WorldWideScience

Sample records for alternate oligomerization states

  1. Thermodynamic competition between membrane protein oligomeric states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Self-assembly of protein monomers into distinct membrane protein oligomers provides a general mechanism for diversity in the molecular architectures, and resulting biological functions, of membrane proteins. We develop a general physical framework describing the thermodynamic competition between different oligomeric states of membrane proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance as a model system, we show how the dominant oligomeric states of membrane proteins emerge from the interplay of protein concentration in the cell membrane, protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations, and direct monomer-monomer interactions. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms and principles underlying regulation of protein function via control of membrane protein oligomeric state.

  2. Thermodynamic competition between membrane protein oligomeric states

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of protein monomers into distinct membrane protein oligomers provides a general mechanism for diversity in the molecular architectures, and resulting biological functions, of membrane proteins. We develop a general physical framework describing the thermodynamic competition between different oligomeric states of membrane proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance as a model system, we show how the dominant oligomeric states of membrane proteins emerge from the interplay of protein concentration in the cell membrane, protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations, and direct monomer-monomer interactions. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms and principles underlying regulation of protein function via control of membrane protein oligomeric state.

  3. Spontaneous Oligomerization of Nucleotide Alternatives in Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen E.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Callahan, Michael P.

    2017-03-01

    On early Earth, a primitive polymer that could spontaneously form from likely available precursors may have preceded both RNA and DNA as the first genetic material. Here, we report that heated aqueous solutions containing 5-hydroxymethyluracil (HMU) result in oligomers of uracil, heated solutions containing 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (HMC) result in oligomers of cytosine, and heated solutions containing both HMU and HMC result in mixed oligomers of uracil and cytosine. Oligomerization of hydroxymethylated pyrimidines, which may have been abundant on the primitive Earth, might have been important in the development of simple informational polymers.

  4. The oligomeric state of the active Vps4 AAA ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Nicole; Han, Han; Gonciarz, Malgorzata D.; Eckert, Debra M.; Karren, Mary Anne; Whitby, Frank G.; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular ESCRT pathway drives membrane constriction toward the cytosol and effects membrane fission during cytokinesis, endosomal sorting, and the release of many enveloped viruses, including HIV. A component of this pathway, the AAA ATPase Vps4, provides energy for pathway progression. Although it is established that Vps4 functions as an oligomer, subunit stoichiometry and other fundamental features of the functional enzyme are unclear. Higher-order oligomers have thus far only been characterized for a Walker B mutant of Vps4 in the presence of ATP. Here, we report that although some mutant Vps4 proteins form dodecameric assemblies, active wild-type S. cerevisiae and S. solfataricus Vps4 enzymes can form hexamers in the presence of ATP and ADP, as assayed by size exclusion chromatography and equilibrium analytical ultracentifugation. The Vta1p activator binds hexameric yeast Vps4p without changing the oligomeric state of Vps4p, implying that the active Vta1p:Vps4p complex also contains a single hexameric ring. Additionally, we report crystal structures of two different archaeal Vps4 homologs, whose structures and lattice interactions suggest a conserved mode of oligomerization. Disruption of the proposed hexamerization interface by mutagenesis abolished the ATPase activity of archaeal Vps4 proteins and blocked Vps4p function in S. cerevisiae. These data challenge the prevailing model that active Vps4 is a double ring dodecamer, and argue that, like other type I AAA ATPases, Vps4 functions as a single ring with six subunits. PMID:24161953

  5. Oligomerization states of Bowman-Birk inhibitor by atomic force microscopy and computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciano P; Azevedo, Ricardo B; Morais, Paulo C; Ventura, Manuel M; Freitas, Sonia M

    2005-11-15

    Several methods have been applied to study protein-protein interaction from structural and thermodynamic point of view. The present study reveals that atomic force microscopy (AFM), molecular modeling, and docking approaches represent alternative methods offering new strategy to investigate structural aspects in oligomerization process of proteinase inhibitors. The topography of the black-eyed pea trypsin/chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) was recorded by AFM and compared with computational rigid-bodies docking approaches. Multimeric states of BTCI identified from AFM analysis showed globular-ellipsoidal shapes. Monomers, dimers, trimers, and hexamers were the most prominent molecular arrays observed in AFM images as evaluated by molecular volume calculations and corroborated by in silico docking and theoretical approaches. We therefore propose that BTCI adopts stable and well-packed self-assembled states in monomer-dimer-trimer-hexamer equilibrium. Although there are no correlation between specificity and packing efficiency among proteinases and proteinase inhibitors, the AFM and docked BTCI analyses suggest that these assemblies may exist in situ to play their potential function in oligomerization process.

  6. Interfacial behavior of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase oligomeric states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernoux, Nathalie; Granjon, Thierry; Marcillat, Olivier; Besson, Françoise; Vial, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Adsorption to the air/water interface of isoenzymes of creatine kinase was investigated using surface pressure-area isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) observations. Octameric mitochondrial creatine kinase (mtCK) exhibits a significant affinity for the air/water interface. Whatever the mode of formation of the interfacial film, i.e., injection of the protein in the subphase or spreading onto the buffer surface, the final arrangement and conformation adopted by mtCK molecules lead to a similar result. In contrast, the dimeric isoenzymes mtCK and cytosolic MMCK do not induce any surface pressure variation. However, when the subphase contains 0.3M NaCl, both isoenzymes adsorb to the interface. When treated with 0.8 or 3M GdnHCl, muscle creatine kinase (MMCK) becomes surface active and occupies a greater surface than mtCK. This result contrasts with previous observations, often derived from monomeric proteins, that their surface activity is increased upon unfolding. It underlines the possible influence exerted by the protein oligomeric state on its interfacial activity. At a subphase pH of 8.8, which corresponds to the pI of octameric mtCK, the profiles of the isotherms obtained with dimeric and octameric states and the resistance to compression of the protein monolayers are significantly affected when compared to those recorded at pH 7.4. These data suggest that the octamer is more hydrophobic than the dimer and may contribute to explaining why octamers bind to the inner mitochondrial membrane while dimers do not. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hydrogen ions directly regulating the oligomerization state of Photosystem I in intact Spirulina platensis cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    H+ concentration induced-monomerization or trimerization of photosystem I (PSI) in cyanobacteria has never been directly observed. In this work, taking characteristic spectra for the trimers and monomers as the indicators, it was experimentally demonstrated that H+ could induce the oligomeric changes of PSI reaction centers in the intact Spirulina ,platensis cells and also in the isolated thylakoid membrane complexes. Especially, the higher concentration of H+ would induce the monomerization while the lower the trimerization, suggesting the electrostatic interaction should be mainly responsible forchanges in the oligomeric state of PSI in Spirulina platensis.

  8. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  9. Alternative Models of Iron and Cobalt Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization and Polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrin; Wedeking; Sherrif; Adewuyi; Maliha; Asma; Igor; Vystorop; Saliu; Amolegbe; Elena; Novikova

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Great progresses have been made in the field of transition metal-based complexes as catalytic precursors for olefin oligomerization and polymerization,in which the core subjects will remain as "know and how" to develop novel catalysts both in academic and industrial consideration.The key advantage of iron and cobalt catalyst for ethylene polymerization is to produce vinyl-type polyethylenes.Therefore following the pioneering works of bis(imino) pyridyl iron and cobalt catalyst by Brookhart[1] ...

  10. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  11. Redox and metal-regulated oligomeric state for human porphobilinogen synthase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, N; Nagahara, N; Arisaka, F; Mitsuoka, K; Minami, M

    2011-06-01

    The oligomeric state of human porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) [EC.4.2.1.24] is homooctamer, which consists of conformationally heterogenous subunits in the tertiary structure under air-saturated conditions. When PBGS is activated by reducing agent with zinc ion, a reservoir zinc ion coordinated by Cys(223) is transferred in the active center to be coordinated by Cys(122), Cys(124), and Cys(132) (Sawada et al. in J Biol Inorg Chem 10:199-207, 2005). The latter zinc ion serves as an electrophilic catalysis. In this study, we investigated a conformational change associated with the PBGS activation by reducing agent and zinc ion using analytical ultracentrifugation, negative staining electron microscopy, native PAGE, and enzyme activity staining. The results are in good agreement with our notion that the main component of PBGS is octamer with a few percent of hexamer and that the octamer changes spatial subunit arrangement upon reduction and further addition of zinc ion, accompanying decrease in f/f (0). It is concluded that redox-regulated PBGS activation via cleavage of disulfide bonds among Cys(122), Cys(124), and Cys(132) and coordination with zinc ion is closely linked to change in the oligomeric state.

  12. Disturbance maintains alternative biome states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Hirota, Marina; Oliveira, Rafael S; Pausas, Juli G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the distribution of biomes remains a challenge. Although tropical biome distribution has traditionally been explained by climate and soil, contrasting vegetation types often occur as mosaics with sharp boundaries under very similar environmental conditions. While evidence suggests that these biomes are alternative states, empirical broad-scale support to this hypothesis is still lacking. Using community-level field data and a novel resource-niche overlap approach, we show that, for a wide range of environmental conditions, fire feedbacks maintain savannas and forests as alternative biome states in both the Neotropics and the Afrotropics. In addition, wooded grasslands and savannas occurred as alternative grassy states in the Afrotropics, depending on the relative importance of fire and herbivory feedbacks. These results are consistent with landscape scale evidence and suggest that disturbance is a general factor driving and maintaining alternative biome states and vegetation mosaics in the tropics.

  13. Unusual Emission of Polystyrene-Based Alternating Copolymers Incorporating Aminobutyl Maleimide Fluorophore-Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesized an unusual 2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MIPOSS-NHBu monomer lacking conventional fluorescent groups. We then prepared poly(styrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(S-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] and poly(4-acetoxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymers through facile free radical copolymerizations using azobisisobutyronitrile as the initiator and tetrahydrofuran as the solvent. A poly(4-hydroxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(HS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymer was prepared through acetoxyl hydrazinolysis of poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu. We employed 1H, 13C, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; differential scanning calorimetry; and photoluminescence spectroscopy to investigate the structures and the thermal and optical properties of the monomers and novel POSS-containing alternating copolymers. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the amino and dihydrofuran-2,5-dione group and clustering of the locked C=O groups from the POSS nanoparticles in the MIPOSS-NHBu units restricted the intramolecular motion of the polymer chain, causing it to exhibit strong light emission. As a result, the MIPOSS-NHBu monomer and the poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu copolymer both have potential applicability in the detection of metal ions with good selectivity.

  14. Conservation of the oligomeric state of native VDAC1 in detergent micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémençon, Benjamin; Fine, Michael; Hediger, Matthias A

    2016-08-01

    The voltage-dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) is an intrinsic β-barrel membrane protein located within the mitochondrial outer membrane where it serves as a pore, connecting the mitochondria to the cytosol. The high-resolution structures of both the human and murine VDACs have been resolved by X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) in 2008. However, the structural data are not completely in line with the findings that were obtained after decades of research on biochemical and functional analysis of VDAC. This discrepancy may be related to the fact that structural biology studies of membrane proteins reveal specific static conformations that may not necessarily represent the physiological state. For example, overexpression of membrane proteins in bacterial inclusion bodies or simply the extraction from the native lipid environment using harsh purification methods (i.e. chaotropic agents) can disturb the physiological conformations and the supramolecular assemblies. To address these potential issues, we have developed a method, allowing rapid one step purification of endogenous VDAC expressed in the native mitochondrial membrane without overexpression of recombinant protein or usage of harsh chaotropic extraction procedures. Using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isoform 1 of VDAC as a model, this method yields efficient purification, preserving VDAC in a more physiological, native state following extraction from mitochondria. Single particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated conservation of oligomeric assembly after purification. Maintenance of the native state was evaluated using functional assessment that involves an ATP-binding assay by micro-scale thermophoresis (MST). Using this approach, we were able to determine for the first time the apparent KD for ATP of 1.2 mM.

  15. Understanding Peptide Oligomeric State in Langmuir Monolayers of Amphiphilic 3-Helix Bundle-Forming Peptide-PEG Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jessica Y.; Xu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Coiled-coil peptide–polymer conjugates are an emerging class of biomaterials. Fundamental understanding of the coiled-coil oligomeric state and assembly process of these hybrid building blocks is necessary to exert control over their assembly into well-defined structures. Here, we studied the effect of peptide structure and PEGylation on the self-assembly process and oligomeric state of a Langmuir monolayer of amphiphilic coiled-coil peptide–polymer conjugates using X-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). Our results show that the oligomeric state of PEGylated amphiphiles based on 3-helix bundle-forming peptide is surface pressure dependent, a mixture of dimers and trimers was formed at intermediate surface pressure but transitions into trimers completely upon increasing surface pressure. Moreover, the interhelical distance within the coiled-coil bundle of 3-helix peptide-PEG conjugate amphiphiles was not perturbed under high surface pressure. Present studies provide valuable insights into the self-assembly process of hybrid peptide–polymer conjugates and guidance to develop biomaterials with controlled multivalency of ligand presentation. PMID:27784156

  16. Dispersion states and surface characteristics of physically blended polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polymer hybrid nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rahul

    Control of dispersion and segregation states of nanostructured additives is one of the biggest challenges in realizing the optimum potential of high performance hybrid polymer nanocomposites. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanostructured chemicals, with their hybrid organic-inorganic nature and flexible functionalization with a variety of organic substituents, yield possibilities to control dispersion and tune compatibility in a wide range of polymer systems. The overall goal of this research is to investigate the fundamental parameters that influence the dispersion and segregation states of POSS nanostructured chemicals, and to understand chain dynamics and conformations in physically blended POSS hybrid polymer nanocomposites (HPNC's). Multiple structural and mechanical factors influencing macro to nano scale surface and bulk properties were successfully investigated and correlated. A strategy based on thermodynamic principles for selective control of POSS dispersion states in a given polymer matrix is developed and discussed. This dissertation consists of eight chapters. Chapter 1 provides a detailed introduction about the development and current research interest in POSS/polymer nanocomposites. This chapter also discusses limitations of current advanced nanoprobe techniques. Chapter 2 establishes the overall goal of this research and specific research ii objectives. Chapter 3 establishes the preferential surface migration behavior of physically dispersed, non-reactive, closed cage octaisobutyl POSS (Oib-POSS) in a non-polar polypropylene matrix. Furthermore, influence of POSS surface segregation on the surface properties, especially nano-tribomechanical behavior is also discussed. Chapter 4 expands the studies by melt blending two different types of POSS molecules, a non-reactive, closed cage Oib-POSS and an open cage trisilanolphenyl POSS (Tsp-POSS), in a nylon 6 matrix. This chapter discusses the morphology, nano-dispersion and macro- to

  17. Defining the oligomerization state of γ-synuclein in solution and in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Zurawsky, Cassandra; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2014-01-21

    γ-Synuclein is expressed at high levels in neuronal cells and in multiple invasive cancers. Like its family member α-synuclein, γ-synuclein is thought to be natively unfolded but does not readily form fibrils. The function of γ-synuclein is unknown, but we have found that it interacts strongly with the enzyme phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ), altering its interaction with G proteins. As a first step in determining its role, we have characterized its oligomerization using fluorescence homotransfer, photon-counting histogram analysis, and native gel electrophoresis. We found that when its expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, γ-synuclein appears monomeric on chromatographs under denaturing conditions, but under native conditions, it appears as oligomers of varying sizes. We followed the monomer-to-tetramer association by labeling the protein with fluorescein and following the concentration-dependent loss in fluorescence anisotropy resulting from fluorescence homotransfer. We also performed photon-counting histogram analysis at increasing concentrations of fluorescein-labeled γ-synuclein and found concentration-dependent oligomerization. Addition of PLCβ2, a strong γ-synuclein binding partner whose cellular expression is correlated with γ-synuclein, results in disruption of γ-synuclein oligomers. Similarly, its binding to lipid membranes promotes the monomer form. When we exogenously express γ-synuclein or microinject purified protein into cells, the protein appears monomeric. Our studies show that even though purified γ-synuclein form oligomers, when binding partners are present, as in cells, it dissociates to a monomer to bind these partners, which in turn may modify protein function and integrity.

  18. The Effect of Detergent, Temperature, and Lipid on the Oligomeric State of MscL Constructs: Insights from Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Eamonn; Walton, Troy A; Liko, Idlir; Marty, Michael T; Laganowsky, Arthur; Rees, Douglas C; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-05-21

    The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) acts as an emergency release valve for osmotic shock of bacteria preventing cell lysis. The large pore size, essential for function, requires the formation of oligomers with tetramers, pentamers, or hexamers observed depending on the species and experimental approach. We applied non-denaturing (native) mass spectrometry to five different homologs of MscL to determine the oligomeric state under more than 50 different experimental conditions elucidating lipid binding and subunit stoichiometry. We found equilibrium between pentameric and tetrameric species, which can be altered by detergent, disrupted by binding specific lipids, and perturbed by increasing temperature (37°C). We also established the presence of lipopolysaccharide bound to MscL and other membrane proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, revealing a potential source of heterogeneity. More generally, we highlight the use of mass spectrometry in probing membrane proteins under a variety of detergent-lipid environments relevant to structural biology.

  19. Assessment of Escherichia coli selenophosphate synthetase oligomeric states by analytical ultracentrifugation and small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, I.R.; Faim, F.M.; Oliveira Neto, M.; Thiemann, O.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP-SC), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Borges, J.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Selenium is an essential micronutrient for many organisms and is present in selenium-containing proteins as selenocysteine (Sec) and RNAs as selenouridine. Specific selenium incorporation into selenoproteins and RNAs requires the generation of a biologically active selenium donor compound, selenophosphate, which is produced from the activation of selenide with adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) in a reaction catalyzed by Selenophosphate Synthetase (SELD). Therefore, SELD is a key enzyme of the selenium pathway in the cell. The Escherichia coli SELD open reading frame was cloned into pET28a (Novagen) expression vector and the recombinant protein was over expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. In order to purify the protein, we used metal-chelate affinity chromatography followed by a gel filtration step. Analytical Ultracentrifugation (AUC) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) were employed to study the oligomeric states of the soluble protein. The results of AUC revealed dimer-tetramer and tetramer-octamer equilibrium at low concentrations of protein, with dissociation constants of 70 2 and 560 40 M, respectively. Moreover, the SAXS results pointed the oligomeric state of the protein at higher concentrations as predominantly dimeric and the p(r) and the SAXS envelope revealed the SELD as elongated. We also performed initial crystallization trials with protein samples at 7 mg/ml in 96-well sitting-drop crystallization plates at room temperature using a crystallization robot. Needle crystals appeared after some days. X-ray diffraction for these crystals were tested in the MX2 beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory (LNLS Campinas). We are now working to improve these crystals in order to obtain suitable crystals for structure determination. (author)

  20. Inferring the relative resilience of alternative states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Angeler

    Full Text Available Ecological systems may occur in alternative states that differ in ecological structures, functions and processes. Resilience is the measure of disturbance an ecological system can absorb before changing states. However, how the intrinsic structures and processes of systems that characterize their states affects their resilience remains unclear. We analyzed time series of phytoplankton communities at three sites in a floodplain in central Spain to assess the dominant frequencies or "temporal scales" in community dynamics and compared the patterns between a wet and a dry alternative state. The identified frequencies and cross-scale structures are expected to arise from positive feedbacks that are thought to reinforce processes in alternative states of ecological systems and regulate emergent phenomena such as resilience. Our analyses show a higher species richness and diversity but lower evenness in the dry state. Time series modeling revealed a decrease in the importance of short-term variability in the communities, suggesting that community dynamics slowed down in the dry relative to the wet state. The number of temporal scales at which community dynamics manifested, and the explanatory power of time series models, was lower in the dry state. The higher diversity, reduced number of temporal scales and the lower explanatory power of time series models suggest that species dynamics tended to be more stochastic in the dry state. From a resilience perspective our results highlight a paradox: increasing species richness may not necessarily enhance resilience. The loss of cross-scale structure (i.e. the lower number of temporal scales in community dynamics across sites suggests that resilience erodes during drought. Phytoplankton communities in the dry state are therefore likely less resilient than in the wet state. Our case study demonstrates the potential of time series modeling to assess attributes that mediate resilience. The approach is useful

  1. Computational and structural evidence for neurotransmitter-mediated modulation of the oligomeric states of human insulin in storage granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palivec, Vladimír; Viola, Cristina M; Kozak, Mateusz; Ganderton, Timothy R; Křížková, Květoslava; Turkenburg, Johan P; Halušková, Petra; Žáková, Lenka; Jiráček, Jiří; Jungwirth, Pavel; Brzozowski, Andrzej M

    2017-05-19

    Human insulin is a pivotal protein hormone controlling metabolism, growth, and aging and whose malfunctioning underlies diabetes, some cancers, and neurodegeneration. Despite its central position in human physiology, the in vivo oligomeric state and conformation of insulin in its storage granules in the pancreas are not known. In contrast, many in vitro structures of hexamers of this hormone are available and fall into three conformational states: T6, T3R(f)3, and R6 As there is strong evidence for accumulation of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine, in insulin storage granules in pancreatic β-cells, we probed by molecular dynamics (MD) and protein crystallography (PC) if these endogenous ligands affect and stabilize insulin oligomers. Parallel studies independently converged on the observation that serotonin binds well within the insulin hexamer (site I), stabilizing it in the T3R3 conformation. Both methods indicated serotonin binding on the hexamer surface (site III) as well. MD, but not PC, indicated that dopamine was also a good site III ligand. Some of the PC studies also included arginine, which may be abundant in insulin granules upon processing of pro-insulin, and stable T3R3 hexamers loaded with both serotonin and arginine were obtained. The MD and PC results were supported further by in solution spectroscopic studies with R-state-specific chromophore. Our results indicate that the T3R3 oligomer is a plausible insulin pancreatic storage form, resulting from its complex interplay with neurotransmitters, and pro-insulin processing products. These findings may have implications for clinical insulin formulations. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies of Mitochondrial Glutaminase C Reveal Extended Flexible Regions, and Link Oligomeric State with Enzyme Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, Søren Skou; Ramachandran, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    , using a high-throughput microfluidic-mixing chip for the SAXS data collection, and we confirm that the oligomeric state correlates with activity. The in-depth solution behavior analysis further reveals the structural behavior of flexible regions of the protein in the dimeric, tetrameric and octameric...... state and investigates the C-terminal influence on the enzyme solution behavior. Our data enable SAXS-based rigid body modeling of the full-length tetramer states, thereby presenting the first ever experimentally derived structural model of mitochondrial glutaminase C including the N- and C...

  3. Small angle X-ray scattering studies of mitochondrial glutaminase C reveal extended flexible regions, and link oligomeric state with enzyme activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Møller

    Full Text Available Glutaminase C is a key metabolic enzyme, which is unregulated in many cancer systems and believed to play a central role in the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells undergo changes to an altered metabolic profile. A long-standing hypothesis links enzymatic activity to the protein oligomeric state, hence the study of the solution behavior in general and the oligomer state in particular of glutaminase C is important for the understanding of the mechanism of protein activation and inhibition. In this report, this is extensively investigated in correlation to enzyme concentration or phosphate level, using a high-throughput microfluidic-mixing chip for the SAXS data collection, and we confirm that the oligomeric state correlates with activity. The in-depth solution behavior analysis further reveals the structural behavior of flexible regions of the protein in the dimeric, tetrameric and octameric state and investigates the C-terminal influence on the enzyme solution behavior. Our data enable SAXS-based rigid body modeling of the full-length tetramer states, thereby presenting the first ever experimentally derived structural model of mitochondrial glutaminase C including the N- and C-termini of the enzyme.

  4. Moyamoya disease-associated protein mysterin/RNF213 is a novel AAA+ ATPase, which dynamically changes its oligomeric state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morito, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kouki; Hoseki, Jun; Kitamura, Akira; Kotani, Yuri; Kiso, Kazumi; Kinjo, Masataka; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic human cerebrovascular disorder that is characterized by progressive stenosis and abnormal collateral vessels. We recently identified mysterin/RNF213 as its first susceptibility gene, which encodes a 591-kDa protein containing enzymatically active P-loop ATPase and ubiquitin ligase domains and is involved in proper vascular development in zebrafish. Here we demonstrate that mysterin further contains two tandem AAA+ ATPase modules and forms huge ring-shaped oligomeric complex. AAA+ ATPases are known to generally mediate various biophysical and mechanical processes with the characteristic ring-shaped structure. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and biochemical evaluation suggested that mysterin dynamically changes its oligomeric forms through ATP/ADP binding and hydrolysis cycles. Thus, the moyamoya disease-associated gene product is a unique protein that functions as ubiquitin ligase and AAA+ ATPase, which possibly contributes to vascular development through mechanical processes in the cell.

  5. Constitutive homo- and hetero-oligomerization of TbetaRII-B, an alternatively spliced variant of the mouse TGF-beta type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnaveni, Manda S; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Seeger, Werner

    2006-01-01

    , but the oligomerization pattern and dynamics of TbetaRII splice variants in live cells has not been demonstrated thus far. Using co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), we demonstrate that the mouse TbetaRII receptor splice variant TbetaRII-B is capable of forming ligand...

  6. How Do States Define Alternative Education? REL 2014-038

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porowski, Allan; O'Conner, Rosemarie; Luo, Jia Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an overview of similarities and differences in how states and state education agencies define alternative education, as well as which states have alternative education standards and what those standards entail. The study reviewed information on alternative education definitions and programs from state and federal websites and…

  7. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies of Mitochondrial Glutaminase C Reveal Extended Flexible Regions, and Link Oligomeric State with Enzyme Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, Søren Skou; Ramachandran, Siddharth;

    2013-01-01

    Glutaminase C is a key metabolic enzyme, which is unregulated in many cancer systems and believed to play a central role in the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells undergo changes to an altered metabolic profile. A long-standing hypothesis links enzymatic activity to the protein oligomeric state......, hence the study of the solution behavior in general and the oligomer state in particular of glutaminase C is important for the understanding of the mechanism of protein activation and inhibition. In this report, this is extensively investigated in correlation to enzyme concentration or phosphate level...... state and investigates the C-terminal influence on the enzyme solution behavior. Our data enable SAXS-based rigid body modeling of the full-length tetramer states, thereby presenting the first ever experimentally derived structural model of mitochondrial glutaminase C including the N- and C...

  8. Two novel cyclodextrin-degrading enzymes isolated from thermophilic bacteria have similar domain structures but differ in oligomeric state and activity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Pernilla; Labes, Antje; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Hreggvidson, Gudmundur O; Schönheit, Peter; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Holst, Olle; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we present the expression and characterization of two novel enzymes from the alpha-amylase family exhibiting cyclomaltodextrinase specificity. The nucleotide sequences encoding the enzymes were isolated from the genomic DNA of two thermophilic bacterial strains originating from Icelandic hot springs and belonging to the genera Anoxybacillus (AfCda13) and Laceyella (LsCda13). The genes were amplified using a consensus primer strategy utilizing two of the four conserved regions present in glycoside hydrolase family 13. No identifiable signal peptides were present in open reading frames encoding the enzymes, indicating an intracellular location of both enzymes, and their physiological function to be intracellular cyclodextrin degradation. The domain structures of both enzymes were also similar, including an N-terminal domain, the catalytic module composed of the A- and B-domains, and a C-terminal domain. Despite the similarity in domain composition, the two enzymes displayed differences in the oligomeric state with AfCda13 being a dimeric protein, whereas LsCda13 was monomeric. The two enzymes also displayed significantly different activity profiles, despite being active on the same range of substrates. It was shown that the enzyme displaying the highest activity on cyclodextrin was dimeric (AfCda13). Moreover, a fraction of the dimeric enzyme could be converted to a monomeric state in the presence of KCl and this fraction retained only 23% of its activity on alpha-cyclodextrin while its activity on starch was not significantly affected, indicating that the oligomeric state is an important factor for a high activity on cyclodextrin substrates.

  9. 24 CFR 248.223 - Alternative State strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alternative State strategy. 248.223... Preservation Act of 1987 § 248.223 Alternative State strategy. (a) The Commissioner may approve a State strategy providing for State approval of plans of action that involve termination of low...

  10. Economics of alternative palm oil processing technologies in Imo State

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economics of alternative palm oil processing technologies in Imo State. ... This study was designed to analyse the costs and returns of alternative palm oil processing ... Output of Palm oil and consequently net returns would increase if palm oil ...

  11. Structural basis for phosphorylated autoinducer-2 modulation of the oligomerization state of the global transcription regulator LsrR from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minhao; Tao, Yue; Liu, Xiaotian; Zang, Jianye

    2013-05-31

    Quorum-sensing systems are widely used by bacteria to control behavior in response to fluctuations in cell density. Several small diffusible molecules called autoinducers act as signaling molecules in quorum-sensing processes through interplay with sensors. Autoinducers modulate vital physiological functions such as nutrient acquisition, gene transcription, and virulence factor production. In Escherichia coli, LsrR serves as a global transcription regulator that responds to autoinducer-2 to regulate the expression of a variety of genes, including the lsr operon and the lsrR gene. Here, we report the crystal structure of full-length LsrR from E. coli, which has an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain connected by a β-strand. Although only two molecules are found in one asymmetric unit, two neighboring dimers pack to form a tetramer that is consistent with the oligomerization state of LsrR in solution. Mutagenesis experiments and gel shift assays indicated that Gln-33 and Tyr-26 might be involved in interactions between LsrR and DNA. The LsrR-binding site for phosphorylated autoinducer-2 was predicted by structural comparisons of LsrR with CggR and SorC. Cross-linking, size exclusion chromatography, and gel shift assays determined that phosphorylated autoinducer-2 triggered the disassembly of the LsrR tetramer into dimers and reduced the DNA binding ability of LsrR. Our findings reveal a mechanism for the change in the oligomerization state of LsrR in the presence of phosphorylated autoinducer-2. Based on these observations, we propose that phosphorylated autoinducer-2 triggers the disassembly of the LsrR tetramer to activate the transcription of its target genes.

  12. A Comparison of State Alternative Education Accountability Policies and Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessman, Amy; Hurtado, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this policy study was to report descriptive research on state-level policy and frameworks for accountability systems of alternative education in the United States. The six states; California, Colorado, Texas, Florida, Oklahoma, and North Carolina; identified in the 2010 Jobs for the Futures policy analysis of alternative education…

  13. Alternative stable states in large shallow lakes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Annette B.G.; Teurlincx, Sven; An, S.Q.; Janse, J.H.; Paer, H.W.; Mooij, Wolf M.

    2014-01-01

    Many lakes worldwide are experiencing great change due to eutrophication. Consequently, species composition changes, toxic algal blooms proliferate, and drinking water supplies dwindle. The transition to the deteriorated state can be catastrophic with an abrupt change from macrophyte to phytoplankto

  14. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transporation Program - State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    Factsheet answering frequently asked questions about the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (the Program) that implements provisions of Titles III–V of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Answers to questions that are frequently asked about the Program by managers of state government and alternative fuel provider fleets are provided in the factsheet.

  15. The role of the C-terminal region on the oligomeric state and enzymatic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Wanda M; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Defelipe, Lucas A; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier; Delfino, José M

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcHPRT) is a critical enzyme for the survival of the parasite. This work demonstrates that the full-length form in solution adopts a stable and enzymatically active tetrameric form, exhibiting large inter-subunit surfaces. Although this protein irreversibly aggregates during unfolding, oligomerization is reversible and can be modulated by low concentrations of urea. When the C-terminal region, which is predicted as a disordered stretch, is excised by proteolysis, TcHPRT adopts a dimeric state, suggesting that the C-terminal region acts as a main guide for the quaternary arrangement. These results are in agreement with X-ray crystallographic data presented in this work. On the other hand, the C-terminal region exhibits a modulatory role on the enzyme, as attested by the enhanced activity observed for the dimeric form. Bisphosphonates act as substrate-mimetics, uncovering long-range communications among the active sites. All in all, this work contributes to establish new ways applicable to the design of novel inhibitors that could eventually result in new drugs against parasitic diseases.

  16. Alternative steady states in ecological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Yael; Shnerb, Nadav M.; Kessler, David A.

    2017-07-01

    In many natural situations, one observes a local system with many competing species that is coupled by weak immigration to a regional species pool. The dynamics of such a system is dominated by its stable and uninvadable (SU) states. When the competition matrix is random, the number of SUs depends on the average value and variance of its entries. Here we consider the problem in the limit of weak competition and large variance. Using a yes-no interaction model, we show that the number of SUs corresponds to the number of maximum cliques in an Erdös-Rényi network. The number of SUs grows exponentially with the number of species in this limit, unless the network is completely asymmetric. In the asymmetric limit, the number of SUs is O (1 ) . Numerical simulations suggest that these results are valid for models with a continuous distribution of competition terms.

  17. Pore formation by human stefin B in its native and oligomeric states and the consequent amyloid induced toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor eAnderluh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that amyloid forming peptides and proteins interact with membranes and that this correlates with cytotoxicity. To introduce the theme we give a brief description of some amyloidogenic proteins and note their similarities with pore forming toxins and cell penetrating peptides. Human stefin B, a member of the family of cystatins, is an amyloidogenic protein in vitro. This review describes our studies of the interaction of stefin B oligomers and prefibrillar aggregates with model membranes leading to pore formation. We have studied the interaction between human stefin B and artificial membranes of various compositions. We also have prepared distinct sizes and morphologies of stefin B prefibrillar states and assessed their toxicity. Furthermore, we have measured electrical currents through pores formed by stefin B prefibrillar oligomers in a planar lipid bilayer setup. We finally discuss the possible functional and pathological significance of such pores formed by human stefin B.

  18. Solid-State Metalloproteins—An Alternative to Immobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor D. Rapson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This commentary outlines a protein engineering approach as an alternative to immobilisation developed in our laboratory. We use a recombinant silk protein into which metal active sites can be incorporated to produce solid-state metalloprotein materials. The silk protein directly coordinates to the metal centres providing control over their reactivity akin to that seen in naturally occurring metalloproteins. These solid-state materials are remarkably stable at a range of temperatures and different solvent conditions. I discuss the genesis of this approach and highlight areas where such solid-state materials could find application.

  19. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Álvarez-Paggi, Damián; Ledesma, Gabriela N.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.; Murgida, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant CuA redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronic wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. These findings suggest a unique role for alternative or “invisible” electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein–protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron–proton energy transduction. PMID:23054836

  20. Oligomerization in health and disease

    CERN Document Server

    Giraldo, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    This special volume of Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science focuses on oligomerization in health and disease. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  1. Recruitment facilitation can drive alternative states on temperate reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskett, Marissa L; Salomon, Anne K

    2010-06-01

    How the combination of positive and negative species interactions acts to drive community dynamics is a fundamental question in ecology. Here we explore one aspect of this question by expanding the theory of predator-mediated coexistence to include the potential role of facilitation between the predator and inferior competitor. To motivate and illustrate our simple model, we focus on sea-urchin-algae interactions in temperate rocky reef systems and incorporate recruitment facilitation, a common characteristic of marine systems. Specifically, the model represents sea urchin grazing on macroalgae, macroalgal competition with crustose coralline algae (CCA), and facilitation of sea urchin recruitment to CCA. These interactions generate alternative stable states, one dominated by macroalgae and the other by urchins, which do not occur when recruitment facilitation of urchins to CCA is ignored. Therefore, recruitment facilitation provides a possible mechanism for alternative kelp forest and urchin barren states in temperate marine systems, where storm events or harvesting of urchins or their predators can drive switches between states that are difficult to reverse. In systems with such dynamics, spatial management such as no-take marine reserves may play a crucial role in protecting community structure by increasing the resilience to shifts between states.

  2. Alternative epigenetic chromatin states of polycomb target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri B Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb (PcG regulation has been thought to produce stable long-term gene silencing. Genomic analyses in Drosophila and mammals, however, have shown that it targets many genes, which can switch state during development. Genetic evidence indicates that critical for the active state of PcG target genes are the histone methyltransferases Trithorax (TRX and ASH1. Here we analyze the repertoire of alternative states in which PcG target genes are found in different Drosophila cell lines and the role of PcG proteins TRX and ASH1 in controlling these states. Using extensive genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, RNAi knockdowns, and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that, in addition to the known repressed state, PcG targets can reside in a transcriptionally active state characterized by formation of an extended domain enriched in ASH1, the N-terminal, but not C-terminal moiety of TRX and H3K27ac. ASH1/TRX N-ter domains and transcription are not incompatible with repressive marks, sometimes resulting in a "balanced" state modulated by both repressors and activators. Often however, loss of PcG repression results instead in a "void" state, lacking transcription, H3K27ac, or binding of TRX or ASH1. We conclude that PcG repression is dynamic, not static, and that the propensity of a target gene to switch states depends on relative levels of PcG, TRX, and activators. N-ter TRX plays a remarkable role that antagonizes PcG repression and preempts H3K27 methylation by acetylation. This role is distinct from that usually attributed to TRX/MLL proteins at the promoter. These results have important implications for Polycomb gene regulation, the "bivalent" chromatin state of embryonic stem cells, and gene expression in development.

  3. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Alternative Compliance; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    The final rule of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and its associated regulations enable covered state and alternative fuel provider fleets to obtain waivers from the alternative fuel vehicle (AFV)-acquisition requirements of Standard Compliance. Under Alternative Compliance, covered fleets instead meet a petroleum-use reduction requirement. This guidance document is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  4. Oligomeric viral proteins: small in size, large in presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Bhargavi; Smith, Amber M.; Fernandes, Jason D.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites that rely heavily on host cellular processes for replication. The small number of proteins typically encoded by a virus is faced with selection pressures that lead to the evolution of distinctive structural properties, allowing each protein to maintain its function under constraints such as small genome size, high mutation rate, and rapidly changing fitness conditions. One common strategy for this evolution is to utilize small building blocks to generate protein oligomers that assemble in multiple ways, thereby diversifying protein function and regulation. In this review, we discuss specific cases that illustrate how oligomerization is used to generate a single defined functional state, to modulate activity via different oligomeric states, or to generate multiple functional forms via different oligomeric states. PMID:27685368

  5. Biophysical characterization of GPCR oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Signe

    a quantitative characterization of GPCR oligomerization. The assay provided the first quantification of the association energy of the β2 Adrenergic Receptor (β2AR), a prototypical GPCR. Furthermore we directly observed the time-dependent dimerization of β2AR and Cannabinoid receptor 1 at the single molecule......The biophysical characterization of the fundamental molecular mechanisms behind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization is proposed to be paramount for understanding the pharmacological consequence of receptor self-association. Here we developed an in vitro assay that allowed...

  6. About an Alternative Vacuum State for Perturbative QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Rigol, M

    1999-01-01

    A particular initial state for the construction of a perturbative QCD expansion is investigated. It is formed as a coherent superposition of zero momentum gluon pairs and shows Lorentz as well as global $SU(3)$ symmetries. The general form of the Wick theorem is discussed, and it follows that the gluon and ghost propagators determined by the proposed vacuum state, coincides with the ones used in an alternative of the usual perturbation theory proposed in a previous work, and reviewed here. Therefore, the ability of such a procedure of producing a finite gluon condensation parameter already in the first orders of perturbation theory is naturally explained. It also follows that this state satisfies the physicality condition of the BRST procedure in its Kugo and Ojima formulation. A brief review of the canonical quantization for gauge fields, developed by Kugo and Ojima, is done and the value of the gauge parameter $\\alpha$ is fixed to $\\alpha=1$ where the procedure is greatly simplified. Therefore, after assumi...

  7. Washington State pediatricians' attitudes toward alternative childhood immunization schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Aaron; Opel, Douglas J; Marcuse, Edgar K; Taylor, James A

    2011-12-01

    To determine the frequency of parents' requests for alternative childhood immunization schedules (ACISs) and pediatricians' comfort with and willingness to use ACISs. Washington State primary care pediatricians were asked to complete an Internet-based survey on ACISs. The main outcome measures were the frequency of parents' requests for ACISs, pediatricians' comfort with their use, and pediatricians' willingness to use ACISs for individual vaccines. In addition, respondents were asked to characterize their practices and to provide demographic information. Of the 311 respondents (response rate: 65%), 209 met inclusion criteria and were included in analyses. Overall, 77% of eligible respondents reported that parents sometimes or frequently requested ACISs, and 61% were comfortable using an ACIS if requested by a parent. Pediatricians were least willing to consider using ACISs for diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-acellular pertussis vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Pediatricians who practiced in a neighborhood or community clinic were less comfortable using ACISs than were those in a 1- or 2-physician practice (odds ratio: 0.10). Washington State pediatricians are regularly being asked to use ACISs, and most of them are comfortable using them if requested. Pediatricians are least willing to delay H influenzae type b vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-acellular pertussis vaccine, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, which suggests prioritization of immunizations that protect against potentially devastating bacterial infections of infancy and early childhood.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education in United States Pharmacy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Donna M.; Kroll, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey of 50 pharmacy schools investigated the degree to which instruction in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was included in the pharmacy curriculum, and use of alternative practitioners as instructors. Almost three-quarters offered coursework in herbal medicine or other areas of CAM; about half offered other alternative medicine…

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education in United States Pharmacy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Donna M.; Kroll, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey of 50 pharmacy schools investigated the degree to which instruction in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was included in the pharmacy curriculum, and use of alternative practitioners as instructors. Almost three-quarters offered coursework in herbal medicine or other areas of CAM; about half offered other alternative medicine…

  10. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Jessica F; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N; Urata, Sarah M; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2017-01-15

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (genera Marburgvirus and Ebolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

  11. Mapping the conformational dynamics and pathways of spontaneous steric zipper Peptide oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Matthes

    Full Text Available The process of protein misfolding and self-assembly into various, polymorphic aggregates is associated with a number of important neurodegenerative diseases. Only recently, crystal structures of several short peptides have provided detailed structural insights into -sheet rich aggregates, known as amyloid fibrils. Knowledge about early events of the formation and interconversion of small oligomeric states, an inevitable step in the cascade of peptide self-assembly, however, remains still limited. We employ molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to study the spontaneous aggregation process of steric zipper peptide segments from the tau protein and insulin in atomistic detail. Starting from separated chains with random conformations, we find a rapid formation of structurally heterogeneous, -sheet rich oligomers, emerging from multiple bimolecular association steps and diverse assembly pathways. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that aggregate intermediates as small as dimers can be kinetically trapped and thus affect the structural evolution of larger oligomers. Alternative aggregate structures are found for both peptide sequences in the different independent simulations, some of which feature characteristics of the known steric zipper conformation (e.g., -sheet bilayers with a dry interface. The final aggregates interconvert with topologically distinct oligomeric states exclusively via internal rearrangements. The peptide oligomerization was analyzed through the perspective of a minimal oligomer, i.e., the dimer. Thereby all observed multimeric aggregates can be consistently mapped onto a space of reduced dimensionality. This novel method of conformational mapping reveals heterogeneous association and reorganization dynamics that are governed by the characteristics of peptide sequence and oligomer size.

  12. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e- waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (˜107 s-1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ˜1-2 nm).

  13. Transient structural distortion of metal-free Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase triggers aberrant oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Smith, Melanie H; Schulz, Eike

    2009-01-01

    of the excited-state structure that forms intermolecular contacts in the earliest nonnative dimer/oligomer. The conformational transition that triggers oligomerization is a common feature of WT SOD1 and ALS-associated mutants that have widely different physicochemical properties. But compared with WT SOD1......, the mutants have enhanced structural distortions in their excited states, and in some cases slightly higher excited-state populations and lower kinetic barriers, implying increased susceptibility to oligomerization. Our results provide a unified picture that highlights both (i) a common denominator among......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease linked to the misfolding of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). ALS-related defects in SOD1 result in a gain of toxic function that coincides with aberrant oligomerization. The structural events triggering oligomerization have...

  14. Federal, State, and Local Roles Supporting Alternative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nancy; Brand, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    This white paper examines the roles that various levels of government play through legislation, policy, and other initiatives that support quality alternative education programs to reconnect youth to education and the workplace. It raises issues for policymakers at all levels to consider in facilitating the development of expanded alternative…

  15. Alternatives to overcoming bacterial resistances: State-of-the-art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Alessandra C; Moutinho, Carla G; Pinto, Flávio C; Del Fiol, Fernando S; Jozala, Angela; Chaud, Marco V; Vila, Marta M D C; Teixeira, José A; Balcão, Victor M

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, bacterial resistance to chemical antibiotics has reached such a high level that endangers public health. Presently, the adoption of alternative strategies that promote the elimination of resistant microbial strains from the environment is of utmost importance. This review discusses and analyses several (potential) alternative strategies to current chemical antibiotics. Bacteriophage (or phage) therapy, although not new, makes use of strictly lytic phage particles as an alternative, or a complement, in the antimicrobial treatment of bacterial infections. It is being rediscovered as a safe method, because these biological entities devoid of any metabolic machinery do not possess any affinity whatsoever to eukaryotic cells. Lysin therapy is also recognized as an innovative antimicrobial therapeutic option, since the topical administration of preparations containing purified recombinant lysins with amounts in the order of nanograms, in infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, demonstrated a high therapeutic potential by causing immediate lysis of the target bacterial cells. Additionally, this therapy exhibits the potential to act synergistically when combined with certain chemical antibiotics already available on the market. Another potential alternative antimicrobial therapy is based on the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), amphiphilic polypeptides that cause disruption of the bacterial membrane and can be used in the treatment of bacterial, fungal and viral infections, in the prevention of biofilm formation, and as antitumoral agents. Interestingly, bacteriocins are a common strategy of bacterial defense against other bacterial agents, eliminating the potential opponents of the former and increasing the number of available nutrients in the environment for their own growth. They can be applied in the food industry as biopreservatives and as probiotics, and also in fighting multi-resistant bacterial strains. The use of antibacterial antibodies

  16. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  17. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report; Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2013/FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    Compliance rates for covered state government and alternative fuel provider fleets under the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (pursuant to the Energy Policy Act or EPAct) are reported for MY 2013/FY 2014 in this publication.

  18. Multiple feedbacks and the prevalence of alternate stable states on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Leemput, Ingrid A.; Hughes, Terry P.; van Nes, Egbert H.; Scheffer, Marten

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of alternate stable states on coral reefs has been disputed, although there is universal agreement that many reefs have experienced substantial losses of coral cover. Alternate stable states require a strong positive feedback that causes self-reinforcing runaway change when a threshold is passed. Here we use a simple model of the dynamics of corals, macroalgae and herbivores to illustrate that even weak positive feedbacks that individually cannot lead to alternate stable states can nonetheless do so if they act in concert and reinforce each other. Since the strength of feedbacks varies over time and space, our results imply that we should not reject or accept the general hypothesis that alternate stable states occur in coral reefs. Instead, it is plausible that shifts between alternate stable states can occur sporadically, or on some reefs but not others depending on local conditions. Therefore, we should aim at a better mechanistic understanding of when and why alternate stable states may occur. Our modelling results point to an urgent need to recognize, quantify, and understand feedbacks, and to reorient management interventions to focus more on the mechanisms that cause abrupt transitions between alternate states.

  19. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins from mangosteen pericarps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Caili; Loo, Alvin Eng Kiat; Chia, Fiona Ping Ping; Huang, Dejian

    2007-09-19

    Oligomeric proanthocyanidins were extracted from mangosteen pericarps and fractionated by a Sephadex LH-20 column to give 0.66% yield (dry matter). (13)C and (1)H NMR signals showed the presence of predominantly procyanidins together with a few prodelphinidin units along with small amounts of stereoisomers of afzelechin/epiafzelechin, catechin/epicatechin, and gallocatechin/epigallocatechin. Depolymerization with benzylmercaptan resulted in epicatechin thioether as the major product, and the mean degree of polymerization was determined to be 6.6. The electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectra revealed the dominant B type oligomers with mainly epicatechin units and with a small amount of A type oligomers. The isolated proanthocyanidins are potent peroxyl radical scavengers as evidenced by the high oxygen radical scavenging capacity at 1.7 x 10 (4) micromol TE/g, much higher than that of pine bark and grape seed extracts.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Urata, Sarah M.; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J.; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps); (Globel Phasing); (UCSD)

    2016-11-09

    ABSTRACT

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (generaMarburgvirusandEbolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

    IMPORTANCEMarburg virus can cause severe disease, with up to 90% human lethality. Its genome is concise, only producing seven proteins. One of the proteins, VP35, is essential for replication of the viral genome and for evasion of host immune responses. VP35 oligomerizes (self-assembles) in order to function, yet the structure by which it assembles has not been visualized. Here we present two crystal structures of this oligomerization domain. In both structures, three copies of VP35 twist about each other to form a coiled coil. This trimeric assembly is in contrast to tetrameric predictions for VP35 of Ebola virus and to known structures of homologous proteins in the measles, mumps, and Nipah viruses. Distinct oligomeric states of the Marburg and Ebola virus VP35 proteins may explain differences between them in polymerase function and immune evasion. These findings may provide a more accurate understanding of the

  1. Identification and characterization of GIP1, an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that enhances the DNA binding affinity and reduces the oligomeric state of G-box binding factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul C. SEHNKE; Beth J. LAUGHNER; Carla R. LYERLY LINEBARGER; William B. GURLEY; Robert J.FERL

    2005-01-01

    Environmental control of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and other stress response genes in plants is in part brought about by transcriptional regulation involving the G-box cis-acting DNA element and bZIP G-box Binding Factors (GBFs).The mechanisms of GBF regulation and requirements for additional factors in this control process are not well understood.In an effort to identify potential GBF binding and control partners, maize GBF1 was used as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an A. thaliana cDNA library. GBF Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) arose from the screen as a 496 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 53,748 kDa that strongly interacts with GBFs. Northern analysis of A.thaliana tissue suggests a 1.8-1.9 kb GIP1 transcript, predominantly in roots. Immunolocalization studies indicate that GIP1 protein is mainly localized to the nucleus. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays using an Adh G-box DNA probe and recombinant A. thaliana GBF3 or maize GBF1, showed that the presence of GIP1 resulted in a tenfold increase in GBF DNA binding activity without altering the migration, suggesting a transient association between GIP1 and GBF. Addition of GIP1 to intentionally aggregated GBF converted GBF to lower molecular weight macromolecular complexes and GIP1 also refolded denatured rhodanese in the absence of ATP. These data suggest GIP1 functions to enhance GBF DNA binding activity by acting as a potent nuclear chaperone or crowbar, and potentially regulates the multimeric state of GBFs, thereby contributing to bZIP-mediated gene regulation.

  2. 20 CFR 416.2204 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or... General Provisions § 416.2204 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a) General. In order to participate in the payment program under this subpart through its VR agency(ies), a State...

  3. 20 CFR 404.2104 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or... General Provisions § 404.2104 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a) General. In order to participate in the payment program under this subpart through its VR agency(ies), a State...

  4. 42 CFR 447.68 - Alternative copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or similar cost sharing charges: State plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternative copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or similar cost sharing charges: State plan requirements. 447.68 Section 447.68 Public Health CENTERS... Under Section 1916a § 447.68 Alternative copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or similar cost...

  5. Competition for nutrient and light: stable coexistence, alternative stable states, or competitive exclusion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarge, J.; Hol, S.; Escher, M.; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Competition theory has put forward three contrasting hypotheses: Competition for nutrients and light may lead to (i) stable coexistence of species, (ii) alternative stable states, or (iii) competitive exclusion. This paper presents a detailed investigation of competition among phytoplankton species

  6. Competition for nutrients and light: Stable coexistence, alternative stable states or competitive exclusion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarge, J.; Hol, S.; Escher, M.; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Competition theory has put forward three contrasting hypotheses: Competition for nutrients and light may lead to (i) stable coexistence of species, (ii) alternative stable states, or (iii) competitive exclusion. This paper presents a detailed investigation of competition among phytoplankto

  7. Global extent and determinants of savanna and forest as alternative biome states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Staver, C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, fire–tree cover feedbacks can maintain savanna and forest as alternative stable states. However, the global extent of fire- driven discontinuities in tree cover is unknown, especially accounting for seasonality and soils. The authors...

  8. Electron Microscopy Structural Insights into CPAP Oligomeric Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez-Cabrera, Ana L; Delgado, Sandra; Gil-Carton, David

    2017-01-01

    that represent obtaining the protein in a soluble, homogeneous state for structural studies. Our work constitutes a systematic structural analysis on multiple oligomers of HsCPAP(897)(-1338), using single-particle electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained (NS) samples. Based on image classification...... into clearly different regular 3D maps (putatively corresponding to dimers and tetramers) and direct observation of individual images representing other complexes of HsCPAP(897-1338) (i.e., putative flexible monomers and higher-order multimers), we report a dynamic oligomeric behavior of this protein, where...... of atomic models into the NS 3D maps at resolutions around 20 Å is performed only to complement our experimental data, allowing us to hypothesize on the oligomeric composition of the different complexes. In this way, the current EM work represents an initial step toward the structural characterization...

  9. An alternative pluripotent state confers interspecies chimaeric competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Okamura, Daiji; Li, Mo; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Luo, Chongyuan; Ma, Li; He, Yupeng; Li, Zhongwei; Benner, Chris; Tamura, Isao; Krause, Marie N.; Nery, Joseph R.; Du, Tingting; Zhang, Zhuzhu; Hishida, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Yuta; Aizawa, Emi; Kim, Na Young; Lajara, Jeronimo; Guillen, Pedro; Campistol, Josep M.; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Ross, Pablo J.; Saghatelian, Alan; Ren, Bing; Ecker, Joseph R.; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotency, the ability to generate any cell type of the body, is an evanescent attribute of embryonic cells. Transitory pluripotent cells can be captured at different time points during embryogenesis and maintained as embryonic stem cells or epiblast stem cells in culture. Since ontogenesis is a dynamic process in both space and time, it seems counterintuitive that these two temporal states represent the full spectrum of organismal pluripotency. Here we show that by modulating culture parameters, a stem-cell type with unique spatial characteristics and distinct molecular and functional features, designated as region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs), can be efficiently obtained from mouse embryos and primate pluripotent stem cells, including humans. The ease of culturing and editing the genome of human rsPSCs offers advantages for regenerative medicine applications. The unique ability of human rsPSCs to generate post-implantation interspecies chimaeric embryos may facilitate our understanding of early human development and evolution. PMID:25945737

  10. Multidimensional poverty: an alternative measurement approach for the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waglé, Udaya R

    2008-06-01

    International poverty research has increasingly underscored the need to use multidimensional approaches to measure poverty. Largely embraced in Europe and elsewhere, this has not had much impact on the way poverty is measured in the United States. In this paper, I use a comprehensive multidimensional framework including economic well-being, capability, and social inclusion to examine poverty in the US. Data from the 2004 General Social Survey support the interconnectedness among these poverty dimensions, indicating that the multidimensional framework utilizing a comprehensive set of information provides a compelling value added to poverty measurement. The suggested demographic characteristics of the various categories of the poor are somewhat similar between this approach and other traditional approaches. But the more comprehensive and accurate measurement outcomes from this approach help policymakers target resources at the specific groups.

