigenstate displaying intriguing combinatorial features. Similar results were previously found for the same model with a diagonal twist. The eigenstate for the anti-diagonal twist is explicitly constructed using the quantum separation of variables technique. A number of sum rules and special components are computed and expressed in terms of Kuperberg’s determinants for partition functions of the inhomogeneous six-vertex model. The computations of some components of the special eigenstate for the diagonal twist are also presented. In the homogeneous limit, the special eigenstates become eigenvectors of the Hamiltonians of the integrable spin-one XXZ chain with twisted boundary conditions. Their sum rules and special components for both twists are expressed in terms of generating functions arising in the weighted enumeration of various symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices (ASMs). These include half-turn symmetric ASMs, quarter-turn symmetric ASMs, vertically symmetric ASMs, vertically and horizontally perverse ASMs and double U-turn ASMs. As side results, new determinant and pfaffian formulas for the weighted enumeration of various symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices are obtained.

  5. A Distance Model of Intuitionistic Fuzzy Cross Entropy to Solve Preference Problem on Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of decision-making, for the multiple attribute decision-making problem with the partially unknown attribute weights, the evaluation information in the form of the intuitionistic fuzzy numbers, and the preference on alternatives, this paper proposes a comprehensive decision model based on the intuitionistic fuzzy cross entropy distance and the grey correlation analysis. The creative model can make up the deficiency that the traditional intuitionistic fuzzy distance measure is easy to cause the confusion of information and can improve the accuracy of distance measure; meanwhile, the grey correlation analysis method, suitable for the small sample and the poor information decision-making, is applied in the evaluation. This paper constructs a mathematical optimization model of maximizing the synthesis grey correlation coefficient between decision-making evaluation values and decision-makers’ subjective preference values, calculates the attribute weights with the known partial weight information, and then sorts the alternatives by the grey correlation coefficient values. Taking venture capital firm as an example, through the calculation and the variable disturbance, we can see that the methodology used in this paper has good stability and rationality. This research makes the decision-making process more scientific and further improves the theory of intuitionistic fuzzy multiple attribute decision-making.

  6. Histopathological Analogies in Chronic Pulmonary Lesions between Cattle and Humans: Basis for an Alternative Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M.; Rodríguez-Tovar, Luis E.; Wong-González, Alfredo; Ledezma-Torres, Rogelio A.; Hernández-Vidal, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Most of the natural cases of pneumonia in feedlot cattle are characterized by a longer clinical course due to chronic lung lesions. Microscopically, these lesions include interstitial fibroplasia, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and epithelial metaplasia of the airways. Herein, the aim was to review, under a medical perspective, the pathologic mechanisms operating in these chronic pneumonic lesions in calves. Based on the similarities of these changes to those reported in bronchiolitis obliterans/organising pneumonia (BO/OP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in human beings, calves are proposed as an alternative animal model. PMID:22629176

  7. Histopathological Analogies in Chronic Pulmonary Lesions between Cattle and Humans: Basis for an Alternative Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ramírez-Romero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the natural cases of pneumonia in feedlot cattle are characterized by a longer clinical course due to chronic lung lesions. Microscopically, these lesions include interstitial fibroplasia, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and epithelial metaplasia of the airways. Herein, the aim was to review, under a medical perspective, the pathologic mechanisms operating in these chronic pneumonic lesions in calves. Based on the similarities of these changes to those reported in bronchiolitis obliterans/organising pneumonia (BO/OP and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in human beings, calves are proposed as an alternative animal model.

  8. Parity violation in atomic cesium and alternatives to the standard model of electroweak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A. (Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique)

    1983-08-18

    We study the implications of the recent observation of a parity violation in atomic cesium. After a discussion of the uncertainties associated with the atomic physics calculations we derive conservative bounds for the weak charge Qsub(W). These bounds are used to put constraints on alternatives to the standard electroweak model, involving an 'extra U(1)' gauge group. We analyze the possibility that the extra gauge boson might be very light and give, as a by-product, the typical range of momentum transfer explored in atomic parity violation experiments.

  9. Criticality in Alternating Layered Ising Models : I. Effects of connectivity and proximity

    OpenAIRE

    Au-Yang, Helen; Fisher, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The specific heats of exactly solvable alternating layered planar Ising models with strips of width $m_1$ lattice spacings and ``strong'' couplings $J_1$ sandwiched between strips of width $m_2$ and ``weak'' coupling $J_2$, have been studied numerically to investigate the effects of connectivity and proximity. We find that the enhancements of the specific heats of the strong layers and of the overall or `bulk' critical temperature, $T_c(J_1,J_2;m_1,m_2)$, arising from the collective effects r...

  10. Alternative model for administration and analysis of research-based assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hobbs, Robert D.; Aiken, John M.; Welch, Nathan M.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    Research-based assessments represent a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers interested in improving undergraduate physics education. However, the historical model for disseminating and propagating conceptual and attitudinal assessments developed by the physics education research (PER) community has not resulted in widespread adoption of these assessments within the broader community of physics instructors. Within this historical model, assessment developers create high quality, validated assessments, make them available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors in order to more explicitly support adoption of research-based assessments. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof of concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges that we encountered while developing, maintaining, and automating this system. Ultimately, we argue that centralized administration and data collection for standardized assessments is a viable and potentially advantageous alternative to the default model characterized by decentralized administration and analysis. Moreover, with the help of online administration and automation, this model can support the long-term sustainability of centralized assessment systems.

  11. Assessing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Latent Structure in Elderly Bereaved European Trauma Victims: Evidence for a Five Factor Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, Cherie; O'Connor, Maja; Elklit, Ask

    2013-01-01

    The three-factor structure of PTSD specified by the DSM-IV is not supported in the empirical literature. Two alternative four-factor models have received a wealth of empirical support. However, a consensus regarding which is superiorhas not been reached. A recent five-factor model has been shown ...

  12. Factor Model Forecasts of Exchange Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Engel; Nelson C. Mark; Kenneth D. West

    2012-01-01

    We construct factors from a cross section of exchange rates and use the idiosyncratic deviations from the factors to forecast. In a stylized data generating process, we show that such forecasts can be effective even if there is essentially no serial correlation in the univariate exchange rate processes. We apply the technique to a panel of bilateral U.S. dollar rates against 17 OECD countries. We forecast using factors, and using factors combined with any of fundamentals suggested by Taylor r...

  13. Assessing Fit of Alternative Unidimensional Polytomous IRT Models Using Posterior Predictive Model Checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongyun; Xie, Chao; Jiao, Hong

    2016-05-30

    This article explored the application of the posterior predictive model checking (PPMC) method in assessing fit for unidimensional polytomous item response theory (IRT) models, specifically the divide-by-total models (e.g., the generalized partial credit model). Previous research has primarily focused on using PPMC in model checking for unidimensional and multidimensional IRT models for dichotomous data, and has paid little attention to polytomous models. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate the performance of PPMC in detecting different sources of misfit for the partial credit model family. Results showed that the PPMC method, in combination with appropriate discrepancy measures, had adequate power in detecting different sources of misfit for the partial credit model family. Global odds ratio and item total correlation exhibited specific patterns in detecting the absence of the slope parameter, whereas Yen's Q1 was found to be promising in the detection of misfit caused by the constant category intersection parameter constraint across items. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Modeling the Impact of Alternative Immunization Strategies: Using Matrices as Memory Lanes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir J Alonso

    Full Text Available Existing modeling approaches are divided between a focus on the constitutive (micro elements of systems or on higher (macro organization levels. Micro-level models enable consideration of individual histories and interactions, but can be unstable and subject to cumulative errors. Macro-level models focus on average population properties, but may hide relevant heterogeneity at the micro-scale. We present a framework that integrates both approaches through the use of temporally structured matrices that can take large numbers of variables into account. Matrices are composed of several bidimensional (time×age grids, each representing a state (e.g. physiological, immunological, socio-demographic. Time and age are primary indices linking grids. These matrices preserve the entire history of all population strata and enable the use of historical events, parameters and states dynamically in the modeling process. This framework is applicable across fields, but particularly suitable to simulate the impact of alternative immunization policies. We demonstrate the framework by examining alternative strategies to accelerate measles elimination in 15 developing countries. The model recaptured long-endorsed policies in measles control, showing that where a single routine measles-containing vaccine is employed with low coverage, any improvement in coverage is more effective than a second dose. It also identified an opportunity to save thousands of lives in India at attractively low costs through the implementation of supplementary immunization campaigns. The flexibility of the approach presented enables estimating the effectiveness of different immunization policies in highly complex contexts involving multiple and historical influences from different hierarchical levels.

  15. The West Central Alberta Woodland Caribou Landscape Plan: Using a Modeling Approach to Develop Alternative Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hubbs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus are classified as threatened in Alberta. In support of Canada's Species at Risk Act, a Recovery Plan for Woodland Caribou in Alberta was completed in 2004 which required local implementation plans to be completed within 5 areas of the province. The West Central Alberta Caribou Landscape Plan (WCCLP is the first of these to be initiated and it addresses the recovery strategies for 4 herds. Two aspatial computer models built on the STELLA© modelling platform (ISee Systems, 2007 were used to assist the planning team in evaluating cumulative effects and alternative scenarios for caribou conservation. The ALCES© (Forem Technologies 2008 modelling tool was used to forecast potential changes in the west central Alberta landscape over time. Yearly landscape condition outputs from ALCES© were then exported into a caribou-specific population model, REMUS© (Weclaw, 2004, that was used to project potential population responses by woodland caribou, other primary prey species [moose (Alces alces, elk (Cervus elaphus and deer (Odocoileus sp.] and wolves (Canis lupus (Weclaw & Hudson, 2004. Simulated habitat management strategies that resulted in the highest likelihood of caribou recovery included the maintenance of a high proportion of old forest, the aggregation of industrial footprints and the reclamation of historic seismic lines (although the latter took decades to provide real dividends. Sharing of industrial roads, protection of fragments of old-growth, and expanding an already aggressive fire control strategy in Alberta had little additional effect on caribou recovery. Simulated population management strategies that were successful all involved decades of intensive wolf control, either directly or indirectly through intensive primary prey control (with the exception of woodland caribou until old-growth forests recovered to densities that provided caribou habitat and decreased alternate prey of wolves. Although

  16. DOE/ORNL heat pump design model, overview and application to R-22 alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, C.K.

    1997-12-01

    This computer program is a public-domain system design tool for application to air-to-air heat pumps. The main aspects of the program are reviewed with emphasis on the newest features of the current fifth-generation version (Mark V) and an upcoming more fully HFC-capable release (Mark VI). Current model predictions are compared to test data for a leading HFC alternative to HCFC-22 in heat pumps. Examples are shown of some user interfaces that have been recently developed for the program. To demonstrate the design capabilities of the model for R-22 alternatives, a refrigerant-side optimization was conducted to find the best balance of heat transfer versus pressure drop for HCFC R-22, HFCs R-134a and R-410A, and the natural refrigerant propane. COP was maximized while refrigerant charge and tube size were minimized. Independent design parameters were fraction of total area in the outdoor coil, tube diameter and number of circuits for each heat exchanger, and condenser subcooling. Heat exchanger design tradeoffs are discussed for a heat pump relative to air conditioners and heating-only units. A design optimized for heating-only operation is presented.

  17. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Moral, A.; Azanza, María J.

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate ("frequency"), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca2+ Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD-CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD-CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B0 ≅0.2-15 mT) AC-MF of frequency fM=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation.

  18. Alternate service delivery models in cancer genetic counseling: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hudson Buchanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state of science regarding service delivery models such as telephone counseling, telegenetics and group counseling. Research on comparative effectiveness of these models in traditional individual, in-person genetic counseling has been promising for improving access to care in a manner acceptable to patients. Yet, it has not fully evaluated the short- and long-term patient- and system-level outcomes that will help answer the question of whether these models achieve the same beneficial psychosocial and behavioral outcomes as traditional cancer genetic counseling. We propose a research agenda focused on comparative effectiveness of available service delivery models and how to match models to patients and practice settings. Only through this rigorous research can clinicians and systems find the optimal balance of clinical quality, ready and secure access to care, and financial sustainability. Such research will be integral to achieving the promise of genomic medicine in oncology.

  19. Traditional and alternative nonlinear models for estimating the growth of Morada Nova sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laaina de Andrade Souza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, alternative and traditional nonlinear models to describe growth curves of Morada Nova sheep reared in the state of Bahia, Brazil, were applied. The nonlinear models were: Schnute, Mitscherlich, Gompertz, Logistic, Meloun I Meloun II, III Meloun, Gamito and Meloun IV. The model adjustment was evaluated by using: Adjusted Coefficient of Determination (R²aj, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC, Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC, Mean Squared Error of Prediction (MEP and Coefficient of Determination of Prediction (R²p. The selection of the best model was based on cluster analysis, using the evaluators as variables. Six out of the nine tested models converged, while Meloun I and Meloun IV were equally effective in explaining animal growth, without significant influence of sex or type of parturition over the curve parameters. The models Meloun I and IV have the best adjustment and reveal a remarkable reduction of weight gain after 150 days of age, which indicates special attention should be given to feeding at this stage.

  20. Calibration of the modified Bartlett-Lewis model using global optimization techniques and alternative objective functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Vanhaute

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of rainfall time series for various applications is widespread. However, in many cases historical rainfall records lack in length or quality for certain practical purposes, resulting in a reliance on rainfall models to supply simulated rainfall time series, e.g., in the design of hydraulic structures. One way to obtain such simulations is by means of stochastic point process rainfall models, such as the Bartlett-Lewis type of model. It is widely acknowledged that the calibration of such models suffers from the presence of multiple local minima which local search algorithms usually fail to avoid. To meet this shortcoming, four relatively new global optimization methods are presented and tested for their abilities to calibrate the Modified Bartlett-Lewis Model (MBL. The list of tested methods consists of: the Downhill Simplex Method (DSM, Simplex-Simulated Annealing (SIMPSA, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO and Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA. The parameters of these algorithms are first optimized to ensure optimal performance, after which they are used for calibration of the MBL model. Furthermore, this paper addresses the issue of subjectivity in the choice of weights in the objective function. Three alternative weighing methods are compared to determine whether or not simulation results (obtained after calibration with the best optimization method are influenced by the choice of weights.

  1. Correlations of MMPI factor scales with measures of the five factor model of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, P T; Busch, C M; Zonderman, A B; McCrae, R R

    1986-01-01

    Two recent item factor analyses of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) classified the resulting factors according to a conceptual scheme offered by Norman's (1963) five factor model. The present article empirically evaluates those classifications by correlating MMPI factor scales with self-report and peer rating measures of the five factor model in a sample of 153 adult men and women. Both sets of predictions were generally supported, although MMPI factors derived in a normal sample showed closer correspondences with the five normal personality dimensions. MMPI factor scales were also correlated with 18 scales measuring specific traits within the broader domains of Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness. The nine Costa, Zonderman, McCrae, and Williams (1985) MMPI factor scales appear to give useful global assessments of four of the five factors; other instruments are needed to provide detailed information on more specific aspects of normal personality. The use of the five factor model in routine clinical assessment is discussed.

  2. Utilization of reconstructed cultured human skin models as an alternative skin for permeation studies of chemical compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Satoshi; 藤堂, 浩明; 杉江, 謙一; 藤本, 英哲; 中田, 圭一; 徳留, 嘉寛; 橋本, フミ惠; 杉林, 堅次

    2010-01-01

    Two reconstructed human skin models, EpiskinSM and EpiDermTM, have been approved as alternative membranes for skin corrosive/irritation experiments due to their close correlation with animal skin. Such reconstructed human skin models were evaluated as alternative membranes for skin permeation experiments. Seven drugs with different lipophilicities and almost the same molecular weight were used as test penetrants. Relationships were investigated between permeability coefficients (P values) of ...

  3. Value-Focused Thinking Model to Evaluate SHM System Alternatives From Military end User Requirements Point of View

    OpenAIRE

    Klimaszewski Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    The article describes Value-Focused Thinking (VFT) model developed in order to evaluate various alternatives for implementation of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system on a military aircraft. Four SHM system alternatives are considered based on: visual inspection (current approach), piezoelectric (PZT) sensors, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors and Comparative Vacuum Monitoring (CVM) sensors. A numerical example is shown to illustrate the model capability. Sensitivity analyses are perfor...

  4. A new method for simultaneous estimation of the factor model parameters, factor scores, and unique parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    In the common factor model the observed data is conceptually split into a common covariance producing part and an uncorrelated unique part. The common factor model is fitted to the data itself and a new method is introduced for the simultaneous estimation of loadings, unique variances, factor scores

  5. Liquidity and Fama-French Three-Factor Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈政

    2012-01-01

      The Fama-French three-factor model was proposed to explain the expected return. In this paper,the author takes advantage of the recent data from NYSE, AMEX and NASDAQ stocks to examine whether the Fama-French three-factor model can explain the expected return well on the basis of reviewing the importance of liquidity and criticizing the Fama-French three-factor model. It turns out that the three-factor model can still reflect the factor in asset pricing to a certain degree.

  6. Linear Confirmatory Factor Models To Evaluate Multitrait-Multimethod Matrices: The Effects of Number of Indicators and Correlation among Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Jose M.; Hontangas, Pedro M.; Oliver, Amparo

    2000-01-01

    Assessed two models for confirmatory factor analysis of multitrait-multimethod data through Monte Carlo simulation. The correlated traits-correlated methods (CTCM) and the correlated traits-correlated uniqueness (CTCU) models were compared. Results suggest that CTCU is a good alternative to CTCM in the typical multitrait-multimethod matrix, but…

  7. Modelling N2O dynamics in the engineered N cycle: Evaluation of alternate model structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Barth F.; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Domingo Felez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    to minimize the carbon footprint of wastewater treatment plants. The present contribution aims to summarize the recent developments in this field and makes use of standard indentifiability measures to show how the choice of experimental protocols and model structures can potentially impact their calibration....

  8. Heteroscedastic one-factor models and marginal maximum likelihood estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, D.J.; Dolan, C.V.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, a general class of heteroscedastic one-factor models is considered. In these models, the residual variances of the observed scores are explicitly modelled as parametric functions of the one-dimensional factor score. A marginal maximum likelihood procedure for parameter estimati

  9. Alternative 3D Modeling Approaches Based on Complex Multi-Source Geological Data Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明超; 韩彦青; 缪正建; 高伟

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complex nature of multi-source geological data, it is difficult to rebuild every geological struc-ture through a single 3D modeling method. The multi-source data interpretation method put forward in this analysis is based on a database-driven pattern and focuses on the discrete and irregular features of geological data. The geological data from a variety of sources covering a range of accuracy, resolution, quantity and quality are classified and inte-grated according to their reliability and consistency for 3D modeling. The new interpolation-approximation fitting construction algorithm of geological surfaces with the non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) technique is then pre-sented. The NURBS technique can retain the balance among the requirements for accuracy, surface continuity and data storage of geological structures. Finally, four alternative 3D modeling approaches are demonstrated with reference to some examples, which are selected according to the data quantity and accuracy specification. The proposed approaches offer flexible modeling patterns for different practical engineering demands.

  10. Autobiography and Anorexia: A Qualitative Alternative to Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Díaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose a qualitative approach to the study of the ways in which people face good and poor health issues. During the last 30 years, Prochaska and DiClemente's "trans-theoretical model" (1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1992 has gained relevance as a model to assess disposition for change in patients. We revise the features of the model and its common techniques to assess stages of change, underlining its methodological and conceptual problems. Particularly, we discuss the paradoxes set by "pre-contemplation" as a concept; the exogenous definition of human problems in terms of institutional and clinical criteria; and the ambiguity of the model, where the purpose of accompanying and orienting the patient contrasts with the imposition of problem definitions and solution strategies. We propose a narrative analysis of autobiographies of patients as an alternative that recasts their own notions of "change," "problem," and "vital trajectory." We illustrate this possibility with the analysis of an autobiographic interview with a woman who has a history of anorexia. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1203209

  11. A Two-Stage Process Model of Sensory Discrimination: An Alternative to Drift-Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Landy, Michael S

    2016-11-02

    Discrimination of the direction of motion of a noisy stimulus is an example of sensory discrimination under uncertainty. For stimuli that are extended in time, reaction time is quicker for larger signal values (e.g., discrimination of opposite directions of motion compared with neighboring orientations) and larger signal strength (e.g., stimuli with higher contrast or motion coherence, that is, lower noise). The standard model of neural responses (e.g., in lateral intraparietal cortex) and reaction time for discrimination is drift-diffusion. This model makes two clear predictions. (1) The effects of signal strength and value on reaction time should interact multiplicatively because the diffusion process depends on the signal-to-noise ratio. (2) If the diffusion process is interrupted, as in a cued-response task, the time to decision after the cue should be independent of the strength of accumulated sensory evidence. In two experiments with human participants, we show that neither prediction holds. A simple alternative model is developed that is consistent with the results. In this estimate-then-decide model, evidence is accumulated until estimation precision reaches a threshold value. Then, a decision is made with duration that depends on the signal-to-noise ratio achieved by the first stage.

  12. Role of Alternative Food in Controlling Chaotic Dynamics in a Predator-Prey Model with Disease in the Predator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Krishna Pada; Bairagi, Nandadulal; Sen, Prabir

    It is generally, but not always, accepted that alternative food plays a stabilizing role in predator-prey interaction. Parasites, on the other hand, have the ability to change both the qualitative and quantitative dynamics of its host population. In recent times, researchers are showing growing interest in formulating models that integrate both the ecological and epidemiological aspects. The present paper deals with the effect of alternative food on a predator-prey system with disease in the predator population. We show that the system, in the absence of alternative food, exhibits different dynamics viz. stable coexistence, limit cycle oscillations, period-doubling bifurcation and chaos when infection rate is gradually increased. However, when predator consumes alternative food coupled with its focal prey, the system returns to regular oscillatory state from chaotic state through period-halving bifurcations. Our study shows that alternative food may have larger impact on the community structure and may increase population persistence.

  13. Factor Model Forecasting of Inflation in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Kunovac

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper tests whether information derived from 144 economic variables (represented by only a few constructed factors can be used for the forecasting of consumer prices in Croatia. The results obtained show that the use of one factor enhances the precision of the benchmark model’s ability to forecast inflation. The methodology used is sufficiently general to be able to be applied directly for the forecasting of other economic variables.

  14. Examination of alternate codon bias solutions for expression and purification of recombinant mechano-growth factor in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianguo; Wan, Rongxue; Yi, Qian; He, Ling; Yang, Li; Tang, Liling

    2015-01-01

    Mechano-growth factor (MGF), an alternative splicing variant of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene, promotes cell proliferation and inhibits cell differentiation. It also plays an important role in tumor development. It is important to optimize the production process and achieve MGF protein because there is no commercial MGF protein available. In this study, the human MGF gene is cloned into pGEX-4T-1 and the recombinant human MGF (rhMGF) protein could be expressed in Rosetta (DE3) by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside induction but not in BL21 (DE3). Mutation from rare codons to Escherichia coli preferred ones is performed. We obtain MGF(Mut54-56) and MGF(Mut-total) fragments through site-directed mutagenesis and overlapping PCR. Both pGEX-4T-1/MGF(Mut54-56)- and pGEX-4T-1/MGF(Mut-total)-transformed BL21 (DE3) can be induced to express rhMGF protein. To optimize the production technology, expression and purification of rhMGF are analyzed and compared in Rosetta (DE3) and BL21 (DE3). Results indicate that rhMGF expression in BL21 (DE3) is significantly higher than that in Rosetta (DE3). The protein yield of pGEX-4T-1/MGF(Mut-total) in BL21 (DE3) is higher than that of pGEX-4T-1/MGF(Mut54-56). We test the biological activity of MGF protein purified by affinity chromatography in C2C12 cell line and find that rhMGF promotes cell proliferation significantly. In conclusion, we establish a method to produce rhMGF economically with high biological activity in BL21 (DE3).

  15. Implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence, and school achievement: testing alternative models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonida, Eleftheria; Kiosseoglou, Grigoris; Leondari, Angeliki

    2006-01-01

    In the present study 3 alternative causal models concerning the relationships between implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence, and school achievement were tested. The direction of changes in implicit theories and perceived competence during early adolescence also was examined. A total of 187 fifth and sixth graders were tested and retested a year later, when they were sixth and seventh graders, respectively. Cross-lagged regression analyses indicated that school achievement determined the adoption of a particular implicit theory through the mediation of perceived competence. Implicit theories were found to change toward the adoption of more incremental beliefs and perceived academic competence declined; however, high achievers, as compared with their low- and middle-level classmates, adopted more incremental beliefs and had significantly higher perceived competence.

  16. An alternative model for postdoctoral education of nurses engaged in research with potentially vulnerable populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Susan; Deatrick, Janet A; Dobal, May T; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; Ball, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Post-doctoral education has become a necessity for new nursing doctoral graduates. However, post-doctoral positions are limited and nurse scientists may face barriers that make non-traditional programs necessary. This study describes the outcomes of the Summer Nursing Research Institute (SNRI), an alternative post-doctoral educational program, reports formative perceptions of SNRI participants, and illustrates the efficacy and limitations of the model with selected summative research related outcomes. Participants between 1997 and 2006 were asked to evaluate the experience while attending the Institute (formative evaluation) and an overall summative evaluation was also conducted. Evaluations indicate that participants gained knowledge, skills, and networking abilities in terms of conducting research with vulnerable populations. A program like the SNRI can be successful in widening the research pipeline, in imparting knowledge, and in fostering positive attitudes as well as in improving research skills.

