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Sample records for altered thalamocortical connectivity

  1. Low-frequency BOLD fluctuations demonstrate altered thalamocortical connectivity in diabetic neuropathic pain

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    Migliorati Filippo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we explored thalamocortical functional connectivity in a group of eight patients suffering from peripheral neuropathic pain (diabetic pain, and compared it with that of a group of healthy subjects. We hypothesized that functional interconnections between the thalamus and cortex can be altered after years of ongoing chronic neuropathic pain. Results Functional connectivity was studied through a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm: temporal correlations between predefined regions of interest (primary somatosensory cortex, ventral posterior lateral thalamic nucleus, medial dorsal thalamic nucleus and the rest of the brain were systematically investigated. The patient group showed decreased resting state functional connectivity between the thalamus and the cortex. Conclusion This supports the idea that chronic pain can alter thalamocortical connections causing a disruption of thalamic feedback, and the view of chronic pain as a thalamocortical dysrhythmia.

  2. Correlating thalamocortical connectivity and activity

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    da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Sporns, Olaf

    2006-07-01

    The segregated regions of the mammalian cerebral cortex and thalamus form an extensive and complex network, whose structure and function are still only incompletely understood. The present letter describes an application of the concepts of complex networks and random walks that allows the identification of nonrandom, highly structured features of thalamocortical connections and their potential effects on dynamic interactions between cortical areas in the cat brain. Utilizing large-scale anatomical data sets of this thalamocortical system, we investigate uniform random walks in such a network by considering the steady state eigenvector of the respective stochastic matrix. It is shown that thalamocortical connections are organized in such a way as to guarantee strong correlation between the outdegree and occupancy rate (a stochastic measure potentially related to activation) of each cortical area. Possible organizational principles underlying this effect are identified and discussed.

  3. Maturing thalamocortical functional connectivity across development

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    Damien Fair

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a surge of investigations examining functional brain organization using resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI. To date, this method has been used to examine systems organization in typical and atypical developing populations. While the majority of these investigations have focused on cortical-cortical interactions, cortical-subcortical interactions also mature into adulthood. Innovative work by Zhang et al (Zhang et al., 2008 in adults have identified methods that utilize rs-fcMRI and known thalamo-cortical topographic segregation to identify functional boundaries in the thalamus that are remarkably similar to known thalamic nuclear grouping. However, despite thalamic nuclei being well formed early in development, the developmental trajectory of functional thalamo-cortical relations remains unexplored. Thalamic maps generated by rs-fcMRI are based on functional relationships, and should modify with the dynamic thalamo-cortical changes that occur throughout maturation. To examine this possibility, we employed a strategy as previously described by Zhang et al to a sample of healthy children, adolescents, and adults. We found strengthening functional connectivity of the frontal cortex with dorsal/anterior subdivisions of the thalamus across age groups. Temporal lobe connectivity with ventral/midline/posterior subdivisions of the thalamus weakened with age. Changes in sensory and motor thalamo-cortical interactions were limited. These findings are consistent with known anatomical and physiological cortical-subcortical changes over development. The methods and developmental context provided here will be important for relating how cortical-subcortical interactions relate to models of typically developing behavior and developmental neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Assessing thalamocortical functional connectivity with Granger causality.

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    Chen, Cheng; Maybhate, Anil; Israel, David; Thakor, Nitish V; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-01

    Assessment of network connectivity across multiple brain regions is critical to understanding the mechanisms underlying various neurological disorders. Conventional methods for assessing dynamic interactions include cross-correlation and coherence analysis. However, these methods do not reveal the direction of information flow, which is important for studying the highly directional neurological system. Granger causality (GC) analysis can characterize the directional influences between two systems. We tested GC analysis for its capability to capture directional interactions within both simulated and in vivo neural networks. The simulated networks consisted of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons; GC analysis was used to estimate the causal influences between two model networks. Our analysis successfully detected asymmetrical interactions between these networks ( , t -test). Next, we characterized the relationship between the "electrical synaptic strength" in the model networks and interactions estimated by GC analysis. We demonstrated the novel application of GC to monitor interactions between thalamic and cortical neurons following ischemia induced brain injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA). We observed that during the post-CA acute period the GC interactions from the thalamus to the cortex were consistently higher than those from the cortex to the thalamus ( 1.983±0.278 times higher, p = 0.021). In addition, the dynamics of GC interactions between the thalamus and the cortex were frequency dependent. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of GC to monitor the dynamics of thalamocortical interactions after a global nervous system injury such as CA-induced ischemia, and offers preferred alternative applications in characterizing other inter-regional interactions in an injured brain.

  5. A critical period for auditory thalamocortical connectivity

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    Rinaldi Barkat, Tania; Polley, Daniel B; Hensch, Takao K

    2011-01-01

    connectivity by in vivo recordings and day-by-day voltage-sensitive dye imaging in an acute brain slice preparation. Passive tone-rearing modified response strength and topography in mouse primary auditory cortex (A1) during a brief, 3-d window, but did not alter tonotopic maps in the thalamus. Gene...... locus of change for the tonotopic plasticity. The evolving postnatal connectivity between thalamus and cortex in the days following hearing onset may therefore determine a critical period for auditory processing....

  6. Altered thalamocortical rhythmicity and connectivity in mice lacking CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in unconsciousness.

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    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Lee, Seongwon; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-06-23

    In unconscious status (e.g., deep sleep and anesthetic unconsciousness) where cognitive functions are not generated there is still a significant level of brain activity present. Indeed, the electrophysiology of the unconscious brain is characterized by well-defined thalamocortical rhythmicity. Here we address the ionic basis for such thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. In particular, we address the role of CaV3.1 T-type Ca(2+) channels, which are richly expressed in thalamic neurons. Toward this aim, we examined the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice lacking CaV3.1 channels (CaV3.1 knockout) during unconsciousness induced by ketamine or ethanol administration. Our findings indicate that CaV3.1 KO mice displayed attenuated low-frequency oscillations in thalamocortical loops, especially in the 1- to 4-Hz delta band, compared with control mice (CaV3.1 WT). Intriguingly, we also found that CaV3.1 KO mice exhibited augmented high-frequency oscillations during unconsciousness. In a behavioral measure of unconsciousness dynamics, CaV3.1 KO mice took longer to fall into the unconscious state than controls. In addition, such unconscious events had a shorter duration than those of control mice. The thalamocortical interaction level between mediodorsal thalamus and frontal cortex in CaV3.1 KO mice was significantly lower, especially for delta band oscillations, compared with that of CaV3.1 WT mice, during unconsciousness. These results suggest that the CaV3.1 channel is required for the generation of a given set of thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. Further, that thalamocortical resonant neuronal activity supported by this channel is important for the control of vigilance states.

  7. Decreased thalamocortical functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation: evidence from resting state FMRI.

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    Yongcong Shao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The thalamus and cerebral cortex are connected via topographically organized, reciprocal connections, which hold a key function in segregating internally and externally directed awareness information. Previous task-related studies have revealed altered activities of the thalamus after total sleep deprivation (TSD. However, it is still unclear how TSD impacts on the communication between the thalamus and cerebral cortex. In this study, we examined changes of thalamocortical functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation by using resting state function MRI (fMRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen healthy volunteers were recruited and performed fMRI scans before and after 36 hours of TSD. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was employed and differences of thalamocortical functional connectivity were tested between the rested wakefulness (RW and TSD conditions. RESULTS: We found that the right thalamus showed decreased functional connectivity with the right parahippocampal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus and right superior frontal gyrus in the resting brain after TSD when compared with that after normal sleep. As to the left thalamus, decreased connectivity was found with the right medial frontal gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyri and left superior frontal gyrus. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest disruptive changes of the thalamocortical functional connectivity after TSD, which may lead to the decline of the arousal level and information integration, and subsequently, influence the human cognitive functions.

  8. Impaired thalamocortical connectivity in autism spectrum disorder: a study of functional and anatomical connectivity.

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    Nair, Aarti; Treiber, Jeffrey M; Shukla, Dinesh K; Shih, Patricia; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2013-06-01

    The thalamus plays crucial roles in the development and mature functioning of numerous sensorimotor, cognitive and attentional circuits. Currently limited evidence suggests that autism spectrum disorder may be associated with thalamic abnormalities, potentially related to sociocommunicative and other impairments in this disorder. We used functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging probabilistic tractography to study the functional and anatomical integrity of thalamo-cortical connectivity in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and matched typically developing children. For connectivity with five cortical seeds (prefontal, parieto-occipital, motor, somatosensory and temporal), we found evidence of both anatomical and functional underconnectivity. The only exception was functional connectivity with the temporal lobe, which was increased in the autism spectrum disorders group, especially in the right hemisphere. However, this effect was robust only in partial correlation analyses (partialling out time series from other cortical seeds), whereas findings from total correlation analyses suggest that temporo-thalamic overconnectivity in the autism group was only relative to the underconnectivity found for other cortical seeds. We also found evidence of microstructural compromise within the thalamic motor parcel, associated with compromise in tracts between thalamus and motor cortex, suggesting that the thalamus may play a role in motor abnormalities reported in previous autism studies. More generally, a number of correlations of diffusion tensor imaging and functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging measures with diagnostic and neuropsychological scores indicate involvement of abnormal thalamocortical connectivity in sociocommunicative and cognitive impairments in autism spectrum disorder.

  9. Specialization and integration of functional thalamocortical connectivity in the human infant

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    Toulmin, H.; Beckmann, C.F.; O'Muircheartaigh, J.; Ball, G.; Nongena, P.; Makropoulis, A.; Ederies, A.; Counsell, S.J.; Kennea, N.; Arichi, T.; Tusor, N.; Rutherford, M.A.; Azzopardi, D.; Gonzalez-Cinca, N.; Hajnal, J.V.; Edwards, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    Connections between the thalamus and cortex develop rapidly before birth, and aberrant cerebral maturation during this period may underlie a number of neurodevelopmental disorders. To define functional thalamocortical connectivity at the normal time of birth, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to measure

  10. Attention to odor modulates thalamocortical connectivity in the human brain.

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    Plailly, Jane; Howard, James D; Gitelman, Darren R; Gottfried, Jay A

    2008-05-14

    It is widely assumed that the thalamus is functionally irrelevant for the sense of smell. Although animal studies suggest that the mediodorsal (MD) thalamus links primary olfactory (piriform) cortex to olfactory neocortical projection sites in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), this transthalamic route is regarded to be inconsequential, particularly compared with a direct monosynaptic pathway linking piriform cortex and OFC. In this study, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with novel effective connectivity techniques to measure attention-dependent network coherence within direct (nonthalamic) and indirect (transthalamic) olfactory pathways. Human subjects were presented with (or without) an odor and with (or without) a tone, while selectively attending to either modality. Attention to odor significantly modulated neural coupling within the indirect pathway, strengthening MD thalamus-OFC connectivity. Critically, these effects were modality specific (odor > tone attention), directionally sensitive (forward > backward connections), and selective to route (indirect > direct pathway). Our findings support the idea that the human transthalamic pathway is an active modulatory target of olfactory attention. The results imply that olfaction, like all other sensory modalities, requires a thalamic relay, if only to consciously analyze a smell.

  11. Disrupted thalamocortical connectivity in PSP: a resting-state fMRI, DTI, and VBM study.

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    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Avula, Ramesh; Master, Ankit; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L; Jones, David T; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2011-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is associated with pathological changes along the dentatorubrothalamic tract and in premotor cortex. We aimed to assess whether functional neural connectivity is disrupted along this pathway in PSP, and to determine how functional changes relate to changes in structure and diffusion. Eighteen probable PSP subjects and 18 controls had resting-state (task-free) fMRI, diffusion tensor imaging and structural MRI. Functional connectivity was assessed between thalamus and the rest of the brain, and within the basal ganglia, salience and default mode networks (DMN). Patterns of atrophy were assessed using voxel-based morphometry, and patterns of white matter tract degeneration were assessed using tract-based spatial statistics. Reduced in-phase functional connectivity was observed between the thalamus and premotor cortex including supplemental motor area (SMA), striatum, thalamus and cerebellum in PSP. Reduced connectivity in premotor cortex, striatum and thalamus were observed in the basal ganglia network and DMN, with subcortical salience network reductions. Tract degeneration was observed between cerebellum and thalamus and in superior longitudinal fasciculus, with grey matter loss in frontal lobe, premotor cortex, SMA and caudate nucleus. SMA functional connectivity correlated with SMA volume and measures of cognitive and motor dysfunction, while thalamic connectivity correlated with degeneration of superior cerebellar peduncles. PSP is therefore associated with disrupted thalamocortical connectivity that is associated with degeneration of the dentatorubrothalamic tract and the presence of cortical atrophy.

  12. Changes in effective connectivity of sensorimotor rhythms in thalamocortical circuits during the induction and recovery of anesthesia in mice.

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    Kang, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Jee Hyun; Hwang, Eunjin; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2016-10-15

    The thalamocortical network serves a role in both consciousness and sensorimotor processing. However, little is known regarding how changes in conscious states, via induction of and recovery from anesthesia, affect the processing of sensorimotor information in the thalamocortical network. To address this, we investigated the dynamics of causal interactions among sensorimotor rhythms (SMR; frequency range of 3-12Hz) across the thalamocortical network during transitions into and out of ketamine-induced unconsciousness. Two local field potentials from the ventral lateral and ventrobasal thalamic nuclei, as well as two intracranial electroencephalography signals from the primary sensory and primary motor regions, were recorded in 10 mice. Spectral Granger causality analysis revealed two distinct frequency-specific patterns in sensorimotor rhythms. For the low-frequency (3-6.5Hz) SMR, loss of consciousness evoked causal influences directed from the cortex to the thalamus. For the high-frequency (6.5-12Hz) SMR, causal influences from the primary sensory cortex to other regions during the conscious period were abruptly altered by loss of consciousness and gradually regenerated following recovery of consciousness. The results of the present study indicate that anesthesia alters the flow of sensorimotor information in the thalamocortical network and may provide evidence of the neural basis of loss and recovery of sensorimotor function associated with anesthesia.

  13. Alterations in Neuronal Activity in Basal Ganglia-Thalamocortical Circuits in the Parkinsonian State

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    Adriana eGalvan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials, electroencephalograms or electrocorticograms. Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation therapy.

  14. Alterations in the properties of neonatal thalamocortical synapses with time in in vitro slices.

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    Luz, Liliana L; Currie, Stephen P; Daw, Michael I

    2017-01-01

    New synapses are constantly being generated and lost in the living brain with only a subset of these being stabilized to form an enduring component of neuronal circuitry. The properties of synaptic transmission have primarily been established in a variety of in vitro neuronal preparations. It is not clear, however, if newly-formed and persistent synapses contribute to the results of these studies consistently throughout the lifespan of these preparations. In neonatal somatosensory, barrel, cortex we have previously hypothesized that a population of thalamocortical synapses displaying unusually slow kinetics represent newly-formed, default-transient synapses. This clear phenotype would provide an ideal tool to investigate if such newly formed synapses consistently contribute to synaptic transmission throughout a normal experimental protocol. We show that the proportion of synapses recorded in vitro displaying slow kinetics decreases with time after brain slice preparation. However, slow synapses persist in vitro in the presence of either minocycline, an inhibitor of microglia-mediated synapse elimination, or the TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone a promoter of synapse formation. These findings show that the observed properties of synaptic transmission may systematically change with time in vitro in a standard brain slice preparation.

  15. A visual thalamocortical slice.

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    MacLean, Jason N; Fenstermaker, Vivian; Watson, Brendon O; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-02-01

    We describe a thalamocortical slice preparation in which connectivity between the mouse lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) is preserved. Through DiI injections in fixed brains we traced and created a three-dimensional model of the mouse visual pathways. From this computer model we designed a slice preparation that contains a projection from LGN to V1. We prepared brain slices with these predicted coordinates and demonstrated anatomical LGN-V1 connectivity in these slices after LGN tracer injections. We also revealed functional LGN-V1 connectivity by stimulating LGN electrically and detecting responses in layer 4 of V1 using calcium imaging, field potential recordings and whole-cell recordings. We also identified layer-4 neurons that receive direct thalamocortical input. Finally, we compared cortical activity after LGN stimulation with spontaneous cortical activity and found significant overlap of the spatiotemporal dynamics generated by both types of events.

  16. The thalamo-cortical complex network correlates of chronic pain

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    Zippo, Antonio G.; Valente, Maurizio; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain (CP) is a condition with a large repertory of clinical signs and symptoms with diverse expressions. Though widely analyzed, an appraisal at the level of single neuron and neuronal networks in CP is however missing. The present research proposes an empirical and theoretic framework which identifies a complex network correlate nested in the somatosensory thalamocortical (TC) circuit in diverse CP models. In vivo simultaneous extracellular neuronal electrophysiological high-density recordings have been performed from the TC circuit in rats. Wide functional network statistics neatly discriminated CP from control animals identifying collective dynamical traits. In particular, a collapsed functional connectivity and an altered modular architecture of the thalamocortical circuit have been evidenced. These results envisage CP as a functional connectivity disorder and give the clue for unveiling innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:27734895

  17. Layer-specific experience-dependent rewiring of thalamocortical circuits.

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    Wang, Lang; Kloc, Michelle; Gu, Yan; Ge, Shaoyu; Maffei, Arianna

    2013-02-27

    Thalamocortical circuits are central to sensory and cognitive processing. Recent work suggests that the thalamocortical inputs onto L4 and L6, the main input layers of neocortex, are activated differently by visual stimulation. Whether these differences depend on layer-specific organization of thalamocortical circuits; or on specific properties of synapses onto receiving neurons is unknown. Here we combined optogenetic stimulation of afferents from the visual thalamus and paired recording electrophysiology in L4 and L6 of rat primary visual cortex to determine the organization and plasticity of thalamocortical synapses. We show that thalamocortical inputs onto L4 and L6 differ in synaptic dynamics and sensitivity to visual drive. We also demonstrate that the two layers differ in the organization of thalamocortical and recurrent intracortical connectivity. In L4, a significantly larger proportion of excitatory neurons responded to light activation of thalamocortical terminal fields than in L6. The local microcircuit in L4 showed a higher degree of recurrent connectivity between excitatory neurons than the microcircuit in L6. In addition, L4 recurrently connected neurons were driven by thalamocortical inputs of similar magnitude indicating the presence of local subnetworks that may be activated by the same axonal projection. Finally, brief manipulation of visual drive reduced the amplitude of light-evoked thalamocortical synaptic currents selectively onto L4. These data are the first direct indication that thalamocortical circuits onto L4 and L6 support different aspects of cortical function through layer-specific synaptic organization and plasticity.

  18. Abnormal thalamocortical dynamics may be altered by deep brain stimulation: using magnetoencephalography to study phantom limb pain.

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    Ray, N J; Jenkinson, N; Kringelbach, M L; Hansen, P C; Pereira, E A; Brittain, J S; Holland, P; Holliday, I E; Owen, S; Stein, J; Aziz, T

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to alleviate chronic pain. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the mechanisms of DBS for pain is difficult because of the artefact caused by the stimulator. We were able to record activity over the occipital lobe of a patient using DBS for phantom limb pain during presentation of a visual stimulus. This demonstrates that MEG can be used to study patients undergoing DBS provided control stimuli are used to check the reliability of the data. We then asked the patient to rate his pain during and off DBS. Correlations were found between these ratings and power in theta (6-9) and beta bands (12-30). Further, there was a tendency for frequencies under 25 Hz to correlate with each other after a period off stimulation compared with immediately after DBS. The results are interpreted as reflecting abnormal thalamocortical dynamics, previously implicated in painful syndromes.