  11. Yellow Dragon, Green Belt and Alternative Ecosystem States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazartseren Boldgiv

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This note briefly discusses different aspects of dust storm and issues surrounding the Green Belt Eco- Strip National Program (GBESNP initiated by the Government of Mongolia in March 2005. Increases in dust storm intensity and magnitude might be an indicator for deteriorating ecosystem states. If there is such an increase, it is only a consequence of unsustainable resource use by humans, including proximately the overgrazing, mining, agriculture and deforestation and ultimately climate change. Additionally, the effects of dust storms are not all bad, but there are other aspects of it that should be considered when one wants to address the issue. Apparently, dust storms play an important role in global circulation of nutrient and minerals as they have always been. Thus they do have positive effects in ecosystem states elsewhere on Earth. It seems however these other effects of dust storms are largely ignored. The note also points out some of the important theoretical and practical aspects that need to be seriously considered before taking on such a large scale environmental engineering effort as GBESNP. If dust storm is increasing in frequency and magnitude, it is crucial to pinpoint causative factors and implement efforts aimed at improving and enforcing laws and regulations on those causative environmental practices. Acting before thinking is not the smartest habit and we have reasons to believe that implementing the GBESNP (with its name basically copied from elsewhere without good plan and management is not a solution, but it may even add to the problem. Therefore, we urge environmental managers and scientists, especially policy- makers to seriously weigh the pros and cons of the project. If policy-makers seek a short-term public relations benefit from a largely uninformed general public, it is the scientists’ obligation to intervene.

  12. On multiple alternating steady states induced by periodic spin phase perturbation waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buračas, Giedrius T; Jung, Youngkyoo; Lee, Jongho; Buxton, Richard B; Wong, Eric C; Liu, Thomas T

    2012-05-01

    Direct measurement of neural currents by means of MRI can potentially open a high temporal resolution (10-100 ms) window applicable for monitoring dynamics of neuronal activity without loss of the high spatial resolution afforded by MRI. Previously, we have shown that the alternating balanced steady state imaging affords high sensitivity to weak periodic currents owing to its amplification of periodic spin phase perturbations. This technique, however, requires precise synchronization of such perturbations to the radiofrequency pulses. Herein, we extend alternating balanced steady state imaging to multiple balanced alternating steady states for estimation of neural current waveforms. Simulations and phantom experiments show that the off-resonance profile of the multiple alternating steady state signal carries information about the frequency content of driving waveforms. In addition, the method is less sensitive than alternating balanced steady state to precise waveform timing relative to radiofrequency pulses. Thus, multiple alternating steady state technique is potentially applicable to MR imaging of the waveforms of periodic neuronal activity.

  13. Reversible peptide oligomerization over nanoscale gold surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Yokoyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A selective oligomeric formation of amyloid beta 1-40 (Ab1-40 monomers over a nanogold colloidal surface was investigated. An unfolded Ab1-40 monomer is considered to construct a dimer or trimer based oligomeric form with its hydrophobic segment placing outward under an acidic condition. Under a basic condition, a conformation of Ab is expected to take a folded monomeric form with its hydrophilic segment folded inward, avoiding the networking with residual colloidal particles. The most probable oligomeric form constructed over a 20 nm gold colloidal surface within a 25 ℃ to 65 ℃ temperature range is a dimer based unit and that over 30 or 40 nm gold colloidal surface below 15 ℃ is concluded to be a trimer based unit. However, selective oligomerization was not successfully reproduced under the rest of the conditions. A dipole-induced dipole interaction must cause a flexible structural change between folded and unfolded forms.

  14. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  15. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  16. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-03-26

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage.

  17. Geography of Existing and Potential Alternative Fuel Markets in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.; Hettinger, D.

    2014-11-01

    When deploying alternative fuels, it is paramount to match the right fuel with the right location, in accordance with local market conditions. We used six market indicators to evaluate the existing and potential regional market health for each of the five most commonly deployed alternative fuels: electricity (used by plug-in electric vehicles), biodiesel (blends of B20 and higher), E85 ethanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and propane. Each market indicator was mapped, combined, and evaluated by industry experts. This process revealed the weight the market indicators should be given, with the proximity of fueling stations being the most important indicator, followed by alternative fuel vehicle density, gasoline prices, state incentives, nearby resources, and finally, environmental benefit. Though markets vary among states, no state received 'weak' potential for all five fuels, indicating that all states have an opportunity to use at least one alternative fuel. California, Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, and Washington appear to have the best potential markets for alternative fuels in general, with each sporting strong markets for four of the fuels. Wyoming showed the least potential, with weak markets for all alternative fuels except for CNG, for which it has a patchy market. Of all the fuels, CNG is promising in the greatest number of states--largely because freight traffic provides potential demand for many far-reaching corridor markets and because the sources of CNG are so widespread geographically.

  18. Alternative fuel vehicles for the state fleets: Results of the 5-year planning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report documents the first attempt by the Department of Energy (DOE) to work with states to prepare five-year Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) acquisition plans to identify alternative fuels and vehicles that they are planning on or would like to acquire. The DOE Regional Support Offices (RSOs) met with representatives from the states in their regions and assisted in the preparation of the plans. These plans will be used in conjunction with previously gathered Federal five-year plans to encourage Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to expand the variety of AFVs produced, reduce the incremental cost of AFVs, and to encourage fuel suppliers to expand the alternative fuel infrastructure and alternative fuel availability. By identifying the needs and requirements of state fleets, DOE can begin to describe the specific nature of the future state fleets, and establish a defined market for OEMs and fuel suppliers. DOE initiated the development and collection of the state five-year plans before the signing of the Energy Policy Act, to raise the awareness of states that they will be required by law to acquire AFVs. As a result, several states that had no AFV acquisition plan when queried have developed or are in the process of developing plans. The DOE and its RSOs are still working with the states to develop and refine acquisition plans, and this report should be treated as documentation of work in progress.

  19. Spontaneous sleep-like brain state alternations and breathing characteristics in urethane anesthetized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pagliardini

    Full Text Available Brain state alternations resembling those of sleep spontaneously occur in rats under urethane anesthesia and they are closely linked with sleep-like respiratory changes. Although rats are a common model for both sleep and respiratory physiology, we sought to determine if similar brain state and respiratory changes occur in mice under urethane. We made local field potential recordings from the hippocampus and measured respiratory activity by means of EMG recordings in intercostal, genioglossus, and abdominal muscles. Similar to results in adult rats, urethane anesthetized mice displayed quasi-periodic spontaneous forebrain state alternations between deactivated patterns resembling slow wave sleep (SWS and activated patterns resembling rapid eye movement (REM sleep. These alternations were associated with an increase in breathing rate, respiratory variability, a depression of inspiratory related activity in genioglossus muscle and an increase in expiratory-related abdominal muscle activity when comparing deactivated (SWS-like to activated (REM-like states. These results demonstrate that urethane anesthesia consistently induces sleep-like brain state alternations and correlated changes in respiratory activity across different rodent species. They open up the powerful possibility of utilizing transgenic mouse technology for the advancement and translation of knowledge regarding sleep cycle alternations and their impact on respiration.

  20. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets - Fleet Compliance Annual Report: Model Year 2015, Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state government and alternative fuel provider fleets, pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. Covered fleets may meet their EPAct requirements through one of two compliance methods: Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. For model year (MY) 2015, the compliance rate with this program for the more than 3011 reporting fleets was 100%. More than 294 fleets used Standard Compliance and exceeded their aggregate MY 2015 acquisition requirements by 8% through acquisitions alone. The seven covered fleets that used Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2015 petroleum use reduction requirements by 46%.

  1. Biogeomorphic feedback between plant growth and flooding causes alternative stable states in an experimental floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Wang, Qiao; Meire, Dieter; Ma, Wandong; Wu, Chuanqing; Meng, Zhen; Van de Koppel, Johan; Troch, Peter; Verhoeven, Ronny; De Mulder, Tom; Temmerman, Stijn

    2016-07-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms of vegetation establishment on bare substrate in a disturbance-driven ecosystem because of many valuable ecosystem services. This study tested for empirical indications of local alternative stable states controlled by biogeomorphic feedbacks using flume experiments with alfalfa: (1) single flood experiments different in flood intensity and plant growth, (2) long-term evolution experiments with repeated flooding and seeding. We observed: (1) a combination of thresholds in plant growth and flooding magnitude for upgrowing seedlings to survive; (2) bimodality in vegetation biomass after floods indicating the existence of two alternative states, either densely vegetated or bare; (3) facilitation of vegetation establishment by the spatial pattern formation of channels and sand bars. In conclusion, empirical indicators were demonstrated for local alternative stable states in a disturbance-driven ecosystem associated with biogeomorphic feedbacks, which could contribute to the protection and restoration of vegetation in such ecosystems.

  2. Dimerization and oligomerization of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Ryder, L Rebekka; Steinø, Anne;

    2003-01-01

    protein. Using PAGE, urea gradient gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis and MS, we show that dimerization through the SH group can be induced by lowering the pH to 5-6, heating, or under conditions that favour partial unfolding such as urea concentrations above 2.6 m or SDS concentrations above...... 0.025%. Moreover, we show that calreticulin also has the ability to self-oligomerize through noncovalent interactions at urea concentrations above 2.6 m at pH below 4.6 or above pH 10, at temperatures above 40 degrees C, or in the presence of high concentrations of organic solvents (25%), conditions...... urea or 1% SDS, and heat-induced oligomerization could be inhibited by 8 m urea or 1% SDS when present during heating. Comparison of the binding properties of monomeric and oligomeric calreticulin in solid-phase assays showed increased binding to peptides and denatured proteins when calreticulin...

  3. A fluorimetric readout reporting the kinetics of nucleotide-induced human ribonucleotide reductase oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Lin, Hong-Yu; Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2014-11-24

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRNR) is a target of nucleotide chemotherapeutics in clinical use. The nucleotide-induced oligomeric regulation of hRNR subunit α is increasingly being recognized as an innate and drug-relevant mechanism for enzyme activity modulation. In the presence of negative feedback inhibitor dATP and leukemia drug clofarabine nucleotides, hRNR-α assembles into catalytically inert hexameric complexes, whereas nucleotide effectors that govern substrate specificity typically trigger α-dimerization. Currently, both knowledge of and tools to interrogate the oligomeric assembly pathway of RNR in any species in real time are lacking. We therefore developed a fluorimetric assay that reliably reports on oligomeric state changes of α with high sensitivity. The oligomerization-directed fluorescence quenching of hRNR-α, covalently labeled with two fluorophores, allows for direct readout of hRNR dimeric and hexameric states. We applied the newly developed platform to reveal the timescales of α self-assembly, driven by the feedback regulator dATP. This information is currently unavailable, despite the pharmaceutical relevance of hRNR oligomeric regulation.

  4. Reactive bay functionalized perylene monoimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane organic electronic dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangatia Lodrick Makokha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation-induced quenching is particularly detrimental in perylene diimides, which are characterized by a near-unity fluorescence quantum yield in solution but are far less emissive in the solid state. Previously, perylene diimide has been improved by linking it to the inorganic cage of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. As a further study on perylene diimidepolyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, we report on a double functionalized molecular structure, which can be used for substitution at the bay area and as a side group in other materials. Typical solution absorption and emission features of the perylene diimide fragment have been observed in this new reactive perylene diimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane. Moreover, reduced stacking during aggregation and spherical particles exhibiting solid fluorescence have been obtained. Organic semiconducting material with enhanced solid state photophysical properties, like solid fluorescence is a subject of great interest owing to its possible high-tech applications in optoelectronic devices.

  5. Determinants of alternative fuel vehicle choice in the continental United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompkins, M.

    1997-12-18

    This paper describes the ongoing investigation into the determinants of alternative fuel vehicle choice. A stated preference vehicle choice survey was conducted for the 47 of the continental U.S. states, excluding California. The national survey is based on and is an extension of previous studies on alternative fuel vehicle choice for the State of California conducted by the University of California's Institute of Transportation Studies (UC ITS). Researchers at UC ITS have used the stated-preference national survey to produce a series of estimates for new vehicle choice models. Three of these models are presented in this paper. The first two of the models were estimated using only the data from the national survey. The third model presented in this paper pools information from the national and California surveys to estimate a true national model for new vehicle choice.

  6. The State unlawful damage and alternative dispute resolution - State of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo Guzmán Gómez; Andrés Fajardo Arturo

    2010-01-01

    This text is intented to make the descripction of the cuirrent state of research on the unlawful damage attributable to the State and conciliation as a method of dispute resolution in litigation against the state. It sets out the various studies, and summarizes the contributions in the diagnosis of the situation and recommendations on the topics of study.

  7. SLC30A3 (ZnT3 oligomerization by dityrosine bonds regulates its subcellular localization and metal transport capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Salazar

    Full Text Available Non-covalent and covalent homo-oligomerization of membrane proteins regulates their subcellular localization and function. Here, we described a novel oligomerization mechanism affecting solute carrier family 30 member 3/zinc transporter 3 (SLC30A3/ZnT3. Oligomerization was mediated by intermolecular covalent dityrosine bonds. Using mutagenized ZnT3 expressed in PC12 cells, we identified two critical tyrosine residues necessary for dityrosine-mediated ZnT3 oligomerization. ZnT3 carrying the Y372F mutation prevented ZnT3 oligomerization, decreased ZnT3 targeting to synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs, and decreased resistance to zinc toxicity. Strikingly, ZnT3 harboring the Y357F mutation behaved as a "gain-of-function" mutant as it displayed increased ZnT3 oligomerization, targeting to SLMVs, and increased resistance to zinc toxicity. Single and double tyrosine ZnT3 mutants indicate that the predominant dimeric species is formed between tyrosine 357 and 372. ZnT3 tyrosine dimerization was detected under normal conditions and it was enhanced by oxidative stress. Covalent species were also detected in other SLC30A zinc transporters localized in different subcellular compartments. These results indicate that covalent tyrosine dimerization of a SLC30A family member modulates its subcellular localization and zinc transport capacity. We propose that dityrosine-dependent membrane protein oligomerization may regulate the function of diverse membrane protein in normal and disease states.

  8. Evaluating Kinship Care Alternatives: A Comparison of a Private Initiative to Traditional State Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Ellis

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple stressors on the child welfare system have forced innovative solutions to the overburdened foster care program. A promising alternative is kinship care, in which children are placed with biological relatives. Proponents cite the opportunity to place the child in familiar surroundings, the natural access to additional family resources, and the degree to which it is sensitive to the norms and values of non-dominant cultural groups. Various models of kinship care have been implemented in several jurisdictions, yet little or no research has been done to determine which alternatives are the most effective. This paper addresses that deficit. It reports the results of a study that compares stability of placement outcomes between a program operated by a private,not-for-profit organization (n=60 and a more traditional program (n=79 operated by a state child welfare agency. Results support the use of the private alternative over the more traditional state-operated program.

  9. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report, Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2014/ FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    This annual report of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program, which ensures compliance with DOE regulations covering state government and alternative fuel provider fleets pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended, provides fleet compliance results for manufacturing year 2014 / fiscal year 2015.

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Attitudes and Use among Health Educators in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ping; Priestley, Jennifer; Porter, Kandice Johnson; Petrillo, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background: Interest in and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States is increasing. However, CAM remains an area of nascency for researchers and western practitioners. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine U.S. health educators' attitudes toward CAM and their use of common CAM therapies. Methods: A…

  11. State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, S.; Novelli, P.; Costes, P.; Bringtown, S.; Christensen, D.; Sakintuna, B.; Peineke, C.; Jongschaap, R.E.E.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.; Valot, L.; Joubert, E.; Perelgritz, J.F.; Filogonio, A.; Roetger, T.; Prieur, A.; Starck, L.; Jeuland, N.; Bogers, P.; Midgley, R.; Bauldreay, J.; Rollin, G.; Rye, L.; Wilson, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarises the findings from the SWAFEA preliminary state of the art study. It covers trends in aspects of future air transport, potential candidate fuels and associated feedstock along with sustainability and economical issues relevant for alternative fuels in aviation..

  12. Alternative proof with interpretations for a recent state-dependent importance sampling scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.

    Recently, a state-dependent change of measure for simulating overflows in the two-node tandem queue was proposed by Dupuis et al. (2005), together with a proof of its asymptotic efficiency. In the present paper, we present an alternative, shorter and simpler proof. Furthermore, we give intuitive

  13. State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, S.; Novelli, P.; Costes, P.; Bringtown, S.; Christensen, D.; Sakintuna, B.; Peineke, C.; Jongschaap, R.E.E.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.; Valot, L.; Joubert, E.; Perelgritz, J.F.; Filogonio, A.; Roetger, T.; Prieur, A.; Starck, L.; Jeuland, N.; Bogers, P.; Midgley, R.; Bauldreay, J.; Rollin, G.; Rye, L.; Wilson, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarises the findings from the SWAFEA preliminary state of the art study. It covers trends in aspects of future air transport, potential candidate fuels and associated feedstock along with sustainability and economical issues relevant for alternative fuels in aviation..

  14. BAX insertion, oligomerization, and outer membrane permeabilization in brain mitochondria: role of permeability transition and SH-redox regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Li, Tsyregma; Yang, Youyun; Zhang, Jiang-Ting; Antonsson, Bruno; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2010-01-01

    BAX cooperates with truncated BID (tBID) and Ca2+ in permeabilizing the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and releasing mitochondrial apoptogenic proteins. The mechanisms of this cooperation are still unclear. Here we show that in isolated brain mitochondria, recombinant BAX readily self-integrates/oligomerizes in the OMM but produces only a minuscule release of cytochrome c, indicating that BAX insertion/oligomerization in the OMM does not always lead to massive OMM permeabilization. Ca2+ in a mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT)-dependent and recombinant tBID in an mPT-independent manner promoted BAX insertion/oligomerization in the OMM and augmented cytochrome c release. Neither tBID nor Ca2+ induced BAX oligomerization in the solution without mitochondria, suggesting that BAX oligomerization required interaction with the organelles and followed rather than preceded BAX insertion in the OMM. Recombinant Bcl-xL failed to prevent BAX insertion/oligomerization in the OMM but strongly attenuated cytochrome c release. On the other hand, a reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT), inhibited BAX insertion/oligomerization augmented by tBID or Ca2+ and suppressed the BAX-mediated release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO but failed to inhibit Ca2+-induced swelling. Altogether, these data suggest that in brain mitochondria, BAX insertion/oligomerization can be dissociated from OMM permeabilization and that tBID and Ca2+ stimulate BAX insertion/oligomerization and BAX-mediated OMM permeabilization by different mechanisms involving mPT induction and modulation of the SH-redox state. PMID:20655869

  15. Oligomeric secoiridoid glucosides from Jasminum abyssinicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Francesca Romana; Palazzino, Giovanna; Federici, Elena; Iurilli, Raffaella; Monache, Franco Delle; Chifundera, Kusamba; Galeffi, Corrado

    2006-03-01

    From the root bark of Jasminum abyssinicum (Oleaceae) collected in Congo was isolated tree oligomeric secoiridoid glucosides named craigosides A-C. The three compounds are esters of a cyclopentanoid monoterpene with an iridane skeleton, esterified with three, two and two, respectively, units of oleoside 11-methyl ester. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and chemical correlations.

  16. p53 oligomerization status modulates cell fate decisions between growth, arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nicholas W; Prodeus, Aaron; Malkin, David; Gariépy, Jean

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the oligomerization domain of p53 are genetically linked to cancer susceptibility in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome. These mutations typically alter the oligomeric state of p53 and impair its transcriptional activity. Activation of p53 through tetramerization is required for its tumor suppressive function by inducing transcriptional programs that lead to cell fate decisions such as cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. How p53 chooses between these cell fate outcomes remains unclear. Here, we use 5 oligomeric variants of p53, including 2 novel p53 constructs, that yield either monomeric, dimeric or tetrameric forms of p53 and demonstrate that they induce distinct cellular activities and gene expression profiles that lead to different cell fate outcomes. We report that dimeric p53 variants are cytostatic and can arrest cell growth, but lack the ability to trigger apoptosis in p53-null cells. In contrast, p53 tetramers induce rapid apoptosis and cell growth arrest, while a monomeric variant is functionally inactive, supporting cell growth. In particular, the expression of pro-arrest CDKN1A and pro-apoptotic P53AIP1 genes are important cell fate determinants that are differentially regulated by the oligomeric state of p53. This study suggests that the most abundant oligomeric species of p53 present in resting cells, namely p53 dimers, neither promote cell growth or cell death and that shifting the oligomeric state equilibrium of p53 in cells toward monomers or tetramers is a key parameter in p53-based cell fate decisions.

  17. What Can States Learn about College and Career Readiness Accountability Measures from Alternative Education? Ask the CCRS Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeds, Carinne; Malter, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    This "Ask the CCRS Center Brief" provides an overview of the accountability measures used by states and districts to assess the college and career readiness of students who are educated in alternative programs and schools (defined hereafter as "alternative settings"). Alternative settings are designed to serve at-risk students…

  18. Oligomerization of a Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Analog: Bridging Experiment and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Tine Maja; Sønderby, Pernille; Ryberg, Line A.

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, is a GLP-1 agonist and is used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. From a pharmaceutical perspective, it is important to know the oligomerization state of liraglutide with respect to stability. Compared to GLP-1...

  19. Alternative Stable States, Coral Reefs, and Smooth Dynamics with a Kick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Stephen; Naudot, Vincent; Noonburg, Erik G

    2016-03-01

    We consider a computer simulation, which was found to be faithful to time series data for Caribbean coral reefs, and an analytical model to help understand the dynamics of the simulation. The analytical model is a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE), and the authors claim this model demonstrates the existence of alternative stable states. The existence of an alternative stable state should consider a sudden shift in coral and macroalgae populations, while the grazing rate remains constant. The results of such shifts, however, are often confounded by changes in grazing rate. Although the ODE suggest alternative stable states, the ODE need modification to explicitly account for shifts or discrete events such as hurricanes. The goal of this paper will be to study the simulation dynamics through a simplified analytical representation. We proceed by modifying the original analytical model through incorporating discrete changes into the ODE. We then analyze the resulting dynamics and their bifurcations with respect to changes in grazing rate and hurricane frequency. In particular, a "kick" enabling the ODE to consider impulse events is added. Beyond adding a "kick" we employ the grazing function that is suggested by the simulation. The extended model was fit to the simulation data to support its use and predicts the existence cycles depending nonlinearly on grazing rates and hurricane frequency. These cycles may bring new insights into consideration for reef health, restoration and dynamics.

  20. Superinfection between influenza and RSV alternating patterns in San Luis Potosi State, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Xicoténcatl Velasco-Hernández

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to explain through the ecological hypothesis superinfection and competitive interaction between two viral populations and niche (host availability, the alternating patterns of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV and influenza observed in a regional hospital in San Luis Potosí State, México using a mathematical model as a methodological tool. The data analyzed consists of community-based and hospital-based Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI consultations provided by health-care institutions reported to the State Health Service Epidemiology Department from 2003 through 2009.

  1. Lyme Disease Surveillance Using Sampling Estimation: Evaluation of an Alternative Methodology in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacik, G; White, J; Noonan-Toly, C; DiDonato, C; Backenson, P B

    2016-02-29

    In the 14-year period from 1993 to 2006, New York State (NYS) accounted for over one-quarter (27.1%) of all confirmed Lyme disease (LD) cases in the United States. During that time period, a nine-county area in south-east NYS accounted for 90.6% of the reported LD cases in the state. Based on concerns related to diminishing resources at both the state and local level and the increasing burden of traditional LD surveillance, the NYS Department of Health (DOH) sought to develop an alternative to traditional surveillance that would reduce the investigative workload while maintaining the ability to track LD trends by developing a system to estimate county-level LD cases based on a 20% random sample of positive laboratory reports. Estimates from this system were compared to observed cases from traditional surveillance for select counties in 2007-2009 and 2011. There were no significant differences between the two methodologies in six of nine evaluations conducted. In addition, in 93 of 98 (94.9%) demographic, symptom and other variable proportion comparisons made between the two methodologies in 2009 and 2011, there were no significant differences found. Overall, using sampling estimates was accurate and efficient in estimating LD cases at the county level. Use of case estimates for LD should be considered as a useful surveillance alternative by health policy makers for states with endemic LD. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Simulations of Oligomeric Intermediates in Prion Diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Mobley, D L; Singh, R R P; Kulkarni, R V; Slepoy, A; Mobley, David L.; Cox, Daniel L.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.; Slepoy, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    We extend our previous stochastic cellular automata based model for areal aggregation of prion proteins on neuronal surfaces. The new anisotropic model allow us to simulate both strong beta-sheet and weaker attachment bonds between proteins. Constraining binding directions allows us to generate aggregate structures with the hexagonal lattice symmetry found in recently observed in vitro experiments. We argue that these constraints on rules may correspond to underlying steric constraints on the aggregation process. We find that monomer dominated growth of the areal aggregate is too slow to account for some observed doubling time-to-incubation time ratios inferred from data, and so consider aggregation dominated by relatively stable but non-infectious oligomeric intermediates. We compare a kinetic theory analysis of oligomeric aggregation to spatially explicit simulations of the process. We find that with suitable rules for misfolding of oligomers, possibly due to water exclusion by the surrounding aggregate, th...

  3. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  4. Metal Catalyzed Oligomerization Reactions of Organosiloxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-28

    Table I. Some monosilanes , e.g. Me3SiH and PhMe2SiH, are found, but none of the expected PhMeSiH 2 is present. However, some of the expected oligomeric...of the monosilanes as indicated in Table I suggested that reaction 17 does occur, but the initially produced PhMeSiH 2 undergoes secondary

  5. An Internet based stated choices household survey for alternative fuelled vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potoglou, D.; Kanaroglou, P.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Centre for Spatial Analysis

    2006-01-15

    Vehicles fuelled by alternative energy sources have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other negative externalities associated with the transportation sector. However, the demand for alternative fuelled vehicles (AFV) and the effectiveness of incentives, marketing promotions, new vehicle designs, and fuel subsystems should be evaluated before devising policy measures that promote the use of new vehicle technologies. This paper discussed the design and application of a stated choices experiment for the demand for AFVs that is administered uniquely through the Internet. The use of the Internet is a new method of survey data collection which provides many advantages over tradition methods of computer-aided telephone interviews (CATI) and mail interviews. The main advantages of Internet surveys are the savings in cost and time. The authors designed a Choice Internet Based Experiment for Research on Cars (CIBER-CARS). It is a self-administered online questionnaire that was used in the Census Metropolitan Area of Hamilton, Ontario. This paper described the survey design in detail and reviewed the implementation and data collection procedures. Measures for evaluating the efficiency of the Internet survey were also highlighted and the characteristics of the collected information were summarized with emphasis on the profiles of respondents and households. The characteristics of this survey were also compared with those of a similar study conducted in the State of California. Out of the 902 respondents in Hamilton, 602 stated that they would buy a vehicle in the next 5 years and 496 provided valid observations for each of the 8 stated choice exercises that included 3 fuel-type options (gasoline, hybrid, and alternative fuel) and 8 vehicle type/size-classes. The objective was to determine the impact of vehicle attributes and household characteristics to the actual choice of certain vehicles. It was expected that people with access to information via the

  6. Alternative Scheme for Teleportation of Two-Atom Entangled State in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhen-Biao

    2006-01-01

    We have proposed an alternative scheme for teleportation of two-atom entangled state in cavity QED. It is based on the degenerate Raman interaction of a single-mode cavity field with a ∧-type three-level atom. The prominent feature of the scheme is that only one cavity is required, which is prior to the previous one. Moreover, the atoms need to be detected are reduced compared with the previous scheme. The experimental feasibility of the scheme is discussed.The scheme can easily be generalized for teleportation of N-atom GHZ entangled states. The number of the atoms needed to be detected does not increase as the number of the atoms in GHZ state increases.

  7. Linking Pattern Formation and Alternative Stable States: Ecohydrologic Thresholds and Critical Transitions in the Everglades Peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, J. B.; Ross, M. S.; Sah, J. P.; Isherwood, E.; Cohen, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial patterning occurs in a variety of ecosystems, and is important for the functional properties of landscapes; for testing spatial models of ecological processes; and as an indicator of landscape condition and resilience. Theory suggests that regular patterns arise from coupled local- and landscape-scale feedbacks that can also create multiple stable landscape states. In the Florida Everglades, hydrologic modification has degraded much of the historically-extensive ridge-slough landscape, a patterned peatland mosaic with distinct, flow-parallel patches. However, in the Everglades and in general, the hypothesis that patterned landscapes have homogeneous alternative states has little direct empirical support. Here we use microtopographic and vegetative heterogeneity, and their relation to hydrologic conditions, to infer the existence of multiple landscape equilibria and identify the hydrologic thresholds for critical transitions between these states. Dual relationships between elevation variance and water depth, and bi-modal distributions of both elevation variance and plant community distinctness, are consistent with generic predictions of multiple states, and covariation between these measures suggests that microtopography is the leading indicator of landscape degradation. Furthermore, a simple ecohydrologic multiple-state model correctly predicts the hydrologic thresholds for persistence of distinct ridges and sloughs. Predicted ridge-slough elevation differences and their relation to water depth are much greater than observed in the contemporary Everglades, but correspond closely with historical observations of pre-drainage conditions. These multiple lines of evidence represent the broadest and most direct support for the link between regular spatial pattern and landscape-scale alternative states in any ecosystem, and suggest that other patterned landscapes could undergo sudden collapse in response to changing environmental conditions. Hydrologic thresholds

  8. Biodiversity loss and turnover in alternative states in the Mediterranean Sea: a case study on meiofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchelli, Silvia; Buschi, Emanuela; Danovaro, Roberto; Pusceddu, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In the Mediterranean Sea hard-bottom macroalgal meadows may switch to alternative and less-productive barrens grounds, as a result of sea urchins overgrazing. Meiofauna (and especially nematodes) represent key components of benthic ecosystems, are highly-diversified, sensitive to environmental change and anthropogenic impacts, but, so-far, have been neglected in studies on regime shifts. We report here that sedimentary organic matter contents, meiofaunal taxa richness and community composition, nematode α- and β-biodiversity vary significantly between alternative macroalgal and barren states. The observed differences are consistent in six areas spread across the Mediterranean Sea, irrespective of barren extent. Our results suggest also that the low biodiversity levels in barren states are the result of habitat loss/fragmentation, which is associated also with a lower availability of trophic resources. Furthermore, differences in meiofaunal and nematode abundance, biomass and diversity between macroalgal meadow and barren states persist when the latter is not fully formed, or consists of patches interspersed in macroalgal meadows. Since barren grounds are expanding rapidly along the Mediterranean Sea and meiofauna are a key trophic component in marine ecosystems, we suggest that the extension and persistence of barrens at the expenses of macroalgal meadows could also affect resilience of higher trophic level. PMID:27708343

  9. Biodiversity loss and turnover in alternative states in the Mediterranean Sea: a case study on meiofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchelli, Silvia; Buschi, Emanuela; Danovaro, Roberto; Pusceddu, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    In the Mediterranean Sea hard-bottom macroalgal meadows may switch to alternative and less-productive barrens grounds, as a result of sea urchins overgrazing. Meiofauna (and especially nematodes) represent key components of benthic ecosystems, are highly-diversified, sensitive to environmental change and anthropogenic impacts, but, so-far, have been neglected in studies on regime shifts. We report here that sedimentary organic matter contents, meiofaunal taxa richness and community composition, nematode α- and β-biodiversity vary significantly between alternative macroalgal and barren states. The observed differences are consistent in six areas spread across the Mediterranean Sea, irrespective of barren extent. Our results suggest also that the low biodiversity levels in barren states are the result of habitat loss/fragmentation, which is associated also with a lower availability of trophic resources. Furthermore, differences in meiofaunal and nematode abundance, biomass and diversity between macroalgal meadow and barren states persist when the latter is not fully formed, or consists of patches interspersed in macroalgal meadows. Since barren grounds are expanding rapidly along the Mediterranean Sea and meiofauna are a key trophic component in marine ecosystems, we suggest that the extension and persistence of barrens at the expenses of macroalgal meadows could also affect resilience of higher trophic level.

  10. Modelling alternative states of an ombrotrophic bog with experimentally deposed nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanqiao; Keller, Philipp; Blodau, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution of peatlands alters their vegetation composition and carbon (C) sequestration. We applied a coupled carbon and nitrogen wetland model (PEATBOG) to analyse alternative steady states of an ombrotrophic bog exposed to experimentally deposited N at 1.6, 3.2 and 6.4 gN m-2 yr-1. The study predicted discontinuous responses of the peatland ecosystem to differing N deposition and a lack of recovery after 15 years of fertilization with 6.4 gN m-2 yr-1, which indicated a regime shift of the modelled ecosystem. In combination drought, as concurrent disturbance, reduced the resilience of the system and contributed to the regime shift. Internal feedbacks may interact with the direct feedback of the external disturbances from nitrogen and climatic drivers and alter the responses of the ecosystem. The result suggested that the state of a peatland exposed to N deposition may be highly uncertain due to a dominant feedback loop that emerged from all disturbances. The finding highlighted the need for systematically quantifying the relative importance of multiple disturbances to predict the potential shift of a peatland ecosystem to alternative states as response to N deposition in a changing environment.

  11. State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. SWAFEA. Sustainable Way for Alternative Fuels and Energy in Aviation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, S.; Novelli, P.; Costes, P.; Bringtown, S.; Christensen, D.; Sakintuna, B.; Peineke, C.; Jongschaap, R.E.E.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.; Valot, L.; Joubert, E.; Perelgritz, J.F.; Filogonio, A.; Roetger, T.; Prieur, A.; Starck, L.; Jeuland, N.; Bogers, P.; Midgley, R.; Bauldreay, J.; Rollin, G.; Rye, L.; Wilson, C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the aviation sector uses petroleum derived liquid fuels as the energy carrier of choice for flight. In light the present environmental, economical and political concerns as to the sustainability of this energy source, the question of which alternatives the aviation sector should pursue in

  12. State of the Art on Alternative Fuels in Aviation. SWAFEA. Sustainable Way for Alternative Fuels and Energy in Aviation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, S.; Novelli, P.; Costes, P.; Bringtown, S.; Christensen, D.; Sakintuna, B.; Peineke, C.; Jongschaap, R.E.E.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.; Valot, L.; Joubert, E.; Perelgritz, J.F.; Filogonio, A.; Roetger, T.; Prieur, A.; Starck, L.; Jeuland, N.; Bogers, P.; Midgley, R.; Bauldreay, J.; Rollin, G.; Rye, L.; Wilson, C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the aviation sector uses petroleum derived liquid fuels as the energy carrier of choice for flight. In light the present environmental, economical and political concerns as to the sustainability of this energy source, the question of which alternatives the aviation sector should pursue in

  13. Confocal Spectroscopy to Study Dimerization, Oligomerization and Aggregation of Proteins: A Practical Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambin, Yann; Polinkovsky, Mark; Francois, Bill; Giles, Nichole; Bhumkar, Akshay; Sierecki, Emma

    2016-04-30

    Protein self-association is a key feature that can modulate the physiological role of proteins or lead to deleterious effects when uncontrolled. Protein oligomerization is a simple way to modify the activity of a protein, as the modulation of binding interfaces allows for self-activation or inhibition, or variation in the selectivity of binding partners. As such, dimerization and higher order oligomerization is a common feature in signaling proteins, for example, and more than 70% of enzymes have the potential to self-associate. On the other hand, protein aggregation can overcome the regulatory mechanisms of the cell and can have disastrous physiological effects. This is the case in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, where proteins, due to mutation or dysregulation later in life, start polymerizing and often fibrillate, leading to the creation of protein inclusion bodies in cells. Dimerization, well-defined oligomerization and random aggregation are often difficult to differentiate and characterize experimentally. Single molecule "counting" methods are particularly well suited to the study of self-oligomerization as they allow observation and quantification of behaviors in heterogeneous conditions. However, the extreme dilution of samples often causes weak complexes to dissociate, and rare events can be overlooked. Here, we discuss a straightforward alternative where the principles of single molecule detection are used at higher protein concentrations to quantify oligomers and aggregates in a background of monomers. We propose a practical guide for the use of confocal spectroscopy to quantify protein oligomerization status and also discuss about its use in monitoring changes in protein aggregation in drug screening assays.

  14. Environmental conditions for alternative tree-cover states in high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abis, Beniamino; Brovkin, Victor

    2017-02-01

    Previous analysis of the vegetation cover from remote sensing revealed the existence of three alternative modes in the frequency distribution of boreal tree cover: a sparsely vegetated treeless state, an open woodland state, and a forest state. Identifying which are the regions subject to multimodality, and assessing which are the main factors underlying their existence, is important to project future change of natural vegetation cover and its effect on climate.We study the link between the tree-cover fraction distribution and eight globally observed environmental factors: mean annual rainfall, mean minimum temperature, growing degree days above 0 °C, permafrost distribution, mean spring soil moisture, wildfire occurrence frequency, soil texture, and mean thawing depth. Through the use of generalised additive models, conditional histograms, and phase-space analysis, we find that environmental conditions exert a strong control over the tree-cover distribution, uniquely determining its state among the three dominant modes in ˜ 95 % of the cases. Additionally, we find that the link between individual environmental variables and tree cover is different within the four boreal regions considered here, namely eastern North Eurasia, western North Eurasia, eastern North America, and western North America. Furthermore, using a classification based on rainfall, minimum temperatures, permafrost distribution, soil moisture, wildfire frequency, and soil texture, we show the location of areas with potentially alternative tree-cover states under the same environmental conditions in the boreal region. These areas, although encompassing a minor fraction of the boreal area ( ˜ 5 %), correspond to possible transition zones with a reduced resilience to disturbances. Hence, they are of interest for a more detailed analysis of land-atmosphere interactions.

  15. The role of nurse functional types in seedling recruitment dynamics of alternative states in rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Dardo R.; Cavallero, Laura

    2017-02-01

    In arid ecosystems, recruitment dynamics are limited by harsh environmental conditions and greatly depend on the net outcome of the balance between facilitation and competition. This outcome can change as a consequence of degradation caused by livestock overgrazing. Also, distinct plant species may show a differential response to a common neighbour under the same environmental conditions. Therefore, ecosystem degradation could affect the net balance of plant-plant interactions, which can also depend on the functional traits of potential nurse species. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of alternative degradation states on (i) the density of seedlings of perennial species emerging in four microsite types, and on (ii) the relative interaction intensity (RII) between seedlings and potential nurses belonging to three functional types (deep- and shallow-rooted shrubs, and tussock grasses). During three years, we recorded seedling density of perennial species in four alternative degradation states in grass-shrubby steppes from northwestern Patagonia. The density of emerged seedlings of perennial species decreased sharply as degradation increased, showing non-linear responses in most microsites. Seedling density underneath deep-rooted shrubs was higher than underneath shallow-rooted shrubs and tussock grasses. Also, deep-rooted shrubs were the only functional type that recorded seedling emergence in highly degraded states. Deep-rooted shrubs had facilitative effects on the seedlings emerging and surviving underneath them, independently of ecosystem degradation. In contrast, RII between shallow-rooted shrubs and recently emerged seedlings, switched from positive effects in the less degraded states, to negative effects in the most degraded state. Tussock grasses recorded the weakest intensity of facilitative interactions with recently emerged seedlings, switching to competitive interactions as degradation increased. Our results suggest that species with key

  16. Nonsteady dynamic properties of a domain wall for the creep state under an alternating driving field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, N. J.; Zheng, B.

    2014-07-01

    With Monte Carlo simulations, the nonsteady dynamic properties of a domain wall have been systematically investigated for the thermally activated creep state under an alternating driving field. Taking the driven random-field Ising model in two dimensions as an example, two distinct growth stages of the domain interface are identified with both the correlation length and roughness function. One stage belongs to the universality class of the random depositions, and the other to that of the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation. In the latter case, due to the dynamic effect of overhangs, the domain interface may exhibit an intrinsic anomalous scaling behavior, different from that of the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation.

  17. Ground-State Phase Diagram of S = 2 Heisenberg Chains with Alternating Single-Site Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    The ground-state phase diagram of S = 2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains with coexisting uniform and alternating single-site anisotropies is investigated by the numerical exact diagonalization and density matrix renormalization group methods. We find the Haldane, large-D, Néel, period-doubled Néel, gapless spin fluid, quantized and partial ferrimagnetic phases. The Haldane phase is limited to the close neighborhood of the isotropic point. Within numerical accuracy, the transition from the gapless spin-fluid phase to the period-doubled Néel phase is a direct transition. Nevertheless, the presence of a narrow spin-gap phase between these two phases is suggested on the basis of the low-energy effective theory. The ferrimagnetic ground state is present in a wide parameter range. This suggests the realization of magnetized single-chain magnets with a uniform spin magnitude by controlling the environment of each magnetic ion without introducing ferromagnetic interactions.

  18. Polybenzoxazine/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles and polybenzoxazine (PBZ have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative to those of non-hybrid PBZs. This review describes the synthesis, dielectric constants, and thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties of covalently bonded mono- and multifunctionalized benzoxazine POSS hybrids, other functionalized benzoxazine POSS derivatives, and non-covalently (hydrogen bonded benzoxazine POSS composites.

  19. Endocytic pathways mediating oligomeric Aβ42 neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxton Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD is amyloid plaques, composed primarily of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ. Over-production or diminished clearance of the 42 amino acid form of Aβ (Aβ42 in the brain leads to accumulation of soluble Aβ and plaque formation. Soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ has recently emerged to be as a likely proximal cause of AD. Results Here we demonstrate that endocytosis is critical in mediating oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. Inhibition of clathrin function either with a pharmacological inhibitor, knock-down of clathrin heavy chain expression, or expression of the dominant-negative mutant of clathrin-assembly protein AP180 did not block oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity or intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. However, inhibition of dynamin and RhoA by expression of dominant negative mutants reduced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation. Pharmacologic inhibition of the dynamin-mediated endocytic pathway by genistein also reduced neurotoxicity. Conclusions These data suggest that dynamin-mediated and RhoA-regulated endocytosis are integral steps for oligomeric Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation.

  20. Turf wars: experimental tests for alternative stable states in a two-phase coastal ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Gretchen; Lee, William G; Pritchard, Daniel W; Wilson, J Bastow

    2014-02-01

    Alternative stable states have long been thought to exist in natural communities, but direct evidence for their presence and for the environmental switches that cause them has been scarce. Using a combination of greenhouse and field experiments, we investigated the environmental drivers associated with two distinctive herbaceous communities in coastal ecosystems in New Zealand. In a mosaic unrelated to micro-topography, a community dominated largely by native turf species (notably Leptinella dioica, Samolus repens, and Selliera radicans) alternates with vegetation comprising exotic (i.e., nonnative) pasture species (notably Agrostis stolonifera, Holcus lanatus, Lolium perenne, and Trifolium repens). The species of these two communities differ in functional characters related to leaf longevity and growth rate, and occupy soils of differing nitrogen levels. Both spatial and environmental factors influenced the species composition locally. Reciprocal transplants of soil, with and without associated vegetation, showed that a native turf community developed when sward or soil from either community was bounded by turf, and a pasture community developed when sward or soil from either community was surrounded by pasture. In artificial mixed communities in the greenhouse, turf was able to invade the pasture community where the vegetation was clipped to simulate grazing, and also where Trifolium was removed and/or salt spray was applied. The pasture community invaded the turf where Trifolium was present or nitrogen was added. These results were supported by trends in experimentally manipulated field plots, where the amount of turf cover increased when nitrogen was kept low and when salt spray was applied, whereas pasture cover increased in the absence of salt spray. Thus, persistence of the native turf community is dependent on grazing, both directly and via its effect on keeping nitrogen levels low by excluding the exotic, nitrogen-fixing Trifolium, and by exposing the

  1. Rhythmic alternating patterns of brain activity distinguish rapid eye movement sleep from other states of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ho Ming; Horovitz, Silvina G; Carr, Walter S; Picchioni, Dante; Coddington, Nate; Fukunaga, Masaki; Xu, Yisheng; Balkin, Thomas J; Duyn, Jeff H; Braun, Allen R

    2013-06-18

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep constitutes a distinct "third state" of consciousness, during which levels of brain activity are commensurate with wakefulness, but conscious awareness is radically transformed. To characterize the temporal and spatial features of this paradoxical state, we examined functional interactions between brain regions using fMRI resting-state connectivity methods. Supporting the view that the functional integrity of the default mode network (DMN) reflects "level of consciousness," we observed functional uncoupling of the DMN during deep sleep and recoupling during REM sleep (similar to wakefulness). However, unlike either deep sleep or wakefulness, REM was characterized by a more widespread, temporally dynamic interaction between two major brain systems: unimodal sensorimotor areas and the higher-order association cortices (including the DMN), which normally regulate their activity. During REM, these two systems become anticorrelated and fluctuate rhythmically, in reciprocally alternating multisecond epochs with a frequency ranging from 0.1 to 0.01 Hz. This unique spatiotemporal pattern suggests a model for REM sleep that may be consistent with its role in dream formation and memory consolidation.

  2. Mowing Submerged Macrophytes in Shallow Lakes with Alternative Stable States: Battling the Good Guys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Jan J.; Verhofstad, Michiel J. J. M.; Louwers, Evelien L. M.; Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Brederveld, Robert J.; van Gerven, Luuk P. A.; Janssen, Annette B. G.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Mooij, Wolf M.

    2017-04-01

    Submerged macrophytes play an important role in maintaining good water quality in shallow lakes. Yet extensive stands easily interfere with various services provided by these lakes, and harvesting is increasingly applied as a management measure. Because shallow lakes may possess alternative stable states over a wide range of environmental conditions, designing a successful mowing strategy is challenging, given the important role of macrophytes in stabilizing the clear water state. In this study, the integrated ecosystem model PCLake is used to explore the consequences of mowing, in terms of reducing nuisance and ecosystem stability, for a wide range of external nutrient loadings, mowing intensities and timings. Elodea is used as a model species. Additionally, we use PCLake to estimate how much phosphorus is removed with the harvested biomass, and evaluate the long-term effect of harvesting. Our model indicates that mowing can temporarily reduce nuisance caused by submerged plants in the first weeks after cutting, particularly when external nutrient loading is fairly low. The risk of instigating a regime shift can be tempered by mowing halfway the growing season when the resilience of the system is highest, as our model showed. Up to half of the phosphorus entering the system can potentially be removed along with the harvested biomass. As a result, prolonged mowing can prevent an oligo—to mesotrophic lake from becoming eutrophic to a certain extent, as our model shows that the critical nutrient loading, where the lake shifts to the turbid phytoplankton-dominated state, can be slightly increased.

  3. Three Redox States of Trypanosoma brucei Alternative Oxidase Identified by Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, Amandine; Kido, Yasutoshi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Moore, Anthony L.; Rich, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemistry coupled with Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the redox properties of recombinant alternative ubiquinol oxidase from Trypanosoma brucei, the organism responsible for African sleeping sickness. Stepwise reduction of the fully oxidized resting state of recombinant alternative ubiquinol oxidase revealed two distinct IR redox difference spectra. The first of these, signal 1, titrates in the reductive direction as an n = 2 Nernstian component with an apparent midpoint potential of 80 mV at pH 7.0. However, reoxidation of signal 1 in the same potential range under anaerobic conditions did not occur and only began with potentials in excess of 500 mV. Reoxidation by introduction of oxygen was also unsuccessful. Signal 1 contained clear features that can be assigned to protonation of at least one carboxylate group, further perturbations of carboxylic and histidine residues, bound ubiquinone, and a negative band at 1554 cm−1 that might arise from a radical in the fully oxidized protein. A second distinct IR redox difference spectrum, signal 2, appeared more slowly once signal 1 had been reduced. This component could be reoxidized with potentials above 100 mV. In addition, when both signals 1 and 2 were reduced, introduction of oxygen caused rapid oxidation of both components. These data are interpreted in terms of the possible active site structure and mechanism of oxygen reduction to water. PMID:19767647

  4. Complementary and alternative medical therapy utilization by people with chronic fatiguing illnesses in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ann-Britt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatiguing illnesses, including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Previous clinical reports addressed the utilization of health care provided to patients with CFS by a variety of practitioners with other than allopathic training, but did not examine the spectrum of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies used. This study was designed to measure CAM therapy use by persons with fatiguing illnesses in the United States population. Methods During a random-digit dialing survey to estimate the prevalence of CFS-like illness in urban and rural populations from different geographic regions of the United States, we queried the utilization of CAM including manipulation or body-based therapies, alternative medical systems, mind-body, biologically-based, and energy modalities. Results Four hundred forty fatigued and 444 non-fatigued persons from 2,728 households completed screening. Fatigued subjects included 53 persons with prolonged fatigue, 338 with chronic fatigue, and 49 with CFS-like illness. Mind-body therapy (primarily personal prayer and prayer by others was the most frequently used CAM across all groups. Among women, there was a significant trend of increasing overall CAM use across all subgroups (p-trend = 0.003. All categories of CAM use were associated with significantly poorer physical health scores, and all but one (alternative medicine systems were associated with significantly poorer mental health scores. People with CFS-like illness were significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (chiropractic and massage than non-fatigued participants (OR = 2.52, CI = 1.32, 4.82. Use of body-based therapies increased significantly in a linear trend across subgroups of non-fatigued, prolonged fatigued, chronic fatigued, and CFS-like subjects (p-trend = 0.002. People with chronic fatigue were also significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (OR = 1.52, CI = 1

  5. Oligomerization of Uukuniemi virus nucleocapsid protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Anna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uukuniemi virus (UUKV belongs to the Phlebovirus genus in the family Bunyaviridae. As a non-pathogenic virus for humans UUKV has served as a safe model bunyavirus in a number of studies addressing fundamental questions such as organization and regulation of viral genes, genome replication, structure and assembly. The present study is focused on the oligomerization of the UUKV nucleocapsid (N protein, which plays an important role in several steps of virus replication. The aim was to locate the domains involved in the N protein oligomerization and study the process in detail. Results A set of experiments concentrating on the N- and C-termini of the protein was performed, first by completely or partially deleting putative N-N-interaction domains and then by introducing point mutations of amino acid residues. Mutagenesis strategy was based on the computer modeling of secondary and tertiary structure of the N protein. The N protein mutants were studied in chemical cross-linking, immunofluorescence, mammalian two-hybrid, minigenome, and virus-like particle-forming assays. The data showed that the oligomerization ability of UUKV-N protein depends on the presence of intact α-helices on both termini of the N protein molecule and that a specific structure in the N-terminal region plays a crucial role in the N-N interaction(s. This structure is formed by two α-helices, rich in amino acid residues with aromatic (W7, F10, W19, F27, F31 or long aliphatic (I14, I24 side chains. Furthermore, some of the N-terminal mutations (e.g. I14A, I24A, F31A affected the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays. Conclusions UUKV-N protein has ability to form oligomers in chemical cross-linking and mammalian two-hybrid assays. In mutational analysis, some of the introduced single-point mutations abolished the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays, suggesting that especially the N

  6. Antioxidant oligomeric proanthocyanidins from Cistus salvifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qa'Dan, Fadi; Petereit, Frank; Mansoor, Kenza; Nahrstedt, Adolf

    2006-11-01

    The purified proanthocyanidin oligomers of Cistus salvifolius herb extract accounted for 78% of the total proanthocyanidins and 73% of the total antioxidant activity of this extract. To elucidate the structure of the oligomer, it was depolymerized by acid catalysis in the presence of phloroglucinol. The structures of the resulting flavan-3-ols and phloroglucinol adducts were determined on the basis of 1D- and reverse 2D-NMR (HSQC, HMBC) experiments of their peracetylated derivatives, MALDI-TOF-MS and CD spectroscopy. These observations resulting from the degradation with phloroglucinol were confirmed by 13C NMR spectroscopy of the oligomer. The mean molecular weight of the higher oligomeric fraction was estimated to be 5-6 flavan-3-ol-units.

  7. Gelatin-based biomaterial engineering with anhydride-containing oligomeric cross-linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Tina; Hötzel, Rudi; Kascholke, Christian; Anderegg, Ulf; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Hacker, Michael C

    2014-06-01

    Chemically cross-linked gelatin hydrogels are versatile cell-adhesive hydrogel materials that have been established for a variety of biomedical applications. The most prominent cross-linker is glutaraldehyde, which, however, has been described to cause compatibility problems and loss of microscopic but relevant structural features. A recently developed oligomeric cross-linker that contains anhydride functionalities was evaluated as cross-linker for the fabrication of gelatin-based hydrogels and microparticles. In a fast curing reaction, hydrogels composed of gelatin and oligomeric cross-linker were fabricated with good conversion over a wide concentration range of constituents and with cross-linkers of different anhydride contents. Hydrogel properties, such as dry weight and mechanics, could be controlled by hydrogel composition and rheological properties correlated to elastic moduli from 1 to 10 kPa. The gels were shown to be cytocompatible and promoted cell adhesion. In soft formulations, cells migrated into the hydrogel bulk. Gelatin microparticles prepared by a standard water-in-oil emulsion technique were also treated with the novel oligomers, and cross-linking degrees matching those obtained with glutaraldehyde were obtained. At the same time, fewer interparticular cross-links were observed. Fluorescein-derivatized cross-linkers yielded labeled microparticles in a concentration-dependent manner. The oligomeric cross-linkers are presented as an efficient and possibly more functional and compatible alternative to glutaraldehyde. The engineered hydrogel materials hold potential for various biomedical applications.

  8. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-alternative mechanisms. 148.128 Section 148.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... reforms—alternative mechanisms. (a) Waiver of requirements. The requirements of § 148.120, which set forth... implements an acceptable alternative mechanism in accordance with the following criteria: (1) The...

  9. The AMS/Paterson Lecture: becoming alternative? Modern transformations of Chinese medicine in China and in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    "Becoming Alternative" offers an overview of the transformations of Chinese medicine at home and abroad since the mid-19th century. After coming into contact with biomedicine, China's indigenous medicine was redefined in terms of national culture and history on the one hand, and a competitive alternative science on the other. Reimagined in terms of scientific syncretism in the PRC, and embraced as a counter-cultural alternative to bio-medicine in the United States, the medicine we call "Chinese" today emerges as a pluralistic system with global reach involving complex accommodations with local medical cultures and institutions both at home and abroad.

  10. Structural polymorphism in the N-terminal oligomerization domain of NPM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrea, Diana M; Grace, Christy R; Buljan, Marija; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Pytel, Nicholas J; Satumba, John; Nourse, Amanda; Park, Cheon-Gil; Madan Babu, M; White, Stephen W; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2014-03-25

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a multifunctional phospho-protein with critical roles in ribosome biogenesis, tumor suppression, and nucleolar stress response. Here we show that the N-terminal oligomerization domain of NPM1 (Npm-N) exhibits structural polymorphism by populating conformational states ranging from a highly ordered, folded pentamer to a highly disordered monomer. The monomer-pentamer equilibrium is modulated by posttranslational modification and protein binding. Phosphorylation drives the equilibrium in favor of monomeric forms, and this effect can be reversed by Npm-N binding to its interaction partners. We have identified a short, arginine-rich linear motif in NPM1 binding partners that mediates Npm-N oligomerization. We propose that the diverse functional repertoire associated with NPM1 is controlled through a regulated unfolding mechanism signaled through posttranslational modifications and intermolecular interactions.