  17. Customer satisfaction and consumer responsibility: toward an alternative model of medical service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, M B; Barber, J C

    1999-01-01

    In the increasingly competitive environment of medical services and patient care, physicians feel a strong pressure for increasing efforts to improve patient satisfaction with the goal of creating a loyal patient base. These steps to promote patient satisfaction have typically involved developing new programs and services, as medical offices seek to attract and keep their patients by continually enhancing service features. While patient satisfaction is a worthy goal, this paper argues that we often make mistakes and incur expensive costs in pursuing satisfaction as an end unto itself. This paper proposes an alternative model, based on creating a doctor-patient therapeutic alliance which has the dual benefits of enhancing patient satisfaction while improving the critical personal relationship between doctors and their patients, so necessary for the delivery of optimal care.

  18. Parity violation in atomic cesium and alternatives to the standard model of electroweak interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C. A.

    1983-08-01

    We study the implications of the recent observation of a parity violation in atomic cesium. After a discussion of the uncertainties associated with the atomic physics calculations we derive conservative bounds for the weak charge QW. These bounds are used to put constraints on alternatives to the standard electroweak model, involving an ``extra U(1)'' gauge group. We analyze the possibility that the extra gauge boson might be very and give, as a by-product, the typical range of momentum transfer explored in atomic parity violation experiments. Laboratoire Propre du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique associée à l'Ecole Normale Supérieure et à l'Université de Paris Sud.

  19. Transgenic rescue of phenotypic deficits in a mouse model of alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S; Dachtler, James; Roder, John C; Clapcote, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 are the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC). Most ATP1A3 mutations in AHC lie within a cluster in or near transmembrane α-helix TM6, including I810N that is also found in the Myshkin mouse model of AHC. These mutations all substantially reduce Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 activity. Herein, we show that Myshkin mice carrying a wild-type Atp1a3 transgene that confers a 16 % increase in brain-specific total Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity show significant phenotypic improvements compared with non-transgenic Myshkin mice. Interventions to increase the activity of wild-type Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α3 in AHC patients should be investigated further.

  20. An alternative order-parameter for non-equilibrium generalized spin models on honeycomb lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Francisco; Henkel, Malte

    2016-04-01

    An alternative definition for the order-parameter is proposed, for a family of non-equilibrium spin models with up-down symmetry on honeycomb lattices, and which depends on two parameters. In contrast to the usual definition, our proposal takes into account that each site of the lattice can be associated with a local temperature which depends on the local environment of each site. Using the generalised voter motel as a test case, we analyse the phase diagram and the critical exponents in the stationary state and compare the results of the standard order-parameter with the ones following from our new proposal, on the honeycomb lattice. The stationary phase transition is in the Ising universality class. Finite-size corrections are also studied and the Wegner exponent is estimated as ω =1.06(9).

  1. Prospects for bioenergy use in Ghana using Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemausuor, Francis; Nygaard, Ivan; Mackenzie, Gordon A.

    2015-01-01

    biomass sources, through the production of biogas, liquid biofuels and electricity. Analysis was based on moderate and high use of bioenergy for transportation, electricity generation and residential fuel using the LEAP (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning) model. Results obtained indicate......As Ghana's economy grows, the choice of future energy paths and policies in the coming years will have a significant influence on its energy security. A Renewable Energy Act approved in 2011 seeks to encourage the influx of renewable energy sources in Ghana's energy mix. The new legal framework...... combined with increasing demand for energy has created an opportunity for dramatic changes in the way energy is generated in Ghana. However, the impending changes and their implication remain uncertain. This paper examines the extent to which future energy scenarios in Ghana could rely on energy from...

  2. Analysis of factors that affect the potential of star fruit (Averhoa Bilimbi) and cactus (Gymnocalycium Hossei) extracts as alternative battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Sitti; Agnesstacia

    2014-03-01

    This research analyzes the factors that affect the work of the battery from the star fruit extract and the cactus extract. The value voltage and current generated are measure the work of the battery. Voltage measurement based on the electrode distance function, and electrode surface area. Voltage as a surface area electrode function and electrode distance function determined the current density and the voltage generated. From the experimental results obtained that the battery voltage is large enough, it is about 1.8 V for the extract of star fruit, and 1.7 V for the extract of cactus, which means that the juice extract from star fruit and the juice extract of cactus can become an alternative as battery replacement. The measurements with different electrode surface area on the star fruit and cactus extract which has the depth of the electrode 0.5 cm to 4 cm causes a decrease in the electric current generated from 12.5 mA to 1.0 mA, but obtained the same voltage.

  3. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  4. The Application of the Model Correction Factor Method to a Reliability Analysis of a Composite Blade Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimiroy; Friis-Hansen, Peter; Berggreen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a reliability analysis of a composite blade profile. The so-called Model Correction Factor technique is applied as an effective alternate approach to the response surface technique. The structural reliability is determined by use of a simplified idealised analytical model whic...... in a probabilistic sense is model corrected so that it close to the design point represents the same structural behaviour as a realistic FE model....

  5. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  6. Exploring alternative wind vulnerability and loss modeling methods - application to Europe extra-tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, N.

    2009-04-01

    loss over the event footprint and the associated uncertainty. Now, the actual loss in the building portfolio may not occur at every location, i.e. there are locations with and without loss. It is anticipated that the total incurred loss over the footprint falls within the range of modeled footprint loss and closer to the expected modeled loss value. An alternative methodology to the above was explored where it was attempted to model realizations of actual losses expected at each location. Firstly the building vulnerability was represented by its underlying fragility functions where each fragility function characterizes the likely damage mode and hence the loss ratio the building could experience during a windstorm and the associated probability of occurrence conditional on the wind speed. The damage modes considered are mutually exclusive and engineering considerations determine the extent of correlation between each damage mode (or sub-damage state). The fragility functions therefore describe the damage matrix for a building subjected to the wind hazard and this matrix produces the probability of damage as well as no damage. Hence at a building location subjected to a certain wind speed within the hazard footprint, one could sample from the damage matrix the actual damage ratio, which could range from zero (where no damage could occur) to the maximum likely damage ratio. By sampling all locations N times, one could subsequently obtain N realizations of the loss footprint hence obtain the expected total event loss and the loss distribution quantifying the uncertainty. In evaluating the insured loss or gross loss, the calculated ground-up loss at a location is used in the expected mode to estimate the gross loss based on the deductibles, limits and other relevant financial structures. This is in contrast to the conventional catastrophe model where the gross loss is calculated as a distributed loss using MDR and SD. The location correlation modeling was explored in the

  7. Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: AComparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P.; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-02-15

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is one of the most common naturally occurring minerals that is present in many subsurface environments. It plays an important role in the genesis of enriched ore deposits through weathering reactions, is the most abundant sulfide mineral in many mine tailings, and is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. The pyrite oxidation reaction serves as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications. Mathematical modeling of these processes is extremely challenging because aqueous concentrations of key species vary over an enormous range, oxygen inventory and supply are typically small in comparison to pyrite inventory, and chemical reactions are complex, involving kinetic control and microbial catalysis. We present the mathematical formulation of a general multi-phase advective-diffusive reactive transport model for redox processes. Two alternative implementations were made in the TOUGHREACT and TOUGH2-CHEM simulation codes which use sequential iteration and simultaneous solution, respectively. The simulators are applied to reactive consumption of pyrite in (1) saturated flow of oxidizing water, and (2) saturated-unsaturated flow in which oxygen transport occurs in both aqueous and gas phases. Geochemical evolutions predicted from different process models are compared, and issues of numerical accuracy and efficiency are discussed.

  8. Regulatory Forum commentary: alternative mouse models for future cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Daniel; Sistare, Frank D; Nambiar, Prashant R; Turner, Oliver C; Radi, Zaher; Bower, Nancy

    2014-07-01

    International regulatory and pharmaceutical industry scientists are discussing revision of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) S1 guidance on rodent carcinogenicity assessment of small molecule pharmaceuticals. A weight-of-evidence approach is proposed to determine the need for rodent carcinogenicity studies. For compounds with high human cancer risk, the product may be labeled appropriately without conducting rodent carcinogenicity studies. For compounds with minimal cancer risk, only a 6-month transgenic mouse study (rasH2 mouse or p53+/- mouse) or a 2-year mouse study would be needed. If rodent carcinogenicity testing may add significant value to cancer risk assessment, a 2-year rat study and either a 6-month transgenic mouse or a 2-year mouse study is appropriate. In many cases, therefore, one rodent carcinogenicity study could be sufficient. The rasH2 model predicts neoplastic findings relevant to human cancer risk assessment as well as 2-year rodent models, produces fewer irrelevant neoplastic outcomes, and often will be preferable to a 2-year rodent study. Before revising ICH S1 guidance, a prospective evaluation will be conducted to test the proposed weight-of-evidence approach. This evaluation offers an opportunity for a secondary analysis comparing the value of alternative mouse models and 2-year rodent studies in the proposed ICH S1 weight-of-evidence approach for human cancer risk assessment.

  9. Reliability Analysis of a Composite Blade Structure Using the Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimiroy; Friis-Hansen, Peter; Berggreen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a reliability analysis of a composite blade profile. The so-called Model Correction Factor technique is applied as an effective alternate approach to the response surface technique. The structural reliability is determined by use of a simplified idealised analytical model which...... in a probabilistic sense is model corrected so that it, close to the design point, represents the same structural behaviour as a realistic FE model. This approach leads to considerable improvement of computational efficiency over classical response surface methods, because the numerically “cheap” idealistic model...... is used as the response surface, while the time-consuming detailed model is called only a few times until the simplified model is calibrated to the detailed model....

  10. A model for equivalent axle load factors

    OpenAIRE

    Amorim, Sara I.R.; Pais, Jorge; Vale, Aline C.; Minhoto, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Most design methods for road pavements require the design traffic, based on the transformation of the traffic spectrum, to be calculated into a number of equivalent passages of a standard axle using the equivalent axle load factors. Generally, these factors only consider the type of axle (single, tandem or tridem), but they do not consider the type of wheel on the axles, i.e., single or dual wheel. The type of wheel has an important influence on the calculation of the design traffic. The exis...

  11. Linear, Non-Linear and Alternative Algorithms in the Correlation of IEQ Factors with Global Comfort: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fassio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Indoor environmental quality (IEQ factors usually considered in engineering studies, i.e., thermal, acoustical, visual comfort and indoor air quality are individually associated with the occupant satisfaction level on the basis of well-established relationships. On the other hand, the full understanding of how single IEQ factors contribute and interact to determine the overall occupant satisfaction (global comfort is currently an open field of research. The lack of a shared approach in treating the subject depends on many aspects: absence of established protocols for the collection of subjective and objective measurements, the amount of variables to consider and in general the complexity of the technical issues involved. This case study is aimed to perform a comparison between some of the models available, studying the results of a survey conducted with objective and subjective method on a classroom within University of Roma TRE premises. Different models are fitted on the same measured values, allowing comparison between different weighting schemes between IEQ categories obtained with different methods. The critical issues, like differences in the weighting scheme obtained with different IEQ models and the variability of the weighting scheme with respect to the time of exposure of the users in the building, identified during this small scale comfort assessment study, provide the basis for a survey activity on a larger scale, basis for the development of an improved IEQ assessment method.

  12. Dispersion modeling to compare alternative technologies for odor remediation at swine facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Susan S; Graham, Brevick G; Williams, C Mike

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of 18 alternative technologies for reducing odor dispersion at and beyond the boundary of swine facilities was assessed in conjunction with an initiative sponsored through agreements between the Attorney General of North Carolina and Smithfield Foods, Premium Standard Farms, and Frontline Farmers. The trajectory and spatial distribution of odor emitted at each facility were modeled at 200 and 400 m downwind from each site under two meteorological conditions (daytime and nighttime) using a Eulerian-Lagrangian model. To predict the dispersion of odor downwind, the geographical area containing the odorant sources at each facility was partitioned into 10-m2 grids on the basis of satellite photographs and architectural drawings. Relative odorant concentrations were assigned to each grid point on the basis of intensity measurements made by the trained odor panel at each facility using a 9-point rating scale. The results of the modeling indicated that odor did not extend significantly beyond 400 m downwind of any of the test sites during the daytime when the layer of air above the earth's surface is usually turbulent. However, modeling indicated that odor from all full-scale farms extended beyond 400 m onto neighboring property in the evenings when deep surface cooling through long-wave radiation to space produces a stable (nocturnal) boundary layer. The results also indicated that swine housing, independent of waste management type, plays a significant role in odor downwind, as do odor sources of moderate to moderately high intensity that emanate from a large surface area such as a lagoon. Human odor assessments were utilized for modeling rather than instrument measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or particulates less than 10 microm in diameter (PM10) because these physical measurements obtained simultaneously with human panel ratings were not found to accurately predict human odor intensity in the field.

  13. Alternative splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 produces a secreted isoform that inhibits fibroblast growth factor-induced proliferation and is repressed in urothelial carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Darren C; L'Hôte, Corine G; Kennedy, Wendy; Pitt, Eva; Knowles, Margaret A

    2005-11-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are a family of receptor tyrosine kinases that play key roles in proliferation, differentiation, and tumorigenesis. FGFR3 was identified as the major family member expressed in both normal human urothelium and cultured normal human urothelial (NHU) cells and was expressed as the IIIb isoform. We also identified a splice variant, FGFR3 Delta8-10, lacking exons encoding the COOH-terminal half of immunoglobulin-like domain III and the transmembrane domain. Previous reports have assumed that this is a cancer-specific splice variant. We showed that FGFR3 Delta8-10 is a normal transcript in NHU cells and is translated, N-glycosylated, and secreted. Primary urothelium expressed high levels of FGFR3 transcripts. In culture, levels were reduced in actively proliferating cells but increased at confluence and as cells approached senescence. Cells overexpressing FGFR3 IIIb showed FGF1-induced proliferation, which was inhibited by the addition of FGFR3 Delta8-10. In bladder tumor cell lines derived from aggressive carcinomas, there were significant alterations in the relative expression of isoforms including an overall decrease in the proportion of FGFR3 Delta8-10 and predominant expression of FGFR3 IIIc in some cases. In summary, alternative splicing of FGFR3 IIIb in NHU cells represents a normal mechanism to generate a transcript that regulates proliferation and in bladder cancer, the ratio of FGFR3 isoforms is significantly altered.

  14. An alternative empirical model for the relationship between the bond valence and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidey, Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between the bond valence s and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds (dr/dT) has been closely approximated by using the alternative three-parameter empirical model (dr/dT) = (u + vs)(-1/w), where u, v and w are the refinable parameters. Unlike the s-(dr/dT) model developed by Brown et al. [(1997), Acta Cryst. B53, 750-761], this alternative model can be optimized for particular s-(dr/dT) datasets in the least-squares refinement procedure. For routine calculations of the thermal expansion rates of chemical bonds, the alternative model with the parameters u = -63.9, v = 2581.0 and w = 0.647 can be recommended.

  15. Personalized Predictive Modeling and Risk Factor Identification using Patient Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenney; Sun, Jimeng; Hu, Jianying; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Personalized predictive models are customized for an individual patient and trained using information from similar patients. Compared to global models trained on all patients, they have the potential to produce more accurate risk scores and capture more relevant risk factors for individual patients. This paper presents an approach for building personalized predictive models and generating personalized risk factor profiles. A locally supervised metric learning (LSML) similarity measure is trained for diabetes onset and used to find clinically similar patients. Personalized risk profiles are created by analyzing the parameters of the trained personalized logistic regression models. A 15,000 patient data set, derived from electronic health records, is used to evaluate the approach. The predictive results show that the personalized models can outperform the global model. Cluster analysis of the risk profiles show groups of patients with similar risk factors, differences in the top risk factors for different groups of patients and differences between the individual and global risk factors.

  16. An Alternative to the ΛCDM Model: The Case of Scale Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Andre

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis is made that, at large scales where general relativity may be applied, empty space is scale invariant. This establishes a relation between the cosmological constant and the scale factor λ of the scale-invariant framework. This relation brings major simplifications in the scale-invariant equations for cosmology, which contain a new term, depending on the derivative of the scale factor, that opposes gravity and produces an accelerated expansion. The displacements due to the acceleration term make a high contribution {{{Ω }}}λ to the energy density of the universe, satisfying an equation of the form {{{Ω }}}{{m}}+{{{Ω }}}{{k}}+{{{Ω }}}λ =1. The models do not demand the existence of unknown particles. There is a family of flat models with different density parameters {{{Ω }}}{{m}}point is that for {{{Ω }}}{{m}}=0.3 the effect is not yet completely killed. Models with non-zero density start explosively with a braking phase followed by a continuously accelerating expansion. Several observational properties are examined, in particular the distances, the m–z diagram, and the {{{Ω }}}{{m}} versus {{{Ω }}}λ plot. Comparisons with observations are also performed for the Hubble constant H0 versus {{{Ω }}}{{m}}, for the expansion history in the plot H(z)/(z+1) versus redshift z, and for the transition redshift from braking to acceleration. These first dynamical tests are satisfied by scale-invariant models, which thus deserve further study.

  17. Chemokine ligand 2 and paraoxonase-1 in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: The search for alternative causative factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jordi; Joven, Jorge

    2015-03-14

    The incidence and prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is constantly increasing. Despite this is apparently associated with the growing increase in obesity, insulin resistance and obesity-related metabolic disturbances their presence is not a necessary or sufficient condition to explain the accumulation of fat in the liver. Conversely, NAFLD is a predictor of other metabolic risks. NAFLD is currently the most frequent chronic liver disease but should not be considered benign or anecdotic because a considerable proportion of patients with NAFLD progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Consequently, the search for alternative molecular mechanisms with therapeutic implications in NAFLD and associated disorders deserves a careful consideration. Mitochondria are possible targets as these organelles generate energy from nutrient oxidation. Some findings, generated in patients with extreme obesity and in murine models, support the notion that NAFLD could be a mitochondrial disease. This is plausible because mitochondrial dysfunction affects the accumulation of lipids in hepatocytes and promotes lipid peroxidation, the production of reactive oxygen species, the release of cytokines causing inflammation and cell death. Here we discuss basic research and mechanistic studies targeting the role of chemokine ligand 2 in liver inflammation and that of the paraoxonases in the oxidative stress. Their combination and association with mitochondrial dysfunction may uncover mechanisms underlying the progression of NAFLD and may help to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Alternative Fabrication Routes toward Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steels and Model Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Frank; Hilger, Isabell; Virta, Jouko; Lagerbom, Juha; Gerbeth, Gunter; Connolly, Sarah; Hong, Zuliang; Grant, Patrick S.; Weissgärber, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The standard powder metallurgy (PM) route for the fabrication of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels involves gas atomization to produce a prealloyed powder, mechanical alloying (MA) with fine oxide powders, consolidation, and finally thermal/thermomechanical treatment (TMT). It is well established that ODS steels with superior property combinations, for example, creep and tensile strength, can be produced by this PM/MA route. However, the fabrication process is complex and expensive, and the fitness for scaling up to the industrial scale is limited. At the laboratory scale, production of small amounts of well-controlled model systems continues to be desirable for specific purposes, such as modeling-oriented experiments. Thus, from the laboratory to industrial application, there is growing interest in complementary or alternative fabrication routes for ODS steels and related model systems, which offer a different balance of cost, convenience, properties, and scalability. This article reviews the state of the art in ODS alloy fabrication and identifies promising new routes toward ODS steels. The PM/AM route for the fabrication of ODS steels is also described, as it is the current default process. Hybrid routes that comprise aspects of both the PM route and more radical liquid metal (LM) routes are suggested to be promising approaches for larger volumes and higher throughput of fabricated material. Although similar uniformity and refinement of the critical nanometer-sized oxide particles has not yet been demonstrated, ongoing innovations in the LM route are described, along with recent encouraging preliminary results for both extrinsic nano-oxide additions and intrinsic nano-oxide formation in variants of the LM route. Finally, physicochemical methods such as ion beam synthesis are shown to offer interesting perspectives for the fabrication of model systems. As well as literature sources, examples of progress in the authors' groups are also highlighted.

  19. Alternative Methods of Classifying Eating Disorders: Models Incorporating Comorbid Psychopathology and Associated Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Jennifer E.; Marcus, Marsha D.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the limitations of current approaches to psychiatric classification. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the eating disorders (EDs). Several alternative methods of classifying EDs have been proposed, which can be divided into two major groups: 1) those that have classified individuals on the basis of disordered eating symptoms; and, 2) those that have classified individuals on the basis of comorbid psychopathology and associated features. Several reviews have addressed symptom-based approaches to ED classification, but we are aware of no paper that has critically examined comorbidity-based systems. Thus, in this paper, we review models of classifying EDs that incorporate information about comorbid psychopathology and associated features. Early approaches are described first, followed by more recent scholarly contributions to comorbidity-based ED classification. Importantly, several areas of overlap among the classification schemes are identified that may have implications for future research. In particular, we note similarities between early models and newer studies in the salience of impulsivity, compulsivity, distress, and inhibition versus risk taking. Finally, we close with directions for future work, with an emphasis on neurobiologically-informed research to elucidate basic behavioral and neuropsychological correlates of comorbidity-based ED classes, as well as implications for treatment. PMID:23416343

  20. Alternative Models of Self-regulation and Implications for L2 Strategy Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Ranalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss the proposal of Dörnyei and colleagues (Dörnyei, 2005; Tseng, Dörnyei, & Schmitt, 2006 to replace the construct of learning strategy with that of self-regulation and thus shift the research focus from specific strategic behaviors to a trait that is seen to underlie them. I argue that before doing so, we need a fuller understanding of what self-regulation entails and how it might intersect with traditional concerns of second language strategy research. To contribute to this understanding, I highlight alternative conceptualizations of self-regulation and then use data from my doctoral research to illustrate one in particular, the COPES model of self-regulated learning (Winne & Hadwin, 1998. This model’s explanatory power is contrasted with that of Dörnyei and colleagues’ conceptualization to show that, depending on the model one adopts, self-regulation is not only compatible with the study of specific strategies but useful for shedding new light on strategy research and integrating it with research in other related areas, such as L2 motivation.

  1. Alternative approaches to electronic damage by ion-beam irradiation: Exciton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo-Lopez, F.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    The paper briefly describes the main features of the damage produced by swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. After a short revision of the widely used thermal spike concept, it focuses on cumulative mechanisms of track formation which are alternative to those based on lattice melting (thermal spike models). These cumulative mechanisms rely on the production of point defects around the ion trajectory, and their accumulation up to a final lattice collapse or amorphization. As to the formation of point defects, the paper considers those mechanisms relying on direct local conversion of the excitation energy into atomic displacements (exciton models). A particular attention is given to processes based on the non-radiative recombination of excitons that have become self-trapped as a consequence of a strong electron-phonon interaction (STEs). These mechanisms, although operative under purely ionizing radiation in some dielectric materials, have been rarely invoked, so far, to discuss SHI damage. They are discussed in this paper together with relevant examples to materials such as Cu{sub 3}N, alkali halides, SiO{sub 2}, and LiNbO{sub 3}. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Expression of the alternative oxidase mitigates beta-amyloid production and toxicity in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Riyad; Kaulio, Eveliina; Lassila, Katariina A; Crowther, Damian C; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely associated with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, but there is no consensus on whether it is a cause or consequence of disease, nor on the precise mechanism(s). We addressed these issues by testing the effects of expressing the alternative oxidase AOX from Ciona intestinalis, in different models of AD pathology. AOX can restore respiratory electron flow when the cytochrome segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is inhibited, supporting ATP synthesis, maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and mitigating excess superoxide production at respiratory complexes I and III. In human HEK293-derived cells, AOX expression decreased the production of beta-amyloid peptide resulting from antimycin inhibition of respiratory complex III. Because hydrogen peroxide was neither a direct product nor substrate of AOX, the ability of AOX to mimic antioxidants in this assay must be indirect. In addition, AOX expression was able to partially alleviate the short lifespan of Drosophila models neuronally expressing human beta-amyloid peptides, whilst abrogating the induction of markers of oxidative stress. Our findings support the idea of respiratory chain dysfunction and excess ROS production as both an early step and as a pathologically meaningful target in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, supporting the concept of a mitochondrial vicious cycle underlying the disease.

  3. Unitarity alternatives in the reduced-action model for gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciafaloni, M.; Colferai, D.; Falcioni, G.

    2011-09-01

    Based on the ACV approach to transplanckian energies, the reduced-action model for the gravitational S-matrix predicts a critical impact parameter {b_c} ˜ R equiv 2Gsqrt {s} such that S-matrix unitarity is satisfied in the perturbative region b > b c , while it is exponentially suppressed with respect to s in the region b < b c that we think corresponds to gravitational collapse. Here we definitely confirm this statement by a detailed analysis of both the critical region b ≃ b c and of further possible contributions due to quantum transitions for b < b c . We point out, however, that the subcritical unitarity suppression is basically due to the boundary condition which insures that the solutions of the model be ultraviolet-safe. As an alternative, relaxing such condition leads to solutions which carry short-distance singularities presumably regularized by the string. We suggest that through such solutions — depending on the detailed dynamics at the string scale — the lost probability may be recovered.

  4. Unitarity alternatives in the reduced-action model for gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Ciafaloni, M; Falcioni, G

    2011-01-01

    Based on the ACV approach to transplanckian energies, the reduced-action model for the gravitational S-matrix predicts a critical impact parameter b_c ~ R = 2 G sqrt{s} such that S-matrix unitarity is satisfied in the perturbative region b > b_c, while it is exponentially suppressed with respect to s in the region b < b_c that we think corresponds to gravitational collapse. Here we definitely confirm this statement by a detailed analysis of both the critical region b ~ b_c and of further possible contributions due to quantum transitions for b < b_c. We point out, however, that the subcritical unitarity suppression is basically due to the boundary condition which insures that the solutions of the model be ultraviolet-safe. As an alternative, relaxing such condition leads to solutions which carry short-distance singularities presumably regularized by the string. We suggest that through such solutions - depending on the detailed dynamics at the string scale - the lost probability may be recovered.