  19. Altered thalamic functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis

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    Liu, Yaou; Liang, Peipeng; Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Jia, Xiuqin [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Dong, Huiqing; Ye, Jing [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shi, Fu-Dong [Department of Neurology and Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We demonstrated decreased connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions in MS. •Increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity was also observed in MS. •The increased functional connectivity is attenuated by increasing disease duration. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare thalamic functional connectivity (FC) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls (HC), and correlate these connectivity measures with other MRI and clinical variables. Methods: We employed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to examine changes in thalamic connectivity by comparing thirty-five patients with MS and 35 age- and sex-matched HC. Thalamic FC was investigated by correlating low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in thalamic voxels with voxels in all other brain regions. Additionally thalamic volume fraction (TF), T2 lesion volume (T2LV), EDSS and disease duration were recorded and correlated with the FC changes. Results: MS patients were found to have a significantly lower TF than HC in bilateral thalami. Compared to HC, the MS group showed significantly decreased FC between thalamus and several brain regions including right middle frontal and parahippocampal gyri, and the left inferior parietal lobule. Increased intra- and inter-thalamic FC was observed in the MS group compared to HC. These FC alterations were not correlated with T2LV, thalamic volume or lesions. In the MS group, however, there was a negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity (r = −0.59, p < 0.001). Conclusion: We demonstrated decreased FC between thalamus and several cortical regions, while increased intra- and inter-thalamic connectivity in MS patients. These complex functional changes reflect impairments and/or adaptations that are independent of T2LV, thalamic volume or presence of thalamic lesions. The negative correlation between disease duration and inter-thalamic connectivity could indicate an adaptive role of thalamus that is

  20. Altered Functional Connectivity in Essential Tremor

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    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D.; Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Manzanedo, Eva; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Posada, Ignacio; Rocon, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) has been associated with a spectrum of clinical features, with both motor and nonmotor elements, including cognitive deficits. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether brain networks that might be involved in the pathogenesis of nonmotor manifestations associated with ET are altered, and the relationship between abnormal connectivity and ET severity and neuropsychological function. Resting-state fMRI data in 23 ET patients (12 women and 11 men) and 22 healthy controls (HC) (12 women and 10 men) were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a “dual-regression” technique, to identify the group differences of resting-state networks (RSNs) (default mode network [DMN] and executive, frontoparietal, sensorimotor, cerebellar, auditory/language, and visual networks). All participants underwent a neuropsychological and neuroimaging session, where resting-state data were collected. Relative to HC, ET patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (DMN and frontoparietal networks) and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and visual networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with ET severity (DMN) and ET duration (DMN and left frontoparietal network), but also with cognitive ability. Moreover, in at least 3 networks (DMN and frontoparietal networks), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, verbal memory, visual memory, and language) and depressive symptoms. Further, in the visual network, decreased connectivity was associated with worse performance on visuospatial ability. ET was associated with abnormal brain connectivity in major RSNs that might be involved in both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Our findings underscore the importance of examining RSNs in this population as a biomarker of disease. PMID:26656325

  1. Choreography of early thalamocortical development.

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    Molnár, Zoltán; Higashi, Shuji; López-Bendito, Guillermina

    2003-06-01

    Thalamic axons, which carry most of the information from the sensory environment, are amongst the first projections to reach the cerebral cortex during embryonic development. It has been proposed that the scaffold of early generated cells in the ventral thalamus, internal capsule and preplate play a pivotal role in their deployment through sharp gene expression boundaries. These ideas were recently evaluated in various strains of mutant mice. In Tbr1, Gbx2, Pax6 KO both thalamic and corticofugal projections fail to traverse the striatocortical junction. In both Emx2 and Pax6 KO brains, the misrouted thalamic afferents are accompanied by displacements of the pioneering projections from the internal capsule. Regardless of their altered route, thalamic afferents in the reeler and L1 KO mice seem to be able to redistribute themselves on the cortical sheet and establish normal periphery-related representation in the somatosensory cortex. Early neural activity delivered through the thalamic projections is thought to be involved in the realignment process of thalamic axons at the time of their accumulation in the subplate layer. However, axonal growth and the early topographic arrangement of thalamocortical fiber pathways appear normal in the Snap25 KO, where action potential mediated synaptic vesicle release is disrupted. We therefore suggest that intercellular communication mediated by constitutive secretion of transmitters or growth factors might play a dominant role during early thalamocortical development.

  2. Altered whole-brain connectivity in albinism.

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    Welton, Thomas; Ather, Sarim; Proudlock, Frank A; Gottlob, Irene; Dineen, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    Albinism is a group of congenital disorders of the melanin synthesis pathway. Multiple ocular, white matter and cortical abnormalities occur in albinism, including a greater decussation of nerve fibres at the optic chiasm, foveal hypoplasia and nystagmus. Despite this, visual perception is largely preserved. It was proposed that this may be attributable to reorganisation among cerebral networks, including an increased interhemispheric connectivity of the primary visual areas. A graph-theoretic model was applied to explore brain connectivity networks derived from resting-state functional and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging data in 23 people with albinism and 20 controls. They tested for group differences in connectivity between primary visual areas and in summary network organisation descriptors. Main findings were supplemented with analyses of control regions, brain volumes and white matter microstructure. Significant functional interhemispheric hyperconnectivity of the primary visual areas in the albinism group were found (P = 0.012). Tests of interhemispheric connectivity based on the diffusion-tensor data showed no significant group difference (P = 0.713). Second, it was found that a range of functional whole-brain network metrics were abnormal in people with albinism, including the clustering coefficient (P = 0.005), although this may have been driven partly by overall differences in connectivity, rather than reorganisation. Based on the results, it was suggested that changes occur in albinism at the whole-brain level, and not just within the visual processing pathways. It was proposed that their findings may reflect compensatory adaptations to increased chiasmic decussation, foveal hypoplasia and nystagmus. Hum Brain Mapp 38:740-752, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

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    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations in abdom...

  4. Altered connections on the road to psychopathy.

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    Craig, M C; Catani, M; Deeley, Q; Latham, R; Daly, E; Kanaan, R; Picchioni, M; McGuire, P K; Fahy, T; Murphy, D G M

    2009-10-01

    Psychopathy is strongly associated with serious criminal behaviour (for example, rape and murder) and recidivism. However, the biological basis of psychopathy remains poorly understood. Earlier studies suggested that dysfunction of the amygdala and/or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) may underpin psychopathy. Nobody, however, has ever studied the white matter connections (such as the uncinate fasciculus (UF)) linking these structures in psychopaths. Therefore, we used in vivo diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) tractography to analyse the microstructural integrity of the UF in psychopaths (defined by a Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R) score of > or = 25) with convictions that included attempted murder, manslaughter, multiple rape with strangulation and false imprisonment. We report significantly reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) (P<0.003), an indirect measure of microstructural integrity, in the UF of psychopaths compared with age- and IQ-matched controls. We also found, within psychopaths, a correlation between measures of antisocial behaviour and anatomical differences in the UF. To confirm that these findings were specific to the limbic amygdala-OFC network, we also studied two 'non-limbic' control tracts connecting the posterior visual and auditory areas to the amygdala and the OFC, and found no significant between-group differences. Lastly, to determine that our findings in UF could not be totally explained by non-specific confounds, we carried out a post hoc comparison with a psychiatric control group with a past history of drug abuse and institutionalization. Our findings remained significant. Taken together, these results suggest that abnormalities in a specific amygdala-OFC limbic network underpin the neurobiological basis of psychopathy.

  5. Altered default mode network functional connectivity in schizotypal personality disorder.

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    Zhang, Qing; Shen, Jing; Wu, Jianlin; Yu, Xiao; Lou, Wutao; Fan, Hongyu; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng

    2014-12-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been identified to play a critical role in many mental disorders, but such abnormalities have not yet been determined in patients with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). The purpose of this study was to analyze the alteration of the DMN functional connectivity in subjects with (SPD) and compared it to healthy control subjects. Eighteen DSM-IV diagnosed SPD subjects (all male, average age: 19.7±0.9) from a pool of 3000 first year college students, and eighteen age and gender matched healthy control subjects were recruited (all male, average age: 20.3±0.9). Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to analyze the DMN functional connectivity alteration. Compared to the healthy control group, SPD subjects had significantly decreased functional connectivity in the frontal areas, including the superior and medial frontal gyrus, and greater functional connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus and sub-lobar regions, including the bilateral putamen and caudate. Compared to subjects with SPD, the healthy control group showed decreased functional connectivity in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus, but showed greater functional connectivity in the right transverse temporal gyrus and left middle temporal gyrus. The healthy control group also showed greater activation in the cerebellum compared to the SPD group. These findings suggest that DMN functional connectivity, particularly that involving cognitive or emotional regulation, is altered in SPD subjects, and thus may be helpful in studying schizophrenia.

  6. Altered functional connectivity of prefrontal cortex in chronic heroin abusers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinbao Qi; Xianming Fu; Ruobing Qian; Chaoshi Niu; Xiangpin Wei

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated alterations in the resting-state functional connectivity of the pre-frontal cortex in chronic heroin abusers using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that, compared with normal controls, in heroin abusers the left prefrontal cortex showed decreased functional connectivity with the left hippocampus, right anterior cingulate, left middle frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus and right precuneus. However, the right prefrontal cortex showed decreased functional connectivity with the left orbital frontal cortex and the left middle frontal gyrus in chronic heroin abusers. These alterations of resting-state functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortices of heroin abusers suggest that their frontal executive neural network may be impaired, and that this may contribute to their continued heroin abuse and relapse after withdrawal.

  7. Altered cortico-striatal-thalamic connectivity in relation to spatial working memory capacity in children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Mills

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD captures a heterogeneous group of children, who are characterized by a range of cognitive and behavioral symptoms. Previous resting state functional connectivity (rs-fcMRI studies have sought to understand the neural correlates of ADHD by comparing connectivity measurements between those with and without the disorder, focusing primarily on cortical-striatal circuits mediated by the thalamus. To integrate the multiple phenotypic features associated with ADHD and help resolve its heterogeneity, it is helpful to determine how specific circuits relate to unique cognitive domains of the ADHD syndrome. Spatial working memory has been proposed as a key mechanism in the pathophysiology of ADHD.Methods: We correlated the rs-fcMRI of five thalamic regions of interest with spatial span working memory scores in a sample of 67 children aged 7-11 years (ADHD and typically developing children; TDC. In an independent dataset, we then examined group differences in thalamo-striatal functional connectivity between 70 ADHD and 89 TDC (7-11 years from the ADHD-200 dataset. Thalamic regions of interest were created based on previous methods that utilize known thalamo-cortical loops and rs-fcMRI to identify functional boundaries in the thalamus.Results/Conclusions: Using these thalamic regions, we found atypical rs-fcMRI between specific thalamic groupings with the basal ganglia. To identify the thalamic connections that relate to spatial working memory in ADHD, only connections identified in both the correlational and comparative analyses were considered. Multiple connections between the thalamus and basal ganglia, particularly between medial and anterior dorsal thalamus and the putamen, were related to spatial working memory and also altered in ADHD. These thalamo-striatal disruptions may be one of multiple atypical neural and cognitive mechanisms that relate to the ADHD clinical phenotype.

  8. Dynamics of coupled thalamocortical modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drover, Jonathan D; Schiff, Nicholas D; Victor, Jonathan D

    2010-06-01

    We develop a model of thalamocortical dynamics using a shared population of thalamic neurons to couple distant cortical regions. Behavior of the model is determined as a function of the connection strengths with shared and unshared populations in the thalamus, either within a relay nucleus or the reticular nucleus. When the coupling is via the reticular nucleus, we locate solutions of the model where distant cortical regions maintain the same activity level, and regions where one region maintains an elevated activity level, suppressing activity in the other. We locate and investigate a region where both types of solutions exist and are stable, yielding a mechanism for spontaneous changes in global activity patterns. Power spectra and coherence are computed, and marked differences in the coherence are found between the two kinds of modes. When, on the other hand, the coupling is via a shared relay nuclei, the features seen with the reticular coupling are absent. These considerations suggest a role for the reticular nucleus in modulating long distance cortical communication.

  9. Prenatal stress alters amygdala functional connectivity in preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Sze, Gordon; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal and early-life stress results in alterations in neural connectivity and an increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, alterations in amygdala connectivity have emerged as a common effect across several recent studies. However, the impact of prenatal stress exposure on the functional organization of the amygdala has yet to be explored in the prematurely-born, a population at high risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. We test the hypothesis that preterm birth and prenatal exposure to maternal stress alter functional connectivity of the amygdala using two independent cohorts. The first cohort is used to establish the effects of preterm birth and consists of 12 very preterm neonates and 25 term controls, all without prenatal stress exposure. The second is analyzed to establish the effects of prenatal stress exposure and consists of 16 extremely preterm neonates with prenatal stress exposure and 10 extremely preterm neonates with no known prenatal stress exposure. Standard resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and seed connectivity methods are used. When compared to term controls, very preterm neonates show significantly reduced connectivity between the amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and the insula (p cortex (p subcortical regions is decreased in preterm neonates compared to term controls. In addition, these data, for the first time, suggest that prenatal stress exposure amplifies these decreases.

  10. Altered resting-state network connectivity in congenital blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Qin, Wen; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yunting; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2014-06-01

    The brain of congenital blind (CB) has experienced a series of structural and functional alterations, either undesirable outcomes such as atrophy of the visual pathway due to sight loss from birth, or compensatory plasticity to interact efficiently with the environment. However, little is known, so far, about alterations in the functional architecture of resting-state networks (RSNs) in CB. This study aimed to investigate intra- and internetwork connectivity differences between CB and sighted controls (SC), using independent component analysis (ICA) on resting state functional MRI data. Compared with SC, CB showed significantly increased network connectivity within the salience network (SN) and the occipital cortex. Moreover, CB exhibited enhanced internetwork connectivity between the SN and the frontoparietal network (FPN) and between the FPN and the occipital cortex; however, they showed decreased internetwork connectivity between the occipital cortex and the sensorimotor network. These findings suggest that CB experience large scale reorganization at the level of the functional network. More importantly, the enhanced intra- and internetwork connectivity of the SN, FPN, and occipital cortex in CB may improve their abilities to identify salient stimuli, to initiate the executive function, and to top-down control of attention, which are critical for the CB to guide appropriate behavior and to better adaption to the environment.

  11. Thalamocortical dysrhythmia: a theoretical update in tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk eDe Ridder

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound source. Pathophysiologically it has been attributed to bottom up deafferentation and/or top down noise-cancelling deficit. Both mechanisms are proposed to alter auditory thalamocortical signal transmission resulting in thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD. In deafferentation, TCD is characterized by a slowing down of resting state alpha to theta activity associated with an increase in surrounding gamma activity, resulting in persisting cross-frequency coupling between theta and gamma activity. Theta burst-firing increases network synchrony and recruitment, a mechanism which might enable long range synchrony, which in turn could represent a means for finding the missing thalamocortical information and for gaining access to consciousness. Theta oscillations could function as a carrier wave to integrate the tinnitus related focal auditory gamma activity in a consciousness enabling network, as envisioned by the global workspace model. This model suggests that focal activity in the brain does not reach consciousness, except if the focal activity becomes functionally coupled to a consciousness enabling network, aka the global workspace. In limited deafferentation the missing information can be retrieved from the auditory cortical neighborhood, decreasing surround inhibition, resulting in TCD. When the deafferentation is too wide in bandwidth it is hypothesized that the missing information is retrieved from theta mediated parahippocampal auditory memory. This suggests that based on the amount of deafferentation TCD might change to parahippocampo-cortical persisting and thus pathological theta-gamma rhythm. From a Bayesian point of view, in which the brain is conceived as a prediction machine that updates its memory-based predictions through sensory updating, tinnitus is the result of a prediction error between the predicted and sensed auditory input. The decrease in sensory updating

  12. Altered resting state cortico-striatal connectivity in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s disease

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    Youngbin Kwak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by dopamine depletion in the striatum. One consistent pathophysiological hallmark of PD is an increase in spontaneous oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical networks. We evaluated these effects using resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s patients on and off L-DOPA and age-matched controls using six different striatal seed regions. We observed an overall increase in the strength of cortico-striatal functional connectivity in PD patients off L-DOPA compared to controls. This enhanced connectivity was down-regulated by L-DOPA as shown by an overall decrease in connectivity strength, particularly within motor cortical regions. We also performed a frequency content analysis of the BOLD signal time course extracted from the six striatal seed regions. PD off L-DOPA exhibited increased power in the frequency band 0.02 – 0.05 Hz compared to controls and to PD on L-DOPA. The L-DOPA associated decrease in the power of this frequency range modulated the L-DOPA associated decrease in connectivity strength between striatal seeds and the thalamus. In addition, the L-DOPA associated decrease in power in this frequency band also correlated with the L-DOPA associated improvement in cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that PD and L-DOPA modulate striatal resting state BOLD signal oscillations and corticostriatal network coherence.

  13. Alterations in neural connectivity in preterm children at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzo, Yeisid; Vohr, Betty; Lacadie, Cheryl; Hampson, Michelle; Katz, Karol H; Maller-Kesselman, Jill; Schneider, Karen C; Peterson, Bradley S; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Makuch, Robert W; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2009-11-01

    Converging data suggest recovery from injury in the preterm brain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that cerebral connectivity involving Wernicke's area and other important cortical language regions would differ between preterm (PT) and term (T) control school age children during performance of an auditory language task. Fifty-four PT children (600-1250 g birth weight) and 24 T controls were evaluated using an fMRI passive language task and neurodevelopmental assessments including: the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - III (WISC-III), the Peabody Individual Achievement Test - Revised (PIAT-R) and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - Revised (PPVT-R) at 8 years of age. Neural activity was assessed for language processing and the data were evaluated for connectivity and correlations to cognitive outcomes. We found that PT subjects scored significantly lower on all components of the WISC-III (p<0.009), the PIAT-R Reading Comprehension test (p=0.013), and the PPVT-R (p=0.001) compared to term subjects. Connectivity analyses revealed significantly stronger neural circuits in PT children between Wernicke's area and the right inferior frontal gyrus (R IFG, Broca's area homologue) and both the left and the right supramarginal gyri (SMG) components of the inferior parietal lobules (palterations may represent a delay in maturation of neural networks or the engagement of alternate circuits for language processing.

  14. Altered brain functional connectivity in relation to perception of scrutiny in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Mónica; Pujol, Jesús; Ortiz, Hector; Soriano-Mas, Carles; López-Solà, Marina; Farré, Magí; Deus, Joan; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Martín-Santos, Rocio

    2012-06-30

    Although the fear of being scrutinized by others in a social context is a key symptom in social anxiety disorder (SAD), the neural processes underlying the perception of scrutiny have not previously been studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We used fMRI to map brain activation during a perception-of-scrutiny task in 20 SAD patients and 20 controls. A multi-dimensional analytic approach was used. Scrutiny perception was mediated by activation of the medial frontal cortex, insula-operculum region and cerebellum, and the additional recruitment of visual areas and the thalamus in patients. Between-group comparison demonstrated significantly enhanced brain activation in patients in the primary visual cortex and cerebellum. Functional connectivity mapping demonstrated an abnormal connectivity between regions underlying general arousal and attention. SAD patients showed significantly greater task-induced functional connectivity in the thalamo-cortical and the fronto-striatal circuits. A statistically significant increase in task-induced functional connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex and scrutiny-perception-related regions was observed in the SAD patients, suggesting the existence of enhanced behavior-inhibitory control. The presented data indicate that scrutiny perception in SAD enhances brain activity in arousal-attention systems, suggesting that fMRI may be a useful tool to explore such a behavioral dimension.

  15. Interpreting the effects of altered brain anatomical connectivity on fMRI functional connectivity: a role for computational neural modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Barry; Hwang, Chuhern; Alstott, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been a large number of studies using resting state fMRI to characterize abnormal brain connectivity in patients with a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and developmental disorders. However, interpreting what the differences in resting state fMRI functional connectivity (rsfMRI-FC) actually reflect in terms of the underlying neural pathology has proved to be elusive because of the complexity of brain anatomical connectivity. The same is the case for task-based fMRI studies. In the last few years, several groups have used large-scale neural modeling to help provide some insight into the relationship between brain anatomical connectivity and the corresponding patterns of fMRI-FC. In this paper we review several efforts at using large-scale neural modeling to investigate the relationship between structural connectivity and functional/effective connectivity to determine how alterations in structural connectivity are manifested in altered patterns of functional/effective connectivity. Because the alterations made in the anatomical connectivity between specific brain regions in the model are known in detail, one can use the results of these simulations to determine the corresponding alterations in rsfMRI-FC. Many of these simulation studies found that structural connectivity changes do not necessarily result in matching changes in functional/effective connectivity in the areas of structural modification. Often, it was observed that increases in functional/effective connectivity in the altered brain did not necessarily correspond to increases in the strength of the anatomical connection weights. Note that increases in rsfMRI-FC in patients have been interpreted in some cases as resulting from neural plasticity. These results suggest that this interpretation can be mistaken. The relevance of these simulation findings to the use of functional/effective fMRI connectivity as biomarkers for brain disorders is also discussed.