  11. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ping; Leser, George P; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high alpha-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  12. Inpatients' Preferences, Beliefs, and Stated Willingness to Pay for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montross-Thomas, Lori P; Meier, Emily A; Reynolds-Norolahi, Kimberly; Raskin, Erin E; Slater, Daniel; Mills, Paul J; MacElhern, Lauray; Kallenberg, Gene

    2017-04-01

    Research demonstrates the benefits of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in myriad environments. Yet, the majority of CAM services are offered in outpatient settings. Incorporating CAM into hospital settings may lead to increased patient comfort, well-being, and overall satisfaction with hospital admissions. Few studies have examined CAM services among inpatients. Therefore, this study assessed inpatients' preferences and beliefs regarding CAM, as well as their stated willingness to pay for these services. Adult patients (n = 100), ranging in age from 19-95 years (M = 53 years; SD = 19.2 years), were recruited during their hospitalization in the University of California, San Diego, Healthcare System. The inpatients completed a brief individual interview to gather their perspectives on common CAM services, including acupuncture, aromatherapy, art therapy, guided imagery, healthy food, humor therapy, massage therapy, music therapy, pet therapy, Reiki, and stress management. Inpatients were asked which CAM therapies they perceived as being potentially the most helpful, their willingness to pay for those therapies, and their perceived beliefs regarding the use of those therapies. Inpatients most commonly perceived healthy food (85%), massage therapy (82%), and humor therapy (70%) to be the most helpful, and were most willing to pay for healthy food (71%), massage therapy (70%), and stress management (48%). Inpatients most commonly believed CAM treatments would provide relaxation (88%), increase well-being (86%), and increase their overall satisfaction with the hospitalization (85%). This study suggests that CAM services may be a beneficial addition to hospitals, as demonstrated by inpatients' interest and stated willingness to pay for these services. These findings may help organizational leaders when making choices regarding the development of CAM services within hospitals, particularly since a significant percentage of inpatients reported that

  13. Alternative stable states and the sustainability of forests, grasslands, and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kirsten A; Bauch, Chris T; Anand, Madhur

    2016-12-20

    Endangered forest-grassland mosaics interspersed with expanding agriculture and silviculture occur across many parts of the world, including the southern Brazilian highlands. This natural mosaic ecosystem is thought to reflect alternative stable states driven by threshold responses of recruitment to fire and moisture regimes. The role of adaptive human behavior in such systems remains understudied, despite its pervasiveness and the fact that such ecosystems can exhibit complex dynamics. We develop a nonlinear mathematical model of coupled human-environment dynamics in mosaic systems and social processes regarding conservation and economic land valuation. Our objective is to better understand how the coupled dynamics respond to changes in ecological and social conditions. The model is parameterized with southern Brazilian data on mosaic ecology, land-use profits, and questionnaire results concerning landowner preferences and conservation values. We find that the mosaic presently resides at a crucial juncture where relatively small changes in social conditions can generate a wide variety of possible outcomes, including complete loss of mosaics; large-amplitude, long-term oscillations between land states that preclude ecosystem stability; and conservation of the mosaic even to the exclusion of agriculture/silviculture. In general, increasing the time horizon used for conservation decision making is more likely to maintain mosaic stability. In contrast, increasing the inherent conservation value of either forests or grasslands is more likely to induce large oscillations-especially for forests-due to feedback from rarity-based conservation decisions. Given the potential for complex dynamics, empirically grounded nonlinear dynamical models should play a larger role in policy formulation for human-environment mosaic ecosystems.

  14. Alternative stable states generated by ontogenetic niche shift in the presence of multiple resource use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takefumi Nakazawa

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that when juveniles and adults use different resources or habitats, alternative stable states (ASS may exist in systems coupled by an ontogenetic niche shift. However, mainly the simplest system, i.e., the one-consumer-two-resource system, has been studied previously, and little is known about the development of ASS existing in more complex systems. Here, I theoretically investigated the development of ASS caused by an ontogenetic niche shift in the presence of multiple resource use. I considered three independent scenarios; (i additional resources, (ii multiple habitats, and (iii interstage resource sharing. The model analyses illustrate that relative balance between the total resource availability in the juvenile and adult habitats is crucial for the development of ASS. This balance is determined by factors such as local habitat productivity, subsidy inputs, colonization area, and foraging mobility. Furthermore, it is also shown that interstage resource sharing generally suppresses ASS. These results suggest that the anthropogenic impacts of habitat modifications (e.g., fragmentation and destruction or interaction modifications (e.g., changes in ontogeny and foraging behavior propagate through space and may cause or prevent regime shifts in the regional community structure.

  15. Constraining the Parameter Space of the Dark Energy Equation of State Using Alternative Cosmic Tracers

    CERN Document Server

    Chávez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    We propose to use HII galaxies (HIIG) to trace the redshift-distance relation, by means of their $L(\\mathrm{H}\\beta) - \\sigma$ correlation, in an attempt to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter solution space, as an alternative to the cosmological use of type Ia supernovae. For a sample of 128 local compact HIIG with high equivalent widths of their Balmer emission lines we obtained ionised gas velocity dispersion from high S/N, high-dispersion spectroscopy (Subaru-HDS and ESO VLT-UVES) and integrated H$\\beta$ fluxes from low dispersion wide aperture spectrophotometry. We find that the $L(\\mathrm{H}\\beta) - \\sigma$ relation is strong and stable against restrictions in the sample. The size of the starforming region is an important second parameter, while adding the emission line equivalent width or the continuum colour and metallicity, produces the solution with the smallest rms scatter. We have used the $L(\\mathrm{H}\\beta) - \\sigma$ relation from a local sample of HIIG and a local calibration ...

  16. Esters of oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol): New biobased oligomeric surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmiere, Sébastien; Valentin, Romain; Maréchal, Philippe; Mouloungui, Zéphirin

    2017-02-01

    Glycerol carbonate is one of the most potentially multifunction glycerol-derived compounds. Glycerol is an important by-product of the oleochemical industry. The oligomerization of glycerol carbonate, assisted by the glycerol, results in the production of polyhydroxylated oligomers rich in linear carbonate groups. The polar moieties of these oligomers (Mwesters of sorbitan polyethoxylates. The self-assembling properties of oligocarbonate esters were highlighted by their ability to stabilize inverse and multiple emulsions. The oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol ether) with relatively low molecular weights showed properties of relatively high-molecular weight molecules, and constitute a viable "green" alternative to ethoxylated surfactants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ordering properties of oligomeric columnar discotic liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umesh, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and liquid crystalline ordering properties of oligomeric discotic liquid crystals were investigated. The phase behaviour and surface ordering properties are dependent on among others core type, spacer length and fluorination.    

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients...

  19. Comparative analyses of quaternary arrangements in homo-oligomeric proteins in superfamilies: Functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the quaternary features of distantly related homo-oligomeric proteins is the focus of the current study. This study has been performed at the levels of quaternary state, symmetry, and quaternary structure. Quaternary state and quaternary structure refers to the number of subunits and spatial arrangements of subunits, respectively. Using a large dataset of available 3D structures of biologically relevant assemblies, we show that only 53% of the distantly related homo-oligomeric proteins have the same quaternary state. Considering these homologous homo-oligomers with the same quaternary state, conservation of quaternary structures is observed only in 38% of the pairs. In 36% of the pairs of distantly related homo-oligomers with different quaternary states the larger assembly in a pair shows high structural similarity with the entire quaternary structure of the related protein with lower quaternary state and it is referred as "Russian doll effect." The differences in quaternary state and structure have been suggested to contribute to the functional diversity. Detailed investigations show that even though the gross functions of many distantly related homo-oligomers are the same, finer level differences in molecular functions are manifested by differences in quaternary states and structures. Comparison of structures of biological assemblies in distantly and closely related homo-oligomeric proteins throughout the study differentiates the effects of sequence divergence on the quaternary structures and function. Knowledge inferred from this study can provide insights for improved protein structure classification and function prediction of homo-oligomers. Proteins 2016; 84:1190-1202. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hydrodynamic and functional analysis of HIV-1 Vif oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Kao, Sandra; Strebel, Klaus; Maynard, Ernest L

    2012-03-13

    HIV-1 Vif is an accessory protein that induces the proteasomal degradation of the host restriction factor, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G). The N-terminal half of Vif binds to APOBEC3G, and the C-terminal half binds to subunits of a cullin 5-based ubiquitin ligase. This Vif-directed ubiquitin ligase induces the degradation of APOBEC3G (a cytidine deaminase) and thereby protects the viral genome from mutation. A conserved PPLP motif near the C-terminus of Vif is essential for Vif function and is also involved in Vif oligomerization. However, the mechanism and functional significance of Vif oligomerization is unclear. We employed analytical ultracentrifugation to examine the oligomeric properties of Vif in solution. Contrary to previous reports, we find that Vif oligomerization does not require the conserved PPLP motif. Instead, our data suggest a more complex mechanism involving interactions among the HCCH motif, the BC box, and downstream residues in Vif. Mutation of residues near the PPLP motif (S165 and V166) affected the oligomeric properties of Vif and weakened the ability of Vif to bind and induce the degradation of APOBEC3G. We propose that Vif oligomerization may represent a mechanism for regulating interactions with APOBEC3G.

  1. Oligomerization paths of the nucleoprotein of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarus, B; Bakowiez, O; Chenavas, S; Duchemin, L; Estrozi, L F; Bourdieu, C; Lejal, N; Bernard, J; Moudjou, M; Chevalier, C; Delmas, B; Ruigrok, R W H; Di Primo, C; Slama-Schwok, A

    2012-03-01

    The influenza viruses contain a segmented, negative strand RNA genome. Each RNA segment is covered by multiple copies of the nucleoprotein (NP) and is associated with the polymerase complex into ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Despite its importance in the virus life cycle, the interactions between the NP and the genome are not well understood. Here, we studied the assembly process of NP-RNA oligomers and analyzed how the oligomeric/monomeric status of RNA-free NP affects RNA binding and oligomerization. Recombinant wild-type NP purified in low salt concentrations and a derived mutant engineered for oligomerization deficiency (R416A) were mainly monomeric in RNA-free solutions as shown by biochemical and electron microscopy techniques. NP monomer formed with RNA a fast 1/1 complex characterized by surface plasmon resonance. In a subsequent and slow process that depended on the RNA length, oligomerization of NP was mediated by RNA binding. In contrast, preparations of wild-type NP purified in high salt concentrations as well as mutant Y148A engineered for deficiency in nucleic acid binding were partly or totally oligomeric in RNA-free solutions. These trimer/tetramer NP oligomers bind directly as oligomers to RNA with a higher affinity than that of the monomers. Both oligomerization routes we characterized could be exploited by cellular or viral factors to modulate or control viral RNA encapsidation by NP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 32: ALTERNATIVE ENERGY: STATE AND PROSPECTS OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the state and prospect of development in the modern world of alternative energy, including wind energy, sun energy, geothermal energy, biogas energy, flood-tide water energy, hydrogen energy and small water energy. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information in area of the present state of world energy and ways of its further development. Results. A brief scientific and technical review is resulted about the state and prospects of world development of basic types of alternative energy. It is shown that, in spite of comparatively small stake (to 10 % of this untraditional energy in general world balance of making of electric power, world association taking into account the necessary changing in the nearest 50 years of present oil-gas «foundation» of energy on other with large raw material, potential and ecological possibilities are forced to invest large financial means in development of the indicated directions of alternative energy. Originality. First on the basis of materials of separate magazine publications, scientific monographs and internet-reports on power problem the brief analytical review of the state and prospects of world development of basic types of alternative energy is executed. Practical value. Deepening and spread of the scientific and technical learnings in area of functioning and ways of development of modern energy. Scientific popularization of arising up before society claimed tasks from global and important for all of humanity of power problem.

  3. 78 FR 51735 - Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    .../fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-06-28/pdf/2013-15465.pdf . Statutory Authority: Sections 412(c)(1)(B) of the... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement,...

  4. 77 FR 52752 - Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice of awards. CFDA Number: 93.566. SUMMARY: The Office of Refugee...

  5. Regime shifts in exploited marine food webs: detecting mechanisms underlying alternative stable states using size- structured community dynamics theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gårdmark, A.; Casini, M.; Huss, M.; van Leeuwen, A.; Hjelm, J.; Persson, L.; de Roos, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Many marine ecosystems have undergone ‘regime shifts’, i.e. abrupt reorgan- izations across trophic levels. Establishing whether these constitute shifts between alternative stable states is of key importance for the prospects of eco- system recovery and for management. We show how mechanisms underly

  6. Lanthanide Complexes for Oligomerization of Phenyl Isocyanate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG,Ming-Yu; YAO,Ying-Ming; ZHOU,Yu-Fang; ZHANG,Li-Fen; SHEN,Qi

    2003-01-01

    A series of lanthanide complexes including (Ind)3Sm(THF)(1),[(MeCp)2Sm(μ-SPh)(THF)]2(2),[(MeCp)2Y(μ-O-i-Pr)]2(3),(MeCp)3Sm·THF(4),Sm(SPh)3(hmpa)3(5),[(MeCp)2Y-(μ-OCH2CF3)2(6)and (CF3CH2O)3Y(THF)3(7) were synthesized and they have good activity for the oligomerization of phenylisocyanate.Among them 5 shows the highest activity.The conversion is as high as 96.2%,with 1/2500 of the molar ratio of cat./PhNCO.The main components in oligomer were characterized to be a cycdlodimer and a cyclotrimer.The ratio of cyclodimer to cyclotrimer depends on the lanthanide complexes used.7 gave 85.2%cyclotrimer with 1/300 of the molar ratio of cat./PhNCO at 40℃ for 0.5h,while 5 gave 77.6% cyclodimer with 1/300 of the molar ratio of cat./PhNCO at 40℃ for 4h.

  7. Changes in dynamics upon oligomerization regulate substrate binding and allostery in amino acid kinase family members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Marcos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization is a functional requirement for many proteins. The interfacial interactions and the overall packing geometry of the individual monomers are viewed as important determinants of the thermodynamic stability and allosteric regulation of oligomers. The present study focuses on the role of the interfacial interactions and overall contact topology in the dynamic features acquired in the oligomeric state. To this aim, the collective dynamics of enzymes belonging to the amino acid kinase family both in dimeric and hexameric forms are examined by means of an elastic network model, and the softest collective motions (i.e., lowest frequency or global modes of motions favored by the overall architecture are analyzed. Notably, the lowest-frequency modes accessible to the individual subunits in the absence of multimerization are conserved to a large extent in the oligomer, suggesting that the oligomer takes advantage of the intrinsic dynamics of the individual monomers. At the same time, oligomerization stiffens the interfacial regions of the monomers and confers new cooperative modes that exploit the rigid-body translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the intact monomers. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of cooperative inhibition of hexameric N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase by arginine and on the allosteric regulation of UMP kinases. It also highlights the significance of the particular quaternary design in selectively determining the oligomer dynamics congruent with required ligand-binding and allosteric activities.

  8. Creation of Alternate Stable States in Tropical Dry Forests as a Consequence of Human Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bloem, S. J.; Whitmire, S. L.; Thaxton, J.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances in Caribbean subtropical dry forests of the Caribbean lead to either novel species assemblages in post-disturbance forest, or stable degraded grassland states. Among these disturbances are fire and clearing. Short-term responses to both disturbances include sharp increases in nutrient fluxes, shifts in soil moisture availability, and the spread of invasive grass species if seed sources are nearby. In Guánica Forest, Puerto Rico, our studies in sites that were frequently burned and a chronosequence of once-burned sites beginning 30 years ago showed that fire is associated with invasion by exotic grass species and that once invaded, grass dominated sites do not revert to forest. After 30 years, single burn sites were still ≥65% lower in basal area and species richness than native forest. Frequently burned sites had 60-75% lower soil N, 50-65% lower S, and 56-68% lower C, as well as elevated Fe and pH. A single burn in a previously unburned forest elevated NO3 flux ~6-fold for at least the next year. Once dominated by grass, tree seed rain is extremely low (7 seeds/m2/y). Low dispersal rates combined with low germination rates makes forest regeneration unlikely. In contrast, sites that cleared or plowed without grass invasion regain structural characteristics of native forests in approximately 40 years. However, these sites are typically dominated by Leucaena leucocephala, a naturalized tree introduced to the island in the 1700s. The proportion of native-species saplings in the understory of Leucaena-dominated forests increased by 0.85%/yr in stands >35 years old until reaching ~95% in 76 yr old stands, suggesting that Leucaena facilitated the reestablishment of native species. We conclude that when anthropogenic disturbance creates grass-dominated sites, these areas will remain stable degraded states. Leucaena can serve as an alternate pathway to forest restoration, facilitating the return of forest cover with a novel combination of

  9. Characterization of tau oligomeric seeds in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Julia E; Sengupta, Urmi; Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J; Troncoso, Juan; Kayed, Rakez

    2014-06-14

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy which is primarily defined by the deposition of tau into globose-type neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Tau in its native form has important functions for microtubule dynamics. Tau undergoes alternative splicing in exons 2, 3, and 10 which results in six different isoforms. Products of splicing on exon 10 are the most prone to mutations. Three repeat (3R) and four repeat (4R) tau, like other disease-associated amyloids, can form oligomers which may then go on to further aggregate and form fibrils. Recent studies from our laboratory and others have provided evidence that tau oligomers, not NFTs, are the most toxic species in neurodegenerative tauopathies and seed the pathological spread of tau. Analysis of PSP brain sections revealed globose-type NFTs, as well as both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated tau oligomers. Analysis of PSP brains via Western blot and ELISA revealed the presence of increased levels of tau oligomers compared to age-matched control brains. Oligomers were immunoprecipitated from PSP brain and were capable of seeding the oligomerization of both 3R and 4R tau isoforms. This is the first time tau oligomers have been characterized in PSP. These results indicate that tau oligomers are an important component of PSP pathology, along with NFTs. The ability of PSP brain-derived tau oligomers to seed 3R and 4R tau suggests that these oligomers represent the pathological species responsible for disease propagation and the presence of oligomers in a pure neurodegenerative tauopathy implies a common neuropathological process for tau seen in diseases with other amyloid proteins.

  10. State Policy Leadership for the Future: History of State Coordination and Governance and Alternatives for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Aims

    2016-01-01

    A decade ago, the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education (the National Center) issued a policy brief, "State Capacity for Higher Education Policy." The National Center's core recommendation: States must have a broad-based, independent, credible public entity with a clear charge to increase the state's educational…

  11. Alternative Testing Strategies for Nanomaterials: State of the Science and Considerations for Risk Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, K J

    2016-08-01

    The rapid growth of the nanotechnology industry has warranted equal progress in the nanotoxicology and risk assessment fields. In vivo models have traditionally been used to determine human and environmental risk for chemicals; however, the use of these tests has limitations, and there are global appeals to develop reliable alternatives to animal testing. Many have investigated the use of alternative (nonanimal) testing methods and strategies have quickly developed and resulted in the generation of large toxicological data sets for numerous nanomaterials (NMs). Due to the novel physicochemical properties of NMs that are related to surface characteristics, the approach toward toxicity test development has distinct considerations from traditional chemicals, bringing new requirements for adapting these approaches for NMs. The methodical development of strategies that combine multiple alternative tests can be useful for predictive NM risk assessment and help screening-level decision making. This article provides an overview of the main developments in alternative methods and strategies for reducing uncertainty in NM risk assessment, including advantages and disadvantages of in vitro, ex vivo, and in silico methods, and examples of existing comprehensive strategies. In addition, knowledge gaps are identified toward improvements for experimental and strategy design, specifically highlighting the need to represent realistic exposure scenarios and to consider NM-specific concerns such as characterization, assay interferences, and standardization. Overall, this article aims to improve the reliability and utility of alternative testing methods and strategies for risk assessment of manufactured NMs.

  12. Characterization and preparation of oligomeric procyanidins from Litchi chinensis pericarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yong; Zheng, Yan; Li, Xiaopeng; Li, Shuyi; Xie, Bijun; Sun, Zhida

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study is to characterize and prepare A-type oligomeric procyanidins from litchi pericarp (Litchi chinensis Baila). The variety of oligomeric procyanidins was characterized by LC-ESI-MS analysis. There were (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, twelve dimers and six trimers of procyanidins were found in litchi pericarp extracts, and A-type procyanidins were much more abundant than B-type procyanidins. The main flavan-3-ol monomer and oligomeric procyanidins in litchi pericarp were (-)-epicatechin, A-type dimers (A1 and A2) and trimer (epicatechin-(4β-8, 2β-O-7)-epicatechin- (4β-8)-epicatechin). Procyanidin A1 (epicatechin-(4β-8, 2β-O-7)-catechin) was identified by NMR in litchi pericarp for the first time. (-)-Epicatechin and oligomeric procyanidins were prepared by the combination of AB-8 column chromatography and Toyopearl HW-40S column chromatography. The results showed that each fraction predominantly owned a single compound and gave a high yield with (-)-epicatechin, A-type dimers (A1 and A2) and trimer, suggesting a useful method to obtain pure (-)-epicatechin and A-type oligomeric procyanidins.

  13. A Changing Number of Alternative States in the Boreal Biome: Reproducibility Risks of Replacing Remote Sensing Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chi; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H; Hirota, Marina; Chapin, F Stuart; Scheffer, Marten

    2015-01-01

    Publicly available remote sensing products have boosted science in many ways. The openness of these data sources suggests high reproducibility. However, as we show here, results may be specific to versions of the data products that can become unavailable as new versions are posted. We focus on remotely-sensed tree cover. Recent studies have used this public resource to detect multi-modality in tree cover in the tropical and boreal biomes. Such patterns suggest alternative stable states separated by critical tipping points. This has important implications for the potential response of these ecosystems to global climate change. For the boreal region, four distinct ecosystem states (i.e., treeless, sparse and dense woodland, and boreal forest) were previously identified by using the Collection 3 data of MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields (VCF). Since then, the MODIS VCF product has been updated to Collection 5; and a Landsat VCF product of global tree cover at a fine spatial resolution of 30 meters has been developed. Here we compare these different remote-sensing products of tree cover to show that identification of alternative stable states in the boreal biome partly depends on the data source used. The updated MODIS data and the newer Landsat data consistently demonstrate three distinct modes around similar tree-cover values. Our analysis suggests that the boreal region has three modes: one sparsely vegetated state (treeless), one distinct 'savanna-like' state and one forest state, which could be alternative stable states. Our analysis illustrates that qualitative outcomes of studies may change fundamentally as new versions of remote sensing products are used. Scientific reproducibility thus requires that old versions remain publicly available.

  14. A Changing Number of Alternative States in the Boreal Biome: Reproducibility Risks of Replacing Remote Sensing Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Xu

    Full Text Available Publicly available remote sensing products have boosted science in many ways. The openness of these data sources suggests high reproducibility. However, as we show here, results may be specific to versions of the data products that can become unavailable as new versions are posted. We focus on remotely-sensed tree cover. Recent studies have used this public resource to detect multi-modality in tree cover in the tropical and boreal biomes. Such patterns suggest alternative stable states separated by critical tipping points. This has important implications for the potential response of these ecosystems to global climate change. For the boreal region, four distinct ecosystem states (i.e., treeless, sparse and dense woodland, and boreal forest were previously identified by using the Collection 3 data of MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields (VCF. Since then, the MODIS VCF product has been updated to Collection 5; and a Landsat VCF product of global tree cover at a fine spatial resolution of 30 meters has been developed. Here we compare these different remote-sensing products of tree cover to show that identification of alternative stable states in the boreal biome partly depends on the data source used. The updated MODIS data and the newer Landsat data consistently demonstrate three distinct modes around similar tree-cover values. Our analysis suggests that the boreal region has three modes: one sparsely vegetated state (treeless, one distinct 'savanna-like' state and one forest state, which could be alternative stable states. Our analysis illustrates that qualitative outcomes of studies may change fundamentally as new versions of remote sensing products are used. Scientific reproducibility thus requires that old versions remain publicly available.

  15. Parallel symbolic state-space exploration is difficult, but what is the alternative?

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardo, Gianfranco; Jin, Xiaoqing; 10.4204/EPTCS.14.1

    2009-01-01

    State-space exploration is an essential step in many modeling and analysis problems. Its goal is to find the states reachable from the initial state of a discrete-state model described. The state space can used to answer important questions, e.g., "Is there a dead state?" and "Can N become negative?", or as a starting point for sophisticated investigations expressed in temporal logic. Unfortunately, the state space is often so large that ordinary explicit data structures and sequential algorithms cannot cope, prompting the exploration of (1) parallel approaches using multiple processors, from simple workstation networks to shared-memory supercomputers, to satisfy large memory and runtime requirements and (2) symbolic approaches using decision diagrams to encode the large structured sets and relations manipulated during state-space generation. Both approaches have merits and limitations. Parallel explicit state-space generation is challenging, but almost linear speedup can be achieved; however, the analysis is...

  16. The active (ADHa) and inactive (ADHi) forms of the PQQ-alcohol dehydrogenase from Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus differ in their respective oligomeric structures and redox state of their corresponding prosthetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; González-Valdez, Alejandra Abigail; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena; Escamilla, Jose E

    2012-03-01

    The membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus contains one pyrroloquinoline quinone moiety (PQQ), one [2Fe-2S] cluster, and four c-type cytochromes. Here, we describe a novel and inactive enzyme. ADHi, similarly to ADHa, is a heterodimer of 72- and 44-kDa subunits and contains the expected prosthetic groups. However, ADHa showed a threefold molecular mass as compared to ADHi. Noteworthy, the PQQ, the [2Fe-2S] and most of the cytochromes in purified ADHi is in the oxidized form, contrasting with ADHa where the PQQ-semiquinone is detected and the [2Fe-2S] cluster as well as the cytochromes c remained fully reduced after purification. Reduction kinetics of the ferricyanide-oxidized enzymes showed that while ADHa was brought back by ethanol to its full reduction state, in ADHi, only one-quarter of the total heme c was reduced. The dithionite-reduced ADHi was largely oxidized by ubiquinone-2, thus indicating that intramolecular electron transfer is not impaired in ADHi. The acidic pH of the medium might be deleterious for the membrane-bound ADH by causing conformational changes leading to changes in the relative orientation of heme groups and shift of corresponding redox potential to higher values. This would hamper electron transfer resulting in the low activity observed in ADHi.

  17. Kelp Forests versus Urchin Barrens: Alternate Stable States and Their Effect on Sea Otter Prey Quality in the Aleutian Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan L. Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macroalgal and urchin barren communities are alternately stable and persist in the Aleutians due to sea otter presence and absence. In the early 1990s a rapid otter population decline released urchins from predation and caused a shift to the urchin-dominated state. Despite increases in urchin abundance, otter numbers continued to decline. Although debated, prey quality changes have been implicated in current otter population status. This study examined otter prey abundance, size, biomass, and potential energy density in remnant kelp forest and urchin-dominated communities to determine if alternate stable states affect prey quality. Findings suggest that although urchin barrens provide more abundant urchin prey, individual urchins are smaller and provide lower biomass and potential energy density compared to kelp forests. Shifts to urchin barrens do affect prey quality but changes are likely compensated by increased prey densities and are insufficient in explaining current otter population status in the Aleutians.

  18. Browns Park state lands ecological site inventory and grazing plan alternatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is prepared for the Colorado State Land Board on field studies conducted on state lands in the Browns Park Resource Management Area. Inventories and...

  19. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    KRUL Cyrille; Ashton, Rachel; Roggen, Erwin; Fuchs, Horst; Gaca, Marianna; Hill, Erin; Poth, Albrecht; Wever, De, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of the art in alternative methods, how companies have, can, and will need to adapt and what drives and hinders regulatory acceptance and use. Several key messages arose from the meeting. First, industry...

  20. Alternative media in a digital era: Comparing news and information use among activists in the United States and Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Harlow, S.; Harp, D.

    2013-01-01

    As activists increasingly use the Internet to bypass traditional media gatekeepers, disseminate their own messages, and mobilize protests, this study explores how activists in the United States and Latin America view activism in relation to mainstream and alternative media, particularly online media. Results from a quantitative and qualitative survey show activists distrust mainstream, corporate media and most frequently get their news online. Also, despite the digital divide and concerns abo...

  1. A Survey of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Knowledge among Health Educators in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ping; Priestley, Jennifer Lewis; Johnson, Roy D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is popular among U.S. health care consumers, but no study has examined how much health educators know about CAM. Purpose: To examine the knowledge of basic CAM concepts and common CAM therapies among health educators in the U.S. Methods: An online survey was conducted among 1,299 health…

  2. Mowing Submerged Macrophytes in Shallow Lakes with Alternative Stable States: Battling the Good Guys?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Jan J.; Verhofstad, Michiel J. J. M.; Louwers, Evelien; Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Brederveld, Robert J.; van Gerven, Luuk P. A.; Janssen, Annette B. G.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Mooij, Wolf M.

    2017-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes play an important role in maintaining good water quality in shallow lakes. Yet extensive stands easily interfere with various services provided by these lakes, and harvesting is increasingly applied as a management measure. Because shallow lakes may possess alternative stable

  3. Perceptions of Educators Regarding the Effectiveness of Alternative Programs in a Southern State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    At-risk students are engaged in dangerous behaviors that lead them to become involved in the juvenile justice system and cause the feeling of low self-worth. This eventually causes at-risk youths to drop out of school and engage in detrimental behaviors that meddle in their academic success. The alternative education program provides these at-risk…

  4. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  5. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ling Cui; Long-hai Qiu; Jia-yan Lian; Jia-chun Li; Jun Hu; Xiao-lin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group) alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group). As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  6. Superinfection between Influenza and RSV Alternating Patterns in San Luis Potosí State, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Hernández, Jorge Xicoténcatl; Núñez-López, Mayra; Comas-García, Andreu; Cherpitel, Daniel Ernesto Noyola; Ocampo, Marcos Capistrán

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to explain through the ecological hypothesis superinfection and competitive interaction between two viral populations and niche (host) availability, the alternating patterns of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and influenza observed in a regional hospital in San Luis Potosí State, México using a mathematical model as a methodological tool. The data analyzed consists of community-based and hospital-based Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) consultations provided by health-care institutions reported to the State Health Service Epidemiology Department from 2003 through 2009. PMID:25803450

  7. Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

  8. Uncoupling of allosteric and oligomeric regulation in a functional hybrid enzyme constructed from Escherichia coli and human ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Long, Marcus J C; Rigney, Mike; Parvez, Saba; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2013-10-08

    An N-terminal-domain (NTD) and adjacent catalytic body (CB) make up subunit-α of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo dNTP biosynthesis. A strong linkage exists between ligand binding at the NTD and oligomerization-coupled RNR inhibition, inducible by both dATP and nucleotide chemotherapeutics. These observations have distinguished the NTD as an oligomeric regulation domain dictating the assembly of inactive RNR oligomers. Inactive states of RNR differ between eukaryotes and prokaryotes (α6 in human versus α4β4 in Escherichia coli , wherein β is RNR's other subunit); however, the NTD structurally interconnects individual α2 or α2 and β2 dimeric motifs within the respective α6 or α4β4 complexes. To elucidate the influence of NTD ligand binding on RNR allosteric and oligomeric regulation, we engineered a human- E. coli hybrid enzyme (HE) where human-NTD is fused to E. coli -CB. Both the NTD and the CB of the HE bind dATP. The HE specifically partners with E. coli -β to form an active holocomplex. However, although the NTD is the sole physical tether to support α2 and/or β2 associations in the dATP-bound α6 or α4β4 fully inhibited RNR complexes, the binding of dATP to the HE NTD only partially suppresses HE activity and fully precludes formation of higher-order HE oligomers. We postulate that oligomeric regulation is the ultimate mechanism for potent RNR inhibition, requiring species-specific NTD-CB interactions. Such interdomain cooperativity in RNR oligomerization is unexpected from structural studies alone or biochemical studies of point mutants.

  9. ALTERNATIVE ENERGIES’ MANAGEMENT IN ROMANIA – MEMBER STATE OF EUROPEAN UNION

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad Gabriel Cârstea; Alexandra Irina Dănciulescu; Ioana Gabriela Fîntînă

    2010-01-01

    Due to the negative effects on the environment made by the usage of fossil fuels, a poor management regarding energy sources made the world leaders to rethink the development strategies for the global economy. As a consequence the European Union made its own strategy based among others on utilizing the alternative energy sources. The paper analyses the implementation of these strategies in Romania, who is an EU member since 2007.

  10. Parallel symbolic state-space exploration is difficult, but what is the alternative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Ciardo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available State-space exploration is an essential step in many modeling and analysis problems. Its goal is to find the states reachable from the initial state of a discrete-state model described. The state space can used to answer important questions, e.g., "Is there a dead state?" and "Can N become negative?", or as a starting point for sophisticated investigations expressed in temporal logic. Unfortunately, the state space is often so large that ordinary explicit data structures and sequential algorithms cannot cope, prompting the exploration of (1 parallel approaches using multiple processors, from simple workstation networks to shared-memory supercomputers, to satisfy large memory and runtime requirements and (2 symbolic approaches using decision diagrams to encode the large structured sets and relations manipulated during state-space generation. Both approaches have merits and limitations. Parallel explicit state-space generation is challenging, but almost linear speedup can be achieved; however, the analysis is ultimately limited by the memory and processors available. Symbolic methods are a heuristic that can efficiently encode many, but not all, functions over a structured and exponentially large domain; here the pitfalls are subtler: their performance varies widely depending on the class of decision diagram chosen, the state variable order, and obscure algorithmic parameters. As symbolic approaches are often much more efficient than explicit ones for many practical models, we argue for the need to parallelize symbolic state-space generation algorithms, so that we can realize the advantage of both approaches. This is a challenging endeavor, as the most efficient symbolic algorithm, Saturation, is inherently sequential. We conclude by discussing challenges, efforts, and promising directions toward this goal.

  11. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Rachel; De Wever, Bart; Fuchs, Horst W; Gaca, Marianna; Hill, Erin; Krul, Cyrille; Poth, Albrecht; Roggen, Erwin L

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15-16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of the art in alternative methods, how companies have, can, and will need to adapt and what drives and hinders regulatory acceptance and use. Several key messages arose from the meeting. First, industry and regulatory bodies should not wait for complete suites of alternative tests to become available, but should begin working with methods available right now (e.g., mining of existing animal data to direct future studies, implementation of alternative tests wherever scientifically valid rather than continuing to rely on animal tests) in non-animal and animal integrated strategies to reduce the numbers of animals tested. Sharing of information (communication), harmonization and standardization (coordination), commitment and collaboration are all required to improve the quality and speed of validation, acceptance, and implementation of tests. Finally, we consider how alternative methods can be used in research and development before formal implementation in regulations. Here we present the conclusions on what can be done already and suggest some solutions and strategies for the future.

  12. Noncontrast-enhanced renal angiography using multiple inversion recovery and alternating TR balanced steady-state free precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hattie Z; Worters, Pauline W; Wu, Holden H; Ingle, R Reeve; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2013-08-01

    Noncontrast-enhanced renal angiography techniques based on balanced steady-state free precession avoid external contrast agents, take advantage of high inherent blood signal from the T 2 / T 1 contrast mechanism, and have short steady-state free precession acquisition times. However, background suppression is limited; inflow times are inflexible; labeling region is difficult to define when tagging arterial flow; and scan times are long. To overcome these limitations, we propose the use of multiple inversion recovery preparatory pulses combined with alternating pulse repetition time balanced steady-state free precession to produce renal angiograms. Multiple inversion recovery uses selective spatial saturation followed by four nonselective inversion recovery pulses to concurrently null a wide range of background T 1 species while allowing for adjustable inflow times; alternating pulse repetition time steady-state free precession maintains vessel contrast and provides added fat suppression. The high level of suppression enables imaging in three-dimensional as well as projective two-dimensional formats, the latter of which has a scan time as short as one heartbeat. In vivo studies at 1.5 T demonstrate the superior vessel contrast of this technique.

  13. Oligomeric structure of a cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide in dodecylphosphocholine micelle determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Rathi; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2011-01-01

    The broad spectrum of antibacterial activities of host defense cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) arises from their ability to perturb membrane integrity of the microbes. The mechanisms are often thought to require assembly of AMPs on the membrane surface to form pores. However, three dimensional structures in the oligomeric form of AMPs in the context of lipid membranes are largely limited. Here, we demonstrate that a 22-residue antimicrobial peptide, termed VK22, derived from fowlicidin-1, a cathelicidin family of AMP from chicken oligomerizes into a predominantly tetrameric state in zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. An ensemble of NMR structures of VK22 determined in 200mM perdeuterated DPC, from 755 NOE constrains including 19 inter-helical NOEs, had revealed an assembly of four helices arranged in anti-parallel fashion. Hydrogen bonds, C(α)H-O=C types, and van der Waals interactions among the helical sub-units appear to be involved in the stabilization of the quaternary structures. The central region of the barrel shaped tetrameric bundle is non-polar with clusters of aromatic residues, whereas all the cationic residues are positioned at the termini. Paramagnetic spin labeled NMR experiments indicated that the tetrameric structure is embedded into micelles such that the non-polar region located inside the lipid acyl chains. Structure and micelle localization of a monomeric version, obtained from substitution of two Tyr residues with Ala, of the peptide is also compared. The mutated peptide VK22AA has been found be localized at the surface of the micelles. The tetrameric structure of VK22 delineates a small water pore that can be larger in the higher order oligomers. As these results provide structural insights, at atomic resolution, into the oligomeric states of a helical AMP in lipid environment, the structural details may be further utilized for the design of novel self-assembled membrane protein mimics.

  14. Effects of Bond Alternation on the Ground-State Phase Diagram of One-Dimensional XXZ Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG Ling; LIU Guang-Hua; TIAN Guang-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The ground-state properties and quantum phase transitions (QPTs) of the one-dimensional bond-alternative XXZ model are investigated by the infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD) method.The bond-alternative effects on its ground-state phase diagram are discussed in detail.Once the bond alternation is taken into account,the antiferromagnetic phase (△ > 1) will be destroyed at a given critical point and change into a disordered phase without nonlocal string order.The QPT is shown to be second-order,and the whole phase diagram is provided.For the ferromagnetic phase region (△ <-1),the critical point rc always equals 1 (independent of △),and the QPT for this case is shown to be first-order.The dimerized Heisenberg model is also discussed,and two disordered phases can be distinguished by with or without nonlocal string orders.Both the bipartite entanglement and the fidelity per site,as two kinds of model-independent measures,are capable of describing all the QPTs in such a quantum model.

  15. Bax monomers form dimer units in the membrane that further self-assemble into multiple oligomeric species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaj, Yamunadevi; Cosentino, Katia; Axmann, Markus; Pedrueza-Villalmanzo, Esteban; Hermann, Eduard; Bleicken, Stephanie; Spatz, Joachim; García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2015-08-01

    Bax is a key regulator of apoptosis that mediates the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol via oligomerization in the outer mitochondrial membrane before pore formation. However, the molecular mechanism of Bax assembly and regulation by other Bcl-2 members remains obscure. Here, by analysing the stoichiometry of Bax oligomers at the single-molecule level, we find that Bax binds to the membrane in a monomeric state and then self-assembles in Bax does not exist in a unique oligomeric state, but as several different species based on dimer units. Moreover, we show that cBid activates Bax without affecting its assembly, while Bcl-xL induces the dissociation of Bax oligomers. On the basis of our experimental data and theoretical modelling, we propose a new mechanism for the molecular pathway of Bax assembly to form the apoptotic pore.

  16. Localized and extended states in doped polyaniline: The effect of bond-length alternation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dücker, H.; Struck, M.; Koslowski, Th.; von Niessen, W.

    1992-11-01

    We present numerical studies of localization properties of oxidized and protonated disordered polyaniline. The calculations are performed on the single electron level, using Hückel theory for π electrons. The spatial extension of the eigenstates at the Fermi energy is determined by a fast and accurate transfer-matrix scheme. The spatial extension of eigenstates diverges for a large degree of protonation, provided all bonds within the benzoid and quinoid can be described with the same set of tight-binding parameters. Localization effects become important for small degrees of protonation and in systems that show bond-length alternation in quinoid rings and aromatic bonds in benzoid rings.

  17. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...

  19. Protic Cationic Oligomeric Ionic Liquids of the Urethane Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Stryutsky, A. V.; Klymenko, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Protic oligomeric cationic ionic liquids of the oligo(ether urethane) type are synthesized via the reaction of an isocyanate prepolymer based on oligo(oxy ethylene)glycol with M = 1000 with hexamethylene-diisocyanate followed by blocking of the terminal isocyanate groups with the use of amine...

  20. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer in polymeric foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce A.; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Costeux, Stephane; Jeon, Hyun K.

    2017-01-17

    A polymeric foam article with a polymer matrix defining multiple cells therein has a polymer component with a first polymer that is a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer that has a weight-average molecular weight of two kilograms per mole or higher and 200 kilograms per mole or lower.

  1. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer in polymeric foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bruce A.; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Costeux, Stephane; Jeon, Hyun K.

    2017-01-17

    A polymeric foam article with a polymer matrix defining multiple cells therein has a polymer component with a first polymer that is a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer that has a weight-average molecular weight of two kilograms per mole or higher and 200 kilograms per mole or lower.

  2. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  3. Engaging with fragile and conflict-affected states: An alternative approach to theory, measurement and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Woolcock, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The coherence and effectiveness of engagement with the world's 'fragile and conflictaffected states' - beyond ethical imperatives and geo-strategic considerations - turns on answers to two vexing questions. First, on what defensible basis is any given country, at any given historical moment, deemed to be (or not to be) 'fragile'? Second, if a defining characteristic of state fragility is low levels of capability to implement core responsibilities, how can international agencies best support d...

  4. Alternative sigma factors in the free state are equilibrium mixtures of open and compact conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raha, Paromita; Chattopadhyay, Suranjana; Mukherjee, Srijata; Chattopadhyay, Ruchira; Roy, Koushik; Roy, Siddhartha

    2010-11-16

    Conformational switching upon core RNA polymerase binding is an integral part of functioning of bacterial sigma factors. Here, we have studied dynamical features of two alternative sigma factors. A study of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrodynamic measurements in Escherichia coli σ(32) suggest a compact shape like those found in complex with anti-sigma factors. On the other hand, the fluorescence anisotropy of probes attached to different regions of the protein and previous hydrogen exchange measurements suggest significant internal flexibility, particularly in the C-terminal half and region 1. In a homologous sigma factor, σ(F) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, emission spectra and fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the single tryptophan (W112) and probes placed in different regions suggest a compact conformation for a major part of the N-terminal half encompassing region 2 and the flexible C-terminal half. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements suggest significant flexibility in the C-terminal half and region 1, as well. Thus, free alternative sigma factors may be in equilibrium between two conformations: a compact one in which the promoter interacting motifs are trapped in the wrong conformation and another less abundant one with a more open and flexible conformation. Such flexibility may be important for promoter recognition and interaction with many partner proteins.

  5. Alternation of up and down states at a dynamical phase-transition of a neural networkwith spatiotemporal attractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eScarpetta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex collective activity emerges spontaneously in cortical circuits in-vivo and in-vitro, such as alternation of up and down states, precise spatiotemporal patterns replay, and power law scaling of neural avalanches. We focus on such critical features observed in cortical slices.We study spontaneous dynamics emerging in noisy recurrent networks of spiking neurons with sparse structured connectivity.The emerging spontaneous dynamics is studied, in presence of noise, with fixed connections. Note that no short-term synaptic depression is used. Two different regimes of spontaneous activity emerge changing the connection strength or noise intensity: a low activity regime, characterized by a nearly exponential distribution of firing rates with a maximum at rate zero, and a high activity regime, characterized by a nearly Gaussian distribution peaked at a high rate for high activity, with long-lasting replay of stored patterns. Between this two regimes, a transition region is observed, where firing rates show a bimodal distribution, with alternation of up and down states. In this region, one observes neuronal avalanches exhibiting power laws in size and duration, and a waiting time distribution between successive avalanches which shows a non-monotonic behaviour. During periods of high activity (up states consecutive avalanches are correlated, since they are part of a short transient replay initiated by noise focusing, and waiting times show a power law distribution. One can think at this critical dynamics as a reservoire of dynamical patterns for memory functions.

  6. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for interstitial cystitis: an update from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Megan Danielle; Shah, Nima M; Whitmore, Kristene E

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) has shifted from organ-specific to a multifactorial, multidisciplinary and individualized approach. Patients with refractory and debilitating symptoms may respond to complementary and alternative medical treatments (CAM). Through CAM therapies, practitioners assist the patient to be at the center of their care, empowering them to be emotionally and physically involved. Multi-disciplinary care, including urology, gynecology, gastroenterology, neurology, psychology, physiotherapy and pain medicine, is also identified to be the crux of adequate management of patients with chronic pelvic pain because of its variable etiology. The purpose of this review is to emphasize these changes and discuss management strategies.

  7. Cost implications of alternative sources of (n-3) fatty acid consumption in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eileen T; Luo, Hanqi; Ausman, Lynne M

    2012-03-01

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 provides authoritative advice on what Americans should eat to stay healthy. These guidelines provide a quantitative recommendation to consume 250 mg/d of (n-3) fatty acids (also known as omega-3 fatty acids). To achieve this goal, Americans would need to more than triple the amount of EPA and DHA currently consumed. This paper assessed the cost implications of increased levels of EPA and DHA from marine and nonmarine food sources using data from the 2007-2008 NHANES, USDA nutrient data base, and the USDA Center for the Nutrition Policy and Promotion food price data. Stearidonic acid (SDA)-enhanced soybean oil is a lower cost alternative to commonly consumed marine food as a source of EPA. In addition, given that SDA-enhanced soybean oil is intended to be used as an ingredient in a variety of products, this may enable consumers to increase consumption of EPA through commonly consumed foods.

  8. An alternative preparation method for ion exchanged catalysts: Solid state redox reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, E.; Hagen, A.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for modifying zeolites with zinc is proposed. The solid state redox reaction between metallic zinc and ZSM-5 zeolites with different Si/Al ratios was investigated by temperature programmed hydrogen evolution (TPHE), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and diffuse reflectance...... infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The evolution of hydrogen was detected at temperatures above 620 K. The source of hydrogen was the solid state redox reaction of the metal with protons of the support. The samples exhibit catalytic activity in ethane aromatization indicating that zinc...

  9. The effects of oligomerization on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm4/6/7 function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davey Megan J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minichromosome maintenance proteins (Mcm 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are related by sequence and form a variety of complexes that unwind DNA, including Mcm4/6/7. A Mcm4/6/7 trimer forms one half of the Mcm2-7 hexameric ring and can be thought of as the catalytic core of Mcm2-7, the replicative helicase in eukaryotic cells. Oligomeric analysis of Mcm4/6/7 suggests that it forms a hexamer containing two Mcm4/6/7 trimers, however, under certain conditions trimeric Mcm4/6/7 has also been observed. The functional significance of the different Mcm4/6/7 oligomeric states has not been assessed. The results of such an assessment would have implications for studies of both Mcm4/6/7 and Mcm2-7. Results Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm4/6/7 reconstituted from individual subunits exists in an equilibrium of oligomeric forms in which smaller oligomers predominate in the absence of ATP. In addition, we found that ATP, which is required for Mcm4/6/7 activity, shifts the equilibrium towards larger oligomers, likely hexamers of Mcm4/6/7. ATPγS and to a lesser extent ADP also shift the equilibrium towards hexamers. Study of Mcm4/6/7 complexes containing mutations that interfere with the formation of inter-subunit ATP sites (arginine finger mutants indicates that full activity of Mcm4/6/7 requires all of its ATP sites, which are formed in a hexamer and not a trimer. In keeping with this observation, Mcm4/6/7 binds DNA as a hexamer. Conclusions The minimal functional unit of Mcm4/6/7 is a hexamer. One of the roles of ATP binding by Mcm4/6/7 may be to stabilize formation of hexamers.

  10. Oligomerization of Mannan-binding Lectin Dictates Binding Properties and Complement Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, T R; Jensen, L; Hansen, A; Dani, R; Jensenius, J C; Dobó, J; Gál, P; Thiel, S

    2016-07-01

    The complement system is a part of the innate immune system and is involved in recognition and clearance of pathogens and altered-self structures. The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) with collagen-like regions bind to foreign or altered self-surfaces. Associated with the collagen-like stems of these PRMs are three mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and two MBL-associated proteins (MAps). The most studied of the PRMs, MBL, is present in serum mainly as trimeric and tetrameric oligomers of the structural subunit. We hypothesized that oligomerization of MBL may influence both the potential to bind to micro organisms and the interaction with the MASPs and MAps, thus influencing the ability to initiate complement activation. When testing binding at 37 °C, we found higher binding of tetrameric MBL to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than trimeric and dimeric MBL. In serum, we found that tetrameric MBL was the main oligomeric form present in complexes with the MASPs and MAp44. Such preference was confirmed using purified forms of recombinant MBL (rMBL) oligomers, where tetrameric rMBL interacted stronger with all of the MASPs and MAp44, compared to trimeric MBL. As a direct consequence of the weaker interaction with the MASPs, we found that trimeric rMBL was inferior to tetrameric rMBL in activating the complement system. Our data suggest that the oligomeric state of MBL is crucial both for the binding properties and the effector function of MBL.

  11. Modulation of the oligomerization of myelin proteolipid protein by transmembrane helix interaction motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Derek P; Deber, Charles M

    2010-08-17

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) is a highly hydrophobic 276-residue integral membrane protein that constitutes more than 50% of the total protein in central nervous system myelin. Previous studies have shown that this protein exists in myelin as an oligomer rather than as a monomer, and mutations in PLP that lead to neurological disorders such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and spastic paraplegia type 2 have been reported to affect its normal oligomerization. Here we employ peptide-based and in vivo approaches to examine the role of the TM domain in the formation of PLP quaternary structure through homo-oligomeric helix-helix interactions. Focusing on the TM4 alpha-helix (sequence (239)FIAAFVGAAATLVSLLTFMIAATY(262)), the site of several disease-causing point mutations that involve putative small residue helix-helix interaction motifs in the TM4 sequence, we used SDS-PAGE, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, size-exclusion chromatography, and TOXCAT assays in an Escherichia coli membrane to show that the PLP TM4 helix readily assembles into varying oligomeric states. In addition, through targeted studies of the PLP TM4 alpha-helix with point mutations that selectively eliminate these small residue motifs via substitution of Gly, Ala, or Ser residues with Ile residues, we describe a potential mechanism through which disease-causing point mutations can lead to aberrant PLP assembly. The overall results suggest that TM segments in misfolded PLP monomers that expose and/or create surface-exposed helix-helix interaction sites that are normally masked may have consequences for disease.

  12. Protein Cross-Linking and Oligomerization through Dityrosine Formation upon Exposure to Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Christopher J; Liu, Fobang; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Berkemeier, Thomas; Meusel, Hannah; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-09-15

    Air pollution is a potential driver for the increasing prevalence of allergic disease, and post-translational modification by air pollutants can enhance the allergenic potential of proteins. Here, the kinetics and mechanism of protein oligomerization upon ozone (O3) exposure were studied in coated-wall flow tube experiments at environmentally relevant O3 concentrations, relative humidities and protein phase states (amorphous solid, semisolid, and liquid). We observed the formation of protein dimers, trimers, and higher oligomers, and attribute the cross-linking to the formation of covalent intermolecular dityrosine species. The oligomerization proceeds fast on the surface of protein films. In the bulk material, reaction rates are limited by diffusion depending on phase state and humidity. From the experimental data, we derive a chemical mechanism and rate equations for a kinetic multilayer model of surface and bulk reaction enabling the prediction of oligomer formation. Increasing levels of tropospheric O3 in the Anthropocene may promote the formation of protein oligomers with enhanced allergenicity and may thus contribute to the increasing prevalence of allergies.

  13. Spectral hardening as a viable alternative to disc truncation in black hole state transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Salvesen, Greg; Reis, Rubens C; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2013-01-01

    Constraining the accretion flow geometry of black hole binaries in outburst is complicated by the inability of simplified multi-colour disc models to distinguish between changes in the inner disc radius and alterations to the emergent spectrum, parameterised by the phenomenological colour correction factor, f_col. We analyse Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the low mass Galactic black hole X-ray binary, GX 339-4, taken over seven epochs when the source was experiencing a state transition. The accretion disc component is isolated using a pipeline resulting in robust detections for disc luminosities, 0.001 < L_disc / L_Edd < 0.5. Assuming that the inner disc remains situated at the innermost stable circular orbit over the course of a state transition, we measure the relative degree of change in f_col required to explain the spectral evolution of the disc component. A variable f_col that increases by a factor of ~ 2.0 - 3.5 as the source transitions from the high/soft state to the low/hard state...

  14. Charges in Hydrophobic Environments: A Strategy for Identifying Alternative States in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Aaron C; Majumdar, Ananya; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2017-01-10

    In the V23E variant of staphylococcal nuclease, Glu-23 has a pKa of 7.5. At low pH, Glu-23 is neutral and buried in the hydrophobic interior of the protein. Crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy experiments show that when Glu-23 becomes charged, the protein switches into an open state in which strands β1 and β2 separate from the β-barrel; the remaining structure is unaffected. In the open state the hydrophobic interior of the protein is exposed to bulk water, allowing Glu-23 to become hydrated. This illustrates several key aspects of protein electrostatics: (1) The apparent pKa of an internal ionizable group can reflect the average of the very different pKa values (open ≈4.5, closed ≫7.5) sampled in the different conformational states. (2) The high apparent dielectric constant reported by the pKa value of internal ionizable group reflects conformational reorganization. (3) The apparent pKa of internal groups can be governed by large conformational changes. (4) A single charge buried in the hydrophobic interior of a protein is sufficient to convert what might have been a transient, partially unfolded state into the dominant state in solution. This suggests a general strategy for examining inaccessible regions of the folding landscape and for engineering conformational switches driven by small changes in pH. These data also constitute a benchmark for stringent testing of the ability of computational algorithms to predict pKa values of internal residues and to reproduce pH-driven conformational transitions of proteins.

  15. Assessment of alternative management practices and policies affecting soil carbon in agroecosystems of the central United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donigian, A.S.; Barnwell, T.O.; Jackson, R.B.; Patwardhan, A.S.; Weinrich, K.B.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of the U.S. EPA BIOME Agroecosystems Assessment Project is to evaluate the degree to which agroecosystems can be technically managed, on a sustainable basis, to conserve and sequester carbon, reduce the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and provide reference datasets and methodologies for agricultural assessment. The report provides preliminary estimates of carbon sequestration potential for the central United States including the Corn Belt, the Great Lakes, and portions of the Great Plains. This study region comprises 44% of the land area and 60% to 70% of the agricultural cropland of the conterminous United States. The assessment methodology includes the integration of the RAMS economic model, the Century soil carbon model, meteorologic and soils data bases, and GIS display and analysis capabilities in order to assess the impacts on soil carbon of current agricultural trends and conditions, alternative tillage practices, use of cover crops, and Conservation Reserve Program policy.

  16. An alternative derivation of ring-polymer molecular dynamics transition-state theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hele, Timothy J H

    2016-01-01

    In a previous article [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084108 (2013)], we showed that the transition-state-theory ($t\\rightarrow 0_+$) limit of ring-polymer molecular dynamics rate-theory (RPMD-TST) is also the $t\\rightarrow 0_+$ limit of a new type of quantum flux-side time-correlation function, in which the dividing surfaces are invariant to imaginary-time translation; in other words, that RPMD-TST is a $t\\rightarrow 0_+$ quantum transition-state theory (QTST). Recently, Jang and Voth [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084110 (2016)] rederived this quantum $t\\rightarrow 0_+$ limit, and claimed that it gives instead the centroid-density approximation. Here we show that the $t\\rightarrow 0_+$ limit derived by Jang and Voth is in fact RPMD-TST.