  5. Validation of temperature and humidity thermal model of 23-person tent-type refuge alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L; Yantek, D; Klein, M; Bissert, P; Matetic, R

    2016-09-01

    U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) regulations require underground coal mines to use refuge alternatives (RAs) to provide a breathable air environment for 96 hours. One of the main concerns with the use of mobile RAs is heat and humidity buildup inside the RA. The accumulation of heat and humidity can result in miners suffering heat stress or even death. MSHA regulations require that the apparent temperature in an occupied RA not exceed 95 °F. To investigate this, the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted testing on a 23-person tent-type RA in its Experimental Mine in a test area that was isolated from the mine ventilation system. The test results showed that the average measured air temperature within the RA increased by 9.4 °C (17 °F) and the relative humidity approached 94 percent at the end of a 96-hour test. The test results were used to benchmark a thermal simulation model of the tested RA. The validated thermal simulation model predicted the volume-weighted average air temperature inside the RA tent at the end of 96 hours to within 0.06 °C (0.1 °F) of the average measured air temperature.

  6. An Exploratory Study of the Factors That Influence Enrolling in Alternative Educational Options: Adult Perceptions and Implications for Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis-McNerney, Violet

    2013-01-01

    This research obtained information using focus groups as qualitative method to determine the factors that influenced alternative education decisions. The purpose of this study was to help bridge theory, research, and educational practices and examine policy reform efforts. Through the lenses of returning adult education students, this research…

  7. Study on neural network model for calculating subsidence factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-bing; ZHANG Jie

    2007-01-01

    The major factors influencing subsidence factor were comprehensively analyzed. Then the artificial neural network model for calculating subsidence factor was set up with the theory of artificial neural network (ANN). A large amount of data from observation stations in China was collected and used as learning and training samples to train and test the artificial neural network model. The calculated results of the ANN model and the observed values were compared and analyzed in this paper. The results demonstrate that many factors can be considered in this model and the result is more precise and closer to observed values to calculate the subsidence factor by the ANN model. It can satisfy the need of engineering.

  8. Analysis of effect factors-based stochastic network planning model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Looking at all the indeterminate factors as a whole and regarding activity durations as independent random variables,the traditional stochastic network planning models ignore the inevitable relationship and dependence among activity durations when more than one activity is possibly affected by the same indeterminate factors.On this basis of analysis of indeterminate effect factors of durations,the effect factors-based stochastic network planning (EFBSNP) model is proposed,which emphasizes on the effects of not only logistic and organizational relationships,but also the dependent relationships,due to indeterminate factors among activity durations on the project period.By virtue of indeterminate factor analysis the model extracts and describes the quantitatively indeterminate effect factors,and then takes into account the indeterminate factors effect schedule by using the Monte Carlo simulation technique.The method is flexible enough to deal with effect factors and is coincident with practice.A software has been developed to simplify the model-based calculation,in VisualStudio.NET language.Finally,a case study is included to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model and comparison is made with some advantages over the existing models.

  9. Alternative decision modelling techniques for the evaluation of health care technologies: Markov processes versus discrete event simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnon, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    Markov models have traditionally been used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of competing health care technologies that require the description of patient pathways over extended time horizons. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a more flexible, but more complicated decision modelling technique, that can also be used to model extended time horizons. Through the application of a Markov process and a DES model to an economic evaluation comparing alternative adjuvant therapies for early breast cancer, this paper compares the respective processes and outputs of these alternative modelling techniques. DES displays increased flexibility in two broad areas, though the outputs from the two modelling techniques were similar. These results indicate that the use of DES may be beneficial only when the available data demonstrates particular characteristics.

  10. A stochastic population model to evaluate Moapa dace (Moapa coriacea) population growth under alternative management scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Russell W.; Jones, Edward; Scoppettone, G. Gary

    2015-07-14

    The primary goal of this research project was to evaluate the response of Moapa dace (Moapa coriacea) to the potential effects of changes in the amount of available habitat due to human influences such as ground water pumping, barriers to movement, and extirpation of Moapa dace from the mainstem Muddy River. To understand how these factors affect Moapa dace populations and to provide a tool to guide recovery actions, we developed a stochastic model to simulate Moapa dace population dynamics. Specifically, we developed an individual based model (IBM) to incorporate the critical components that drive Moapa dace population dynamics. Our model is composed of several interlinked submodels that describe changes in Moapa dace habitat as translated into carrying capacity, the influence of carrying capacity on demographic rates of dace, and the consequent effect on equilibrium population sizes. The model is spatially explicit and represents the stream network as eight discrete stream segments. The model operates at a monthly time step to incorporate seasonally varying reproduction. Growth rates of individuals vary among stream segments, with growth rates increasing along a headwater to mainstem gradient. Movement and survival of individuals are driven by density-dependent relationships that are influenced by the carrying capacity of each stream segment.

  11. Intron-mediated alternative splicing of WOOD-ASSOCIATED NAC TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1B regulates cell wall thickening during fiber development in Populus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunjun; Sun, Jiayan; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Li, Laigeng

    2014-02-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism involved in regulating the development of multicellular organisms. Although many genes in plants undergo alternative splicing, little is understood of its significance in regulating plant growth and development. In this study, alternative splicing of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) wood-associated NAC domain transcription factor (PtrWNDs), PtrWND1B, is shown to occur exclusively in secondary xylem fiber cells. PtrWND1B is expressed with a normal short-transcript PtrWND1B-s as well as its alternative long-transcript PtrWND1B-l. The intron 2 structure of the PtrWND1B gene was identified as a critical sequence that causes PtrWND1B alternative splicing. Suppression of PtrWND1B expression specifically inhibited fiber cell wall thickening. The two PtrWND1B isoforms play antagonistic roles in regulating cell wall thickening during fiber cell differentiation in Populus spp. PtrWND1B-s overexpression enhanced fiber cell wall thickening, while overexpression of PtrWND1B-l repressed fiber cell wall thickening. Alternative splicing may enable more specific regulation of processes such as fiber cell wall thickening during wood formation.

  12. Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

  13. An alternative method for calibration of narrow band radiometer using a radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, J; Wolfram, E; D' Elia, R [Centro de Investigaciones en Laseres y Aplicaciones, CEILAP (CITEFA-CONICET), Juan B. de La Salle 4397 (B1603ALO), Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zamorano, F; Casiccia, C [Laboratorio de Ozono y Radiacion UV, Universidad de Magallanes, Punta Arenas (Chile) (Chile); Rosales, A [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, UNPSJB, Facultad de Ingenieria, Trelew (Argentina) (Argentina); Quel, E, E-mail: jsalvador@citefa.gov.ar [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Unidad Academica Rio Gallegos Avda. Lisandro de la Torre 1070 ciudad de Rio Gallegos-Sta Cruz (Argentina) (Argentina)

    2011-01-01

    The continual monitoring of solar UV radiation is one of the major objectives proposed by many atmosphere research groups. The purpose of this task is to determine the status and degree of progress over time of the anthropogenic composition perturbation of the atmosphere. Such changes affect the intensity of the UV solar radiation transmitted through the atmosphere that then interacts with living organisms and all materials, causing serious consequences in terms of human health and durability of materials that interact with this radiation. One of the many challenges that need to be faced to perform these measurements correctly is the maintenance of periodic calibrations of these instruments. Otherwise, damage caused by the UV radiation received will render any one calibration useless after the passage of some time. This requirement makes the usage of these instruments unattractive, and the lack of frequent calibration may lead to the loss of large amounts of acquired data. Motivated by this need to maintain calibration or, at least, know the degree of stability of instrumental behavior, we have developed a calibration methodology that uses the potential of radiative transfer models to model solar radiation with 5% accuracy or better relative to actual conditions. Voltage values in each radiometer channel involved in the calibration process are carefully selected from clear sky data. Thus, tables are constructed with voltage values corresponding to various atmospheric conditions for a given solar zenith angle. Then we model with a radiative transfer model using the same conditions as for the measurements to assemble sets of values for each zenith angle. The ratio of each group (measured and modeled) allows us to calculate the calibration coefficient value as a function of zenith angle as well as the cosine response presented by the radiometer. The calibration results obtained by this method were compared with those obtained with a Brewer MKIII SN 80 located in the

  14. LINEAR MODEL ALTERNATIVE TO ESTIMATE THE GREEN BIOMASS OF THE Bambusa vulgaris SCHRAD. EX J.C. WENDL.WITHIN THE APPEARANCE OF MULTICOLLINEARITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Victor Lopes da Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to use a multivariate statistical method as an alternative to estimate the green biomass of the main bamboo rod, Bambusa vulgaris Schrad. i.e.: J.C. Wendl., in the presence of multicollinearity. The data came from an experiment carried out for the Agroindustrial Excelsior S. A. (Agrimex company located in the city of Goiana – PE. Quantified by their green biomass weight, 450 bamboo rods were used and 4 independent variables measured in the rod. Initially, the presence of the multicollinearity could be verified through the correlation matrix of the independent variables and the varience inflation factors, the alternative used was the regression of the principal components based on the covariate matrix. The result indicates that, when there is an interpretation to the main components, the model shows a satisfactory data adjust, and it could be used to estimate the green biomass of the main bamboo rod.

  15. Shape Modelling Using Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2001-01-01

    of the training set are in reality a time series, e.g.\\$\\backslash\\$ snapshots of a beating heart during the cardiac cycle or when the shapes are slices of a 3D structure, e.g. the spinal cord. Second, in almost all applications a natural order of the landmark points along the contour of the shape is introduced......This paper addresses the problems of generating a low dimensional representation of the shape variation present in a training set after alignment using Procrustes analysis and projection into shape tangent space. We will extend the use of principal components analysis in the original formulation...... of Active Shape Models by Timothy Cootes and Christopher Taylor by building new information into the model. This new information consists of two types of prior knowledge. First, in many situation we will be given an ordering of the shapes of the training set. This situation occurs when the shapes...

  16. An alternative possibility to equatorial plasma bubble forecasting through mathematical modeling and Digisonde data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousasantos, J.; Kherani, E. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.

    2017-02-01

    Equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs), or large-scale plasma depleted regions, are one of the subjects of great interest in space weather research since such phenomena have been extensively reported to cause strong degrading effects on transionospheric radio propagation at low latitudes, especially over the Brazilian region, where satellite communication interruptions by the EPBs have been, frequently, registered. One of the most difficult tasks for this field of scientific research is the forecasting of such plasma-depleted structures. This forecasting capability would be of significant help for users of positioning/navigation systems operating in the low-latitude/equatorial region all over the world. Recently, some efforts have been made trying to assess and improve the capability of predicting the EPB events. The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative approach to EPB prediction by means of the use of mathematical numerical simulation associated with ionospheric vertical drift, obtained through Digisonde data, focusing on telling beforehand whether ionospheric plasma instability processes will evolve or not into EPB structures. Modulations in the ionospheric vertical motion induced by gravity waves prior to the prereversal enhancement occurrence were used as input in the numerical model. A comparison between the numerical results and the observed EPB phenomena through CCD all-sky image data reveals a considerable coherence and supports the hypothesis of a capability of short-term forecasting.

  17. Explaining the diphoton excess in Alternative Left-Right Symmetric Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hati, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a possible explanation of the recent diphoton excess reported by ATLAS and CMS collaborations, at around 750 GeV diphoton invariant mass, within the framework of $E_{6}$ motivated Alternative Left-Right Symmetric Model (ALRSM), which is capable of addressing the $B$ decay anomalies in the flavor sector, the $eejj$ and $e$ missing $p_{T}jj$ excesses reported by CMS in run 1 of LHC and has the feature of high scale leptogenesis. We find that gluon-gluon fusion can give the observed production rate of the 750 GeV resonance, $\\tilde{n}$, through a loop of scalar leptoquarks ($\\tilde{h}^{(c)}$) with mass below a few TeV range, while $\\tilde{n}$ can subsequently decay into $\\gamma\\gamma$ final state via loops of $\\tilde{h}^{(c)}$ and $\\tilde{E}^{(c)}$. Interestingly, the $\\tilde{E}^{(c)}$ loop can enhance the diphoton branching ratio significantly to successfully explain the observed cross section of the diphoton signal.

  18. Alternative robust estimators for autoregressive models with outliers using differential evolution algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addawe, Rizavel C.; Addawe, Joel M.; Magadia, Joselito C.

    2016-11-01

    The Least Squares (LS), Least Median Squares (LMdS), Reweighted Least Squares (RLS) and Trimmed Least Squares (TLS) estimators are used to obtain parameter estimates of AR models using DE algorithm. The empirical study indicated that, the RLS estimator seems to be very reasonable because of having smaller root mean square error (RMSE), particularly for the Gaussian AR(1) process with unknown drift and additive outliers. Moreover, while LS performs well on shorter processes with less percentage and smaller magnitude of additive outliers (AOS); RLS and TLS compare favorably with respect to LS for longer AR processes. Thus, this study recommends the Reweighted Least Squares estimator as an alternative to the LS estimator in the case of autoregressive processes with additive outliers. The experiment also demonstrates that Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm obtains optimal solutions for fitting first-order autoregressive processes with outliers using the estimators. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 15 December 2016. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing contained errors in some of the mathematical equations and in Table 2. The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  19. Neoproterozoic paleogeography of the Tarim Block: An extended or alternative "missing-link" model for Rodinia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bin; Evans, David A. D.; Li, Yong-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Recent reconstructions of the Rodinia supercontinent and its breakup incorporate South China as a ;missing link; between Australia and Laurentia, and place the Tarim craton adjacent to northwestern Australia on the supercontinent's periphery. However, subsequent kinematic evolution toward Gondwana amalgamation requires complex geometric shuffling between South China and Tarim, which cannot be easily resolved with the stratigraphic records of those blocks. Here we present new paleomagnetic data from early Ediacaran strata of northwest Tarim, and document large-scale rotation at near-constant paleolatitudes during Cryogenian time. The rotation is coeval with Rodinia breakup, and Tarim's paleolatitudes are compatible with its placement between Australia and Laurentia, either by itself as an alternative ;missing link; or joined with South China in that role. At the same time, indications of subduction-related magmatism in Tarim's Neoproterozoic record suggest that Rodinia breakup was dynamically linked to subduction retreat along its northern margin. Such a model is akin to early stages of Jurassic fragmentation within southern Gondwana, and implies more complicated subduction-related dynamics of supercontinent breakup than superplume impingement alone.

  20. Instrumental Variable Bayesian Model Averaging via Conditional Bayes Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Karl, Anna; Lenkoski, Alex

    2012-01-01

    We develop a method to perform model averaging in two-stage linear regression systems subject to endogeneity. Our method extends an existing Gibbs sampler for instrumental variables to incorporate a component of model uncertainty. Direct evaluation of model probabilities is intractable in this setting. We show that by nesting model moves inside the Gibbs sampler, model comparison can be performed via conditional Bayes factors, leading to straightforward calculations. This new Gibbs sampler is...

  1. Nucleon form factors in the canonically quantized Skyrme model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acus, A.; Norvaisas, E. [Lithuanian Academy of Sciences, Vilnius (Lithuania). Inst. of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy; Riska, D.O. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Helsinki Inst. of Physics

    2001-08-01

    The explicit expressions for the electric, magnetic, axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors of the nucleons are derived in the ab initio quantized Skyrme model. The canonical quantization procedure ensures the existence of stable soliton solutions with good quantum numbers. The form factors are derived for representations of arbitrary dimension of the SU(2) group. After fixing the two parameters of the model, f{sub {pi}} and e, by the empirical mass and electric mean square radius of the proton, the calculated electric and magnetic form factors are fairly close to the empirical ones, whereas the the axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors fall off too slowly with momentum transfer. (orig.)

  2. Nucleon form factors in the canonically quantized Skyrme model

    CERN Document Server

    Acus, A; Riska, D O

    2001-01-01

    The explicit expressions for the electric, magnetic, axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors of the nucleons are derived in the {\\it ab initio} quantized Skyrme model. The canonical quantization procedure ensures the existence of stable soliton solutions with good quantum numbers. The form factors are derived for representations of arbitrary dimension of the SU(2) group. After fixing the two parameters of the model, $f_\\pi$ and $e$, by the empirical mass and electric mean square radius of the proton, the calculated electric and magnetic form factors are fairly close to the empirical ones, whereas the the axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors fall off too slowly with momentum transfer.

  3. Model of complex integrated use of alternative energy sources for highly urbanized areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Elena Ivanovna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The increase of population and continuous development of highly urbanized territories poses new challenges to experts in the field of energy saving technologies. Only a multifunctional and autonomous system of building engineering equipment formed by the principles of energy efficiency and cost-effectiveness meets the needs of modern urban environment. Alternative energy sources, exploiting the principle of converting thermal energy into electrical power, show lack of efficiency, so it appears to be necessary for reaching a visible progress to skip this middle step. A fuel cell, converting chemical energy straight into electricity, and offering a vast diversity of both fuel types and oxidizing agents, gives a strong base for designing a complex integrated system. Regarding the results of analysis and comparison conducted among the most types of fuel cells proposed by contemporary scholars, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is approved to be able to ensure the smooth operation of such a system. While the advantages of this device meet the requirements of engineering equipment for modern civil and, especially, dwelling architecture, its drawbacks do not contradict with the operating regime of the proposed system. The article introduces a model of a multifunctional system based on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC and not only covering the energy demand of a particular building, but also providing the opportunity for proper and economical operation of several additional sub-systems. Air heating and water cooling equipment, ventilating and conditioning devices, the circle of water supply and preparation of water discharge for external use (e.g. agricultural needs included into a closed circuit of the integrated system allow evaluating it as a promising model of further implementation of energy saving technologies into architectural and building practice. This, consequently, will positively affect both ecological and economic development of urban environment.

  4. Alternative sigma factors SigF, SigE, and SigG are essential for sporulation in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, David G; Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces heat-resistant endospores that may germinate and outgrow into neurotoxic cultures in foods. Sporulation is regulated by the transcription factor Spo0A and the alternative sigma factors SigF, SigE, SigG, and SigK in most spore formers studied to date. We constructed mutants of sigF, sigE, and sigG in C. botulinum ATCC 3502 and used quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and electron microscopy to assess their expression of the sporulation pathway on transcriptional and morphological levels. In all three mutants the expression of spo0A was disrupted. The sigF and sigE mutants failed to induce sigG and sigK beyond exponential-phase levels and halted sporulation during asymmetric cell division. In the sigG mutant, peak transcription of sigE was delayed and sigK levels remained lower than that in the parent strain. The sigG mutant forespore was engulfed by the mother cell and possessed a spore coat but no peptidoglycan cortex. The findings suggest that SigF and SigE of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 are essential for early sporulation and late-stage induction of sigK, whereas SigG is essential for spore cortex formation but not for coat formation, as opposed to previous observations in B. subtilis sigG mutants. Our findings add to a growing body of evidence that regulation of sporulation in C. botulinum ATCC 3502, and among the clostridia, differs from the B. subtilis model.

  5. Observational Learning from Animated Models: Effects of Studying-Practicing Alternation and Illusion of Control on Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Pieter; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Wouters, P. J. M., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). Observational learning from animated models: effects of studying-practicing alternation and illusion of control on transfer. Instructional Science, 38(1), 89-104. doi:10.1007/s11251-008-9079-0

  6. The building of the kitchen table : In search of an alternative model for in-company leadership development programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, C.L.; Nabben, E.H. (Iselien); Bergsma, E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative model of a leadership-development program. Design/methodology/approach: A leadership-development program based on a "closure-type description" instead of an "input-type description" (Varela) was designed and executed for an organization. The res

  7. Testing Constancy of the Error Covariance Matrix in Vector Models against Parametric Alternatives using a Spectral Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yukay

    I consider multivariate (vector) time series models in which the error covariance matrix may be time-varying. I derive a test of constancy of the error covariance matrix against the alternative that the covariance matrix changes over time. I design a new family of Lagrange-multiplier tests against...

  8. The development of an in vitro model for studying mechanisms of nephrotoxicity as an alternative for animal experiments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.J.W.M.

    1991-01-01

    SUMMARYPresently in our society animal tests still form the main starting point for the assessment of the possible risks of chemicals with regard to human and animal health. For scientific. economic, and ethical reasons. attempts are undertaken continuously to develop cell models as alternatives to

  9. On the Complexity of Model-Checking Branching and Alternating-Time Temporal Logics in One-Counter Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Steen

    2015-01-01

    We study the complexity of the model-checking problem for the branching-time logic CTL ∗  and the alternating-time temporal logics ATL/ATL ∗  in one-counter processes and one-counter games respectively. The complexity is determined for all three logics when integer weights are input in unary (non...

  10. Model of key success factors for Business Intelligence implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mesaros

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New progressive technologies recorded growth in every area. Information-communication technologies facilitate the exchange of information and it facilitates management of everyday activities in enterprises. Specific modules (such as Business Intelligence facilitate decision-making. Several studies have demonstrated the positive impact of Business Intelligence to decision-making. The first step is to put in place the enterprise. The implementation process is influenced by many factors. This article discusses the issue of key success factors affecting to successful implementation of Business Intelligence. The article describes the key success factors for successful implementation and use of Business Intelligence based on multiple studies. The main objective of this study is to verify the effects and dependence of selected factors and proposes a model of key success factors for successful implementation of Business Intelligence. Key success factors and the proposed model are studied in Slovak enterprises.

  11. Evaluation of alternate outreach models for cataract services in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Maria

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bharatpur Eye Hospital in Chitwan District, a primarily agrarian setting in south-central Nepal, reduced the number of diagnostic screening and treatment (DST camps by one half (151 to 75 in an attempt to increase both the efficiency of its outreach program and the number of people that go directly to the hospital for service. The Hospital evaluated the two program models in terms of program costs, cataract surgical utilization, hospital direct payment and patient equity. Methods The study is a prospective, before and after, study of the impact of an alternate outreach model on cataract service utilization patterns and cost per outreach camp and cost per cataract surgery at Bharatpur Eye Hospital, comparing the service years July 2006 to June 2007, with July 2007 to June 2008. Study findings were based on routinely gathered hospital and outreach administrative data. Results The total cost of the DST camps decreased by approximately US$2000. The cost per camp increased from US$52 to $78 and the cost per cataract surgery decreased from US$ 3.80 to $3.20. The number of patients who went directly to the hospital, and paid for cataract surgery, increased from 432 (17% to 623 (25%. The total number of cataract surgical procedures at Bharatpur Eye Hospital remained very similar between the two service years (2501 and 2449, respectively. The presenting visual acuity and sex of the two cataract surgical populations were very similar (favouring women, 53 and 55% in the two years, respectively. A shift toward younger men and women occurred with a 245 (64% increase in people age 50-59 years, and shift away from people age 70 years and older with a 236 (22% reduction. The age and sex distribution of the direct paying patients were very similar in the two years. Conclusion The new, more concentrated, more rural DST model of service delivery reduced overall outreach program costs, cost per cataract surgery transported, while increasing

  12. Varactor Modelling for Power Factor Correction in a Varying Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agwu D. D.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available : For efficient system operation, it is desirable to keep the power factor at, or very close to unity. One of the very often used methods is application of suitable power factor correction technology. Capacitors are good candidate for constant load power factor correction due to suitability and cost effectiveness. However for varying loads, synchronous condensers are preferred despite having high initial cost as a result of their being able to supply varying leading or lagging reactive power; according to their field excitation. Due to the high acquisition and operation cost of synchronous condensers, this paper presents varactors as a possible alternative for power factor correction. These are diodes that vary their capacitances and leading reactive power according to supply voltage. Applying this involves looking at variation of power factor with supply voltage; and the option of aggregating and harnessing the junction capacitance of varactors for power factor correction of varying loads at low voltage AC levels. This innovation may lead to great improvement in distribution systems requiring quality power supply

  13. Selection between Linear Factor Models and Latent Profile Models Using Conditional Covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Maraun, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for selecting between K-dimensional linear factor models and (K + 1)-class latent profile models is proposed. In particular, it is shown that the conditional covariances of observed variables are constant under factor models but nonlinear functions of the conditioning variable under latent profile models. The performance of a convenient…

  14. Rethinking "Harmonious Parenting" Using a Three-Factor Discipline Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Diana Baumrind's typology of parenting is based on a two-factor model of "control" and "warmth". Her recommended discipline style, labeled "authoritative parenting", was constructed by taking high scores on these two factors. A problem with authoritative parenting is that it does not allow for flexible and differentiated responses to discipline…

  15. Form factors in an algebraic model of the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1995-01-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon in a collective model of baryons. In an algebraic approach to hadron structure, we derive closed expressions for both elastic and transition form factors, and consequently for the helicity amplitudes that can be measured in electro- and photoproduction.

  16. A relativistic quark model for the Omega- electromagnetic form factors

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G; Gross, Franz

    2009-01-01

    We compute the Omega- electromagnetic form factors and the decuplet baryon magnetic moments using a quark model application of the Covariant Spectator Theory. Our predictions for the Omega- electromagnetic form factors can be tested in the future by lattice QCD simulations at the physical strange quark mass.

  17. Detecting Social Desirability Bias Using Factor Mixture Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Walter L.; Cooper, Lou Ann

    2010-01-01

    Based on the conceptualization that social desirable bias (SDB) is a discrete event resulting from an interaction between a scale's items, the testing situation, and the respondent's latent trait on a social desirability factor, we present a method that makes use of factor mixture models to identify which examinees are most likely to provide…

  18. Relativistic quark model for the Omega- electromagnetic form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima, Franz Gross

    2009-08-01

    We compute the Omega- electromagnetic form factors and the decuplet baryon magnetic moments using a quark model application of the Covariant Spectator Theory. Our predictions for the Omega- electromagnetic form factors can be tested in the future by lattice QCD simulations at the physical strange quark mass.