  16. Characterizing Thalamo-Cortical Disturbances in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Cole, Michael W.; Repovs, Grega; Murray, John D.; Brumbaugh, Margaret S.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Savic, Aleksandar; Krystal, John H.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Glahn, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with distributed brain dysconnectivity that may involve large-scale thalamo-cortical systems. Incomplete characterization of thalamic connectivity in schizophrenia limits our understanding of its relationship to symptoms and to diagnoses with shared clinical presentation, such as bipolar illness, which may exist on a spectrum. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized thalamic connectivity in 90 schizophrenia patients versus 90 matched controls via: (1) Subject-specific anatomically defined thalamic seeds; (2) anatomical and data-driven clustering to assay within-thalamus dysconnectivity; and (3) machine learning to classify diagnostic membership via thalamic connectivity for schizophrenia and for 47 bipolar patients and 47 matched controls. Schizophrenia analyses revealed functionally related disturbances: Thalamic over-connectivity with bilateral sensory–motor cortices, which predicted symptoms, but thalamic under-connectivity with prefrontal–striatal–cerebellar regions relative to controls, possibly reflective of sensory gating and top-down control disturbances. Clustering revealed that this dysconnectivity was prominent for thalamic nuclei densely connected with the prefrontal cortex. Classification and cross-diagnostic results suggest that thalamic dysconnectivity may be a neural marker for disturbances across diagnoses. Present findings, using one of the largest schizophrenia and bipolar neuroimaging samples to date, inform basic understanding of large-scale thalamo-cortical systems and provide vital clues about the complex nature of its disturbances in severe mental illness. PMID:23825317

  17. Intrinsic modulators of auditory thalamocortical transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Charles C; Sherman, S Murray

    2012-05-01

    Neurons in layer 4 of the primary auditory cortex receive convergent glutamatergic inputs from thalamic and cortical projections that activate different groups of postsynaptic glutamate receptors. Of particular interest in layer 4 neurons are the Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which hyperpolarize neurons postsynaptically via the downstream opening of GIRK channels. This pronounced effect on membrane conductance could influence the neuronal processing of synaptic inputs, such as those from the thalamus, essentially modulating information flow through the thalamocortical pathway. To examine how Group II mGluRs affect thalamocortical transmission, we used an in vitro slice preparation of the auditory thalamocortical pathways in the mouse to examine synaptic transmission under conditions where Group II mGluRs were activated. We found that both pre- and post-synaptic Group II mGluRs are involved in the attenuation of thalamocortical EPSP/Cs. Thus, thalamocortical synaptic transmission is suppressed via the presynaptic reduction of thalamocortical neurotransmitter release and the postsynaptic inhibition of the layer 4 thalamorecipient neurons. This could enable the thalamocortical pathway to autoregulate transmission, via either a gating or gain control mechanism, or both.

  18. Altered intrahemispheric structural connectivity in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS is a common developmental neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics and frequent psychiatric comorbidities, often causing significant disability. Tic generation has been linked to disturbed networks of brain areas involved in planning, controlling and execution of actions, particularly structural and functional disorders in the striatum and cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical loops. We therefore applied structural diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to characterize changes in intrahemispheric white matter connectivity in cortico-subcortical circuits engaged in motor control in 15 GTS patients without psychiatric comorbidities. White matter connectivity was analyzed by probabilistic fiber tractography between 12 predefined cortical and subcortical regions of interest. Connectivity values were combined with measures of clinical severity rated by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS. GTS patients showed widespread structural connectivity deficits. Lower connectivity values were found specifically in tracts connecting the supplementary motor areas (SMA with basal ganglia (pre-SMA–putamen, SMA–putamen and in frontal cortico-cortical circuits. There was an overall trend towards negative correlations between structural connectivity in these tracts and YGTSS scores. Structural connectivity of frontal brain networks involved in planning, controlling and executing actions is reduced in adult GTS patients which is associated with tic severity. These findings are in line with the concept of GTS as a neurodevelopmental disorder of brain immaturity.

  19. How do brain tumors alter functional connectivity? : A magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bosma, Ingeborg; Klein, Martin; Baayen, Johannes C; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Postma, Tjeerd J; Heimans, Jan J; van Dijk, Bob W; de Munck, Jan C; de Jongh, Arent; Cover, Keith S; Stam, Cornelis J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that brain tumors interfere with normal brain function by disrupting functional connectivity of brain networks. METHODS: Functional connectivity was assessed by computing the synchronization likelihood in a broad band (0.5-60Hz) or in the g

  20. Altered intrahemispheric structural connectivity in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bastian; Braass, Hanna; Ganos, Christos; Treszl, Andras; Biermann-Ruben, Katja; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten; Schnitzler, Alfons; Gerloff, Christian; Münchau, Alexander; Thomalla, Götz

    2014-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a common developmental neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics and frequent psychiatric comorbidities, often causing significant disability. Tic generation has been linked to disturbed networks of brain areas involved in planning, controlling and execution of actions, particularly structural and functional disorders in the striatum and cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loops. We therefore applied structural diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize changes in intrahemispheric white matter connectivity in cortico-subcortical circuits engaged in motor control in 15 GTS patients without psychiatric comorbidities. White matter connectivity was analyzed by probabilistic fiber tractography between 12 predefined cortical and subcortical regions of interest. Connectivity values were combined with measures of clinical severity rated by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS). GTS patients showed widespread structural connectivity deficits. Lower connectivity values were found specifically in tracts connecting the supplementary motor areas (SMA) with basal ganglia (pre-SMA-putamen, SMA-putamen) and in frontal cortico-cortical circuits. There was an overall trend towards negative correlations between structural connectivity in these tracts and YGTSS scores. Structural connectivity of frontal brain networks involved in planning, controlling and executing actions is reduced in adult GTS patients which is associated with tic severity. These findings are in line with the concept of GTS as a neurodevelopmental disorder of brain immaturity.

  1. Prenatal stress alters amygdala functional connectivity in preterm neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Scheinost

    2016-01-01

    Functional connectivity from the amygdala to other subcortical regions is decreased in preterm neonates compared to term controls. In addition, these data, for the first time, suggest that prenatal stress exposure amplifies these decreases.

  2. Altered resting brain connectivity in persistent cancer related fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson P. Hampson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an estimated 3 million women in the US living as breast cancer survivors and persistent cancer related fatigue (PCRF disrupts the lives of an estimated 30% of these women. PCRF is associated with decreased quality of life, decreased sleep quality, impaired cognition and depression. The mechanisms of cancer related fatigue are not well understood; however, preliminary findings indicate dysfunctional activity in the brain as a potential factor. Here we investigate the relationship between PCRF on intrinsic resting state connectivity in this population. Twenty-three age matched breast cancer survivors (15 fatigued and 8 non-fatigued who completed all cancer-related treatments at least 12 weeks prior to the study, were recruited to undergo functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI. Intrinsic resting state networks were examined with both seed based and independent component analysis methods. Comparisons of brain connectivity patterns between groups as well as correlations with self-reported fatigue symptoms were performed. Fatigued patients displayed greater left inferior parietal lobule to superior frontal gyrus connectivity as compared to non-fatigued patients (P < 0.05 FDR corrected. This enhanced connectivity was associated with increased physical fatigue (P = 0.04, r = 0.52 and poor sleep quality (P = 0.04, r = 0.52 in the fatigued group. In contrast greater connectivity in the non-fatigued group was found between the right precuneus to the periaqueductal gray as well as the left IPL to subgenual cortex (P < 0.05 FDR corrected. Mental fatigue scores were associated with greater default mode network (DMN connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus (P = 0.05 FDR corrected among fatigued subjects (r = 0.82 and less connectivity in the non-fatigued group (r = −0.88. These findings indicate that there is enhanced intrinsic DMN connectivity to the frontal gyrus in breast cancer survivors with persistent

  3. Altered functional and structural connectivity networks in psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Rong Ding

    Full Text Available Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES are paroxysmal behaviors that resemble epileptic seizures but lack abnormal electrical activity. Recent studies suggest aberrant functional connectivity involving specific brain regions in PNES. Little is known, however, about alterations of topological organization of whole-brain functional and structural connectivity networks in PNES. We constructed functional connectivity networks from resting-state functional MRI signal correlations and structural connectivity networks from diffusion tensor imaging tractography in 17 PNES patients and 20 healthy controls. Graph theoretical analysis was employed to compute network properties. Moreover, we investigated the relationship between functional and structural connectivity networks. We found that PNES patients exhibited altered small-worldness in both functional and structural networks and shifted towards a more regular (lattice-like organization, which could serve as a potential imaging biomarker for PNES. In addition, many regional characteristics were altered in structural connectivity network, involving attention, sensorimotor, subcortical and default-mode networks. These regions with altered nodal characteristics likely reflect disease-specific pathophysiology in PNES. Importantly, the coupling strength of functional-structural connectivity was decreased and exhibited high sensitivity and specificity to differentiate PNES patients from healthy controls, suggesting that the decoupling strength of functional-structural connectivity might be an important characteristic reflecting the mechanisms of PNES. This is the first study to explore the altered topological organization in PNES combining functional and structural connectivity networks, providing a new way to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of PNES.

  4. Synaptic basis for intense thalamocortical activation of feedforward inhibitory cells in neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Scott J; Lewis, Timothy J; Connors, Barry W

    2007-04-01

    The thalamus provides fundamental input to the neocortex. This input activates inhibitory interneurons more strongly than excitatory neurons, triggering powerful feedforward inhibition. We studied the mechanisms of this selective neuronal activation using a mouse somatosensory thalamocortical preparation. Notably, the greater responsiveness of inhibitory interneurons was not caused by their distinctive intrinsic properties but was instead produced by synaptic mechanisms. Axons from the thalamus made stronger and more frequent excitatory connections onto inhibitory interneurons than onto excitatory cells. Furthermore, circuit dynamics allowed feedforward inhibition to suppress responses in excitatory cells more effectively than in interneurons. Thalamocortical excitatory currents rose quickly in interneurons, allowing them to fire action potentials before significant feedforward inhibition emerged. In contrast, thalamocortical excitatory currents rose slowly in excitatory cells, overlapping with feedforward inhibitory currents that suppress action potentials. These results demonstrate the importance of selective synaptic targeting and precise timing in the initial stages of neocortical processing.

  5. Compensating for thalamocortical synaptic loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhassan, Kamal; Coyle, Damien; Maguire, Liam

    2014-01-01

    The study presents a thalamocortical network model which oscillates within the alpha frequency band (8-13 Hz) as recorded in the wakeful relaxed state with closed eyes to study the neural causes of abnormal oscillatory activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Incorporated within the model are various types of cortical excitatory and inhibitory neurons, recurrently connected to thalamic and reticular thalamic regions with the ratios and distances derived from the mammalian thalamocortical system. The model is utilized to study the impacts of four types of connectivity loss on the model's spectral dynamics. The study focuses on investigating degeneration of corticocortical, thalamocortical, corticothalamic, and corticoreticular couplings, with an emphasis on the influence of each modeled case on the spectral output of the model. Synaptic compensation has been included in each model to examine the interplay between synaptic deletion and compensation mechanisms, and the oscillatory activity of the network. The results of power spectra and event related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/S) analyses show that the dynamics of the thalamic and cortical oscillations are significantly influenced by corticocortical synaptic loss. Interestingly, the patterns of changes in thalamic spectral activity are correlated with those in the cortical model. Similarly, the thalamic oscillatory activity is diminished after partial corticothalamic denervation. The results suggest that thalamic atrophy is a secondary pathology to cortical shrinkage in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, this study finds that the inhibition from neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (RTN) to thalamic relay (TCR) neurons plays a key role in regulating thalamic oscillations; disinhibition disrupts thalamic oscillatory activity even though TCR neurons are more depolarized after being released from RTN inhibition. This study provides information that can be explored experimentally to further our understanding

  6. Compensating for Thalamocortical Synaptic Loss in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal eAbuhassan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a thalamocortical network model which oscillates within the alpha frequency band (8-13 Hz as recorded in the wakeful relaxed state with closed eyes to study the neural causes of abnormal oscillatory activity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Incorporated within the model are various types of cortical excitatory and inhibitory neurons, recurrently connected to thalamic and reticular thalamic regions with the ratios and distances derived from the mammalian thalamocortical system. The model is utilized to study the impacts of four types of connectivity loss on the model’s spectral dynamics. The study focuses on investigating degeneration of corticocortical, thalamocortical, corticothalamic and corticoreticular couplings, with an emphasis on the influence of each modelled case on the spectral output of the model. Synaptic compensation has been included in each model to examine the interplay between synaptic deletion and compensation mechanisms, and the oscillatory activity of the network. The results of power spectra and event related desynchronisation/synchronisation (ERD/S analyses show that the dynamics of the thalamic and cortical oscillations are significantly influenced by corticocortical synaptic loss. Interestingly, the patterns of changes in thalamic spectral activity are correlated with those in the cortical model. Similarly, the thalamic oscillatory activity is diminished after partial corticothalamic denervation. The results suggest that thalamic atrophy is a secondary pathology to cortical shrinkage in Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, this study finds that the inhibition from neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (RTN to thalamic relay (TCR neurons plays a key role in regulating thalamic oscillations; disinhibition disrupts thalamic oscillatory activity even though TCR neurons are more depolarized after being released from RTN inhibition. This study provides information that can be explored experimentally to

  7. Altered interhemispheric connectivity in individuals with Tourette's disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    subjects, but the magnitudes of the correlations were significantly greater in the group with Tourette's disorder. The effects of medication and comorbid illnesses had no appreciable influence on the findings. CONCLUSIONS: Given prior evidence for the role of prefrontal hypertrophy in the regulation of tic......OBJECTIVE: The corpus callosum is the major commissure connecting the cerebral hemispheres. Prior evidence suggests involvement of the corpus callosum in the pathophysiology of Tourette's disorder. The authors assessed corpus callosum size and anatomical connectivity across the cerebral hemispheres...... in persons with Tourette's disorder. METHOD: The size of the corpus callosum was determined on the true midsagittal slices of reformatted, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans and compared across groups in a cross-sectional case-control study of 158 subjects with Tourette's disorder and 121...

  8. Dynamic functional connectivity reveals altered variability in functional connectivity among patients with major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornador, Cristian; Falcón, Carles; López‐Solà, Marina; Hernández‐Ribas, Rosa; Pujol, Jesús; Menchón, José M.; Ritter, Petra; Cardoner, Narcis; Soriano‐Mas, Carles; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Resting‐state fMRI (RS‐fMRI) has become a useful tool to investigate the connectivity structure of mental health disorders. In the case of major depressive disorder (MDD), recent studies regarding the RS‐fMRI have found abnormal connectivity in several regions of the brain, particularly in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, the relevance of the DMN to self‐referential thoughts and ruminations has made the use of the resting‐state approach particularly important for MDD. The majority of such research has relied on the grand averaged functional connectivity measures based on the temporal correlations between the BOLD time series of various brain regions. We, in our study, investigated the variations in the functional connectivity over time at global and local level using RS‐fMRI BOLD time series of 27 MDD patients and 27 healthy control subjects. We found that global synchronization and temporal stability were significantly increased in the MDD patients. Furthermore, the participants with MDD showed significantly increased overall average (static) functional connectivity (sFC) but decreased variability of functional connectivity (vFC) within specific networks. Static FC increased to predominance among the regions pertaining to the default mode network (DMN), while the decreased variability of FC was observed in the connections between the DMN and the frontoparietal network. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2918–2930, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27120982

  9. Specific functional connectivity alterations of the dorsal striatum in young people with depression

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    Rebecca Kerestes

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The results provide evidence that alterations in corticostriatal connectivity are evident at the early stages of the illness and are not a result of antidepressant treatment. Increased connectivity between the dorsal caudate, which is usually associated with cognitive processes, and the more affectively related ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may reflect a compensatory mechanism for dysfunctional cognitive-emotional processing in youth depression.

  10. Pseudorabies virus infection alters neuronal activity and connectivity in vitro.

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    Kelly M McCarthy

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-herpesviruses, including human herpes simplex virus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus and the swine pseudorabies virus (PRV, infect the peripheral nervous system of their hosts. Symptoms of infection often include itching, numbness, or pain indicative of altered neurological function. To determine if there is an in vitro electrophysiological correlate to these characteristic in vivo symptoms, we infected cultured rat sympathetic neurons with well-characterized strains of PRV known to produce virulent or attenuated symptoms in animals. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made at various times after infection. By 8 hours of infection with virulent PRV, action potential (AP firing rates increased substantially and were accompanied by hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials and spikelet-like events. Coincident with the increase in AP firing rate, adjacent neurons exhibited coupled firing events, first with AP-spikelets and later with near identical resting membrane potentials and AP firing. Small fusion pores between adjacent cell bodies formed early after infection as demonstrated by transfer of the low molecular weight dye, Lucifer Yellow. Later, larger pores formed as demonstrated by transfer of high molecular weight Texas red-dextran conjugates between infected cells. Further evidence for viral-induced fusion pores was obtained by infecting neurons with a viral mutant defective for glycoprotein B, a component of the viral membrane fusion complex. These infected neurons were essentially identical to mock infected neurons: no increased AP firing, no spikelet-like events, and no electrical or dye transfer. Infection with PRV Bartha, an attenuated circuit-tracing strain delayed, but did not eliminate the increased neuronal activity and coupling events. We suggest that formation of fusion pores between infected neurons results in electrical coupling and elevated firing rates, and that these processes may contribute to the altered neural

  11. Functional Connectivity with the Default Mode Network Is Altered in Fibromyalgia Patients

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    Chiu, Yee; Nurmikko, Turo; Stancak, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients show altered connectivity with the network maintaining ongoing resting brain activity, known as the default mode network (DMN). The connectivity patterns of DMN with the rest of the brain in FMS patients are poorly understood. This study employed seed-based functional connectivity analysis to investigate resting-state functional connectivity with DMN structures in FMS. Sixteen female FMS patients and 15 age-matched, healthy control subjects underwent T2-weighted resting-state MRI scanning and functional connectivity analyses using DMN network seed regions. FMS patients demonstrated alterations to connectivity between DMN structures and anterior midcingulate cortex, right parahippocampal gyrus, left superior parietal lobule and left inferior temporal gyrus. Correlation analysis showed that reduced functional connectivity between the DMN and the right parahippocampal gyrus was associated with longer duration of symptoms in FMS patients, whereas augmented connectivity between the anterior midcingulate and posterior cingulate cortices was associated with tenderness and depression scores. Our findings demonstrate alterations to functional connectivity between DMN regions and a variety of regions which are important for pain, cognitive and emotional processing in FMS patients, and which may contribute to the development or maintenance of chronic symptoms in FMS. PMID:27442504

  12. Altered cerebellar functional connectivity with intrinsic connectivity networks in adults with major depressive disorder.

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    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have demonstrated the higher-order functions of the cerebellum, including emotion regulation and cognitive processing, and have indicated that the cerebellum should therefore be included in the pathophysiological models of major depressive disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the resting-state functional connectivity of the cerebellum in adults with major depression and healthy controls. METHODS: Twenty adults with major depression and 20 gender-, age-, and education-matched controls were investigated using seed-based resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Compared with the controls, depressed patients showed significantly increased functional connectivity between the cerebellum and the temporal poles. However, significantly reduced cerebellar functional connectivity was observed in the patient group in relation to both the default-mode network, mainly including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, and the executive control network, mainly including the superior frontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. Moreover, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score was negatively correlated with the functional connectivity between the bilateral Lobule VIIb and the right superior frontal gyrus in depressed patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated increased cerebellar coupling with the temporal poles and reduced coupling with the regions in the default-mode and executive control networks in adults with major depression. These differences between patients and controls could be associated with the emotional disturbances and cognitive control function deficits that accompany major depression. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity during major depression may also imply a substantial role for the cerebellum in the pathophysiological models of depression.

  13. Volitional regulation of emotions produces distributed alterations in connectivity between visual, attention control, and default networks.