  17. An alternative preparation method for ion exchanged catalysts: Solid state redox reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, E.; Hagen, A.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for modifying zeolites with zinc is proposed. The solid state redox reaction between metallic zinc and ZSM-5 zeolites with different Si/Al ratios was investigated by temperature programmed hydrogen evolution (TPHE), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and diffuse reflectance...... infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The evolution of hydrogen was detected at temperatures above 620 K. The source of hydrogen was the solid state redox reaction of the metal with protons of the support. The samples exhibit catalytic activity in ethane aromatization indicating that zinc...... should be located at the same sites as in catalysts prepared by conventional methods. Combination of XANES and catalytic activity point to zinc being mainly present in tetrahedral geometry under reaction conditions....

  18. Roraima State: energy and alternatives to the future; Roraima: energia e alternativas para o futuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-01

    Report made by the Conselho Indigena de Roraima by and large with the Comissao Pro-Indio of Sao Paulo, addressed to the indigenous populations who lives near from the hydroelectric power plant on the state of Roraima, giving information about damns construction, energy electric uses, description of Hydroelectric and thermoelectric functioning, the energy program, electric energy landscape now and in the future, are presented. The work, was developed as support to meetings with the indigenous leaders. 7 figs.

  19. Fueling the dragon: Alternative Chinese oil futures and their implications for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberling, George G.

    This study examines how Chinese oil energy will likely shape future Sino-American relations under conditions of dependency and non-dependency. The study will list and describe three possible Chinese oil energy futures or scenarios (Competitive Dependency, Competitive Surplus and Cooperative Surplus) using Scenario Analysis to subsequently estimate their associated likelihoods using the PRINCE forecasting system and discuss and evaluate their strategic implications for the United States. Further, this study will determine the most likely oil energy future or scenario. Finally, the study will list and describe the most likely United States political, economic and/or military policy responses for each future or scenario. The study contributes to the literature on Chinese and United States energy security, foreign policy, political economy and political risk analysis by showing how China will most likely address its growing oil energy dependence and by determining what will be the most likely U.S. foreign policy consequences based on the most current literature available on energy security and foreign policy.

  20. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.winkler@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR{sub Q-PAS1}) and two (PpsR{sub N-Q-PAS1}) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR{sub ΔHTH}) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR{sub ΔHTH} structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that

  1. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-03-01

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  2. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  3. Semi-solid-state fermentation: a promising alternative for neomycin production by the actinomycete Streptomyces fradiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Isabel; Teixeira, José A; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana

    2013-06-10

    The production of neomycin by the actinomycete Streptomyces fradiae, under semi-solid-state fermentation conditions was the main subject of this study. Two supports (nylon sponge and orange peelings) were tested in order to determine the most suitable one for the production of neomycin by the above-mentioned microorganism. Nylon sponge led to the highest neomycin production, reaching a maximum value of 13,903 μg/mL on the 10th day of cultivation. As a control, the same experiment was performed under submerged fermentation (SmF) conditions, without solid support. Here the production of neomycin by S. fradiae was about 55-fold lower (i.e. 250 μg/mL) than that obtained for SSF.

  4. Curricular Inclusion of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Content in Occupational Therapy Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-10-01

    An exploratory, cross-sectional survey design was used to explore the extent to which CAM was included, what factors impacted its inclusion, topics and student learning outcomes covered, who taught the material, and what sources were used to prepare for delivering course content. While the vast majority of responding occupational therapy educators reported curricular inclusion of CAM, educational experiences for occupational therapy students varied widely. This overview of the curricular inclusion of CAM by faculty in occupational therapy programs in the United States indicated that many occupational therapy educators are responding to the demands of a more integrative healthcare system. Resolving ethical and pragmatic issues, providing faculty development opportunities, and standardizing student learning outcomes would align all stakeholders and mitigate ambiguities that currently exist surrounding the inclusion of CAM in occupational therapy education.

  5. Preparative isolation of oligomeric procyanidins from Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumdick, S; Petereit, F; Luftmann, H; Hensel, A

    2009-04-01

    The oligomeric procyanidins (OPC) from Hawthorn leaves and flowers (Crataegi folium cum flore) are considered to be in part responsible for the cardiotonic clinical activity of the herbal material. Effective methods for rapid isolation of these heterogenous oligomeric clusters with defined molecular weight as reference compounds are not published until now. Therefore the water soluble fraction of an acetone/water (7 + 3) extract of Hawthorn leaves and flowers was fractionated by a combination of MPLC on RP-18 material and preparative HPLC using a diol stationary phase. This procedure resulted in the effective isolation of procyanidins with a distinct degree of polymerization (DP) from dimers DP2 up to tridecamers DP13. Exact mass measurements with negative ESI-TOF/MS were employed to confirm the respective structures of the isolated procyanidins.

  6. Zinc ion conducting polymer electrolytes based on oligomeric polyether/PVDF-HFP blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Xu, Jun John

    Here we report novel zinc ion conducting polymer electrolytes based on oligomeric polyether/PVDF-HFP blends with or without the incorporation of a small amount of organic carbonates. Their thermal properties, ionic conductivity and electrochemical properties are characterized and the effect of different Zn salts and incorporation of a small amount of organic carbonates are investigated. These polymer electrolyte membranes exhibit essentially no or very low volatility, high thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, wide electrochemical stability window, acceptable interfacial resistance with zinc, and the capability for reversible Zn plating/stripping. Particularly promising are electrolyte systems based on the combination of low lattice energy zinc imide salt and a special co-solvent of oligomeric poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (PEGDME) mixed with a small amount of ethylene carbonate (EC), dimensionally stabilized with PVDF-HFP. Such novel polymer electrolyte membranes could lead to the development of new kinds of electrochemical energy storage devices based on zinc electrochemistry, including solid-state, thin-film rechargeable zinc/air cells envisaged.

  7. Zinc ion conducting polymer electrolytes based on oligomeric polyether/PVDF-HFP blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Hui; Xu, Jun John [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2007-03-20

    Here we report novel zinc ion conducting polymer electrolytes based on oligomeric polyether/PVDF-HFP blends with or without the incorporation of a small amount of organic carbonates. Their thermal properties, ionic conductivity and electrochemical properties are characterized and the effect of different Zn salts and incorporation of a small amount of organic carbonates are investigated. These polymer electrolyte membranes exhibit essentially no or very low volatility, high thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, wide electrochemical stability window, acceptable interfacial resistance with zinc, and the capability for reversible Zn plating/stripping. Particularly promising are electrolyte systems based on the combination of low lattice energy zinc imide salt and a special co-solvent of oligomeric poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (PEGDME) mixed with a small amount of ethylene carbonate (EC), dimensionally stabilized with PVDF-HFP. Such novel polymer electrolyte membranes could lead to the development of new kinds of electrochemical energy storage devices based on zinc electrochemistry, including solid-state, thin-film rechargeable zinc/air cells envisaged. (author)

  8. Characterization of Lassa virus glycoprotein oligomerization and influence of cholesterol on virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Lennartz, Frank; Ströher, Ute; Garten, Wolfgang; Strecker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature glycoprotein spikes are inserted in the Lassa virus envelope and consist of the distal subunit GP-1, the transmembrane-spanning subunit GP-2, and the signal peptide, which originate from the precursor glycoprotein pre-GP-C by proteolytic processing. In this study, we analyzed the oligomeric structure of the viral surface glycoprotein. Chemical cross-linking studies of mature glycoprotein spikes from purified virus revealed the formation of trimers. Interestingly, sucrose density gradient analysis of cellularly expressed glycoprotein showed that in contrast to trimeric mature glycoprotein complexes, the noncleaved glycoprotein forms monomers and oligomers spanning a wide size range, indicating that maturation cleavage of GP by the cellular subtilase SKI-1/S1P is critical for formation of the correct oligomeric state. To shed light on a potential relation between cholesterol and GP trimer stability, we performed cholesterol depletion experiments. Although depletion of cholesterol had no effect on trimerization of the glycoprotein spike complex, our studies revealed that the cholesterol content of the viral envelope is important for the infectivity of Lassa virus. Analyses of the distribution of viral proteins in cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant membrane areas showed that Lassa virus buds from membrane areas other than those responsible for impaired infectivity due to cholesterol depletion of lipid rafts. Thus, derivation of the viral envelope from cholesterol-rich membrane areas is not a prerequisite for the impact of cholesterol on virus infectivity.

  9. Pharmacological Profiles of Oligomerized μ-Opioid Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ing-Kang Ho; Cynthia Wei-Sheng Lee

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely prescribed pain relievers with multiple side effects and potential complications. They produce analgesia via G-protein-protein coupled receptors: μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and opioid receptor-like 1 receptors. Bivalent ligands targeted to the oligomerized opioid receptors might be the key to developing analgesics without undesired side effects and obtaining effective treatment for opioid addicts. In this review we will update the biological effects of μ-opioids on homo- or hetero-ol...

  10. Receptor Oligomerization as a Process Modulating Cellular Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The majority of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) self-assemble in the form dimeric/oligomeric complexes along the plasma membrane. Due to the molecular interactions they participate, GPCRs can potentially provide the framework for discriminating a wide variety of intercellular signals, as based...... and degeneracy may appear as the required feature to integrate the cell system into functional units of progressively higher hierarchical levels....

  11. DNA display of glycoconjugates to emulate oligomeric interactions of glycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Novoa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glycans (carbohydrate portion of glycoproteins and glycolipids frequently exert their function through oligomeric interactions involving multiple carbohydrate units. In efforts to recapitulate the diverse spatial arrangements of the carbohydrate units, assemblies based on hybridization of nucleic acid conjugates have been used to display simplified ligands with tailored interligand distances and valences. The programmability of the assemblies lends itself to a combinatorial display of multiple ligands. Recent efforts in the synthesis and applications of such conjugates are discussed.

  12. Solid-State Fermentation: an Alternative to Improve the Nutritive Value of Coffee Pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, Walter; Molina, Mario R.; Brenes, Roberto Gomez; Bressani, Ricardo

    1985-01-01

    Coffee pulp was subjected to a solid-state fermentation process, using Aspergillus niger. The initial moisture content of the pulp, as well as the fermentation time and temperature, had a significant effect on the increase in total amino acid content of the material. The increase in total amino acids showed a significant correlation with the dry matter recovered (r = −0.98) and the increase in pH during the process (r = 0.98). With a moisture content of 80%, a pH of 3.5, a temperature of 35°C, and an aeration of 8 liters/min per kg as fermentation conditions, it was found that the maximum concentration of total amino acids was attained after 43 h. The fermented product had a higher total amino acid content and a lower cell wall constituent value (primarily cellulose and hemicellulose) than the original pulp. A growing chicken's ration containing 10% of the fermented product had a feed efficiency (2.14) similar to that of the standard ration (2.19) and was significantly better than that of the diet containing 10% of the original pulp (2.53). The difference observed in feed intake and weight gain between the standard diet and that with 10% of the fermented product is considered to be due to palatability factors which should be studied further. PMID:16346724

  13. Solid-state fermentation: an alternative to improve the nutritive value of coffee pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, W; Molina, M R; Brenes, R G; Bressani, R

    1985-02-01

    Coffee pulp was subjected to a solid-state fermentation process, using Aspergillus niger. The initial moisture content of the pulp, as well as the fermentation time and temperature, had a significant effect on the increase in total amino acid content of the material. The increase in total amino acids showed a significant correlation with the dry matter recovered (r = -0.98) and the increase in pH during the process (r = 0.98). With a moisture content of 80%, a pH of 3.5, a temperature of 35 degrees C, and an aeration of 8 liters/min per kg as fermentation conditions, it was found that the maximum concentration of total amino acids was attained after 43 h. The fermented product had a higher total amino acid content and a lower cell wall constituent value (primarily cellulose and hemicellulose) than the original pulp. A growing chicken's ration containing 10% of the fermented product had a feed efficiency (2.14) similar to that of the standard ration (2.19) and was significantly better than that of the diet containing 10% of the original pulp (2.53). The difference observed in feed intake and weight gain between the standard diet and that with 10% of the fermented product is considered to be due to palatability factors which should be studied further.

  14. Neuromodulatory state and sex specify alternative behaviors through antagonistic synaptic pathways in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Heeun; Kim, Kyuhyung; Neal, Scott J; Macosko, Evan; Kim, Dongshin; Butcher, Rebecca A; Zeiger, Danna M; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Sengupta, Piali

    2012-08-23

    Pheromone responses are highly context dependent. For example, the C. elegans pheromone ascaroside C9 (ascr#3) is repulsive to wild-type hermaphrodites, attractive to wild-type males, and usually neutral to "social" hermaphrodites with reduced activity of the npr-1 neuropeptide receptor gene. We show here that these distinct behavioral responses arise from overlapping push-pull circuits driven by two classes of pheromone-sensing neurons. The ADL sensory neurons detect C9 and, in wild-type hermaphrodites, drive C9 repulsion through their chemical synapses. In npr-1 mutant hermaphrodites, C9 repulsion is reduced by the recruitment of a gap junction circuit that antagonizes ADL chemical synapses. In males, ADL sensory responses are diminished; in addition, a second pheromone-sensing neuron, ASK, antagonizes C9 repulsion. The additive effects of these antagonistic circuit elements generate attractive, repulsive, or neutral pheromone responses. Neuronal modulation by circuit state and sex, and flexibility in synaptic output pathways, may permit small circuits to maximize their adaptive behavioral outputs.

  15. Copper-induced oligomerization of peptides: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Gitta; Stefanescu, Raluca; Przybylski, Michael; Murariu, Manuela; Hudecz, Ferenc; Drochioiu, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    In this work, copper-binding of the tetraglycine peptide (Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly) was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Experiments were performed under alkaline conditions, in the presence of ethanolamine (pH 10.95). We observed that the presence of copper(II) ions induces the aggregation of the peptide and the formation of copper-bound complexes with higher molecular mass is favored, such as the oligomer complexes [3M+2Cu-3H](+) and [4M+3Cu-5H](+). At 1:1 peptide-copper(II) ion ratio, the singly charged [3M+2Cu-3H](+) oligomer complex is the base peak in the mass spectrum. Metal ion-induced oligomer-ization of neurotoxic peptides is well known in the literature; however, there are very few examples in which such oligomerization was directly observed by mass spectrometry. Our results show that application of short peptides can be useful to study the -mechanism of metal ion binding and metal ion-induced oligomerization of peptides.

  16. Projected increase in total knee arthroplasty in the United States - an alternative projection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, M C S; Paxton, E W; Graves, S E; Namba, R S; Nemes, S

    2017-08-08

    The purpose of our study was to estimate the future incidence rate (IR) and volume of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the United States from 2015 to 2050 using a conservative projection model that assumes a maximum IR of procedures. Furthermore, our study compared these projections to a model assuming exponential growth, as done in previous studies, for illustrative purposes. A population based epidemiological study was conducted using data from US National Inpatient Sample (NIS) and Census Bureau. Primary TKA procedures performed between 1993 and 2012 were identified. The IR, 95% confidence intervals (CI), or prediction intervals (PI) of TKA per 100,000 US citizens over the age of 40 years were calculated. The estimated IR was used as the outcome of a regression modelling with a logistic regression (i.e., conservative model) and Poisson regression equation (i.e., exponential growth model). Logistic regression modelling suggests the IR of TKA is expected to increase 69% by 2050 compared to 2012, from 429 (95%CI 374-453) procedures/100,000 in 2012 to 725 (95%PI 121-1041) in 2050. This translates into a 143% projected increase in TKA volume. Using the Poisson model, the IR in 2050 was projected to increase 565%, to 2854 (95%CI 2278-4004) procedures/100,000 IR, which is an 855% projected increase in volume compared to 2012. Even after using a conservative projection approach, the number of TKAs in the US, which already has the highest IR of knee arthroplasty in the world, is expected to increase 143% by 2050. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Auto-oligomerization and hydration of pyrrole revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advanced Light Source; Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Duffin, Andrew M.; England, Alice H.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J

    2009-05-29

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra have been measured at the carbon and nitrogen K-edges of the prototypical aromatic molecule, pyrrole, both in the gas phase and when solvated in water, and compared with spectra simulated using a combination of classical molecular dynamics and first principles density functional theory in the excited state core hole approximation. The excellent agreement enabled detailed assignments. Pyrrole is highly reactive, particularly in water, and reaction products formed by the auto-oligomerization of pyrrole are identified. The solvated spectra have been measured at two different temperatures, indicating that the final states remain largely unaffected by both hydration and temperature. This is somewhat unexpected, since the nitrogen in pyrrole can donate a hydrogen bond to water.

  18. Solid-state fermentation and composting as alternatives to treat hair waste: A life-cycle assessment comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Eva; Komilis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Antoni

    2017-07-01

    One of the wastes associated with leather production in tannery industries is the hair residue generated during the dehairing process. Hair wastes are mainly dumped or managed through composting but recent studies propose the treatment of hair wastes through solid-state fermentation (SSF) to obtain proteases and compost. These enzymes are suitable for its use in an enzymatic dehairing process, as an alternative to the current chemical dehairing process. In the present work, two different scenarios for the valorization of the hair waste are proposed and assessed by means of life-cycle assessment: composting and SSF for protease production. Detailed data on hair waste composting and on SSF protease production are gathered from previous studies performed by our research group and from a literature survey. Background inventory data are mainly based on Ecoinvent version 3 from software SimaPro® 8. The main aim of this study was to identify which process results in the highest environmental impact. The SSF process was found to have lower environmental impacts than composting, due to the fact that the enzyme use in the dehairing process prevents the use of chemicals traditionally used in the dehairing process. This permits to reformulate an industrial process from the classical approach of waste management to a novel alternative based on circular economy.

  19. A new alternative to produce gibberellic acid by solid state fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Rodrigues

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gibberellic acid (GA3 is an important hormone, which controls plant's growth and development. Solid State Fermentation (SSF allows the use of agro-industrial residues reducing the production costs. The screening of strains (four of Gibberella fujikuoroi and one of Fusarium moniliforme and substrates (citric pulp, soy bran, sugarcane bagasse, soy husk, cassava bagasse and coffee husk and inoculum preparation study were conducted in order to evaluate the best conditions to produce GA3 by SSF. Fermentation assays were carried out in erlenmeyers flasks at 29°C, with initial moisture of 75-80%. Different medium for inoculum production were tested in relation to cells viability and GA3 production by SSF. F. moniliforme LPB 03 and citric pulp were chosen for GA3 production. The best medium for inoculum production was citric pulp extract supplemented with sucrose. GA3 production by SSF reached 5.9 g /kg of dry CP after 3 days of fermentation.O ácido giberélico (GA3 é um importante hormônio vegetal. A fermentação no estado sólido (FES utiliza resíduos agro-industriais reduzindo os custos de produção. Neste trabalho a seleção de cepas (quatro de Gibberella fujikuoroi e uma de Fusarium moniliforme e substratos (polpa cítrica, casca de soja, bagaço de cana, farelo de soja, bagaço de mandioca e casca de café e o estudo da preparação do inóculo foram conduzidos para otimizar as condições de produção de GA3 por FES. Os ensaios foram realizados em frascos de erlenmeyer a 29°C, com umidade inicial de 75-80%. Diferentes meios para a produção do inóculo foram testados em relação à viabilidade das células e produção de GA3 por FES. F. moniliforme LPB03 e polpa cítrica foram escolhidos. O melhor meio para a produção de inóculo foi o extrato de polpa cítrica. A produção por FES alcançou 5.8 g de GA3/kg de polpa cítrica após 3 dias de fermentação.

  20. Atmospheric protein chemistry influenced by anthropogenic air pollutants: nitration and oligomerization upon exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fobang; Lakey, Pascale S J; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Meusel, Hannah; Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Lai, Senchao; Weller, Michael G; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-08-24

    The allergenic potential of airborne proteins may be enhanced via post-translational modification induced by air pollutants like ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The molecular mechanisms and kinetics of the chemical modifications that enhance the allergenicity of proteins, however, are still not fully understood. Here, protein tyrosine nitration and oligomerization upon simultaneous exposure of O3 and NO2 were studied in coated-wall flow-tube and bulk solution experiments under varying atmospherically relevant conditions (5-200 ppb O3, 5-200 ppb NO2, 45-96% RH), using bovine serum albumin as a model protein. Generally, more tyrosine residues were found to react via the nitration pathway than via the oligomerization pathway. Depending on reaction conditions, oligomer mass fractions and nitration degrees were in the ranges of 2.5-25% and 0.5-7%, respectively. The experimental results were well reproduced by the kinetic multilayer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB). The extent of nitration and oligomerization strongly depends on relative humidity (RH) due to moisture-induced phase transition of proteins, highlighting the importance of cloud processing conditions for accelerated protein chemistry. Dimeric and nitrated species were major products in the liquid phase, while protein oligomerization was observed to a greater extent for the solid and semi-solid phase states of proteins. Our results show that the rate of both processes was sensitive towards ambient ozone concentration, but rather insensitive towards different NO2 levels. An increase of tropospheric ozone concentrations in the Anthropocene may thus promote pro-allergic protein modifications and contribute to the observed increase of allergies over the past decades.

  1. Both Ca2+ and Zn2+ are essential for S100A12 protein oligomerization and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhtman Alexander

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human S100A12 is a member of the S100 family of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins that are associated with many diseases including cancer, chronic inflammation and neurological disorders. S100A12 is an important factor in host/parasite defenses and in the inflammatory response. Like several other S100 proteins, it binds zinc and copper in addition to calcium. Mechanisms of zinc regulation have been proposed for a number of S100 proteins e.g. S100B, S100A2, S100A7, S100A8/9. The interaction of S100 proteins with their targets is strongly dependent on cellular microenvironment. Results The aim of the study was to explore the factors that influence S100A12 oligomerization and target interaction. A comprehensive series of biochemical and biophysical experiments indicated that changes in the concentration of calcium and zinc led to changes in the oligomeric state of S100A12. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed that the presence of both calcium and zinc is essential for the interaction of S100A12 with one of its extracellular targets, RAGE – the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products. By using a single-molecule approach we have shown that the presence of zinc in tissue culture medium favors both the oligomerization of exogenous S100A12 protein and its interaction with targets on the cell surface. Conclusion We have shown that oligomerization and target recognition by S100A12 is regulated by both zinc and calcium. Our present work highlighted the potential role of calcium-binding S100 proteins in zinc metabolism and, in particular, the role of S100A12 in the cross talk between zinc and calcium in cell signaling.

  2. Functional Perfluoroalkyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (F-POSS): Building Blocks for Low Surface Energy Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Functional Perfluoroalkyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (F...long chain fluorinated alkyl groups ranging from 6-12 carbon atoms in length. Herein, a disilanol perfluoroalkyl polyhedral oligomeric...FUNCTIONAL PERFLUOROALKYL POLYHEDRAL OLIGOMERIC SILSESQUIOXANES (F-POSS): BUILDING BLOCKS FOR LOW SURFACE ENERGY MATERIA LS Sean M Rami,.e:, Yvonne Dia

  3. hA molecular switch in amyloid assembly: Met35 and amyloid beta-protein oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Bitan, Gal; Tarus, Bogdan; Vollers, Sabrina S.; Lashuel, Hilal A.; Condron, Margaret M.; Straub, John E.; Teplow, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Aberrant protein oligomerization is an important pathogenetic process in vivo. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) forms neurotoxic oligomers. The predominant in vivo Abeta alloforms, Abeta40 and Abeta42, have distinct oligomerization pathways. Abeta42 monomers oligomerize into pentamer/hexamer units (paranuclei) which self-associate to form larger oligomers. Abeta40 does not form these paranuclei, a fact which may explain the particularly strong linkage of Abeta42 w...

  4. A Note on Non-Closure Property of Sublogarithmic Space-Bounded 1-Inkdot Alternating Pushdown Automata with Only Existential (Universal) States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Liang Xu; Yun-Xia Liu; Tsunehiro Yoshinaga

    2006-01-01

    1-inkdot alternating pushdown automaton is a slightly modified alternating pushdown automaton with the additional power of marking at most 1 tape-cell on the input (with an inkdot) once. This paper investigates the closure property of sublogarithmic space-bounded 1-inkdot alternating pushdown automata with only existential (universal) states,and shows, for example, that for any function L(n) such that L(n) ≥ log log n and L(n) = o(log n), the class of sets accepted by weakly (strongly) L(n) space-bounded 1-inkdot two-way alternating pushdown automata with only existential (universal)states is not closed under concatenation with regular sets, length-preserving homomorphism, and Kleene closure.

  5. What rheumatologists in the United States think of complementary and alternative medicine: results of a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curlin Farr A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to describe prevailing attitudes and practices of rheumatologists in the United States toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. We wanted to determine whether rheumatologists' perceptions of the efficacy of CAM therapies and their willingness to recommend them relate to their demographic characteristics, geographic location, or clinical practices. Methods A National Institutes of Health-sponsored cross-sectional survey of internists and rheumatologists was conducted regarding CAM for treatment of chronic back pain or joint pain. In this study we analyzed responses only from rheumatologists. Response items included participant characteristics and experience with 6 common CAM categories, as defined by the National Institutes of Health. Descriptive statistics were used to describe attitudes to CAM overall and to each CAM category. Composite responses were devised for respondents designating 4 or more of the 6 CAM therapies as "very" or "moderately" beneficial or "very likely" or "somewhat likely" to recommend. Results Of 600 rheumatologists who were sent the questionnaire, 345 responded (58%; 80 (23% were women. Body work had the highest perceived benefit, with 70% of respondents indicating benefit. Acupuncture was perceived as beneficial by 54%. Most were willing to recommend most forms of CAM. Women had significantly higher composite benefit and recommend responses than men. Rheumatologists not born in North America were more likely to perceive benefit of select CAM therapies. Conclusions In this national survey of rheumatologists practicing in the United States, we found widespread favorable opinion toward many, but not all, types of CAM. Further research is required to determine to what extent CAM can or should be integrated into the practice of rheumatology in the United States.

  6. Entropic estimate of cooperative binding of substrate on a single oligomeric enzyme: An index of cooperativity

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Here we have systematically studied the cooperative binding of substrate molecules on the active sites of a single oligomeric enzyme in a chemiostatic condition. The average number of bound substrate and the net velocity of the enzyme catalyzed reaction are studied by the formulation of stochastic master equation for the cooperative binding classified here as spatial and temporal. We have estimated the entropy production for the cooperative binding schemes based on single trajectory analysis using a kinetic Monte Carlo technique. It is found that the total as well as the medium entropy production show the same generic diagnostic signature for detecting the cooperativity, usually characterized in terms of the net velocity of the reaction. This feature is also found to be valid for the total entropy production rate at the nonequilibrium steady state. We have introduced an index of cooperativity, C, defined in terms of the ratio of the surprisals or equivalently, the stochastic system entropy associated with the...

  7. The Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Like Receptors in Pulmonary Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Kristin M; Coates, Bria M; Ridge, Karen M

    2017-08-01

    Pneumonia is caused by both viral and bacterial pathogens and is responsible for a significant health burden in the Unites States. The innate immune system is the human body's first line of defense against these pathogens. The recognition of invading pathogens via pattern recognition receptors leads to proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, followed by recruitment and activation of effector immune cells. The nonspecific inflammatory nature of the innate immune response can result in immunopathology that is detrimental to the host. In this review, we focus on one class of pattern recognition receptors, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors, specifically NOD1 and NOD2, and their role in host defense against viral and bacterial pathogens of the lung, including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. It is hoped that improved understanding of NOD1 and NOD2 activity in pneumonia will facilitate the development of novel therapies and promote improved patient outcomes.

  8. The sigma-1 receptors are present in monomeric and oligomeric forms in living cells in the presence and absence of ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deo R.; Biener, Gabriel; Yang, Jay; Oliver, Julie A.; Ruoho, Arnold; Raicu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223-amino-acid membrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane of some mammalian cells. The S1R is regulated by various synthetic molecules including (+)-pentazocine, cocaine and haloperidol and endogenous molecules such as sphingosine, dimethyltryptamine and dehydroepiandrosterone. Ligand-regulated protein chaperone functions linked to oxidative stress and neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain have been attributed to the S1R. Several client proteins that interact with S1R have been identified including various types of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). When S1R constructs containing C-terminal monomeric GFP2 and YFP fusions were co-expressed in COS-7 cells and subjected to FRET spectrometry analysis, monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric forms of S1R were identified under non-liganded conditions. In the presence of the prototypic S1R agonist, (+)-pentazocine, however, monomers and dimers were the prevailing forms of S1R. The prototypic antagonist, haloperidol, on the other hand, favoured higher order S1R oligomers. These data, in sum, indicate that heterologously expressed S1Rs occur in vivo in COS-7 cells in multiple oligomeric forms and that S1R ligands alter these oligomeric structures. We suggest that the S1R oligomerization states may regulate its function(s). PMID:25510962

  9. Quaternary Structure Analyses of an Essential Oligomeric Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Christensen, Janni B; Desbois, Sebastien; Gordon, Shane E; Gupta, Ruchi; Hogan, Campbell J; Nelson, Tao G; Downton, Matthew T; Gardhi, Chamodi K; Abbott, Belinda M; Wagner, John; Panjikar, Santosh; Perugini, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review recent studies aimed at defining the importance of quaternary structure to a model oligomeric enzyme, dihydrodipicolinate synthase. This will illustrate the complementary and synergistic outcomes of coupling the techniques of analytical ultracentrifugation with enzyme kinetics, in vitro mutagenesis, macromolecular crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations, to demonstrate the role of subunit self-association in facilitating protein dynamics and enzyme function. This multitechnique approach has yielded new insights into the molecular evolution of protein quaternary structure.

  10. All About Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Robert D.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A primer on alternative schools. Described are existing programs in different areas, philosophy of the alternative schools, funding, student behavior, community relations, accountability, State regulations, management, and the environment of the alternative school. A list of sources of additional information on alternative schools is included.…

  11. Single-Cell Analyses of ESCs Reveal Alternative Pluripotent Cell States and Molecular Mechanisms that Control Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Papatsenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of gene expression in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs cultured in serum and LIF revealed the presence of two distinct cell subpopulations with individual gene expression signatures. Comparisons with published data revealed that cells in the first subpopulation are phenotypically similar to cells isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM. In contrast, cells in the second subpopulation appear to be more mature. Pluripotency Gene Regulatory Network (PGRN reconstruction based on single-cell data and published data suggested antagonistic roles for Oct4 and Nanog in the maintenance of pluripotency states. Integrated analyses of published genomic binding (ChIP data strongly supported this observation. Certain target genes alternatively regulated by OCT4 and NANOG, such as Sall4 and Zscan10, feed back into the top hierarchical regulator Oct4. Analyses of such incoherent feedforward loops with feedback (iFFL-FB suggest a dynamic model for the maintenance of mESC pluripotency and self-renewal.

  12. Large-scale identification of coevolution signals across homo-oligomeric protein interfaces by direct coupling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguzzoni, Guido; John Lovis, Shalini; Oteri, Francesco; Schug, Alexander; Szurmant, Hendrik; Weigt, Martin

    2017-03-28

    Proteins have evolved to perform diverse cellular functions, from serving as reaction catalysts to coordinating cellular propagation and development. Frequently, proteins do not exert their full potential as monomers but rather undergo concerted interactions as either homo-oligomers or with other proteins as hetero-oligomers. The experimental study of such protein complexes and interactions has been arduous. Theoretical structure prediction methods are an attractive alternative. Here, we investigate homo-oligomeric interfaces by tracing residue coevolution via the global statistical direct coupling analysis (DCA). DCA can accurately infer spatial adjacencies between residues. These adjacencies can be included as constraints in structure prediction techniques to predict high-resolution models. By taking advantage of the ongoing exponential growth of sequence databases, we go significantly beyond anecdotal cases of a few protein families and apply DCA to a systematic large-scale study of nearly 2,000 Pfam protein families with sufficient sequence information and structurally resolved homo-oligomeric interfaces. We find that large interfaces are commonly identified by DCA. We further demonstrate that DCA can differentiate between subfamilies with different binding modes within one large Pfam family. Sequence-derived contact information for the subfamilies proves sufficient to assemble accurate structural models of the diverse protein-oligomers. Thus, we provide an approach to investigate oligomerization for arbitrary protein families leading to structural models complementary to often-difficult experimental methods. Combined with ever more abundant sequential data, we anticipate that this study will be instrumental to allow the structural description of many heteroprotein complexes in the future.

  13. Physicochemical constraints of elevated pH affect efficient membrane interaction and arrest an abortive membrane-bound oligomeric intermediate of the beta-barrel pore-forming toxin Vibrio cholerae cytolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Kundu, Nidhi; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a potent membrane-damaging cytotoxic protein. VCC causes permeabilization of the target cell membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores. Membrane pore formation by VCC involves following key steps: (i) membrane binding, (ii) formation of a pre-pore oligomeric intermediate, (iii) membrane insertion of the pore-forming motifs, and (iv) formation of the functional transmembrane pore. Membrane binding, oligomerization, and subsequent pore-formation process of VCC appear to be facilitated by multiple regulatory mechanisms that are only partly understood. Here, we have explored the role(s) of the physicochemical constraints, specifically imposed by the elevated pH conditions, on the membrane pore-formation mechanism of VCC. Elevated pH abrogates efficient interaction of VCC with the target membranes, and blocks its pore-forming activity. Under the elevated pH conditions, membrane-bound fractions of VCC remain trapped in the form of abortive oligomeric species that fail to generate the functional transmembrane pores. Such an abortive oligomeric assembly appears to represent a distinct, more advanced intermediate state than the pre-pore state. The present study offers critical insights regarding the implications of the physicochemical constraints for regulating the efficient membrane interaction and pore formation by VCC.

  14. Reaction Mechanisms of the Initial Oligomerization of Aluminophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yan; Xin, Liang; Deetz, Joshua D; Sun, Huai

    2016-05-12

    The mechanisms of aluminophosphate oligomerization were investigated using density functional theory with the SMD solvation model. Two aluminum species, Al(OH)4(-) and Al(H2O)6(3+), and four phosphorus species, H3PO4, H2PO4(-), HPO4(2-), and PO4(3-), were considered as the monomers for polycondensation reactions. It was found that the most favorable pathway to dimerization was a Lewis acid-base reaction: the aprotic oxygen of phosphoric acid (P═O) performs a nucleophilic attack on the central aluminum atom of Al(OH)4(-). Using this mechanism as a pattern, plausible dimerization mechanisms were investigated by varying the proticity and hydration of the phosphorus and aluminum monomers, respectively. The relative reaction rates of each mechanism were estimated under different pH conditions. The chain growth of aluminophosphates to trimers, tetramers, and pentamers and the cyclization of a linear tetramer were also investigated. For oligomerization reactions beyond dimer formation, it is found that cluster growth favors the addition of the phosphoric monomers rather than aluminum monomers.

  15. Structure-based molecular modeling approaches to GPCR oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana; Poso, Antti

    2013-01-01

    Classical structure-based drug design techniques using G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as targets focus nearly exclusively on binding at the orthosteric site of a single receptor. Dimerization and oligomerization of GPCRs, proposed almost 30 years ago, have, however, crucial relevance for drug design. Targeting these complexes selectively or designing small molecules that affect receptor-receptor interactions might provide new opportunities for novel drug discovery. In order to study the mechanisms and dynamics that rule GPCRs oligomerization, it is essential to understand the dynamic process of receptor-receptor association and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding, which may be determined with experimental methods such as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and computational sequence- and structure-based approaches. The aim of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive description of the structure-based molecular modeling methods for studying GPCR dimerization, that is, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics, normal mode analysis, and electrostatics studies.

  16. Modulation of Innate Immune Signalling by Lipid-Mediated MAVS Transmembrane Domain Oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Nobre

    Full Text Available RIG-I-like receptors detect viral RNA in infected cells and promote oligomerization of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS to induce innate immunity to viral infection through type I interferon production. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS have been shown to enhance anti-viral MAVS signalling, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Using a biochemical oligomerization-reporter fused to the transmembrane domain of MAVS, we found that mROS inducers promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization in the plane of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These events were mirrored by Sendai virus infection, which similarly induced lipid peroxidation and promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization. Our observations point to a role for mROS-induced changes in lipid bilayer properties in modulating antiviral innate signalling by favouring the oligomerization of MAVS transmembrane domain in the outer-mitochondrial membrane.

  17. Effect of leaving group on the oligomerization of 5'-AMP on montmorillonite. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabahar, K. Joseph; Ferris, James P.

    1994-01-01

    The oligomerization of imidazole derivative of 5'-AMP (ImpA) in the presence of montmorillonite clay yields oligomers containing up to 10 monomer units. In these reactions, the heterocyclic base, imidazole is the leaving group. In our present study, we synthesized a series of activated nucleotides of 5'AMP using other leaving groups such as pyrazole, 1,2,4-triazole, piperidine, morpholine, 4-aminopyridine, 4-methylaminopyridine, 4-dimethylaminopyridine, 2-aminobenzimidazole etc. to determine the effect of amine leaving group on the products of the oligomerization reaction. Earlier results from our laboratory showed that the presence AppA in the clay reaction of ImpA enhances the oligomerization reaction to yield higher oligomers. We also studied the effect of AppA in the clay mediated oligomerization reaction of the activated nucleotides. Oligomerization of 2-amino-benzimidazole derivative of 5'-AMP gave higher oligomers containing up to nine monomer units in the presence of AppA.

  18. 40 CFR 721.3100 - Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a hy-droxyl-al-kyla-mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3100 Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a... chemical substance identified generically as oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with...

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine use and nutrient intake among individuals with multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masullo, Laura; Papas, Mia A; Cotugna, Nancy; Baker, Sandra; Mahoney, Lauren; Trabulsi, Jillian

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, specific CAM therapies used within this population have not been thoroughly described, particularly the use of supplements, herbal remedies, and dietary modifications. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of specific types of CAM used by adults with MS in the United States. Participants included adults who were diagnosed with MS at least 1 year prior to study enrollment. CAM use was measured using the CAM Supplement of the National Health Interview Survey, and nutrient intake was assessed using an Automated Self-Administered 24-h Recall. This study found that a majority (77 %, n = 27) of the sample used CAM within the past 12 months, the most prevalent type being vitamins/minerals (88.9 %, n = 24), nonvitamin, nonmineral, natural products (NP) (44.4 %, n = 12), relaxation techniques (33.3 %, n = 9), and special diets (29.6 %, n = 8). Regarding diet, median percent calories from fat (37 %) and saturated fat (12 %) were higher than current recommendations, while dietary fiber intake met only 87 % of the adequate intake. Participants following the Paleo (7.4 %, n = 2) diet did not meet the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for vitamins D and E, while those on the Swank diet (7.4 %, n = 2) were below the EAR for vitamins C, A, E, and folate. The results support previous findings that CAM therapies are commonly used by individuals with MS. Inadequate intakes of certain vitamins and minerals by those following the Swank and Paleo diet suggest these diets may be too restrictive, thus further research is warranted.

  20. Early Triassic alternative ecological states driven by anoxia, hyperthermals, and erosional pulses following the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, C.; Petsios, E.; Bottjer, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    community may represent an alternative ecological state. However, subsequent environmental changes including the return of an oxygenated water column, increased sea surface temperatures, and sedimentary influx led to continued restructuring of the benthic fauna throughout the Early Triassic.

  1. The Northeastern United States Energy-Water Nexus: Climate Change Impacts and Alternative Water Management Strategies for the Power Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miara, A.; Macknick, J.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Cohen, S. M.; Rosenzweig, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Northeastern United States (NE) relies heavily on thermoelectric power plants (90% of total capacity) to provide electricity to more than 70 million people. This region's power plants require consistent, large volumes of water at sufficiently cold temperatures to generate electricity efficiently, and withdraw approximately 10.5 trillion gallons of water annually. Previous findings indicate that assessments of future electricity pathways must account for water availability, water temperature and the changing climate, as changes in these conditions may limit operational efficiency in the future. To account for such electric system vulnerabilities, we have created a link between an electricity system capacity expansion model (ReEDS) and a hydrologic model that is coupled to a power plant simulation model (FrAMES-TP2M) that allows for a new approach to analyze electricity system development, performance, and environmental impacts. Together, these coupled tools allow us to estimate electricity development and operations in the context of a changing climate and impacts on the seasonal spatial and temporal variability of water resources, downstream thermal effluents that cause plant-to-plant interferences and harm aquatic habitat, economic costs of water conservation methods and associated carbon emissions. In this study, we test and compare a business-as-usual strategy with three alternative water management scenarios that include changes in cooling technologies and water sources utilized for the years 2014-2050. Results of these experiments can provide useful insight into the feasibility of the electricity expansion scenarios in terms of associated water use and thermal impacts, carbon emissions, the cost of generating electricity, and also highlight the importance of accounting for water resources in future power sector planning and performance assessments.

  2. Flood effects provide evidence of an alternate stable state from dam management on the Upper Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalak, Katherine; Benthem, Adam J.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Schenk, Edward R.; Galloway, Joel M.; Nustad, Rochelle A.

    2017-01-01

    We examine how historic flooding in 2011 affected the geomorphic adjustments created by dam regulation along the approximately 120 km free flowing reach of the Upper Missouri River bounded upstream by the Garrison Dam (1953) and downstream by Lake Oahe Reservoir (1959) near the City of Bismarck, ND, USA. The largest flood since dam regulation occurred in 2011. Flood releases from the Garrison Dam began in May 2011 and lasted until October, peaking with a flow of more than 4200 m3 s−1. Channel cross-section data and aerial imagery before and after the flood were compared with historic rates of channel change to assess the relative impact of the flood on the river morphology. Results indicate that the 2011 flood maintained trends in island area with the loss of islands in the reach just below the dam and an increase in island area downstream. Channel capacity changes varied along the Garrison Segment as a result of the flood. The thalweg, which has been stable since the mid-1970s, did not migrate. And channel morphology, as defined by a newly developed shoaling metric, which quantifies the degree of channel braiding, indicates significant longitudinal variability in response to the flood. These results show that the 2011 flood exacerbates some geomorphic trends caused by the dam while reversing others. We conclude that the presence of dams has created an alternate geomorphic and related ecological stable state, which does not revert towards pre-dam conditions in response to the flood of record. This suggests that management of sediment transport dynamics as well as flow modification is necessary to restore the Garrison Segment of the Upper Missouri River towards pre-dam conditions and help create or maintain habitat for endangered species. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Evaluation of ICA-AROMA and alternative strategies for motion artifact removal in resting state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruim, Raimon H R; Mennes, Maarten; Buitelaar, Jan K; Beckmann, Christian F

    2015-05-15

    We proposed ICA-AROMA as a strategy for the removal of motion-related artifacts from fMRI data (Pruim et al., 2015). ICA-AROMA automatically identifies and subsequently removes data-driven derived components that represent motion-related artifacts. Here we present an extensive evaluation of ICA-AROMA by comparing our strategy to a range of alternative strategies for motion-related artifact removal: (i) no secondary motion correction, (ii) extensive nuisance regression utilizing 6 or (iii) 24 realignment parameters, (iv) spike regression (Satterthwaite et al., 2013a), (v) motion scrubbing (Power et al., 2012), (vi) aCompCor (Behzadi et al., 2007; Muschelli et al., 2014), (vii) SOCK (Bhaganagarapu et al., 2013), and (viii) ICA-FIX (Griffanti et al., 2014; Salimi-Khorshidi et al., 2014), without re-training the classifier. Using three different functional connectivity analysis approaches and four different multi-subject resting-state fMRI datasets, we assessed all strategies regarding their potential to remove motion artifacts, ability to preserve signal of interest, and induced loss in temporal degrees of freedom (tDoF). Results demonstrated that ICA-AROMA, spike regression, scrubbing, and ICA-FIX similarly minimized the impact of motion on functional connectivity metrics. However, both ICA-AROMA and ICA-FIX resulted in significantly improved resting-state network reproducibility and decreased loss in tDoF compared to spike regression and scrubbing. In comparison to ICA-FIX, ICA-AROMA yielded improved preservation of signal of interest across all datasets. These results demonstrate that ICA-AROMA is an effective strategy for removing motion-related artifacts from rfMRI data. Our robust and generalizable strategy avoids the need for censoring fMRI data and reduces motion-induced signal variations in fMRI data, while preserving signal of interest and increasing the reproducibility of functional connectivity metrics. In addition, ICA-AROMA preserves the temporal non

  4. Ethylene Oligomerization and Polymerization: Alternative Iron Catalysts beyond 2,6-Bisiminopyridyl Iron Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyun Jie; Shu Zhang; Wenjuan Zhang; Yingxia Song; Junxian Hou; Wen-Hua Sun

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polyolefin industry arrives the option to transfer from multiple-site systems of the classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts to more sophisticated single-site catalysts. The late-transition metal compounds were traditionally assumed with poor polymerization properties due to the highly competitive chain-termination step, and produced the short-chain oligomers up to 40 carbon atoms (SHOP catalysts). Recently the polyolefins employing latetransition metal complexes as catalysts became a hot research subject with the pioneering works by Brookhart and Gibson. It is promising for nickel catalysts to use solely ethylene as monomer for highly branched polyethylenes, and the designed nickel catalysts were not useful in industry. It is critical time to investigate the relationship of coordination modes of nickel complexes and its catalytic activities and the properties of resultant polyethylenes.

  5. Antioxidant activity of oligomeric acylphloroglucinols from Myrtus communis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Antonella; Deiana, Monica; Casu, Viviana; Corona, Giulia; Appendino, Giovanni; Bianchi, Federica; Ballero, Mauro; Dessì, M Assunta

    2003-09-01

    The use of myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) as a culinary spice and as a flavoring agent for alcoholic beverages is widespread in the Mediterranean area, and especially in Sardinia. Myrtle contains unique oligomeric non-prenylated acylphloroglucinols, whose antioxidant activity was investigated in various systems. Both semimyrtucommulone (1) and myrtucommulone A (2) showed powerful antioxidant properties, protecting linoleic acid against free radical attack in simple in vitro systems, inhibiting its autoxidation and its FeCl3- and EDTA-mediated oxidation. While both compounds lacked pro-oxidant activity, semimyrtucommulone was more powerful than myrtucommulone A, and was further evaluated in rat liver homogenates for activity against lipid peroxidation induced by ferric-nitrilotriacetate, and in cell cultures for cytotoxicity and the inhibition of TBH- or FeCl3-induced oxidation. The results of these studies established semimyrtucommulone as a novel dietary antioxidant lead.

  6. Green Nanocomposites from Renewable Plant Oils and Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tsujimoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Green nanocomposites based on renewable plant oils and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS have been developed. An acid-catalyzed curing of epoxidized plant oils with oxirane-containing POSS derivatives produced transparent nanocomposite coatings with high gloss surface, in which the organic and inorganic components were linked via covalent bonds. The hardness and mechanical strength were improved by the incorporation of the POSS unit into the organic polymer matrix. Nanostructural analyses of the nanocomposites showed the formation of homogeneous structures at the micrometer scale. On the other hand, such improvements of the coating and mechanical properties were not observed in the composite without covalent bonds between the plant oil-based polymer and POSS unit. The study demonstrates the correlation between the nanostructure of composites and macroscopic properties.

  7. Does oligomerization in fused thiophene affect reactivity and aromaticity?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddhartha Kr Purkayastha; Pradip Kr Bhattacharyya

    2016-02-01

    Reactivity and aromaticity of a few fused thiophene oligomers and their conformers are discussed in the light of density functional theory (DFT) and conceptual density functional theory. Reactivity parameters, such as hardness () and electrophilicity (), chemical potential () and energy of the HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) have been studied. Oligomerization raises the HOMO of the species, which in turn increases the reactivity of the oligomers. The absorption spectra of the species are analysed using TDDFT (time dependent density functional theory). The absorption peaks show red shift with increasing size of the oligomers. Aromaticity of the species is gauged by nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS). The out-of-plane component, (NICSzz) values advocate higher aromatic character at longer distance whereas, NICS supports the reverse.

  8. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...... and the pathogenicity of mAbs was investigated by passive transfer experiments. RESULTS: B cell immunodominant epitopes were localized within 4 antigenic domains of the COMP but with preferential response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain. Some of our anti-COMP mAbs showed interactions with the native...... form of COMP, which is present in cartilage and synovium. Passive transfer of COMP-specific mAbs enhanced arthritis when co-administrated with a sub-arthritogenic dose of a mAb specific to collagen type II. Interestingly, we found that a combination of 5 COMP mAbs was capable of inducing arthritis...

  9. Revisiting the oligomerization mechanism of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, a beta-barrel pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2016-06-03

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a membrane-damaging beta-barrel pore-forming toxin (beta-PFT). VCC causes permeabilization of the target membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores. Oligomerization is a key step in the mode of action of any beta-PFT, including that of VCC. Earlier studies have identified some of the key residues in VCC that are directly involved in the generation of the inter-protomer contacts, thus playing critical roles in the oligomerization of the membrane-bound toxin. Analysis of the VCC oligomeric pore structure reveals a potential hydrogen-bond network that appears to connect the sidechain of an asparagine residue (Asn582; located within an inter-domain linker sequence) from one protomer to the backbone CO- and NH-groups of the neighbouring protomer, indirectly through water molecules at most of the inter-protomer interfaces. In the present study, we show that the mutation of Asn582Ala affects the oligomerization and the pore-forming activity of VCC in the membrane lipid bilayer of the synthetic lipid vesicles, while the replacement of Asn582Gln results into the restoration of the oligomeric pore-forming ability of the toxin. Using a number of truncated variants of VCC, having deletion in the C-terminal region of the toxin starting from the Asn582 residue or beyond, we also show that the presence of Asn582 is critically required for the oligomerization of the truncated form of the protein.

  10. Effects of Glycine, Water, Ammonia, and Ammonium Bicarbonate on the Oligomerization of Methionine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    The abiotic oligomerization of amino acids may have created primordial, protein-like biological catalysts on the early Earth. Previous studies have proposed and evaluated the potential of diagenesis for the amino acid oligomerization, simulating the formation of peptides that include glycine, alanine, and valine, separately. However, whether such conditions can promote the formation of peptides composed of multiple amino acids remains unclear. Furthermore, the chemistry of pore water in sediments should affect the oligomerization and degradation of amino acids and oligomers, but these effects have not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of water, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, pH, and glycine on the oligomerization and degradation of methionine under high pressure (150 MPa) and high temperature conditions (175 °C) for 96 h. Methionine is more difficult to oligomerize than glycine and methionine dimer was formed in the incubation of dry powder of methionine. Methionine oligomers as long as trimers, as well as methionylglycine and glycylmethionine, were formed under every condition with these additional compounds. Among the compounds tested, the oligomerization reaction rate was accelerated by the presence of water and by an increase in pH. Ammonia also increased the oligomerization rate but consumed methionine by side reactions and resulted in the rapid degradation of methionine and its peptides. Similarly, glycine accelerated the oligomerization rate of methionine and the degradation of methionine, producing water, ammonia, and bicarbonate through its decomposition. With Gly, heterogeneous dimers (methionylglycine and glycylmethionine) were formed in greater amounts than with other additional compounds although smaller amount of these heterogeneous dimers were formed with other additional compounds. These results suggest that accelerated reaction rates induced by water and co-existing reactive compounds promote the oligomerization

  11. Effects of Glycine, Water, Ammonia, and Ammonium Bicarbonate on the Oligomerization of Methionine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    The abiotic oligomerization of amino acids may have created primordial, protein-like biological catalysts on the early Earth. Previous studies have proposed and evaluated the potential of diagenesis for the amino acid oligomerization, simulating the formation of peptides that include glycine, alanine, and valine, separately. However, whether such conditions can promote the formation of peptides composed of multiple amino acids remains unclear. Furthermore, the chemistry of pore water in sediments should affect the oligomerization and degradation of amino acids and oligomers, but these effects have not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of water, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, pH, and glycine on the oligomerization and degradation of methionine under high pressure (150 MPa) and high temperature conditions (175 °C) for 96 h. Methionine is more difficult to oligomerize than glycine and methionine dimer was formed in the incubation of dry powder of methionine. Methionine oligomers as long as trimers, as well as methionylglycine and glycylmethionine, were formed under every condition with these additional compounds. Among the compounds tested, the oligomerization reaction rate was accelerated by the presence of water and by an increase in pH. Ammonia also increased the oligomerization rate but consumed methionine by side reactions and resulted in the rapid degradation of methionine and its peptides. Similarly, glycine accelerated the oligomerization rate of methionine and the degradation of methionine, producing water, ammonia, and bicarbonate through its decomposition. With Gly, heterogeneous dimers (methionylglycine and glycylmethionine) were formed in greater amounts than with other additional compounds although smaller amount of these heterogeneous dimers were formed with other additional compounds. These results suggest that accelerated reaction rates induced by water and co-existing reactive compounds promote the oligomerization

  12. Deadly competition and life-saving predation: the potential for alternative stable states in a stage-structured predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Benjamin J; Rombado, Bianca R; Rudolf, Volker H W

    2016-08-31

    Predators often undergo complete ontogenetic diet shifts, engaging in resource competition with species that become their prey during later developmental stages. Theory posits that this mix of stage-specific competition and predation, termed life-history intraguild predation (LHIGP), can lead to alternative stable states. In one state, prey exclude predators through competition (i.e. juvenile competitive bottleneck), while in the alternative, adult predators control prey density to limit competition and foster coexistence. Nevertheless, the interactions leading to these states have not been demonstrated in an empirical LHIGP system. To address this gap, we manipulated densities of cannibalistic adult cyclopoid copepods (Mesocyclops edax) and their cladoceran prey (Daphnia pulex) in a response-surface design and measured the maturation and survival of juvenile copepods (nauplii). We found that Daphnia reduced and even precluded both nauplii maturation and survival through depletion of a shared food resource. As predicted, adult copepods enhanced nauplii maturation and survival through Daphnia consumption, yet this positive effect was dependent on the relative abundance of Daphnia as well as the absolute density of adult copepods. Adult copepods reduced nauplii survival through cannibalism at low Daphnia densities and at the highest copepod density. This work demonstrates that predation can relax a strong juvenile competitive bottleneck in freshwater zooplankton, though cannibalism can reduce predator recruitment. Thus, our results highlight a key role for cannibalism in LHIGP dynamics and provide evidence for the interactions that drive alternative stable states in such systems.

  13. Novel Molecular Insights into Classical and Alternative Activation States of Microglia as Revealed by Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC)-based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Temin, Harris; Culver-Cochran, Ashley E; Chaput, Dale; Carlson, Christina M; Kuehl, Melanie; Burkhardt, Brant R; Bickford, Paula C; Liu, Bin; Stevens, Stanley M

    2015-12-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, have been shown to display a complex spectrum of roles that span from neurotrophic to neurotoxic depending on their activation status. Microglia can be classified into four stages of activation, M1, which most closely matches the classical (pro-inflammatory) activation stage, and the alternative activation stages M2a, M2b, and M2c. The alternative activation stages have not yet been comprehensively analyzed through unbiased, global-scale protein expression profiling. In this study, BV2 mouse immortalized microglial cells were stimulated with agonists specific for each of the four stages and total protein expression for 4644 protein groups was quantified using SILAC-based proteomic analysis. After validating induction of the various stages through a targeted cytokine assay and Western blotting of activation states, the data revealed novel insights into the similarities and differences between the various states. The data identify several protein groups whose expression in the anti-inflammatory, pro-healing activation states are altered presumably to curtail inflammatory activation through differential protein expression, in the M2a state including CD74, LYN, SQST1, TLR2, and CD14. The differential expression of these proteins promotes healing, limits phagocytosis, and limits activation of reactive nitrogen species through toll-like receptor cascades. The M2c state appears to center around the down-regulation of a key member in the formation of actin-rich phagosomes, SLP-76. In addition, the proteomic data identified a novel activation marker, DAB2, which is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is significantly different between M2a and either M1 or M2b states. Western blot analysis of mouse primary microglia stimulated with the various agonists of the classical and alternative activation states revealed a similar trend of DAB2 expression compared with BV2 cells.