  19. Electrospun polyurethane as an alternative ventricular catheter and in vitro model of shunt obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Supraja; Black, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    Intracranial pressure and volume vary considerably between hydrocephalic patients, and with age, health and haemodynamic status; if left untreated, intracranial pressure rises and the ventricular system expands to accommodate the excess cerebrospinal fluid, with significant morbidity and mortality. Cerebrospinal fluid shunts in use today have a high incidence of failure with shunt obstruction being the most serious. Conventional proximal shunt catheters are made from poly(dimethyl)siloxane, the walls of which are perforated with holes for the cerebrospinal fluid to pass through. The limited range of catheters, in terms of material selection and flow distribution, is responsible in large part for their poor performance. In this study, we present an alternative design of proximal catheter made of electrospun polyether urethane, and evaluate its performance in the presence of glial cells, which are responsible for shunt blockage. The viability and growth of cells on catheter materials such as poly(dimethyl)siloxane and polyurethane in the form of cast films, microfibrous mats and porous sponges were studied in the presence of proteins present in cerebrospinal fluid after 48 h and 96 h in culture. The numbers of viable cells on each substrate were comparable to untreated poly(dimethyl)siloxane, both in the presence and absence of serum proteins found in cerebrospinal fluid. A cell culture model of shunt obstruction was developed in which cells on electrospun polyether urethane catheters were subjected to flow during culture in vitro, and the degree of obstruction quantified in terms of hydraulic permeability after static and perfusion culture. The results indicate that a catheter made of electrospun polyether urethane would be able to maintain cerebrospinal fluid flow even with the presence of cells for the time period chosen for this study. These findings have implications for the design and deployment of microporous shunt catheter systems for the treatment of

  20. Drinking water from alternative water sources: differences in beliefs, social norms and factors of perceived behavioural control across eight Australian locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnicar, S; Hurlimann, A

    2009-01-01

    Australia is facing serious challenges in the management of water in various urban and regional locations. Two popular responses to these challenges are increasing supply through alternative water sources such as recycled and desalinated water. However, significant gaps exist in our knowledge of community attitudes to these alternative sources of water, particularly for potable use. This paper reports results from an Australian study of community attitudes to alternative water sources. Sixty six qualitative interviews were held at eight locations with distinctly different water situations. This paper explores all three antecedents to the behaviour of drinking recycled water and desalinated water as postulated by the Theory of Planned Behaviour: attitudes, social norms and factors of perceived behavioural control. Key results indicate that while people hold both positive and negative beliefs (mostly cost, health and environmental concerns) about water from alternative sources, nearly all of them are willing to drink it if the water crisis were to deteriorate further. People also feel they lack knowledge and state that information from scientists would influence their decision to drink recycled and desalinated water most. Friends and relatives are most influential in preventing people from drinking recycled water. The findings reported in this paper have major implications for water policy, and will be of particular interest to water engineers. The paper raises a provocative question: Is it better to avoid public consultation in introducing water from alternative sources?

  1. Factorized domain wall partition functions in trigonometric vertex models

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O; Zuparic, M

    2007-01-01

    We obtain factorized domain wall partition functions for two sets of trigonometric vertex models: 1. The N-state Deguchi-Akutsu models, for N = {2, 3, 4} (and conjecture the result for all N >= 5), and 2. The sl(r+1|s+1) Perk-Schultz models, for {r, s = \\N}, where (given the symmetries of these models) the result is independent of {r, s}.

  2. Hidden Markov Models with Factored Gaussian Mixtures Densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hao-zheng; LIU Zhi-qiang; ZHU Xiang-hua

    2004-01-01

    We present a factorial representation of Gaussian mixture models for observation densities in Hidden Markov Models(HMMs), which uses the factorial learning in the HMM framework. We derive the reestimation formulas for estimating the factorized parameters by the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm. We conduct several experiments to compare the performance of this model structure with Factorial Hidden Markov Models(FHMMs) and HMMs, some conclusions and promising empirical results are presented.

  3. A Mathematical Model for Alternation of Polygamy and Parthenogenesis: Stability Versus Efficiency and Analogy with Parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Palencia, Evariste; Lherminier, Philippe; Françoise, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the sempiternal problem of the "burden of factor two" implied by sexual reproduction versus asexual one, as males are energy consumers not contributing to the production of offspring. We construct a deterministic mathematical model in population dynamics where a species enjoys both sexual and parthenogenetic capabilities of reproduction and lives on a limited resource. We then show how polygamy implies instability of a parthenogenetic population with a small number of sexually born males. This instability implies evolution of the system towards an attractor involving both (sexual and asexual) populations (which does not imply optimality of the population). We also exhibit the analogy with a parasite/host system.

  4. Psycho-socioeconomic factors affecting complementary and alternative medicine use among selected rural communities in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurubaran Ganasegeran

    Full Text Available The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM as a source of cure has gained much spectrum worldwide, despite skeptics and advocates of evidence-based practice conceptualized such therapies as human nostrum.This study aimed to explore the factors affecting CAM use among rural communities in Malaysia.A cross-sectional study was carried out on 288 occupants across four rural villages within the District of Selama, Perak, Malaysia. A survey that consisted of socio-economic characteristics, history of CAM use and the validated Holistic Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (HCAMQ were used.The prevalence of self-reported CAM use over the past one year was 53.1%. Multiple logistic regression analyses yielded three significant predictors of CAM use: monthly household income of less than MYR 2500, higher education level, and positive attitude towards CAM.Psycho-socioeconomic factors were significantly associated with CAM use among rural communities in Malaysia.

  5. BIB-SEM of representative area clay structures paving towards an alternative model of porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; Houben, M.; Hemes, S.; Klaver, J.

    2012-04-01

    A major contribution to understanding the sealing capacity, coupled flow, capillary processes and associated deformation in clay-rich geomaterials is based on detailed investigation of the rock microstructures. However, the direct characterization of pores in representative elementary area (REA) and below µm-scale resolution remains challenging. To investigate directly the mm- to nm-scale porosity, SEM is certainly the most direct approach, but it is limited by the poor quality of the investigated surfaces. The recent development of ion milling tools (BIB and FIB; Desbois et al, 2009, 2011; Heath et al., 2011; Keller et al., 2011) and cryo-SEM allows respectively producing exceptional high quality polished cross-sections suitable for high resolution porosity SEM-imaging at nm-scale and investigating samples under wet conditions by cryogenic stabilization. This contribution focuses mainly on the SEM description of pore microstructures in 2D BIB-polished cross-sections of Boom (Mol site, Belgium) and Opalinus (Mont Terri, Switzerland) clays down to the SEM resolution. Pores detected in images are statistically analyzed to perform porosity quantification in REA. On the one hand, BIB-SEM results allow retrieving MIP measurements obtained from larger sample volumes. On the other hand, the BIB-SEM approach allows characterizing porosity-homogeneous and -predictable islands, which form the elementary components of an alternative concept of porosity/permeability model based on pore microstructures. Desbois G., Urai J.L. and Kukla P.A. (2009) Morphology of the pore space in claystones - evidence from BIB/FIB ion beam sectioning and cryo-SEM observations. E-Earth, 4, 15-22. Desbois G., Urai J.L., Kukla P.A., Konstanty J. and Baerle C. (2011). High-resolution 3D fabric and porosity model in a tight gas sandstone reservoir: a new approach to investigate microstructures from mm- to nm-scale combining argon beam cross-sectioning and SEM imaging . Journal of Petroleum Science

  6. Pedagogical model for online learning based on sociocultural constructivism: An alternative for the appropriation of knowledge in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ebert Bonilla Olaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes, from an academic analysis, a pedagogicalmodel applicable in virtual learning environments, based onsociocultural constructivism and from the situated and collaborativelearning styles. The model is called virtual and socioculturalconstructivism model for online learning, which makes good useof the benefits and potential of social networks and web 2.0 toolsfor constructing knowledge. Similarly, the role of the interactionsbetween knowledge, teacher, student and teaching tools isdetermined, in order to achieve a flexible and open educationalproposal. The model herein presented allows others to enrich it oruse it as a starting point for developing alternative models.

  7. Alternating Coordinate-Momentum Representation for Quantum States Based on Bopp Operators for Modelling Long-Distance Coherence Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat G. Bakhoum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an alternating coordinate-momentum representation for propagation and transition of associated wave function, based on Bopp operators and on a certain symbolic determinant corresponding to a set of two linear equations with null free terms. It is shown that this alternating representation can justify in a good manner the patterns created through reflection/refraction of waves on nonperfectly smooth interfaces and phase correspondence of diffracted beams without the need of supplementary support functions. Correlations with Lorentz transformation of wave functions by interaction with a certain material medium (the space-time origin of a wave-train being adjusted are also presented, and supplementary aspects regarding the use of electromagnetic scalar and vector potentials for modelling evolution within this alternating representation are added.

  8. Particle Reduction Strategies - PAREST. Traffic emission modelling. Model comparision and alternative scenarios. Sub-report; Strategien zur Verminderung der Feinstaubbelastung - PAREST. Verkehrsemissionsmodellierung. Modellvergleich und Alternative Szenarien. Teilbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, Ulrike; Theloke, Jochen [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Joerss, Wolfram [Institut fuer Zukunftsstudien und Technologiebewertung gGmbH (IZT), Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The modeling of the reference scenario and the various reduction scenarios in PAREST was based on the Central System of Emissions (CSE) (CSE, 2007). Emissions from road traffic were calculated by using the traffic emission model TREMOD (Knoerr et al., 2005) and fed into the CSE. The version TREMOD 4.17 has been used. The resulting emission levels in PAREST reference scenario were supplemented by the emission-reducing effect of the implementation of the future Euro 5 and 6 emission standards for cars and light commercial vehicles and Euro VI for heavy commercial vehicles in combination with the truck toll extension. [German] Die Modellierung des Referenzszenarios und der verschiedenen Minderungsszenarien in PAREST erfolgte auf Grundlage des Zentralen System Emissionen (ZSE) (ZSE, 2007). Emissionen aus dem Strassenverkehr wurden mit Hilfe des Verkehrsemissionsmodells TREMOD (Knoerr et al., 2005) berechnet und in das ZSE eingespeist. Dabei wurde die Version TREMOD 4.17 verwendet. Die daraus resultierenden Emissionsmengen wurden im PAREST-Referenzszenario um die emissionsmindernde Wirkung der zukuenftigen Implementierung der Abgasnormen Euro 5 und 6 fuer Pkw und leichte Nutzfahrzeuge sowie Euro VI fuer schwere Nutzfahrzeuge in Kombination einer Erweiterung der Lkw-Maut ergaenzt. Die Berechnung der Emissionen des Referenzszenarios wurde auf Grundlage des Inlandsprinzips sowie des Energiebilanzprinzips durchgefuehrt. Die auf dieser Grundlage berechneten Emissionen fuer das Basisjahr 2005 und fuer die Referenzjahre 2010, 2015 und 2020 unterscheiden sich teilweise erheblich von den mit Hilfe des Modells TREMOVE (dem von der EU Kommission verwendeten Modell fuer mobile Quellen) berechneten Emissionen.

  9. Testing and modeling non-normality within the one-factor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, D.; Dolan, C.V.; Verhelst, N.D.

    2010-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimation in the one-factor model is based on the assumption of multivariate normality for the observed data. This general distributional assumption implies three specific assumptions for the parameters in the one-factor model: the common factor has a normal distribution; the res

  10. Continuous utility factor in segregation models: a few surprises

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Parna

    2015-01-01

    We consider the constrained Schelling model of social segregation which allows non-local jumps of the agents. In the present study, the utility factor u is defined in a way such that it can take continuous values and depends on the tolerance threshold as well as fraction of unlike neighbours. Two models are proposed: in model A the jump probability is determined by the sign of u only which makes it equivalent to the discrete model. In model B the actual values of u are considered. Model A and model B are shown to differ drastically as far as segregation behaviour and phase transitions are concerned. The constrained model B turns out to be as efficient as the unconstrained discrete model, if not more. In addition, we also consider a few other dynamical aspects which have not been studied in segregation models earlier.

  11. Evaluation of alternative age-based methods for estimating relative abundance from survey data in relation to assessment models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Casper Willestofte; Nielsen, Anders; Kristensen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    Indices of abundance from fishery-independent trawl surveys constitute an important source of information for many fish stock assessments. Indices are often calculated using area stratified sample means on age-disaggregated data, and finally treated in stock assessment models as independent...... observations. We evaluate a series of alternative methods for calculating indices of abundance from trawl survey data (delta-lognormal, delta-gamma, and Tweedie using Generalized Additive Models) as well as different error structures for these indices when used as input in an age-based stock assessment model...... the different indices produced. The stratified mean method is found much more imprecise than the alternatives based on GAMs, which are found to be similar. Having time-varying index variances is found to be of minor importance, whereas the independence assumption is not only violated but has significant impact...

  12. Public participation and rural management of Brazilian waters: an alternative to the deficit model (Portuguese original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Luís Piolli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge deficit model with regard to the public has been severely criticized in the sociology of the public perception of science. However, when dealing with public decisions regarding scientific matters, political and scientific institutions insist on defending the deficit model. The idea that only certified experts, or those with vast experience, should have the right to participate in decisions can bring about problems for the future of democracies. Through a type of "topography of ideas", in which some concepts from the social studies of science are used in order to think about these problems, and through the case study of public participation in the elaboration of the proposal of discounts in the fees charged for rural water use in Brazil, we will try to point out an alternative to the deficit model. This alternative includes a "minimum comprehension" of the scientific matters involved in the decision on the part of the participants, using criteria judged by the public itself.

  13. Alternative zoning scenarios for regional sustainable land use controls in China: a knowledge-based multiobjective optimisation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yin; Liu, Dianfeng; Liu, Yaolin; He, Jianhua; Hong, Xiaofeng

    2014-08-28

    Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements of land use stakeholders and managers. This model combined multiple zoning objectives, i.e., maximum zoning suitability, maximum planning compatibility and maximum spatial compactness, with land use constraints by using goal programming technique, and employed a modified simulated annealing algorithm to search for the optimal zoning solutions. The land use zoning knowledge was incorporated into the initialisation operator and neighbourhood selection strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm to improve its efficiency. The case study indicates that the model is both effective and robust. Five optimal zoning scenarios of the study area were helpful for satisfying the requirements of land use controls in loess hilly regions, e.g., land use intensification, agricultural protection and environmental conservation.

  14. Development of the Model of Decision Support for Alternative Choice in the Transportation Transit System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabashkin Igor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The decision support system is one of the instruments for choosing the most effective decision for cargo owner in constant fluctuated business environment. The objective of this Paper is to suggest the multiple-criteria approach for evaluation and choice the alternatives of cargo transportation in the large scale transportation transit system for the decision makers - cargo owners. The large scale transportation transit system is presented by directed finite graph. Each of 57 alternatives is represented by the set of key performance indicators Kvi and set of parameters Paj. There has been developed a two-level hierarchy system of criteria with ranging expert evaluations based on Analytic Hierarchy Process Method. The best alternatives were suggested according to this method.

  15. Towards an Accurate Performance Modeling of Parallel SparseFactorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigori, Laura; Li, Xiaoye S.

    2006-05-26

    We present a performance model to analyze a parallel sparseLU factorization algorithm on modern cached-based, high-end parallelarchitectures. Our model characterizes the algorithmic behavior bytakingaccount the underlying processor speed, memory system performance, aswell as the interconnect speed. The model is validated using theSuperLU_DIST linear system solver, the sparse matrices from realapplications, and an IBM POWER3 parallel machine. Our modelingmethodology can be easily adapted to study performance of other types ofsparse factorizations, such as Cholesky or QR.

  16. Antibody directs properdin-dependent activation of the complement alternative pathway in a mouse model of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui-Fang; Yan, Huimin; Stover, Cordula M; Fernandez, Tamara Montes; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Song, Wen-Chao; Wu, Xiaobo; Thompson, Robert W; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Atkinson, John P; Hourcade, Dennis E; Pham, Christine T N

    2012-02-14

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex inflammatory vascular disease. There are currently limited treatment options for AAA when surgery is inapplicable. Therefore, insights into molecular mechanisms underlying AAA pathogenesis may reveal therapeutic targets that could be manipulated pharmacologically or biologically to halt disease progression. Using an elastase-induced AAA mouse model, we previously established that the complement alternative pathway (AP) plays a critical role in the development of AAA. However, the mechanism by which complement AP is initiated remains undefined. The complement protein properdin, traditionally viewed as a positive regulator of the AP, may also initiate complement activation by binding directly to target surfaces. In this study, we sought to determine whether properdin serves as a focal point for the initiation of the AP complement activation in AAA. Using a properdin loss of function mutation in mice and a mutant form of the complement factor B protein that produces a stable, properdin-free AP C3 convertase, we show that properdin is required for the development of elastase-induced AAA in its primary role as a convertase stabilizer. Unexpectedly, we find that, in AAA, natural IgG antibodies direct AP-mediated complement activation. The absence of IgG abrogates C3 deposition in elastase-perfused aortic wall and protects animals from AAA development. We also determine that blockade of properdin activity prevents aneurysm formation. These results indicate that an innate immune response to self-antigens activates the complement system and initiates the inflammatory cascade in AAA. Moreover, the study suggests that properdin-targeting strategies may halt aneurysmal growth.

  17. An alternant method to the traditional NASA hindlimb unloading model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J Andries; Crissey, Jacqueline M; Brown, Marybeth

    2011-03-10

    The Morey-Holton hindlimb unloading (HU) method is a widely accepted National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ground-based model for studying disuse-atrophy in rodents. Our study evaluated an alternant method to the gold-standard Morey-Holton HU tail-traction technique in mice. Fifty-four female mice (4-8 mo.) were HU for 14 days (n=34) or 28 days (n=20). Recovery from HU was assessed after 3 days of normal cage ambulation following HU (n=22). Aged matched mice (n=76) served as weight-bearing controls. Prior to HU a tail ring was formed with a 2-0 sterile surgical steel wire that was passed through the 5(th), 6(th), or 7(th) inter-vertebral disc space and shaped into a ring from which the mice were suspended. Vertebral location for the tail-ring was selected to appropriately balance animal body weight without interfering with defecation. We determined the success of this novel HU technique by assessing body weight before and after HU, degree of soleus atrophy, and adrenal mass following HU. Body weight of the mice prior to HU (24.3 ± 2.9g) did not significantly decline immediately after 14d of HU (22.7 ± 1.9g), 28d of HU (21.3 + 2.1g) or after 3 days recovery (24.0 ± 1.8g). Soleus muscle mass significantly declined (-39.1%, and -46.6%) following HU for 14 days and 28 days respectively (pmaintenance of animal body weight, comparable adrenal gland weights, and soleus atrophy following HU, corresponding to expected literature values. The primary advantages of this HU method include: 1) ease of tail examination during suspension; 2) decreased likelihood of cyanotic, inflamed, and/or necrotic tails frequently observed with tail-taping and HU; 3) no possibility of mice chewing the traction tape and coming out of the suspension apparatus; and 4) rapid recovery and normal cage activity immediately after HU.

  18. Alternating Carrier Models of Asymmetric Glucose Transport Violate the Energy Conservation Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Alternating access transporters with high-affinity externally facing sites and low-affinity internal sites relate substrate transit directly to the unliganded asymmetric “carrier” (Ci) distribution. When both bathing solutions contain equimolar concentrations of ligand, zero net flow of the substrate-carrier complex requires a higher proportion of unliganded low-affinity inside sites (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\propto}1/K_{{\\mathrm{D}}}^{{\\mathrm{in}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) and slower unliganded “free” carrier transit from inside to outside than in the reverse direction. However, asymmetric rates of unliganded carrier movement, kij, imply that an energy source, ΔGcarrier = RT ln (koi/kio) = RT ln (Cin/Cout) = RT ln (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}K_{{\\mathrm{D}}}^{{\\mathrm{in}}}/K_{{\\mathrm{D}}}^{{\\mathrm{out}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}), where R is the universal gas constant (8.314 Joules/M/K°), and T is the temperature, assumed here to be 300 K°, sustains the asymmetry. Without this invalid assumption, the constraints of carrier path cyclicity, combined with asymmetric ligand affinities and equimolarity at equilibrium, are irreconcilable, and any passive asymmetric uniporter or cotransporter model system, e.g., Na-glucose cotransporters, espousing this fundamental error is untenable. With glucose transport via GLUT1, the higher maximal rate and Km of net ligand exit compared to net ligand entry is only properly

  19. Analogy, an Alternative Model.
 Critics to the standard model of analogical problems solving and proposals for an alternative one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A. Minervino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors made an extension of Hofstadter‘s criticisms against the standard approach in analogical thinking represented by the structure-mapping theory of Gentner and the multiconstraint theory of Holyoak and Thagard. Based on this extension, they proposed a non-serial model of analogical problem solving. Against the standard approach, the model postulates that: (a people detect and evaluate differences between mapped elements before the subprocess of inference generation and consider them in order to control it, and (b properties of an element that explain why the element could fill a certain role in the base problem resolution (PERs play a crucial role in these detection and evaluation operations, and also in post-inferences subprocesses. An experiment showed that: (a people detect and evaluate the relevance of differences between mapped elements before inference generation, (b that they inhibit the generation of literal inferences when they face relevant differences, and (c that they stop the subprocess when they recognize insuperable ones. The results also showed that base PERs are reactivated at different moments of analogical transfer. The data obtained are incompatible with the standard theories of analogical thinking, which treat inference generation as a syntactic mechanism and exclude contextual semantic analysis from the study of analogy. 

  20. Workshop IV – Cosmology-theoretical models/alternative scenarios: A report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asit Banerjee; Reza Tavakol

    2000-10-01

    Due to its subject matter, this workshop included a number of rather disjointed contributions in a number of areas, including exact solutions, mathematical cosmology and alternative theories. We shall therefore give a brief summary of each talk in this section in alphabetical order.

  1. ALP: Alternate Learning Project; Overview of a Model High School in Providence, Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Charles B.

    The Alternate Learning Project (ALP) is a community based public high school in Providence, Rhode Island. The ALP student population participates in a program offering individualized basic skills instruction, college preparatory courses, career exploration activities, and a broad arts curriculum. Throughout, the emphasis is on continuous…

  2. MODELING AND DESIGN STUDY USING HFC-236EA AS AN ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANT IN A CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an investigation of the operation of a centrifugal compressor--part of a chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114 chiller installation--with the new refrigerant hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea, a proposed alternative to CFC-114. A large set of CFC-236ea operating da...

  3. ARAC: Alternative Route to Administrative Certification. A New Model for Administrator Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jeffrey B.; Ashby, Dianne; Azinger, Al; Klass, Patricia H.

    Alternative routes to administrator certification may provide many benefits to states and school districts unable to fill critical public school administrative positions. Such programs can appeal to qualified individuals outside of education, as well as those persons unable or unwilling to progress through a traditional program of study. To be…

  4. Life Skills Training through Situated Learning Experiences: An Alternative Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Shelly

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the value of situated learning as an alternative to the traditional college course instructional approach for pre-service teachers. The situated learning mode of teaching immerses students in the actual setting, practicing the skills and concepts emphasized in the curriculum. Through a partnership with a college, community…

  5. Evaluation of alternative management strategies of muskrat Ondatra zibethicus population control using a population model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Daan; Ydenberg, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Muskrats Ondatra zibethicus are considered a pest species in the Netherlands, and a year-round control programme is in effect. Currently, the agency responsible for the management of muskrat populations in the Netherlands (the LCCM) is preparing for field studies to compare alternative strategies of

  6. Effects of Bond Alternation on the Ground-State Phase Diagram of One-Dimensional XXZ Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG Ling; LIU Guang-Hua; TIAN Guang-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The ground-state properties and quantum phase transitions (QPTs) of the one-dimensional bond-alternative XXZ model are investigated by the infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD) method.The bond-alternative effects on its ground-state phase diagram are discussed in detail.Once the bond alternation is taken into account,the antiferromagnetic phase (△ > 1) will be destroyed at a given critical point and change into a disordered phase without nonlocal string order.The QPT is shown to be second-order,and the whole phase diagram is provided.For the ferromagnetic phase region (△ <-1),the critical point rc always equals 1 (independent of △),and the QPT for this case is shown to be first-order.The dimerized Heisenberg model is also discussed,and two disordered phases can be distinguished by with or without nonlocal string orders.Both the bipartite entanglement and the fidelity per site,as two kinds of model-independent measures,are capable of describing all the QPTs in such a quantum model.

  7. Fuzzy MCDM Model for Risk Factor Selection in Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejman Rezakhani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Risk factor selection is an important step in a successful risk management plan. There are many risk factors in a construction project and by an effective and systematic risk selection process the most critical risks can be distinguished to have more attention. In this paper through a comprehensive literature survey, most significant risk factors in a construction project are classified in a hierarchical structure. For an effective risk factor selection, a modified rational multi criteria decision making model (MCDM is developed. This model is a consensus rule based model and has the optimization property of rational models. By applying fuzzy logic to this model, uncertainty factors in group decision making such as experts` influence weights, their preference and judgment for risk selection criteria will be assessed. Also an intelligent checking process to check the logical consistency of experts` preferences will be implemented during the decision making process. The solution inferred from this method is in the highest degree of acceptance of group members. Also consistency of individual preferences is checked by some inference rules. This is an efficient and effective approach to prioritize and select risks based on decisions made by group of experts in construction projects. The applicability of presented method is assessed through a case study.