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    Sripada, Chandra; Angstadt, Michael; Kessler, Daniel; Phan, K Luan; Liberzon, Israel; Evans, Gary W; Welsh, Robert C; Kim, Pilyoung; Swain, James E

    2014-04-01

    The ability to volitionally regulate emotions is critical to health and well-being. While patterns of neural activation during emotion regulation have been well characterized, patterns of connectivity between regions remain less explored. It is increasingly recognized that the human brain is organized into large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) whose interrelationships are altered in characteristic ways during psychological tasks. In this fMRI study of 54 healthy individuals, we investigated alterations in connectivity within and between ICNs produced by the emotion regulation strategy of reappraisal. In order to gain a comprehensive picture of connectivity changes, we utilized connectomic psychophysiological interactions (PPI), a whole-brain generalization of standard single-seed PPI methods. In particular, we quantified PPI connectivity pair-wise across 837 ROIs placed throughout the cortex. We found that compared to maintaining one's emotional responses, engaging in reappraisal produced robust and distributed alterations in functional connections involving visual, dorsal attention, frontoparietal, and default networks. Visual network in particular increased connectivity with multiple ICNs including dorsal attention and default networks. We interpret these findings in terms of the role of these networks in mediating critical constituent processes in emotion regulation, including visual processing, stimulus salience, attention control, and interpretation and contextualization of stimuli. Our results add a new network perspective to our understanding of the neural underpinnings of emotion regulation, and highlight that connectomic methods can play a valuable role in comprehensively investigating modulation of connectivity across task conditions.

  14. Detecting altered connectivity patterns in HIV associated neurocognitive impairment using mutual connectivity analysis

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    Abidin, Anas Zainul; D'Souza, Adora M.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The use of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has provided interesting insights into our understanding of the brain. In clinical setups these scans have been used to detect and study changes in the brain network properties in various neurological disorders. A large percentage of subjects infected with HIV present cognitive deficits, which are known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). In this study we propose to use our novel technique named Mutual Connectivity Analysis (MCA) to detect differences in brain networks in subjects with and without HIV infection. Resting state functional MRI scans acquired from 10 subjects (5 HIV+ and 5 HIV-) were subject to standard preprocessing routines. Subsequently, the average time-series for each brain region of the Automated Anatomic Labeling (AAL) atlas are extracted and used with the MCA framework to obtain a graph characterizing the interactions between them. The network graphs obtained for different subjects are then compared using Network-Based Statistics (NBS), which is an approach to detect differences between graphs edges while controlling for the family-wise error rate when mass univariate testing is performed. Applying this approach on the graphs obtained yields a single network encompassing 42 nodes and 65 edges, which is significantly different between the two subject groups. Specifically connections to the regions in and around the basal ganglia are significantly decreased. Also some nodes corresponding to the posterior cingulate cortex are affected. These results are inline with our current understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of HIV associated neurocognitive disease (HAND) and other HIV based fMRI connectivity studies. Hence, we illustrate the applicability of our novel approach with network-based statistics in a clinical case-control study to detect differences connectivity patterns.

  15. Mean-field modeling of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system. I Firing rates in healthy and parkinsonian states.

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    van Albada, S J; Robinson, P A

    2009-04-21

    Parkinsonism leads to various electrophysiological changes in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system (BGTCS), often including elevated discharge rates of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the output nuclei, and reduced activity of the globus pallidus external (GPe) segment. These rate changes have been explained qualitatively in terms of the direct/indirect pathway model, involving projections of distinct striatal populations to the output nuclei and GPe. Although these populations partly overlap, evidence suggests dopamine depletion differentially affects cortico-striato-pallidal connection strengths to the two pallidal segments. Dopamine loss may also decrease the striatal signal-to-noise ratio, reducing both corticostriatal coupling and striatal firing thresholds. Additionally, nigrostriatal degeneration may cause secondary changes including weakened lateral inhibition in the GPe, and mesocortical dopamine loss may decrease intracortical excitation and especially inhibition. Here a mean-field model of the BGTCS is presented with structure and parameter estimates closely based on physiology and anatomy. Changes in model rates due to the possible effects of dopamine loss listed above are compared with experiment. Our results suggest that a stronger indirect pathway, possibly combined with a weakened direct pathway, is compatible with empirical evidence. However, altered corticostriatal connection strengths are probably not solely responsible for substantially increased STN activity often found. A lower STN firing threshold, weaker intracortical inhibition, and stronger striato-GPe inhibition help explain the relatively large increase in STN rate. Reduced GPe-GPe inhibition and a lower GPe firing threshold can account for the comparatively small decrease in GPe rate frequently observed. Changes in cortex, GPe, and STN help normalize the cortical rate, also in accord with experiments. The model integrates the basal ganglia into a unified framework along with an

  16. Functional integrity of thalamocortical circuits differentiates normal aging from mild cognitive impairment.

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    Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes; Gomez-Herrero, German; Cruz-Vadell, Abel; Gil-Neciga, Eulogio; Rodriguez-Romero, Rafael; Garcia-Solis, David

    2009-12-01

    Resonance in thalamocortical networks is critically involved in sculpting oscillatory behavior in large ensembles of neocortical cells. Neocortical oscillations provide critical information about the integrity of thalamocortical circuits and functional connectivity of cortical networks, which seem to be significantly disrupted by the neuronal death and synapse loss characterizing Alzheimer's disease (AD). By applying a novel analysis methodology to overcome volume conduction effects between scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements, we were able to estimate the temporal activation of EEG-alpha sources in the thalamus and parieto-occipital regions of the cortex. We found that synaptic flow underlying the lower alpha band (7.5-10 Hz) was abnormally facilitated in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as compared to healthy elderly individuals, particularly from thalamus to cortex (approximately 38% higher). In addition, the thalamic generator of lower alpha oscillations was also abnormally activated in patients with MCI. Regarding the upper alpha subdivision (10.1-12.5 Hz), both controls and patients with MCI showed a bidirectional decrease of thalamocortical synaptic transmission, which was age-dependent only in the control group. Altogether, our results suggest that functional dynamics of thalamocortical networks differentiate individuals at high risk of developing AD from healthy elderly subjects, supporting the hypothesis that neurodegeneration mechanisms are active years before the patient is clinically diagnosed with dementia.

  17. Perfusion deficits and functional connectivity alterations in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder

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    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Linchuan; Li, Liang; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    To explore the alteration in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and functional connectivity between survivors with recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and without PTSD, survived from the same coal mine flood disaster. In this study, a processing pipeline using arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence was proposed. Considering low spatial resolution of ASL sequence, a linear regression method was firstly used to correct the partial volume (PV) effect for better CBF estimation. Then the alterations of CBF between two groups were analyzed using both uncorrected and PV-corrected CBF maps. Based on altered CBF regions detected from the CBF analysis as seed regions, the functional connectivity abnormities in PTSD patients was investigated. The CBF analysis using PV-corrected maps indicates CBF deficits in the bilateral frontal lobe, right superior frontal gyrus and right corpus callosum of PTSD patients, while only right corpus callosum was identified in uncorrected CBF analysis. Furthermore, the regional CBF of the right superior frontal gyrus exhibits significantly negative correlation with the symptom severity in PTSD patients. The resting-state functional connectivity indicates increased connectivity between left frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. These results indicate that PV-corrected CBF exhibits more subtle perfusion changes and may benefit further perfusion and connectivity analysis. The symptom-specific perfusion deficits and aberrant connectivity in above memory-related regions may be putative biomarkers for recent onset PTSD induced by a single prolonged trauma exposure and help predict the severity of PTSD.

  18. Effects of Etomidate on GABAergic and Glutamatergic Transmission in Rat Thalamocortical Slices.

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    Fu, Bao; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Hao; Yu, Tian

    2016-12-01

    Although accumulative evidence indicates that the thalamocortical system is an important target for general anesthetics, the underlying mechanisms of anesthetic action on thalamocortical neurotransmission are not fully understood. The aim of the study is to explore the action of etomidate on glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in rat thalamocortical slices by using whole cell patch-clamp recording. We found that etomidate mainly prolonged the decay time of spontaneous GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs), without changing the frequency. Furthermore, etomidate not only prolonged the decay time of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) but also increased the amplitude. On the other hand, etomidate significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs), without altering the amplitude or decay time in the absence of bicuculline. When GABAA receptors were blocked using bicuculline, the effects of etomidate on sEPSCs were mostly eliminated. These results suggest that etomidate enhances GABAergic transmission mainly through postsynaptic mechanism in thalamocortical neuronal network. Etomidate attenuates glutamatergic transmission predominantly through presynaptic action and requires presynaptic GABAA receptors involvement.

  19. Resting-state connectivity of the amygdala is altered following Pavlovian fear conditioning.

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    Schultz, Douglas H; Balderston, Nicholas L; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2012-01-01

    Neural plasticity in the amygdala is necessary for the acquisition and storage of memory in Pavlovian fear conditioning, but most neuroimaging studies have focused only on stimulus-evoked responses during the conditioning session. This study examined changes in the resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the amygdala before and after Pavlovian fear conditioning, an emotional learning task. Behavioral results from the conditioning session revealed that participants learned normally and fMRI data recorded during learning identified a number of stimulus-evoked changes that were consistent with previous work. A direct comparison between the pre- and post-conditioning amygdala connectivity revealed a region of dorsal prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the superior frontal gyrus that showed a significant increase in connectivity following the conditioning session. A behavioral measure of explicit memory performance was positively correlated with the change in amygdala connectivity within a neighboring region in the superior frontal gyrus. Additionally, an implicit autonomic measure of conditioning was positively correlated with the change in connectivity between the amygdala and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The resting-state data show that amygdala connectivity is altered following Pavlovian fear conditioning and that these changes are also related to behavioral outcomes. These alterations may reflect the operation of a consolidation process that strengthens neural connections to support memory after the learning event.

  20. Resting-state connectivity of the amygdala is altered following Pavlovian fear conditioning

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    Douglas H Schultz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural plasticity in the amygdala is necessary for the acquisition and storage of memory in Pavlovian fear conditioning, but most neuroimaging studies have focused only on stimulus-evoked responses during the conditioning session. This study examined changes in the resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC of the amygdala before and after Pavlovian fear conditioning, an emotional learning task. Behavioral results from the conditioning session revealed that participants learned normally and FMRI data recorded during learning identified a number of stimulus-evoked changes that were consistent with previous work. A direct comparison between the pre and post-conditioning amygdala connectivity revealed a region of dorsal prefrontal cortex (PFC in the superior frontal gyrus that showed a significant increase in connectivity following the conditioning session. A behavioral measure of explicit memory performance was positively correlated with the change in amygdala connectivity within a neighboring region in the superior frontal gyrus. Additionally, an implicit autonomic measure of conditioning was positively correlated with the change in connectivity between the amygdala and the anterior cingulate cortex. The resting-state data show that amygdala connectivity is altered following Pavlovian fear conditioning and that these changes are also related to behavioral outcomes. These alterations may reflect the operation of a consolidation process that strengthens neural connections to support memory after the learning event.

  1. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in cortical networks in psychopathy.

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    Philippi, Carissa L; Pujara, Maia S; Motzkin, Julian C; Newman, Joseph; Kiehl, Kent A; Koenigs, Michael

    2015-04-15

    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by callous antisocial behavior and criminal recidivism. Here we examine whether psychopathy is associated with alterations in functional connectivity in three large-scale cortical networks. Using fMRI in 142 adult male prison inmates, we computed resting-state functional connectivity using seeds from the default mode network, frontoparietal network, and cingulo-opercular network. To determine the specificity of our findings to these cortical networks, we also calculated functional connectivity using seeds from two comparison primary sensory networks: visual and auditory networks. Regression analyses related network connectivity to overall psychopathy scores and to subscores for the "factors" and "facets" of psychopathy: Factor 1, interpersonal/affective traits; Factor 2, lifestyle/antisocial traits; Facet 1, interpersonal; Facet 2, affective; Facet 3, lifestyle; Facet 4, antisocial. Overall psychopathy severity was associated with reduced functional connectivity between lateral parietal cortex and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. The two factor scores exhibited contrasting relationships with functional connectivity: Factor 1 scores were associated with reduced functional connectivity in the three cortical networks, whereas Factor 2 scores were associated with heightened connectivity in the same networks. This dissociation was evident particularly in the functional connectivity between anterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. The facet scores also demonstrated distinct patterns of connectivity. We found no associations between psychopathy scores and functional connectivity within visual or auditory networks. These findings provide novel evidence on the neural correlates of psychopathy and suggest that connectivity between cortical association hubs, such as the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, may be a neurobiological marker of the disorder.

  2. Alteration of long-distance functional connectivity and network topology in patients with supratentorial gliomas

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    Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Ho Sung; Kim, Sang Joon; Shim, Woo Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The need for information regarding functional alterations in patients with brain gliomas is increasing, but little is known about the functional consequences of focal brain tumors throughout the entire brain. Using resting-state functional MR imaging (rs-fMRI), this study assessed functional connectivity in patients with supratentorial brain gliomas with possible alterations in long-distance connectivity and network topology. Data from 36 patients with supratentorial brain gliomas and 12 healthy subjects were acquired using rs-fMRI. The functional connectivity matrix (FCM) was created using 32 pairs of cortical seeds on Talairach coordinates in each individual subject. Local and distant connectivity were calculated using z-scores in the individual patient's FCM, and the averaged FCM of patients was compared with that of healthy subjects. Weighted network analysis was performed by calculating local efficiency, global efficiency, clustering coefficient, and small-world topology, and compared between patients and healthy controls. When comparing the averaged FCM of patients with that of healthy controls, the patients showed decreased long-distance, inter-hemispheric connectivity (0.32 ± 0.16 in patients vs. 0. 42 ± 0.15 in healthy controls, p = 0.04). In network analysis, patients showed increased local efficiency (p < 0.05), but global efficiency, clustering coefficient, and small-world topology were relatively preserved compared to healthy subjects. Patients with supratentorial brain gliomas showed decreased long-distance connectivity while increased local efficiency and preserved small-world topology. The results of this small case series may provide a better understanding of the alterations of functional connectivity in patients with brain gliomas across the whole brain scale. (orig.)

  3. Altered directional connectivity between emotion network and motor network in Parkinson's disease with depression.

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    Liang, Peipeng; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Zhao, Sinan; Liu, Jiangtao; Hu, Xiaoping; Li, Kuncheng

    2016-07-01

    Depression is common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), which can make all the other symptoms of PD much worse. It is thus urgent to differentiate depressed PD (DPD) patients from non-depressed PD (NDPD).The purpose of the present study was to characterize alterations in directional brain connectivity unique to Parkinson's disease with depression, using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI).Sixteen DPD patients, 20 NDPD patients, 17 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 21 healthy control subjects (normal controls [NC]) underwent structural MRI and rs-fMRI scanning. Voxel-based morphometry and directional brain connectivity during resting-state were analyzed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 2-sample t tests were used to compare each pair of groups, using sex, age, education level, structural atrophy, and/or HAMD, unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) as covariates.In contrast to NC, DPD showed significant gray matter (GM) volume abnormalities in some mid-line limbic regions including dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and precuneus, and sub-cortical regions including caudate and cerebellum. Relative to NC and MDD, both DPD and NDPD showed significantly increased directional connectivity from bilateral anterior insula and posterior orbitofrontal cortices to left inferior temporal cortex. As compared with NC, MDD and NDPD, alterations of directional connectivity in DPD were specifically observed in the pathway from bilateral anterior insula and posterior orbitofrontal cortices to right basal ganglia.Resting state directional connectivity alterations were observed between emotion network and motor network in DPD patients after controlling for age, sex, structural atrophy. Given that these alterations are unique to DPD, it may provide a potential differential biomarker for distinguishing DPD from NC, NDPD, and MDD.

  4. Pukala intrusion, its age and connection to hydrothermal alteration in Orivesi, southwestern Finland

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    Matti Talikka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pukala intrusion is situated in the Paleoproterozoic Svecofennian domain of the Fennoscandian Shield in the contact region between the Central Finland Granitoid Complex and the Tampere Belt. The acid subvolcanic intrusion, which is in contact or close to severalaltered domains, mainly consists of porphyritic granodiorite and trondhjemite. The Pukala intrusion was emplaced into volcanic sequence in an island-arc or fore-arc setting before or during the early stages of the main regional deformation phase of the Svecofennian orogeny. On the basis of the geochemical data, the Pukala intrusion is a peraluminous volcanic-arc granitoid. After crystallisation at 1896±3 Ma, multiphase deformation and metamorphismcaused alteration, recrystallisation, and orientation of the minerals, and tilted the intrusion steeply towards south. The 1851±5 Ma U-Pb age for titanite is connected to the late stages of the Svecofennian tectonometamorphic evolution of the region. Several hydrothermally altered domains are located in the felsic and intermediate metavolcanic rocks of the Tampere Belt within less than one kilometre south of the Pukala intrusion. Alteration is divided into three basic types: partial silica alteration, chlorite-sericite±silica alteration, and sericite alteration in shear zones. The first two types probably formed during the emplacement and crystallisation of the Pukala intrusion, and the third is linked to late shearing. Intense sericitisation and comb quartz bands in the contact of theintrusion and the altered domain at Kutemajärvi suggest that the hydrothermal system was driven by the Pukala intrusion.

  5. Altered default network resting-state functional connectivity in adolescents with Internet gaming addiction.

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    Wei-na Ding

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Excessive use of the Internet has been linked to a variety of negative psychosocial consequences. This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate whether functional connectivity is altered in adolescents with Internet gaming addiction (IGA. METHODS: Seventeen adolescents with IGA and 24 normal control adolescents underwent a 7.3 minute resting-state fMRI scan. Posterior cingulate cortex (PCC connectivity was determined in all subjects by investigating synchronized low-frequency fMRI signal fluctuations using a temporal correlation method. To assess the relationship between IGA symptom severity and PCC connectivity, contrast images representing areas correlated with PCC connectivity were correlated with the scores of the 17 subjects with IGA on the Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11 and their hours of Internet use per week. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the distributions of the age, gender, and years of education between the two groups. The subjects with IGA showed longer Internet use per week (hours (p<0.0001 and higher CIAS (p<0.0001 and BIS-11 (p = 0.01 scores than the controls. Compared with the control group, subjects with IGA exhibited increased functional connectivity in the bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe and middle temporal gyrus. The bilateral inferior parietal lobule and right inferior temporal gyrus exhibited decreased connectivity. Connectivity with the PCC was positively correlated with CIAS scores in the right precuneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, caudate, nucleus accumbens, supplementary motor area, and lingual gyrus. It was negatively correlated with the right cerebellum anterior lobe and left superior parietal lobule. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that adolescents with IGA exhibit different resting-state patterns of brain activity. As these alterations are partially consistent with those in patients

  6. Altered neural connectivity during response inhibition in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and their unaffected siblings

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    Daan van Rooij

    2015-01-01

    Discussion: Subjects with ADHD fail to integrate activation within the response inhibition network and to inhibit connectivity with task-irrelevant regions. Unaffected siblings show similar alterations only during failed stop trials, as well as unique suppression of motor areas, suggesting compensatory strategies. These findings support the role of altered functional connectivity in understanding the neurobiology and familial transmission of ADHD.

  7. Altered fMRI connectivity dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy might explain seizure semiology

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    Helmut eLaufs

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE can be conceptualized as a network disease. The network can be characterized by inter-regional functional connectivity, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal correlations between any two region pairs. However, functional connectivity is not constant over time, thus computing correlation at a given time and then at some later time could give different results (non-stationarity. We hypothesized (1 that non-stationarities can be induced by epilepsy (e.g. interictal epileptic activity increasing local signal variance and that (2 these transient events contribute to fluctuations in connectivity leading to pathological functioning, i.e. TLE semiology. We analyzed fMRI data from 27 patients with TLE and 22 healthy controls focusing on EEG-confirmed wake epochs only to protect against sleep-induced connectivity changes. Testing hypothesis (1, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal variance was significantly greater in TLE than in controls: the temporal pole - including the hippocampus. Taking the latter as the seed region and testing hypothesis (2 we calculated the time-varying interregional correlation values (dynamic functional connectivity to other brain regions and found greater connectivity variance in the TLE than the control group mainly in the precuneus, the supplementary and sensori-motor and the frontal cortices.We conclude that the highest BOLD signal variance in the hippocampi is highly suggestive of a specific epilepsy-related effect. The altered connectivity dynamics in TLE patients might help to explain the hallmark semiological features of dyscognitive seizures including impaired consciousness (precuneus, frontal cortex, sensory disturbance and motor automatisms (sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor cortex. Accounting for the non-stationarity and state-dependence of functional connectivity are a prerequisite in the search for potential connectivity-derived biomarkers in TLE.