  14. Alternating Coordinate-Momentum Representation for Quantum States Based on Bopp Operators for Modelling Long-Distance Coherence Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat G. Bakhoum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an alternating coordinate-momentum representation for propagation and transition of associated wave function, based on Bopp operators and on a certain symbolic determinant corresponding to a set of two linear equations with null free terms. It is shown that this alternating representation can justify in a good manner the patterns created through reflection/refraction of waves on nonperfectly smooth interfaces and phase correspondence of diffracted beams without the need of supplementary support functions. Correlations with Lorentz transformation of wave functions by interaction with a certain material medium (the space-time origin of a wave-train being adjusted are also presented, and supplementary aspects regarding the use of electromagnetic scalar and vector potentials for modelling evolution within this alternating representation are added.

  15. Multi-level multi-criteria analysis of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimoun, Mousa; Madani, Kaveh; Reinhart, Debra

    2016-04-15

    Historically, the U.S. waste collection fleet was dominated by diesel-fueled waste collection vehicles (WCVs); the growing need for sustainable waste collection has urged decision makers to incorporate economically efficient alternative fuels, while mitigating environmental impacts. The pros and cons of alternative fuels complicate the decisions making process, calling for a comprehensive study that assesses the multiple factors involved. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods allow decision makers to select the best alternatives with respect to selection criteria. In this study, two MCDA methods, Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Simple Additive Weighting (SAW), were used to rank fuel alternatives for the U.S. waste collection industry with respect to a multi-level environmental and financial decision matrix. The environmental criteria consisted of life-cycle emissions, tail-pipe emissions, water footprint (WFP), and power density, while the financial criteria comprised of vehicle cost, fuel price, fuel price stability, and fueling station availability. The overall analysis showed that conventional diesel is still the best option, followed by hydraulic-hybrid WCVs, landfill gas (LFG) sourced natural gas, fossil natural gas, and biodiesel. The elimination of the WFP and power density criteria from the environmental criteria ranked biodiesel 100 (BD100) as an environmentally better alternative compared to other fossil fuels (diesel and natural gas). This result showed that considering the WFP and power density as environmental criteria can make a difference in the decision process. The elimination of the fueling station and fuel price stability criteria from the decision matrix ranked fossil natural gas second after LFG-sourced natural gas. This scenario was found to represent the status quo of the waste collection industry. A sensitivity analysis for the status quo scenario showed the overall ranking of diesel and

  16. State university preparatory class EFL instructors' attitudes towards assessment methods used at their institutions and portfolios as a method of alternative assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Oğuz, Şebnem

    2003-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. The purpose of this study was to investigate preparatory class instructors’ attitudes towards the methods of assessment they are currently using at their institutions, and their knowledge about and attitudes towards portfolios as an alternative method of assessment. The study was conducted with 386 English instructors from the preparatory class programs of 14 Turkish state universities. Data were collected through a fourpart questio...

  17. Mathematical and Dynamic Analysis of a Prey-Predator Model in the Presence of Alternative Prey with Impulsive State Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Dai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic complexities of a prey-predator system in the presence of alternative prey with impulsive state feedback control are studied analytically and numerically. By using the analogue of the Poincaré criterion, sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of semitrivial periodic solutions can be obtained. Furthermore, the corresponding bifurcation diagrams and phase diagrams are investigated by means of numerical simulations which illustrate the feasibility of the main results.

  18. Religiosity and Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Foreign-Born Hispanics in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, John D.; West, Joshua H.; Hall, P. Cougar; Trinidad, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the association between religiosity and utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a sample of foreign-born Hispanic adults, even when excluding prayer as a form of CAM. Data were collected using a self-report Spanish-language survey. Study participants consisted of 306 respondents between…

  19. Religiosity and Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Foreign-Born Hispanics in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, John D.; West, Joshua H.; Hall, P. Cougar; Trinidad, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the association between religiosity and utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a sample of foreign-born Hispanic adults, even when excluding prayer as a form of CAM. Data were collected using a self-report Spanish-language survey. Study participants consisted of 306 respondents between…

  20. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-09-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail.

  1. Ground-state phase diagram of an (S, S') = (1, 2) spin-alternating chain with competing single-ion anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonegawa, T [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fukui University of Technology, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Okamoto, K [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sakai, T [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Spring-8, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kaburagi, M, E-mail: tonegawa@ccmails.fukui-ut.ac.j [Graduate School of Intercultural Studies, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Employing various numerical methods, we determine the ground-state phase diagram of an (S, S') = (1, 2) spin-alternating chain with antiferromagnetic nearest-neighboring exchange interactions and uniaxial single-ion anisotropies. The resulting phase diagram consists of eight kinds of phases including two phases which accompany the spontaneous breaking of the translational symmetry and a ferrimagnetic phase in which the ground-state magnetization varies continuously with the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy constants for the S=1 and S =2 spins. The appearance of these three phases is attributed to the competition between the uniaxial single-ion anisotropies of both spins.

  2. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  3. Penicillin-binding protein 5 can form a homo-oligomeric complex in the inner membrane of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Karl; Bruzell, Filippa Stenberg; Ducroux, Aurélie; Hellberg, Mårten; Johansson, Henrik; Lehtiö, Janne; Högbom, Martin; Daley, Daniel O

    2011-09-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) is a DD-carboxypeptidase, which cleaves the terminal D-alanine from the muramyl pentapeptide in the peptidoglycan layer of Escherichia coli and other bacteria. In doing so, it varies the substrates for transpeptidation and plays a key role in maintaining cell shape. In this study, we have analyzed the oligomeric state of PBP5 in detergent and in its native environment, the inner membrane. Both approaches indicate that PBP5 exists as a homo-oligomeric complex, most likely as a homo-dimer. As the crystal structure of the soluble domain of PBP5 (i.e., lacking the membrane anchor) shows a monomer, we used our experimental data to generate a model of the homo-dimer. This model extends our understanding of PBP5 function as it suggests how PBP5 can interact with the peptidoglycan layer. It suggests that the stem domains interact and the catalytic domains have freedom to move from the position observed in the crystal structure. This would allow the catalytic domain to have access to pentapeptides at different distances from the membrane. Copyright © 2011 The Protein Society.

  4. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patie......OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...

  5. Controlling Protein Oligomerization with Surface Curvature on the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylowicz, Marty; Dutcher, John

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the effect of surface curvature on the conformation of beta-lactoglobulin (β LG) using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy. β LG is a model interfacial protein which stabilizes oil droplets in milk and is known to undergo structural rearrangement when adsorbed onto a surface. We reliably control nanoscale surface curvature by creating close-packed monolayers of monodisperse polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with diameters of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 140 nm, which are stable in aqueous buffer. By adsorbing β LG onto these hydrophobic surfaces and collecting force-extension curves in the fluid phase we can compare the conformation of β LG on 5 different surface curvatures with that on a flat PS film. We demonstrate a transition from oligomeric to monomeric β LG as the surface curvature is increased. Histograms of contour length from fits to peaks in the force-extension curves show a single maximum near 30 nm for β LG adsorbed onto nanoparticles with diameters less than 80 nm. For the larger nanoparticles, the histogram approaches that observed for β LG adsorbed onto a flat PS film, with maxima indicative of β LG dimers and trimers.

  6. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Functionalized Carbon Dots for Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Hai, Xin; Mao, Quan-Xing; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-08-05

    In the present study, octa-aminopropyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane hydrochloride salt (OA-POSS) functionalized carbon dots (CDs/POSS) are prepared by a one-pot approach with glycerol as carbon source and solvent medium. OA-POSS serves as a passivation agent, and it is obtained via hydrolytic condensation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). During the functionalization process, the amino groups on OA-POSS combine with carboxylic groups on the bare CDs via formation of amide bond to construct organic-inorganic hybrid carbon dots. The obtained CDs/POSS are well dispersed in aqueous medium with a diameter of ca. 3.6 nm. It is demonstrated that CDs/POSS provide favorable photoluminescent property with a quantum yield of 24.0%. They also exhibit resistance to photobleaching and excellent photoluminescence stability in the presence of biological sample matrix (characterized by heavy metals and organic molecules), which facilitate cell imaging in biological systems. Both the photoluminescent emission wavelength and the fluorescence intensity depend closely on the excitation wavelength, and thus, it provides a potential for multicolor imaging as demonstrated with HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells.

  7. Accurate length control of supramolecular oligomerization: Vernier assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Christopher A; Tomas, Salvador

    2006-07-12

    Linear oligomeric supramolecular assemblies of defined length have been generated using the Vernier principle. Two molecules, containing a different number (n and m) of mutually complementary binding sites, separated by the same distance, interact with each other to form an assembly of length (n x m). The assembly grows in the same way as simple supramolecular polymers, but at a molecular stop signal, when the binding sites come into register, the assembly terminates giving an oligomer of defined length. This strategy has been realized using tin and zinc porphyrin oligomers as the molecular building blocks. In the presence of isonicotinic acid, a zinc porphyrin trimer and a tin porphyrin dimer form a 3:4 triple stranded Vernier assembly six porphyrins long. The triple strand Vernier architecture introduced here adds an additional level of cooperativity, yielding a stability and selectivity that cannot be achieved via a simple Vernier approach. The assembly properties of the system were characterized using fluorescence titrations and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Assembly of the Vernier complex is efficient at micromolar concentrations in nonpolar solvents, and under more competitive conditions, a variety of fragmentation assemblies can be detected, allowing determination of the stability constants for this system and detailed speciation profiles to be constructed.

  8. Alternative energies; Energies alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, J.; Rossetti, P

    2007-07-01

    The earth took millions years to made the petroleum, the gas the coal and the uranium. Only a few centuries will be needed to exhaust these fossil fuels and some years to reach expensive prices. Will the wold continue on this way of energy compulsive consumption? The renewable energies and some citizen attitudes are sufficient to break this spiral. This book proposes to discuss these alternative energies. It shows that this attitude must be supported by the government. It takes stock on the more recent information concerning the renewable energies. it develops three main points: the electricity storage, the housing and the transports. (A.L.B.)

  9. Two states are not enough: quantitative evaluation of the valence-bond intramolecular charge-transfer model and its use in predicting bond length alternation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarowski, Peter D; Mo, Yirong

    2014-12-15

    The structural weights of the canonical resonance contributors used in the Two-state valence-bond charge-transfer model, neutral (N, R1) and ionic (VB-CT, R2), to the ground states and excited states of a series of linear dipolar intramolecular charge-transfer chromophores containing a buta-1,3-dien-1,4-diyl bridge have been computed by using the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) level to provide the first quantitative assessment of this simple model. Ground- and excited-state analysis reveals surprisingly low ground-state structural weights for the VB-CT resonance form using either this Two-state model or an expanded Ten-state model. The VB-CT state is found to be more prominent in the excited state. Individual resonance forms were structurally optimized to understand the origins of the bond length alternation (BLA) of the bridging unit. Using a Wheland energy-based weighting scheme, the weighted average of the optimized bond lengths with the Two-state model was unable to reproduce the BLA features with values 0.04 to 0.02 Å too large compared to the fully delocalized (FD) structure (BLW: ca. -0.13 to -0.07 Å, FD: ca. -0.09 to -0.05 Å). Instead, an expanded Ten-state model fit the BLA values of the FD structure to within only 0.001 Å of FD. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Solar energy alternatives for the United States Embassy and for rural development projects within the Republic of Upper Volta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1978-03-07

    This report is organized in three sections/: solar cooling options for the new Embassy office building, electrification of Fada N' Gourma using solar photovolatic versus conventional energy systems and an overview of the potential for village solar photovoltaic energy utilization in Upper Volta. The analysis indicates that the least-cost alternative for cooling the new offices is to modify existing plans, which call for standard electric room air conditioning units, and to incorporate energy conservation measures in the building construction and operation.

  11. Structure-properties relationships of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS filled PS nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schwab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS additivated polystyrene (PS based nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing and the structure-properties relationships of the POSS-PS systems were compared to those of the neat PS. In order to investigate the effect of these structural parameters on the final properties of the polymer nanocomposites, five different kinds of POSS samples were used, in particular, POSS with different inorganic cage and with different organic pendent groups. The rheological investigation suggests clearly that the POSS acts as a plasticizer and that the processability of the PS was positively modified. The affinity between the POSS samples and the PS matrix was estimated by the calculated theoretical solubility parameters, considering the Hoy’s method and by morphology analysis. Minor difference between the solubility parameter of POSS and the matrix means better compatibility and no aggregation tendency. Furthermore, the POSS loading leads to a decrease of the rigidity, of the glass transition temperature and of the damping factor of the nanocomposite systems. The loading of different POSS molecules with open cage leads to a more pronounced effect on all the investigated properties that the loading of the POSS molecules with closed cage. Moreover, the melt properties are significantly influenced by the type of inorganic framework, by the type of the pendent organic groups and by the interaction between the POSS organic groups and the host matrix, while, the solid state properties appears to be influenced more by the kind of cage.

  12. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, P; Meier, M; Lustig, A

    2000-12-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helical and 100% dimeric tinder physiological buffer conditions. Interestingly, the peptide was shown to switch its oligomerization state from a dimer to a trimer upon increasing ionic strength. The correctness of the rational design principles used here is supported by details of the atomic structure of the peptide deduced from X-ray crystallography. The structure of the peptide shows that it is not a molten globule but assumes a unique, native-like conformation. This de novo peptide thus represents an attractive model system for the design of a molecular recognition system.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus thiaminase II: oligomerization warrants proteolytic protection against serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Afshan; Drebes, Julia; Kikhney, Alexey; Müller, Ingrid B; Perbandt, Markus; Svergun, Dmitri; Wrenger, Carsten; Betzel, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus TenA (SaTenA) is a thiaminase type II enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of aminopyrimidine, as well as the cleavage of thiamine into 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ), within thiamine (vitamin B1) metabolism. Further, by analogy with studies of Bacillus subtilis TenA, SaTenA may act as a regulator controlling the secretion of extracellular proteases such as the subtilisin type of enzymes in bacteria. Thiamine biosynthesis has been identified as a potential drug target of the multi-resistant pathogen S. aureus and therefore all enzymes involved in the S. aureus thiamine pathway are presently being investigated in detail. Here, the structure of SaTenA, determined by molecular replacement and refined at 2.7 Å resolution to an R factor of 21.6% with one homotetramer in the asymmetric unit in the orthorhombic space group P212121, is presented. The tetrameric state of wild-type (WT) SaTenA was postulated to be the functional biological unit and was confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments in solution. To obtain insights into structural and functional features of the oligomeric SaTenA, comparative kinetic investigations as well as experiments analyzing the structural stability of the WT SaTenA tetramer versus a monomeric SaTenA mutant were performed.

  14. Seeking an Alternative Modality to the Management of Nigeria's Fertilizer Subsidy Scheme-An Empirical Approach to the Case Study of Ondo State (1976-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Asekunowo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of Nigeria’s fertilizer subsidy scheme was to make inorganic fertilizers readily available to farmers at affordable prices in order to boost food production in the country. Shortly into the scheme, farmers complained that fertilizers were not received at the time of need and in sufficient quantities. Approach: Using Ondo State, Nigeria as a case study, to determine; inter alia, if the farmers’ complaints were founded and if so, to design alternative ways of administering the scheme such that the lofty goals for which it was established could be realized. Methodology: Primary data were collected from 596 farmers randomly selected from the state. Secondary data were collected from purposively selected NAFCON, AISC, ADP, FPDD (now FFD and a published book source. The primary data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics such as percentages and means. The secondary data were analyzed with the use of OLS and TLS regression methods. Results: The descriptive analyses showed that farmers in Ondo State did not receive their fertilizer supplies in sufficient quantities and at the time of need, despite the fact that supply surpassed adoption (demand for most years of the study period. The inferential analyses showed that a subsidy introduced into NAFCON and other producing firms’ production processes would engender increased output and induce fertilizer prices to fall in Ondo State. Conclusion: These results showed that farmers in Ondo State did not receive their fertilizer supplies at the time of need and in sufficient quantities due to leakages and diversion of the substance from the vast bureaucratic distribution channels. As an alternative, if subsidy was administered through the producing firms’ production processes, output of fertilizers would have increased making the market supply curve of fertilizers to shift to the right. This would have also caused the price of fertilizer to

  15. Experiences and meanings of integration of TCAM (Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medical) providers in three Indian states: results from a cross-sectional, qualitative implementation research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, D; Narayan, V V; Josyula, L K; Porter, J D H; Sathyanarayana, T N; Sheikh, K

    2014-11-25

    Efforts to engage Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medical (TCAM) practitioners in the public health workforce have growing relevance for India's path to universal health coverage. We used an action-centred framework to understand how policy prescriptions related to integration were being implemented in three distinct Indian states. Health departments and district-level primary care facilities in the states of Kerala, Meghalaya and Delhi. In each state, two or three districts were chosen that represented a variation in accessibility and distribution across TCAM providers (eg, small or large proportions of local health practitioners, Homoeopaths, Ayurvedic and/or Unani practitioners). Per district, two blocks or geographical units were selected. TCAM and allopathic practitioners, administrators and representatives of the community at the district and state levels were chosen based on publicly available records from state and municipal authorities. A total of 196 interviews were carried out: 74 in Kerala, and 61 each in Delhi and Meghalaya. We sought to understand experiences and meanings associated with integration across stakeholders, as well as barriers and facilitators to implementing policies related to integration of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative (TCA) providers at the systems level. We found that individual and interpersonal attributes tended to facilitate integration, while system features and processes tended to hinder it. Collegiality, recognition of stature, as well as exercise of individual personal initiative among TCA practitioners and of personal experience of TCAM among allopaths enabled integration. The system, on the other hand, was characterised by the fragmentation of jurisdiction and facilities, intersystem isolation, lack of trust in and awareness of TCA systems, and inadequate infrastructure and resources for TCA service delivery. State-tailored strategies that routinise interaction, reward individual and system

  16. The United States Remains Unprepared for Oil Import Disruptions. Volume II. Detailed Review of Current Emergency Programs and Alternative Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-29

    Conservation Act ERA Economic Regulatory Administration ERDO Emergency Reserve Drawdown Obligation ESS Emergency Sharing System ESSD Emergency Strategies and...a fraction of the base period volume. Each prime supplier (a refiner or wholesaler who first transports gasoline into a State) generally must use a...that State. Each prime supplier must set aside 5 percent of supply for this purpose. 1/See U.S. General Accounting Office, "Gasoline Allocation A Chaotic

  17. Alternative additives; Alternative additiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-15

    In this project a number of industrial and agricultural waste products have been characterised and evaluated in terms of alkali-getter performance. The intended use is for biomass-fired power stations aiming at reducing corrosion or slagging related problems. The following products have been obtained, characterised and evaluated: 1) Brewery draff 2) Danish de-gassed manure 3) Paper sludge 4) Moulding sand 5) Spent bleaching earth 6) Anorthosite 7) Sand 8) Clay-sludge. Most of the above alternative additive candidates are deemed unsuitable due to insufficient chemical effect and/or expensive requirements for pre-treatment (such as drying and transportation). 3 products were selected for full-scale testing: de-gassed manure, spent bleaching earth and clay slugde. The full scale tests were undertaken at the biomass-fired power stations in Koege, Slagelse and Ensted. Spent bleaching earth (SBE) and clay sludge were the only tested additive candidates that had a proven ability to react with KCl, to thereby reduce Cl-concentrations in deposits, and reduce the deposit flux to superheater tubes. Their performance was shown to nearly as good as commercial additives. De-gassed manure, however, did not evaluate positively due to inhibiting effects of Ca in the manure. Furthermore, de-gassed manure has a high concentration of heavy metals, which imposes a financial burden with regard to proper disposal of the ash by-products. Clay-sludge is a wet clay slurring, and drying and transportation of this product entails substantial costs. Spent bleaching does not require much pre-treatment and is therefore the most promising alternative additive. On the other hand, bleaching earth contains residual plant oil which means that a range of legislation relating to waste combustion comes into play. Not least a waste combustion fee of 330 DKK/tonne. For all alternative (and commercial) additives disposal costs of the increase ash by-products represents a significant cost. This is

  18. Oligomerization of optically active N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide in the presence of β-cyclodextrin and the minor role of chirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Ritter

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative oligomerization of a chiral mandelamide derivative (N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide, 1 was performed in the presence of horseradish peroxidase, laccase and N,N'-bis(salicylideneethylenediamine-iron(II to obtain chiral oligophenols 2. The low enantioselectivity of the enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was investigated. In addition, the poor influence of cyclodextrin on the enantioselectivity of enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was studied.

  19. Binding and Oligomerization of Modified and Native Bt Toxins in Resistant and Susceptible Pink Bollworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue Ocelotl

    Full Text Available Insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are used extensively in sprays and transgenic crops for pest control, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Better understanding of the mode of action of Bt toxins and the mechanisms of insect resistance is needed to enhance the durability of these important alternatives to conventional insecticides. Mode of action models agree that binding of Bt toxins to midgut proteins such as cadherin is essential for toxicity, but some details remain unresolved, such as the role of toxin oligomers. In this study, we evaluated how Bt toxin Cry1Ac and its genetically engineered counterpart Cry1AcMod interact with brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV from resistant and susceptible larvae of Pectinophora gossypiella (pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton. Compared with Cry1Ac, Cry1AcMod lacks 56 amino acids at the amino-terminus including helix α-1; previous work showed that Cry1AcMod formed oligomers in vitro without cadherin and killed P. gossypiella larvae harboring cadherin mutations linked with >1000-fold resistance to Cry1Ac. Here we found that resistance to Cry1Ac was associated with reduced oligomer formation and insertion. In contrast, Cry1AcMod formed oligomers in BBMV from resistant larvae. These results confirm the role of cadherin in oligomerization of Cry1Ac in susceptible larvae and imply that forming oligomers without cadherin promotes toxicity of Cry1AcMod against resistant P. gossypiella larvae that have cadherin mutations.

  20. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Personal Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Occupational Therapy Educators in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a baseline description of American occupational therapy educators' knowledge, attitudes, and personal use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a first step in exploring the larger issue of future occupational therapy practitioners' preparedness for meeting clients' occupational needs in today's evolving healthcare environment. Results of this cross-sectional survey highlighted limitations of occupational therapy educators' knowledge of common CAM concepts and therapies across all demographic variables, varying attitudes towards CAM in general and its inclusion in occupational therapy education, and personal use of common CAM therapies. Without increased occupational therapy educator knowledge about CAM and engagement in the current healthcare practices, occupational therapy practitioners are at risk for having a limited role in integrative healthcare.

  1. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cyrille Krul; Rachel Ashton; Erwin Roggen; Horst Fuchs; Marianna Gaca; Erin Hill; Albrecht Poth; Bart De Wever

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of

  2. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashton, Rachel; Fuchs, Horst; Wever, Bart De; Gaca, Marianna; Hill, Erin; Krul, Cyrille; Poth, Albrecht; Roggen, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of th

  3. The Kra Canal: An Analysis of a Foreign Policy Alternative for the United States Navy in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    United States Navy B.A., University of New Mexico , 1968 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS IN NAVAL...and Military/Strategic Potential," The Indian Ocean: Tts Politica , Economi c and Military Iportance, ed. by Alvin J. Cottrll and R.M. Burrell, (New

  4. Increasing The Supply of Physicians--Alternative Sources for a State. Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No. A.4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butter, Irene; Feldstein, Paul J.

    The purpose of this paper is to study flows into the pool of medical manpower in Michigan to develop guidelines for medical manpower policies. Assuming the goals were to maximize the number of physicians in Michigan, this paper describes an approach that would show the consequences of different allocations of state funds for achieving these…

  5. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashton, R.; Wever, B. de; Fuchs, H.W.; Gaca, M.; Hill, E.; Krul, C.A.M.; Poth, A.; Roggen, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of th

  6. An alternative use of Kieffer's lattice dynamics model using vibrational density of states for constructing thermodynamic databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H.G.; van den Berg, A.P.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.

    2013-01-01

    We use Kieffer's model to represent the vibrational density of states (VDoS) and thermodynamic properties of pure substances in pressure-temperature space. We show that this model can be simplified to a vibrational model in which the VDoS is represented by multiple Einstein frequencies without

  7. Bax phosphorylation association with nucleus and oligomerization after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Smitha Krishna; Oberhauser, Andres F; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2013-09-01

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a common occurrence in preterm and low-birth-weight infants, and the incidence of low-birth-weight and preterm births is increasing. Characterization of brain injury after HI is of critical importance in developing new treatments that more accurately target the injury. After severe HI, neuronal cells undergo necrosis and secondary apoptosis of the surrounding cells as a result of neuroinflammation. We sought to characterize the biochemical pathways associated with cell death after HI. Bax, a cell death signaling protein, is activated after HI and translocates to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The translocation patterns of Bax affect the resultant cell death phenotype (necrotic or apoptotic) observed. Although Bax is known to oligomerize once it is activated, less is known about the factors that control its translocation and oligomerization. We hypothesize that Bax kinase-specific phosphorylation determines its oligomerization and intracellular localization. Using well-established in vivo and in vitro models of neonatal HI, we characterized Bax oligomerization and multiorganelle translocation. We found that HI-dependent phosphorylation of Bax determines its oligomerization status and multiorganelle localization, and, ultimately, the cell death phenotype observed. Understanding the mechanisms of Bax translocation will aid in the rational design of therapeutic strategies that decrease the trauma resulting from HI-associated inflammation.

  8. Tris-acetate polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis for the analysis of protein oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Sánchez-Tena, Susana; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-02-01

    Here we report a new approach for studying protein oligomerization in cells using a single electrophoresis gel. We combined the use of a crosslinking reagent for sample preparation, such as glutaraldehyde, with the analysis of oligomers by Tris-acetate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The use of a 3-15% Tris-acetate polyacrylamide gradient gel allows for the simultaneous analysis of proteins of masses ranging from 10 to 500 kDa. We showed the usefulness of this method for analyzing endogenous p53 oligomerization with high resolution and sensitivity in human cells. Oligomerization analysis was dependent on the crosslinker concentration used. We also showed that this method could be used to study the regulation of oligomerization. In all experiments, Tris-acetate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis proved to be a robust, manageable, and cost- and time-efficient method that provided excellent results using a single gel. This approach can be easily extrapolated to the study of other oligomers. All of these features make this method a highly useful tool for the analysis of protein oligomerization.

  9. Biocatalytically Oligomerized Epicatechin with Potent and Specific Anti-proliferative Activity for Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Nagarajan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, naturally occurring flavonoids derived from wine and green tea, are known to exhibit multiple health benefits. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is one of the most widely investigated catechins, but its efficacy in cancer therapy is still inconsistent and limited. The poor stability of EGCG has contributed to the disparity in the reported anti-cancer activity and other beneficial properties. Here we report an innovative enzymatic strategy for the oligomerization of catechins (specifically epicatechin that yields stable, water-soluble oligomerized epicatechins with enhanced and highly specific anti-proliferative activity for human breast cancer cells. This one-pot oxidative oligomerization is carried out in ambient conditions using Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP as a catalyst yielding water-soluble oligo(epicatechins. The oligomerized epicatechins obtained exhibit excellent growth inhibitory effects against human breast cancer cells with greater specificity towards growth-inhibiting cancer cells as opposed to normal cells, achieving a high therapeutic differential. Our studies indicate that water-soluble oligomeric epicatechins surpass EGCG in stability, selectivity and efficacy at lower doses.

  10. Report on the international workshop on alternative methods for Leptospira vaccine potency testing: state of the science and the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William; Srinivas, Geetha; McFarland, Richard; Kulpa-Eddy, Jodie; Casey, Warren; Walker, Angela; Draayer, Hans; Sebring, Randy; Brown, Karen; Balks, Elisabeth; Stirling, Catrina; Klaasen, Eric; Hill, Richard; Rippke, Byron; Ruby, Kevin; Alt, David; Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Kojima, Hajime; Johnson, Nelson; Rinckel, Lori; Doelling, Vivian; Jones, Brett

    2013-09-01

    Routine potency testing of Leptospira vaccines is mostly conducted using a vaccination-challenge test that involves large numbers of hamsters and unrelieved pain and distress. NICEATM, ICCVAM, and their international partners organized a workshop to review the state of the science of alternative methods that might replace, reduce, and refine the use of animals for veterinary Leptospira vaccine potency testing and to identify ways to advance improved alternative methods. Vaccine manufacturers were encouraged to initiate or continue product-specific validation using in vitro enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays as replacements for potency testing of four common Leptospira serogroups. Participants discussed the potential for eliminating the back-titration procedure in the hamster challenge assay, which could reduce animal use by 50% for each individual potency test. Further animal reduction may also be possible by using cryopreserved Leptospira stock to replace continual passaging through hamsters. Serology assays were identified as a way to further reduce and refine animal use but should be considered only after attempting in vitro assays. Workshop participants encouraged consideration of analgesics and use of earlier humane endpoints when the hamster vaccination-challenge potency assay is used. International harmonization of alternative potency methods was recommended to avoid duplicative potency testing to meet regionally different requirements. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Alternative Donor--Acceptor Stacks from Crown Ethers and Naphthalene Diimide Derivatives: Rapid, Selective Formation from Solution and Solid State Grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advanced Light Source; Liu, Yi; Klivansky, Liana; Cao, Dennis; Snauko, Marian; Teat, Simon J.; Struppe, Jochem O.; Koshkakaryan, Gayane

    2009-01-22

    Self assembling {pi}-conjugated molecules into ordered structures are of increasing interest in the field of organic electronics. One particular example is charge transfer complexes containing columnar alternative donor-acceptor (ADA) stacks, where neutral and ionic ground states can be readily tuned to modulate electrical, optical, and ferroelectrical properties. Aromatic-aromatic and charge transfer interactions have been the leading driving forces in assisting the self-assembly of ADA stacks. Various folding structures containing ADA stacks were assembled in solution with the aid of solvophobic or ion-binding interactions. Meanwhile, examples of solid ADA stacks, which are more appealing for practical use in devices, were obtained from cocrystalization of binary components or mesophase assembly of liquid crystals in bulk blends. Regardless of these examples, faster and more controllable approaches towards precise supramolecular order in the solid state are still highly desirable.

  12. Seven competing ways to recover the Michaelis-Menten equation reveal the alternative approaches to steady state modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Denis; Ruelle, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction is sufficient to perceive many subtleties of network modeling, including the concentration and time scales separations, the formal equivalence between bulk phase and single-molecule approaches, or the relationships between single-cycle transient probabilities and steady state rates. Seven methods proposed by different authors and yielding the same famous Michaelis-Menten equation, are selected here to illustrate the kinetic and p...

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Approaches for Pediatric Pain: A Review of the State-of-the-science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in pediatric populations has increased considerably, especially for chronic conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and cystic fibrosis in which pain may be a significant problem. Despite the growing popularity of CAM approaches for pediatric pain, questions regarding the efficacy of these interventions remain. This review critically evaluates the existing empirical evidence for the efficacy of CAM interventions for pain symptoms in children. CAM modalities that possess a published literature, including controlled trials and/or multiple baseline studies, that focused on either chronic or acute, procedural pain were included in this review. The efficacy of the CAM interventions was evaluated according to the framework developed by the American Psychological Association (APA Division 12 Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. According to these criteria, only one CAM approach reviewed herein (self-hypnosis/guided imagery/relaxation for recurrent pediatric headache qualified as an empirically supported therapy (EST, although many may be considered possibly efficacious or promising treatments for pediatric pain. Several methodological limitations of the existing literature on CAM interventions for pain problems in children are highlighted and future avenues for research are outlined.

  14. Oligomeric structure and minimal functional unit of the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Liyo; Sassani, Pakan; Azimov, Rustam; Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Liu, Weixin; Newman, Debra; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-09-26

    The electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A mediates the basolateral absorption of sodium and bicarbonate in the proximal tubule. In this study the oligomeric state and minimal functional unit of NBCe1-A were investigated. Wild-type (wt) NBCe1-A isolated from mouse kidney or heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells was predominantly in a dimeric state as was shown using fluorescence energy transfer, pulldown, immunoprecipitation, cross-linking experiments, and nondenaturing perfluorooctanoate-PAGE. NBCe1-A monomers were found to be covalently linked by S-S bonds. When each of the 15 native cysteine residues were individually removed on a wt-NBCe1-A backbone, dimerization of the cotransporter was not affected. In experiments involving multiple native cysteine residue removal, both Cys(630) and Cys(642) in extracellular loop 3 were shown to mediate S-S bond formation between NBCe1-A monomers. When native NBCe1-A cysteine residues were individually reintroduced into a cysteineless NBCe1-A mutant backbone, the finding that a Cys(992) construct that lacked S-S bonds functioned normally indicated that stable covalent linkage of NBCe1-A monomers was not a necessary requirement for functional activity of the cotransporter. Studies using concatameric constructs of wt-NBCe1-A, whose activity is resistant to methanesulfonate reagents, and an NBCe1-A(T442C) mutant, whose activity is completely inhibited by methanesulfonate reagents, confirmed that NBCe1-A monomers are functional. Our results demonstrate that wt-NBCe1-A is predominantly a homodimer, dependent on S-S bond formation that is composed of functionally active monomers.

  15. Evaluation of alternatives for the future of facilities at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center. [State and NRC-licensed burial areas; low-level liquid waste treatment facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-01

    Regulatory considerations are discussed. Alternatives for the continued operation or decommissioning of the state-licensed burial area, the low-level waste treatment facilities, and the NRC licensed burial area are evaluated. Radiological impact analyses were also performed for alternatives on other facilities. (DLC)

  16. Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme requires oligomerization for activity of processed forms in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Wu, J; Faucheu, C; Lalanne, J L; Diu, A; Livingston, D J; Su, M S

    1995-05-01

    Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) is composed of 10' (p10) and 20 kDa (p20) subunits, which are derived from a common 45 kDa precursor. Recent crystallographic studies have shown that ICE exists as a tetramer (p20/p10)2 in the crystal lattice. We provide evidence that the p10 and p20 subunits of ICE associate as oligomers in transfected COS cells. Using intragenic complementation, we show that the activity of a p10/p10 interface mutant defective in autoprocessing can be restored by co-expression with active site ICE mutants. Different active site mutants can also complement each other by oligomerization to form active ICE. These studies indicate that ICE precursor polypeptides may associate in different quaternary structures and that oligomerization is required for autoprocessing. Furthermore, integenic complementation of active site mutants of ICE and an ICE homolog restores autoprocessing activity, suggesting that hetero-oligomerization occurs between ICE homologs.

  17. N-(1-Pyrenyl Maleimide Induces Bak Oligomerization and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Jurkat Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Rong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-(1-pyrenyl maleimide (NPM is a fluorescent reagent that is frequently used as a derivatization agent for the detection of thio-containing compounds. NPM has been shown to display a great differential cytotoxicity against hematopoietic cancer cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism by which NPM induces apoptosis was examined. Here, we show that treatment of Jurkat cells with NPM leads to Bak oligomerization, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, and release of cytochrome C from mitochondria to cytosol. Induction of Bak oligomerization appears to play a critical role in NPM-induced apoptosis, as downregulation of Bak by shRNA significantly prevented NPM-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase 8 by Z-IETD-FMK and/or depletion of Bid did not affect NPM-induced oligomerization of Bak. Taken together, these results suggest that NPM-induced apoptosis is mediated through a pathway that is independent of caspase-8 activation.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative Blood-Screening Strategies for West Nile Virus in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: West Nile virus (WNV is endemic in the US, varying seasonally and by geographic region. WNV can be transmitted by blood transfusion, and mandatory screening of blood for WNV was recently introduced throughout the US. Guidelines for selecting cost-effective strategies for screening blood for WNV do not exist. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis for screening blood for WNV using a computer-based mathematical model, and using data from prospective studies, retrospective studies, and published literature. For three geographic areas with varying WNV-transmission intensity and length of transmission season, the model was used to estimate lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios associated with alternative screening strategies in a target population of blood-transfusion recipients. We compared the status quo (baseline screening using a donor questionnaire to several strategies which differed by nucleic acid testing of either pooled or individual samples, universal versus targeted screening of donations designated for immunocompromised patients, and seasonal versus year-long screening. In low-transmission areas with short WNV seasons, screening by questionnaire alone was the most cost-effective strategy. In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations designated for immunocompromised recipients was the most cost-effective strategy. Seasonal screening of the entire recipient pool added minimal clinical benefit, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios exceeding US$1.7 million per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Year-round screening offered no additional benefit compared to seasonal screening in any of the transmission settings. CONCLUSIONS: In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations

  19. Cost-effectiveness of alternative blood-screening strategies for West Nile Virus in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline T Korves

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is endemic in the US, varying seasonally and by geographic region. WNV can be transmitted by blood transfusion, and mandatory screening of blood for WNV was recently introduced throughout the US. Guidelines for selecting cost-effective strategies for screening blood for WNV do not exist.We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis for screening blood for WNV using a computer-based mathematical model, and using data from prospective studies, retrospective studies, and published literature. For three geographic areas with varying WNV-transmission intensity and length of transmission season, the model was used to estimate lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios associated with alternative screening strategies in a target population of blood-transfusion recipients. We compared the status quo (baseline screening using a donor questionnaire to several strategies which differed by nucleic acid testing of either pooled or individual samples, universal versus targeted screening of donations designated for immunocompromised patients, and seasonal versus year-long screening. In low-transmission areas with short WNV seasons, screening by questionnaire alone was the most cost-effective strategy. In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations designated for immunocompromised recipients was the most cost-effective strategy. Seasonal screening of the entire recipient pool added minimal clinical benefit, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios exceeding USD 1.7 million per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Year-round screening offered no additional benefit compared to seasonal screening in any of the transmission settings.In areas with high levels of WNV transmission, seasonal screening of individual samples and restricting screening to blood donations designated for immunocompromised recipients is cost

  20. Seven competing ways to recover the Michaelis-Menten equation reveal the alternative approaches to steady state modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction is sufficient to perceive many subtleties of network modeling, including the concentration and time scales separations, the formal equivalence between bulk phase and single-molecule approaches, or the relationships between single-cycle transient probabilities and steady state rates. Seven methods proposed by different authors and yielding the same famous Michaelis-Menten equation, are selected here to illustrate the kinetic and probabilistic use of rate constants and to review basic techniques for handling them. Finally, the general rate of an ordered multistep reaction, of which the Michaelis-Menten reaction is a particular case, is deduced from a Markovian approach.

  1. A stable transcription factor complex nucleated by oligomeric AML1–ETO controls leukaemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Lan; Jiang, Yanwen; Kost, Nils; Soong, T. David; Chen, Wei-Yi; Tang, Zhanyun; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Elemento, Olivier; Fischle, Wolfgang; Melnick, Ari; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Roeder, Robert G.

    2013-06-30

    Transcription factors are frequently altered in leukaemia through chromosomal translocation, mutation or aberrant expression. AML1–ETO, a fusion protein generated by the t(8;21) translocation in acute myeloid leukaemia, is a transcription factor implicated in both gene repression and activation. AML1–ETO oligomerization, mediated by the NHR2 domain, is critical for leukaemogenesis, making it important to identify co-regulatory factors that ‘read’ the NHR2 oligomerization and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Here we show that, in human leukaemic cells, AML1–ETO resides in and functions through a stable AML1–ETO-containing transcription factor complex (AETFC) that contains several haematopoietic transcription (co)factors. These AETFC components stabilize the complex through multivalent interactions, provide multiple DNA-binding domains for diverse target genes, co-localize genome wide, cooperatively regulate gene expression, and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Within the AETFC complex, AML1–ETO oligomerization is required for a specific interaction between the oligomerized NHR2 domain and a novel NHR2-binding (N2B) motif in E proteins. Crystallographic analysis of the NHR2–N2B complex reveals a unique interaction pattern in which an N2B peptide makes direct contact with side chains of two NHR2 domains as a dimer, providing a novel model of how dimeric/oligomeric transcription factors create a new protein-binding interface through dimerization/oligomerization. Intriguingly, disruption of this interaction by point mutations abrogates AML1–ETO-induced haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell self-renewal and leukaemogenesis. These results reveal new mechanisms of action of AML1–ETO, and provide a potential therapeutic target in t(8;21)-positive acute myeloid leukaemia.

  2. Requirements and ontology for a G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization knowledge base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmentier Marc

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs are a large and diverse family of membrane proteins whose members participate in the regulation of most cellular and physiological processes and therefore represent key pharmacological targets. Although several bioinformatics resources support research on GPCRs, most of these have been designed based on the traditional assumption that monomeric GPCRs constitute the functional receptor unit. The increase in the frequency and number of reports about GPCR dimerization/oligomerization and the implication of oligomerization in receptor function makes necessary the ability to store and access information about GPCR dimers/oligomers electronically. Results We present here the requirements and ontology (the information scheme to describe oligomers and associated concepts and their relationships for an information system that can manage the elements of information needed to describe comprehensively the phenomena of both homo- and hetero-oligomerization of GPCRs. The comprehensive information management scheme that we plan to use for the development of an intuitive and user-friendly GPCR-Oligomerization Knowledge Base (GPCR-OKB is the result of a community dialog involving experimental and computational colleagues working on GPCRs. Conclusion Our long term goal is to disseminate to the scientific community organized, curated, and detailed information about GPCR dimerization/oligomerization and its related structural context. This information will be reported as close to the data as possible so the user can make his own judgment on the conclusions drawn for a particular study. The requirements and ontology described here will facilitate the development of future information systems for GPCR oligomers that contain both computational and experimental information about GPCR oligomerization. This information is freely accessible at http://www.gpcr-okb.org.

  3. Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Alternative Medicine en Español email Send this article to a ... Dr. Yvonne Ou on Lifestyle Modifications and Glaucoma Alternative medicine may be defined as non-standard, unconventional treatments ...

  4. Tip-induced C-H activation and oligomerization of thienoanthracenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, L E; MacLeod, J M; Lipton-Duffin, J; Fu, C; Ma, D; Perepichka, D F; Rosei, F

    2014-08-14

    The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) can be used to dehydrogenate freely-diffusing tetrathienoanthracene (TTA) molecules on Cu(111), trapping the molecules into metal-coordinated oligomeric structures. The process proceeds at bias voltages above ~3 V and produces organometallic structures identical to those resulting from the thermally-activated cross-coupling of a halogenated analogue. The process appears to be substrate dependent: no oligomerization was observed on Ag(111) or HOPG. This approach demonstrates the possibility of controlled synthesis and nanoscale patterning of 2D oligomer structures on selected surfaces.

  5. A domain in the N-terminal part of Hsp26 is essential for chaperone function and oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Martin; Ignatiou, Athanasios; Saibil, Helen; Helmich, Sonja; Frenzl, Elke; Stromer, Thusnelda; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-10-15

    Small heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones which prevent the unspecific aggregation of non-native proteins. For Hsp26, a cytosolic sHsp from of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been shown that, at elevated temperatures, the 24 subunit complex dissociates into dimers. This dissociation is required for the efficient interaction with non-native proteins. Deletion analysis of the protein showed that the N-terminal half of Hsp26 (amino acid residues 1-95) is required for the assembly of the oligomer. Limited proteolysis in combination with mass spectrometry suggested that this region can be divided in two parts, an N-terminal segment including amino acid residues 1-30 and a second part ranging from residues 31-95. To analyze the structure and function of the N-terminal part of Hsp26 we created a deletion mutant lacking amino acid residues 1-30. We show that the oligomeric state and the structure, as determined by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy, corresponds to that of the Hsp26 wild-type protein. Furthermore, this truncated version of Hsp26 is active as a chaperone. However, in contrast to full length Hsp26, the truncated version dissociates at lower temperatures and complexes with non-native proteins are less stable than those found with wild-type Hsp26. Our results suggest that the N-terminal segment of Hsp26 is involved in both, oligomerization and chaperone function and that the second part of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 31-95) is essential for both functions.

  6. Marginal Paramagnetic State of a One-Dimensional Half-Filled Alternating Chain in (TTM-TTP)AuI 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Tadashi; Mori, Takehiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Misaki, Yohji; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi

    2000-12-01

    (TTM-TTP)AuI2(TTM-TTP: 2,5-bis[4,5-bis(methylthio)-1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene]-1,3,4,6-tetrathiapentalene)has a dimerized structurealong the donor stacking direction,and shows semiconducting behavior below room temperature.ESR, static magnetic susceptibility, and optical reflectanceof this salt have been measured to investigatethe spin state and the electronic correlation.The ESR signal has been observed from room temperature to 3 K,and the spin susceptibility shows paramagnetic behavior with arapid decrease below 10 K.The static magnetic susceptibility is paramagnetic andhas an anomaly around 10 K in agreement with the ESR result.The chain axis optical reflectance spectra showclear optical gap in the mid-infrared region.An attempt is undertaken to analyzethe optical spectrumby means of the one-dimensional dimerized Hubbard model,which suggests that the on-site Coulomb repulsion,U, is small and the spin polarization islocated at the marginal paramagnetic boundary.These results indicate that this compound is not a band-insulatorbut the Mott insulator with a small spin gap.

  7. Outlook for alternative transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushee, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides a brief review of regulatory issues and Federal programs regarding alternative fuel use in automobiles. A number of U.S. DOE initiatives and studies aimed at increasing alternative fuels are outlined, and tax incentives in effect at the state and Federal levels are discussed. Data on alternative fuel consumption and alternative fuel vehicle use are also presented. Despite mandates, tax incentives, and programs, it is concluded alternative fuels will have minimal market penetration. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. Alternation in F-wave parameters of median nerve from unaffected extremity in stroke patients with hemiplegia under dynamic state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hang Zhao; Yong Lin; Wenhua Qi; Shuping Yin; Jiachun Feng

    2006-01-01

    state were detected in order. The amplitude and appearance percentage of F wave were recorded.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of F-wave parameters of median nerve between the unaffected extremity of stroke patients with hemiplegia and the extremity of control subjects under different status.RESULTS: All the patients accomplished the detection, and all of them participated in the final analysis. ①Under dynamic status, the amplitude and appearance percentage of F wave of unaffected extremity of patients in BRSS Ⅲ-Ⅳ group were significantly higher than those in the normal control group, respectively [(0.803 9±0.157 3) mV vs. (0.406 7±0.170 3) mV; (0.856 1±0.266 8)% vs. (0.650 0±0.197 6)%, P< 0.05]. Under static status, there were no significant differences in F-wave parameters of median nerve in the unaffected extremity of patients between BRSS Ⅰ -Ⅱ group and BRSS Ⅴ-Ⅵ group (P> 0.05). ②F-wave parameters of median nerve of unaffected extremity of patients in BRSS Ⅰ - Ⅱ group and BRSS Ⅴ -Ⅵ group under dynamic statewere higher than those under static status, without significant difference (P>0.05),while the amplitude and appearance percentage of F wave of median nerve of unaffected extremity of patients in BRSS Ⅲ- Ⅳ group under dynamic statewere significantly higher than those under static state [(0.803 9±0.157 3) mV vs.(0.391 7±0.131 6) mV; (0.856 1±0.266 8 )% vs.(0.639 1 ±0.259 4)%,P< 0.05]. ③ There was no significant difference in F wave parameters among groups under static state(P>0.05). However, under dynamic status,the amplitude and appearance percentage of F wave parameters of median nerve of unaffected extremity of patients in BRSS Ⅲ-Ⅳ group [(0.803 9±0.157 3) mV, (0.856 1±0.266 8)%] were significantly lower than those in the other two groups [(0.395 1±0.1488),(0.437 1±0.157 6) mV;(0.612 5±0.232 8)%,(0.657 1±0.232 5)%,P< 0.05].CONCLUSION: With the development of disease condition and the increase of

  9. Alternative modelling approaches for estimating pyrogenic carbon, soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in contrasting ecoregions within the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauss, Verena; Sullivan, Patrick; Lehmann, Johannes; Sanderman, Jonathan; Daub, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Given that turnover rates of pyrogenic carbon (PyC) in soil are substantially slower than those of other organic carbon input, it is considered an important carbon pool and its function and fate are relevant to global environmental change processes. Research on PyC has expanded greatly over recent years, but the analytical challenges of determining environmental core factors influencing its production, accumulation and dispersion still require elucidation across different scales. Mid-infrared spectroscopy and partial least-squares analysis were used in conjunction with ultraviolet photo-oxidation followed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques, to quantify PyC, soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (total N) amounts for samples we collected of surface and subsurface soils across the United States at National Science Foundation supported Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites as well as samples from a national soil sampling effort by the U.S. Geological Survey. In our study, we illustrate the impact of the aforementioned natural factors by examining their correlation with PyC content in soils under contrasting environmental conditions thus identifying the factors affecting PyC accumulation. Our central findings revealed a statistically significant relationship of PyC with environmental variables soil drainage, lignin content of the vegetation, mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation as well as for the USGS sites total soil sulphur. During our investigations we evaluated PyC on different spatial scales. On a geographically smaller scale we examined samples from New England and New York. We developed a new and innovative Bayesian framework and applied three spatial models to the data in order to relate critical environmental covariates to changes in spatial density of PyC over the landscape. Akaike Information Criterion demonstrated that the Bayesian Multivariate Linear Regression model performed best (r2=0.6; p>0.05) with

  10. Styrene oligomerization as a molecular probe reaction for Brønsted acidity at the nanoscale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo Corrales, Luis; Wirick, Sue; Miedema, P.S.; Buurmans, I.L.C.; de Groot, F.M.F.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Brønsted acid-catalyzed oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene has been studied on a series ofH-ZSM-5 zeolite powders, steamed under different conditions, with a combination of UV-Vismicro-spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). UV-Vis microspectroscopyand STXM have been used

  11. Selective Antimicrobial Activities and Action Mechanism of Micelles Self-Assembled by Cationic Oligomeric Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengcheng; Wang, Fengyan; Chen, Hui; Li, Meng; Qiao, Fulin; Liu, Zhang; Hou, Yanbo; Wu, Chunxian; Fan, Yaxun; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu; Wang, Yilin

    2016-02-17

    This work reports that cationic micelles formed by cationic trimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric surfactants bearing amide moieties in spacers can efficiently kill Gram-negative E. coli with a very low minimum inhibitory concentration (1.70-0.93 μM), and do not cause obvious toxicity to mammalian cells at the concentrations used. With the increase of the oligomerization degree, the antibacterial activity of the oligomeric surfactants increases, i.e., hexameric surfactant > tetrameric surfactant > trimeric surfactant. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and zeta potential results reveal that the cationic micelles interact with the cell membrane of E. coli through two processes. First, the integrity of outer membrane of E. coli is disrupted by the electrostatic interaction of the cationic ammonium groups of the surfactants with anionic groups of E. coli, resulting in loss of the barrier function of the outer membrane. The inner membrane then is disintegrated by the hydrophobic interaction of the surfactant hydrocarbon chains with the hydrophobic domains of the inner membrane, leading to the cytoplast leakage. The formation of micelles of these cationic oligomeric surfactants at very low concentration enables more efficient interaction with bacterial cell membrane, which endows the oligomeric surfactants with high antibacterial activity.

  12. Selective lowering of synapsins induced by oligomeric α-synuclein exacerbates memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Megan E; Greimel, Susan J; Amar, Fatou; LaCroix, Michael; Boyle, Gabriel; Sherman, Mathew A; Schley, Hallie; Miel, Camille; Schneider, Julie A; Kayed, Rakez; Benfenati, Fabio; Lee, Michael K; Bennett, David A; Lesné, Sylvain E

    2017-06-06

    Mounting evidence indicates that soluble oligomeric forms of amyloid proteins linked to neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyloid-β (Aβ), tau, or α-synuclein (αSyn) might be the major deleterious species for neuronal function in these diseases. Here, we found an abnormal accumulation of oligomeric αSyn species in AD brains by custom ELISA, size-exclusion chromatography, and nondenaturing/denaturing immunoblotting techniques. Importantly, the abundance of αSyn oligomers in human brain tissue correlated with cognitive impairment and reductions in synapsin expression. By overexpressing WT human αSyn in an AD mouse model, we artificially enhanced αSyn oligomerization. These bigenic mice displayed exacerbated Aβ-induced cognitive deficits and a selective decrease in synapsins. Following isolation of various soluble αSyn assemblies from transgenic mice, we found that in vitro delivery of exogenous oligomeric αSyn but not monomeric αSyn was causing a lowering in synapsin-I/II protein abundance. For a particular αSyn oligomer, these changes were either dependent or independent on endogenous αSyn expression. Finally, at a molecular level, the expression of synapsin genes SYN1 and SYN2 was down-regulated in vivo and in vitro by αSyn oligomers, which decreased two transcription factors, cAMP response element binding and Nurr1, controlling synapsin gene promoter activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that endogenous αSyn oligomers can impair memory by selectively lowering synapsin expression.

  13. Antitumor-promoting activity of oligomeric proanthocyanidins in mouse epidermis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei Xiao Gao; Elisabeth M. Perchellet; Hala U. Gali; Limarie Rodriguez; Richard W. Hemingway; Jean-Pierre Perchellet

    1994-01-01

    The flavanoid catechin and heterogenous samples of oligomeric proanthocyanidins extracted from various sources were compared for their ability to inhibit the biochemical and biological effects of 12-o-tertra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in mouse epidermis in vivo. Topical applications of catechin fail to alter the hydroperoxide response to TPA but inhibit the...

  14. Monitoring receptor oligomerization by line-scan fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Postma, M.; Conn, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane-localized receptor proteins are involved in many signaling cascades, and diffusion and oligomerization are key processes controlling their activity. In order to study these processes in living cells, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques have been developed that allow the quantif

  15. Concentration Dependent Ion-Protein Interaction Patterns Underlying Protein Oligomerization Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batoulis, Helena; Schmidt, Thomas H.; Weber, Pascal; Schloetel, Jan-Gero; Kandt, Christian; Lang, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Salts and proteins comprise two of the basic molecular components of biological materials. Kosmotropic/chaotropic co-solvation and matching ion water affinities explain basic ionic effects on protein aggregation observed in simple solutions. However, it is unclear how these theories apply to proteins in complex biological environments and what the underlying ionic binding patterns are. Using the positive ion Ca2+ and the negatively charged membrane protein SNAP25, we studied ion effects on protein oligomerization in solution, in native membranes and in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that concentration-dependent ion-induced protein oligomerization is a fundamental chemico-physical principle applying not only to soluble but also to membrane-anchored proteins in their native environment. Oligomerization is driven by the interaction of Ca2+ ions with the carboxylate groups of aspartate and glutamate. From low up to middle concentrations, salt bridges between Ca2+ ions and two or more protein residues lead to increasingly larger oligomers, while at high concentrations oligomers disperse due to overcharging effects. The insights provide a conceptual framework at the interface of physics, chemistry and biology to explain binding of ions to charged protein surfaces on an atomistic scale, as occurring during protein solubilisation, aggregation and oligomerization both in simple solutions and membrane systems.