  8. Alternate stresses and temperature variation as factors of influence of ultrasonic vibration on mechanical and functional properties of shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Sergey; Volkov, Alexander; Resnina, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the main factors in a variation in the shape memory alloy properties under insonation are heating of the material and alternate stresses action. In the present work the experimental study of the mechanical behaviour and functional properties of shape memory alloy under the action of alternate stresses and varying temperature was carried out. The data obtained had demonstrated that an increase in temperature of the sample resulted in a decrease or increase in deformation stress depending on the structural state of the TiNi sample. It was shown that in the case of the alloy in the martensitic state, a decrease in stress was observed, and on the other hand, in the austenitic state an increase in stress took place. It was found that action of alternate stresses led to appearance of strain jumps on the strain-temperature curves during cooling and heating the sample through the temperature range of martensitic transformation under the constant stress. The value of the strain jumps depended on the amplitude of alternate stresses and the completeness of martensitic transformation. It was shown that the heat action of ultrasonic vibration to the mechanical behaviour of shape memory alloys was due to the non-monotonic dependence of yield stress on the temperature. The force action of ultrasonic vibration to the functional properties was caused by formation of additional oriented martensite.

  9. Modeling impacts of management alternatives on soil carbon storage of farmland in Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhang

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Long-term losses of soil organic carbon (SOC have been observed in many agriculture lands in Northwest China, one of the regions with the longest cultivation history in the world. The decline of SOC contents not only impaired the soil fertility but also increased the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 emitted from terrestrial ecosystems into the atmosphere. However, quantifying the SOC losses at regional scale has long been remaining unsolved. A process-based model, Denitrification-Decomposition or DNDC, was adopted in the study to quantify impacts of farming management practices on SOC dynamics for a selected region, Shaanxi Province. The selected domain, with 3 million hectares of cropland across different climatic and farming management regimes, is representative for the major agricultural areas in Northwest China. The DNDC model was tested against long-term SOC dynamics observed at five agricultural sites in China. The agreement between the observed and modeled results indicate that DNDC was capable of capturing patterns and magnitudes of SOC changes across the climate zones, soil types, and management regimes in China. To quantify SOC dynamics for Shaanxi, we constructed a GIS database to hold all of the DNDC-required input information (e.g., weather, soil properties, crop acreage, and farming practices for all the farmland in the studied domain. Sensitivity tests indicated the spatial heterogeneity of soil properties, especially initial SOC content, was the major source of uncertainty for the modeled SOC dynamics at regional scale. The Most Sensitive Factor (MSF method was employed in the study to quantify the uncertainties produced from the upscaling process. The results from the regional simulations for Shaanxi indicated that (1 the overall 3 million hectares of farmland in the province was a source of atmospheric CO2 with 0.5 Tg C yr−1 lost in 2000 under the current farming

  10. High-dimensional covariance matrix estimation in approximate factor models

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Jianqing; Mincheva, Martina; 10.1214/11-AOS944

    2012-01-01

    The variance--covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high-dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu [J. Amer. Statist. Assoc. 106 (2011) 672--684], taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studi...

  11. Matrix Factorizations for Local F-Theory Models

    CERN Document Server

    Omer, Harun

    2016-01-01

    I use matrix factorizations to describe branes at simple singularities as they appear in elliptic fibrations of local F-theory models. Each node of the corresponding Dynkin diagrams of the ADE-type singularities is associated with one indecomposable matrix factorization which can be deformed into one or more factorizations of lower rank. Branes with internal fluxes arise naturally as bound states of the indecomposable factorizations. Describing branes in such a way avoids the need to resolve singularities and encodes information which is neglected in conventional F-theory treatments. This paper aims to show how branes arising in local F-theory models around simple singularities can be described in this framework.

  12. Game Factors and Game-Based Learning Design Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ru Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to design useful digital game-based learning is a topic worthy of discussion. Past research focused on specific game genres design, but it is difficult to use when the target game genre differs from the default genres used in the research. This study presents macrodesign concepts that elucidates 11 crucial game-design factors, including game goals, game mechanism, game fantasy, game value, interaction, freedom, narrative, sensation, challenges, sociality, and mystery. We clearly define each factor and analyze the relationships among the 11 factors to construct a game-based learning design model. Two application examples are analyzed to verify the usability of the model and the performance of these factors. It can assist educational game designers in developing interesting games.

  13. Critical behavior of the square lattice Blume-Capel model with an alternating anisotropy and next nearest neighbour interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shigenori; Ito, Nobuyasu; Hida, Kazuo

    2010-02-01

    Phase diagram and critical phenomena of a frustrated Blume-Capel model with alternating single-ion anisotropy ± D, nearest- and next-nearest-neighbour exchange interactions with equal magnitude J are studied by the Monte Carlo simulations using Wang-Landau sampling and nonequilibrium relaxation method. The collinear ordered phase due to next-nearest-neighbour interaction and partial ordered phase due to alternating anisotropy are confirmed together with a paramagnetic phase. We obtained the numerical results which strongly suggests that a single phase transition at D = 0 splits into two Ising lines as soon as D is switched on. With the increase of D, the critical point of the easy-axis sublattice stays on a usual Ising-like critical line while that of the easy-plane sublattice passes through the tricritical point and the transition becomes of the first order as in the usual Blume-Capel model.

  14. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yuan(Alan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ( status and Estrogen Receptor negative ( status, respectively.

  15. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia; Zhang, Jianqiu(Michelle); Qi, Yuan(Alan); Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2010-12-01

    The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM) is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status and Estrogen Receptor negative ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status, respectively.

  16. Impact of festival factor on electric quantity multiplication forecast model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This research aims to improve the forecasting precision of electric quantity. It is discovered that the total electricity consumption considerably increased during the Spring Festival by the analysis of the electric quantity time series from 2002 to 2007 in Shandong province. The festival factor is ascertained to be one of the important seasonal factors affecting the electric quantity fluctuations, and the multiplication model for forecasting is improved by introducing corresponding variables and parameters...

  17. Electromagnetic form factors in a collective model of the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R; Leviatan, A

    1995-01-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon in a collective model of baryons. Using the algebraic approach to hadron structure, we derive closed expressions for both elastic and transition form factors, and consequently for the helicity amplitudes that can be measured in electro- and photoproduction. Effects of spin-flavor symmetry breaking and of swelling of hadrons with increasing excitation energy are considered.

  18. Electromagnetic form factors in a collective model of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R.; Iachello, F.; Leviatan, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 (Mexico)]|[Distrito Federale (Mexico)]|[Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120 (United States)]|[Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    1996-10-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon in a collective model of baryons. Using the algebraic approach to hadron structure, we derive closed expressions for both elastic and transition form factors, and consequently for the helicity amplitudes that can be measured in electro- and photoproduction. Effects of spin-flavor symmetry breaking and of swelling of hadrons with increasing excitation energy are considered. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. A discrete latent factor model for smoking, cancer and mortality.

    OpenAIRE

    Howdon, D.; Jones, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationships between social circumstances, individual behaviours, and ill-health later in life, with a particular focus on the development of cancer. A discrete latent factor model incorporating individuals' smoking and health outcomes (lifespan and time-to-cancer) is jointly estimated, using the 1984/5 British Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS) dataset and its July 2009 follow-up, allowing for unobservable factors to affect decisions regarding smoking behaviours ...

  20. Alternative energies; Energies alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, J.; Rossetti, P

    2007-07-01

    The earth took millions years to made the petroleum, the gas the coal and the uranium. Only a few centuries will be needed to exhaust these fossil fuels and some years to reach expensive prices. Will the wold continue on this way of energy compulsive consumption? The renewable energies and some citizen attitudes are sufficient to break this spiral. This book proposes to discuss these alternative energies. It shows that this attitude must be supported by the government. It takes stock on the more recent information concerning the renewable energies. it develops three main points: the electricity storage, the housing and the transports. (A.L.B.)

  1. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  2. Consumer's Online Shopping Influence Factors and Decision-Making Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiangbin; Dai, Shiliang

    Previous research on online consumer behavior has mostly been confined to the perceived risk which is used to explain those barriers for purchasing online. However, perceived benefit is another important factor which influences consumers’ decision when shopping online. As a result, an integrated consumer online shopping decision-making model is developed which contains three elements—Consumer, Product, and Web Site. This model proposed relative factors which influence the consumers’ intention during the online shopping progress, and divided them into two different dimensions—mentally level and material level. We tested those factors with surveys, from both online volunteers and offline paper surveys with more than 200 samples. With the help of SEM, the experimental results show that the proposed model and method can be used to analyze consumer’s online shopping decision-making process effectively.

  3. An Alternative Model of Music Learning and "Last Night's Fun": Participatory Music Making In/As Participatory Culture in Irish Traditional Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Exploring emergent music learning and teaching models facilitated by global Web access can reveal alternative music education practices and delivery systems not seen in "traditional" conservatories and schools. One example of an alternative music learning model comes from the Online Academy of Irish Music (OAIM), a community music…

  4. K factor estimation in distribution transformers using linear regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Astorga Gómez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to massive incorporation of electronic equipment to distribution systems, distribution transformers are subject to operation conditions other than the design ones, because of the circulation of harmonic currents. It is necessary to quantify the effect produced by these harmonic currents to determine the capacity of the transformer to withstand these new operating conditions. The K-factor is an indicator that estimates the ability of a transformer to withstand the thermal effects caused by harmonic currents. This article presents a linear regression model to estimate the value of the K-factor, from total current harmonic content obtained with low-cost equipment.Method: Two distribution transformers that feed different loads are studied variables, current total harmonic distortion factor K are recorded, and the regression model that best fits the data field is determined. To select the regression model the coefficient of determination R2 and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC are used. With the selected model, the K-factor is estimated to actual operating conditions.Results: Once determined the model it was found that for both agricultural cargo and industrial mining, present harmonic content (THDi exceeds the values that these transformers can drive (average of 12.54% and minimum 8,90% in the case of agriculture and average value of 18.53% and a minimum of 6.80%, for industrial mining case.Conclusions: When estimating the K factor using polynomial models it was determined that studied transformers can not withstand the current total harmonic distortion of their current loads. The appropriate K factor for studied transformer should be 4; this allows transformers support the current total harmonic distortion of their respective loads.

  5. Electrical tortuosity, Kozeny’s factor and cementation factor modelled for chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Based on the electrical properties of chalk from the North Sea and Stevns Klint and on published data, we explore how klinkenberg corrected permeability from experimental data relate to porosity and electrical resistivity. In the current study we use electrical conductivity data of partially water......, to calculate permeability based on electrical resistivity data. We also calculate the permeability based on a simple porosity model. Finally, we redefine Kozeny’s factor, c, using Carman’s model based on tortuosity and the model based on porosity. This resulted in a third modelled permeability, which describes...

  6. Influence of models and scales on the ranking of multiattribute alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M. Moshkovich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of three multiple criteria methods to determining rank of residential real estate options. Methods SAW and TODIM are based on eliciting the decision maker's preferences (weights and values directly in a quantitative form while using linear (SAW and non-linear (TODIM aggregation functions for alternatives' evaluation. ZAPROS seeks and uses preferences in an ordinal form as an indirect comparison of trade-offs between criteria. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches are discussed.

  7. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Schlupp, P.; M. Weber; T. Schmidts; Geiger, K.; Runkel, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and re...

  8. Regimes cambiais: um modelo alternativo para o Brasil Exchange rate rules: an alternative model for Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Carlos de Castro Pires

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available After the collapse of the Bretton Woods system, many frameworks of exchange rate have been proposed. The aim of this paper is to propose an alternative rule of exchange rate and evaluate the case for Brazil. The analysis of the Brazilian case made necessary the evaluation of auxiliary instruments for its implementation. The paper proposes the use of capital controls or scape clauses.

  9. A Right Coprime Factorization of Neural State Space Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, various methods for identification of nonlinear systems in closed loop using open-loop approaches have received considerable attention. However, these methods rely on differentially coprime factorizations of the nonlinear plants, which can be difficult to compute in practice....... To address this issue, this paper presents various technical results leading up to explicit formulae for right coprime factorizations of neural state space models, i.e., nonlinear system models represented in state space using neural networks, which satisfy a Bezout identity. ...

  10. Functional dynamic factor models with application to yield curve forecasting

    KAUST Repository

    Hays, Spencer

    2012-09-01

    Accurate forecasting of zero coupon bond yields for a continuum of maturities is paramount to bond portfolio management and derivative security pricing. Yet a universal model for yield curve forecasting has been elusive, and prior attempts often resulted in a trade-off between goodness of fit and consistency with economic theory. To address this, herein we propose a novel formulation which connects the dynamic factor model (DFM) framework with concepts from functional data analysis: a DFM with functional factor loading curves. This results in a model capable of forecasting functional time series. Further, in the yield curve context we show that the model retains economic interpretation. Model estimation is achieved through an expectation- maximization algorithm, where the time series parameters and factor loading curves are simultaneously estimated in a single step. Efficient computing is implemented and a data-driven smoothing parameter is nicely incorporated. We show that our model performs very well on forecasting actual yield data compared with existing approaches, especially in regard to profit-based assessment for an innovative trading exercise. We further illustrate the viability of our model to applications outside of yield forecasting.

  11. Modeling Image Structure with Factorized Phase-Coupled Boltzmann Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Cadieu, Charles F

    2010-01-01

    We describe a model for capturing the statistical structure of local amplitude and local spatial phase in natural images. The model is based on a recently developed, factorized third-order Boltzmann machine that was shown to be effective at capturing higher-order structure in images by modeling dependencies among squared filter outputs (Ranzato and Hinton, 2010). Here, we extend this model to $L_p$-spherically symmetric subspaces. In order to model local amplitude and phase structure in images, we focus on the case of two dimensional subspaces, and the $L_2$-norm. When trained on natural images the model learns subspaces resembling quadrature-pair Gabor filters. We then introduce an additional set of hidden units that model the dependencies among subspace phases. These hidden units form a combinatorial mixture of phase coupling distributions, concentrated in the sum and difference of phase pairs. When adapted to natural images, these distributions capture local spatial phase structure in natural images.

  12. Solutions of two-factor models with variable interest rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinglu; Clemons, C. B.; Young, G. W.; Zhu, J.

    2008-12-01

    The focus of this work is on numerical solutions to two-factor option pricing partial differential equations with variable interest rates. Two interest rate models, the Vasicek model and the Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model (CIR), are considered. Emphasis is placed on the definition and implementation of boundary conditions for different portfolio models, and on appropriate truncation of the computational domain. An exact solution to the Vasicek model and an exact solution for the price of bonds convertible to stock at expiration under a stochastic interest rate are derived. The exact solutions are used to evaluate the accuracy of the numerical simulation schemes. For the numerical simulations the pricing solution is analyzed as the market completeness decreases from the ideal complete level to one with higher volatility of the interest rate and a slower mean-reverting environment. Simulations indicate that the CIR model yields more reasonable results than the Vasicek model in a less complete market.

  13. The structure of musical preferences: a five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J; Goldberg, Lewis R; Levitin, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    Music is a cross-cultural universal, a ubiquitous activity found in every known human culture. Individuals demonstrate manifestly different preferences in music, and yet relatively little is known about the underlying structure of those preferences. Here, we introduce a model of musical preferences based on listeners' affective reactions to excerpts of music from a wide variety of musical genres. The findings from 3 independent studies converged to suggest that there exists a latent 5-factor structure underlying music preferences that is genre free and reflects primarily emotional/affective responses to music. We have interpreted and labeled these factors as (a) a Mellow factor comprising smooth and relaxing styles; (b) an Unpretentious factor comprising a variety of different styles of sincere and rootsy music such as is often found in country and singer-songwriter genres; (c) a Sophisticated factor that includes classical, operatic, world, and jazz; (d) an Intense factor defined by loud, forceful, and energetic music; and (e) a Contemporary factor defined largely by rhythmic and percussive music, such as is found in rap, funk, and acid jazz. The findings from a fourth study suggest that preferences for the MUSIC factors are affected by both the social and the auditory characteristics of the music.

  14. Alternative additives; Alternative additiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-15

    In this project a number of industrial and agricultural waste products have been characterised and evaluated in terms of alkali-getter performance. The intended use is for biomass-fired power stations aiming at reducing corrosion or slagging related problems. The following products have been obtained, characterised and evaluated: 1) Brewery draff 2) Danish de-gassed manure 3) Paper sludge 4) Moulding sand 5) Spent bleaching earth 6) Anorthosite 7) Sand 8) Clay-sludge. Most of the above alternative additive candidates are deemed unsuitable due to insufficient chemical effect and/or expensive requirements for pre-treatment (such as drying and transportation). 3 products were selected for full-scale testing: de-gassed manure, spent bleaching earth and clay slugde. The full scale tests were undertaken at the biomass-fired power stations in Koege, Slagelse and Ensted. Spent bleaching earth (SBE) and clay sludge were the only tested additive candidates that had a proven ability to react with KCl, to thereby reduce Cl-concentrations in deposits, and reduce the deposit flux to superheater tubes. Their performance was shown to nearly as good as commercial additives. De-gassed manure, however, did not evaluate positively due to inhibiting effects of Ca in the manure. Furthermore, de-gassed manure has a high concentration of heavy metals, which imposes a financial burden with regard to proper disposal of the ash by-products. Clay-sludge is a wet clay slurring, and drying and transportation of this product entails substantial costs. Spent bleaching does not require much pre-treatment and is therefore the most promising alternative additive. On the other hand, bleaching earth contains residual plant oil which means that a range of legislation relating to waste combustion comes into play. Not least a waste combustion fee of 330 DKK/tonne. For all alternative (and commercial) additives disposal costs of the increase ash by-products represents a significant cost. This is

  15. The latent structure of loneliness: testing competing factor models of the UCLA Loneliness Scale in a large adolescent sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevlin, Mark; Murphy, Siobhan; Murphy, Jamie

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the dimensional structure of the UCLA Loneliness Scale ([UCLA-LS], UCLA-3). Data from the Northern Ireland Young Life and Times Survey (2011), a survey of 1,434 16-year-olds, was used to examine the underlying factor structure of the scale. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed to compare alternative factor analytical models that can inform the scoring of the measure and determine the degree to which different factors provided unique predictive utility. Fit statistics indicated that the best fitting model comprised three correlated factors: Isolation, Related Connectedness, and Collective Connectedness. These findings were consistent with previous findings that identified the multidimensional nature of the UCLA-LS. The study also found evidence that the subscales were differentially associated with psychiatric morbidity as measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and provides a more reliable and comprehensive framework to assess the clinical significance of loneliness.

  16. Aotus infulatus monkey is susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum infection and may constitute an alternative experimental model for malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Leonardo JM

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aotus is one of the WHO-recommended primate models for studies in malaria, and several species can be infected with Plasmodium falciparum or P. vivax. Here we describe the successful infection of the species A. infulatus from eastern Amazon with blood stages of P. falciparum. Both intact and splenectomized animals were susceptible to infection; the intact ones were able to keep parasitemias at lower levels for several days, but developed complications such as severe anemia; splenectomized monkeys developed higher parasitemias but no major complications. We conclude that A. infulatus is susceptible to P. falciparum infection and may represent an alternative model for studies in malaria.

  17. World Urbanization Prospects: an alternative to the UN model of projection compatible with the mobility transition theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Bocquier

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to critically examine the United Nations projections on urbanisation. Both the estimates of current trends based on national data and the method of projection are evaluated. The theory of mobility transition is used as an alternative hypothesis. Projections are proposed using a polynomial model and compared to the UN projections, which are based on a linear model. The conclusion is that UN projections may overestimate the urban population for the year 2030 by almost one billion, or 19% in relative term. The overestimation would be particularly more pronounced for developing countries and may exceed 30% in Africa, India and Oceania.

  18. The SAM framework: modeling the effects of management factors on human behavior in risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D M; Paté-Cornell, M E

    1996-08-01

    Complex engineered systems, such as nuclear reactors and chemical plants, have the potential for catastrophic failure with disastrous consequences. In recent years, human and management factors have been recognized as frequent root causes of major failures in such systems. However, classical probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) techniques do not account for the underlying causes of these errors because they focus on the physical system and do not explicitly address the link between components' performance and organizational factors. This paper describes a general approach for addressing the human and management causes of system failure, called the SAM (System-Action-Management) framework. Beginning with a quantitative risk model of the physical system, SAM expands the scope of analysis to incorporate first the decisions and actions of individuals that affect the physical system. SAM then links management factors (incentives, training, policies and procedures, selection criteria, etc.) to those decisions and actions. The focus of this paper is on four quantitative models of action that describe this last relationship. These models address the formation of intentions for action and their execution as a function of the organizational environment. Intention formation is described by three alternative models: a rational model, a bounded rationality model, and a rule-based model. The execution of intentions is then modeled separately. These four models are designed to assess the probabilities of individual actions from the perspective of management, thus reflecting the uncertainties inherent to human behavior. The SAM framework is illustrated for a hypothetical case of hazardous materials transportation. This framework can be used as a tool to increase the safety and reliability of complex technical systems by modifying the organization, rather than, or in addition to, re-designing the physical system.

  19. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek…

  20. Evaluation of Alternative Atomistic Models for the Incipient Growth of ZnO by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Manh-Hung; Tian, Liang; Chaker, Ahmad; Skopin, Evgenii; Cantelli, Valentina; Ouled, Toufik; Boichot, Raphaël; Crisci, Alexandre; Lay, Sabine; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Thomas, Olivier; Deschanvres, Jean-Luc; Renevier, Hubert; Fong, Dillon; Ciatto, Gianluca

    2017-03-01

    ZnO thin films are interesting for applications in several technological fields, including optoelectronics and renewable energies. Nanodevice applications require controlled synthesis of ZnO structures at nanometer scale, which can be achieved via atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the mechanisms governing the initial stages of ALD had not been addressed until very recently. Investigations into the initial nucleation and growth as well as the atomic structure of the heterointerface are crucial to optimize the ALD process and understand the structure-property relationships for ZnO. We have used a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques to investigate both the structural and chemical evolution during ZnO growth by ALD on two different substrates, i.e., SiO2 and Al2O3, which led us to formulate an atomistic model of the incipient growth of ZnO. The model relies on the formation of nanoscale islands of different size and aspect ratio and consequent disorder induced in the Zn neighbors' distribution. However, endorsement of our model requires testing and discussion of possible alternative models which could account for the experimental results. In this work, we review, test, and rule out several alternative models; the results confirm our view of the atomistic mechanisms at play, which influence the overall microstructure and resulting properties of the final thin film.

  1. Internal heating of lithium-ion batteries using alternating current based on the heat generation model in frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Ding, Zhanming

    2015-01-01

    This study develops a method to internally preheat lithium-ion batteries at low temperatures with sinusoidal alternating current (AC). A heat generation rate model in frequency domain is developed based on the equivalent electrical circuit. Using this model as the source term, a lumped energy conservation model is adopted to predict the temperature rise. These models are validated against the experimental results of preheating an 18650 cell at different thermal insulation conditions. The effects of current amplitude and frequency on the heating rate are illustrated with a series of simulated contours of heating time. These contours indicate that the heating rate increases with higher amplitude, lower frequency and better thermal insulation. The cell subjected to an alternating current with an amplitude of 7 A (2.25 C) and a frequency of 1 Hz, under a calibrated heat transfer coefficient of 15.9 W m-2 K-1, can be heated from -20 °C to 5 °C within 15 min and the temperature distribution remains essentially uniform. No capacity loss is found after repeated AC preheating tests, indicating this method incurs little damage to the battery health. These models are computationally-efficient and can be used in real time to control the preheating devices in electric vehicles.

  2. BEGA Starter/Alternator - Vector Control Implementation and Performance for Wide Speed Range at Unity Power Factor Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Boldea, Ion; Coroban-Schramel, Vasile

    2008-01-01

    to infinite. A vector control structure is proposed for BEGA operation during motoring and generating, at unity power factor with zero d-axis current (id) and zero q-axis flux (Ψq) control. In such conditions BEGA behaves like a truly dc. brush machine (with zero reactance in steady state !). A high iq...... current is required in order to cancel the q-axis flux, during unity power factor operation. This engages higher copper losses in the machine. In order to minimize the copper losses, for lower load levels, a current referencer is proposed. Due to higher dc field excitation time constant, the dc field...

  3. Alternative modelling of brittle structures in a sub-area of the SKB candidate area at Forsmark, eastern Sweden.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askling, Per; Tiren, Sven A.; Beckholmen, Monica; Straeng, Thomas (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    One way to test the confidence of a presented model is to construct an alternative model. Such work is cognitive process of skill acquisition and also a process of understanding data in the sense of sorting and classifying data. This is of particular interest for the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) in their technical review of SKB's on-going site investigation programme for potential repository sites. In this study, an alternative brittle deformation model of a selected part of the SKB candidate area in eastern Sweden was constructed. The input data set was obtained from SKB's database SICADA and is a selected set of data from five cored boreholes drilled from two drill-sites and comprises geophysical borehole logs, geological core-logs, hydrological logs (PFL; Posiva Flow Log) and borehole deviation measurements. Statistical cluster analysis applied on the geophysical borehole data were used to obtain the locations of bedrock with contrasting physical characteristics similar to those of brittle deformation zones. The cluster analysis is an objective procedure, contrasting with SKB's more subjective approach to the single-hole interpretation. Thus some differences are expected which could illustrate the effect of methodology that includes subjective 'expert judgement.' and indicate the possibility of alternative interpretations. The information about brittle structures in the geological boreholes logs was sorted and classification was made according to character of the structures (all fractures, open fractures, partly open fractures, frequency, orientate on/identification of fracture sets, sections of crush rock, and alteration). A separate study was performed to relate rock alteration with structures. The resolution applied in the fracture statistics is one metre, i.e. all studied entities were expressed per metre borehole length. All clusters were structurally characterized by the fractures inside the clusters (orientation and

  4. Zero modes method and form factors in quantum integrable models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pakuliak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study integrable models solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and possessing GL(3-invariant R-matrix. Assuming that the monodromy matrix of the model can be expanded into series with respect to the inverse spectral parameter, we define zero modes of the monodromy matrix entries as the first nontrivial coefficients of this series. Using these zero modes we establish new relations between form factors of the elements of the monodromy matrix. We prove that all of them can be obtained from the form factor of a diagonal matrix element in special limits of Bethe parameters. As a result we obtain determinant representations for form factors of all the entries of the monodromy matrix.