  8. Alterations in interhemispheric functional and anatomical connectivity are associated with tobacco smoking in humans.

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    Viswanath, Humsini; Velasquez, Kenia M; Thompson-Lake, Daisy Gemma Yan; Savjani, Ricky; Carter, Asasia Q; Eagleman, David; Baldwin, Philip R; De La Garza, Richard; Salas, Ramiro

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity correlates with several neurologic and psychiatric conditions, including depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and stroke. Abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity also correlates with abuse of cannabis and cocaine. In the current report, we evaluated whether tobacco abuse (i.e., cigarette smoking) is associated with altered interhemispheric connectivity. To that end, we examined resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in short term tobacco deprived and smoking as usual tobacco smokers, and in non-smoker controls. Additionally, we compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the same subjects to study differences in white matter. The data reveal a significant increase in interhemispheric functional connectivity in sated tobacco smokers when compared to controls. This difference was larger in frontal regions, and was positively correlated with the average number of cigarettes smoked per day. In addition, we found a negative correlation between the number of DTI streamlines in the genual corpus callosum and the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Taken together, our results implicate changes in interhemispheric functional and anatomical connectivity in current cigarette smokers.

  9. Mean-field modeling of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system. II Dynamics of parkinsonian oscillations.

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    van Albada, S J; Gray, R T; Drysdale, P M; Robinson, P A

    2009-04-21

    Neuronal correlates of Parkinson's disease (PD) include a shift to lower frequencies in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and enhanced synchronized oscillations at 3-7 and 7-30 Hz in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cortex. This study describes the dynamics of a recent physiologically based mean-field model of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system, and shows how it accounts for many key electrophysiological correlates of PD. Its detailed functional connectivity comprises partially segregated direct and indirect pathways through two populations of striatal neurons, a hyperdirect pathway involving a corticosubthalamic projection, thalamostriatal feedback, and local inhibition in striatum and external pallidum (GPe). In a companion paper, realistic steady-state firing rates were obtained for the healthy state, and after dopamine loss modeled by weaker direct and stronger indirect pathways, reduced intrapallidal inhibition, lower firing thresholds of the GPe and subthalamic nucleus (STN), a stronger projection from striatum to GPe, and weaker cortical interactions. Here it is shown that oscillations around 5 and 20 Hz can arise with a strong indirect pathway, which also causes increased synchronization throughout the basal ganglia. Furthermore, increased theta power with progressive nigrostriatal degeneration is correlated with reduced alpha power and peak frequency, in agreement with empirical results. Unlike the hyperdirect pathway, the indirect pathway sustains oscillations with phase relationships that coincide with those found experimentally. Alterations in the responses of basal ganglia to transient stimuli accord with experimental observations. Reduced cortical gains due to both nigrostriatal and mesocortical dopamine loss lead to slower changes in cortical activity and may be related to bradykinesia. Finally, increased EEG power found in some studies may be partly explained by a lower effective GPe firing threshold, reduced GPe-GPe inhibition, and/or weaker

  10. Altered causal connectivity of resting state brain networks in amnesic MCI.

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    Peipeng Liang

    Full Text Available Most neuroimaging studies of resting state networks in amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI have concentrated on functional connectivity (FC based on instantaneous correlation in a single network. The purpose of the current study was to investigate effective connectivity in aMCI patients based on Granger causality of four important networks at resting state derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging data--default mode network (DMN, hippocampal cortical memory network (HCMN, dorsal attention network (DAN and fronto-parietal control network (FPCN. Structural and functional MRI data were collected from 16 aMCI patients and 16 age, gender-matched healthy controls. Correlation-purged Granger causality analysis was used, taking gray matter atrophy as covariates, to compare the group difference between aMCI patients and healthy controls. We found that the causal connectivity between networks in aMCI patients was significantly altered with both increases and decreases in the aMCI group as compared to healthy controls. Some alterations were significantly correlated with the disease severity as measured by mini-mental state examination (MMSE, and California verbal learning test (CVLT scores. When the whole-brain signal averaged over the entire brain was used as a nuisance co-variate, the within-group maps were significantly altered while the between-group difference maps did not. These results suggest that the alterations in causal influences may be one of the possible underlying substrates of cognitive impairments in aMCI. The present study extends and complements previous FC studies and demonstrates the coexistence of causal disconnection and compensation in aMCI patients, and thus might provide insights into biological mechanism of the disease.

  11. Altered resting-state amygdala functional connectivity in men with posttraumatic stress disorder

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    Sripada, Rebecca K.; King, Anthony P.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.; Wang, Xin; Sripada, Chandra S.; Welsh, Robert C.; Liberzon, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Background Converging neuroimaging research suggests altered emotion neurocircuitry in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emotion activation studies in these individuals have shown hyperactivation in emotion-related regions, including the amygdala and insula, and hypoactivation in emotion-regulation regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). However, few studies have examined patterns of connectivity at rest in individuals with PTSD, a potentially powerful method for illuminating brain network structure. Methods Using the amygdala as a seed region, we measured resting-state brain connectivity using 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging in returning male veterans with PTSD and combat controls without PTSD. Results Fifteen veterans with PTSD and 14 combat controls enrolled in our study. Compared with controls, veterans with PTSD showed greater positive connectivity between the amygdala and insula, reduced positive connectivity between the amygdala and hippocampus, and reduced anticorrelation between the amygdala and dorsal ACC and rostral ACC. Limitations Only male veterans with combat exposure were tested, thus our findings cannot be generalized to women or to individuals with non–combat related PTSD. Conclusion These results demonstrate that studies of functional connectivity during resting state can discern aberrant patterns of coupling within emotion circuits and suggest a possible brain basis for emotion-processing and emotion-regulation deficits in individuals with PTSD. PMID:22313617

  12. Can orchards help connect Mediterranean ecosystems? Animal movement data alter conservation priorities

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    Nogeire, Theresa M.; Davis, Frank W.; Crooks, Kevin R.; McRae, Brad H.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Boydston, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    As natural habitats become fragmented by human activities, animals must increasingly move through human-dominated systems, particularly agricultural landscapes. Mapping areas important for animal movement has therefore become a key part of conservation planning. Models of landscape connectivity are often parameterized using expert opinion and seldom distinguish between the risks and barriers presented by different crop types. Recent research, however, suggests different crop types, such as row crops and orchards, differ in the degree to which they facilitate or impede species movements. Like many mammalian carnivores, bobcats (Lynx rufus) are sensitive to fragmentation and loss of connectivity between habitat patches. We investigated how distinguishing between different agricultural land covers might change conclusions about the relative conservation importance of different land uses in a Mediterranean ecosystem. Bobcats moved relatively quickly in row crops but relatively slowly in orchards, at rates similar to those in natural habitats of woodlands and scrub. We found that parameterizing a connectivity model using empirical data on bobcat movements in agricultural lands and other land covers, instead of parameterizing the model using habitat suitability indices based on expert opinion, altered locations of predicted animal movement routes. These results emphasize that differentiating between types of agriculture can alter conservation planning outcomes.

  13. Thalamocortical rhythms during a vibrotactile detection task

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    Haegens, Saskia; Vázquez, Yuriria; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Jensen, Ole; Romo, Ranulfo

    2014-01-01

    To explore the role of oscillatory dynamics of the somatosensory thalamocortical network in perception and decision making, we recorded the simultaneous neuronal activity in the ventral posterolateral nucleus (VPL) of the somatosensory thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in two macaque monkeys performing a vibrotactile detection task. Actively detecting a vibrotactile stimulus and reporting its perception elicited a sustained poststimulus beta power increase in VPL and an alpha power decrease in S1, in both stimulus-present and stimulus-absent trials. These oscillatory dynamics in the somatosensory thalamocortical network depended on the behavioral context: they were stronger for the active detection condition than for a passive stimulation condition. Furthermore, contrasting stimulus-present vs. stimulus-absent responses, we found that poststimulus theta power increased in both VPL and S1, and alpha/beta power decreased in S1, reflecting the monkey’s perceptual decision but not the motor response per se. Additionally, higher prestimulus alpha power in S1 correlated with an increased probability of the monkey reporting a stimulus, regardless of the actual presence of a stimulus. Thus, we found task-related modulations in oscillatory activity, not only in the neocortex but also in the thalamus, depending on behavioral context. Furthermore, oscillatory modulations reflected the perceptual decision process and subsequent behavioral response. We conclude that these early sensory regions, in addition to their primary sensory functions, may be actively involved in perceptual decision making. PMID:24733899

  14. Thalamocortical rhythms during a vibrotactile detection task.

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    Haegens, Saskia; Vázquez, Yuriria; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Jensen, Ole; Romo, Ranulfo

    2014-04-29

    To explore the role of oscillatory dynamics of the somatosensory thalamocortical network in perception and decision making, we recorded the simultaneous neuronal activity in the ventral posterolateral nucleus (VPL) of the somatosensory thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in two macaque monkeys performing a vibrotactile detection task. Actively detecting a vibrotactile stimulus and reporting its perception elicited a sustained poststimulus beta power increase in VPL and an alpha power decrease in S1, in both stimulus-present and stimulus-absent trials. These oscillatory dynamics in the somatosensory thalamocortical network depended on the behavioral context: they were stronger for the active detection condition than for a passive stimulation condition. Furthermore, contrasting stimulus-present vs. stimulus-absent responses, we found that poststimulus theta power increased in both VPL and S1, and alpha/beta power decreased in S1, reflecting the monkey's perceptual decision but not the motor response per se. Additionally, higher prestimulus alpha power in S1 correlated with an increased probability of the monkey reporting a stimulus, regardless of the actual presence of a stimulus. Thus, we found task-related modulations in oscillatory activity, not only in the neocortex but also in the thalamus, depending on behavioral context. Furthermore, oscillatory modulations reflected the perceptual decision process and subsequent behavioral response. We conclude that these early sensory regions, in addition to their primary sensory functions, may be actively involved in perceptual decision making.

  15. Altered Functional Connectivity in Essential Tremor: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

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    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D; Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Manzanedo, Eva; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Posada, Ignacio; Rocon, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET) has been associated with a spectrum of clinical features, with both motor and nonmotor elements, including cognitive deficits. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether brain networks that might be involved in the pathogenesis of nonmotor manifestations associated with ET are altered, and the relationship between abnormal connectivity and ET severity and neuropsychological function.Resting-state fMRI data in 23 ET patients (12 women and 11 men) and 22 healthy controls (HC) (12 women and 10 men) were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a "dual-regression" technique, to identify the group differences of resting-state networks (RSNs) (default mode network [DMN] and executive, frontoparietal, sensorimotor, cerebellar, auditory/language, and visual networks). All participants underwent a neuropsychological and neuroimaging session, where resting-state data were collected.Relative to HC, ET patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (DMN and frontoparietal networks) and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and visual networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with ET severity (DMN) and ET duration (DMN and left frontoparietal network), but also with cognitive ability. Moreover, in at least 3 networks (DMN and frontoparietal networks), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, verbal memory, visual memory, and language) and depressive symptoms. Further, in the visual network, decreased connectivity was associated with worse performance on visuospatial ability.ET was associated with abnormal brain connectivity in major RSNs that might be involved in both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Our findings underscore the importance of examining RSNs in this population as a biomarker of disease.

  16. Evidence for altered basal ganglia-brainstem connections in cervical dystonia.

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    Anne J Blood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been increasing interest in the interaction of the basal ganglia with the cerebellum and the brainstem in motor control and movement disorders. In addition, it has been suggested that these subcortical connections with the basal ganglia may help to coordinate a network of regions involved in mediating posture and stabilization. While studies in animal models support a role for this circuitry in the pathophysiology of the movement disorder dystonia, thus far, there is only indirect evidence for this in humans with dystonia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study we investigated probabilistic diffusion tractography in DYT1-negative patients with cervical dystonia and matched healthy control subjects, with the goal of showing that patients exhibit altered microstructure in the connectivity between the pallidum and brainstem. The brainstem regions investigated included nuclei that are known to exhibit strong connections with the cerebellum. We observed large clusters of tractography differences in patients relative to healthy controls, between the pallidum and the brainstem. Tractography was decreased in the left hemisphere and increased in the right hemisphere in patients, suggesting a potential basis for the left/right white matter asymmetry we previously observed in focal dystonia patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support the hypothesis that connections between the basal ganglia and brainstem play a role in the pathophysiology of dystonia.

  17. Thalamocortical mechanisms for the anteriorization of α rhythms during propofol-induced unconsciousness.

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    Vijayan, Sujith; Ching, Shinung; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Kopell, Nancy J

    2013-07-01

    As humans are induced into a state of general anesthesia via propofol, the normal alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) in the occipital cortex disappears and a frontal alpha rhythm emerges. This spatial shift in alpha activity is called anteriorization. We present a thalamocortical model that suggests mechanisms underlying anteriorization. Our model captures the neural dynamics of anteriorization when we adjust it to reflect two key actions of propofol: its potentiation of GABA and its reduction of the hyperpolarization-activated current Ih. The reduction in Ih abolishes the occipital alpha by silencing a specialized subset of thalamocortical cells, thought to generate occipital alpha at depolarized membrane potentials (>-60 mV). The increase in GABA inhibition imposes an alpha timescale on both the cortical and thalamic portions of the frontal component that are reinforced by reciprocal thalamocortical feedback. Anteriorization can thus be understood as a differential effect of anesthetic drugs on thalamic nuclei with disparate spatial projections, i.e.: (1) they disrupt the normal, depolarized alpha in posterior-projecting thalamic nuclei while (2) they engage a new, hyperpolarized alpha in frontothalamic nuclei. Our model generalizes to other anesthetics that include GABA as a target, since the molecular targets of many such anesthetics alter the model dynamics in a manner similar to that of propofol.

  18. Mean-field modeling of thalamocortical dynamics and a model-driven approach to EEG analysis.

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    Victor, Jonathan D; Drover, Jonathan D; Conte, Mary M; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2011-09-13

    Higher brain function depends on task-dependent information flow between cortical regions. Converging lines of evidence suggest that interactions between cortical regions and the central thalamus play a key role in establishing the dynamic patterns of functional connectivity that normally support these processes. In patients with chronic disturbances of cognitive function due to severe brain injury, dysfunction of this circuitry likely plays a crucial role in pathogenesis. However, assaying thalamocortical interactions is challenging even in healthy subjects and more so in severely impaired patients. To approach this problem, we apply a dynamical-systems approach to motivate an analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG). We begin with a model for a single thalamocortical module [Robinson PA, Rennie CJ, Rowe DL (2002) Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 65:041924; Robinson PA, Rennie CJ, Wright JJ, Bourke PD (1998) Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 58:3557-3571]. When two such modules interact via shared thalamic inhibition, multistable behavior emerges; each mode is characterized by a different pattern of coherence between cortical regions. This observation suggests that changing patterns of cortical coherence are a hallmark of normal thalamocortical dynamics. In a preliminary study, we test this idea by analyzing the EEG of a patient with chronic brain injury, who has a marked improvement in behavior and frontal brain metabolism in response to zolpidem. The analysis shows that following zolpidem administration, changing patterns of coherence are identified between the frontal lobes and between frontal and distant brain regions. These observations support the role of the central thalamus in the organization of patterns of cortical interactions and suggest how indexes of thalamocortical dynamics can be extracted from the EEG.

  19. Altered Effective Connectivity of Hippocampus-Dependent Episodic Memory Network in mTBI Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are generally recognized to affect episodic memory. However, less is known regarding how external force altered the way functionally connected brain structures of the episodic memory system interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely, multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore causal interactions within the brain network of interest. Results presented that TBI induced increased bilateral and decreased ipsilateral effective connectivity in the episodic memory network in comparison with that of normal controls. Moreover, the left anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG, the concept forming hub), left hippocampus (the personal experience binding hub), and left parahippocampal gyrus (the contextual association hub) were no longer network hubs in TBI survivors, who compensated for hippocampal deficits by relying more on the right hippocampus (underlying perceptual memory) and the right medial frontal gyrus (MeFG) in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC). We postulated that the overrecruitment of the right anterior PFC caused dysfunction of the strategic component of episodic memory, which caused deteriorating episodic memory in mTBI survivors. Our findings also suggested that the pattern of brain network changes in TBI survivors presented similar functional consequences to normal aging. PMID:28074162

  20. Altered Effective Connectivity of Hippocampus-Dependent Episodic Memory Network in mTBI Survivors

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    Hao Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs are generally recognized to affect episodic memory. However, less is known regarding how external force altered the way functionally connected brain structures of the episodic memory system interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely, multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore causal interactions within the brain network of interest. Results presented that TBI induced increased bilateral and decreased ipsilateral effective connectivity in the episodic memory network in comparison with that of normal controls. Moreover, the left anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG, the concept forming hub, left hippocampus (the personal experience binding hub, and left parahippocampal gyrus (the contextual association hub were no longer network hubs in TBI survivors, who compensated for hippocampal deficits by relying more on the right hippocampus (underlying perceptual memory and the right medial frontal gyrus (MeFG in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC. We postulated that the overrecruitment of the right anterior PFC caused dysfunction of the strategic component of episodic memory, which caused deteriorating episodic memory in mTBI survivors. Our findings also suggested that the pattern of brain network changes in TBI survivors presented similar functional consequences to normal aging.

  1. Different types of connective tissue alterations associated with cervical artery dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausser, Ingrid; Müller, Uta; Engelter, Stefan; Lyrer, Philippe; Pezzini, Alessandro; Padovani, Alessandro; Moormann, Birgit; Busse, Otto; Weber, Ralf; Brandt, Tobias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar

    2004-06-01

    This study describes the technical handling and the diagnostic evaluation of skin biopsies in order to standardize the assessment of the delicate morphologic abnormalities that are found in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissections (sCAD). Skin biopsies from 126 patients with sCAD and from 29 healthy relatives were analyzed. The morphology of the connective tissue was normal in 54 patients with sCAD (43%) and aberrant in 72 patients with sCAD (57%). These latter patients were classified into three groups: in 43 patients, we repeatedly observed composite collagen fibrils and elastic fibers with fragmentation and minicalcifications. In 13 further patients, the dermis was significantly thinner than in healthy subjects. The collagen fibers contained fibrils with highly variable diameters. In a third group of 16 sCAD patients, the abnormalities were restricted to the elastic fibers (with fragmentation and minicalcifications) without significant alterations in the morphology of the collagen fibrils. The finding of different morphologic classes of aberrations among patients suggests that the connective tissue defects are genetically heterogeneous. The segregation of the connective tissue phenotype in three families suggested an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.

  2. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning.

  3. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal–Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior

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    Hui-Ching eLin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr, and dorsal striatum (Dstr. LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2 and 4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (4-nAChR occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity’s ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning.

  4. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

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    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  5. Alterations of Functional Connectivity Among Resting-State Networks in Hypothyroidism.

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    Singh, S; Kumar, M; Modi, S; Kaur, P; Shankar, L R; Khushu, S

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism affects brain functioning as suggested by various neuroimaging studies. The primary focus of the present study was to examine whether hypothyroidism would impact connectivity among resting-state networks (RSNs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Twenty-two patients with hypothyroidism and 22 healthy controls were recruited and scanned using rsfMRI. The data were analysed using independent component analysis and a dual regression approach that was applied on five RSNs that were identified using fsl software (http://fsl.fmrib.ox.ac.uk). Hypothyroid patients showed significantly decreased functional connectivity in the regions of the right frontoparietal network (frontal pole), the medial visual network (lateral occipital gyrus, precuneus cortex and cuneus) and the motor network (precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, precuneus cortex, paracingulate gyrus, cingulate gyrus and supramarginal gyrus) compared to healthy controls. The reduced functional connectivity in the right frontoparietal network, the medial visual network and the motor network suggests neurocognitive alterations in hypothyroid patients in the corresponding functions. However, the study would be further continued to investigate the effects of thyroxine treatment and correlation with neurocognitive scores. The findings of the present study provide further interesting insights into our understanding of the action of thyroid hormone on the adult human brain.

  6. Bilingualism alters brain functional connectivity between "control" regions and "language" regions: Evidence from bimodal bilinguals.