  16. Styrene oligomerization as a molecular probe reaction for Brønsted acidity at the nanoscale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo Corrales, Luis; Wirick, Sue; Miedema, P.S.; Buurmans, I.L.C.; de Groot, F.M.F.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Brønsted acid-catalyzed oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene has been studied on a series ofH-ZSM-5 zeolite powders, steamed under different conditions, with a combination of UV-Vismicro-spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). UV-Vis microspectroscopyand STXM have been used

  17. Predicting success of oligomerized pool engineering (OPEN for zinc finger target site sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodwin Mathew J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise and efficient methods for gene targeting are critical for detailed functional analysis of genomes and regulatory networks and for potentially improving the efficacy and safety of gene therapies. Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN is a recently developed method for engineering C2H2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs designed to bind specific DNA sequences with high affinity and specificity in vivo. Because generation of ZFPs using OPEN requires considerable effort, a computational method for identifying the sites in any given gene that are most likely to be successfully targeted by this method is desirable. Results Analysis of the base composition of experimentally validated ZFP target sites identified important constraints on the DNA sequence space that can be effectively targeted using OPEN. Using alternate encodings to represent ZFP target sites, we implemented Naïve Bayes and Support Vector Machine classifiers capable of distinguishing "active" targets, i.e., ZFP binding sites that can be targeted with a high rate of success, from those that are "inactive" or poor targets for ZFPs generated using current OPEN technologies. When evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation on a dataset of 135 experimentally validated ZFP target sites, the best Naïve Bayes classifier, designated ZiFOpT, achieved overall accuracy of 87% and specificity+ of 90%, with an ROC AUC of 0.89. When challenged with a completely independent test set of 140 newly validated ZFP target sites, ZiFOpT performance was comparable in terms of overall accuracy (88% and specificity+ (92%, but with reduced ROC AUC (0.77. Users can rank potentially active ZFP target sites using a confidence score derived from the posterior probability returned by ZiFOpT. Conclusion ZiFOpT, a machine learning classifier trained to identify DNA sequences amenable for targeting by OPEN-generated zinc finger arrays, can guide users to target sites that are most likely to function

  18. Systematic comparison of the effects of alpha-synuclein mutations on its oligomerization and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana F Lázaro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation of alpha-synuclein (ASYN in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites is the typical pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD and other synucleinopathies. Furthermore, mutations in the gene encoding for ASYN are associated with familial and sporadic forms of PD, suggesting this protein plays a central role in the disease. However, the precise contribution of ASYN to neuronal dysfunction and death is unclear. There is intense debate about the nature of the toxic species of ASYN and little is known about the molecular determinants of oligomerization and aggregation of ASYN in the cell. In order to clarify the effects of different mutations on the propensity of ASYN to oligomerize and aggregate, we assembled a panel of 19 ASYN variants and compared their behaviour. We found that familial mutants linked to PD (A30P, E46K, H50Q, G51D and A53T exhibited identical propensities to oligomerize in living cells, but had distinct abilities to form inclusions. While the A30P mutant reduced the percentage of cells with inclusions, the E46K mutant had the opposite effect. Interestingly, artificial proline mutants designed to interfere with the helical structure of the N-terminal domain, showed increased propensity to form oligomeric species rather than inclusions. Moreover, lysine substitution mutants increased oligomerization and altered the pattern of aggregation. Altogether, our data shed light into the molecular effects of ASYN mutations in a cellular context, and established a common ground for the study of genetic and pharmacological modulators of the aggregation process, opening new perspectives for therapeutic intervention in PD and other synucleinopathies.

  19. Phenolic compounds prevent the oligomerization of α-synuclein and reduce synaptic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryoichi; Ono, Kenjiro; Takamura, Yusaku; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Ikeda, Tokuhei; Nishijo, Hisao; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    Lewy bodies, mainly composed of α-synuclein (αS), are pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Epidemiological studies showed that green tea consumption or habitual intake of phenolic compounds reduced Parkinson's disease risk. We previously reported that phenolic compounds inhibited αS fibrillation and destabilized preformed αS fibrils. Cumulative evidence suggests that low-order αS oligomers are neurotoxic and critical species in the pathogenesis of α-synucleinopathies. To develop disease modifying therapies for α-synucleinopathies, we examined effects of phenolic compounds (myricetin (Myr), curcumin, rosmarinic acid (RA), nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and ferulic acid) on αS oligomerization. Using methods such as photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins, circular dichroism spectroscopy, the electron microscope, and the atomic force microscope, we showed that Myr and RA inhibited αS oligomerization and secondary structure conversion. The nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that Myr directly bound to the N-terminal region of αS, whereas direct binding of RA to monomeric αS was not detected. Electrophysiological assays for long-term potentiation in mouse hippocampal slices revealed that Myr and RA ameliorated αS synaptic toxicity by inhibition of αS oligomerization. These results suggest that Myr and RA prevent the αS aggregation process, reducing the neurotoxicity of αS oligomers. To develop disease modifying therapies for α-synucleinopathies, we examined effects of phenolic compounds on α-synuclein (αS) oligomerization. Phenolic compounds, especially Myricetin (Myr) and Rosmarinic acid (RA), inhibited αS oligomerization and secondary structure conversion. Myr and RA ameliorated αS synaptic toxicity on the experiment of long-term potentiation. Our results suggest that Myr and RA prevent αS aggregation process and reduce the neurotoxicity of αS oligomers. Phenolic compounds are good

  20. Alternative assessment of nano-TiO{sub 2} sedimentation under different conditions based on sedimentation efficiency at quasi-stable state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Guang’an; Chen, Rui; Lu, Shushen [Sun Yat-sen University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Jiang, Chengchun [Shenzhen Polytechnic, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (China); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liuhong@cigit.ac.cn [Sun Yat-sen University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Wang, Chuan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology (China)

    2015-11-15

    The predictable significant increase in manufacture and use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) will cause their inevitable release into environment, and the potential harmful effects of ENPs have been confirmed. As representative ENPs, sedimentation behavior of nano-titanium dioxide (n-TiO{sub 2}) should be better understood to control its environmental risk. In this study, an experimental methodology was established to set the sampling area and sampling time of n-TiO{sub 2} sedimentation. In addition, we defined a quasi-stable state and a precise index, i.e., sedimentation efficiency (SE) at this state, to describe the n-TiO{sub 2} sedimentation behavior. Both alternative concentration determination and conventional size measurement were applied to evaluate the sedimentation behavior of n-TiO{sub 2} with fulvic acid. Results showed that the sedimentation behavior described by SE was more precise and in disagreement with those predicted by particle size. Moreover, sedimentation experiments with salicylic acid (SA), under an electric field and different water temperatures or with sulfosalicylic acid under light irradiation were also performed. When the total organic carbon concentration of SA, the voltage of working electrodes, and water temperature increased, or the wavelength of light source decreased, the SE of n-TiO{sub 2} increased and n-TiO{sub 2} showed a tendency to settle in water. These findings might be important for deepening the understanding of n-TiO{sub 2} environmental behavior and exploring sedimentation behavior of other ENPs.

  1. Alternative wastewatersystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyck-Madsen, Søren; Hoffmann, Birgitte; Gabriel, Søren

    1999-01-01

    The report:-  Communicates experiences from Swedish buildings from the establishment and running of alternative wastewater systems. Communicates pictures of alternative buildings and wastewater systems in Sweden. Gives a short evaluation of the performance and the sustainability of the systems....

  2. Cell-surface protein-protein interaction analysis with time-resolved FRET and snap-tag technologies: application to G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comps-Agrar, Laëtitia; Maurel, Damien; Rondard, Philippe; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Trinquet, Eric; Prézeau, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in cell-cell communication, the dysregulation of which has often deleterious effects leading to pathologies such as psychiatric and neurological diseases. Consequently, GPCRs represent excellent drug targets, and as such are the object of intense research in drug discovery for therapeutic application. Recently, the GPCR field has been revolutionized by the demonstration that GPCRs are part of large protein complexes that control their pharmacology, activity, and signaling. Moreover, in these complexes, one GPCR can either associate with itself, forming homodimers or homooligomers, or with other receptor types, forming heterodimeric or heterooligomeric receptor entities that display new receptor features. These features include alterations in ligand cooperativity and selectivity, the activation of novel signaling pathways, and novel processes of desensitization. Thus, it has become necessary to identify GPCR-associated protein complexes of interest at the cell surface, and to determine the state of oligomerization of these receptors and their interactions with their partner proteins. This is essential to understand the function of GPCRs in their native environment, as well as ways to either modulate or control receptor activity with appropriate pharmacological tools, and to develop new therapeutic strategies. This requires the development of technologies to precisely address protein-protein interactions between oligomers at the cell surface. In collaboration with Cisbio Bioassay, we have developed such a technology, which combines TR-FRET detection with a new labeling method called SnapTag. This technology has allowed us to address the oligomeric state of many GPCRs.

  3. Synthesis of Nonionic Oligomeric Manganese(Ⅱ) Complexes and Investigation of Their Toxicity and Τ1-Relaxation Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Kai-chao; LI Ying-xia; ZHOU Jin-lan; DING Shang-wu; YE Chao-hui

    2005-01-01

    Six nonionic oligomeric manganese(Ⅱ) complexes with oligomeric phosphate-polyglycol-EDTA ester ligands were synthesized and characterized. The longitudinal relaxivities of these complexes were measured. One of these complexes, which showed the highest relaxivity, was chosen to be used in the acute toxicity test and the Τ1-weighted imaging experiment. It has been found that compared to Gd-DTPA, this nonionic oligomeric Mn(Ⅱ) complex exhibits no acute toxicity, generates highly enhanced MRI signals and increases the intention time in the rat liver tissue.

  4. United States biomass energy: An assessment of costs and infrastructure for alternative uses of biomass energy crops as an energy feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, William Russell, III

    Reduction of the negative environmental and human health externalities resulting from both the electricity and transportation sectors can be achieved through technologies such as clean coal, natural gas, nuclear, hydro, wind, and solar photovoltaic technologies for electricity; reformulated gasoline and other fossil fuels, hydrogen, and electrical options for transportation. Negative externalities can also be reduced through demand reductions and efficiency improvements in both sectors. However, most of these options come with cost increases for two primary reasons: (1) most environmental and human health consequences have historically been excluded from energy prices; (2) fossil energy markets have been optimizing costs for over 100 years and thus have achieved dramatic cost savings over time. Comparing the benefits and costs of alternatives requires understanding of the tradeoffs associated with competing technology and lifestyle choices. As bioenergy is proposed as a large-scale feedstock within the United States, a question of "best use" of bioenergy becomes important. Bioenergy advocates propose its use as an alternative energy resource for electricity generation and transportation fuel production, primarily focusing on ethanol. These advocates argue that bioenergy offers environmental and economic benefits over current fossil energy use in each of these two sectors as well as in the U.S. agriculture sector. Unfortunately, bioenergy research has offered very few comparisons of these two alternative uses. This thesis helps fill this gap. This thesis compares the economics of bioenergy utilization by a method for estimating total financial costs for each proposed bioenergy use. Locations for potential feedstocks and bio-processing facilities (co-firing switchgrass and coal in existing coal fired power plants and new ethanol refineries) are estimated and linear programs are developed to estimate large-scale transportation infrastructure costs for each sector

  5. A Novel Catalyst for Isobutene Oligomerization to High Quality Gasoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周硼; 安增建; 蔡天锡; 蹇锡高

    2003-01-01

    Dimerization of isobutene in liquid state to form high-octane value gasoline components was investigated over a homemade novel ion exchange resin,SPPESK,which shows high activity and selectivity in isobutene dimerization under mild conditions.

  6. DNA structure modulates the oligomerization properties of the AAV initiator protein Rep68.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mansilla-Soto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Rep68 is a multifunctional protein of the adeno-associated virus (AAV, a parvovirus that is mostly known for its promise as a gene therapy vector. In addition to its role as initiator in viral DNA replication, Rep68 is essential for site-specific integration of the AAV genome into human chromosome 19. Rep68 is a member of the superfamily 3 (SF3 helicases, along with the well-studied initiator proteins simian virus 40 large T antigen (SV40-LTag and bovine papillomavirus (BPV E1. Structurally, SF3 helicases share two domains, a DNA origin interaction domain (OID and an AAA(+ motor domain. The AAA(+ motor domain is also a structural feature of cellular initiators and it functions as a platform for initiator oligomerization. Here, we studied Rep68 oligomerization in vitro in the presence of different DNA substrates using a variety of biophysical techniques and cryo-EM. We found that a dsDNA region of the AAV origin promotes the formation of a complex containing five Rep68 subunits. Interestingly, non-specific ssDNA promotes the formation of a double-ring Rep68, a known structure formed by the LTag and E1 initiator proteins. The Rep68 ring symmetry is 8-fold, thus differing from the hexameric rings formed by the other SF3 helicases. However, similiar to LTag and E1, Rep68 rings are oriented head-to-head, suggesting that DNA unwinding by the complex proceeds bidirectionally. This novel Rep68 quaternary structure requires both the DNA binding and AAA(+ domains, indicating cooperativity between these regions during oligomerization in vitro. Our study clearly demonstrates that Rep68 can oligomerize through two distinct oligomerization pathways, which depend on both the DNA structure and cooperativity of Rep68 domains. These findings provide insight into the dynamics and oligomeric adaptability of Rep68 and serve as a step towards understanding the role of this multifunctional protein during AAV DNA replication and site-specific integration.

  7. Alternative metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    As the old 'publish or perish' adage is brought into question, additional research-impact indices, known as altmetrics, are offering new evaluation alternatives. But such metrics may need to adjust to the evolution of science publishing.

  8. Thermal and Chemical Stability of Two Homologous POZ/BTB Domains of KCTD Proteins Characterized by a Different Oligomeric Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Pirone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available POZ/BTB domains are widespread modules detected in a variety of different biological contexts. Here, we report a biophysical characterization of the POZ/BTB of KCTD6, a protein that is involved in the turnover of the muscle small ankyrin-1 isoform 5 and, in combination with KCTD11, in the ubiquitination and degradation of HDAC1. The analyses show that the domain is a tetramer made up by subunits with the expected α/ structure. A detailed investigation of its stability, carried out in comparison with the homologous pentameric POZ/BTB domain isolated from KCTD5, highlights a number of interesting features, which are shared by the two domains despite their different organization. Their thermal/chemical denaturation curves are characterized by a single and sharp inflection point, suggesting that the denaturation of the two domains is a cooperative two-state process. Furthermore, both domains present a significant content of secondary structure in their denatured state and a reversible denaturation process. We suggest that the ability of these domains to fold and unfold reversibly, a property that is somewhat unexpected for these oligomeric assemblies, may have important implications for their biological function. Indeed, these properties likely favor the formation of heteromeric associations that may be essential for the intricate regulation of the processes in which these proteins are involved.

  9. Screening of Drugs Inhibiting In vitro Oligomerization of Cu/Zn-Superoxide Dismutase with a Mutation Causing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Itsuki; Toichi, Keisuke; Tokuda, Eiichi; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Akiyama, Shuji; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene have been shown to cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD1-ALS). A major pathological hallmark of this disease is abnormal accumulation of mutant SOD1 oligomers in the affected spinal motor neurons. While no effective therapeutics for SOD1-ALS is currently available, SOD1 oligomerization will be a good target for developing cures of this disease. Recently, we have reproduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers abnormally cross-linked via disulfide bonds in a test tube. Using our in vitro model of SOD1 oligomerization, therefore, we screened 640 FDA-approved drugs for inhibiting the oligomerization of SOD1 proteins, and three effective classes of chemical compounds were identified. Those hit compounds will provide valuable information on the chemical structures for developing a novel drug candidate suppressing the abnormal oligomerization of mutant SOD1 and possibly curing the disease.

  10. Comparison of health care expenditures among insured users and nonusers of complementary and alternative medicine in Washington State: a cost minimization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Bonnie K; Lafferty, William E; Tyree, Patrick T; Diehr, Paula K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to compare health care expenditures between insured patients with back pain, fibromyalgia syndrome, or menopause symptoms who used complementary and alternative medical (CAM) providers for some of their care to a matched group of patients who did not use any CAM care. Insurance coverage was equivalent for both conventional and CAM providers. Insurance claims data for 2000-2003 from Washington State, which mandates coverage of CAM providers, were analyzed. CAM-using patients were matched to CAM-nonusing patients based on age group, gender, index medical condition, overall disease burden, and prior-year expenditures. Both unadjusted tests and linear regression models indicated that CAM users had lower average expenditures than nonusers. (Unadjusted: $3,797 versus $4,153, p = 0.0001; beta from linear regression -$367 for CAM users.) CAM users had higher outpatient expenditures that which were offset by lower inpatient and imaging expenditures. The largest difference was seen in the patients with the heaviest disease burdens among whom CAM users averaged $1,420 less than nonusers, p < 0.0001, which more than offset slightly higher average expenditures of $158 among CAM users with lower disease burdens. This analysis indicates that among insured patients with back pain, fibromyalgia, and menopause symptoms, after minimizing selection bias by matching patients who use CAM providers to those who do not, those who use CAM will have lower insurance expenditures than those who do not use CAM.

  11. Preconditioners based on the Alternating-Direction-Implicit algorithm for the 2D steady-state diffusion equation with orthotropic heterogeneous coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Longfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) algorithm with the concept of preconditioning and apply it to linear systems discretized from the 2D steady-state diffusion equations with orthotropic heterogeneous coefficients by the finite element method assuming tensor product basis functions. Specifically, we adopt the compound iteration idea and use ADI iterations as the preconditioner for the outside Krylov subspace method that is used to solve the preconditioned linear system. An efficient algorithm to perform each ADI iteration is crucial to the efficiency of the overall iterative scheme. We exploit the Kronecker product structure in the matrices, inherited from the tensor product basis functions, to achieve high efficiency in each ADI iteration. Meanwhile, in order to reduce the number of Krylov subspace iterations, we incorporate partially the coefficient information into the preconditioner by exploiting the local support property of the finite element basis functions. Numerical results demonstrated the efficiency and quality of the proposed preconditioner. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Three-Dimensional Models of the Oligomeric Human Asialoglycoprotein Receptor (ASGP-R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Bianucci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here is aimed at suggesting plausible hypotheses for functional oligomeric forms of the human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R, by applying a combination of different computational techniques. The functional ASGP-R is a hetero-oligomer, that comprises of several subunits of two different kinds (H1 and H2, which are highly homologous. Its stoichiometry is still unknown. An articulated step-wise modeling protocol was used in order to build the receptor model in a minimal oligomeric form, necessary for it to bind multi-antennary carbohydrate ligands. The ultimate target of the study is to contribute to increasing the knowledge of interactions between the human ASGP-R and carbohydrate ligands, at the molecular level, pertinent to applications in the field of hepatic tissue engineering.

  13. Near-Field Optical Microscopy of Defects in Cholesteric Oligomeric Liquid Crystal Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.

    2006-08-18

    This paper describes formation of 2-D hexagonal structures with a periodicity ~0.5-0.8 um in the defects of thin films of cholesteric oligomeric liquid crystals prepared by the evaporation of the solvent from the oligomer solution on the substrate. These regular arrays were observed by scanning near-field optical and concurrent atomic force microscopy. The mechanisms considered are both Benard-Marangoni and buoyancy conventions induced by solvent evaporation and air-bubble creation around the condensed water droplets from the air during evaporative cooling. Hexagonal structures prepared by this method can be used in photonic devices for emission enhancement, for instance, in liquid crystal lasers and single photon sources with oligomeric liquid crystal hosts.

  14. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  15. Effect of acid density of HZSM-5 on the oligomerization of ethylene in FCC dry gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Ding; Shan Geng; Chunyi Li; Chaohe Yang; Guohui Wang

    2009-01-01

    The oligomerization of ethylene in FCC dry gas over HZSM-5 catalyst with different Si/Al2 ratios was studied. The effect of acid density of catalyst on the oligomerization of ethylene was discussed. By increasing the acid density of catalyst, ethylene conversion showed a linear increase, while the yields of olefins decreased when the acid density of catalyst exceeded 0.14 mmolNH3/g owing to a promotion of hydrogen transfer reaction. Through comparing the average distance between acid sites on catalyst with kinetic diameters of olefins, it was found that the dimerization of ethylene was not restrained by the sparse distribution of acid sites, while the hydrogen transfer reaction of C3 and C4 olefins was limited. On these bases, a conclusion is proposed that the dimerization of ethylene proceeded via Eley-Rideal mechanism, while the hydrogen transfer reaction of C3 and C4 olefins followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism.

  16. Molecular basis for oligomeric-DNA binding and episome maintenance by KSHV LANA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Domsic

    Full Text Available LANA is the KSHV-encoded terminal repeat binding protein essential for viral replication and episome maintenance during latency. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of LANA C-terminal DNA binding domain (LANADBD to reveal its capacity to form a decameric ring with an exterior DNA binding surface. The dimeric core is structurally similar to EBV EBNA1 with an N-terminal arm that regulates DNA binding and is required for replication function. The oligomeric interface between LANA dimers is dispensable for single site DNA binding, but is required for cooperative DNA binding, replication function, and episome maintenance. We also identify a basic patch opposite of the DNA binding surface that is responsible for the interaction with BRD proteins and contributes to episome maintenance function. The structural features of LANADBD suggest a novel mechanism of episome maintenance through DNA-binding induced oligomeric assembly.

  17. Three-Dimensional Models of the Oligomeric Human Asialoglycoprotein Receptor (ASGP-R)

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Maria Bianucci; Ilaria Massarelli; Federica Chiellini; Emo Chiellini

    2010-01-01

    The work presented here is aimed at suggesting plausible hypotheses for functional oligomeric forms of the human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R), by applying a combination of different computational techniques. The functional ASGP-R is a hetero-oligomer, that comprises of several subunits of two different kinds (H1 and H2), which are highly homologous. Its stoichiometry is still unknown. An articulated step-wise modeling protocol was used in order to build the receptor model in a minimal...

  18. Zn(2+) site engineering at the oligomeric interface of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard-Nielsen, Kristine; Norregaard, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne

    2002-01-01

    of the dopamine transporter (DAT) corresponding to the external end of transmembrane segment 6. Upon binding to this site, which involves a histidine inserted in position 310 (V310H) and the endogenous Cys306 within the same DAT molecule, Zn(2+) potently inhibits [(3)H]dopamine uptake. These data provide indirect...... evidence that conformational changes critical for the translocation process may occur at the interface between two transporter molecules in the oligomeric structure....

  19. Oligomerization of DH Domain Is Essential for Dbl-Induced Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Kejin; Debreceni, Balazs; Bi, Feng; Zheng, Yi

    2001-01-01

    The dbl oncogene product (onco-Dbl) is the prototype member of a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho GTPases. The Dbl homology (DH) domain of onco-Dbl is responsible for the GEF catalytic activity, and the DH domain, together with the immediately adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, constitutes the minimum module bearing transforming function. In the present study, we demonstrate that the onco-Dbl protein exists in oligomeric form in vitro and in cells. The oligo...

  20. Membrane Permeabilization by Oligomeric α-Synuclein: In Search of the Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart D van Rooijen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The question of how the aggregation of the neuronal protein α-synuclein contributes to neuronal toxicity in Parkinson's disease has been the subject of intensive research over the past decade. Recently, attention has shifted from the amyloid fibrils to soluble oligomeric intermediates in the α-synuclein aggregation process. These oligomers are hypothesized to be cytotoxic and to permeabilize cellular membranes, possibly by forming pore-like complexes in the bilayer. Although the subject of α-synuclein oligomer-membrane interactions has attracted much attention, there is only limited evidence that supports the pore formation by α-synuclein oligomers. In addition the existing data are contradictory. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have studied the mechanism of lipid bilayer disruption by a well-characterized α-synuclein oligomer species in detail using a number of in vitro bilayer systems and assays. Dye efflux from vesicles induced by oligomeric α-synuclein was found to be a fast all-or-none process. Individual vesicles swiftly lose their contents but overall vesicle morphology remains unaltered. A newly developed assay based on a dextran-coupled dye showed that non-equilibrium processes dominate the disruption of the vesicles. The membrane is highly permeable to solute influx directly after oligomer addition, after which membrane integrity is partly restored. The permeabilization of the membrane is possibly related to the intrinsic instability of the bilayer. Vesicles composed of negatively charged lipids, which are generally used for measuring α-synuclein-lipid interactions, were unstable to protein adsorption in general. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dye efflux from negatively charged vesicles upon addition of α-synuclein has been hypothesized to occur through the formation of oligomeric membrane pores. However, our results show that the dye efflux characteristics are consistent with bilayer defects caused by

  1. Recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction allows rapid and seamless cloning of oligomeric genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jonathan R; Mackay, J Andrew; Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-04-12

    This paper reports a new strategy, recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction (PRe-RDL), to rapidly clone highly repetitive polypeptides of any sequence and specified length over a large range of molecular weights. In a single cycle of PRe-RDL, two halves of a parent plasmid, each containing a copy of an oligomer, are ligated together, thereby dimerizing the oligomer and reconstituting a functional plasmid. This process is carried out recursively to assemble an oligomeric gene with the desired number of repeats. PRe-RDL has several unique features that stem from the use of type IIs restriction endonucleases: first, PRe-RDL is a seamless cloning method that leaves no extraneous nucleotides at the ligation junction. Because it uses type IIs endonucleases to ligate the two halves of the plasmid, PRe-RDL also addresses the major limitation of RDL in that it abolishes any restriction on the gene sequence that can be oligomerized. The reconstitution of a functional plasmid only upon successful ligation in PRe-RDL also addresses two other limitations of RDL: the significant background from self-ligation of the vector observed in RDL, and the decreased efficiency of ligation due to nonproductive circularization of the insert. PRe-RDL can also be used to assemble genes that encode different sequences in a predetermined order to encode block copolymers or append leader and trailer peptide sequences to the oligomerized gene.

  2. Rapid synthesis of cyclic oligomeric depsipeptides with positional, stereochemical, and macrocycle size distribution control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiste, Suzanne M; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2016-12-27

    Macrocyclic small molecules are attractive tools in the development of sensors, new materials, and therapeutics. Within early-stage drug discovery, they are increasingly sought for their potential to interact with broad surfaces of peptidic receptors rather than within their narrow folds and pockets. Cyclization of linear small molecule precursors is a straightforward strategy to constrain conformationally mobile motifs, but forging a macrocycle bond typically becomes more difficult at larger ring sizes. We report the development of a general approach to discrete collections of oligomeric macrocyclic depsipeptides using an oligomerization/macrocyclization process governed by a series of Mitsunobu reactions of hydroxy acid monomers. Ring sizes of 18, 24, 30, and 36 are formed in a single reaction from a didepsipeptide, whereas sizes of 24, 36, and 60 result from a tetradepsipeptide. The ring-size selectivity inherent to the approach can be modulated by salt additives that enhance the formation of specific ring sizes. Use of chemical synthesis to prepare the monomers suggests broad access to functionally and stereochemically diverse collections of natural product-like oligodepsipeptide macrocycles. Two cyclodepsipeptide natural products were prepared along with numerous unnatural oligomeric congeners to provide rapid access to discrete collections of complex macrocyclic small molecules from medium (18) to large (60) ring sizes.

  3. Phosphomimetic mutations enhance oligomerization of phospholemman and modulate its interaction with the Na/K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiujing; Pallikkuth, Sandeep; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M; Robia, Seth L

    2011-03-18

    Na/K-ATPase (NKA) activity is dynamically regulated by an inhibitory interaction with a small transmembrane protein, phospholemman (PLM). Inhibition is relieved upon PLM phosphorylation. Phosphorylation may alter how PLM interacts with NKA and/or itself, but details of these interactions are unknown. To address this, we quantified FRET between PLM and its regulatory target NKA in live cells. Phosphorylation of PLM was mimicked by mutation S63E (PKC site), S68E (PKA/PKC site), or S63E/S68E. The dependence of FRET on protein expression in live cells yielded information about the structure and binding affinity of the PLM-NKA regulatory complex. PLM phosphomimetic mutations altered the quaternary structure of the regulatory complex and reduced the apparent affinity of the PLM-NKA interaction. The latter effect was likely due to increased oligomerization of PLM phosphomimetic mutants, as suggested by PLM-PLM FRET measurements. Distance constraints obtained by FRET suggest that phosphomimetic mutations slightly alter the oligomer quaternary conformation. Photon-counting histogram measurements revealed that the major PLM oligomeric species is a tetramer. We conclude that phosphorylation of PLM increases its oligomerization into tetramers, decreases its binding to NKA, and alters the structures of both the tetramer and NKA regulatory complex.

  4. Structural basis for the oligomerization of the MADS domain transcription factor SEPALLATA3 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Sriharsha; Acajjaoui, Samira; Conn, Simon; Costa, Luca; Conn, Vanessa; Vial, Anthony; Marcellin, Romain; Melzer, Rainer; Brown, Elizabeth; Hart, Darren; Theißen, Günter; Silva, Catarina S; Parcy, François; Dumas, Renaud; Nanao, Max; Zubieta, Chloe

    2014-09-01

    In plants, MADS domain transcription factors act as central regulators of diverse developmental pathways. In Arabidopsis thaliana, one of the most central members of this family is SEPALLATA3 (SEP3), which is involved in many aspects of plant reproduction, including floral meristem and floral organ development. SEP3 has been shown to form homo and heterooligomeric complexes with other MADS domain transcription factors through its intervening (I) and keratin-like (K) domains. SEP3 function depends on its ability to form specific protein-protein complexes; however, the atomic level determinants of oligomerization are poorly understood. Here, we report the 2.5-Å crystal structure of a small portion of the intervening and the complete keratin-like domain of SEP3. The domains form two amphipathic alpha helices separated by a rigid kink, which prevents intramolecular association and presents separate dimerization and tetramerization interfaces comprising predominantly hydrophobic patches. Mutations to the tetramerization interface demonstrate the importance of highly conserved hydrophobic residues for tetramer stability. Atomic force microscopy was used to show SEP3-DNA interactions and the role of oligomerization in DNA binding and conformation. Based on these data, the oligomerization patterns of the larger family of MADS domain transcription factors can be predicted and manipulated based on the primary sequence. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional foods effective for hepatitis C: Identification of oligomeric proanthocyanidin and its action mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yo-ichi; Ishida; Masahiko; Takeshita; Hiroaki; Kataoka

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus(HCV)is a major cause of viral hepatitis and currently infects approximately 170 million people worldwide.An infection by HCV causes high rates of chronic hepatitis(>75%)and progresses to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma ultimately.HCV can be eliminated by a combination of pegylatedα-interferon and the broad-spectrum antiviral drug ribavirin;however,this treatment is still associated with poor efficacy and tolerability and is often accompanied by serious side-effects.While some novel direct-actingantivirals against HCV have been developed recently,high medical costs limit the access to the therapy in cost-sensitive countries.To search for new natural anti-HCV agents,we screened local agricultural products for their suppressive activities against HCV replication using the HCV replicon cell system in vitro.We found a potent inhibitor of HCV RNA expression in the extracts of blueberry leaves and then identified oligomeric proanthocyanidin as the active ingredient.Further investigations into the action mechanism of oligomeric proanthocyanidin suggested that it is an inhibitor of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins(hn RNPs)such as hn RNP A2/B1.In this review,we presented an overview of functional foods and ingredients efficient for HCV infection,the chemical structural characteristics of oligomeric proanthocyanidin,and its action mechanism.

  6. Physiological relevance of plant 2-Cys peroxiredoxin overoxidation level and oligomerization status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveau, Delphine; Ouahrani, Djelloul; Marok, Mohamed Amine; Blanchard, Laurence; Rey, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are ubiquitous thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases presumed to display, upon environmental constraints, a chaperone function resulting from a redox-dependent conformational switch. In this work, using biochemical and genetic approaches, we aimed to unravel the factors regulating the redox status and the conformation of the plastidial 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys PRX) in plants. In Arabidopsis, we show that in optimal growth conditions, the overoxidation level mainly depends on the availability of thioredoxin-related electron donors, but not on sulfiredoxin, the enzyme reducing the 2-Cys PRX overoxidized form. We also observed that upon various physiological temperature, osmotic and light stress conditions, the overoxidation level and oligomerization status of 2-Cys PRX can moderately vary depending on the constraint type. Further, no major change was noticed regarding protein conformation in water-stressed Arabidopsis, barley and potato plants, whereas species-dependent up- and down-variations in overoxidation were observed. In contrast, both 2-Cys PRX overoxidation and oligomerization were strongly induced during a severe oxidative stress generated by methyl viologen. From these data, revealing that the oligomerization status of plant 2-Cys PRX does not exhibit important variation and is not tightly linked to the protein redox status upon physiologically relevant environmental constraints, the possible in planta functions of 2-Cys PRX are discussed.

  7. Structural reorganisation and potential toxicity of oligomeric species formed during the assembly of amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mookyung Cheon

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that oligomeric protein assemblies may represent the molecular species responsible for cytotoxicity in a range of neurological disorders including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. We use all-atom computer simulations to reveal that the process of oligomerization can be divided into two steps. The first is characterised by a hydrophobic coalescence resulting in the formation of molten oligomers in which hydrophobic residues are sequestered away from the solvent. In the second step, the oligomers undergo a process of reorganisation driven by interchain hydrogen bonding interactions that induce the formation of beta sheet rich assemblies in which hydrophobic groups can become exposed. Our results show that the process of aggregation into either ordered or amorphous species is largely determined by a competition between the hydrophobicity of the amino acid sequence and the tendency of polypeptide chains to form arrays of hydrogen bonds. We discuss how the increase in solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface resulting from such a competition offers an explanation for recent observations concerning the cytotoxicity of oligomeric species formed prior to mature amyloid fibrils.

  8. Non-Enzymatic Oligomerization of 3’, 5’ Cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Pino, Samanta; Timperio, Anna Maria; Šponer, Judit E.; Šponer, Jiří; Nováková, Olga; Šedo, Ondrej; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies illustrate that short oligonucleotide sequences can be easily produced from nucleotide precursors in a template-free non-enzymatic way under dehydrating conditions, i.e. using essentially dry materials. Here we report that 3’,5’ cyclic AMP may also serve as a substrate of the reaction, which proceeds under moderate conditions yet with a lower efficiency than the previously reported oligomerization of 3’,5’ cyclic GMP. Optimally the oligomerization requires (i) a temperature of 80°C, (ii) a neutral to alkaline environment and (iii) a time on the order of weeks. Differences in the yield and required reaction conditions of the oligomerizations utilizing 3’,5’ cGMP and cAMP are discussed in terms of the crystal structures of the compounds. Polymerization of 3’,5’ cyclic nucleotides, whose paramount relevance in a prebiotic chemistry context has been widely accepted for decades, supports the possibility that the origin of extant genetic materials might have followed a direct uninterrupted path since its very beginning, starting from non-elaborately pre-activated monomer compounds and simple reactions. PMID:27802310

  9. Differential structural remodelling of heparan sulfate by chemokines: the role of chemokine oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Elisa; Salanga, Catherina L.; Thakar, Dhruv

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines control the migration of cells in normal physiological processes and in the context of disease such as inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. Two major interactions are involved: (i) binding of chemokines to chemokine receptors, which activates the cellular machinery required for movement; and (ii) binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which facilitates the organization of chemokines into haptotactic gradients that direct cell movement. Chemokines can bind and activate their receptors as monomers; however, the ability to oligomerize is critical for the function of many chemokines in vivo. Chemokine oligomerization is thought to enhance their affinity for GAGs, and here we show that it significantly affects the ability of chemokines to accumulate on and be retained by heparan sulfate (HS). We also demonstrate that several chemokines differentially rigidify and cross-link HS, thereby affecting HS rigidity and mobility, and that HS cross-linking is significantly enhanced by chemokine oligomerization. These findings suggest that chemokine–GAG interactions may play more diverse biological roles than the traditional paradigms of physical immobilization and establishment of chemokine gradients; we hypothesize that they may promote receptor-independent events such as physical re-organization of the endothelial glycocalyx and extracellular matrix, as well as signalling through proteoglycans to facilitate leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. PMID:28123055

  10. Oligomerization of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin is dependent upon caveolins 1 and 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Fennessey

    Full Text Available Evidence from multiple studies suggests that Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin is a pore-forming toxin, assembling into oligomeric complexes in the plasma membrane of sensitive cells. In a previous study, we used gene-trap mutagenesis to identify mammalian factors contributing to toxin activity, including caveolin-2 (CAV2. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of caveolin-2 and its interaction partner, caveolin-1 (CAV1, in ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. Using CAV2-specific shRNA in a toxin-sensitive human kidney cell line, ACHN, we confirmed that cells deficient in CAV2 exhibit increased resistance to ε-toxin. Similarly, using CAV1-specific shRNA, we demonstrate that cells deficient in CAV1 also exhibit increased resistance to the toxin. Immunoprecipitation of CAV1 and CAV2 from ε-toxin-treated ACHN cells demonstrated interaction of both CAV1 and -2 with the toxin. Furthermore, blue-native PAGE indicated that the toxin and caveolins were components of a 670 kDa protein complex. Although ε-toxin binding was only slightly perturbed in caveolin-deficient cells, oligomerization of the toxin was dramatically reduced in both CAV1- and CAV2-deficient cells. These results indicate that CAV1 and -2 potentiate ε-toxin induced cytotoxicity by promoting toxin oligomerization - an event which is requisite for pore formation and, by extension, cell death.

  11. Phosphomimetic Mutations Enhance Oligomerization of Phospholemman and Modulate Its Interaction with the Na/K-ATPase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiujing; Pallikkuth, Sandeep; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M.; Robia, Seth L.

    2011-01-01

    Na/K-ATPase (NKA) activity is dynamically regulated by an inhibitory interaction with a small transmembrane protein, phospholemman (PLM). Inhibition is relieved upon PLM phosphorylation. Phosphorylation may alter how PLM interacts with NKA and/or itself, but details of these interactions are unknown. To address this, we quantified FRET between PLM and its regulatory target NKA in live cells. Phosphorylation of PLM was mimicked by mutation S63E (PKC site), S68E (PKA/PKC site), or S63E/S68E. The dependence of FRET on protein expression in live cells yielded information about the structure and binding affinity of the PLM-NKA regulatory complex. PLM phosphomimetic mutations altered the quaternary structure of the regulatory complex and reduced the apparent affinity of the PLM-NKA interaction. The latter effect was likely due to increased oligomerization of PLM phosphomimetic mutants, as suggested by PLM-PLM FRET measurements. Distance constraints obtained by FRET suggest that phosphomimetic mutations slightly alter the oligomer quaternary conformation. Photon-counting histogram measurements revealed that the major PLM oligomeric species is a tetramer. We conclude that phosphorylation of PLM increases its oligomerization into tetramers, decreases its binding to NKA, and alters the structures of both the tetramer and NKA regulatory complex. PMID:21220422

  12. Disruption of oligomerization induces nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of leukemia-associated rho Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabocka, Elda; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2007-10-01

    The rgsRhoGEFs comprise a subfamily of three guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which function in linking heterotrimeric G-proteins to the monomeric RhoGTPase. Here, we reveal the novel finding that oligomerization of leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) functions to prevent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and to retain LARG in the cytoplasm. We establish that oligomerization is mediated by a predicted coiled-coil sequence (amino acids 1507-1520) in the extreme C terminus of LARG and that substitution of isoleucines 1507/1510 with alanines disrupts homo-oligomerization and leads to nucleocytoplasmic shuttling via the CRM1 nuclear transport pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that induced dimerization of an otherwise nuclear monomeric LARG mutant promotes cytoplasmic localization. Furthermore, we establish that nuclear import of monomeric LARG is mediated by the nuclear localization sequence (29)PTDKKQK(35) in the extreme N terminus. We propose that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling provides a mechanism for spatially regulating the activity of LARG toward its cytoplasmic targets and potentially new nuclear targets.

  13. Organization of the mitochondrial apoptotic BAK pore: oligomerization of the BAK homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluvila, Sreevidya; Mandal, Tirtha; Hustedt, Eric; Fajer, Peter; Choe, Jun Yong; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2014-01-31

    The multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins BAK and BAX are believed to form large oligomeric pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Formation of these pores results in the release of apoptotic factors including cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm, where they initiate the cascade of events that lead to cell death. Using the site-directed spin labeling method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we have determined the conformational changes that occur in BAK when the protein targets to the membrane and forms pores. The data showed that helices α1 and α6 disengage from the rest of the domain, leaving helices α2-α5 as a folded unit. Helices α2-α5 were shown to form a dimeric structure, which is structurally homologous to the recently reported BAX "BH3-in-groove homodimer." Furthermore, the EPR data and a chemical cross-linking study demonstrated the existence of a hitherto unknown interface between BAK BH3-in-groove homodimers in the oligomeric BAK. This novel interface involves the C termini of α3 and α5 helices. The results provide further insights into the organization of the BAK oligomeric pores by the BAK homodimers during mitochondrial apoptosis, enabling the proposal of a BAK-induced lipidic pore with the topography of a "worm hole."

  14. Dealuminated ZSM-5 Zeolite Catalyst for Ethylene Oligomerization to Liquid Fuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin; Didi Dwi Anggoro

    2002-01-01

    Ethylene oligomerization using ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated to study the role of Bronstedacid sites in the formation of higher hydrocarbons. The oligomerization of olefins, dependent on the acidityof ZSM-5 zeolite, is an important step in the conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels. The framework Si/Alratio reflects the number of potential acid sites and the acid strength of the ZSM-5 catalyst. ZSM-5 withthe mole ratio SiO2/Al2O3 equal to 30 was dealuminated for different periods of time according to theacidic ion-exchange method to produce ZSM-5 with various Si/Al ratios. The FT-IR analysis revealedthat the integrated framework aluminum band, non-framework aluminum band, and silanol groups areasof the ZSM-5 zeolites decreased after being dealuminated. The performance of the dealuminated zeolitewas tested for ethylene oligomerization. The results demonstrated that the dealumination of ZSM-5 ledto higher ethylene conversion, but the gasoline selectivity was reduced compared to the performance of aZSM-5 zeolite. The characterization results revealed the amount of aluminum in the zeolitic framework,the crystallinity of the ZSM-5 zeolite, and the Si/Al ratio affected the formation of Bronsted acid sites.The number of the Bronsted acid sites on the catalyst active sites is important in the olefin conversion toliquid hydrocarbons.

  15. Biochemical and Structural Studies of YEast Vps4 Oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonciarz, M.; Whitby, F; Eckert, D; Kieffer, C; Heroux, A; Sundquist, W; Hill, C

    2008-01-01

    The ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) pathway functions in vesicle formation at the multivesicular body, the budding of enveloped RNA viruses such as HIV-1, and the final abscission stage of cytokinesis. As the only known enzyme in the ESCRT pathway, the AAA ATPase (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) Vps4 provides the energy required for multiple rounds of vesicle formation. Like other Vps4 proteins, yeast Vps4 cycles through two states: a catalytically inactive disassembled state that we show here is a dimer and a catalytically active higher-order assembly that we have modeled as a dodecamer composed of two stacked hexameric rings. We also report crystal structures of yeast Vps4 proteins in the apo- and ATPS (adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate))-bound states. In both cases, Vps4 subunits assembled into continuous helices with 6-fold screw axes that are analogous to helices seen previously in other Vps4 crystal forms. The helices are stabilized by extensive interactions between the large and small AAA ATPase domains of adjacent Vps4 subunits, suggesting that these contact surfaces may be used to build both the catalytically active dodecamer and catalytically inactive dimer. Consistent with this model, we have identified interface mutants that specifically inhibit Vps4 dimerization, dodecamerization, or both. Thus, the Vps4 dimer and dodecamer likely form distinct but overlapping interfaces. Finally, our structural studies have allowed us to model the conformation of a conserved loop (pore loop 2) that is predicted to form an arginine-rich pore at the center of one of the Vps4 hexameric rings. Our mutational analyses demonstrate that pore loop 2 residues Arg241 and Arg251 are required for efficient HIV-1 budding, thereby supporting a role for this 'arginine collar' in Vps4 function.

  16. Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Young Adults in the United States: Findings From the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Dawn M; Wexler Rainisch, Bethany K

    2012-10-01

    This study describes complementary and alternative medicine use among a national sample of young adults, with an emphasis on characterizing racial and ethnic differences, highlighting variation across subgroups of Hispanics. The authors examined young adults ages 18 to 27 years (n = 14 128) from wave III (2001-2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Prevalence estimates and logistic regression results were weighted and adjusted for complex sample design. The study examined recent complementary and alternative medicine use in the past 12 months, recent use for each of 15 specific complementary and alternative medicine modalities, and the 5 most commonly used modalities (herbs, massage, chiropractic, relaxation, and vitamins). Results showed that 29% of young adults aged 18 to 27 years recently used complementary and alternative medicine. Prevalence was highest among Cuban Americans (42%) and lowest among blacks (22%). Young adults used a diversity of complementary and alternative medicine modalities and there were substantial differences in use across racial and ethnic groups.

  17. Alternative Veier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Tove Elisabeth; Salamonsen, Anita

    reflektioner omkring patienters brug af og erfaringer med alternativ behandling. Patientorganisationer, organisatoner for alternative behandlere og organisationer for læger og medicinstuderende har læst bogens patienthistorier og deres perspektiver lægges frem. Til slut i bogen diskuteres betydningen af de...

  18. Growing Alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2014-01-01

    From 2014, Anhui Province will pilot a reform of the residential land market in China, thus integrating rural Anhui in the national housing market. In contrast, artist and activist Ou Ning has proposed the Bishan time money currency, intending to establish an alternative economic circuit in Bishan...

  19. Magnetostrictive Alternator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger; Bruder, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This innovation replaces the linear alternator presently used in Stirling engines with a continuous-gradient, impedance-matched, oscillating magnetostrictive transducer that eliminates all moving parts via compression, maintains high efficiency, costs less to manufacture, reduces mass, and eliminates the need for a bearing system. The key components of this new technology are the use of stacked magnetostrictive materials, such as Terfenol-D, under a biased magnetic and stress-induced compression, continuous-gradient impedance-matching material, coils, force-focusing metallic structure, and supports. The acoustic energy from the engine travels through an impedancematching layer that is physically connected to the magnetostrictive mass. Compression bolts keep the structure under compressive strain, allowing for the micron-scale compression of the magnetostrictive material and eliminating the need for bearings. The relatively large millimeter displacement of the pressure side of the impedance-matching material is reduced to micron motion, and undergoes stress amplification at the magnetostrictive interface. The alternating compression and expansion of the magnetostrictive material creates an alternating magnetic field that then induces an electric current in a coil that is wound around the stack. This produces electrical power from the acoustic pressure wave and, if the resonant frequency is tuned to match the engine, can replace the linear alternator that is commonly used.

  20. Alternative Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triglyceride (fat) produced by processing coconut oil or palm kernel oil. The body breaks down caprylic acid into substances called “ketone bodies.” The theory behind Axona is that the ketone bodies derived from caprylic acid may provide an alternative energy source for brain cells that have lost ...

  1. State-and-transition simulation modeling to compare outcomes of alternative management scenarios under two natural disturbance regimes in a forested landscape in northeastern Wisconsin, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Swearingen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons of the potential outcomes of multiple land management strategies and an understanding of the influence of potential increases in climate-related disturbances on these outcomes are essential for long term land management and conservation planning. To provide these insights, we developed an approach that uses collaborative scenario development and state-and-transition simulation modeling to provide land managers and conservation practitioners with a comparison of potential landscapes resulting from alternative management scenarios and climate conditions, and we have applied this approach in the Wild Rivers Legacy Forest (WRLF area in northeastern Wisconsin. Three management scenarios were developed with input from local land managers, scientists, and conservation practitioners: 1 continuation of current management, 2 expanded working forest conservation easements, and 3 cooperative ecological forestry. Scenarios were modeled under current climate with contemporary probabilities of natural disturbance and under increased probability of windthrow and wildfire that may result from climate change in this region. All scenarios were modeled for 100 years using the VDDT/TELSA modeling suite. Results showed that landscape composition and configuration were relatively similar among scenarios, and that management had a stronger effect than increased probability of windthrow and wildfire. These findings suggest that the scale of the landscape analysis used here and the lack of differences in predominant management strategies between ownerships in this region play significant roles in scenario outcomes. The approach used here does not rely on complex mechanistic modeling of uncertain dynamics and can therefore be used as starting point for planning and further analysis.

  2. Alternative Fuel Vehicle Adoption Increases Fleet Gasoline Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions under United States Corporate Average Fuel Economy Policy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenn, Alan; Azevedo, Inês M L; Michalek, Jeremy J

    2016-03-01

    The United States Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emission standards are designed to reduce petroleum consumption and GHG emissions from light-duty passenger vehicles. They do so by requiring automakers to meet aggregate criteria for fleet fuel efficiency and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission rates. Several incentives for manufacturers to sell alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) have been introduced in recent updates of CAFE/GHG policy for vehicles sold from 2012 through 2025 to help encourage a fleet technology transition. These incentives allow automakers that sell AFVs to meet less-stringent fleet efficiency targets, resulting in increased fleet-wide gasoline consumption and emissions. We derive a closed-form expression to quantify these effects. We find that each time an AFV is sold in place of a conventional vehicle, fleet emissions increase by 0 to 60 t of CO2 and gasoline consumption increases by 0 to 7000 gallons (26,000 L), depending on the AFV and year of sale. Using projections for vehicles sold from 2012 to 2025 from the Energy Information Administration, we estimate that the CAFE/GHG AFV incentives lead to a cumulative increase of 30 to 70 million metric tons of CO2 and 3 to 8 billion gallons (11 to 30 billion liters) of gasoline consumed over the vehicles' lifetimes - the largest share of which is due to legacy GHG flex-fuel vehicle credits that expire in 2016. These effects may be 30-40% larger in practice than we estimate here due to optimistic laboratory vehicle efficiency tests used in policy compliance calculations.

  3. Interplay of histidine residues of the Alzheimer’s disease Aβ peptide governs its Zn-induced oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrate, Andrey N.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Zhokhov, Sergey S.; Mantsyzov, Alexey B.; Kechko, Olga I.; Pastore, Annalisa; Makarov, Alexander A.; Polshakov, Vladimir I.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational changes of Aβ peptide result in its transformation from native monomeric state to the toxic soluble dimers, oligomers and insoluble aggregates that are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Interactions of zinc ions with Aβ are mediated by the N-terminal Aβ1–16 domain and appear to play a key role in AD progression. There is a range of results indicating that these interactions trigger the Aβ plaque formation. We have determined structure and functional characteristics of the metal binding domains derived from several Aβ variants and found that their zinc-induced oligomerization is governed by conformational changes in the minimal zinc binding site 6HDSGYEVHH14. The residue H6 and segment 11EVHH14, which are part of this site are crucial for formation of the two zinc-mediated interaction interfaces in Aβ. These structural determinants can be considered as promising targets for rational design of the AD-modifying drugs aimed at blocking pathological Aβ aggregation.

  4. Protein misfolding, congophilia, oligomerization, and defective amyloid processing in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhimschi, Irina A; Nayeri, Unzila A; Zhao, Guomao; Shook, Lydia L; Pensalfini, Anna; Funai, Edmund F; Bernstein, Ira M; Glabe, Charles G; Buhimschi, Catalin S

    2014-07-16

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of unknown etiology and a leading contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because there is no cure other than delivery, preeclampsia is the leading cause of iatrogenic preterm birth. We show that preeclampsia shares pathophysiologic features with recognized protein misfolding disorders. These features include urine congophilia (affinity for the amyloidophilic dye Congo red), affinity for conformational state-dependent antibodies, and dysregulation of prototype proteolytic enzymes involved in amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. Assessment of global protein misfolding load in pregnancy based on urine congophilia (Congo red dot test) carries diagnostic and prognostic potential for preeclampsia. We used conformational state-dependent antibodies to demonstrate the presence of generic supramolecular assemblies (prefibrillar oligomers and annular protofibrils), which vary in quantitative and qualitative representation with preeclampsia severity. In the first attempt to characterize the preeclampsia misfoldome, we report that the urine congophilic material includes proteoforms of ceruloplasmin, immunoglobulin free light chains, SERPINA1, albumin, interferon-inducible protein 6-16, and Alzheimer's β-amyloid. The human placenta abundantly expresses APP along with prototype APP-processing enzymes, of which the α-secretase ADAM10, the β-secretases BACE1 and BACE2, and the γ-secretase presenilin-1 were all up-regulated in preeclampsia. The presence of β-amyloid aggregates in placentas of women with preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction further supports the notion that this condition should join the growing list of protein conformational disorders. If these aggregates play a pathophysiologic role, our findings may lead to treatment for preeclampsia.

  5. Dynamin-2 Stabilizes the HIV-1 Fusion Pore with a Low Oligomeric State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Jones

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key research areas surrounding HIV-1 concerns the regulation of the fusion event that occurs between the virus particle and the host cell during entry. Even if it is universally accepted that the large GTPase dynamin-2 is important during HIV-1 entry, its exact role during the first steps of HIV-1 infection is not well characterized. Here, we have utilized a multidisciplinary approach to study the DNM2 role during fusion of HIV-1 in primary resting CD4 T and TZM-bl cells. We have combined advanced light microscopy and functional cell-based assays to experimentally assess the role of dynamin-2 during these processes. Overall, our data suggest that dynamin-2, as a tetramer, might help to establish hemi-fusion and stabilizes the pore during HIV-1 fusion.

  6. The intrinsically disordered distal face of nucleoplasmin recognizes distinct oligomerization states of histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Isbaal; Fernández-Rivero, Noelia; Arranz, Rocío; Aloria, Kerman; Finn, Ron; Arizmendi, Jesús M.; Ausió, Juan; Valpuesta, José María; Muga, Arturo; Prado, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    The role of Nucleoplasmin (NP) as a H2A-H2B histone chaperone has been extensively characterized. To understand its putative interaction with other histone ligands, we have characterized its ability to bind H3-H4 and histone octamers. We find that the chaperone forms distinct complexes with histones, which differ in the number of molecules that build the assembly and in their spatial distribution. When complexed with H3-H4 tetramers or histone octamers, two NP pentamers form an ellipsoidal particle with the histones located at the center of the assembly, in stark contrast with the NP/H2A-H2B complex that contains up to five histone dimers bound to one chaperone pentamer. This particular assembly relies on the ability of H3-H4 to form tetramers either in solution or as part of the octamer, and it is not observed when a variant of H3 (H3C110E), unable to form stable tetramers, is used instead of the wild-type protein. Our data also suggest that the distal face of the chaperone is involved in the interaction with distinct types of histones, as supported by electron microscopy analysis of the different NP/histone complexes. The use of the same structural region to accommodate all type of histones could favor histone exchange and nucleosome dynamics. PMID:24121686

  7. Phosphorylation and oligomerization states of native pig brain HSP90 studied by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnier, C.; Lafitte, D.; Jorgensen, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    HSP90 is one of the most abundant proteins in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. HSP90 forms transient or stable complexes with several key proteins involved in signal transduction including protooncogenic protein kinases and nuclear receptors, it interacts with cellular structural elements...... such as actin-microfilament, tubulin-microtubule and intermediate filaments, and also exhibits conventional chaperone functions. This protein exists in two isoforms alpha-HSP90 and beta-HSP90, and it forms dimers which are crucial species for its biological activity. PAGE, ESI-MS and MALDI-MS were used to study...... HSP90 purified from pig brain. The two protein isoforms were clearly distinguished by ESI-MS, the alpha isoform being approximately six times more abundant than the beta isoform. ESI-MS in combination with lambda phosphatase treatment provided direct evidence of the existence of four phosphorylated...