  5. Factorization model for distributions of quarks in hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, B.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Greco, M. [University Roma Tre, Department of Mathematics and Physics, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Troyan, S.I. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    We consider distributions of unpolarized (polarized) quarks in unpolarized (polarized) hadrons. Our approach is based on QCD factorization. We begin with a study of the basic factorization for the parton-hadron scattering amplitudes in the forward kinematics and suggest a model for non-perturbative contributions to such amplitudes. This model is based on this simple observation: after emitting an active quark by the initial hadron, the remaining set of quarks and gluons becomes unstable, so a description of this colored state can approximately be done in terms of resonances, which leads to expressions of the Breit-Wigner type. Then we reduce these formulas to obtain explicit expressions for the quark-hadron scattering amplitudes and quark distributions in K{sub T}- and collinear factorizations. (orig.)

  6. Factorization model for distributions of quarks in hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2015-01-01

    We consider distributions of unpolarized (polarized) quarks in unpolarized (polarized) hadrons. Our approach is based on QCD factorization. We begin with study of Basic factorization for the parton-hadron scattering amplitudes in the forward kinematics and suggest a model for non-perturbative contributions to such amplitudes. This model is based on the simple observation: after emitting an active quark by the initial hadron, the remaining set quarks and gluons becomes unstable, so description of this colored state can approximately be done in terms of resonances, which leads to expressions of the Breit-Wigner type. for non-perturbative contributions to the distributions of unpolarized and polarized quarks in the hadrons. Then we reduce these formulae to obtain explicit expressions for the quark-hadron scattering amplitudes and quark distributions in K_T- and Collinear factorizations.

  7. Bayesian Estimation of Random Coefficient Dynamic Factor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hairong; Ferrer, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic factor models (DFMs) have typically been applied to multivariate time series data collected from a single unit of study, such as a single individual or dyad. The goal of DFMs application is to capture dynamics of multivariate systems. When multiple units are available, however, DFMs are not suited to capture variations in dynamics across…

  8. Bayesian Gaussian Copula Factor Models for Mixed Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jared S; Dunson, David B; Carin, Lawrence; Lucas, Joseph E

    2013-06-01

    Gaussian factor models have proven widely useful for parsimoniously characterizing dependence in multivariate data. There is a rich literature on their extension to mixed categorical and continuous variables, using latent Gaussian variables or through generalized latent trait models acommodating measurements in the exponential family. However, when generalizing to non-Gaussian measured variables the latent variables typically influence both the dependence structure and the form of the marginal distributions, complicating interpretation and introducing artifacts. To address this problem we propose a novel class of Bayesian Gaussian copula factor models which decouple the latent factors from the marginal distributions. A semiparametric specification for the marginals based on the extended rank likelihood yields straightforward implementation and substantial computational gains. We provide new theoretical and empirical justifications for using this likelihood in Bayesian inference. We propose new default priors for the factor loadings and develop efficient parameter-expanded Gibbs sampling for posterior computation. The methods are evaluated through simulations and applied to a dataset in political science. The models in this paper are implemented in the R package bfa.

  9. Tests of risk premia in linear factor models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.

    2009-01-01

    We show that statistical inference on the risk premia in linear factor models that is based on the Fama-MacBeth (FM) and generalized least squares (GLS) two-pass risk premia estimators is misleading when the β’s are small and/or the number of assets is large. We propose novel statistics, that are ba

  10. Tests of risk premia in linear factor models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.

    2005-01-01

    We show that inference on risk premia in linear factor models that is based on the Fama-MacBeth and GLS risk premia estimators is misleading when the ß’s are small and/or the number of assets is large. We propose some novel statistics that remain trustworthy in these cases. The inadequacy of Fama-Ma

  11. Reproductive Behavior and Personality Traits of the Five Factor Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokela, Markus; Alvergne, Alexandra; Pollet, Thomas V.; Lummaa, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    We examined associations between Five Factor Model personality traits and various outcomes of reproductive behavior in a sample of 15 729 women and men from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) and Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) survey. Personality and reproductive history was se

  12. Risk factors and prognostic models for perinatal asphyxia at term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, S.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis will focus on the risk factors and prognostic models for adverse perinatal outcome at term, with a special focus on perinatal asphyxia and obstetric interventions during labor to reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes. For the majority of the studies in this thesis we were allowed to use data

  13. Linear Factor Models and the Estimation of Expected Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarisoy, Cisil; de Goeij, Peter; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Linear factor models of asset pricing imply a linear relationship between expected returns of assets and exposures to one or more sources of risk. We show that exploiting this linear relationship leads to statistical gains of up to 31% in variances when estimating expected returns on individual asse

  14. Linear Factor Models and the Estimation of Expected Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarisoy, Cisil; de Goeij, Peter; Werker, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Estimating expected returns on individual assets or portfolios is one of the most fundamental problems of finance research. The standard approach, using historical averages,produces noisy estimates. Linear factor models of asset pricing imply a linear relationship between expected returns and exposu

  15. Validation of a Four-Factor Model of Career Indecision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven D.; Hacker, Jason; Abrams, Matthew; Carr, Andrea; Rector, Christopher; Lamp, Kristen; Telander, Kyle; Siena, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were designed to explore whether a meta-analytically derived four-factor model of career indecision (Brown & Rector, 2008) could be replicated at the primary and secondary data levels. In the first study, an initial pool of 167 items was written based on 35 different instruments whose scores had loaded saliently on at least one…

  16. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schlupp

    2014-01-01

    Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies.

  17. The Interpersonal Style Inventory and the five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorr, M; Youniss, R P; Kluth, C

    1992-03-01

    The study examined relations between the 15 scale scores of the Interpersonal Style Inventory (Lorr & Youniss, 1985) and the domain measures of the five-factor model provided by the NEO Personality Inventory (Costa & McCrae, 1985). A sample of 236 college students were administered both inventories. A principal component analysis of the 5 NEO-PI domain scores and the 15 ISI scale scores followed by a Varimax rotation disclosed the expected five higher-order factors. Four factors, Neuroticism, Extraversion, Conscientiousness and Ageeableness, were defined by both NEO and ISI scales. Openness to Experience, however, was represented in the ISI by Independence and Directiveness, which define its Autonomy dimension. Thus, the ISI measures four of the five factors assessed by the NEO-PI.

  18. New alternating direction procedures in finite element analysis based upon EBE approximate factorizations. [element-by-element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T. J. R.; Winget, J.; Levit, I.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Element-by-element approximate factorization procedures are proposed for solving the large finite element equation systems which arise in computational mechanics. A variety of techniques are compared on problems of structural mechanics, heat conduction and fluid mechanics. The results obtained suggest considerable potential for the methods described.

  19. Testing alternative conceptual models of seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer using computer simulation, southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.

    1997-01-01

    Two alternative conceptual models of the physical processes controlling seawater intrusion in a coastal basin in California, USA, were tested to identify a likely principal pathway for seawater intrusion. The conceptual models were tested by using a two-dimensional, finite-element groundwater flow and transport model. This pathway was identified by the conceptual model that best replicated the historical data. The numerical model was applied in cross section to a submarine canyon that is a main avenue for seawater to enter the aquifer system underlying the study area. Both models are characterized by a heterogeneous, layered, water-bearing aquifer. However, the first model is characterized by flat-lying aquifer layers and by a high value of hydraulic conductivity in the basal aquifer layer, which is thought to be a principal conduit for seawater intrusion. The second model is characterized by offshore folding, which was modeled as a very nearshore outcrop, thereby providing a shorter path for seawater to intrude. General conclusions are that: 1) the aquifer system is best modeled as a flat, heterogeneous, layered system; 2) relatively thin basal layers with relatively high values of hydraulic conductivity are the principal pathways for seawater intrusion; and 3) continuous clay layers of low hydraulic conductivity play an important role in controlling the movement of seawater.

  20. Mechanical modeling of innovative metamaterials alternating pentamode lattices and confinement plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraternali, F.; Amendola, A.

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the mechanical behavior of a novel class of mechanical metamaterials alternating pentamode lattices and stiffening plates. The unit cell of such lattices consists of a sub-lattice of the face cubic-centered unit cell typically analyzed in the current literature on pentamode materials. The studied systems exhibit only three soft deformation modes in the infinitesimal stretch-dominated regime, as opposed to the five zero-energy modes of unconfined pentamode lattices. We develop analytical formulae for the vertical and bending stiffness properties and study the dependence of such quantities on the main design parameters: the lattice constant, the solid volume fraction, the cross-section area of the rods, and the layer thickness. A noteworthy result is that the effective compression modulus of the analyzed structures is equal to two thirds of the Young modulus of the stiffest isotropic elastic networks currently available in the literature, being accompanied by zero-rigidity against infinitesimal shear and twisting mechanisms. The use of the proposed metamaterials as novel seismic-isolation devices and impact-protection equipment is discussed by drawing comparisons with the response of alternative devices already available or under development.

  1. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlupp, P; Weber, M; Schmidts, T; Geiger, K; Runkel, F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and reproducible method for a high throughput of skin samples with impaired skin barrier was developed and verified by skin permeation studies (25 h) of caffeine, sorbic acid and testosterone compared to healthy (untreated) and tape-stripped skin. Skin barrier disruption was controlled by TEWL measurement. Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies.

  2. Evaluating indoor exposure modeling alternatives for LCA: A case study in the vehicle repair industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demou, Evangelia; Hellweg, Stefanie; Wilson, Michael P.; Hammond, S. Katharine; McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated three exposure models with data obtained from measurements among workers who use"aerosol" solvent products in the vehicle repair industry and with field experiments using these products to simulate the same exposure conditions. The three exposure models were the: 1) homogeneously-mixed-one-box model, 2) multi-zone model, and 3) eddy-diffusion model. Temporally differentiated real-time breathing zone volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration measurements, integrated far-field area samples, and simulated experiments were used in estimating parameters, such as emission rates, diffusivity, and near-field dimensions. We assessed differences in model input requirements and their efficacy for predictive modeling. The One-box model was not able to resemble the temporal profile of exposure concentrations, but it performed well concerning time-weighted exposure over extended time periods. However, this model required an adjustment for spatial concentration gradients. Multi-zone models and diffusion-models may solve this problem. However, we found that the reliable use of both these models requires extensive field data to appropriately define pivotal parameters such as diffusivity or near-field dimensions. We conclude that it is difficult to apply these models for predicting VOC exposures in the workplace. However, for comparative exposure scenarios in life-cycle assessment they may be useful.

  3. Self-pathology, the five-factor model, and bloated specific factors: A cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmanns, Joshua R; Widiger, Thomas A

    2016-04-01

    The five-factor model (FFM) is widely regarded as a useful model for the structure of both normal and maladaptive personality traits. However, recent factor analytic studies have suggested that deficits in the sense of self fall outside the FFM. The current study replicates and extends these findings, illustrating that factors can be situated outside a higher-order domain by including a relatively large number of closely related scales, forming what is known as a bloated specific factor. A total of 1,553 participants (M age = 37.8 years, SD = 13.1) were recruited across 3 studies. One measure of self-pathology (including 15 scales) and 2 measures of the FFM were administered, along with 17 measures of anxiousness and 12 measures of social withdrawal/sociability. Across 2 independent samples and 2 different measures of the FFM, deficits in the sense of self separated from neuroticism when all 15 scales of self-pathology were included. However, self-pathology loaded with FFM neuroticism when only a subset of the self-pathology scales was included. This finding was replicated with measures of social withdrawal/sociability, although only partially replicated with measures of anxiousness. Implications of these findings for past and future factor analytic studies of the structure of psychopathology are discussed.

  4. Examining the DSM-5 alternative personality disorder model operationalization of antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy in a male correctional sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wygant, Dustin B; Sellbom, Martin; Sleep, Chelsea E; Wall, Tina D; Applegate, Kathryn C; Krueger, Robert F; Patrick, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    For decades, it has been known that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnosis of Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) is a nonadequate operationalization of psychopathy (Crego & Widiger, 2015). The DSM-5 alternative model of personality disorders provides an opportunity to rectify some of these long held concerns. The current study compared the Section III alternative model's trait-based conception of ASPD with the categorical model from the main diagnostic codes section of DSM-5 in terms of associations with differing models of psychopathy. We also evaluated the validity of the trait-based conception more broadly in relation to measures of antisocial tendencies as well as psychopathy. Participants were 200 male inmates who were administered a battery of self-report and interview-based researcher rating measures of relevant constructs. Analyses showed that Section III ASPD outperformed Section II ASPD in predicting scores on Hare's (2003) Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; r = .88 vs. .59). Additionally, aggregate scores for Section III ASPD performed well in capturing variance in differing ASPD and psychopathy measures. Finally, we found that the Section III ASPD impairment criteria added incrementally to the Section III ASPD traits in predicting PCL-R psychopathy and SCID-II ASPD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Spatial and stage-structured population model of the American crocodile for comparison of comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy W.; Slone, Daniel H.; Swain, Eric D.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Lohmann, Melinda; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Rice, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    the American crocodile. This modeling effort examines how CERP restoration alternatives will affect growth and survival rates of hatchling and juvenile crocodiles, hatchling dispersal to suitable nursery habitat, and relative abundance and distribution in response to changing salinity and water depth for all stage classes of crocodiles. The response of the American crocodile to restoration efforts will provide a quantifiable measure of restoration success. By applying the crocodile model to proposed restoration alternatives and predicting population responses, we can choose alternatives that approximate historical conditions, enhance habitat for multiple species, and identify future research needs.

  6. Alternative splicing isoform of T cell factor 4K suppresses the proliferation and metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y C; Min, L; Chen, H; Liu, Y L

    2015-10-30

    The Wnt pathway has been implicated in the initiation, progression, and metastasis of lung cancer. T cell factor 4, a member of TCF/LEF family, acts as a transcriptional factor for Wnt pathways in lung cancer. Increasing amounts of evidence have shown that TCF-4 has multiple alternative splicing isoforms with transactivation or transrepression activity toward the Wnt pathway. Here, we found the presence of multiple TCF-4 isoforms in lung cancer cell lines and in normal bronchial epithelial cells. TCF-4K isoform expression was significantly decreased in lung cancer cells compared with normal bronchial epithelial cells and was identified as a transcriptional suppressor of the Wnt pathway in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Overexpression of TCF-4K significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells. Collectively, our data indicate that TCF-4K functions as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC by down-regulating the Wnt pathway.

  7. Dysmenorrhea Characteristics of Female Students of Health School and Affecting Factors and Their Knowledge and Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midilli, Tulay Sagkal; Yasar, Eda; Baysal, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the menstruation and dysmenorrhea characteristics and the factors affecting dysmenorrhea of health school students, and the knowledge and use of the methods of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) on the part of those students with dysmenorrhea. This is a descriptive study. A descriptive analysis was made by calculating the number, percentage, mean, Pearson χ, and logistic regression analysis. A total of 488 female students participated in the research and 87.7% (n = 428) of all students experienced dysmenorrhea. It was detected that a family history of dysmenorrhea and regular menstrual cycles of the students were dysmenorrhea-affecting factors (P students with dysmenorrhea used CAM methods. Heat application of CAM methods for dysmenorrhea management was the most commonly used and also known by the students. The students who experienced severe pain used analgesics (P < .05) and CAM methods (P < .05).

  8. Form factor approach to dynamical correlation functions in critical models

    CERN Document Server

    Kitanine, N; Maillet, J M; Slavnov, N A; Terras, V

    2012-01-01

    We develop a form factor approach to the study of dynamical correlation functions of quantum integrable models in the critical regime. As an example, we consider the quantum non-linear Schr\\"odinger model. We derive long-distance/long-time asymptotic behavior of various two-point functions of this model. We also compute edge exponents and amplitudes characterizing the power-law behavior of dynamical response functions on the particle/hole excitation thresholds. These last results confirm predictions based on the non-linear Luttinger liquid method. Our results rely on a first principles derivation, based on the microscopic analysis of the model, without invoking, at any stage, some correspondence with a continuous field theory. Furthermore, our approach only makes use of certain general properties of the model, so that it should be applicable, with possibly minor modifications, to a wide class of (not necessarily integrable) gapless one dimensional Hamiltonians.

  9. Harmonic amplitude dependent dynamic stiffness of hydraulic bushings: Alternate nonlinear models and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredette, Luke; Dreyer, Jason T.; Rook, Todd E.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic stiffness properties of automotive hydraulic bushings exhibit significant amplitude sensitivity which cannot be captured by linear time-invariant models. Quasi-linear and nonlinear models are therefore proposed with focus on the amplitude sensitivity in magnitude and loss angle spectra (up to 50 Hz). Since production bushing model parameters are unknown, dynamic stiffness tests and laboratory experiments are utilized to extract model parameters. Nonlinear compliance and resistance elements are incorporated, including their interactions in order to improve amplitude sensitive predictions. New solution approximations for the new nonlinear system equations refine the multi-term harmonic balance term method. Quasi-linear models yield excellent accuracy but cannot predict trends in amplitude sensitivity since they rely on available dynamic stiffness measurements. Nonlinear models containing both nonlinear resistance and compliance elements yield superior predictions to those of prior models (with a single nonlinearity) while also providing more physical insight. Suggestion for further work is briefly mentioned.

  10. Chronic gastritis rat model and role of inducing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zun Xiang; Jian-Min Si; Huai-De Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish an experimental animal model of chronic gastritis in a short term and to investigate the effects of several potential inflammation-inducing factors on rat gastric mucosa.METHODS: Twenty-four healthy, male SD rats were treated with intragastric administration of 600 mL/L alcohol, 20mmol/L sodium deoxycholate and 0.5 g/L ammonia (factor A), forage containing low levels of vitamins (factor B), and/or indomethacin (factor C), according to an L8(27)orthogonal design. After 12 wk, gastric antral and body mucosae were pathologically examined.RESULTS: Chronic gastritis model was successfully induced in rats treated with factor A for 12 wk. After the treatment of animals, the gastric mucosal inflammation was significantly different from that in controls, and the number of pyloric glands at antrum and parietal cells at body were obviously reduced (P<0.01). Indomethacin induced gastritis but without atrophy, and short-term vitamin deficiency failed to induce chronic gastritis and gastric atrophy, In addition,indomethacin and vitamin deficiency had no synergistic effect in inducing gastritis with the factor A. No atypical hyperplasia and intestinal metaplasia in the gastric antrum and body were observed in all rats studied.CONCLUSION: Combined intragastric administration of 600 mL/L alcohol, 20 mmol/L sodium deoxycholate and 0.5 g/L ammonia induces chronic gastritis and gastric atrophy in rats. Indomethacin induces chronic gastritis only.The long-term roles of these factors in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis need to be further elucidated.

  11. Replicating hedge fund returns: A factor model approach

    OpenAIRE

    Naser, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Growth in the Hedge Fund industry mirrors the growth in the Mutual Fund industry. This raises the possibility of creating a passive strategy that replicates Hedge Fund returns at lower cost using liquid, exchange-traded instruments. Using monthly returns for the period 1991-2005 on thirteen Hedge Fund strategies, I build a linear factor models (“clones”) that replicate Hedge Fund returns. I use six common factors to determine the amount of expected return and variation in returns that can be ...

  12. Learning Hidden Markov Models using Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Cybenko, George

    2008-01-01

    The Baum-Welsh algorithm together with its derivatives and variations has been the main technique for learning Hidden Markov Models (HMM) from observational data. We present an HMM learning algorithm based on the non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) of higher order Markovian statistics that is structurally different from the Baum-Welsh and its associated approaches. The described algorithm supports estimation of the number of recurrent states of an HMM and iterates the non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm to improve the learned HMM parameters. Numerical examples are provided as well.

  13. QCD dipole model and $k_{T}$ factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, A; Peschanski, R

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the colour dipole approach to hard scattering at high energy is fully compatible with k_T factorization at the leading logarithm approximation (in -log x_Bj). The relations between the dipole amplitudes and unintegrated diagonal and non-diagonal gluon distributions are given. It is also shown that including the exact gluon kinematics in the k_T factorization formula destroys the conservation of transverse position vectors and thus is incompatible with the dipole model for both elastic and diffractive amplitudes.

  14. Cluster analysis in kinetic modelling of the brain: A noninvasive alternative to arterial sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liptrot, Matthew George; Adams, K.H.; Martiny, L.

    2004-01-01

    In emission tomography, quantification of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling. We propose a noninvasive alternative via the use of a blood vessel time-activity curve (TAC......) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by cluster analysis. Five healthy subjects were injected with the 5HT2A- receptor ligand [18F]-altanserin and blood samples were subsequently taken from the radial artery and cubital vein. Eight regions-of-interest (ROI) TACs were...... extracted from the PET data set. Hierarchical K-means cluster analysis was performed on the PET time series to extract a cerebral vasculature ROI. The number of clusters was varied from K = 1 to 10 for the second of the two-stage method. Determination of the correct number of clusters was performed...

  15. Muscle-specific splicing factors ASD-2 and SUP-12 cooperatively switch alternative pre-mRNA processing patterns of the ADF/cofilin gene in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genta Ohno

    Full Text Available Pre-mRNAs are often processed in complex patterns in tissue-specific manners to produce a variety of protein isoforms from single genes. However, mechanisms orchestrating the processing of the entire transcript are not well understood. Muscle-specific alternative pre-mRNA processing of the unc-60 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans, encoding two tissue-specific isoforms of ADF/cofilin with distinct biochemical properties in regulating actin organization, provides an excellent in vivo model of complex and tissue-specific pre-mRNA processing; it consists of a single first exon and two separate series of downstream exons. Here we visualize the complex muscle-specific processing pattern of the unc-60 pre-mRNA with asymmetric fluorescence reporter minigenes. By disrupting juxtaposed CUAAC repeats and UGUGUG stretch in intron 1A, we demonstrate that these elements are required for retaining intron 1A, as well as for switching the processing patterns of the entire pre-mRNA from non-muscle-type to muscle-type. Mutations in genes encoding muscle-specific RNA-binding proteins ASD-2 and SUP-12 turned the colour of the unc-60 reporter worms. ASD-2 and SUP-12 proteins specifically and cooperatively bind to CUAAC repeats and UGUGUG stretch in intron 1A, respectively, to form a ternary complex in vitro. Immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR analyses demonstrate that ASD-2 and SUP-12 are also required for switching the processing patterns of the endogenous unc-60 pre-mRNA from UNC-60A to UNC-60B in muscles. Furthermore, systematic analyses of partially spliced RNAs reveal the actual orders of intron removal for distinct mRNA isoforms. Taken together, our results demonstrate that muscle-specific splicing factors ASD-2 and SUP-12 cooperatively promote muscle-specific processing of the unc-60 gene, and provide insight into the mechanisms of complex pre-mRNA processing; combinatorial regulation of a single splice site by two tissue-specific splicing regulators

  16. Seeing Perfectly Fitting Factor Models That Are Causally Misspecified: Understanding That Close-Fitting Models Can Be Worse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayduk, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Researchers using factor analysis tend to dismiss the significant ill fit of factor models by presuming that if their factor model is close-to-fitting, it is probably close to being properly causally specified. Close fit may indeed result from a model being close to properly causally specified, but close-fitting factor models can also be seriously…

  17. How do alternative root water uptake models affect the inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters and the prediction of evapotranspiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayler, Sebastian; Salima-Sultana, Daisy; Selle, Benny; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Högy, Petra; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Soil water extraction by roots affects the dynamics and distribution of soil moisture and controls transpiration, which influences soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes. Consequently, root water uptake requires close attention when predicting water fluxes across the land surface, e.g., in agricultural crop models or in land surface schemes of weather and climate models. The key parameters for a successful simultaneous simulation of soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration in Richards equation-based models are the soil hydraulic parameters, which describe the shapes of the soil water retention curve and the soil hydraulic conductivity curve. As measurements of these parameters are expensive and their estimation from basic soil data via pedotransfer functions is rather inaccurate, the values of the soil hydraulic parameters are frequently inversely estimated by fitting the model to measured time series of soil water content and evapotranspiration. It is common to simulate root water uptake and transpiration by simple stress functions, which describe from which soil layer water is absorbed by roots and predict when total crop transpiration is decreased in case of soil water limitations. As for most of the biogeophysical processes simulated in crop and land surface models, there exist several alternative functional relationships for simulating root water uptake and there is no clear reason for preferring one process representation over another. The error associated with alternative representations of root water uptake, however, contributes to structural model uncertainty and the choice of the root water uptake model may have a significant impact on the values of the soil hydraulic parameters estimated inversely. In this study, we use the agroecosystem model system Expert-N to simulate soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration at three agricultural field sites located in two contrasting regions in Southwest Germany (Kraichgau, Swabian Alb). The Richards

  18. Investigation of an alternative generic model for predicting pharmacokinetic changes during physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Henry T; Edginton, Andrea N; Cheung, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed using MATLAB Simulink® and PK-Sim®. We compared the capability and usefulness of these two models by simulating pharmacokinetic changes of midazolam under exercise and heat stress to verify the usefulness of MATLAB Simulink® as a generic PBPK modeling software. Although both models show good agreement with experimental data obtained under resting condition, their predictions of pharmacokinetics changes are less accurate in the stressful conditions. However, MATLAB Simulink® may be more flexible to include physiologically based processes such as oral absorption and simulate various stress parameters such as stress intensity, duration and timing of drug administration to improve model performance. Further work will be conducted to modify algorithms in our generic model developed using MATLAB Simulink® and to investigate pharmacokinetics under other physiological stress such as trauma.