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    Li, Le; Abutalebi, Jubin; Zou, Lijuan; Yan, Xin; Liu, Lanfang; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ruiming; Guo, Taomei; Ding, Guosheng

    2015-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that bilingualism induces both structural and functional neuroplasticity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the left caudate nucleus (LCN), both of which are associated with cognitive control. Since these "control" regions should work together with other language regions during language processing, we hypothesized that bilingualism may also alter the functional interaction between the dACC/LCN and language regions. Here we tested this hypothesis by exploring the functional connectivity (FC) in bimodal bilinguals and monolinguals using functional MRI when they either performed a picture naming task with spoken language or were in resting state. We found that for bimodal bilinguals who use spoken and sign languages, the FC of the dACC with regions involved in spoken language (e.g. the left superior temporal gyrus) was stronger in performing the task, but weaker in the resting state as compared to monolinguals. For the LCN, its intrinsic FC with sign language regions including the left inferior temporo-occipital part and right inferior and superior parietal lobules was increased in the bilinguals. These results demonstrate that bilingual experience may alter the brain functional interaction between "control" regions and "language" regions. For different control regions, the FC alters in different ways. The findings also deepen our understanding of the functional roles of the dACC and LCN in language processing.

  7. Thalamocortical dynamics of sleep: roles of purinergic neuromodulation.

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    Halassa, Michael M

    2011-04-01

    Thalamocortical dynamics, the millisecond to second changes in activity of thalamocortical circuits, are central to perception, action and cognition. Generated by local circuitry and sculpted by neuromodulatory systems, these dynamics reflect the expression of vigilance states. In sleep, thalamocortical dynamics are thought to mediate "offline" functions including memory consolidation and synaptic scaling. Here, I discuss thalamocortical sleep dynamics and their modulation by the ascending arousal system and locally released neurochemicals. I focus on modulation of these dynamics by electrically silent astrocytes, highlighting the role of purinergic signaling in this glial form of communication. Astrocytes modulate cortical slow oscillations, sleep behavior, and sleep-dependent cognitive function. The discovery that astrocytes can modulate sleep dynamics and sleep-related behaviors suggests a new way of thinking about the brain, in which integrated circuits of neurons and glia control information processing and behavioral output.

  8. Altered amygdala resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder

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    Christine Anne Rabinak

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is often characterized by aberrant amygdala activation and functional abnormalities in corticolimbic circuitry, as elucidated by functional neuroimaging. These ‘activation’ studies have primarily relied on tasks designed to induce region-specific, and task-dependent brain responses in limbic (e.g., amygdala and paralimbic brain areas through the use of evocative probes such as personalized traumatic script-driven imagery and other negatively valenced emotional stimuli (e.g., threatening faces, aversive scenes, traumatic cues. It remains unknown if these corticolimbic circuit abnormalities exist at baseline or ‘at rest’, in the absence of fear/anxiety-related provocation and outside the context of task demands. Recently, a new approach to studying functional interconnectivity of brain regions derived from ‘resting state’ scans has elucidated systems-level neural network function that may be obscured by activation tasks and may help inform functional interpretations of brain activation patterns. Little is known about whether altered amygdala connectivity patterns exist at rest in PTSD. Therefore the primary aim of the present experiment was to investigate aberrant amygdala functional connectivity patterns in combat-related PTSD patients during resting state. Seventeen Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF veterans with combat-related PTSD (PTSD group and seventeen combat-exposed OEF/OIF veterans without PTSD (Combat-Exposed Control [CEC] group underwent an 8-minute resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Using conventional methods to generate connectivity maps, we extracted the time series from an anatomically-derived amygdala ‘seed’ region and conducted voxel-wise correlation analyses across the entire brain to search for group differences (between PTSD and CEC groups in amygdala functional connectivity, which we hypothesized would localize to the medial

  9. Moderate Cortical Cooling Eliminates Thalamocortical Silent States during Slow Oscillation.

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    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-09-23

    Reduction in temperature depolarizes neurons by a partial closure of potassium channels but decreases the vesicle release probability within synapses. Compared with cooling, neuromodulators produce qualitatively similar effects on intrinsic neuronal properties and synapses in the cortex. We used this similarity of neuronal action in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized mice and non-anesthetized mice to manipulate the thalamocortical activity. We recorded cortical electroencephalogram/local field potential (LFP) activity and intracellular activities from the somatosensory thalamus in control conditions, during cortical cooling and on rewarming. In the deeply anesthetized mice, moderate cortical cooling was characterized by reversible disruption of the thalamocortical slow-wave pattern rhythmicity and the appearance of fast LFP spikes, with frequencies ranging from 6 to 9 Hz. These LFP spikes were correlated with the rhythmic IPSP activities recorded within the thalamic ventral posterior medial neurons and with depolarizing events in the posterior nucleus neurons. Similar cooling of the cortex during light anesthesia rapidly and reversibly eliminated thalamocortical silent states and evoked thalamocortical persistent activity; conversely, mild heating increased thalamocortical slow-wave rhythmicity. In the non-anesthetized head-restrained mice, cooling also prevented the generation of thalamocortical silent states. We conclude that moderate cortical cooling might be used to manipulate slow-wave network activity and induce neuromodulator-independent transition to activated states. Significance statement: In this study, we demonstrate that moderate local cortical cooling of lightly anesthetized or naturally sleeping mice disrupts thalamocortical slow oscillation and induces the activated local field potential pattern. Mild heating has the opposite effect; it increases the rhythmicity of thalamocortical slow oscillation. Our results demonstrate that slow oscillation can be

  10. Dynamics of sensory thalamocortical synaptic networks during information processing states.

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    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A

    2004-11-01

    The thalamocortical network consists of the pathways that interconnect the thalamus and neocortex, including thalamic sensory afferents, corticothalamic and thalamocortical pathways. These pathways are essential to acquire, analyze, store and retrieve sensory information. However, sensory information processing mostly occurs during behavioral arousal, when activity in thalamus and neocortex consists of an electrographic sign of low amplitude fast activity, known as activation, which is caused by several neuromodulator systems that project to the thalamocortical network. Logically, in order to understand how the thalamocortical network processes sensory information it is essential to study its response properties during states of activation. This paper reviews the temporal and spatial response properties of synaptic pathways in the whisker thalamocortical network of rodents during activated states as compared to quiescent (non-activated) states. The evidence shows that these pathways are differentially regulated via the effects of neuromodulators as behavioral contingencies demand. Thus, during activated states, the temporal and spatial response properties of pathways in the thalamocortical network are transformed to allow the processing of sensory information.

  11. REORGANIZATION OF VISUAL CALLOSAL CONNECTIONS FOLLOWING ALTERATIONS OF RETINAL INPUT AND BRAIN DAMAGE

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    LAURA RESTANI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Vision is a very important sensory modality in humans. Visual disorders are numerous and arising from diverse and complex causes. Deficits in visual function are highly disabling from a social point of view and in addition cause a considerable economic burden. For all these reasons there is an intense effort by the scientific community to gather knowledge on visual deficit mechanisms and to find possible new strategies for recovery and treatment. In this review we focus on an important and sometimes neglected player of the visual function, the corpus callosum (CC. The CC is the major white matter structure in the brain and is involved in information processing between the two hemispheres. In particular, visual callosal connections interconnect homologous areas of visual cortices, binding together the two halves of the visual field. This interhemispheric communication plays a significant role in visual cortical output. Here, we will first review essential literature on the physiology of the callosal connections in normal vision. The available data support the view that the callosum contributes to both excitation and inhibition to the target hemisphere, with a dynamic adaptation to the strength of the incoming visual input. Next, we will focus on data showing how callosal connections may sense visual alterations and respond to the classical paradigm for the study of visual plasticity, i.e. monocular deprivation. This is a prototypical example of a model for the study of callosal plasticity in pathological conditions (e.g. strabismus and amblyopia characterized by unbalanced input from the two eyes. We will also discuss findings of callosal alterations in blind subjects. Noteworthy, we will discuss data showing that inter-hemispheric transfer mediates recovery of visual responsiveness following cortical damage. Finally, we will provide an overview of how callosal projections dysfunction could contribute to pathologies such as neglect and occipital

  12. Thalamocortical model for a propofol-induced alpha-rhythm associated with loss of consciousness.

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    Ching, Shinung; Cimenser, Aylin; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Kopell, Nancy J

    2010-12-28

    Recent data reveal that the general anesthetic propofol gives rise to a frontal α-rhythm at dose levels sufficient to induce loss of consciousness. In this work, a computational model is developed that suggests the network mechanisms responsible for such a rhythm. It is shown that propofol can alter the dynamics in thalamocortical loops, leading to persistent and synchronous α-activity. The synchrony that forms in the cortex by virtue of the involvement of the thalamus may impede responsiveness to external stimuli, thus providing a correlate for the unconscious state.

  13. Thalamocortical model for a propofol-induced α-rhythm associated with loss of consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, ShiNung; Cimenser, Aylin; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data reveal that the general anesthetic propofol gives rise to a frontal α-rhythm at dose levels sufficient to induce loss of consciousness. In this work, a computational model is developed that suggests the network mechanisms responsible for such a rhythm. It is shown that propofol can alter the dynamics in thalamocortical loops, leading to persistent and synchronous α-activity. The synchrony that forms in the cortex by virtue of the involvement of the thalamus may impede responsiveness to external stimuli, thus providing a correlate for the unconscious state. PMID:21149695

  14. Directional connectivity between frontal and posterior brain regions is altered with increasing concentrations of propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimow, Anu; Silfverhuth, Minna; Långsjö, Jaakko; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Georgiadis, Stefanos; Jääskeläinen, Satu; Scheinin, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies using electroencephalography (EEG) suggest that alteration of coherent activity between the anterior and posterior brain regions might be used as a neurophysiologic correlate of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. One way to assess causal relationships between brain regions is given by renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC). Importantly, directional connectivity is evaluated in the frequency domain by taking into account the whole multichannel EEG, as opposed to time domain or two channel approaches. rPDC was applied here in order to investigate propofol induced changes in causal connectivity between four states of consciousness: awake (AWA), deep sedation (SED), loss (LOC) and return of consciousness (ROC) by gathering full 10/20 system human EEG data in ten healthy male subjects. The target-controlled drug infusion was started at low rate with subsequent gradual stepwise increases at 10 min intervals in order to carefully approach LOC (defined as loss of motor responsiveness to a verbal stimulus). The direction of the causal EEG-network connections clearly changed from AWA to SED and LOC. Propofol induced a decrease (p = 0.002-0.004) in occipital-to-frontal rPDC of 8-16 Hz EEG activity and an increase (p = 0.001-0.040) in frontal-to-occipital rPDC of 10-20 Hz activity on both sides of the brain during SED and LOC. In addition, frontal-to-parietal rPDC within 1-12 Hz increased in the left hemisphere at LOC compared to AWA (p = 0.003). However, no significant changes were detected between the SED and the LOC states. The observed decrease in back-to-front EEG connectivity appears compatible with impaired information flow from the posterior sensory and association cortices to the executive prefrontal areas, possibly related to decreased ability to perceive the surrounding world during sedation. The observed increase in the opposite (front-to-back) connectivity suggests a propofol concentration dependent association and is not directly related

  15. Directional connectivity between frontal and posterior brain regions is altered with increasing concentrations of propofol.

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    Anu Maksimow

    Full Text Available Recent studies using electroencephalography (EEG suggest that alteration of coherent activity between the anterior and posterior brain regions might be used as a neurophysiologic correlate of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. One way to assess causal relationships between brain regions is given by renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC. Importantly, directional connectivity is evaluated in the frequency domain by taking into account the whole multichannel EEG, as opposed to time domain or two channel approaches. rPDC was applied here in order to investigate propofol induced changes in causal connectivity between four states of consciousness: awake (AWA, deep sedation (SED, loss (LOC and return of consciousness (ROC by gathering full 10/20 system human EEG data in ten healthy male subjects. The target-controlled drug infusion was started at low rate with subsequent gradual stepwise increases at 10 min intervals in order to carefully approach LOC (defined as loss of motor responsiveness to a verbal stimulus. The direction of the causal EEG-network connections clearly changed from AWA to SED and LOC. Propofol induced a decrease (p = 0.002-0.004 in occipital-to-frontal rPDC of 8-16 Hz EEG activity and an increase (p = 0.001-0.040 in frontal-to-occipital rPDC of 10-20 Hz activity on both sides of the brain during SED and LOC. In addition, frontal-to-parietal rPDC within 1-12 Hz increased in the left hemisphere at LOC compared to AWA (p = 0.003. However, no significant changes were detected between the SED and the LOC states. The observed decrease in back-to-front EEG connectivity appears compatible with impaired information flow from the posterior sensory and association cortices to the executive prefrontal areas, possibly related to decreased ability to perceive the surrounding world during sedation. The observed increase in the opposite (front-to-back connectivity suggests a propofol concentration dependent association and is not directly

  16. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: Reasoning training alters structural connectivity

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    Allyson P Mackey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA, have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n=23 who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT, a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n=22. DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination.

  17. Acupuncture induces divergent alterations of functional connectivity within conventional frequency bands: evidence from MEG recordings.

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    Youbo You

    Full Text Available As an ancient Chinese healing modality which has gained increasing popularity in modern society, acupuncture involves stimulation with fine needles inserted into acupoints. Both traditional literature and clinical data indicated that modulation effects largely depend on specific designated acupoints. However, scientific representations of acupoint specificity remain controversial. In the present study, considering the new findings on the sustained effects of acupuncture and its time-varied temporal characteristics, we employed an electrophysiological imaging modality namely magnetoencephalography with a temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds. Taken into account the differential band-limited signal modulations induced by acupuncture, we sought to explore whether or not stimulation at Stomach Meridian 36 (ST36 and a nearby non-meridian point (NAP would evoke divergent functional connectivity alterations within delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Whole-head scanning was performed on 28 healthy participants during an eyes-closed no-task condition both preceding and following acupuncture. Data analysis involved calculation of band-limited power (BLP followed by pair-wise BLP correlations. Further averaging was conducted to obtain local and remote connectivity. Statistical analyses revealed the increased connection degree of the left temporal cortex within delta (0.5-4 Hz, beta (13-30 Hz and gamma (30-48 Hz bands following verum acupuncture. Moreover, we not only validated the closer linkage of the left temporal cortex with the prefrontal and frontal cortices, but further pinpointed that such patterns were more extensively distributed in the ST36 group in the delta and beta bands compared to the restriction only to the delta band for NAP. Psychophysical results for significant pain threshold elevation further confirmed the analgesic effect of acupuncture at ST36. In conclusion, our findings may provide a new perspective to lend

  18. Short-term dynamics of causal information transfer in thalamocortical networks during natural inputs and microstimulation for somatosensory neuroprosthesis

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    Mulugeta eSemework

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recording the activity of large populations of neurons requires new methods to analyze and use the large volumes of time series data thus created. Fast and clear methods for finding functional connectivity are an important step towards the goal of understanding neural processing. This problem presents itself readily in somatosensory neuroprosthesis (SSNP research, which uses microstimulation (MiSt to activate neural tissue to mimic natural stimuli, and has the capacity to potentiate, depotentiate, or even destroy functional connections. As the aim of SSNP engineering is artificially creating neural responses that resemble those observed during natural inputs, a central goal is describing the influence of MiSt on activity structure among groups of neurons, and how this structure may be altered to affect perception or behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of Granger causality, combined with maximum likelihood methods, applied to neural signals recorded before, during, and after natural and electrical stimulation. We show how these analyses can be used to evaluate the changing interactions in the thalamocortical somatosensory system in response to repeated perturbation. Using LFPs recorded from the ventral posterolateral thalamus (VPL and somatosensory cortex (S1 in anesthetized rats, we estimated pair-wise functional interactions between functional microdomains. The preliminary results demonstrate input-dependent modulations in the direction and strength of information flow during and after application of MiSt. Cortico-cortical interactions during cortical MiSt and baseline conditions showed the largest causal influence differences, while there was no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-stimulation baseline causal activities. These functional connectivity changes agree with physiologically accepted communication patterns through the network, and their particular parameters have implications for both

  19. Short-term dynamics of causal information transfer in thalamocortical networks during natural inputs and microstimulation for somatosensory neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semework, Mulugeta; DiStasio, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Recording the activity of large populations of neurons requires new methods to analyze and use the large volumes of time series data thus created. Fast and clear methods for finding functional connectivity are an important step toward the goal of understanding neural processing. This problem presents itself readily in somatosensory neuroprosthesis (SSNP) research, which uses microstimulation (MiSt) to activate neural tissue to mimic natural stimuli, and has the capacity to potentiate, depotentiate, or even destroy functional connections. As the aim of SSNP engineering is artificially creating neural responses that resemble those observed during natural inputs, a central goal is describing the influence of MiSt on activity structure among groups of neurons, and how this structure may be altered to affect perception or behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of Granger causality, combined with maximum likelihood methods, applied to neural signals recorded before, during, and after natural and electrical stimulation. We show how these analyses can be used to evaluate the changing interactions in the thalamocortical somatosensory system in response to repeated perturbation. Using LFPs recorded from the ventral posterolateral thalamus (VPL) and somatosensory cortex (S1) in anesthetized rats, we estimated pair-wise functional interactions between functional microdomains. The preliminary results demonstrate input-dependent modulations in the direction and strength of information flow during and after application of MiSt. Cortico-cortical interactions during cortical MiSt and baseline conditions showed the largest causal influence differences, while there was no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-stimulation baseline causal activities. These functional connectivity changes agree with physiologically accepted communication patterns through the network, and their particular parameters have implications for both rehabilitation and brain

  20. Differences in functional brain connectivity alterations associated with cerebral amyloid deposition in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

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    Dahyun eYi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite potential implications for the early detection of impending AD, very little is known about the differences of large scale brain networks between amnestic MCI (aMCI with high cerebral amyloid beta protein (Aβ deposition (i.e., aMCI+ and aMCI with no or very little Aβ deposition (i.e., aMCI-. We first aimed to extend the current literature on altering intrinsic functional connectivity (FC of the default mode network (DMN and salience network (SN from CN to AD dementia. Second, we further examined the differences of the DMN and the SN between aMCI-, aMCI+, and CN. Forty-three older adult (12 CN, 10 aMCI+, 10 aMCI-, and 11 AD dementia subjects were included. All participants received clinical and neuropsychological assessment, resting state functional MRI, structural MRI, and Pittsburgh compound-B-PET scans. FC data were preprocessed using Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components of FSL. Group comparisons were carried out using the dual-regression approach. In addition, to verify presence of grey matter (GM volume changes with intrinsic functional network alterations, Voxel Based Morphometry was performed on the acquired T1-weighted data. As expected, AD dementia participants exhibited decreased FC in the DMN compared to CN (in precuneus and cingulate gyrus. The degree of alteration in the DMN in aMCI+ compared to CN was intermediate to that of AD. In contrast, aMCI- exhibited increased FC in the DMN compared to CN (in precuneus as well as aMCI+. In terms of the SN, aMCI- exhibited decreased FC compared to both CN and aMCI+ particularly in the inferior frontal gyrus. FC within the SN in aMCI+ and AD did not differ from CN. Compared to CN, aMCI- showed atrophy in bilateral superior temporal gyri whereas aMCI+ showed atrophy in right precuneus. The results indicate that despite of the similarity in cross-sectional cognitive features aMCI- has quite different functional brain connectivity compared to

  1. Imaging of thalamocortical dysrhythmia in neuropsychiatry.

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    Schulman, Joshua J; Cancro, Robert; Lowe, Sandlin; Lu, Feng; Walton, Kerry D; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal brain activity dynamics, in the sense of a thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD), has been proposed as the underlying mechanism for a subset of disorders that bridge the traditional delineations of neurology and neuropsychiatry. In order to test this proposal from a psychiatric perspective, a study using magnetoencephalography (MEG) was implemented in subjects with schizophrenic spectrum disorder (n = 14), obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 10), or depressive disorder (n = 5) and in control individuals (n = 18). Detailed CNS electrophysiological analysis of these patients, using MEG, revealed the presence of abnormal theta range spectral power with typical TCD characteristics, in all cases. The use of independent component analysis and minimum-norm-based methods localized such TCD to ventromedial prefrontal and temporal cortices. The observed mode of oscillation was spectrally equivalent but spatially distinct from that of TCD observed in other related disorders, including Parkinson's disease, central tinnitus, neuropathic pain, and autism. The present results indicate that the functional basis for much of these pathologies may relate most fundamentally to the category of calcium channelopathies and serve as a model for the cellular substrate for low-frequency oscillations present in these psychiatric disorders, providing a basis for therapeutic strategies.