  8. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A.; Neary, Marianne; Gregory I. Mashanov; Birdsall, Nigel J.M.; Breckenridge, Ross A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHOM2 cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and he...

  9. Activation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 by human cytomegalovirus initiates innate immune responses and restricts virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kapoor

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 is an important innate immune sensor of bacterial pathogens. Its induction results in activation of the classic NF-κB pathway and alternative pathways including type I IFN and autophagy. Although the importance of NOD2 in recognizing RNA viruses has recently been identified, its role in sensing DNA viruses has not been studied. We report that infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV results in significant induction of NOD2 expression, beginning as early as 2 hours post infection and increasing steadily 24 hours post infection and afterwards. Infection with human herpesvirus 1 and 2 does not induce NOD2 expression. While the HCMV-encoded glycoprotein B is not required for NOD2 induction, a replication competent virion is necessary. Lentivirus-based NOD2 knockdown in human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs and U373 glioma cells leads to enhanced HCMV replication along with decreased levels of interferon beta (IFN-β and the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL8. NOD2 induction in HCMV-infected cells activates downstream NF-κB and interferon pathways supported by reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB and pIRF3 in NOD2 knockdown HFFs. Stable overexpression of NOD2 in HFFs restricts HCMV replication in association with increased levels of IFN-β and IL8. Similarly, transient overexpression of NOD2 in U373 cells or its downstream kinase, RIPK2, results in decreased HCMV replication and enhanced cytokine responses. However, overexpression of a mutant NOD2, 3020insC, associated with severe Crohn's disease, results in enhanced HCMV replication and decreased levels of IFN-β in U373 cells. These results show for the first time that NOD2 plays a significant role in HCMV replication and may provide a model for studies of HCMV recognition by the host cell and HCMV colitis in Crohn's disease.

  10. The Alternative to Occupy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Emil; Hansen, Allan Dreyer

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the political anatomy of two distinct enactments of (leftist) radical politics: Occupy Wall Street, a large social movement in the United States, and The Alternative, a recently elected political party in Denmark. Based on Ernesto Laclau’s conceptualization of ‘the...... universal’ and ‘the particular’, we show how the institutionalization of radical politics (as carried out by The Alternative) entails a move from universality towards particularity. This move, however, comes with the risk of cutting off supporters who no longer feel represented by the project. We refer...

  11. There's plenty of gloom at the bottom: the many challenges of accurate quantitation in size-based oligomeric separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, André M

    2013-11-01

    There is a variety of small-molecule species (e.g., tackifiers, plasticizers, oligosaccharides) the size-based characterization of which is of considerable scientific and industrial importance. Likewise, quantitation of the amount of oligomers in a polymer sample is crucial for the import and export of substances into the USA and European Union (EU). While the characterization of ultra-high molar mass macromolecules by size-based separation techniques is generally considered a challenge, it is this author's contention that a greater challenge is encountered when trying to perform, for quantitation purposes, separations in and of the oligomeric region. The latter thesis is expounded herein, by detailing the various obstacles encountered en route to accurate, quantitative oligomeric separations by entropically dominated techniques such as size-exclusion chromatography, hydrodynamic chromatography, and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation, as well as by methods which are, principally, enthalpically driven such as liquid adsorption and temperature gradient interaction chromatography. These obstacles include, among others, the diminished sensitivity of static light scattering (SLS) detection at low molar masses, the non-constancy of the response of SLS and of commonly employed concentration-sensitive detectors across the oligomeric region, and the loss of oligomers through the accumulation wall membrane in asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation. The battle is not lost, however, because, with some care and given a sufficient supply of sample, the quantitation of both individual oligomeric species and of the total oligomeric region is often possible.

  12. Hsp70 oligomerization is mediated by an interaction between the interdomain linker and the substrate-binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco A Aprile

    Full Text Available Oligomerization in the heat shock protein (Hsp 70 family has been extensively documented both in vitro and in vivo, although the mechanism, the identity of the specific protein regions involved and the physiological relevance of this process are still unclear. We have studied the oligomeric properties of a series of human Hsp70 variants by means of nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy and quantitative size exclusion chromatography. Our results show that Hsp70 oligomerization takes place through a specific interaction between the interdomain linker of one molecule and the substrate-binding domain of a different molecule, generating dimers and higher-order oligomers. We have found that substrate binding shifts the oligomerization equilibrium towards the accumulation of functional monomeric protein, probably by sequestering the helical lid sub-domain needed to stabilize the chaperone: substrate complex. Taken together, these findings suggest a possible role of chaperone oligomerization as a mechanism for regulating the availability of the active monomeric form of the chaperone and for the control of substrate binding and release.

  13. Hsp70 Oligomerization Is Mediated by an Interaction between the Interdomain Linker and the Substrate-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Francesco A.; Dhulesia, Anne; Stengel, Florian; Roodveldt, Cintia; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Tortora, Paolo; Robinson, Carol V.; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M.; Cremades, Nunilo

    2013-01-01

    Oligomerization in the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 family has been extensively documented both in vitro and in vivo, although the mechanism, the identity of the specific protein regions involved and the physiological relevance of this process are still unclear. We have studied the oligomeric properties of a series of human Hsp70 variants by means of nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy and quantitative size exclusion chromatography. Our results show that Hsp70 oligomerization takes place through a specific interaction between the interdomain linker of one molecule and the substrate-binding domain of a different molecule, generating dimers and higher-order oligomers. We have found that substrate binding shifts the oligomerization equilibrium towards the accumulation of functional monomeric protein, probably by sequestering the helical lid sub-domain needed to stabilize the chaperone: substrate complex. Taken together, these findings suggest a possible role of chaperone oligomerization as a mechanism for regulating the availability of the active monomeric form of the chaperone and for the control of substrate binding and release. PMID:23840795

  14. Single Site Silica Supported Tetramethyl Niobium by the SOMC Strategy: Synthesis, Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship in Ethylene Oligomerization Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali

    2017-06-06

    Silica supported Tetramethyl niobium complex [(≡SiO)NbMe4] 2 has been isolated by surface alkylation of [(≡SiO-)NbCl3Me] 1 with dimethyl zinc in pentane. 1 can be easily synthesized by grafting of NbCl3Me2 on to the surface of partially dehydroxylated silica by the SOMC strategy. Precise structural analysis was carried out by the FTIR, advance solid state NMR, elemental analysis and mass balance techniques (gas quantification after treating 2 with degassed water) . Complex 1 was found to be active in the ethylene oligomerization to produce up to C30, whereas to our surprise complex 2 selectively dimerizes ethylene into 1-butene in the absence of a co-catalyst at the same conversion levels.

  15. Isolation and quantification of oligomeric and polymeric procyanidins in leaves and flowers of Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellenbrand, N; Sendker, J; Lechtenberg, M; Petereit, F; Hensel, A

    2015-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) constitute a class of polyphenols with flavan-3-ols as monomeric building blocks. These polyphenols are mostly quantified by colorimetric methods or by chromatographic determination of monomeric flavan-3-ols or low molecular oligomers as lead compounds. No reliable analytical methods are available for unambiguous identification of the homologues series of oligo- and polymeric PAs. For Hawthorn leaf and flower (Crataegi folium cum flore) from Crataegus spp. (Rosaceae) a protocol for preparative isolation of oligomeric and polymeric PAs from an acetone-water extract was developed, yielding procyanidin reference clusters with defined degree of polymerization (DP) from 2 to 10 besides a procyanidin-polymer. Identity and purity of these clusters were proven by HPLC, MS and in part NMR studies. For identification and quantification from Hawthorn an ICH-Q2 validated UHPLC method with fluorimetric detection and less than 10min runtime was developed. The method enabled quantification of procyanidin clusters with DP from 2 to 10 besides the polymer fraction. Batch analysis revealed procyanidin contents of about 20 to 45mg/g from a homologues series of oligomeric PAs and about 50% of polymer fraction. Monitoring of procyanidin distribution during seasonal growth of fresh plants of Crataegus monogyna showed more or less constant contents between 20 and 55mg/g dry weight of oligomeric procyanidins during the growing season in the different plant organs with strong accumulation in the flowers and fruits (55mg/g dry weight). From these data it can be speculated that procyanidins serve as part of the plants defense system in the reproductive organs of the plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. LDRD final report on new homogeneous and supported oligomerization catalysts (LDRD 42461).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hascall, Anthony G.; Kemp, Richard Alan

    2004-11-01

    The overall purpose of this LDRD is multifold. First, we are interested in preparing new homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the oligomerization of ethylene and in understanding commercially important systems better. Second, we are interested in attempting to support these new homogeneous catalysts in the pores of nano- or mesoporous materials in order to force new and unusual distributions of a-olefins to be formed during the oligomerization. Thus the overall purpose is to try to prepare new catalytic species and to possibly control the active site architecture in order to yield certain desired products during a catalytic reaction, much like nature does with enzymes. In order to rationally synthesize catalysts it is imperative to comprehend the function of the various components of the catalyst. In heterogeneous systems, it is of utmost importance to know how a support interacts with the active site of the catalyst. In fact, in the catalysis world this lack of fundamental understanding of the relationship between active site and support is the single largest reason catalysis is considered an 'empirical' or 'black box' science rather than a well-understood one. In this work we will be preparing novel ethylene oligomerization catalysts, which are normally P-O chelated homogeneous complexes, with new ligands that replace P with a stable carbene. We will also examine a commercially catalyst system and investigate the active site in it via X-ray crystallography. We will also attempt to support these materials inside the pores of nano- and mesoporous materials. Essentially, we will be tailoring the size and scale of the catalyst active site and its surrounding environment to match the size of the molecular product(s) we wish to make. The overall purpose of the study will be to prepare new homogeneous catalysts, and if successful in supporting them to examine the effects that steric constraints and pore structures can have on growing oligomer

  17. Structural properties of cyanase. Denaturation, renaturation, and role of sulfhydryls and oligomeric structure in catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, R M; Anderson, P M

    1987-07-25

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate to give ammonia and bicarbonate. The enzyme is composed of 8-10 identical subunits (Mr = 17,008). The objective of this study was to clarify some of the structural properties of cyanase for the purpose of understanding the relationship between oligomeric structure and catalytic activity. Circular dichroism studies showed that cyanase has a significant amount of alpha-helix and beta-sheet structure. The one sulfhydryl group per subunit does not react with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) unless cyanase is denatured. Denaturation is apparently complete in 10 M urea or 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, but is significantly reduced in 10 M urea by the presence of azide (analog of cyanate) and is incomplete in 8 M urea. Denatured cyanase could be renatured and reactivated (greater than 85%) by removal of denaturants. Reactivation was greatly facilitated by the presence of certain anions, particularly bicarbonate, and by high ionic strength and protein concentration. The catalytic activity of renatured cyanase was associated only with oligomer. Cyanase that had been denatured in the presence of DTNB to give a cyanase-DTNB derivative could also be renatured at 26 degrees C to give active cyanase-DTNB oligomer. The active oligomeric form of the cyanase-DTNB derivative could be converted reversibly to inactive dimer by lowering the temperature to 4 degrees C or by reduction of the ionic strength and removal of monoanions. These results provide evidence that free sulfhydryl groups are not required for catalytic activity and that catalytic activity may be dependent upon oligomeric structure.

  18. APOBEC3G oligomerization is associated with the inhibition of both Alu and LINE-1 retrotransposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Koyama

    Full Text Available Alu and LINE-1 (L1, which constitute ~11% and ~17% of the human genome, respectively, are transposable non-LTR retroelements. They transpose not only in germ cells but also in somatic cells, occasionally causing cancer. We have previously demonstrated that antiretroviral restriction factors, human APOBEC3 (hA3 proteins (A-H, differentially inhibit L1 retrotransposition. In this present study, we found that hA3 members also restrict Alu retrotransposition at differential levels that correlate with those observed previously for L1 inhibition. Through deletion analyses based on the best-characterized hA3 member human APOBEC3G (hA3G, its N-terminal 30 amino acids were required for its inhibitory activity against Alu retrotransposition. The inhibitory effect of hA3G on Alu retrotransposition was associated with its oligomerization that was affected by the deletion of its N-terminal 30 amino acids. Through structural modeling, the amino acids 24 to 28 of hA3G were predicted to be located at the interface of the dimer. The mutation of these residues resulted in abrogated hA3G oligomerization, and consistently abolished the inhibitory activity of hA3G against Alu retrotransposition. Importantly, the anti-L1 activity of hA3G was also associated with hA3G oligomerization. These results suggest that the inhibitory activities of hA3G against Alu and L1 retrotransposition might involve a common mechanism.

  19. Crystal structures from the Plasmodium peroxiredoxins: new insights into oligomerization and product binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Wei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite primarily responsible for more than one million malarial deaths, annually, and is developing resistance to current therapies. Throughout its lifespan, the parasite is subjected to oxidative attack, so Plasmodium antioxidant defences are essential for its survival and are targets for disease control. Results To further understand the molecular aspects of the Plasmodium redox system, we solved 4 structures of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins (Prx. Our study has confirmed PvTrx-Px1 to be a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-sensitive peroxiredoxin. We have identified and characterized the novel toroid octameric oligomer of PyTrx-Px1, which may be attributed to the interplay of several factors including: (1 the orientation of the conserved surface/buried arginine of the NNLA(I/LGRS-loop; and (2 the C-terminal tail positioning (also associated with the aforementioned conserved loop which facilitates the intermolecular hydrogen bond between dimers (in an A-C fashion. In addition, a notable feature of the disulfide bonds in some of the Prx crystal structures is discussed. Finally, insight into the latter stages of the peroxiredoxin reaction coordinate is gained. Our structure of PyPrx6 is not only in the sulfinic acid (RSO2H form, but it is also with glycerol bound in a way (not previously observed indicative of product binding. Conclusions The structural characterization of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins provided herein provides insight into their oligomerization and product binding which may facilitate the targeting of these antioxidant defences. Although the structural basis for the octameric oligomerization is further understood, the results yield more questions about the biological implications of the peroxiredoxin oligomerization, as multiple toroid configurations are now known. The crystal structure depicting the product bound active site gives insight into the overoxidation of the active site and

  20. Report on the international workshop on alternatives to the murine histamine sensitization test (HIST) for acellular pertussis vaccines: state of the science and the path forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbrucker, Richard; Arciniega, Juan; McFarland, Richard; Chapsal, Jean-Michel; Xing, Dorothy; Bache, Christina; Nelson, Sue; Costanzo, Angele; Hoonakker, Marieke; Castiaux, Amélie; Halder, Marlies; Casey, Warren; Johnson, Nelson; Jones, Brett; Doelling, Vivian; Sprankle, Cathy; Rinckel, Lori; Stokes, William

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory authorities require safety and potency testing prior to the release of each production lot of acellular pertussis (aP)-containing vaccines. Currently, the murine histamine sensitization test (HIST) is used to evaluate the presence of residual pertussis toxin in aP containing vaccines. However, the testing requires the use of a significant number of mice and results in unrelieved pain and distress. NICEATM, ICCVAM, their partners in the International Cooperation on Alternative Test Methods, and the International Working Group for Alternatives to HIST organized a workshop to discuss recent developments in alternative assays to the HIST, review data from an international collaborative study on non-animal alternative tests that might replace the HIST, and address the path toward global acceptance of this type of method. Currently, there are three potential alternative methods to HIST. Participants agreed that no single in vitro method was sufficiently developed for harmonized validation studies at this time. It is unlikely that any single in vitro method would be applicable to all aP vaccines without modification, due to differences between vaccines. Workshop participants recommended further optimization of cell-based assays under development. Participants agreed that the next international collaborative studies should commence in 2013 based on discussions during this workshop.

  1. Isolation and identification of oligomeric procyanidins from Crataegus leaves and flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedström, Ulla; Vuorela, Heikki; Kostiainen, Risto; Tuominen, Jari; Kokkonen, Juha; Rauha, Jussi-Pekka; Laakso, Into; Hiltunen, Raimo

    2002-08-01

    Oligomeric procyanidins were isolated from the leaves and flowers of hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata). A trimer, epicatechin-(4 beta-->8)-epicatechin-(4 beta-->6)-epicatechin, and a pentamer consisting of (-)-epicatechin units linked through C-4 beta/C-8 bonds have been isolated from hawthorn for the first time, in addition to known procyanidins including dimers B-2, B-4 and B-5, trimers C-1 and epicatechin-(4 beta-->6)-epicatechin-(4 beta-->8)-epicatechin, and tetramer D-1. A fraction containing a hexamer was also found.

  2. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Ignazio, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Bottino, Francesco A., E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Cicala, Gianluca, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Cozzo, Giulia, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Latteri, Alberta, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it; Recca, Antonino, E-mail: iblanco@dii.unict.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted.

  3. [Theory of V.A. dogiel on polymerization and oligomerization as a general integration concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makmaev, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The theory of V.A. Dogiel on the significance of polymerization and ligomerization processes in the evolution of Protozoa and Metazoa is compared with the paper of I.I. Schmalhauisen (1972) on factors and steps of aromorph evolution. Dogiel's theory is considered as a general integration conception. Four steps are distinguished in the evolution of biological systems: (1) formation of morphofunctional system by units of the lower structural level, (2) polymerization of morphofunctional units of a system, (3) oligomerization of morphofunctional units of system by means of their reduction, uniting, or differentiation, (4) integration and stabilization of a system owing to development of morphofunctional connections between its parts.

  4. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco A.; Cicala, Gianluca; Cozzo, Giulia; Latteri, Alberta; Recca, Antonino

    2014-05-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted.

  5. An Envoy for Alternative Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN WEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ The United States stands poised to cash in on China's growing appetite for alternative energy.This message rang loud and clear during a recent visit to China by U.S.Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke.

  6. Disassembly intermediates of RbsD protein remain oligomeric despite the loss of an intact secondary structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins exist as homo-oligomers in living organisms wherein the change of oligomeric status apparently serves as an effective means for modulating their biological activities. We have previously reported that the homo-decameric RbsD from Escherichia coli undergoes stepwise disassembly and non-stepwise reassembly. Here the structural status of the urea-induced RbsD disassembly intermediates was examined, mainly using urea-containing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and chemical cross-linking. Such intermediates were found to remain oligomeric while losing their intact secondary structures. Such disassembly intermediates were able to effectively refold when the concentration of the urea denaturant was reduced to a lower level, or to refold/reassemble into the native decamers when urea was completely removed, as detected by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These novel observations strongly suggest that the assembly of oligomeric proteins may occur before the completion of subunit folding.

  7. Structures and formation mechanisms of aquo/hydroxo oligomeric beryllium in aqueous solution: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoyan; Liao, Rongbao; Wu, Hai; Huang, Zhengjie; Zhang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The structures and formation mechanisms of a wide variety of aquo/hydroxo oligomeric beryllium clusters were investigated using density functional theory. The structural parameters of beryllium clusters were found to vary regularly with the stepwise substitution of bound water molecules in the inner coordination sphere by hydroxyl groups. According to the Gibbs free energies deduced from SMD solvation model computations, unhydrolyzed oligomeric beryllium species are the most favorable products of polymerization, independent of the degrees of hydrolysis of the reactants. Simulation of the formation processes of oligomeric beryllium showed that polymerization, in essence, involves the nucleophilic attack of a terminal hydroxyl group in one BeO4 tetrahedron on the beryllium center in another BeO4 tetrahedron, leading to the bridging of two BeO4 tetrahedrons by a hydroxyl group.

  8. Alternative Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planting, A.; De saint Jacob, Y.; Verwijs, H.; Belin, H.; Preesman, L.

    2009-03-15

    In two articles, one interview and one column attention is paid to alternative energies. The article 'A new light on saving energy' discusses the option to save energy by modernising lighting systems in urban areas. The column 'View from Paris' focuses on investment decisions in France with regard to renewable energy and energy savings. The article 'Europe turns a blind eye to big battery' discusses developments in batteries to store energy. The interview concerns fuel cell expert and formerly President of UTC Power Jan van Dokkum. The last article gives a brief overview of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA) and the challenges this alliance will have to face with regard to climate change and energy security.

  9. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chung-ke [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tzong-Huah [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Biochemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chu-Ya [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-heng [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tai-huang, E-mail: bmthh@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse, E-mail: jthuang@chem.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  10. Oligomerization of SCFTIR1 Is Essential for Aux/IAA Degradation and Auxin Signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfulian, Mohammad H; Jalili, Espanta; Roberto, Don Karl A; Moss, Britney L; Khoo, Kerry; Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Crosby, William L

    2016-09-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Molecular studies in Arabidopsis have shown that auxin perception and signaling is mediated via TIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA co-receptors that assemble as part of the SCFTIR1/AFB E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex and direct the auxin-regulated degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. Despite the importance of auxin signaling, little is known about the functional regulation of the TIR1/AFB receptor family. Here we show that TIR1 can oligomerize in planta via a set of spatially clustered amino acid residues. While none of the residues identified reside in the interaction interface of the TIR1-Aux/IAA degron, they nonetheless regulate the binding of TIR1 to Aux/IAA substrate proteins and their subsequent degradation in vivo as an essential aspect of auxin signaling. We propose oligomerization of TIR1 as a novel regulatory mechanism in the regulation of auxin-mediated plant patterning and development.

  11. Glycation of Wild-Type Apomyoglobin Induces Formation of Highly Cytotoxic Oligomeric Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, Clara; Carafa, Vincenzo; Altucci, Lucia; Irace, Gaetano; Borriello, Margherita; Vinciguerra, Roberto; Sirangelo, Ivana

    2015-11-01

    Protein glycation is a non-enzymatic, irreversible modification of protein amino groups by reactive carbonyl species leading to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Several proteins implicated in neurodegenerative diseases have been found to be glycated in vivo and the extent of glycation is related to the pathologies of the patients. Although it is now accepted that there is a direct correlation between AGEs formation and the development of neurodegenerative diseases related to protein misfolding and amyloid aggregation, several questions still remain unanswered: whether glycation is the triggering event or just an additional factor acting on the aggregation pathway. We have recently shown that glycation of the amyloidogenic W7FW14F apomyoglobin mutant significantly accelerates the amyloid fibrils formation providing evidence that glycation actively participates to the process. In the present study, to test if glycation can be considered also a triggering factor in amyloidosis, we evaluated the ability of different glycation agents to induce amyloid aggregation in the soluble wild-type apomyoglobin. Our results show that glycation covalently modifies apomyoglobin and induces conformational changes that lead to the formation of oligomeric species that are not implicated in amyloid aggregation. Thus, AGEs formation does not trigger amyloid aggregation in the wild-type apomyoglobin but only induce the formation of soluble oligomeric species able to affect cell viability. The molecular bases of cell toxicity induced by AGEs formed upon glycation of wild-type apomyoglobin have been also investigated.

  12. Quercetin Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Interfering with ASC Oligomerization and Prevents Interleukin-1 Mediated Mouse Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiciano, Talita P.; Wakita, Daiko; Jones, Heather D.; Crother, Timothy R.; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Arditi, Moshe; Shimada, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a highly inflammatory cytokine that significantly contributes to both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. The secretion of IL-1β requires a unique protease, caspase-1, which is activated by various protein platforms called inflammasomes. Data suggests a key role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species for inflammasome activation. Flavonoids constitute a group of naturally occurring polyphenolic molecules with many biological activities, including antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of three flavonoids, quercetin (QUC), naringenin, and silymarim on inflammasome activation. We found that QUC inhibits IL-1β secretion by both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in a dose dependent manner, but not the NLRC4 inflammasome. QUC inhibition of the inflammasome was still observed in Atg16l1 knockout macrophages, indicating that QUC’s effect was autophagy independent. Since QUC inhibited both NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes but not NLRC4, we assessed ASC speck formation. QUC reduced ASC speck formation and ASC oligomerization compared with controls. Additionally, QUC inhibited IL-1β in Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) macrophages, where NLRP3 inflammasome is constitutively activated. In conclusion, QUC inhibits both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome by preventing ASC oligomerization and may be a potential therapeutic candidate for Kawasaki disease vasculitis and other IL-1 mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:28148962

  13. Integration and oligomerization of Bax protein in lipid bilayers characterized by single molecule fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Dongxiang

    2014-11-14

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein. The activated Bax translocates to mitochondria, where it forms pore and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane. This process requires the BH3-only activator protein (i.e. tBid) and can be inhibited by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins such as Bcl-xL. Here by using single molecule fluorescence techniques, we studied the integration and oligomerization of Bax in lipid bilayers. Our study revealed that Bax can bind to lipid membrane spontaneously in the absence of tBid. The Bax pore formation undergoes at least two steps: pre-pore formation and membrane insertion. The activated Bax triggered by tBid or BH3 domain peptide integrates on bilayers and tends to form tetramers, which are termed as pre-pore. Subsequent insertion of the pre-pore into membrane is highly dependent on the composition of cardiolipin in lipid bilayers. Bcl-xL can translocate Bax from membrane to solution and inhibit the pore formation. The study of Bax integration and oligomerization at the single molecule level provides new evidences that may help elucidate the pore formation of Bax and its regulatory mechanism in apoptosis. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Quercetin Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Interfering with ASC Oligomerization and Prevents Interleukin-1 Mediated Mouse Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiciano, Talita P; Wakita, Daiko; Jones, Heather D; Crother, Timothy R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Arditi, Moshe; Shimada, Kenichi

    2017-02-02

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a highly inflammatory cytokine that significantly contributes to both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. The secretion of IL-1β requires a unique protease, caspase-1, which is activated by various protein platforms called inflammasomes. Data suggests a key role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species for inflammasome activation. Flavonoids constitute a group of naturally occurring polyphenolic molecules with many biological activities, including antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of three flavonoids, quercetin (QUC), naringenin, and silymarim on inflammasome activation. We found that QUC inhibits IL-1β secretion by both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in a dose dependent manner, but not the NLRC4 inflammasome. QUC inhibition of the inflammasome was still observed in Atg16l1 knockout macrophages, indicating that QUC's effect was autophagy independent. Since QUC inhibited both NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes but not NLRC4, we assessed ASC speck formation. QUC reduced ASC speck formation and ASC oligomerization compared with controls. Additionally, QUC inhibited IL-1β in Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) macrophages, where NLRP3 inflammasome is constitutively activated. In conclusion, QUC inhibits both the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome by preventing ASC oligomerization and may be a potential therapeutic candidate for Kawasaki disease vasculitis and other IL-1 mediated inflammatory diseases.

  15. Structural insight into DNA binding and oligomerization of the multifunctional Cox protein of bacteriophage P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Odegrip, Richard; Sehlén, Wilhelmina; Skaar, Karin; Svensson, Linda M; Massad, Tariq; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 is a small multifunctional DNA-binding protein. It is involved in site-specific recombination leading to P2 prophage excision and functions as a transcriptional repressor of the P2 Pc promoter. Furthermore, it transcriptionally activates the unrelated, defective prophage P4 that depends on phage P2 late gene products for lytic growth. In this article, we have investigated the structural determinants to understand how P2 Cox performs these different functions. We have solved the structure of P2 Cox to 2.4 Å resolution. Interestingly, P2 Cox crystallized in a continuous oligomeric spiral with its DNA-binding helix and wing positioned outwards. The extended C-terminal part of P2 Cox is largely responsible for the oligomerization in the structure. The spacing between the repeating DNA-binding elements along the helical P2 Cox filament is consistent with DNA binding along the filament. Functional analyses of alanine mutants in P2 Cox argue for the importance of key residues for protein function. We here present the first structure from the Cox protein family and, together with previous biochemical observations, propose that P2 Cox achieves its various functions by specific binding of DNA while wrapping the DNA around its helical oligomer.

  16. STRUCTURAL BASIS FOR ALLOSTERIC REGULATION OF HUMAN RIBONUCLEOTIDE REDUCTASE BY NUCLEOTIDE-INDUCED OLIGOMERIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairman, James Wesley; Wijerathna, Sanath Ranjan; Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Xu, Hai; Nakano, Ryo; Jha, Shalini; Prendergast, Jay; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Roos, Annette; Nordlund, Pär; Li, Zongli; Walz, Thomas; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2011-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is an αnβn (RR1●RR2) complex that maintains balanced dNTP pools by reducing ribonucleoside diphosphates to deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates. RR1 is the catalytic subunit and RR2 houses the free radical required for catalysis. RR is allosterically regulated by its activator ATP and its inhibitor dATP, which regulate RR activity by inducing oligomerization of RR1. Here, we report the first X-ray structures of human RR1 bound to TTP-only, dATP-only, TTP●GDP, TTP●ATP, and TTP●dATP. These structures provide insights into ATP/dATP regulation of RR. At physiological dATP concentrations, RR1 forms inactive hexamers. We determined the first X-ray structure of the RR1●dATP hexamer and used single-particle electron microscopy to visualize the α6●ββ’ 1●dATP holo complex. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional assays confirm that hexamerization is a prerequisite for inhibition by dATP. Our data provide an elegant mechanism for regulating RR activity by dATP-induced oligomerization. PMID:21336276

  17. Oligomeric structure of the MALT1 tandem Ig-like domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1 plays an important role in the adaptive immune program. During TCR- or BCR-induced NF-κB activation, MALT1 serves to mediate the activation of the IKK (IκB kinase complex, which subsequently regulates the activation of NF-κB. Aggregation of MALT1 is important for E3 ligase activation and NF-κB signaling. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Unlike the isolated CARD or paracaspase domains, which behave as monomers, the tandem Ig-like domains of MALT1 exists as a mixture of dimer and tetramer in solution. High-resolution structures reveals a protein-protein interface that is stabilized by a buried surface area of 1256 Å(2 and contains numerous hydrogen and salt bonds. In conjunction with a second interface, these interactions may represent the basis of MALT1 oligomerization. CONCLUSIONS: The crystal structure of the tandem Ig-like domains reveals the oligomerization potential of MALT1 and a potential intermediate in the activation of the adaptive inflammatory pathway. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  18. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT downward arrow AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring > or =6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3'-->5' direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation ( approximately 24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV).

  19. Lipid-II Independent Antimicrobial Mechanism of Nisin Depends On Its Crowding And Degree Of Oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Ashutosh; Sandhu, Padmani; Kumar, Pankaj; Dash, Eva; Sharma, Shingarika; Arakha, Manoranjan; Jha, Suman; Akhter, Yusuf; Saleem, Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    Nisin inhibits bacterial growth by generating pores in cell membrane and interrupting cell-wall biosynthesis through specific lipid II interaction. However, the role of the hinge region and C-terminus residues of the peptide in antibacterial action of nisin is largely unknown. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and experimental approach, we report that at high concentration regimes of nisin, interaction with phospholipids may equally deform the bacterial cell membranes even under significantly varying amounts of lipid-II. Membrane thinning, destabilization and decrease in lipid density depend on the degree of oligomerization of nisin. Growth kinetics of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli interestingly show recovery by extended lag phase under low concentrations of nisin treatment while high concentrations of nisin caused decrease in cell viability as recorded by striking reduction in membrane potential and surface area. The significant changes in the dipole potential and fluorescence anisotropy were observed in negatively charged membranes in the absence of lipid-II with increasing concentration of nisin. The identical correlation of cell viability, membrane potential dissipation and morphology with the concentration regime of nisin, in both Bacillus subtilis (lipid II rich) and Escherichia coli (lipid II impoverished), hints at a non-specific physical mechanism where degree of membrane deformation depends on degree of crowding and oligomerization of nisin.

  20. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL REACTIVE OLIGOMERIC LADDERLIKE COPOLYMETHYL-AMINOPROPYL SILSESQUIOXANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-hua Duan; Tao-yi Zhang; Kui-lin Deng; Ping Xie; Rong-ben Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A novel ordered reactive oligomeric ladderlike copolymethyl-aminopropylsilsesquioxane (Me-AP-T), was successfully synthesized by an efficient hydrosilylation graft reaction of 1,1,1-trimethyl-N-2-propenyl-silanamine with a reactive oligomeric ladderlike copolymethyl-hydrosilsesquioxane (Me-H-T), which was prepared by "supramolecular chemistry-dictated stepwise coupling polymerization" process. FT-IR, 1H- and 29Si-NMR spectra show that hydrosilylation reaction proceeds completely. Moreover, 1H-NMR spectra also indicate that both the molar ratios of ≡SiMe group to Si-H and ≡ SiMe group to ≡ SiPrNH2 are approximately 1:1 respectively based on the ratio of integrated resonance areas of the different groups. XRD analysis and 29Si-NMR spectra are used for investigating the ladderlike structure of the polymers. A high Tg (128.38℃) of Me-AP-T shown in DSC measurement implies that the ordered reactive Me-AP-T macromolecules have much stiff chains.

  1. Evolutionary trace-based peptides identify a novel asymmetric interaction that mediates oligomerization in nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peili; Morgan, Daniel H; Sattar, Minawar; Xu, Xueping; Wagner, Ryan; Raviscioni, Michele; Lichtarge, Olivier; Cooney, Austin J

    2005-09-01

    Germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF) is an orphan nuclear receptor that plays important roles in development and reproduction, by repressing the expression of essential genes such as Oct4, GDF9, and BMP15, through binding to DR0 elements. Surprisingly, whereas recombinant GCNF binds to DR0 sequences as a homodimer, endogenous GCNF does not exist as a homodimer but rather as part of a large complex termed the transiently retinoid-induced factor (TRIF). Here, we use evolutionary trace (ET) analysis to design mutations and peptides that probe the molecular basis for the formation of this unusual complex. We find that GCNF homodimerization and TRIF complex formation are DNA-dependent, and ET suggests that dimerization involves key functional sites on both helix 3 and helix 11, which are located on opposing surfaces of the ligand binding domain. Targeted mutations in either helix of GCNF disrupt the formation of both the homodimer and the endogenous TRIF complex. Moreover, peptide mimetics of both of these ET-determined sites inhibit dimerization and TRIF complex formation. This suggests that a novel helix 3-helix 11 heterotypic interaction mediates GCNF interaction and would facilitate oligomerization. Indeed, it was determined that the endogenous TRIF complex is composed of a GCNF oligomer. These findings shed light on an evolutionarily selected mechanism that reveals the unusual DNA-binding, dimerization, and oligomerization properties of GCNF.

  2. Apolipoprotein E, especially apolipoprotein E4, increases the oligomerization of amyloid β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Hori, Yukiko; Adams, Kenneth W; Takeda, Shuko; Banerji, Adrian Olaf; Mitani, Akinori; Joyner, Daniel; Thyssen, Diana H; Bacskai, Brian J; Frosch, Matthew P; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Finn, Mary Beth; Holtzman, David M; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-10-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder causing dementia. Massive deposition of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain is the pathological hallmark of AD, but oligomeric, soluble forms of Aβ have been implicated as the synaptotoxic component. The apolipoprotein E ε 4 (apoE ε4) allele is known to be a genetic risk factor for developing AD. However, it is still unknown how apoE impacts the process of Aβ oligomerization. Here, we found that the level of Aβ oligomers in APOE ε4/ε4 AD patient brains is 2.7 times higher than those in APOE ε3/ε3 AD patient brains, matched for total plaque burden, suggesting that apoE4 impacts the metabolism of Aβ oligomers. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of apoE on Aβ oligomer formation. Using both synthetic Aβ and a split-luciferase method for monitoring Aβ oligomers, we observed that apoE increased the level of Aβ oligomers in an isoform-dependent manner (E2 apoE4, increases Aβ oligomers in the brain. Higher levels of Aβ oligomers in the brains of APOE ε4/ε4 carriers compared with APOE ε3/ε3 carriers may increase the loss of dendritic spines and accelerate memory impairments, leading to earlier cognitive decline in AD.

  3. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knüpfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    The oligomerization of Aβ peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of Aβ and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Aβ peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of Aβ fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of Aβ(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  4. Characterization of oligomeric procyanidins and identification of quercetin glucuronide from lotus ( Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seedpod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jun-Song; Xie, Bi-Jun; Cao, Yan-Ping; Wu, Hua; Sun, Zhi-Da; Xiao, Di

    2012-03-21

    Procyanidins are a class of polyphenols in the plant kingdom. Lotus ( Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seedpods, the inedible part of lotus and a byproduct during the production of lotus seeds, were found to be a new source rich in procyanidins. Detailed information about oligomeric procyanidins in lotus seedpods remains unknown. In this study, lotus seedpods were extracted using 60% aqueous methanol and characterized with phloroglucinolysis and liquid chromatography (mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization source). The results indicate that the oligomeric and polymeric fraction had a mean degree of polymerization of 3.2 and 15.4, respectively, and consisted of (+)-catechin (m/z 289), gallocatechin or epigallocatechin (m/z 305), quercetin glycoside (m/z 463), quercetin glucuronide (m/z 477), procyanidin dimers (m/z 577.1), proanthocyanidin dimer gallate (m/z 593.3), prodelphinidin dimers (m/z 609.1), procyanidin trimers (m/z 865.1), etc. Quercetin glucuronide was further purified using flash chromatography and identified as quercetin-3-O-β-glucuronide by determining its exact mass using ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ¹H and ¹³C nuclear magnetic resonance, ¹H-detected heteronuclear single-quantum coherence, and ¹H-detected heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation analyses.

  5. Dealuminated ZSM—5 Zeolite Catalyst for Ethylene Oligomerization to Liquid Fuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NorAishahSaidinaAmin; DidiDwiAnggoro

    2002-01-01

    Ethylene oligomerization using ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated to study the role of Broensted acid sites in the formation of higher hydrocarbons,The oligomeriztion of olefins,dependent on the acidity of ZSM-5 zeolite ,is an important step in the conversion of natural gas to liquied fuels,The framework Si/Al ratio reflects the number of potential acid sites and the acid strength of the ZSM-5 catalyst,ZSM-5 with the mole ratio SiO2/Al2O3 equal to 30 was dealuminated for different periods of time according to the acidic ion-exchange method to produce ZSM-5 with various Si/Al ratios,The FT-IR analysis revealed that the integrated framework aluminum band,non-framework aluminum band,and silanol groups areas of the ZSM-5 zeolites decreased after being dealuminated,The performanc of the dealuminated zeolite was tested for ethylene oligomerization.The results demonstrated that the dealumination of ZSM-5 led to higher ethylene conversion,but the gasoline selectivity was reduced compared to the performance of a ZSM-5 zeolite ,The characterization results revealed the amount of aluminum in the zeolitic framework,the crystallinity of the ZSM-5 zeolite,and the Si/Al ration affected the formation of Broensted acid sites,The number of the Broensted acid sites on the catalyst active sites is important in the olefin conversion to liquied hydrocarbons.

  6. Oligomerization of Glycine and Alanine Catalyzed by Iron Oxides: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G.; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of A Polynuclear Yttrium Trifluoroethoxide and Its Activity for Oligomerization of Phenyl Isocyanate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A polynuclear yttrium trifluoroethoxide was synthesized and its activity for the oligomerization of phenyl isocyanate was tested. Reaction of anhydrous YCl3 with CF3CH2ONa in a 1:3 molar ratio in THF at room temperature, after workup, gave complex 1 as colorless crystals. The composition of complex 1 is [Y(OCH2CF3)3]6ONa2(THF)12, which was identified by elemental analysis and 1H NMR. Further X-ray structure determination reveals that complex 1 is a polynuclear ion pair compound, [Y6(μ6-O)(OCH2CF3)18]2-[Na(THF)6]+2 (1). The crystal data of complex 1 are trigonal, P-3 space group, a=1.78440(14) nm, b=1.78440(14) nm, c=1.27395(12) nm, γ=120°, V=3.5129(5) nm3, Z=1, Dc=1.607 mg·m-3, μ=2.591 mm-1 (Mo Kα), F(000)=1710, R=0.067, wR=0.182. Preliminary results demonstrated that complex 1 is a highly effective catalyst for the oligomerization of phenyl isocyanate.

  8. Influence of oligomeric silsesquioxane coating treatment on interfacial properties of CF/PAA composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuezhong; HUANG Yudong; WANG Tianyu; HU Lijiang

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fibres (CF) were modified with different oligomeric silsesquioxane (SSO) coatings to improve the interfacial property of carbon fibres/polyarylacetylene (CF/PAA).The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of CF/PAA was tested to determine the effect of the treatment.Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in force modulation mode was adopted to study the cross-section surface of unidirectional CF/PAA composites and the relative stiffness of various phases, including CF,interphase and resin.The probability histogram and line distribution of CF/PAA cross-section surface relative stiffness,obtained from the statistical analysis of relative stiffness image,were used to compare and study the interface characterizations of composites.The results show that the ILSS increases effectively and the effects on interfacial characterizations are distinguished from each other in accor-dance with the CF surface modified with different SSO coatings owing to the various structures.Cage oligomeric silsesquioxane,including large organic groups (methacryl isobutyl-POSS),has better treatment result.AFM observa-tions lead to the conclusion that an interfacial transition layer with different morphology and stiffness appears in CF/PAA composites after being treated by the SSO coatings of different structures.It can be inferred that the appearance of the transition layer may contribute to the improvement of fibre/matrix adhesion.

  9. Development of a fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometric screening method for alkyl-ended oligomeric biguanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, J. J.; Morden, W. E.

    1992-12-01

    The FAB-MS and FAB-MS---MS behaviour of a series of "alkyl-ended" oligomeric biguanides has been studied. MS---MS product ion scans showed that fragmentation of these species occurred by predictable cleavages of the biguanide chains. Results are presented from a number of MS---MS precursor ion and neutral loss scans studied in an attempt to develop a screening method for biguanides in complex mixtures. The most effective of these scans is shown to be the neutral loss of the N-alkylguanidine molecule. Use of this scan is demonstrated for a mixture of oligomeric biguanides.

  10. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr......Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA......) and osteoarthritis (OA). This study was undertaken to investigate the ability of COMP to regulate complement, a capacity that has previously been shown for some other cartilage proteins....

  11. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of O-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  12. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds and improvement of visual adaptation to the dark (ID 680) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of health...... claims in relation to oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds and improvement of visual adaptation to the dark. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA...... has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds. The Panel considers that OPCs from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds are sufficiently characterised...

  13. Long-term energy demand forecasting for the Sao Paulo state, Brazil, applying the structural decomposition model for three alternative growth sceneries of the state economy; Projecao da demanda setorial de energia do Estado de Sao Paulo no longo prazo, aplicando o modelo de desagregacao estrutural em tres cenarios alternativos de crescimento da economia do estado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laite, Alvaro Afonso Furtado; Bajay, Sergio Valdir; Pereira, Andre Flavio Soares [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia]|[Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico (NIPE)]. E-mails: afurtado@fem.unicamp.br; bajay@fem.unicamp.br; apereira@fem.unicamp.br

    2006-07-01

    Long-term demand forecasts (up to 2025) are presented in this paper for the main energy forms consumed in the residential, trade and services, rural, transport, and industrial sectors in the State of Sao Paulo. They were obtained with the help of a flexible forecasting model based on the structural decomposition of the demand, for three alternative scenarios concerning the growth of the state economy. These three state-wise scenarios are related to initially nation-wide defined scenarios, through assumptions concerning the evolution on the ratio between the state GDP and the national GDP. (author)

  14. Alternative Fuel from Biomass:Experiences and Inspirations of Alternative Fuel Production in the United States of America%关于发展生物质替代燃料的讨论--美国替代燃料生产经验对中国的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽丽; 张东杰

    2014-01-01

    介绍了美国发展粮食乙醇的历史、现状及世界各国对美国继续发展该产业的担忧和质疑,分析了中国未来大规模发展生物质替代燃料的途径选择:走出一条不同于美国或巴西的发展道路。%The history and current status of grain-based ethanol production in the United States of America is introduced and analyzed , which has raised great anxieties and questions among countries over the world about the future develop -ment of such industry in the United States .It shows that the massive development of alternative fuel from biomass in Chi-na should be in a different path from the United States or Brazil .

  15. Styrene oligomerization as a molecular probe reaction for zeolite acidity: a UV-Vis spectroscopy and DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.; Pidko, E.A.; de Groot, J.M.; Stavitski, I.; van Santen, R.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of H-ZSM-5 crystallites with different framework Si/Al ratios was studied by analyzing the kinetics and reaction mechanism of the oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene as molecular probe reaction for Brønsted acidity. The formation of carbocationic species was followed by UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  16. The upstream conserved regions (UCRs) mediate homo- and hetero-oligomerization of type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Moses; Blackman, Brigitte; Scheitrum, Colleen; Mika, Delphine; Blanchard, Elise; Lei, Tao; Conti, Marco; Richter, Wito

    2014-05-01

    PDE4s (type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases) are divided into long and short forms by the presence or absence of conserved N-terminal domains termed UCRs (upstream conserved regions). We have shown previously that PDE4D2, a short variant, is a monomer, whereas PDE4D3, a long variant, is a dimer. In the present study, we have determined the apparent molecular masses of various long and short PDE4 variants by size-exclusion chromatography and sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. Our results indicate that dimerization is a conserved property of all long PDE4 forms, whereas short forms are monomers. Dimerization is mediated by the UCR domains. Given their high sequence conservation, the UCR domains mediate not only homo-oligomerization, but also hetero-oligomerization of distinct PDE4 long forms as detected by co-immunoprecipitation assays and FRET microscopy. Endogenous PDE4 hetero-oligomers are, however, low in abundance compared with homo-dimers, revealing the presence of mechanisms that predispose PDE4s towards homo-oligomerization. Oligomerization is a prerequisite for the regulatory properties of the PDE4 long forms, such as their PKA (protein kinase A)-dependent activation, but is not necessary for PDE4 protein-protein interactions. As a result, individual PDE4 protomers may independently mediate protein-protein interactions, providing a mechanism whereby PDE4s contribute to the assembly of macromolecular signalling complexes.

  17. Disulphide bond restrains the C-terminal region of thermostable direct hemolysin during folding to promote oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Nidhi; Tichkule, Swapnil; Pandit, Shashi Bhushan; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2017-01-15

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are typically produced as water-soluble monomers, which upon interacting with target cells assemble into transmembrane oligomeric pores. Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) is an atypical PFT that exists as a tetramer in solution, prior to membrane binding. The TDH structure highlights a core β-sandwich domain similar to those found in the eukaryotic actinoporin family of PFTs. However, the TDH structure harbors an extended C-terminal region (CTR) that is not documented in the actinoporins. This CTR remains tethered to the β-sandwich domain through an intra-molecular disulphide bond. Part of the CTR is positioned at the inter-protomer interface in the TDH tetramer. Here we show that the truncation, as well as mutation, of the CTR compromise tetrameric assembly, and the membrane-damaging activity of TDH. Our study also reveals that intra-protomer disulphide bond formation during the folding/assembly process of TDH restrains the CTR to mediate its participation in the formation of inter-protomer contact, thus facilitating TDH oligomerization. However, once tetramerization is achieved, disruption of the disulphide bond does not affect oligomeric assembly. Our study provides critical insights regarding the regulation of the oligomerization mechanism of TDH, which has not been previously documented in the PFT family.

  18. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bax and Bak Oligomerization Prevents Genotoxic Cell Death and Promotes Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xin; Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Mergenthaler, Philipp; Zhang, Zhi; Sang, Jing; Daude, Michael; Ehlert, Fabian G R; Diederich, Wibke E; Wong, Eve; Zhu, Weijia; Pogmore, Justin; Nandy, Jyoti P; Satyanarayana, Maragani; Jimmidi, Ravi K; Arya, Prabhat; Leber, Brian; Lin, Jialing; Culmsee, Carsten; Yi, Jing; Andrews, David W

    2017-04-20

    Aberrant apoptosis can lead to acute or chronic degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) triggered by the oligomerization of the Bcl-2 family proteins Bax/Bak is an irreversible step leading to execution of apoptosis. Here, we describe the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of Bax/Bak oligomerization that prevent MOMP. We demonstrate that these molecules disrupt multiple, but not all, interactions between Bax dimer interfaces thereby interfering with the formation of higher-order oligomers in the MOM, but not recruitment of Bax to the MOM. Small-molecule inhibition of Bax/Bak oligomerization allowed cells to evade apoptotic stimuli and rescued neurons from death after excitotoxicity, demonstrating that oligomerization of Bax is essential for MOMP. Our discovery of small-molecule Bax/Bak inhibitors provides novel tools for the investigation of the mechanisms leading to MOMP and will ultimately facilitate development of compounds inhibiting Bax/Bak in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Frydman-Marom

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence indicates that accumulation of soluble oligomeric assemblies of β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Specifically, 56 kDa oligomeric species were shown to be correlated with impaired cognitive function in AD model mice. Several reports have documented the inhibition of Aβ plaque formation by compounds from natural sources. Yet, evidence for the ability of common edible elements to modulate Aβ oligomerization remains an unmet challenge. Here we identify a natural substance, based on cinnamon extract (CEppt, which markedly inhibits the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers and prevents the toxicity of Aβ on neuronal PC12 cells. When administered to an AD fly model, CEppt rectified their reduced longevity, fully recovered their locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain. Furthermore, oral administration of CEppt to an aggressive AD transgenic mice model led to marked decrease in 56 kDa Aβ oligomers, reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior. Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric Aβ species formation in AD through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.

  20. Permeability Changes of Manduca sexta Midgut Brush Border Membranes Induced by Oligomeric Structures of Different Cry Toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz-Garay, C.; Sánchez, J.; Darszon, A.; Maagd, de R.A.; Bakker, P.; Soberón, M.; Bravo, A.

    2006-01-01

    The pore-formation activity of monomeric and oligomeric forms of different Cry1 toxins (from Cry1A to Cry1G) was analyzed by monitoring ionic permeability across Manduca sexta brush border membrane vesicles. The membrane vesicles were isolated from microvilli structures, showing a high enrichment of

  1. Recognition of coxiella burnetii by toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerdorffer, Anne; Schoffelen, Teske; Gresnigt, Mark S.; Oosting, Marije; Brok, Den Martijn H.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Kanneganti, Thirumala Devi; Jong, De Dirk J.; Deuren, Van Marcel; Roest, Hendrik Jan; Rebel, Johanna M.J.; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Sprong, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background. Infection with Coxiella burnetii can lead to acute and chronic Q fever. Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 1 (NOD1), NOD2, and the mitogen-activated protein kinases are central in the innate immune response against

  2. Recognition of Coxiella burnetii by Toll-like Receptors and Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-like Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerdorffer, A.; Schoffelen, T.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Oosting, M.; Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Kanneganti, T.D.; Jong, D.J. de; Deuren, M. van; Roest, H.J.; Rebel, J.M.; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Sprong, T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Coxiella burnetii can lead to acute and chronic Q fever. Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor 1 (NOD1), NOD2, and the mitogen-activated protein kinases are central in the innate immune response against

  3. Interference with RUNX1/ETO Leukemogenic Function by Cell-Penetrating Peptides Targeting the NHR2 Oligomerization Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Bartel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The leukemia-associated fusion protein RUNX1/ETO is generated by the chromosomal translocation t(8;21 which appears in about 12% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs. Essential for the oncogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO is the oligomerization of the chimeric fusion protein through the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2 within ETO. In previous studies, we have shown that the intracellular expression of peptides containing the NHR2 domain inhibits RUNX1/ETO oligomerization, thereby preventing cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of RUNX1/ETO transformed cells. Here, we show that introduction of a recombinant TAT-NHR2 fusion polypeptide into the RUNX1/ETO growth-dependent myeloid cell line Kasumi-1 results in decreased cell proliferation and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. This effect was highly specific and mediated by binding the TAT-NHR2 peptide to ETO sequences, as TAT-polypeptides containing the oligomerization domain of BCR did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in Kasumi-1 cells. Thus, the selective interference with NHR2-mediated oligomerization by peptides represents a challenging but promising strategy for the inhibition of the leukemogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO in t(8;21-positive leukemia.

  4. Interference with RUNX1/ETO Leukemogenic Function by Cell-Penetrating Peptides Targeting the NHR2 Oligomerization Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Yvonne; Grez, Manuel; Wichmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The leukemia-associated fusion protein RUNX1/ETO is generated by the chromosomal translocation t(8;21) which appears in about 12% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). Essential for the oncogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO is the oligomerization of the chimeric fusion protein through the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2) within ETO. In previous studies, we have shown that the intracellular expression of peptides containing the NHR2 domain inhibits RUNX1/ETO oligomerization, thereby preventing cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of RUNX1/ETO transformed cells. Here, we show that introduction of a recombinant TAT-NHR2 fusion polypeptide into the RUNX1/ETO growth-dependent myeloid cell line Kasumi-1 results in decreased cell proliferation and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. This effect was highly specific and mediated by binding the TAT-NHR2 peptide to ETO sequences, as TAT-polypeptides containing the oligomerization domain of BCR did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in Kasumi-1 cells. Thus, the selective interference with NHR2-mediated oligomerization by peptides represents a challenging but promising strategy for the inhibition of the leukemogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO in t(8;21)-positive leukemia. PMID:23865046

  5. The Solvent Effect on the Chemoselectivity of Palladium-catalyzed Oligomerization of 3, 3-Dimethyl-1-butyne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng CHENG; Jin Heng LI; Huan Feng JIANG; Xiao Yue OUYANG

    2003-01-01

    The chemoselectivities of PdC12 and CuC12-catalyzed oligomerization of 3, 3-dimethyl-butyne: 1, 3, 5-tri-tert-butylbenzene, 2, 2, 7, 7-tetramethyl-3, 6-dichloro-3, 5-octadiene and 2, 2, 7,7- tetramethyl-3,5-octadiyne were obtained, respectively, by regulating the polarity of the solvent.

  6. Structure of viroid replicative intermediates: physico-chemical studies on SP6 transcripts of cloned oligomeric potato spindle tuber viroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, G; Tabler, M; Brüggemann, W; Colpan, M; Klotz, G; Sänger, H L; Riesner, D

    1986-12-22

    The structure and structural transitions of transcripts of cloned oligomeric viroid were studied in physico-chemical experiments and stability calculations. Transcripts of (+) and (-) polarity, from unit up to sixfold length, were synthesized from DNA clones of the potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTV) with the SP6 transcription system. Their structural properties were investigated by optical denaturation curves, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), electron microscopy, sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium and velocity sedimentation. Secondary structures of the RNAs and theoretical denaturation curves were calculated using an energy optimization program. The secondary structure of lowest free energy for unit length and oligomeric transcripts is a rod-like structure similar to that of the mature circular viroids. When this structure is used as a model for calculations, there is a large degree of agreement between the theoretical and the experimental denaturation curves. At high temperatures, however, (+) strand transcripts exhibited a transition which was more stable than expected from the calculations or than was known from curves of mature viroids. This transition arises from a rearrangement of the central conserved region of viroids to a helical region of 28 stable base pairs either intermolecularly leading to bimolecular complexes, or intramolecularly giving rise to a branched secondary structure. The rearrangement could be detected by electron microscopy, HPLC, and analytical ultracentrifugation. The helical region serves to divide up the oligomeric (+) strand into structural units which may be recognized by cleavage and ligation enzymes which process the oligomeric intermediates to circular mature viroids.

  7. A rapid, semi-quantitative assay to screen for modulators of alpha-synuclein oligomerization ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eDelenclos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha synuclein (αsyn aggregates are associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease and others related disorders. Although modulation of αsyn aggregation is an attractive therapeutic target, new powerful methodologies are desperately needed to facilitate in vivo screening of novel therapeutics. Here we describe an in vivo rodent model with the unique ability to rapidly track αsyn-αsyn interactions and thus oligomerization using a bioluminescent protein complementation strategy that monitors spatial and temporal αsyn oligomerization ex vivo. We find that αsyn forms oligomers in vivo as early as 1 week after stereotactic AAV injection into rat substantia nigra. Strikingly, although abundant αsyn expression is also detected in striatum at one week, no αsyn oligomers are detected at this time point. By 4 weeks, oligomerization of αsyn is detected in both striatum and substantia nigra homogenates. Moreover, in a proof-of-principle experiment, the effect of a previously described Hsp90 inhibitor known to prevent αsyn oligomer formation, demonstrates the utility of this rapid and sensitive animal model to monitor αsyn oligomerization status in the rat brain.