  19. Alternative splicing and expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) gene in osteoblasts under mechanical stretch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAN Chengyu; WANG Yuanliang; ZHANG Bingbing; TANG Liling; PAN Jun; LUO Yanfeng; JIANG Peng; LI Dajun

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes osteoblasts differentiation and bone formation,and its expression is induced by mechanical stretch,thus IGF-1 has been considered an effector molecule that links mechanical stimulation and local tissue responses. In this study, a mechanical stretching device was designed to apply physiological level static or cyclic stretching stimulation to osteoblasts.Different isoforms of IGF-1 mRNA were amplified by RT-PCR from the cells using respective primers and these amplified products were sequenced. An isoform of IGF-1 splicing product was found to be selectively produced by osteoblasts under stretching stimulation. This IGF-1 isoform had identical sequence with the mechano growth factor (MGF) which was originally identified in muscle cells. Regulations of the expression of the liver-type IGF (L.IGF-1) and MGF in osteoblasts under stretch stimulation were further studied using semi-quantitative RT-PCR.Stretch stimulation was found to promot the expression of IGF-1 (L.IGF-1 and MGF), and for both isoforms expression was more effectively stimulated by cyclic stretch than static stretch. MGF was detected only in osteoblasts subjected to mechanical stretch,suggesting MGF was a stretch sensitive growth factor.Expression of MGF peaked earlier than that of L.IGF-1, which was similar to their regulation in muscie and suggested similar roles of MGF and L.IGF-1in bone as in muscle cells. The functions of MGF and L.IGF-1 in osteoblasts shall be established by further experimental studies.

  20. Autobiography and Anorexia: A Qualitative Alternative to Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model

    OpenAIRE

    Félix Díaz; Natalia Solano Pinto; Irene Solbes

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we propose a qualitative approach to the study of the ways in which people face good and poor health issues. During the last 30 years, Prochaska and DiClemente's "trans-theoretical model" (1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1992) has gained relevance as a model to assess disposition for change in patients. We revise the features of the model and its common techniques to assess stages of change, underlining its methodological and conceptual problems. Particularly, we discuss the paradoxe...

  1. Ethical guidelines, animal profile, various animal models used in periodontal research with alternatives and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Mohan Kumar; Molahally, Subramanya Shetty; Salwaji, Supraja

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory animal models serve as a facilitator to investigate the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease, are used to know the efficacy of reconstructive and regenerative procedures, and are also helpful in evaluation of newer therapeutic techniques including laser and implant therapies prior to application in the human beings. The aim of this review is to know the different animal models used in various specialties of dental research and to know the ethical guidelines prior to the usage of experimental models with main emphasis on how to refine, replace, and reduce the number of animal models usage in the laboratory. An online search for experimental animal models used in dental research was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed database. Publications from 2009 to May 2013 in the specialty of periodontics were included in writing this review. A total of 652 references were published in PubMed/MEDLINE databases based on the search terms used. Out of 245 studies, 241 were related to the periodontal research published in English from 2009 to 2013. Relevant papers were chosen according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. After extensive electronic and hand search on animal models, it has been observed that various animal models were used in dental research. Search on animal models used for dental research purpose revealed that various animals such as rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbit, beagle dogs, goats, and nonhuman primates were extensively used. However, with the new advancement of ex vivo animal models, it has become easy to investigate disease pathogenesis and to test the efficacy of newer therapeutic modalities with the reduced usage of animal models. This review summarized the large amount of literature on animal models used in periodontal research with main emphasis on ethical guidelines and on reducing the animal model usage in future perspective. PMID:28298815

  2. Ethical guidelines, animal profile, various animal models used in periodontal research with alternatives and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Kumar Pasupuleti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory animal models serve as a facilitator to investigate the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease, are used to know the efficacy of reconstructive and regenerative procedures, and are also helpful in evaluation of newer therapeutic techniques including laser and implant therapies prior to application in the human beings. The aim of this review is to know the different animal models used in various specialties of dental research and to know the ethical guidelines prior to the usage of experimental models with main emphasis on how to refine, replace, and reduce the number of animal models usage in the laboratory. An online search for experimental animal models used in dental research was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed database. Publications from 2009 to May 2013 in the specialty of periodontics were included in writing this review. A total of 652 references were published in PubMed/MEDLINE databases based on the search terms used. Out of 245 studies, 241 were related to the periodontal research published in English from 2009 to 2013. Relevant papers were chosen according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. After extensive electronic and hand search on animal models, it has been observed that various animal models were used in dental research. Search on animal models used for dental research purpose revealed that various animals such as rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbit, beagle dogs, goats, and nonhuman primates were extensively used. However, with the new advancement of ex vivo animal models, it has become easy to investigate disease pathogenesis and to test the efficacy of newer therapeutic modalities with the reduced usage of animal models. This review summarized the large amount of literature on animal models used in periodontal research with main emphasis on ethical guidelines and on reducing the animal model usage in future perspective.

  3. Styrofoam-and-Velcro: An Alternative to Ball-and-Stick Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer Rowan Masonjones

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For students learning biology at introductory levels, one of the most significant instructional barriers is their lack of preparation in chemistry. In upper-division college chemistry and biology courses, students employ ball-and-stick models in order to visualize molecular structures, but at the introductory biology level, models are inconsistently used and at the secondary level they are avoided altogether. Traditional ball-and-stick models perform poorly at all levels because they only show bonds, never valence electrons. This poses a problem for students who are visual or kinesthetic learners, as modeling electrons in the bonding process may be critical to understanding the mechanisms behind the biochemical reactions that serve as a foundation for biological concepts. Our molecular modeling kits show the action of valence electrons and correctly deal with the issue of polarity and partial charge, while still illustrating structure and function similarly to ball-and-stick models, allowing students to model nearly every reaction or molecule they may need to learn.  Additionally, this kit will foster model building exercises required as part of the Next Generation Science Standards (http://www.nextgenscience.org/next-generation-science-standards. This model was devloped in conjunction with 'Molecular Twister: A Game for Exploring Solution Chemistry' (JMBE Vol 15, No 1; http://jmbe.asm.org/index.php/jmbe/article/view/652 by the same authors, which uses principles derived from the present paper.

  4. An origin of the universe: a model alternative to Big Bang

    OpenAIRE

    Mercik, Andrzej; Mercik, Szymon

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the model of an origin of the universe built by Oscar Klein and Hannes Alfv\\'{e}n. Some modifications of assumptions underlying the model result in a possible scenario of the universe creation consistent with observations. We explain the large scale structre of the universe and we estimate the Hubble constant value as well as the number of galaxies in the universe. The model does not require many assumptions made in the model based on the Big Bang idea.

  5. The developmental antecedents of sexual coercion against women: testing alternative hypotheses with structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Raymond A; Sims-Knight, Judith E

    2003-06-01

    A unified model of the origin of sexual aggression against women on both adult and juvenile sexual offender samples has been developed and successfully tested. This model proposed three major causal paths to sexual coercion against women. In the first path, physical and verbal abuse was hypothesized to produce callousness and lack of emotionality, which disinhibited sexual drive and sexual fantasies. These in turn disinhibited hostile sexual fantasies, and led to sexual coercion. In the second causal path, sexual abuse contributed directly to the disinhibition of sexual drive and sexual fantasies, which through hostile sexual fantasies led to sexual coercion. The third path operated through early antisocial behavior, including aggressive acts. It developed as a result of both physical/verbal abuse and callousness/lack of emotion. It in turn directly affected sexual coercion and worked indirectly through the hostile sexual fantasies path. In the present study, the anonymous responses of a group of 168 blue-collar, community males to an inventory (the Multidimensional Assessment of Sex and Aggression) were used in a structural equation model to test the validity of this model. Moreover, this model was pitted against (Malamuth's (1998)) two-path model. Whereas the three-path model had an excellent fit with the data (CFI =.951, RMSEA =.047), the two-path model fit less well (CFI =.857, RMSEA =.079). These results indicate the superiority of the three-path model and suggest that it constitutes a solid, empirically disconfirmable heuristic for the etiology of sexual coercion against women.

  6. Investigating Impacts of Alternative Crop Market Scenarios on Land Use Change with an Agent-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Ding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We developed an agent-based model (ABM to simulate farmers’ decisions on crop type and fertilizer application in response to commodity and biofuel crop prices. Farm profit maximization constrained by farmers’ profit expectations for land committed to biofuel crop production was used as the decision rule. Empirical parameters characterizing farmers’ profit expectations were derived from an agricultural landowners and operators survey and integrated in the ABM. The integration of crop production cost models and the survey information in the ABM is critical to producing simulations that can provide realistic insights into agricultural land use planning and policy making. Model simulations were run with historical market prices and alternative market scenarios for corn price, soybean to corn price ratio, switchgrass price, and switchgrass to corn stover ratio. The results of the comparison between simulated cropland percentage and crop rotations with satellite-based land cover data suggest that farmers may be underestimating the effects that continuous corn production has on yields. The simulation results for alternative market scenarios based on a survey of agricultural land owners and operators in the Clear Creek Watershed in eastern Iowa show that farmers see cellulosic biofuel feedstock production in the form of perennial grasses or corn stover as a more risky enterprise than their current crop production systems, likely because of market and production risks and lock in effects. As a result farmers do not follow a simple farm-profit maximization rule.

  7. On an Alternative Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vankov, A

    1998-01-01

    The suggested alternative cosmology is based on the idea of barion symmetric universe, in which our home universe is a representative of multitude of typical matter and antimatter universes. This alternative concept gives a physically reasonable explanation of all major problems of the Standard Cosmological Model. Classification Code MSC: Cosmology 524.8 Key words: standard cosmological model, alternative cosmology, barionic symmetry, typical universe, quasars, cosmic rays.

  8. Integrated Impact Indicators (I3) compared with Impact Factors (IFs): An alternative research design with policy implications

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-01-01

    In bibliometrics, the association of "impact" with central-tendency statistics is mistaken. The impact of two collisions is more than the mean or median of the two impacts; impacts add up, and citation curves should therefore be integrated instead of averaged. For example, the journals MIS Quarterly and JASIST differ by a factor of two in terms of their respective impact factors (IF), but the journal with the lower IF has the higher impact. Using percentiles (e.g., top-1%, top-10%, etc.), an integrated impact indicator (I3) can be based on integration of the citation curves after normalization to the same scale. The results across document sets can be compared as percentages of the total impact of a reference set. Total number of citations, however, should not be used instead because the shape of the citation curves is then not appreciated. In addition to comparing I3 with IFs for the journals in two ISI Subject Categories ("Information Science & Library Science" and "Multidisciplinary Sciences"), we show...

  9. Social and Cultural Factors Affecting Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM Use during Menopause in Sydney and Bologna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne van der Sluijs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous surveys found CAM use during menopause to be popular. This paper compares the results from two surveys (Sydney and Bologna to examine factors that determine the extent and pattern of CAM use to alleviate menopausal symptoms. Methods. Women, aged 45–65 years, who were symptomatic when transitioning through menopause or asymptomatic but taking menopause-specific treatments, were recruited in Sydney (n=1,296 and Bologna (n=1,106 to complete the same voluntary, anonymous, and self-administered questionnaire. The results were reanalysed using stratified analyses to determine similarities and differences. Results. Demographics of the two cohorts differed significantly. CAM was more popular in Sydney. The most significant determinants of CAM use were the use of CAM for other conditions besides menopause and the severity of vasomotor symptoms. Occupational status was a determinant of CAM use amongst Bologna respondents only. In order to relieve symptoms, Australian and Italian women used different CAM modalities whose effectiveness was generally perceived as good. Conclusion. CAM use is popular amongst menopausal women from Sydney and Bologna. Differences in the patterns of CAM use seem to depend on CAM availability and on the educational level and professional status of users. The complex interaction between market, social, and cultural factors of CAM use seems to be more influential on women’s choice of CAM than the available evidence of their effectiveness.

  10. A comparison of behavioural alternative models in the context of the theory of reasoned action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Putte, B.; Hoogstraten, J.; Meertens, R.

    1996-01-01

    In Fishbein & Ajzen's theory of reasoned action, behaviour is predicted by the behavioural intention, which in turn is determined by a personal attitudinal and a social normative factor. These variables are usually measured with respect to the behaviour of interest, ignoring the choice process betwe

  11. Studying Effective Factors on Corporate Entrepreneurship: Representing a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Soleimani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Development and advancement of current organizations depends on Corporate Entrepreneurship (CE and its anticipants considerably. Therefore purpose of conducting this survey is to study effective factors on corporate entrepreneurship (personal characteristics of entrepreneurship, human resource practices, organizational culture and employees' satisfaction. This survey was conducted using descriptive-field methodology. Statistical population included managers and experts of Hexa Consulting Engineers Company (Tehran/Iran and the sample consisted of forty seven of them. Questionnaire was tool of data collection. Data was collected in cross-sectional form in July-August 2011. Descriptive and inferential (spearman correlation statistics methods were used for data analysis. According to results, there is a positive significant relationship among all factors (personal characteristics of entrepreneurship, human resource practices, organizational culture and employees' satisfaction and corporate entrepreneurship. In other words, the proposed variables as effective factors on corporate entrepreneurship were confirmed in conceptual model of survey.

  12. Proposition Factor Model of World Class Manufacturing in Brazilian Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sergio Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to develop a model of World Class Manufacturing, to achieve this goal was elaborated a questionnaire with 35 assertive divided in 7 areas suggested by literature review. This questionnaire was send to manufacture specialists, product developers and technician through LinkedIn the participants was select by researchers in discussion groups taking in consideration their experience using the professional profile. About 1000 invite was send to professional from metal-mechanic sector which returned 180 valid questionnaires. The data was analyzed through factor analyses and was obtained 7 constructs, which explained 67% of data variance. The KMO was 0,84, which is considered good for, analyzes purpose. The seventh factor was eliminated because it Cranach’s Alpha was below 0,6 and the remained factor was nominated as: Lean Manufacturing, Human Resources Management to achieve flexibility, Marketing Integration, Costs Reduction and Flexibility.

  13. Developing Alternative Frameworks for Exploring Intercultural Learning: A Critique of Hofstede's Cultural Difference Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Paola; Wiesemes, Rolf; Murphy, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Hofstede's model of cultural difference has been used widely for exploring aspects of culture in educational settings. In this paper, we review Hofstede's model and explore some of its limitations, particularly in relation to the field of higher education. These limitations include an oversimplification of cultural differences, inconsistencies…

  14. Fitting Multilevel Models with Ordinal Outcomes: Performance of Alternative Specifications and Methods of Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Daniel J.; Sterba, Sonya K.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has compared methods of estimation for fitting multilevel models to binary data, but there are reasons to believe that the results will not always generalize to the ordinal case. This article thus evaluates (a) whether and when fitting multilevel linear models to ordinal outcome data is justified and (b) which estimator to employ…

  15. Spatially varying coefficient models in real estate: Eigenvector spatial filtering and alternative approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbich, M; Griffith, D

    2016-01-01

    Real estate policies in urban areas require the recognition of spatial heterogeneity in housing prices to account for local settings. In response to the growing number of spatially varying coefficient models in housing applications, this study evaluated four models in terms of their spatial patterns

  16. Leading bureaucracies to the tipping point: an alternative model of multiple stable equilibrium levels of corruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caulkins, J.P.; Feichtinger, G.; Grass, D.; Hartl, R.F.; Kort, P.M.; Novak, A.J.; Seidl, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel model of corruption dynamics in the form of a nonlinear optimal dynamic control problem. It has a tipping point, but one whose origins and character are distinct from that in the classic Schelling (1978) model. The decision maker choosing a level of corruption is the chief or some

  17. Genomics Analogy Model for Educators (GAME): From Jumping Genes to Alternative Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Joanie; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Orvis, Kathryn S.

    2004-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is usually a lack of understanding concerning the fields of genetics and genomics among high school students (Lewis and Wood-Robinson, 2000). A recent article (Kirkpatrick et al, 2002) introduced the GAME (Genomics Analogy Model for Educators) model and two of its components: (1) explaining sequencing technology with…

  18. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2007-06-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory.

  19. Value-Added Models for Teacher Preparation Programs: Validity and Reliability Threats, and a Manageable Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Heiser, Lawrence A.; McCormick, Jazarae K.; Forgan, James

    2016-01-01

    High-stakes standardized student assessments are increasingly used in value-added evaluation models to connect teacher performance to P-12 student learning. These assessments are also being used to evaluate teacher preparation programs, despite validity and reliability threats. A more rational model linking student performance to candidates who…

  20. Octet Baryon Electromagnetic Form Factors in a Relativistic Quark Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilberto Ramalho, Kazuo Tsushima

    2011-09-01

    We study the octet baryon electromagnetic properties by applying the covariant spectator quark model, and provide covariant parametrization that can be used to study baryon electromagnetic reactions. While we use the lattice QCD data in the large pion mass regime (small pion cloud effects) to determine the parameters of the model in the valence quark sector, we use the nucleon physical and octet baryon magnetic moment data to parameterize the pion cloud contributions. The valence quark contributions for the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors are estimated by extrapolating the lattice parametrization in the large pion mass regime to the physical regime. As for the pion cloud contributions, we parameterize them in a covariant, phenomenological manner, combined with SU(3) symmetry. We also discuss the impact of the pion cloud effects on the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and their radii.

  1. Octet baryon electromagnetic form factors in a relativistic quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G

    2011-01-01

    We study the octet baryon electromagnetic properties by applying the covariant spectator quark model, and provide covariant parametrization that can be used to study baryon electromagnetic reactions. While we use the lattice QCD data in the large pion mass regime (small pion cloud effects) to determine the parameters of the model in the valence quark sector, we use the nucleon physical and octet baryon magnetic moment data to parameterize the pion cloud contributions. The valence quark contributions for the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors are estimated by extrapolating the lattice parametrization in the large pion mass regime to the physical regime. As for the pion cloud contributions, we parameterize them in a covariant, phenomenological manner, combined with SU(3) symmetry. We also discuss the impact of the pion cloud effects on the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and their radii.

  2. The FIRO model of family therapy: implications of factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, R J; Ross, M W

    1989-11-01

    Schutz's FIRO model contains three main elements: inclusion, control, and affection. It is used widely in mental health research and practice, but has received little empirical validation. The present study is based on factor analysis of the resources to FIRO questionnaire of 120 normal couples and 191 couples who were attending a clinic for marital/psychiatric problems. Results confirmed the validity of the FIRO model for women only. The differences between the sexes reflected a considerable degree of sex-role stereotyping, the clinical implications of which are discussed.

  3. Baryon octet electromagnetic form factors in a confining NJL model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Carrillo-Serrano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic form factors of the baryon octet are studied using a Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model which utilizes the proper-time regularization scheme to simulate aspects of colour confinement. In addition, the model also incorporates corrections to the dressed quarks from vector meson correlations in the t-channel and the pion cloud. Comparison with recent chiral extrapolations of lattice QCD results shows a remarkable level of consistency. For the charge radii we find the surprising result that rEp

  4. Neuroprotective Transcription Factors in Animal Models of Parkinson Disease

    OpenAIRE

    François-Xavier Blaudin de Thé; Hocine Rekaik; Alain Prochiantz; Julia Fuchs; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of transcription factors, including En1/2, Foxa1/2, Lmx1a/b, Nurr1, Otx2, and Pitx3, with key roles in midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development, also regulate adult mDA neuron survival and physiology. Mouse models with targeted disruption of some of these genes display several features reminiscent of Parkinson disease (PD), in particular the selective and progressive loss of mDA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The characterization of these animal models ha...

  5. Modeling impact of environmental factors on photovoltaic array performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jie; Sun, Yize; Xu, Yang [College of Mechanical Engineering, Donghua University NO.2999, North Renmin Road, Shanghai (China)

    2013-07-01

    It is represented in this paper that a methodology to model and quantify the impact of the three environmental factors, the ambient temperature, the incident irradiance and the wind speed, upon the performance of photovoltaic array operating under outdoor conditions. First, A simple correlation correlating operating temperature with the three environmental variables is validated for a range of wind speed studied, 2-8, and for irradiance values between 200 and 1000. Root mean square error (RMSE) between modeled operating temperature and measured values is 1.19% and the mean bias error (MBE) is -0.09%. The environmental factors studied influence I-V curves, P-V curves, and maximum-power outputs of photovoltaic array. The cell-to-module-to-array mathematical model for photovoltaic panels is established in this paper and the method defined as segmented iteration is adopted to solve the I-V curve expression to relate model I-V curves. The model I-V curves and P-V curves are concluded to coincide well with measured data points. The RMSE between numerically calculated maximum-power outputs and experimentally measured ones is 0.2307%, while the MBE is 0.0183%. In addition, a multivariable non-linear regression equation is proposed to eliminate the difference between numerically calculated values and measured ones of maximum power outputs over the range of high ambient temperature and irradiance at noon and in the early afternoon. In conclusion, the proposed method is reasonably simple and accurate.

  6. Factor models on locally tree-like graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Dembo, Amir; Sun, Nike

    2011-01-01

    We consider homogeneous factor models on uniformly sparse graph sequences converging locally to a (unimodular) random tree T, and study the existence of the free energy density phi, the limit of the log-partition function divided by the number of vertices n as n tends to infinity. We provide a new interpolation scheme and use it to prove existence of, and to explicitly compute, the quantity phi subject to uniqueness of a relevant Gibbs measure for the factor model on T. By way of example we compute phi for the independent set (or hard-core) model at low fugacity, for the ferromagnetic Ising model at all parameter values, and for the ferromagnetic Potts model with both weak enough and strong enough interactions. Even beyond uniqueness our interpolation provides useful explicit bounds on phi. In the regimes in which we establish existence of the limit, we show that it coincides with the Bethe free energy functional evaluated at a suitable fixed point of the belief propagation recursions on T. In the special cas...

  7. On the Performance of Alternate Conceptual Ecohydrological Models for Streamflow Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Bushra; Ajami, Hoori; Cordery, Ian; Sharma, Ashish

    2016-04-01

    A merging of a lumped conceptual hydrological model with two conceptual dynamic vegetation models is presented to assess the performance of these models for simultaneous simulations of streamflow and leaf area index (LAI). Two conceptual dynamic vegetation models with differing representation of ecological processes are merged with a lumped conceptual hydrological model (HYMOD) to predict catchment scale streamflow and LAI. The merged RR-LAI-I model computes relative leaf biomass based on transpiration rates while the RR-LAI-II model computes above ground green and dead biomass based on net primary productivity and water use efficiency in response to soil moisture dynamics. To assess the performance of these models, daily discharge and 8-day MODIS LAI product for 27 catchments of 90 - 1600km2 in size located in the Murray - Darling Basin in Australia are used. Our results illustrate that when single-objective optimisation was focussed on maximizing the objective function for streamflow or LAI, the other un-calibrated predicted outcome (LAI if streamflow is the focus) was consistently compromised. Thus, single-objective optimization cannot take into account the essence of all processes in the conceptual ecohydrological models. However, multi-objective optimisation showed great strength for streamflow and LAI predictions. Both response outputs were better simulated by RR-LAI-II than RR-LAI-I due to better representation of physical processes such as net primary productivity (NPP) in RR-LAI-II. Our results highlight that simultaneous calibration of streamflow and LAI using a multi-objective algorithm proves to be an attractive tool for improved streamflow predictions.

  8. Principal component and factor analytic models in international sire evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Jette

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interbull is a non-profit organization that provides internationally comparable breeding values for globalized dairy cattle breeding programmes. Due to different trait definitions and models for genetic evaluation between countries, each biological trait is treated as a different trait in each of the participating countries. This yields a genetic covariance matrix of dimension equal to the number of countries which typically involves high genetic correlations between countries. This gives rise to several problems such as over-parameterized models and increased sampling variances, if genetic (covariance matrices are considered to be unstructured. Methods Principal component (PC and factor analytic (FA models allow highly parsimonious representations of the (covariance matrix compared to the standard multi-trait model and have, therefore, attracted considerable interest for their potential to ease the burden of the estimation process for multiple-trait across country evaluation (MACE. This study evaluated the utility of PC and FA models to estimate variance components and to predict breeding values for MACE for protein yield. This was tested using a dataset comprising Holstein bull evaluations obtained in 2007 from 25 countries. Results In total, 19 principal components or nine factors were needed to explain the genetic variation in the test dataset. Estimates of the genetic parameters under the optimal fit were almost identical for the two approaches. Furthermore, the results were in a good agreement with those obtained from the full rank model and with those provided by Interbull. The estimation time was shortest for models fitting the optimal number of parameters and prolonged when under- or over-parameterized models were applied. Correlations between estimated breeding values (EBV from the PC19 and PC25 were unity. With few exceptions, correlations between EBV obtained using FA and PC approaches under the optimal fit were

  9. A finite volume alternate direction implicit approach to modeling selective laser melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Mohanty, Sankhya

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, several studies have attempted to develop thermal models for analyzing the selective laser melting process with a vision to predict thermal stresses, microstructures and resulting mechanical properties of manufactured products. While a holistic model addressing all involved...... is proposed for modeling single-layer and few-layers selective laser melting processes. The ADI technique is implemented and applied for two cases involving constant material properties and non-linear material behavior. The ADI FV method consume less time while having comparable accuracy with respect to 3D...

  10. Alternative Specifications for the Lévy Libor Market Model: An Empirical Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, David; Nicolato, Elisa

    This paper introduces and analyzes specications of the Lévy Market Model originally proposed by Eberlein and Özkan (2005). An investigation of the term structure of option implied moments rules out the Brownian motion and homogeneous Lévy processes as suitable modeling devices, and consequently...... of the estimation show that pricing performances are improved when a high frequency jump component is incorporated. Specifically, excellent results are achieved with the 4 parameter Sato-Variance Gamma model, which is able to fit an entire surface of caps with an average absolute percentage pricing error of less...