  2. Imaging of thalamocortical dysrhythmia in neuropsychiatry

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    Joshua J Schulman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal brain activity dynamics, in the sense of a thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD, has been proposed as the underlying mechanism for a subset of disorders that bridge the traditional delineations of neurology and neuropsychiatry. In order to test this proposal from a psychiatric perspective, a study using magnetoencephalography (MEG was implemented in subjects with schizophrenic spectrum disorder (SSD (n=14, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD (n = 10, or depressive disorder (DD (n=5 and in control individuals (n = 18. Detailed CNS electrophysiological analysis of these patients, using MEG, revealed the presence of abnormal theta range spectral power with typical TCD characteristics, in all cases. The use of independent component analysis (ICA and minimum-norm-based methods localized such TCD to ventromedial prefrontal and temporal cortices. The observed mode of oscillation was spectrally equivalent but spatially distinct from that of TCD observed in other related disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, central tinnitus, neuropathic pain, and autism. The present results indicate that the functional basis for much of these pathologies may relate most fundamentally to the category of calcium channelopathies and serve as a model for the cellular substrate for low frequency oscillations present in these psychiatric disorders, providing a basis for therapeutic strategies.

  3. Assessment of the structural brain network reveals altered connectivity in children with unilateral cerebral palsy due to periventricular white matter lesions

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    Kerstin Pannek

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This study shows that network-based analysis of structural connectivity can identify alterations in FA in unilateral CP, and that these alterations in FA are related to clinical function. Application of this connectome-based analysis to investigate alterations in connectivity following treatment may elucidate the neurological correlates of improved functioning due to intervention.

  4. Coding of object location in the vibrissal thalamocortical system.

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    Yu, Chunxiu; Horev, Guy; Rubin, Naama; Derdikman, Dori; Haidarliu, Sebastian; Ahissar, Ehud

    2015-03-01

    In whisking rodents, object location is encoded at the receptor level by a combination of motor and sensory related signals. Recoding of the encoded signals can result in various forms of internal representations. Here, we examined the coding schemes occurring at the first forebrain level that receives inputs necessary for generating such internal representations--the thalamocortical network. Single units were recorded in 8 thalamic and cortical stations in artificially whisking anesthetized rats. Neuronal representations of object location generated across these stations and expressed in response latency and magnitude were classified based on graded and binary coding schemes. Both graded and binary coding schemes occurred across the entire thalamocortical network, with a general tendency of graded-to-binary transformation from thalamus to cortex. Overall, 63% of the neurons of the thalamocortical network coded object position in their firing. Thalamocortical responses exhibited a slow dynamics during which the amount of coded information increased across 4-5 whisking cycles and then stabilized. Taken together, the results indicate that the thalamocortical network contains dynamic mechanisms that can converge over time on multiple coding schemes of object location, schemes which essentially transform temporal coding to rate coding and gradual to labeled-line coding.

  5. Alteration of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Expression in Orbital Fibroblasts from Patients with Graves' Ophthalmopathy.

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    Tsai, Chieh-Chih; Wu, Shi-Bei; Chang, Pei-Chen; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disfiguring and sometimes blinding disease, which is characterized by inflammation and swelling of orbital tissues, with fibrosis and adipogenesis being predominant features. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the expression levels of fibrosis-related genes, especially that of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), are altered in orbital fibroblasts of patients with GO. The role of oxidative stress in the regulation of CTGF expression in GO orbital fibroblasts is also examined. By a SYBR Green-based real time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR), we demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF in cultured orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO were significantly higher than those of age-matched normal controls (p = 0.007, 0.037, and 0.002, respectively). In addition, the protein expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF analyzed by Western blot were also significantly higher in GO orbital fibroblasts (p = 0.046, 0.032, and 0.008, respectively) as compared with the control. Furthermore, after treatment of orbital fibroblasts with a sub-lethal dose of hydrogen peroxide (200 μM H2O2), we found that the H2O2-induced increase of CTGF expression was more pronounced in the GO orbital fibroblasts as compared with those in normal controls (20% vs. 7%, p = 0.007). Importantly, pre-incubation with antioxidants including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin C, respectively, resulted in significant attenuation of the induction of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts in response to H2O2 (p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively). Taken together, we suggest that oxidative stress plays a role in the alteration of the expression of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts that may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of GO. Antioxidants may be used in combination with the therapeutic agents for effective treatment of GO.

  6. High serotonin levels during brain development alter the structural input-output connectivity of neural networks in the rat somatosensory layer IV

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    Stéphanie eMiceli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic regulation of serotonin (5-HT concentration is critical for normal topographical organization and development of thalamocortical (TC afferent circuits. Down-regulation of the serotonin transporter (SERT and the consequent impaired reuptake of 5-HT at the synapse, results in a reduced terminal branching of developing TC afferents within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1. Despite the presence of multiple genetic models, the effect of high extracellular 5-HT levels on the structure and function of developing intracortical neural networks is far from being understood. Here, using juvenile SERT knockout (SERT-/- rats we investigated, in vitro, the effect of increased 5-HT levels on the structural organization of (i the thalamocortical projections of the ventroposteromedial thalamic nucleus towards S1, (ii the general barrel-field pattern and (iii the electrophysiological and morphological properties of the excitatory cell population in layer IV of S1 (spiny stellate and pyramidal cells. Our results confirmed previous findings that high levels of 5-HT during development lead to a reduction of the topographical precision of TCA projections towards the barrel cortex. Also, the barrel pattern was altered but not abolished in SERT-/- rats. In layer IV, both excitatory spiny stellate and pyramidal cells showed a significantly reduced intracolumnar organization of their axonal projections. In addition, the layer IV spiny stellate cells gave rise to a prominent projection towards the infragranular layer Vb. Our findings point to a structural and functional reorganization, of TCAs, as well as early stage intracortical microcircuitry, following the disruption of 5-HT reuptake during critical developmental periods. The increased projection pattern of the layer IV neurons suggests that the intracortical network changes are not limited to the main entry layer IV but may also affect the subsequent stages of the canonical circuits of the barrel

  7. Seizure-like thalamocortical rhythms initiate in the deep layers of the cortex in a co-culture model.

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    Adams, Brendan E L; Kyi, Mervyn; Reid, Christopher A; Myers, Damian E; Xu, Shenghong; Williams, David A; O'Brien, Terence J

    2011-01-01

    The oscillatory rhythms underlying many physiological and pathological states, including absence seizures, require both the thalamus and cortices for full expression. A co-culture preparation combining cortical and thalamic explants provides a unique model for investigating how such oscillations initiate and spread. Here we investigated the dynamics of synchronized thalamocortical activity by simultaneous measurement of field-potential recordings and rapid imaging of Ca(2+) transients by fluorescence methods. Spontaneous sustained hypersynchronized "seizure-like" oscillations required reciprocal cortico-thalamocortical connections. Isolated cortical explants can independently develop brief discharges, while thalamic explants alone were unable to do so. Rapid imaging of Ca(2+) transients demonstrated deep-layer cortical initiation of oscillatory network activity in both connected and isolated explants. Further, cortical explants derived from a rat model of genetic absence epilepsy showed increased bursting duration consistent with an excitable cortex. We propose that thalamocortical oscillatory network activity initiates in deep layers of the cortex with reciprocal thalamic interconnections enabling sustained hyper-synchronization.

  8. Connectivity and tissue microstructural alterations in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by diffusion spectrum imaging

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    Alia Lemkaddem

    2014-01-01

    Global connectivity, hub architecture and regional connectivity patterns were altered in TLE patients and showed different characteristics in RTLE vs LTLE with stronger abnormalities in RTLE. The microstructural analysis suggested that disturbed axonal density contributed more than fiber orientation to the connectivity changes affecting the temporal lobes whereas fiber orientation changes were more involved in extratemporal lobe changes. Our study provides further structural evidence that RTLE and LTLE are not symmetrical entities and DSI-based imaging could help investigate the microstructural correlate of these imaging abnormalities.

  9. Altered functional brain connectivity in a non-clinical sample of young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

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    Cocchi, Luca; Bramati, Ivanei E; Zalesky, Andrew; Furukawa, Emi; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Moll, Jorge; Tripp, Gail; Mattos, Paulo

    2012-12-05

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity that often persist in adulthood. There is a growing consensus that ADHD is associated with abnormal function of diffuse brain networks, but such alterations remain poorly characterized. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized multivariate (complex network measures), bivariate (network-based statistic), and univariate (regional homogeneity) properties of brain networks in a non-clinical, drug-naive sample of high-functioning young men and women with ADHD (nine males, seven females) and a group of matched healthy controls. Data from our sample allowed the isolation of intrinsic functional connectivity alterations specific to ADHD diagnosis and symptoms that are not related to developmental delays, general cognitive dysfunction, or history of medication use. Multivariate results suggested that frontal, temporal, and occipital cortices were abnormally connected locally as well as with the rest of the brain in individuals with ADHD. Results from the network-based statistic support and extend multivariate results by isolating two brain networks comprising regions between which inter-regional connectivity was significantly altered in the ADHD group; namely, a frontal amygdala-occipital network and a frontal temporal-occipital network. Brain behavior correlations further highlighted the key role of altered orbitofrontal-temporal and frontal-amygdala connectivity for symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. All univariate properties were similar between groups. Taken together, results from this study show that the diagnosis and the two main symptom dimensions of ADHD are related to altered intrinsic connectivity in orbitofrontal-temporal-occipital and fronto-amygdala-occipital networks. Accordingly, our findings highlight the importance of extending the conceptualization of ADHD beyond segregated fronto

  10. Evaluation of alteration in mucogingival line location following use of subepithelial connective tissue graft

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    Saber Fariba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective : The aim of this study is to evaluate the positional changes that occur in mucogingival line following the use of subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG. Materials and Methods : In 19 Miller class I or II gingival recession defects, distance between mucogingival line (MGL and cemento-enamel junction, also width of keratinized and attached gingiva, and clinical attachment level were measured. SCTG were used for covering the exposed roots. A fore mentioned parameters were repeated at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery and alterations were measured. Paired t test was used to analyze the results. Results : MGL had been moved in coronal direction (4.39 ± 0.77 mm on average during surgical approach. After 1 year, MGL shifted 2.11 ± 0.7 mm apically. In accordance with this apical shift, a significant increase in the width of keratinized and attached gingival width (2.89 ± 0.63 mm and 2.82 ± 0.5 mm, respectively was seen (P < 0.05. Conclusion : MGL tended to revert back to its original position following the use of SCTG, and this reversion is accompanied with an increase in the keratinized and attached gingival width.

  11. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

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    Isaac Canals

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  12. Mindfulness meditation training alters stress-related amygdala resting state functional connectivity: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Taren, Adrienne A; Gianaros, Peter J; Greco, Carol M; Lindsay, Emily K; Fairgrieve, April; Brown, Kirk Warren; Rosen, Rhonda K; Ferris, Jennifer L; Julson, Erica; Marsland, Anna L; Bursley, James K; Ramsburg, Jared; Creswell, J David

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that mindfulness meditation training interventions reduce stress and improve stress-related health outcomes, but the neural pathways for these effects are unknown. The present research evaluates whether mindfulness meditation training alters resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the amygdala, a region known to coordinate stress processing and physiological stress responses. We show in an initial discovery study that higher perceived stress over the past month is associated with greater bilateral amygdala-subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) rsFC in a sample of community adults (n = 130). A follow-up, single-blind randomized controlled trial shows that a 3-day intensive mindfulness meditation training intervention (relative to a well-matched 3-day relaxation training intervention without a mindfulness component) reduced right amygdala-sgACC rsFC in a sample of stressed unemployed community adults (n = 35). Although stress may increase amygdala-sgACC rsFC, brief training in mindfulness meditation could reverse these effects. This work provides an initial indication that mindfulness meditation training promotes functional neuroplastic changes, suggesting an amygdala-sgACC pathway for stress reduction effects.

  13. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G.; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:26411903

  14. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-10-13

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  15. Resting-state functional connectivity bias of middle temporal gyrus and caudate with altered gray matter volume in major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqiong Ma

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies have indicated that the structure deficits and resting-state functional connectivity (FC imbalances in cortico-limbic circuitry might underline the pathophysiology of MDD. Using structure and functional MRI, our aim is to investigate gray matter abnormalities in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD and treatment-responsive depression (TSD, and test whether the altered gray matter is associated with altered FC. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the regions with gray matter abnormality and FC analysis was further conducted between each gray matter abnormal region and the remaining voxels in the brain. Using one-way analysis of variance, we found significant gray matter abnormalities in the right middle temporal cortex (MTG and bilateral caudate among the TRD, TSD and healthy controls. For the FC of the right MTG, we found that both the patients with TRD and TSD showed altered connectivity mainly in the default-mode network (DMN. For the FC of the right caudate, both patient groups showed altered connectivity in the frontal regions. Our results revealed the gray matter reduction of right MTG and bilateral caudate, and disrupted functional connection to widely distributed circuitry in DMN and frontal regions, respectively. These results suggest that the abnormal DMN and reward circuit activity might be biomarkers of depression trait.

  16. Altered functional connectivity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in first-episode patients with major depressive disorder

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    Ye, Ting, E-mail: yeting@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Peng, Jing, E-mail: ppengjjing@sina.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Nie, Binbin, E-mail: niebb@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, Juan, E-mail: gaojuan@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 918, Yu-Quan St, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Jiangtao, E-mail: Liujiangtao813@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Li, Yang, E-mail: Liyang2007428@hotmail.com [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Wang, Gang, E-mail: gangwang@gmail.com [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Ma, Xin, E-mail: lijianshe@medmail.com.cn [Department of Psychiatry, Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 5, An Kang Hutong, Deshengmen wai, Xicheng District, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, No. 45, Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); and others

    2012-12-15

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate resting-state functional connectivity alteration of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in patients with first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: Twenty-two first-episode MDD patients and thirty age-, gender- and education-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled. Rest state functional magnetic resonance images and structure magnetic resonance images were scanned. The functional connectivity analysis was done based on the result of voxel-based morphometry (VBM). And the right DLPFC was chosen as the seed region of interests (ROI), as its gray matter density (GMD) decreased in the MDD patients compared with controls and its GMD values were negative correlation with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores. Results: Compared to healthy controls, the MDD patients showed increased functional connectivity with right the DLPFC in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), thalamus and precentral gyrus. In contrast, there were decreased functional connectivity between the right DLPFC and right parietal lobe. Conclusions: By applying the VBM results to the functional connectivity analysis, the study suggested that abnormality of GMD in right DLPFC might be related to the functional connectivity alteration in the pathophysiology of MDD, which might be useful in further characterizing structure–function relations in this disorder.

  17. Altered functional connectivity related to white matter changes inside the working memory network at the very early stage of MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au Duong, My-Van; Audoin, Bertrand; Boulanouar, Kader; Ibarrola, Daniella; Malikova, Irina; Confort-Gouny, Sylrane; Celsis, Pierre; Pelletier, Jean; Cozzone, Patrick J; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe

    2005-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT) as paradigm was used to study the functional connectivity in 18 patients at the very early stage of multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with 18 controls, to determine the existence of circuitry disturbance inside the working memory network and its relationship with white matter abnormalities assessed by conventional MRI and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging. The left BA 45/46 was selected as the seed region to compute correlation maps with other brain regions. After obtaining the correlation map for each subject, between-group comparisons were performed using random effect procedure. Compared with controls, patients did not show any greater functional connectivity between left BA 45/46 and other regions during PASAT. In contrast, decrease in functional connectivity was observed in patients between left BA 45/46 and left BA 9, right BA 3, and the anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24). In patients, no correlations were found between altered functional connectivity and clinical data. However, functional connectivity observed between left BA 45/46 and BA 24 in patients was correlated with the MTR of normal appearing white matter, and with brain T(2) lesion load. Altered functional connectivity is present inside the working memory network of patients at the very early stage of MS and is related to the extent of diffuse white matter changes.

  18. Altered Default Network Resting State Functional Connectivity in Patients with a First Episode of Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Solís, Anna; Corripio, Iluminada; de Castro-Manglano, Pilar; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Garcia-Garcia, Manuel; Proal, Erika; Nuñez-Marín, Fidel; Soutullo, Cesar; Alvarez, Enric; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Kelly, Clare; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Default network (DN) abnormalities have been identified in patients with chronic schizophrenia using “resting state” functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Here, we examined the integrity of the DN in patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis (FEP) compared with sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Methods We collected R-fMRI data from 19 FEP patients (mean age 24.9±4.8 yrs, 14 males) and 19 healthy controls (26.1±4.8 yrs, 14 males) at 3 Tesla. Following standard preprocessing, we examined the functional connectivity (FC) of two DN subsystems and the two DN hubs (P<0.0045, corrected). Results Patients with FEP exhibited abnormal FC that appeared largely restricted to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) DN subsystem. Relative to controls, FEP patients exhibited weaker positive FC between dMPFC and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus, extending laterally through the parietal lobe to the posterior angular gyrus. Patients with FEP exhibited weaker negative FC between the lateral temporal cortex and the intracalcarine cortex, bilaterally. The PCC and temporo-parietal junction also exhibited weaker negative FC with the right fusiform gyrus extending to the lingual gyrus and lateral occipital cortex, in FEP patients, compared to controls. By contrast, patients with FEP showed stronger negative FC between the temporal pole and medial motor cortex, anterior precuneus and posterior mid-cingulate cortex. Conclusions Abnormalities in the dMPFC DN subsystem in patients with a FEP suggest that FC patterns are altered even in the early stages of psychosis. PMID:22633527

  19. Altered Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Offspring of Schizophrenia Patients Relative to Offspring of Bipolar Patients and Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solé-Padullés

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD share clinical features, genetic risk factors and neuroimaging abnormalities. There is evidence of disrupted connectivity in resting state networks in patients with SZ and BD and their unaffected relatives. Resting state networks are known to undergo reorganization during youth coinciding with the period of increased incidence for both disorders. We therefore focused on characterizing resting state network connectivity in youth at familial risk for SZ or BD to identify alterations arising during this period. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in a sample of 106 youth, aged 7-19 years, comprising offspring of patients with SZ (N = 27, offspring of patients with BD (N = 39 and offspring of community control parents (N = 40. We used Independent Component Analysis to assess functional connectivity within the default mode, executive control, salience and basal ganglia networks and define their relationship to grey matter volume, clinical and cognitive measures. There was no difference in connectivity within any of the networks examined between offspring of patients with BD and offspring of community controls. In contrast, offspring of patients with SZ showed reduced connectivity within the left basal ganglia network compared to control offspring, and they showed a positive correlation between connectivity in this network and grey matter volume in the left caudate. Our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in the basal ganglia network is a robust correlate of familial risk for SZ and can be detected during childhood and adolescence.

  20. Reliability of spike and burst firing in thalamocortical relay cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeldenrust, F.; Chameau, P.J.P.; Wadman, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The reliability and precision of the timing of spikes in a spike train is an important aspect of neuronal coding. We investigated reliability in thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells in the acute slice and also in a Morris-Lecar model with several extensions. A frozen Gaussian noise current, superimpose

  1. Thalamo-Cortical Disruption Contributes to Short-Term Memory Deficits in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voets, Natalie L; Menke, Ricarda A L; Jbabdi, Saad; Husain, Masud; Stacey, Richard; Carpenter, Katherine; Adcock, Jane E

    2015-11-01

    Short-term (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) have largely been considered as separate brain systems reflecting fronto-parietal and medial temporal lobe (MTL) functions, respectively. This functional dichotomy has been called into question by evidence of deficits on aspects of working memory in patients with MTL damage, suggesting a potentially direct hippocampal contribution to STM. As the hippocampus has direct anatomical connections with the thalamus, we tested the hypothesis that damage to thalamic nuclei regulating cortico-cortical interactions may contribute to STM deficits in patients with hippocampal dysfunction. We used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging-based tractography to identify anatomical subdivisions in patients with MTL epilepsy. From these, we measured resting-state functional connectivity with detailed cortical divisions of the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Whereas thalamo-temporal functional connectivity reflected LTM performance, thalamo-prefrontal functional connectivity specifically predicted STM performance. Notably, patients with hippocampal volume loss showed thalamic volume loss, most prominent in the pulvinar region, not detected in patients with normal hippocampal volumes. Aberrant thalamo-cortical connectivity in the epileptic hemisphere was mirrored in a loss of behavioral association with STM performance specifically in patients with hippocampal atrophy. These findings identify thalamo-cortical disruption as a potential mechanism contributing to STM deficits in the context of MTL damage.