  8. The decision of farmers from the tropical region of Cochabamba in Bolivia to cultivate coca instead of state-recommended alternative products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrientos Juan Carlos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available

  1. Properties of PMR Polyimides Improved by Preparation of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi G.; Lee, Andre

    2005-01-01

    The field of hybrid organic-inorganic materials has grown drastically over the last several years. This interest stems from our ever-increasing ability to custom-build and control molecular structure at several length scales. This ability to control both the composition and structure of hybrid materials is sometimes broadly referred to as nanocomposite systems. One class of hybrid (organic-inorganic) nanostructured material is polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), shown in the preceding diagram. The hybrid composition gives POSS materials dramatically enhanced properties relative to traditional hydrocarbons and inorganics. An important benefit of this technology is that it makes possible the formulations of nanostructured chemicals with excellent thermal and oxidative stability. This is largely due to the inorganic component.

  2. Chalcane-stilbene conjugates and oligomeric flavonoids from Chinese Dragon's Blood produced from Dracaena cochinchinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qian; Saito, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Yosuke; Li, Hai-Zhou; Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    A detailed chemical investigation of Chinese Dragon's Blood, which is a traditional medicine produced form the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis, yielded two chalcane-stilbene conjugates, named cochinchinenenes G and H, together with 25 known compounds. The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic examination. HPLC analysis of the resin indicated that the major constituents were a complex mixture of oligomeric polyphenols, which were detected as a broad hump on the base line of a HPLC chromatogram. (13)C NMR analysis indicated that the oligomers were mainly composed of oxygenated chalcane units. This suggestion was supported by the results of a thiol degradation experiment with mercaptoethanol, which yielded a thioether of 4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)propyl]-3-methoxyphenol. Furthermore, methylation followed by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopic analysis of the resulting fractions established the presence of at least one heptamer of chalcane units. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tunable Gravimetric and Volumetric Hydrogen Storage Capacities in Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Amol; Chiu, Cheng-Chau; Chen, Yun-Wen; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2016-09-28

    We study the hydrogen adsorption in porous frameworks composed of silsesquioxane cages linked via boron substituted aromatic structures by first-principles modeling. Such polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) frameworks can be further modified by decorating them with metal atoms binding to the ring structures of the linkers. We have considered Sc- and Ti-doped frameworks which bind H2 via so-called Kubas interaction between hydrogen molecules and transition metal atoms. It will be demonstrated that the maximum H2 gravimetric capacity can be improved to more than 7.5 wt % by using longer linkers with more ring structures. However, the maximum H2 volumetric capacity can be tuned to more than 70 g/L by varying the size of silsesquioxane cages. We are optimistic that by varying the building blocks, POSS frameworks can be modified to meet the targets for the gravimetric and volumetric capacities set by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Radiation-induced pink nickel oligomeric clusters in water. Pulse radiolysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioul, Mohamed Larbi; Lin, Mingzhang; Belloni, Jacqueline; Keghouche, Nassira; Marignier, Jean-Louis

    2014-10-09

    γ-rays and pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Ni(2+) ions in the presence of polyacrylate (PA(-)) and 2-propanol leads to the formation of metastable species absorbing at 540 nm that are ascribed to "pink" oligomeric clusters of a few nickel atoms only. The molar absorption coefficient is evaluated as ε540 nm = 3300 ± 300 L mol(-1) cm(-1) per Ni(0) atom. The successive steps from the reduction of Ni(2+) into Ni(+) ions to the formation of the pink clusters at 540 nm under conditions of complexation by PA(-) are investigated by pulse radiolysis. The yield of the formation of pink clusters increases markedly with the irradiation dose rate, demonstrating the occurrence of the disproportionation of the [Ni(+), PA(-)] complex after a single electron pulse. The reduction and nucleation mechanisms, including rate constants, in competition with the back oxidation by protons, particularly at low dose rate, are discussed.

  5. Understanding Controls on Wetting at Fluorinated Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polymer Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yi; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2016-01-12

    Fluorinated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (F-POSS) nanoparticles have been widely used to enhance the hydrophobicity or oleophobicity of polymer films via constructing the specific micro/nanoscale roughness. In this work, we study the oleophobicity of pure and F-POSS-decorated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films using a dynamic density functional theory approach. The role of nanoparticle size and coverage and the chemical features of F-POSS and the polymer film in the wetting behavior of diiodomethane droplets has been integrated to the remaining ratio of surface potential to quantitatively characterize the corner effect. It is shown that, on the basis of universal force field parameters, the theoretically predicted contact angles are in general agreement with the available experimental data.

  6. Oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid variants as potential biomarkers for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie M; Schulz, Philip; Sierks, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of α-synuclein and β-amyloid are toxic protein variants that are thought to contribute to the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. The detection of toxic variants in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood has great promise for facilitating early and accurate diagnoses of these devastating diseases. Two hurdles that have impeded the use of these protein variants as biomarkers are the availability of reagents that can bind the different variants and a sensitive assay to detect their very low concentrations. We previously isolated antibody-based reagents that selectively bind two different oligomeric variants of α-synuclein and two of β-amyloid, and developed a phage-based capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with subfemtomolar sensitivity to quantify their presence. Here, we used these reagents to show that these oligomeric α-synuclein variants are preferentially present in PD brain tissue, CSF and serum, and that the oligomeric β-amyloid variants are preferentially present in AD brain tissue, CSF, and serum. Some AD samples also had α-synuclein pathology and some PD samples also had β-amyloid pathology, and, very intriguingly, these PD cases also had a history of dementia. Detection of different oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid species is an effective method for identifying tissue, CSF and sera from PD and AD samples, respectively, and samples that also contained early stages of other protein pathologies, indicating their potential value as blood-based biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Uncovering the Mechanism of Forkhead-Associated Domain-Mediated TIFA Oligomerization That Plays a Central Role in Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jui-Hung; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Huang, Chia-Chi Flora; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Lim, Liang-Hin; Chen, Yu-Hou; Ho, Meng-Ru; Wang, Iren; Huang, Kai-Fa; Chen, Chun-Jung; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2015-10-13

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is the only signaling domain that recognizes phosphothreonine (pThr) specifically. TRAF-interacting protein with an FHA domain (TIFA) was shown to be involved in immune responses by binding with TRAF2 and TRAF6. We recently reported that TIFA is a dimer in solution and that, upon stimulation by TNF-α, TIFA is phosphorylated at Thr9, which triggers TIFA oligomerization via pThr9-FHA domain binding and activates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the structural mechanism for the functionally important TIFA oligomerization remains to be established. While FHA domain-pThr binding is known to mediate protein dimerization, its role in oligomerization has not been demonstrated at the structural level. Here we report the crystal structures of TIFA (residues 1-150, with the unstructured C-terminal tail truncated) and its complex with the N-terminal pThr9 peptide (residues 1-15), which show unique features in the FHA structure (intrinsic dimer and extra β-strand) and in its interaction with the pThr peptide (with residues preceding rather than following pThr). These structural features support previous and additional functional analyses. Furthermore, the structure of the complex suggests that the pThr9-FHA domain interaction can occur only between different sets of dimers rather than between the two protomers within a dimer, providing the structural mechanism for TIFA oligomerization. Our results uncover the mechanism of FHA domain-mediated oligomerization in a key step of immune responses and expand the paradigm of FHA domain structure and function.

  8. The protective effects and underlying mechanism of an anti-oligomeric Aβ42 single-chain variable fragment antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Xu; Liu, Jinyu; Zhang, Yingjiu

    2015-12-01

    Oligomeric Aβ42 aggregates have been identified as one of the major neurotoxic components of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Immunotherapy targeted against these Aβ42 aggregates has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. Here, we report an anti-oligomeric Aβ42 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, named MO6, obtained from the human antibody library of a healthy donor. ScFv MO6 specifically recognized and bound to the oligomeric Aβ42 (Aβ42 oligomers and immature protofibrils; 18-37 kDa), and reduced their levels mainly by blocking their formation, although scFv MO6 also induced disaggregation of Aβ42 aggregates. More importantly, scFv MO6 ameliorated or attenuated Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity and increased cell viability by up to 33%. Furthermore, scFv MO6 efficiently passed through an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model with a delivery efficiency of 66% after 60 min post-administration. ScFv MO6 is a monovalent antibody with an affinity constant (KD) of 5.2×10(-6) M for Aβ42 oligomers. Molecular docking simulations of Aβ42 to scFv MO6 revealed that the approach and specific binding of scFv MO6 to oligomeric Aβ42 aggregates was achieved by conformational recognition and directed induction, which resulted in a more dynamic adaptation of Aβ42 to scFv MO6, occurring mainly in the N-terminal (3-4), middle (12-19) and C-terminal (34-42) regions of Aβ42. This binding mode of scFv MO6 to Aβ42 explains its protective effects against oligomeric Aβ42. Our findings may be applied for the design of a smaller antibody specific for Aβ42 oligermers.

  9. Looking for an Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jack

    1999-01-01

    Argues that high school newspapers might do well to create stronger ties with alternative weeklies. Discusses issues of niche marketing, alternative content, and alternative presentation. Notes that high school papers could learn a lot from alternative newspapers. (SR)

  10. Functional role of oligomerization for bacterial and plant SWEET sugar transporter family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Hu, Yi Bing; Chen, Li-Qing; Sosso, Davide; Ducat, Daniel C; Hou, Bi-Huei; Frommer, Wolf B

    2013-09-24

    Eukaryotic sugar transporters of the MFS and SWEET superfamilies consist of 12 and 7 α-helical transmembrane domains (TMs), respectively. Structural analyses indicate that MFS transporters evolved from a series of tandem duplications of an ancestral 3-TM unit. SWEETs are heptahelical proteins carrying a tandem repeat of 3-TM separated by a single TM. Here, we show that prokaryotes have ancestral SWEET homologs with only 3-TM and that the Bradyrhizobium japonicum SemiSWEET1, like Arabidopsis SWEET11, mediates sucrose transport. Eukaryotic SWEETs most likely evolved by internal duplication of the 3-TM, suggesting that SemiSWEETs form oligomers to create a functional pore. However, it remains elusive whether the 7-TM SWEETs are the functional unit or require oligomerization to form a pore sufficiently large to allow for sucrose passage. Split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid and split GFP assays indicate that Arabidopsis SWEETs homo- and heterooligomerize. We examined mutant SWEET variants for negative dominance to test if oligomerization is necessary for function. Mutation of the conserved Y57 or G58 in SWEET1 led to loss of activity. Coexpression of the defective mutants with functional A. thaliana SWEET1 inhibited glucose transport, indicating that homooligomerization is necessary for function. Collectively, these data imply that the basic unit of SWEETs, similar to MFS sugar transporters, is a 3-TM unit and that a functional transporter contains at least four such domains. We hypothesize that the functional unit of the SWEET family of transporters possesses a structure resembling the 12-TM MFS structure, however, with a parallel orientation of the 3-TM unit.

  11. Aqueous SOA formation from radical oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, P.; Siekmann, F.; Ravier, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Clément, J.; Ervens, B.; Monod, A.

    2013-12-01

    It is now accepted that one of the important pathways of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation occurs through aqueous phase chemistry in the atmosphere. However, the chemical mechanisms leading to macromolecules are still not well understood. It was recently shown that oligomer production by OH radical oxidation in the aerosol aqueous phase from α-dicarbonyl precursors, such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal, is irreversible and fast. We have investigated the aqueous phase photooxidation of MACR and MVK, which are biogenic organic compounds derived from isoprene. Aqueous phase photooxidation of MVK and MACR was investigated in a photoreactor using photolysis of H2O2 as OH radical source. Electrospray high resolution mass spectrometry analysis of the solutions brought clear evidence for the formation of oligomer systems having a mass range of up to 1800 Da within less than 15 minutes of reaction. Highest oligomer formation rates were obtained under conditions of low dissolved oxygen, highest temperature (T = 298 K) and highest precursor initial concentrations ([MVK]0 = 20 mM). A radical mechanism of oligomerization is proposed to explain the formation of the high molecular weight products. Furthermore, we quantified the total amount of carbon present in oligomers. Kinetic parameters of the proposed oligomerization mechanism are constrained by means of a box model that is able to reproduce the temporal evolution of intermediates and products as observed in the laboratory experiments. Additional model simulations for atmospherically-relevant conditions will be presented that show the extent to which these radical processes contribute to SOA formation in the atmospheric multiphase system as compared to other aqueous phase as well as traditional SOA sources. MVK time profile (as measured by UV Spectroscopy) and mass spectra (obtained using UPLC-ESI-MS for the retention time range 0-5 min in the positive mode) at 5, 10 and 50 min of reaction (MVK 20 mM, 25° C, under

  12. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhengliang L., E-mail: Leon.wu@bio-techne.com [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Zhou, Hui [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States); Ethen, Cheryl M. [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Reinhold, Vernon N., E-mail: Vernon.Reinhold@unh.edu [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and {sup 3}H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. - Graphical abstract: Proposed mechanism for how core-fucose prohibits the tetramerization of the 1918 pandemic viral neuraminidase. Only the cross section of the stalk region with two N-linked glycans are depicted for clarity. (A) Carbohydrate–carbohydrate interaction on non-fucosylated monomer allows tetramerization. (B) Core-fucosylation disrupts the interaction and prevents the tetramerization. - Highlights: • Expressed 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase has inactive and active forms. • The inactive form contains high level of core-6 fucose, while the active form lacks such modification. • Core fucose could interfere the oligomerization of the neuraminidase and thus its activation. • This discovery may explain

  13. Targeting Bax interaction sites reveals that only homo-oligomerization sites are essential for its activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, R; Tong, J-S; Li, H; Yue, B; Zou, F; Yu, J; Zhang, L

    2013-01-01

    Bax is a proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member that has a central role in the initiation of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. However, the mechanism of Bax activation during apoptosis remains unsettled. It is believed that the activation of Bax is mediated by either dissociation from prosurvival Bcl-2 family members, or direct association with BH3-only members. Several interaction sites on Bax that mediate its interactions with other Bcl-2 family members, as well as its proapoptotic activity, have been identified in previous studies by other groups. To rigorously investigate the functional role of these interaction sites, we knocked in their respective mutants using HCT116 colon cancer cells, in which apoptosis induced by several stimuli is strictly Bax-dependent. Bax-mediated apoptosis was intact upon knock-in (KI) of K21E and D33A, which were shown to block the interaction of Bax with BH3-only activators. Apoptosis was partially reduced by KI of D68R, which impairs the interaction of Bax with prosurvival members, and S184V, a constitutively mitochondria-targeting mutant. In contrast, apoptosis was largely suppressed by KI of L70A/D71A, which blocks homo-oligomerization of Bax and its binding to prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins. Collectively, our results suggest that the activation of endogenous Bax in HCT116 cells is dependent on its homo-oligomerization sites, but not those previously shown to interact with BH3-only activators or prosurvival proteins only. We therefore postulate that critical interaction sites yet to be identified, or mechanisms other than protein-protein interactions, need to be pursued to delineate the mechanism of Bax activation during apoptosis. PMID:23392123

  14. The R439C mutation in LMNA causes lamin oligomerization and susceptibility to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Valerie LRM; Caputo, Sandrine; Van Steensel, Maurice AM; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma JH; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J; Briedé, Jacob J; Le Dour, Caroline; Marcelis, Carlo LM; Van Geel, Michel; Steijlen, Peter M; Van Den Wijngaard, Arthur; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Broers, Jos LV

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is a laminopathy characterized by an aberrant fat distribution and a metabolic syndrome for which oxidative stress has recently been suggested as one of the disease-causing mechanisms. In a family affected with FPLD, we identified a heterozygous missense mutation c.1315C>T in the LMNA gene leading to the p.R439C substitution. Cultured patient fibroblasts do not show any prelamin A accumulation and reveal honeycomb-like lamin A/C formations in a significant percentage of nuclei. The mutation affects a region in the C-terminal globular domain of lamins A and C, different from the FPLD-related hot spot. Here, the introduction of an extra cysteine allows for the formation of disulphide-mediated lamin A/C oligomers. This oligomerization affects the interaction properties of the C-terminal domain with DNA as shown by gel retardation assays and causes a DNA-interaction pattern that is distinct from the classical R482W FPLD mutant. Particularly, whereas the R482W mutation decreases the binding efficiency of the C-terminal domain to DNA, the R439C mutation increases it. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy studies show significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon induction of oxidative stress in R439C patient fibroblasts compared to healthy controls. This increased sensitivity to oxidative stress seems independent of the oligomerization and enhanced DNA binding typical for R439C, as both the R439C and R482W mutants show a similar and significant increase in ROS upon induction of oxidative stress by H2O2. PMID:19220582

  15. Genetic analysis and serum level of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with pseudoachondroplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng-xia; LI Zhi-ling; WEI Zhen-ji; MENG yan; REN Cui-ai; ZHANG Xu-de; YU Meng-xue; HUANG Shang-zhi

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is an autosomal-dominant osteochondrodysplasia due to mutations in the gene encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP).Clinical diagnosis of PSACH is based primarily on family history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation.There is evidence that decreased serum COMP concentration may serve as a diagnostic marker in PSACH.Here, we investigated the role of this gene and the serum COMP concentration in Chinese patients with PSACH.Methods A family with three patients and a sporadic case were recruited.Genomic and phenotypic data were recorded.The diagnosis of PSACH was made on the base of clinical evaluation.The genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes.The 8-19 exons and flanking intron-exon boundary sequences of COMP were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and screened for mutation by direct DNA sequencing.Serum COMP concentrations of 4 patients and age-compatible control group of 20 unrelated healthy subjects were analyzed on the basis of an ELISA Kit for human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.Results A deletion (c.1447-1455del) was identified in exon 13 in the sporadic case.The mean serum COMP concentrations of four patients (3.12±2.28) were significantly lower than those of control group (10.86±2.21, P <0.05).There was no overlap in the distribution of serum COMP concentration between PSACH patients and controls.Conclusions Mutations in COMP gene are responsible for the PSACH.Serum COMP concentration may be suggested as an additional diagnostic marker to aid clinical findings in suspected cases of PSACH.

  16. Following activation of the amyloid cascade, apolipoprotein E4 drives the in vivo oligomerization of amyloid-β resulting in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinson, Haim; Kariv-Inbal, Zehavit; Kayed, Rakez; Masliah, Eliezer; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the accumulation of oligomerized amyloid-β (Aβ) is a primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The trigger of the amyloid cascade and of Aβ oligomerization in sporadic AD, the most prevalent form of the disease, remains elusive. Here, we examined the hypothesis that apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), the most prevalent genetic risk factor for AD, triggers the accumulation of intraneuronal oligomerized Aβ following activation of the amyloid cascade. We investigated the intracellular organelles that are targeted by these processes and govern their pathological consequences. This revealed that activation of the amyloid cascade in vivo by inhibition of the Aβ degrading enzyme neprilysin specifically results in accumulation of Aβ and oligomerized Aβ and of ApoE4 in the CA1 neurons of ApoE4 mice. This was accompanied by lysosomal and mitochondrial pathology and the co-localization of Aβ, oligomerized Aβ, and ApoE4 with enlarged lysosomes and of Aβ and oligomerized Aβ with mitochondria. The time course of the lysosomal effects paralleled that of the loss of CA1 neurons, whereas the mitochondrial effects reached an earlier plateau. These findings suggest that ApoE4 potentiates the pathological effects of Aβ and the amyloid cascade by triggering the oligomerization of Aβ, which in turn, impairs intraneuronal mitochondria and lysosomes and drives neurodegeneration.

  17. Alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: a look back at the state of the field in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truffa, Adriano A; Lopes, Renato D; Newby, L Kristin

    2013-03-01

    Stroke is the most feared complication among patients with atrial fibrillation. Oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) has been the gold standard for stroke prevention for the past 60 years. However, VKA therapy has many downsides, including risk for bleeding, a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for frequent monitoring, as well as numerous diet and lifestyle considerations that make its use cumbersome. Thus, development of new drugs that can preserve the benefits of VKAs while eliminating the negative aspects of VKA therapy has been enthusiastically sought. This article reviews the anticoagulant agents that are clinically available or under development as alternatives to VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

  18. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  19. An Alternative Method for Calculating Bound-State of Energy Eigenvalues of Klein-Gordon for Quasi-exactly Solvable Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eser Ol(g)ar

    2009-01-01

    We obtain the bound-state energy of the Klein-Gordon equation for some examples of quasi-exactly solvable potentials within the framework of asymptotic iteration method (AIM). The eigenvalues are calculated for type-1 solutions. The whole quasi-exactly solvable potentials are generated from the defined relation between the vector and scalar potentials.

  20. Molecular transformations of phenolic SOA during photochemical aging in the aqueous phase: competition among oligomerization, functionalization, and fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; George, Katheryn M.; Anastasio, Cort; Laskin, Julia; Dillner, Ann M.; Zhang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Organic aerosol is formed and transformed in atmospheric aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog droplets and deliquesced airborne particles containing small amounts of water) through a multitude of chemical reactions. Understanding these reactions is important for a predictive understanding of atmospheric aging of aerosols and their impacts on climate, air quality, and human health. In this study, we investigate the chemical evolution of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formed during reactions of phenolic compounds with two oxidants - the triplet excited state of an aromatic carbonyl (3C∗) and hydroxyl radical (•OH). Changes in the molecular composition of aqSOA as a function of aging time are characterized using an offline nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (nano-DESI MS) whereas the real-time evolution of SOA mass, elemental ratios, and average carbon oxidation state (OSC) are monitored using an online aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Our results indicate that oligomerization is an important aqueous reaction pathway for phenols, especially during the initial stage of photooxidation equivalent to ˜ 2 h irradiation under midday winter solstice sunlight in Northern California. At later reaction times functionalization (i.e., adding polar oxygenated functional groups to the molecule) and fragmentation (i.e., breaking of covalent bonds) become more important processes, forming a large variety of functionalized aromatic and open-ring products with higher OSC values. Fragmentation reactions eventually dominate the photochemical evolution of phenolic aqSOA, forming a large number of highly oxygenated ring-opening molecules with carbon numbers (nC) below 6. The average nC of phenolic aqSOA decreases while average OSC increases over the course of photochemical aging. In addition, the saturation vapor pressures (C∗) of dozens of the most abundant phenolic aqSOA molecules are estimated. A wide range of C∗ values is observed, varying

  1. Nonsense-Mediated Decay of Alternative Precursor mRNA Splicing Variants Is a Major Determinant of the Arabidopsis Steady State Transcriptome[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel, Gabriele; Kahles, André; Kesarwani, Anil K.; Stauffer, Eva; Behr, Jonas; Drewe, Philipp; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wachter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) surveillance pathway can recognize erroneous transcripts and physiological mRNAs, such as precursor mRNA alternative splicing (AS) variants. Currently, information on the global extent of coupled AS and NMD remains scarce and even absent for any plant species. To address this, we conducted transcriptome-wide splicing studies using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in the NMD factor homologs UP FRAMESHIFT1 (UPF1) and UPF3 as well as wild-type samples treated with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. Our analyses revealed that at least 17.4% of all multi-exon, protein-coding genes produce splicing variants that are targeted by NMD. Moreover, we provide evidence that UPF1 and UPF3 act in a translation-independent mRNA decay pathway. Importantly, 92.3% of the NMD-responsive mRNAs exhibit classical NMD-eliciting features, supporting their authenticity as direct targets. Genes generating NMD-sensitive AS variants function in diverse biological processes, including signaling and protein modification, for which NaCl stress–modulated AS-NMD was found. Besides mRNAs, numerous noncoding RNAs and transcripts derived from intergenic regions were shown to be NMD responsive. In summary, we provide evidence for a major function of AS-coupled NMD in shaping the Arabidopsis transcriptome, having fundamental implications in gene regulation and quality control of transcript processing. PMID:24163313

  2. Size dependent deactivation of the excited state of DHICA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Melanin is a natural pigment mainly responsible for the protection of skin and eyes from UV damage. 5,6- dihydroxyindole- 2 carboxylic acid (DHICA) is a key melanin building block. We have investigated the excited state dynamics of DHICA as well as its derivatives and oligomeric units using...

  3. Size dependent deactivation of the excited state of DHICA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia;

    2008-01-01

    Melanin is a natural pigment mainly responsible for the protection of skin and eyes from UV damage. 5,6- dihydroxyindole- 2 carboxylic acid (DHICA) is a key melanin building block. We have investigated the excited state dynamics of DHICA as well as its derivatives and oligomeric units using...

  4. Computational Study of the Effect of Confinement within Microporous Structures on the Activity and Selectivity of Metallocene Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization

    KAUST Repository

    Toulhoat, Hervé

    2011-03-02

    The effect of confinement within some zeolitic structures on the activity and selectivity of metallocene catalysts for the ethylene oligomerization has been investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations (GCMC). The following zeolite (host) frameworks displaying different pore sizes, have been studied as solid hosts: mazzite (MAZ), AIPO-8 (AET), UTD-1F (DON), faujasite (FAU), and VPI-5 (VFI). Intermediates and transition states involved in the ethylene trimerization reaction catalyzed by a Ti-based catalyst [(η5-C5H4CMe2C6H 5)TiCl3/MAO] have been used as sorbates (guests). We have demonstrated linear correlations with slope aH,j between the adsorption enthalpy and the molecular volume Vm of the sorbates, each holding for a given microporous host below a host-specific threshold V mmax,j. Beyond this maximal molecular volume, the adsorption vanishes due to steric exclusion. aH,j increases, and Vmmax,j decreases with decreasing host pore size, in line with the confinement concept. We moreover showed that, in the limit of vanishing loading (Henry regime), the enthalpies and entropies of adsorption in a given host are linearly correlated. We have defined a host-specific confinement compensation temperature a j, which refers to a temperature where the stabilizing adsorption enthalpic interactions are canceled out against the loss in entropy. However, calculated aj are much larger than the operating temperatures. With a setup microkinetic model, we predict that the activity and selectivity of the confined Ti-catalyst in ethylene oligomerization can be significantly altered with respect to homogeneous phase conditions, since the adsorption free energies of transition states and intermediates also become functions of aH,j and Vm. We have applied this theory to predict the optimum host pore size to get maximum α-octene production, instead of α-hexene, which is primarily produced in the homogeneous phase. We also predict a significantly increased activity for

  5. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.meyer@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  6. Effects of aerobic exercise intervention on serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels and lymphocyte dna damage in obese elderly females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Su Youn; Roh, Hee Tae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the reported research was to investigate the effects of regular aerobic exercise on cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and oxidative DNA damage in obese, elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen class I obese, elderly females, according to World Health Organization criteria, were randomly and equally assigned to a control group (n=8) or an exercise group (n=8). The exercise group participated in exercise sessions of 60 minutes per day, 3 days per week, for a period of 8 weeks. [Results] After aerobic exercise intervention, weight, body mass index, body fat, waist circumference, and DNA damage (Tail moment) were significantly decreased, compared with baseline values. In contrast, serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels were not significantly different among any groups or time-points. [Conclusion] Regular aerobic exercise may be effective for reducing obesity-induced high DNA damage levels in obese females, without causing the deformation or degradation of lower extremity articular cartilage. PMID:27390441

  7. Binding of an Oligomeric Ellagitannin Series to Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA): Analysis by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karonen, Maarit; Oraviita, Marianne; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Green, Rebecca J

    2015-12-16

    A unique series of oligomeric ellagitannins was used to study their interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by isothermal titration calorimetry. Oligomeric ellagitannins, ranging from monomer to heptamer and a mixture of octamer-undecamers, were isolated as individual pure compounds. This series allowed studying the effects of oligomer size and other structural features. The monomeric to trimeric ellagitannins deviated most from the overall trends. The interactions of ellagitannin oligomers from tetramers to octa-undecamers with BSA revealed strong similarities. In contrast to the equilibrium binding constant, enthalpy showed an increasing trend from the dimer to larger oligomers. It is likely that first the macrocyclic part of the ellagitannin binds to the defined binding sites on the protein surface and then the "flexible tail" of the ellagitannin coats the protein surface. The results highlight the importance of molecular flexibility to maximize binding between the ellagitannin and protein surfaces.

  8. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, V. V., E-mail: vlaegur@omrb.pnpi.spb.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gorshkov, A. N. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation); Murugova, T. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Vasin, A. V. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation); Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kiselev, O. I. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551–560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  9. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, V. V.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Murugova, T. N.; Vasin, A. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Kiselev, O. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551-560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  10. Oligomerization and Polymerization of Ethylene Initiated by a Novel Ni(Ⅱ)-Based Acetyliminopyridine Complexes as Single-Site Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Novel Ni(Ⅱ)-based acetyliminopyridine complexes 1b, 2b, 3b (1-3b), which are synthesized from ligands 1a, 2a, 3a (1-3a) and [NiCl2(DME)], are suitable precursors for the catalysts that are necessary for ethylene oligomerization and polymerization reactions, activated by methylaluminoxane (MAO).The MAO-treated 1-3b presents an active catalytic center, which may oligomerize and polymerize ethylene to produce linear α-olefins and polyethylene, respectively. The molecular weight distributions of oligomers that are obtained are in good agreement with the Schulz-Flory rules for oligomers>C4. The activity of oligomers show significant reliance on the structures of catalyst precursors.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization and Ethylene Oligomerization Behavior of Neutral Nickel Complexes Bearing N-Fluorinated Phenyl Salicylaldiminato Chelate Ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋力平; 宋绍迪; 黄吉玲

    2012-01-01

    A series of neutral nickel complexes featuring N-fluorinated phenyl salicylaldiminato chelate ligands was syn- thesized, and the novel molecular structure of complex C14 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analy- sis. The neutral nickel complexes showed high activity up to 9.96× 10^5 g oligomers/(mol Nioh) and high selectivity of C6 in catalyzing ethylene oligomerization using methylaluminoxane (MAO) as cocatalyst. It was observed that the strong electron-withdrawing effect of the fluorinated salicylaldiminato ligand was able to significantly increase the catalytic activity for oligomerization of ethylene. In addition, the influence of reaction parameters such as A1/Ni molar ratio, reaction temperature, a variety of cocatalyst and ethylene pressure on catalytic activity was investigated.

  12. Home Blood Pressure Monitoring as an Alternative to Confirm Diagnoses of Hypertension in Adolescents with Elevated Office Blood Pressure from a Brazilian State Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Thaís Inacio Rolim; Jardim, Thiago Veiga; Carneiro, Carolina de Souza; Ferreira, Vanessa Roriz; Mendonça, Karla Lorena; Morais, Polyana Resende Silva de; Nascente, Flávia Miquetichuc Nogueira; Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso de; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga

    2017-08-07

    Regional differences of using home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) as an alternative to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in hypertensive adolescents are unknown. Define if HBPM is an option to confirm diagnoses of hypertension in adolescents from a Brazilian capital with elevated office blood pressure (BP). Adolescents (12-18years) from public and private schools with BP > 90th percentile were studied to compare and evaluate the agreement among office BP measurements, HBPM and ambulatory BP monitoring. Office BP measurements, HBPM and ABPM were performed according to guidelines recommendations. Semi-automatic devices were used for BP measurements. Values of p 90 foram estudados para comparar e avaliar a concordância entre as medidas de PA, MRPA e MAPA. As medidas de PA de consultório, MRPA e MAPA foram realizadas de acordo com as recomendações das diretrizes. Foram utilizados dispositivos semiautomáticos para medições de PA. Valores de p valores médios da pressão arterial sistólica e pressão arterial diastólica da MRPA foram semelhantes aos valores de MAPA diurnos (120,3 ± 12,6 mmHg x 121,5 ± 9,8 mmHg - p = 0,111 e 69,4 ± 7,7 mmHg x 70,2 ± 6,6 mmHg - p = 0,139) e inferiores aos valores de consultório (127,3 ± 13,8 mmHg por 74,4 ± 9,5 mmHg - p < 0,001). Os gráficos de Bland-Altman mostraram boa concordância entre MRPA e MAPA. MRPA é uma opção para confirmar diagnóstico de hipertensão arterial em adolescentes de uma capital brasileira com PA de consultório elevada e pode ser usada como alternativa à MAPA.

  13. Increased serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels and decreased patellar bone mineral density in patients with chondromalacia patellae.

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chondromalacia patellae is a potentially disabling disorder characterised by features of patellar cartilage degradation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate markers of cartilage and bone turnover in patients with chondromalacia patellae. METHODS: 18 patients with chondromalacia patellae were studied. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (s-COMP) and bone sialoprotein (s-BSP) levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared with those of age and sex matched he...

  14. Protective role of Cys-178 against the inactivation and oligomerization of human insulin-degrading enzyme by oxidation and nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralat, Luis A; Ren, Min; Schilling, Alexander B; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a 110-kDa metalloendopeptidase, hydrolyzes several physiologically relevant peptides, including insulin and amyloid-beta (Abeta). Human IDE has 13 cysteines and is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), donors of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, respectively. Here, we report that the oxidative burst of BV-2 microglial cells leads to oxidation or nitrosylation of secreted IDE, leading to the reduced activity. Hydrogen peroxide and GSNO treatment of IDE reduces the V(max) for Abeta degradation, increases IDE oligomerization, and decreases IDE thermostability. Additionally, this inhibitory response of IDE is substrate-dependent, biphasic for Abeta degradation but monophasic for a shorter bradykinin-mimetic substrate. Our mutational analysis of IDE and peptide mass fingerprinting of GSNO-treated IDE using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer reveal a surprising interplay of Cys-178 with Cys-110 and Cys-819 for catalytic activity and with Cys-789 and Cys-966 for oligomerization. Cys-110 is near the zinc-binding catalytic center and is normally buried. The oxidation and nitrosylation of Cys-819 allow Cys-110 to be oxidized or nitrosylated, leading to complete inactivation of IDE. Cys-789 is spatially adjacent to Cys-966, and their nitrosylation and oxidation together trigger the oligomerization and inhibition of IDE. Interestingly, the Cys-178 modification buffers the inhibition caused by Cys-819 modification and prevents the oxidation or nitrosylation of Cys-110. The Cys-178 modification can also prevent the oligomerization-mediated inhibition. Thus, IDE can be intricately regulated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The structure of IDE reveals the molecular basis for the long distance interactions of these cysteines and how they regulate IDE function.

  15. Screening of drugs inhibiting in vitro oligomerization of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase with a mutation causing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Itsuki Anzai; Keisuke Toichi; Eiichi Tokuda; Atsushi Mukaiyama; Shuji Akiyama; Yoshiaki Furukawa

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene have been shown to cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD1-ALS). A major pathological hallmark of this disease is abnormal accumulation of mutant SOD1 oligomers in the affected spinal motor neurons. While no effective therapeutics for SOD1-ALS is currently available, SOD1 oligomerization will be a good target for developing cures of this disease. Recently, we have reproduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers ab...

  16. Synthesis, Characterization of Neutral Nickel Complexes Bearing N-Fluorophenylsalicylaldimine Chelate Ligands and Their Catalytic Activity to Ethylene Oligomerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵蔚; 黄吉玲; 朱仕正

    2005-01-01

    A series of neutral nickel complexes featuring N-fluorophenylsalicylaldimine chelate ligands was synthesized,and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The neutral nickel complexes showed high activity up to 4.22×105 g oligomers/(mol Nioh) and high selectivity to C6 olefins in catalyzing ethylene oligomerization using methylaluminoxane (MAO) as cocatalyst.

  17. Transmembrane oligomeric form of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin triggers TLR2/TLR6-dependent proinflammatory responses in monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilwani, Barkha; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-02-15

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) kills target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel pores. Once irreversibly converted into the transmembrane oligomeric form, VCC acquires an unusual structural stability and loses its cytotoxic property. It is therefore possible that, on exertion of its cytotoxic activity, the oligomeric form of VCC retained in the disintegrated membrane fractions of the lysed cells would survive within the host cellular milieu for a long period, without causing any further cytotoxicity. Under such circumstances, VCC oligomers may potentially be recognized by the host immune cells. Based on such a hypothesis, in the present study we explored the interaction of the transmembrane oligomeric form of VCC with the monocytes and macrophages of the innate immune system. Our study shows that the VCC oligomers assembled in the liposome membranes elicit potent proinflammatory responses in monocytes and macrophages, via stimulation of the toll-like receptor (TLR)2/TLR6-dependent signalling cascades that involve myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/interleukin-1-receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)1/tumour-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated factor (TRAF)6. VCC oligomer-mediated proinflammatory responses critically depend on the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Proinflammatory responses induced by the VCC oligomers also require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family member c-Jun N-terminal kinase, which presumably acts via stimulation of the transcription factor activator protein-1. Notably, the role of the MAPK p38 could not be documented in the process.

  18. Increased serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels and decreased patellar bone mineral density in patients with chondromalacia patellae.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, E; Fitzgerald, O; Saxne, Tore; Bresnihan, B

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chondromalacia patellae is a potentially disabling disorder characterised by features of patellar cartilage degradation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate markers of cartilage and bone turnover in patients with chondromalacia patellae. METHODS: 18 patients with chondromalacia patellae were studied. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (s-COMP) and bone sialoprotein (s-BSP) levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared with those of age and sex matched he...

  19. Synthesis and Catalytic Performances of a Novel Zn-MOF Catalyst Bearing Nickel Chelating Diimine Carboxylate Ligands for Ethylene Oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel Zn-MOF[Zn3(OH2L2] was synthesized from dicarboxylate ligands with diimine groups (1,4-bis(4-CO2HC6H4-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-diazabutadiene. The physicochemical properties of the material were characterized by a series of technologies including XRD, SEM, and ICP. In order to adapt to the ethylene oligomerization process, a catalyst [Zn3OH2L1Ni2] (denoted as Cat.A possessing active Ni2+ centers was prepared by a postsynthetic treatment method using dichloride nickel as a nickel source in this work. For comparison, α-diimine ligands with/without dicarboxylic acid groups reacted with dichloride nickel to obtain homogenous Cat.B and Cat.C, respectively. The effects of reaction parameters, including n(Al/n(Ni, temperature, and pressure on the oligomerization activities and oligomers distribution were investigated. The results demonstrated that all of catalysts used with diethylaluminum chloride were active for the ethylene oligomerization. Among them, Cat.A and Cat.B showed higher catalytic activities and higher selectivities to low-carbon α-olefins at atmospheric pressure. The Cat.A exhibited the optimal catalytic activity [6.7 × 105 g/(mol·Ni·h·atm] for C4 (91.8% under the conditions of Al/Ni = 1500, P = 1.0 atm, T = 20°C. In addition, Cat.A and Cat.B presented large amount of ethylene polymer, while Cat.C had a higher catalytic activity of ethylene oligomerization at high pressure.

  20. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative medicine refers to treatments that are used instead of conventional (standard) ones. If you use an alternative ... with conventional medicine or therapy, it is considered complementary therapy. There are many forms of alternative medicine. Acupuncture ...

  1. A “ Youth Multi-function Centre” in the Free State: An alternative to clinic-based HIV/AIDS prevention and care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Heunis

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The youth are especially vulnerable to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa. In the Free State (second highest incidence of HIV/AIDS among the provinces, the Welkom-Goldfields area may for various reasons be singled out as a high risk area for HIV/AIDS which should receive priority attention in attempts to combat the disease. It is suggested that a Youth Multi-function Centre would place youth reproductive health care in the broader development and life skills arena - where it could be thought to rightfully belong. The objectives of the paper are to depict the rationale for a Youth Multi-function Centre, to broadly conceptualise a Youth Multi-function Centre, and to report on the process and methodology followed in an attempt to actually establish such a centre in Thabong/Welkom.

  2. Oligomeric adiponectin forms and their complexes in the blood of healthy donors and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Alexander E; Filatov, Vladimir L; Kolosova, Olga V; Katrukha, Ivan A; Mironova, Ekaterina V; Zhuravleva, Natalya S; Nagibin, Oleg A; Kara, Andrei N; Bereznikova, Anastasiya V; Katrukha, Alexey G

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin (Adn) is a protein that circulates in the blood in several oligomeric forms, namely low-, medium-, and high-molecular-weight forms. Adn may serve as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aims of this work were (1) to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to different Adn oligomeric forms, (2) to design immunoassays suitable for measuring the Adn forms present in human blood, and (3) to investigate the changes in Adn forms that occur in patients with T2DM. Gel filtration, fluoroimmunoassays, and Western blotting were utilized as major techniques in this study. MAbs recognizing various oligomeric forms of Adn were obtained. Complexes between Adn and complement component C1q and between the low molecular weight form of Adn and albumin were described in human blood. A decrease in the total Adn and Adn-albumin complex levels in the blood of patients with T2DM and no difference in the levels of the Adn-C1q complex in comparison with healthy volunteers were demonstrated. An Adn94-Adn63 fluoroimmunoassay was selected as the technique that most accurately measured the mass ratio of Adn oligomers in blood samples, and an Adn214-Adn27 assay that measured the low-molecular-weight form of Adn only.

  3. Metal-dependent SpoIIE oligomerization stabilizes FtsZ during asymmetric division in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Ewa; de Sousa Borges, Anabela; Kopacz, Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    SpoIIE is a bifunctional protein involved in asymmetric septum formation and in activation of the forespore compartment-specific transcription factor σF through dephosphorylation of SpoIIAA-P. The phosphatase activity of SpoIIE requires Mn2+ as a metal cofactor. Here, we show that the presence of a metal cofactor also influences SpoIIE oligomerization and asymmetric septum formation. Absence of Mn2+ from sporulation medium results in a delay of the formation of polar FtsZ-rings, similar to a spoIIE null mutant. We purified the entire cytoplasmic part of the SpoIIE protein, and show that the protein copurifies with bound metals. Metal binding both stimulates SpoIIE oligomerization, and results in the formation of larger oligomeric structures. The presence of SpoIIE oligomers reduces FtsZ GTP hydrolysis activity and stabilizes FtsZ polymers in a light scattering assay. Combined, these results indicate that metal binding is not just required for SpoIIE phosphatase activity but also is important for SpoIIE's role in asymmetric septum formation. PMID:28358838

  4. Microwave dielectric study of an oligomeric electrolyte gelator by time domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Shyamal Kumar; Yagihara, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2009-07-30

    The dynamics of water molecules in aqueous solutions of an oligomeric electrolyte gelator, poly[pyridinium-1,4-diyliminocarbonyl-1,4-phenylene-methylene chloride] (1-Cl) was characterized by microwave dielectric measurements using the time domain reflectometry method. The dielectric dispersion and absorption curves related to the orientational motion of water molecules were described by the Cole-Cole equation. Discontinuities were observed in the concentration dependence of the dielectric relaxation strength, Deltaepsilonh, as well as in the Cole-Cole parameter, betah. These discontinuities were observed between the samples with concentrations of 6 and 7 g/L 1-Cl/water, which correspond to a change in the transparency. Such a discontinuity corresponds to the observation of the critical concentration of gelation. The interaction between water and 1-Cl molecules was discussed from the tauh-betah diagram. As 1-Cl carries an amide group, it could be expected that 1-Cl may interact hydrophilically with water, but the present result suggests that 1-Cl interact hydrophobically with water.

  5. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Zhou, Hui; Ethen, Cheryl M; N Reinhold, Vernon

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and (3)H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme.

  6. Oligomeric synthesis and density functional theory of leucoemeraldine base form of polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Rizwan; Ullah, Habib; Shah, Anwar-ul-Haq Ali; Bilal, Salma; Ali, Khurshid

    2017-01-01

    Oligomeric synthesis of phenyl-end-capped oligoaniline (4PANI LB) has been carried out through a weak oxidizing agent, CuCl2, using chemical oxidative polymerization protocol. The sample was characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-vis, IR, and CHN elemental analysis. The experimental results are counterchecked with the aid of Quantum mechanical calculations such as density functional theory (DFT). DFT at B3LYP/6-31 G (d) level of theory was used for the geometric and electronic properties simulations which also confirm the existence of 4PANI LB. Excellent correlation is observed between the experiment and theory, particularly in the UV-vis spectra which conclude the formation of tetramer (fully reduced form) 4PANI LB (C24H20.06N4.07). Electronic properties such as Ionization Potential (I.P), Electron Affinities (E.A), the coefficient of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the coefficient of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of 4PANI LB were evaluated at the above-mentioned level of theory.

  7. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-06-30

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes-which express particularly high levels of GLUT1-have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells.

  8. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Li; Gao, Yu; Ban, Jinghao; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS), have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group]) and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups]) were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials. PMID:24550674

  9. Structure-property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Li; Gao, Yu; Ban, Jinghao; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS), have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group]) and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups]) were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials.

  10. Role of redox environment on the oligomerization of higher molecular weight adiponectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez Martha

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory actions. The assembly of trimeric, hexameric, and higher molecular weight (HMW species of adiponectin is a topic of significant interest because physiological actions of adiponectin are oligomer-specific. In addition, adiponectin assembly is an example of oxidative oligomerization of multi-subunit protein complexes in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Results We previously reported that trimers assemble into HMW adiponectin via intermediates stabilized by disulfide bonds, and complete oxidation of available cysteines locks adiponectin in hexameric conformation. In this study, we examined the effects of redox environment on the rate of oligomer formation and the distribution of oligomers. Reassembly of adiponectin under oxidizing conditions accelerated disulfide bonding but favored formation of hexamers over the HMW species. Increased ratios of HMW to hexameric adiponectin could be achieved rapidly under oxidizing conditions by promoting disulfide rearrangement. Conclusions Based upon these observations, we propose oxidative assembly of multi-subunit adiponectin complexes in a defined and stable redox environment is favored under oxidizing conditions coupled with high rates of disulfide rearrangement.

  11. DHPC strongly affects the structure and oligomerization propensity of Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahse, Kirsten; Garvey, Megan; Kovermann, Michael; Vogel, Alexander; Balbach, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus; Fahr, Alfred

    2010-11-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to depend on the deleterious action of amyloid fibrils or oligomers derived from β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide. Out of various known Aβ alloforms, the 40-residue peptide Aβ(1-40) occurs at highest concentrations inside the brains of AD patients. Its aggregation properties critically depend on lipids, and it was thus proposed that lipids could play a major role in AD. To better understand their possible effects on the structure of Aβ and on the ability of this peptide to form potentially detrimental amyloid structures, we here analyze the interactions between Aβ(1-40) and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). DHPC has served, due to its controlled properties, as a major model system for studying general lipid properties. Here, we show that DHPC concentrations of 8 mM or higher exert dramatic effects on the conformation of soluble Aβ(1-40) peptide and induce the formation of β-sheet structure at high levels. By contrast, we find that DHPC concentrations well below the critical micelle concentration present no discernible effect on the conformation of soluble Aβ, although they substantially affect the peptide's oligomerization and fibrillation kinetics. These data imply that subtle lipid-peptide interactions suffice in controlling the overall aggregation properties and drastically accelerate, or delay, the fibrillation kinetics of Aβ peptide in near-physiological buffer solutions.

  12. An integrative approach to the study of filamentous oligomeric assemblies, with application to RecA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Benjamin; Ezelin, Johann; Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Zacharias, Martin; Robert, Charles H; Prévost, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called "extended" and "compressed" forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general.

  13. Oligomeric procyanidins of French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol) effectively inhibit alpha-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Angelika; Högger, Petra

    2007-07-01

    The standardized maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol) was reported to exert clinical anti-diabetic effects after peroral intake. However, an increased insulin secretion was not observed after administration of the extract to patients. Our aim was to elucidate whether the described clinical effects of Pycnogenol are related to inhibition of alpha-glucosidase. Therefore, we analyzed the inhibitory activity of Pycnogenol, green tea extract and acarbose towards alpha-glucosidase. Furthermore, we explored different fractions of Pycnogenol containing compounds of diverse molecular masses from polyphenolic monomers, dimers and higher oligomers to uncover which components exhibited the most pronounced inhibitory activity. We found that Pycnogenol exhibited the most potent inhibition (IC(50) about 5 microg/mL) on alpha-glucosidase compared to green tea extract (IC(50) about 20 microg/mL) and acarbose (IC(50) about 1mg/mL). The inhibitory action of Pycnogenol was stronger in extract fractions containing higher procyanidin oligomers. The results obtained assign a novel, local effect to oligomeric procyanidins and contribute to the explanation of glucose-lowering effects of Pycnogenol observed in clinical trials with diabetic patients.

  14. Oligomerization of 10,16-Dihydroxyhexadecanoic Acid and Methyl 10,16-Dihydroxyhexadecanoate Catalyzed by Lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Arrieta-Baez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main monomer of tomato cuticle, 10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid (10,16-DHPA and its methyl ester derivative (methyl-10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanote; methyl-10,16-DHHD, were used to study their oligomerization reactions catalyzed by five lipases: Candida antarctica lipase B (CAL-B, Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RM, Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TL, Pseudomonas cepacia lipase (PCL and porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL. For 10,16-DHPA, optimum yields were obtained at 60 °C using toluene and 2-methyl-2-butanol (2M2B as solvent, while for methyl-10,16-DHHD the bests yields were obtained in toluene and acetonitrile. Both reactions leaded to linear polyesters according to the NMR and FT-IR analysis, and there was no data indicating the presence of branched polymers. Using optimized conditions, poly(10,16-DHPA and poly(methyl-10,16-DHHD with Mw = 814 and Mn = 1,206 Da, and Mw = 982 and Mn = 860 Da, respectively, were formed according to their MALDI-TOF MS and ESI-MS data. The self-assembly of the polyesters obtained were analyzed by AFM.

  15. Strong Screening Effect of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS Nanoparticles on Hydrogen Bonded Polymer Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Wei Chiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we used anionic living polymerization to prepare two different homopolymers: a poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and a PMMA derivative presenting polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (PMA-POSS units as its side chains. We then employed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD to investigate the miscibility and specific interactions of PMMA and PMA-POSS with three hydrogen bonding donor compounds: poly(vinyl phenol (PVPh, phenolic resin, and bisphenol A (BPA. DSC revealed that all of the PVPh/PMMA, phenolic/PMMA, and BPA/PMMA blends exhibited a single glass transition temperature, characteristic of miscible systems; FTIR spectroscopic analyses revealed that such miscibility resulted from hydrogen bonding interactions between the C=O groups of PMMA and the OH groups of these three hydrogen bonding donor compounds. In contrast, all of the PVPh/PMA-POSS, phenolic/PMA-POSS, and BPA/PMA-POSS blends were immiscible: DSC revealed two glass transition temperatures arising from strong screening effects (FTIR spectroscopy and high degrees of aggregation (WAXD of the POSS nanoparticles. We propose that the value of the intramolecular screening effect (γ should be very close to 1 for all PMA-POSS blend systems when POSS nanoparticles appear as the side chains of PMMA, such that the OH groups of the hydrogen bonding donor compounds cannot interact with the C=O groups of PMA-POSS.

  16. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented.

  17. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: is there a repeated bout effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Behringer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the present study was to investigate if there is a repeated bout effect for cartilage tissue, evident in the marker serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP. Ten healthy male subjects (26.4±3.14 years performed two high impact interventions (100 drop jumps with a 30 second interval carried out at a 3 week interval. After each intervention, sCOMP and muscle soreness were assessed on 8 and 6 occasions respectively. Muscle soreness was determined via a visual analog scale with a maximum pain score of 10. sComp levels did not show a blunted response after the second bout (Bout 1: 12.2±3.3 U/L−1; Bout 2: 13.1±4.0 U/L−1; P>0.05. Remarkably, sCOMP increased from baseline levels by 16% after bout 1 and 15% after bout 2. Muscle soreness was blunted following the second intervention (Bout 1: 5.0±1.8; Bout 2: 1.6±0.8. Unlike the known repeated bout effect for muscle damage markers, sCOMP levels do not show a blunted response after two similar loading interventions. This information on biomarker behavior is essential to clinicians attempting to use this marker as an indicator of cartilage damage associated with the development or progression of osteoarthritis.

  18. AFM study of glucagon fibrillation via oligomeric structures resulting in interwoven fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Mingdong [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hovgaard, Mads Bruun [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Xu Sailong [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Otzen, Daniel Erik [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2006-08-28

    Glucagon is a 29-residue amphiphatic hormone involved in the regulation of blood glucose levels in conjunction with insulin. In concentrated aqueous solutions, glucagon spontaneously aggregates to form amyloid fibrils, destroying its biological activity. In this study we utilize the atomic force microscope (AFM) to elucidate the fibrillation mechanism of glucagon at the nanoscale under acidic conditions (pH 2.0) by visualizing the nanostructures of fibrils formed at different stages of the incubation. Hollow disc-shaped oligomers form at an early stage in the process and subsequently rearrange to more solid oligomers. These oligomers co-exist with, and most likely act as precursors for, protofibrils, which subsequently associate to form at least three different classes of higher-order fibrils of different heights. A repeat unit of around 50 nm along the main fibril axis suggests a helical arrangement of interwoven protofibrils. The diversity of oligomeric and fibrillar arrangements formed at pH 2.0 complements previous spectroscopic analyses that revealed that fibrils formed under different conditions can differ substantially in stability and secondary structure.

  19. Anticancer effects of oligomeric proanthocyanidins on human colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youn-Jung Kim; Hae-Jeong Park; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Mi-Ja Kim; Kang-Hyun Leem; Joo-Ho Chung; Hye-Kyung Kim

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC), natural polyphenolic compounds found in plants, are known to have antioxidant and anti-cancer effects. We investigated whether the anti-cancer effects of the OPC are induced by apoptosis on human colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4.METHODS: Colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4 was cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. The cytotoxic effect of OPC was assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenylt-etrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To find out the apoptotic cell death, 4, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining,terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and caspase-3 enzyme assay were performed.RESULTS: In this study, cytotoxic effect of OPC on SNUC4 cells appeared in a dose-dependent manner. OPC treatment (100 μg/mL) revealed typical morphological apoptotic features. Additionally OPC treatment (100 μg/mL)increased level of BAX and CASPASE-3, and decreased level of BCL-2 mRNA expression. Caspase-3 enzyme activity was also significantly increased by treatment of OPC (100 μg/mL) compared with control.CONCLUSION: These data indicate that OPC caused cell death by apoptosis through caspase pathways on human colorectal cancer cell line, SNU-C4.

  20. Coatings of molecularly imprinted polymers based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane for open tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Li; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Li-Shun; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2016-05-15

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic coating for capillary electrochromatography. The imprinted monolithic coating was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), S-amlodipine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), and 2-methacrylamidopropyl methacrylate (crosslinker), in a porogenic mixture of toluene-isooctane. The influence of synthesis parameters on the imprinting effect and separation performance, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest resolution for enantiomers separation on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was up to 22.3, about 2 times higher than that prepared in absence of the POSS. Column efficiency on the POSS-based MIP coatings was beyond 30,000 plate m(-1). The comparisons between MIP coating synthesized with the POSS and without the POSS were made in terms of selectivity, column efficiency, and resolution. POSS-based MIP capillaries with naproxen or zopiclone was also prepared and separation of enantiomers can be achieved.