  11. Detection of two-sided alternatives in a Brownian motion model

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjiliadis, Olympia

    2007-01-01

    This work examines the problem of sequential detection of a change in the drift of a Brownian motion in the case of two-sided alternatives. Applications to real life situations in which two-sided changes can occur are discussed. Traditionally, 2-CUSUM stopping rules have been used for this problem due to their asymptotically optimal character as the mean time between false alarms tends to $\\infty$. In particular, attention has focused on 2-CUSUM harmonic mean rules due to the simplicity in calculating their first moments. In this paper, we derive closed-form expressions for the first moment of a general 2-CUSUM stopping rule. We use these expressions to obtain explicit upper and lower bounds for it. Moreover, we derive an expression for the rate of change of this first moment as one of the threshold parameters changes. Based on these expressions we obtain explicit upper and lower bounds to this rate of change. Using these expressions we are able to find the best 2-CUSUM stopping rule with respect to the exten...

  12. Alternative models for determining the surface energy components in offset printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järn, M; Tåg, C-M; Järnström, J; Granqvist, B; Rosenholm, J B

    2006-09-15

    Different ways of calculating surface energy components for substrates used in offset printing are compared. The results of the very useful van Oss-Chaudhury-Good bi-bidentate model (vOCG) are simplified to mono-bidentate and mono-monodentate models. The unbalance in the acid-base values often obtained by the vOCG model is strongly reduced when applying the simple mono-monodentate model. Moreover, the frequently encountered problem of negative square roots of the acid and base components is removed. An attempt to describe the ink transfer during offset printing by calculating theoretical works of adhesion between ink/plate and ink/paper is also made. The effect of paper roughness on the wetting was studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  13. The Luminous Convolution Model as an alternative to dark matter in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cisneros, S; Formaggio, J A; Ott, R A; Chester, D; Battaglia, D J; Ashley, A; Robinson, R; Rodriguez, A

    2014-01-01

    The Luminous Convolution Model (LCM) demonstrates that it is possible to predict the rotation curves of spiral galaxies directly from estimates of the luminous matter. We consider two frame-dependent effects on the light observed from other galaxies: relative velocity and relative curvature. With one free parameter, we predict the rotation curves of twenty-three (23) galaxies represented in forty-two (42) data sets. Relative curvature effects rely upon knowledge of both the gravitational potential from luminous mass of the emitting galaxy and the receiving galaxy, and so each emitter galaxy is compared to four (4) different Milky Way luminous mass models. On average in this sample, the LCM is more successful than either dark matter or modified gravity models in fitting the observed rotation curve data. Implications of LCM constraints on populations synthesis modeling are discussed in this paper. This paper substantially expands the results in arXiv:1309.7370.

  14. F-statistics under alternation of sexual and asexual reproduction: a model and data from schistosomes (platyhelminth parasites).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugnolle, Franck; Roze, Denis; Théron, André; DE Meeûs, Thierry

    2005-04-01

    Accurate inferences on population genetics data require a sound underlying theoretical null model. Nearly nothing is known about the gene dynamics of organisms with complex life cycles precluding any biological interpretation of population genetics parameters. In this article, we used an infinite island model to derive the expectations of those parameters for the life cycle of a dioecious organism obligatorily alternating sexual and asexual reproductions as it is the case for schistosomes (plathyhelminth parasites). This model allowed us to investigate the effects of the degree of mixing among individuals coming from different subpopulations at each new generation (represented in the model by the migration rates before and after clonal reproductions) and the variance in the reproductive success of individuals during the clonal phase. We also consider the effects of different migration rates and degrees of clonal reproductive skew between male and female individuals. Results show that the variance in the reproductive success of clones is very important in shaping the distribution of the genetic variability both within and among subpopulations. Thus, higher variance in the reproductive success of clones generates heterozygous excesses within subpopulations and also increases genetic differentiation between them. Migration occurring before and after asexual reproduction has different effects on the patterns of F(IS) and F(ST). When males and females display different degrees of reproductive skew or migration rates, we observe differences in their respective population genetic structure. While results of the model apply to any organism alternating sexual and clonal reproductions (e.g. all parasitic trematodes, many plants, and all aphididae), we finally confront some of these theoretical expectations to empirical data from Schistosoma mansoni infecting Rattus rattus in Guadeloupe.

  15. Acquisition Management for Systems-of-Systems: Analysis of Alternatives via Computational Exploratory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    as ADP amd MPC) to bear upon the immediate acquisition problem, keeping enterprise, model-centric architectures of decision-making processes in...useful in model-centric enterprise systems, where clear visualization of connectivity between individual systems is crucial to the design and...html/proj- constella tion/ltr-rep.pdf [accessed 15 January 2009]. Dekker, T. J., & Hoffmann, W. (1989). Rehabilitation of the Gauss-Jordan Algorithm

  16. Bids in Brazilian E and P oil and gas sector: evaluation, challenges and alternative models; Modelo de licitacoes de blocos: evolucao, desafios e alternativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Renato S.B. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (CEFET-RN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Pos-graduacao e Pesquisa em Engenharia. Nucleo de Estudos de Tecnologia, Gestao e Logistica; Fernandes, Elton [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (TGL/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Pos-graduacao e Pesquisa em Engenharia. Nucleo de Estudos de Tecnologia, Gestao e Logistica; Alonso, Paulo S.R. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); SERMAT Montagens e Instalacoes Industriais Ltda, Itaquaquecetuba, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents results of a survey, that among other subject matter approaches the model of farewell adopted by the National Agency of Oil Gas and Biofuels - ANP in Brazil. It is an analysis and discussion of evolution of the scenario of exploration and production of hydrocarbons in this country. In addition, it analyzes issues such as competition about farewell rounds and the reconfiguration of the upstream segment. The study is based on the methodology of the study-compared cases with focus in Brazilian and OCS-GOM-EUA auction models.The results of the study suggest that the model of granting the ANP produced: degree of concentration of business moderate to high, balancing of the reserves / production and strengthen the competitive capacity of PETROBRAS and considerable insertion of new entrants in the production chain, while political factors, Economic, social and technological developments have significantly affected the performance of rounds. Facing the new scenario of international prices, discoveries of large reserves and geopolitical issues the findings point to the need to consider possible exemptions to the model and suggests alternatives. (author)

  17. Pentameric models as alternative molecular targets for the design of new antiaggregant agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera Guisasola, Exequiel E; Gutierrez, Lucas J; Andujar, Sebastián A; Angelina, Emilio; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-01-01

    The structure-based drug design has been an extremely useful technique used for searching and developing of new therapeutic agents in various biological systems. In the case of AD, this approach has been difficult to implement. Among other several causes, the main problem might be the lack of a specific stable and reliable molecular target. In this paper the results obtained using a pentameric amyloid beta (Aβ) model as a molecular target are discussed. Our MD simulations have shown that this system is relatively structured and stable, displaying a lightly conformational flexibility during 2.0 μs of simulation time. This study allowed us to distinguish characteristic structural features in specific regions of the pentamer which should be taken into account when choosing this model as a molecular target. This represents a clear advantage compared to the monomer or dimer models which are highly flexible structures with large numbers of possible conformers. Using this pentameric model we performed two types of studies usually carried out on a molecular target: a virtual screening and the design on structural basis of new mimetic peptides with antiaggregant properties. Our results indicate that this pentameric model might be a good molecular target for these particular studies of molecular modeling. Details about the predictive power of our virtual screening as well as about the molecular interactions that stabilize the mimetic peptide-pentamer Aβ complexes are discussed in this paper.

  18. An empirical comparison of alternate regime-switching models for electricity spot prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janczura, Joanna [Hugo Steinhaus Center, Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Weron, Rafal [Institute of Organization and Management, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    One of the most profound features of electricity spot prices are the price spikes. Markov regime-switching (MRS) models seem to be a natural candidate for modeling this spiky behavior. However, in the studies published so far, the goodness-of-fit of the proposed models has not been a major focus. While most of the models were elegant, their fit to empirical data has either been not examined thoroughly or the signs of a bad fit ignored. With this paper we want to fill the gap. We calibrate and test a range of MRS models in an attempt to find parsimonious specifications that not only address the main characteristics of electricity prices but are statistically sound as well. We find that the best structure is that of an independent spike 3-regime model with time-varying transition probabilities, heteroscedastic diffusion-type base regime dynamics and shifted spike regime distributions. Not only does it allow for a seasonal spike intensity throughout the year and consecutive spikes or price drops, which is consistent with market observations, but also exhibits the 'inverse leverage effect' reported in the literature for spot electricity prices. (author)

  19. An alternative model of vascularized bone marrow transplant: partial femur transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Wu; Chen, Chen; Su, Ying-Jun; Yan, Lun; Wang, Shi-Ping; Guo, Shu-Zhong

    2014-12-01

    The vascularized whole femur transplantation model is one of the commonly used vascularized bone marrow transplant models. It involves technical complexity and morbidities. To optimize this model, we took 2/3 femur as the carrier of bone marrow cells, and developed a vascularized partial femur model. Four experimental groups were carried out, namely, the syngeneic partial femur transplantation, allogeneic partial femur transplantation with or without cyclosporine A, and allogeneic whole femur transplantation with cyclosporine A. The results showed that the partial femur model was technically simpler and shortened the operative and ischemia time compared to the whole femur model. Gross and histologic appearance confirmed the viability of femur, and its bone marrow inside the bone could also maintain normal morphologically at 60-day posttransplant. Besides, donor multilineage chimerism could be continuously detected in immunosuppressed allogeneic partial femur recipients at 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 8-week posttransplant, and it showed no significant differences when compared with whole femur transplantation. Meanwhile, long-term engraftment of donor-origin cells was also confirmed in recipients' bone marrow, lymph nodes, and spleen, but not in thymus. Therefore, the vascularized partial femur can serve as a continuous resource of bone morrow cells and may provide a useful tool for the study of immune tolerance in vascularized composite allotransplantation.

  20. Rapid architecture alternative modeling (RAAM): A framework for capability-based analysis of system of systems architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobucci, Joseph V.

    The research objective for this manuscript is to develop a Rapid Architecture Alternative Modeling (RAAM) methodology to enable traceable Pre-Milestone A decision making during the conceptual phase of design of a system of systems. Rather than following current trends that place an emphasis on adding more analysis which tends to increase the complexity of the decision making problem, RAAM improves on current methods by reducing both runtime and model creation complexity. RAAM draws upon principles from computer science, system architecting, and domain specific languages to enable the automatic generation and evaluation of architecture alternatives. For example, both mission dependent and mission independent metrics are considered. Mission dependent metrics are determined by the performance of systems accomplishing a task, such as Probability of Success. In contrast, mission independent metrics, such as acquisition cost, are solely determined and influenced by the other systems in the portfolio. RAAM also leverages advances in parallel computing to significantly reduce runtime by defining executable models that are readily amendable to parallelization. This allows the use of cloud computing infrastructures such as Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud and the PASTEC cluster operated by the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Institute (GTRI). Also, the amount of data that can be generated when fully exploring the design space can quickly exceed the typical capacity of computational resources at the analyst's disposal. To counter this, specific algorithms and techniques are employed. Streaming algorithms and recursive architecture alternative evaluation algorithms are used that reduce computer memory requirements. Lastly, a domain specific language is created to provide a reduction in the computational time of executing the system of systems models. A domain specific language is a small, usually declarative language that offers expressive power focused on a particular

  1. [The structural characteristics, alternative splicing and genetic experession analysis of ADP-ribosylation-factor 1 (arf1) in cotton].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mao-Zhi; Chen, Quan-Jia; Zhang, Rui; Guo, San-Dui

    2004-08-01

    The full-length cDNA,DNA and promoter of ADP-ribosylation-factor 1 (arf1) was isolated from Gossypium hirsutum Y18 by means of isocaudarner inverse PCR (II-PCR) and rapid isolating cDNA 5' unknown sequence and promoter (RICUP) established in our lab. Results indicated that the gene is 4 360 bp in size, including seven exons and six introns. Interestingly, alterative splicing occurs at intron I. Differential processing of intron 1 yields three different transcripts with 1 026 bp, 1103 bp and 1 544 bp in sizes, respectively. Arf1 encodes 181 amino acids. Sequence analysis indicated that sequence upstream transcription initiation site of arf1 includes typical initiator, TATA box, CCAAT box, GC box and several forward and reverse repeat sequences. And typical promoter structures, such as AT-rich sequence and palindrome structure have been detected in the sequence downstream transcription initiation site. Southern blot analysis indicated that the gene has two copies in the genome of cotton. Northern blot confirmed the predominate expression of arf1 in reproductive organs of cotton, including bud, flower, fiber and boll. Also, the feature and character of arf1 and its promoter have been studied. This study will lay foundation for the other research on function of arf1 in the development of reproductive organs in cotton.

  2. Challenges and implications of global modeling approaches that are alternatives to using constant plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegom, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years a number of approaches have been developed to provide alternatives to the use of plant functional types (PFTs) with constant vegetation characteristics for simulating vegetation responses to climate changes. In this presentation, an overview of those approaches and their challenges is given. Some new approaches aim at removing PFTs altogether by determining the combination of vegetation characteristics that would fit local conditions best. Others describe the variation in traits within PFTs as a function of environmental drivers, based on community assembly principles. In the first approach, after an equilibrium has been established, vegetation composition and its functional attributes can change by allowing the emergence of a new type that is more fit. In the latter case, changes in vegetation attributes in space and time as assumed to be the result intraspecific variation, genetic adaptation and species turnover, without quantifying their respective importance. Hence, it is assumed that -by whatever mechanism- the community as a whole responds without major time lags to changes in environmental drivers. Recently, we showed that intraspecific variation is highly species- and trait-specific and that none of the current hypotheses on drivers of this variation seems to hold. Also genetic adaptation varies considerably among species and it is uncertain whether it will be fast enough to cope with climate change. Species turnover within a community is especially fast in herbaceous communities, but much slower in forest communities. Hence, it seems that assumptions made may not hold for forested ecosystems, but solutions to deal with this do not yet exist. Even despite the fact that responsiveness of vegetation to environmental change may be overestimated, we showed that -upon implementation of trait-environment relationships- major changes in global vegetation distribution are projected, to similar extents as to those without such responsiveness.

  3. An alternative approach for choice models in transportation: Use of possibility theory for comparison of utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell’orco Mauro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of human choice mechanism has been a topic of intense discussion in the transportation community for many years. The framework of modeling has been rooted in probability theory in which the analyst’s uncertainty about the integrity of the model is expressed in probability. In most choice situations, the decision-maker (traveler also experiences uncertainty because of the lack of complete information on the choices. In the traditional modeling framework, the uncertainty of the analyst and that of the decision-maker are both embedded in the same random term and not clearly separated. While the analyst's uncertainty may be represented by probability due to the statistical nature of events, that of the decision maker, however, is not always subjected to randomness; rather, it is the perceptive uncertainty. This paper proposes a modeling framework that attempts to account for the decision maker’s uncertainty by possibility theory and then the analyst's uncertainty by probability theory. The possibility to probability transformation is performed using the principle of uncertainty invariance. The proposed approach accounts for the quality of information on the changes in choice probability. The paper discusses the thought process, mathematics of possibility theory and probability transformation, and examples.

  4. A model, describing the influence of water management alternatives on dike stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J. W. M.; Vastenburg, E.; Roelofsen, F. J.

    2015-11-01

    The awareness is rising that economic effects of Land Subsidence are high. Nevertheless, quantifying these economic losses is difficult and, as far as known, not yet done in a sophisticated way. Also, to be able to decide about future strategies, for example to avoid or decrease subsidence, it is necessary to know the financial consequences of measures and possible solutions. As a first step to quantify these economic effects, a MODFLOW-SCR (coupled MODFLOW-Settlements model) is coupled with the model DAM. Based on the local stratigraphy, the shape and composition of the existing dike or levee, the level of the surface water and the surface level, macro-stability of the dike is calculated and - if the dike does not meet the required stability - adaptions are proposed. The model enables to separate effects that are caused by sea-level rise and the effects of subsidence. Coupling the DAM model with an economic model to calculate costs of these adaptions is under construction.

  5. Searching for a two-factor model of marriage duration: commentary on Gottman and Levenson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKay, Michael L; Greeno, Catherine G; Houck, Patricia R

    2002-01-01

    Gottman and Levenson (2002) report a number of post hoc ordinary least squares regressions to "predict" the length of marriage, given that divorce has occurred. We argue that the type of statistical model they use is inappropriate for answering clinically relevant questions about the causes and timing of divorce, and present several reasons why an alternative family of models called duration models would be more appropriate. The distribution of marriage length is not bimodal, as Gottman and Levenson suggest, and their search for a two-factor model for explaining marriage length is misguided. Their regression models omit many variables known to affect marriage length, and instead use variables that were pre-screened for their predictive ability. Their final model is based on data for only 15 cases, including one unusual case that has undue influence on the results. For these and other technical reasons presented in the text, we believe that Gottman and Levenson's results are not replicable, and that they should not be used to guide interventions for couples in clinical settings.

  6. TEST OF THE CHEN-ROLL-ROSS MACROECONOMIC FACTOR MODEL: EVIDENCE FROM CROATIAN STOCK MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Dolinar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically examines the well-known Chen-Roll-Ross model on the Croatian stock market. Modifications of definitions of the Chen-Roll-Ross model variables showed as necessary because of doubtful availability and quality of input data needed. Namely, some macroeconomic and market variables are not available in the originally defined form or do not exist. In that sense this paper gives some alternative definitions for some model variables. Also, in order to improve statistical analysis, in this paper we have modified Fama-MacBeth technique in the way that second-pass regression was substituted with panel regression analysis. Based on the two-pass regression analysis of returns of 34 Croatian stocks on 4 macroeconomic variables during the seven-and-half-year observation period the following conclusion is made. In contrast to the results of Chen, Roll and Ross (1986 for the U.S. stock market, their model is not successful when describing a risk-return relation of Croatian stocks. Nevertheless, one observed version of the Chen-RollRoss model showed certain statistical significance. Namely, two risk factors in that version of the model were statistically significant: default premium, measured as risk premium for the corporate short-term bank loan financing, and term structure premium, measured on short-run basis.

  7. Bundled Payment in Total Joint Care: Survey of AAHKS Membership Attitudes and Experience with Alternative Payment Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Atul F; Courtney, Paul M; Bozic, Kevin J; Mehta, Samir; Parsley, Brian S; Froimson, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    The goal of alternative payment models (APMs), particularly bundling of payments in total joint arthroplasty (TJA), is to incentivize physicians, hospitals, and payers to deliver quality care at lower cost. To study the effect of APMs on the field of adult reconstruction, we conducted a survey of AAHKS members using an electronic questionnaire format. Of the respondents, 61% are planning to or participate in an APM. 45% of respondents feel that a bundled payment system will be the most effective model to improve quality and to reduce costs. Common concerns were disincentives to operate on high-risk patients (94%) and uncertainty about revenue sharing (79%). While many members feel that APMs may improve value in TJA, surgeons continue to have reservations about implementation.

  8. Leading bureaucracies to the tipping point: An alternative model of multiple stable equilibrium levels of corruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P; Feichtinger, Gustav; Grass, Dieter; Hartl, Richard F; Kort, Peter M; Novak, Andreas J; Seidl, Andrea

    2013-03-16

    We present a novel model of corruption dynamics in the form of a nonlinear optimal dynamic control problem. It has a tipping point, but one whose origins and character are distinct from that in the classic Schelling (1978) model. The decision maker choosing a level of corruption is the chief or some other kind of authority figure who presides over a bureaucracy whose state of corruption is influenced by the authority figure's actions, and whose state in turn influences the pay-off for the authority figure. The policy interpretation is somewhat more optimistic than in other tipping models, and there are some surprising implications, notably that reforming the bureaucracy may be of limited value if the bureaucracy takes its cues from a corrupt leader.

  9. Leading bureaucracies to the tipping point: An alternative model of multiple stable equilibrium levels of corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P.; Feichtinger, Gustav; Grass, Dieter; Hartl, Richard F.; Kort, Peter M.; Novak, Andreas J.; Seidl, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel model of corruption dynamics in the form of a nonlinear optimal dynamic control problem. It has a tipping point, but one whose origins and character are distinct from that in the classic Schelling (1978) model. The decision maker choosing a level of corruption is the chief or some other kind of authority figure who presides over a bureaucracy whose state of corruption is influenced by the authority figure’s actions, and whose state in turn influences the pay-off for the authority figure. The policy interpretation is somewhat more optimistic than in other tipping models, and there are some surprising implications, notably that reforming the bureaucracy may be of limited value if the bureaucracy takes its cues from a corrupt leader. PMID:23565027

  10. Bronchial epithelial spheroids: an alternative culture model to investigate epithelium inflammation-mediated COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangloff Sophie C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by abnormal lung inflammation that exceeds the protective response. Various culture models using epithelial cell lines or primary cells have been used to investigate the contribution of bronchial epithelium in the exaggerated inflammation of COPD. However, these models do not mimic in vivo situations for several reasons (e.g, transformed epithelial cells, protease-mediated dissociation of primary cells, etc.. To circumvent these concerns, we developed a new epithelial cell culture model. Methods Using non transformed non dissociated bronchial epithelium obtained by bronchial brushings from COPD and non-COPD smokers, we developed a 3-dimensional culture model, bronchial epithelial spheroids (BES. BES were analyzed by videomicroscopy, light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. We also compared the inflammatory responses of COPD and non-COPD BES. In our study, we chose to stimulate BES with lipopolycaccharide (LPS and measured the release of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4 and the anti-inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Results BES obtained from both COPD and non-COPD patients were characterized by a polarized bronchial epithelium with tight junctions and ciliary beating, composed of basal cells, secretory cells and ciliated cells. The ciliary beat frequency of ciliated cells was not significantly different between the two groups. Of interest, BES retained their characteristic features in culture up to 8 days. BES released the inflammatory mediators IL-8, PGE2 and LTB4 constitutively and following exposure to LPS. Interestingly, LPS induced a higher release of IL-8, but not PGE2 and LTB4 in COPD BES (p Conclusion This study provides for the first time a compelling evidence that the BES model provides an unaltered bronchial surface epithelium. More importantly, BES represent an

  11. Alternative to Ritt's pseudodivision for finding the input-output equations of multi-output models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Anderson, Chris; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2012-09-01

    Differential algebra approaches to structural identifiability analysis of a dynamic system model in many instances heavily depend upon Ritt's pseudodivision at an early step in analysis. The pseudodivision algorithm is used to find the characteristic set, of which a subset, the input-output equations, is used for identifiability analysis. A simpler algorithm is proposed for this step, using Gröbner Bases, along with a proof of the method that includes a reduced upper bound on derivative requirements. Efficacy of the new algorithm is illustrated with several biosystem model examples.

  12. Clinical application of the five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiger, Thomas A; Presnall, Jennifer Ruth

    2013-12-01

    The Five-Factor Model (FFM) has become the predominant dimensional model of general personality structure. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a clinical application. A substantial body of research indicates that the personality disorders included within the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) can be understood as extreme and/or maladaptive variants of the FFM (the acronym "DSM" refers to any particular edition of the APA DSM). In addition, the current proposal for the forthcoming fifth edition of the DSM (i.e., DSM-5) is shifting closely toward an FFM dimensional trait model of personality disorder. Advantages of this shifting conceptualization are discussed, including treatment planning.

  13. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF DECISIONMAKING SYSTEM INTEGRATION IN THE MULTIPLE CHOICE ALTERNATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halizev V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the models and the methods of the market of the proposed sub-systems and equipment, based on the analysis of the requirements for security to choose the best solution for the synthesis of the integrated security system

  14. Stochastic user equilibrium with equilibrated choice sets: Part I - Model formulations under alternative distributions and restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watling, David Paul; Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    the advantages of the two principles, namely the definition of unused routes in DUE and of mis-perception in SUE, such that the resulting choice sets of used routes are equilibrated. Two model families are formulated to address this issue: the first is a general version of SUE permitting bounded and discrete...

  15. Precision-cut intestinal slices : alternative model for drug transport, metabolism, and toxicology research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME-tox) processes of drugs are of importance and require preclinical investigation intestine in addition to the liver. Various models have been developed for prediction of ADME-tox in the intestine. In this review, pre

  16. Multigroup Analysis in Partial Least Squares (PLS) Path Modeling: Alternative Methods and Empirical Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarstedt, Marko; Henseler, Jörg; Ringle, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – Partial least squares (PLS) path modeling has become a pivotal empirical research method in international marketing. Owing to group comparisons' important role in research on international marketing, we provide researchers with recommendations on how to conduct multigroup analyses in PLS p

  17. Forecasting the Marine Corps’ Enlisted Classification Plan: Assessment of An Alternative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Figure 8. Example GAR Requirements Over the FYDP.................................................24 Figure 9. Models’ MAPE Distribution...Marine Air-Ground Task Force MAPE Mean Absolute Percent Error MCT Marine Combat Training MOE Measure of Effectiveness MOS Military Occupational...Figure 9. Models’ MAPE Distribution However, an analysis of the steady-state model reveals that produced a forecast error mean of 40 percentage

  18. Mathematical Modelling in Engineering: An Alternative Way to Teach Linear Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-García, S.; García-Planas, M. I.; Taberna, J.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances require that basic science courses for engineering, including Linear Algebra, emphasize the development of mathematical strengths associated with modelling and interpretation of results, which are not limited only to calculus abilities. Based on this consideration, we have proposed a project-based learning, giving a dynamic…

  19. Do we need a communal coping model of pain catastrophizing? An alternative explanation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severeijns, R.; Vlaeyen, J.W.S.; Hout, M.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    In this topical review, a case is made for placing pain catastrophizing within the transactional stress and coping model of Lazarus and Folkman (1984). It is argued that the CCM in its current formulation might actually contribute to the conceptual confusion around the construct of pain catastrophiz

  20. The Fantastical Body and the Vulnerability of Comfort: Alternative Models for Understanding Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springgay, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Arguing for new models of inquiry that interrogate body image from the perspective of intercorporeality, this article explores a research study conducted in a secondary school art class. Shifting analysis from the representation of body image to a tactile, sensuous, and experiential understanding of body image, I highlight the contradictions and…