  2. Altered resting state neuromotor connectivity in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: A MAPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J. Kutch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain network activity associated with altered motor control in individuals with chronic pain is not well understood. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS is a debilitating condition in which previous studies have revealed altered resting pelvic floor muscle activity in men with CP/CPPS compared to healthy controls. We hypothesized that the brain networks controlling pelvic floor muscles would also show altered resting state function in men with CP/CPPS. Here we describe the results of the first test of this hypothesis focusing on the motor cortical regions, termed pelvic-motor, that can directly activate pelvic floor muscles. A group of men with CP/CPPS (N = 28, as well as group of age-matched healthy male controls (N = 27, had resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network study. Brain maps of the functional connectivity of pelvic-motor were compared between groups. A significant group difference was observed in the functional connectivity between pelvic-motor and the right posterior insula. The effect size of this group difference was among the largest effect sizes in functional connectivity between all pairs of 165 anatomically-defined subregions of the brain. Interestingly, many of the atlas region pairs with large effect sizes also involved other subregions of the insular cortices. We conclude that functional connectivity between motor cortex and the posterior insula may be among the most important markers of altered brain function in men with CP/CPPS, and may represent changes in the integration of viscerosensory and motor processing.

  3. Altered resting state neuromotor connectivity in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: A MAPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Jason J.; Yani, Moheb S.; Asavasopon, Skulpan; Kirages, Daniel J.; Rana, Manku; Cosand, Louise; Labus, Jennifer S.; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Farmer, Melissa A.; Johnson, Kevin A.; Ness, Timothy J.; Deutsch, Georg; Harris, Richard E.; Apkarian, A. Vania; Clauw, Daniel J.; Mackey, Sean C.; Mullins, Chris; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Brain network activity associated with altered motor control in individuals with chronic pain is not well understood. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a debilitating condition in which previous studies have revealed altered resting pelvic floor muscle activity in men with CP/CPPS compared to healthy controls. We hypothesized that the brain networks controlling pelvic floor muscles would also show altered resting state function in men with CP/CPPS. Here we describe the results of the first test of this hypothesis focusing on the motor cortical regions, termed pelvic-motor, that can directly activate pelvic floor muscles. A group of men with CP/CPPS (N = 28), as well as group of age-matched healthy male controls (N = 27), had resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network study. Brain maps of the functional connectivity of pelvic-motor were compared between groups. A significant group difference was observed in the functional connectivity between pelvic-motor and the right posterior insula. The effect size of this group difference was among the largest effect sizes in functional connectivity between all pairs of 165 anatomically-defined subregions of the brain. Interestingly, many of the atlas region pairs with large effect sizes also involved other subregions of the insular cortices. We conclude that functional connectivity between motor cortex and the posterior insula may be among the most important markers of altered brain function in men with CP/CPPS, and may represent changes in the integration of viscerosensory and motor processing. PMID:26106574

  4. More consistently altered connectivity patterns for cerebellum and medial temporal lobes than for amygdala and striatum in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning ePeters

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain architecture can be divided into a cortico-thalamic system and modulatory ‘subcortical-cerebellar’ systems containing key structures such as striatum, medial temporal lobes (MTLs, amygdala, and cerebellum. Subcortical-cerebellar systems are known to be altered in schizophrenia. In particular, intrinsic functional brain connectivity (iFC between these systems has been consistently demonstrated in patients. While altered connectivity is known for each subcortical-cerebellar system separately, it is unknown whether subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns with the cortico-thalamic system are comparably altered across systems, i.e., if separate subcortical-cerebellar systems’ connectivity patterns are consistent across patients. Methods: To investigate this question, 18 patients with schizophrenia (3 unmedicated, 15 medicated with atypical antipsychotics and 18 healthy controls were assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Independent component analysis of fMRI data revealed cortical intrinsic brain networks (NWs with time courses representing proxies for cortico-thalamic system activity. Subcortical-cerebellar systems’ activity was represented by fMRI-based time courses of selected regions-of-interest (ROIs (i.e., striatum, MTL, amygdala, cerebellum. Correlation analysis among ROI- and NWs-time courses yielded individual connectivity matrices (i.e. connectivity between NW and ROIs (allROIs-NW, separateROI-NW, only NWs (NWs-NWs, and only ROIs (allROIs-allROIs as main outcome measures, which were classified by support-vector-machine-based leave-one-out cross-validation. Differences in classification accuracy were statistically evaluated for consistency across subjects and systems. Results: Correlation matrices based on allROIs-NWs yielded 91% classification accuracy, which was significantly superior to allROIs-allROIs and NWs-NWs (56% and 74%, respectively. Considering separate

  5. Connectivity and tissue microstructural alterations in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by diffusion spectrum imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkaddem, Alia; Daducci, Alessandro; Kunz, Nicolas; Lazeyras, François; Seeck, Margitta; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Focal epilepsy is increasingly recognized as the result of an altered brain network, both on the structural and functional levels and the characterization of these widespread brain alterations is crucial for our understanding of the clinical manifestation of seizure and cognitive deficits as well as for the management of candidates to epilepsy surgery. Tractography based on Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows non-invasive mapping of white matter tracts in vivo. Recently, diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), based on an increased number of diffusion directions and intensities, has improved the sensitivity of tractography, notably with respect to the problem of fiber crossing and recent developments allow acquisition times compatible with clinical application. We used DSI and parcellation of the gray matter in regions of interest to build whole-brain connectivity matrices describing the mutual connections between cortical and subcortical regions in patients with focal epilepsy and healthy controls. In addition, the high angular and radial resolution of DSI allowed us to evaluate also some of the biophysical compartment models, to better understand the cause of the changes in diffusion anisotropy. Global connectivity, hub architecture and regional connectivity patterns were altered in TLE patients and showed different characteristics in RTLE vs LTLE with stronger abnormalities in RTLE. The microstructural analysis suggested that disturbed axonal density contributed more than fiber orientation to the connectivity changes affecting the temporal lobes whereas fiber orientation changes were more involved in extratemporal lobe changes. Our study provides further structural evidence that RTLE and LTLE are not symmetrical entities and DSI-based imaging could help investigate the microstructural correlate of these imaging abnormalities.

  6. Altered functional connectivity of the language network in ASD: Role of classical language areas and cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Verly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of language, social interaction and communicative skills is remarkably different in the child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Atypical brain connectivity has frequently been reported in this patient population. However, the neural correlates underlying their disrupted language development and functioning are still poorly understood. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated the functional connectivity properties of the language network in a group of ASD patients with clear comorbid language impairment (ASD-LI; N = 19 and compared them to the language related connectivity properties of 23 age-matched typically developing children. A verb generation task was used to determine language components commonly active in both groups. Eight joint language components were identified and subsequently used as seeds in a resting state analysis. Interestingly, both the interregional and the seed-based whole brain connectivity analysis showed preserved connectivity between the classical intrahemispheric language centers, Wernicke's and Broca's areas. In contrast however, a marked loss of functional connectivity was found between the right cerebellar region and the supratentorial regulatory language areas. Also, the connectivity between the interhemispheric Broca regions and modulatory control dorsolateral prefrontal region was found to be decreased. This disruption of normal modulatory control and automation function by the cerebellum may underlie the abnormal language function in children with ASD-LI.

  7. Early silent microstructural degeneration and atrophy of the thalamocortical network in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Michael; Krämer, Julia; Tenberge, Jan-Gerd; Marinell, Jasmin; Schwindt, Wolfram; Deppe, Katja; Groppa, Sergiu; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies on patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrated thalamic atrophy. Here we addressed the following question: Is early thalamic atrophy in patients with CIS and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) mainly a direct consequence of white matter (WM) lesions-as frequently claimed-or is the atrophy stronger correlated to "silent" (nonlesional) microstructural thalamic alterations? One-hundred and ten patients with RRMS, 12 with CIS, and 30 healthy controls were admitted to 3 T magnetic resonance imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was computed from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess thalamic and WM microstructure. The relative thalamic volume (RTV) and thalamic FA were significantly reduced in patients with CIS and RRMS relative to healthy controls. Both measures were also correlated. The age, gender, WM lesion load, thalamic FA, and gray matter volume-corrected RTV were reduced even in the absence of thalamic and extensive white matter lesions-also in patients with short disease duration (≤24 months). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed that the RTV reduction had a significant effect on local WM FA-in areas next to the thalamus and basal ganglia. These WM alterations could not be explained by WM lesions, which had a differing spatial distribution. Early thalamic atrophy is mainly driven by silent microstructural thalamic alterations. Lesions do not disclose the early damage of thalamocortical circuits, which seem to be much more affected in CIS and RRMS than expected. Thalamocortical damage can be detected by DTI in normal appearing brain tissue. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1866-1879, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Altered temporal features of intrinsic connectivity networks in boys with combined type of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xun-Heng, E-mail: xhwang@hdu.edu.cn [College of Life Information Science and Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Li, Lihua [College of Life Information Science and Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Temporal patterns within ICNs provide new way to investigate ADHD brains. • ADHD exhibits enhanced temporal activities within and between ICNs. • Network-wise ALFF influences functional connectivity between ICNs. • Univariate patterns within ICNs are correlated to behavior scores. - Abstract: Purpose: Investigating the altered temporal features within and between intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) for boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); and analyzing the relationships between altered temporal features within ICNs and behavior scores. Materials and methods: A cohort of boys with combined type of ADHD and a cohort of age-matched healthy boys were recruited from ADHD-200 Consortium. All resting-state fMRI datasets were preprocessed and normalized into standard brain space. Using general linear regression, 20 ICNs were taken as spatial templates to analyze the time-courses of ICNs for each subject. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) were computed as univariate temporal features within ICNs. Pearson correlation coefficients and node strengths were computed as bivariate temporal features between ICNs. Additional correlation analysis was performed between temporal features of ICNs and behavior scores. Results: ADHD exhibited more activated network-wise ALFF than normal controls in attention and default mode-related network. Enhanced functional connectivities between ICNs were found in ADHD. The network-wise ALFF within ICNs might influence the functional connectivity between ICNs. The temporal pattern within posterior default mode network (pDMN) was positively correlated to inattentive scores. The subcortical network, fusiform-related DMN and attention-related networks were negatively correlated to Intelligence Quotient (IQ) scores. Conclusion: The temporal low frequency oscillations of ICNs in boys with ADHD were more activated than normal controls during resting state; the temporal features within ICNs could

  9. Alterations of Intrinsic Brain Connectivity Patterns in Depression and Bipolar Disorders: A Critical Assessment of Magnetoencephalography-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamian, Golnoush; Hincapié, Ana-Sofía; Combrisson, Etienne; Thiery, Thomas; Martel, Véronique; Althukov, Dmitrii; Jerbi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Despite being the object of a thriving field of clinical research, the investigation of intrinsic brain network alterations in psychiatric illnesses is still in its early days. Because the pathological alterations are predominantly probed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), many questions about the electrophysiological bases of resting-state alterations in psychiatric disorders, particularly among mood disorder patients, remain unanswered. Alongside important research using electroencephalography (EEG), the specific recent contributions and future promise of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in this field are not fully recognized and valued. Here, we provide a critical review of recent findings from MEG resting-state connectivity within major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). The clinical MEG resting-state results are compared with those previously reported with fMRI and EEG. Taken together, MEG appears to be a promising but still critically underexploited technique to unravel the neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate abnormal (both hyper- and hypo-) connectivity patterns involved in MDD and BD. In particular, a major strength of MEG is its ability to provide source-space estimations of neuromagnetic long-range rhythmic synchronization at various frequencies (i.e., oscillatory coupling). The reviewed literature highlights the relevance of probing local and interregional rhythmic synchronization to explore the pathophysiological underpinnings of each disorder. However, before we can fully take advantage of MEG connectivity analyses in psychiatry, several limitations inherent to MEG connectivity analyses need to be understood and taken into account. Thus, we also discuss current methodological challenges and outline paths for future research. MEG resting-state studies provide an important window onto perturbed spontaneous oscillatory brain networks and hence supply an important complement to fMRI-based resting-state measurements in

  10. Thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex in the monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Kyuhou, Shin-ichi; Matsuura-Nakao, Kazuko; Gemba, Hisae

    2004-01-23

    Thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) were investigated electrophysiologically in the monkey. Cortical field potentials evoked by the thalamic stimulation were recorded with electrodes chronically implanted on the cortical surface and at a 2.0-3.0 mm cortical depth in the PPC. The stimulation of the nucleus lateralis posterior (LP), nucleus ventralis posterior lateralis pars caudalis (VPLc), and nucleus pulvinaris lateralis (Pul.l) and medialis (Pul.m) induced surface-negative, depth-positive potentials in the PPC. The LP and VPLc projected mainly to the superior parietal lobule (SPL) and the anterior bank of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and the Pul.m mainly to the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the posterior bank of the IPS. The Pul.l had projections to all of the SPL, the IPL and both the banks. The significance of the projections is discussed in connection with motor functions.

  11. Altered resting-state amygdala functional connectivity after 36 hours of total sleep deprivation.

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    Yongcong Shao

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have identified a potentially critical role of the amygdala in disrupted emotion neurocircuitry in individuals after total sleep deprivation (TSD. However, connectivity between the amygdala and cerebral cortex due to TSD remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used resting-state functional MRI (fMRI to investigate the functional connectivity changes of the basolateral amygdala (BLA and centromedial amygdala (CMA in the brain after 36 h of TSD.Fourteen healthy adult men aged 25.9 ± 2.3 years (range, 18-28 years were enrolled in a within-subject crossover study. Using the BLA and CMA as separate seed regions, we examined resting-state functional connectivity with fMRI during rested wakefulness (RW and after 36 h of TSD.TSD resulted in a significant decrease in the functional connectivity between the BLA and several executive control regions (left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC], right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex [ACC], right inferior frontal gyrus [IFG]. Increased functional connectivity was found between the BLA and areas including the left posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PrCu and right parahippocampal gyrus. With regard to CMA, increased functional connectivity was observed with the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC and right precentral gyrus.These findings demonstrate that disturbance in amygdala related circuits may contribute to TSD psychophysiology and suggest that functional connectivity studies of the amygdala during the resting state may be used to discern aberrant patterns of coupling within these circuits after TSD.

  12. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  13. Altered effective connectivity within default mode network in major depression disorder

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    Li, Liang; Li, Baojuan; Bai, Yuanhan; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Linchuan; Cui, Longbiao; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the neural basis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is important for the diagnosis and treatment of this mental disorder. The default mode network (DMN) is considered to be highly involved in the MDD. To find directed interaction between DMN regions associated with the development of MDD, the effective connectivity within the DMN of the MDD patients and matched healthy controls was estimated by using a recently developed spectral dynamic causal modeling. Sixteen patients with MDD and sixteen matched healthy control subjects were included in this study. While the control group underwent the resting state fMRI scan just once, all patients underwent resting state fMRI scans before and after two months' treatment. The spectral dynamic causal modeling was used to estimate directed connections between four DMN nodes. Statistical analysis on connection strengths indicated that efferent connections from the medial frontal cortex (MFC) to posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and to right parietal cortex (RPC) were significant higher in pretreatment MDD patients than those of the control group. After two-month treatment, the efferent connections from the MFC decreased significantly, while those from the left parietal cortex (LPC) to MFC, PCC and RPC showed a significant increase. These findings suggest that the MFC may play an important role for inhibitory conditioning of the DMN, which was disrupted in MDD patients. It also indicates that disrupted suppressive function of the MFC could be effectively restored after two-month treatment.

  14. Draxin from neocortical neurons controls the guidance of thalamocortical projections into the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmyo, Yohei; Asrafuzzaman Riyadh, M; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Bin Naser, Iftekhar; Hossain, Mahmud; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Ohta, Kunimasa; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2015-12-14

    The thalamocortical tract carries sensory information to the neocortex. It has long been recognized that the neocortical pioneer axons of subplate neurons are essential for thalamocortical development. Herein we report that an axon guidance cue, draxin, is expressed in early-born neocortical neurons, including subplate neurons, and is necessary for thalamocortical development. In draxin(-/-) mice, thalamocortical axons do not enter the neocortex. This phenotype is sufficiently rescued by the transgenic expression of draxin in neocortical neurons. Genetic interaction data suggest that draxin acts through Deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and Neogenin (Neo1), to regulate thalamocortical projections in vivo. Draxin promotes the outgrowth of thalamic axons in vitro and this effect is abolished in thalamic neurons from Dcc and Neo1 double mutants. These results suggest that draxin from neocortical neurons controls thalamocortical projections into the neocortex, and that this effect is mediated through the DCC and Neo1 receptors.

  15. The importance of combinatorial gene expression in early mammalian thalamic patterning and thalamocortical axonal guidance

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    David J Price

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus is essential for sensory perception. In mammals, work on the mouse has taught us most of what we know about how it develops and connects to the cortex. The mature thalamus of all mammalian species comprises numerous anatomically distinct collections of neurons called nuclei that differ in function, connectivity and molecular constitution. At the time of its initial appearance as a distinct structure following neural tube closure, the thalamus is already patterned by the regional expression of numerous regulatory genes. This patterning, which lays down the blueprint for later development of thalamic nuclei, predates the development of thalamocortical projections. In this review we apply novel analytical methods to gene expression data available in the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas to highlight the complex organized molecular heterogeneity already present among cells in the thalamus from the earliest stages at which it contains differentiating neurons. This early patterning is likely to invest in axons growing from different parts of the thalamus the ability to navigate in an ordered way to their appropriate area in the cerebral cortex. We review the mechanisms and cues that thalamic axons use, encounter and interpret to attain the cortex. Mechanisms include guidance by previously-generated guidepost cells, such as those in the subpallium that maintain thalamic axonal order and direction, and axons such as those of reciprocal projections from intermediate structures or from the cortex itself back towards the thalamus. We show how thalamocortical pathfinding involves numerous guidance cues operating at a series of steps along their route. We stress the importance of the combinatorial actions of multiple genes for the development of the numerous specific identities and functions of cells in this exquisitely complex system and their orderly innervation of the cortex.

  16. Neural dynamics in a model of the thalamocortical system. II. The role of neural synchrony tested through perturbations of spike timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumer, E D; Edelman, G M; Tononi, G

    1997-01-01

    Activity in the mammalian thalamocortical system is often accompanied by a synchronous discharge of cortical and thalamic neurons. Although many functions have been attributed to such synchronous firing, it is not known whether or how synchrony of firing per se affects thalamocortical operations. Direct experimental tests of the consequences of neuronal synchronization in vivo are hard to carry out, whereas theoretical studies based on single-neuron models cannot reveal the effects of synchrony at the system level. To overcome these limitations, we have used a perturbational approach to test the causal efficacy of synchrony per se in large-scale simulations of the thalamocortical system. The test consists of selectively disrupting firing synchrony by 'jittering' the timing of action potentials in the simulations and determining whether firing rates are modified by this perturbation. The simulations are based in detail on the known anatomy and physiology of the thalamocortical-visual system of the cat, and have been shown in a companion paper to produce episodes of fast synchronous activity at multiple levels. By carrying out the perturbation analysis, we established that neurons can have long membrane time constants (8-16 ms) and balanced synaptic activations, and yet function collectively in such a way that synchrony within a time window of 4 ms significantly affects the rates and selectivity of the responses to visual stimuli. The simulations also revealed a complex interplay, at the network level, between synchrony of firing and rate of firing. The dynamic consequences of firing synchrony were most evident when spike jittering was applied to specific polysynaptic loops involving corticocortical and corticothalamic connections. These results support the view that firing synchrony within thalamocortical and corticocortical loops plays a causal role in the cooperative and competitive neural interactions that produce pattern-selective responses in the cortex.

  17. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in patients with chronic bilateral vestibular failure

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    Martin Göttlich

    2014-01-01

    Using whole brain resting-state connectivity analysis in BVF patients we show that enduring bilateral deficient or missing vestibular input leads to changes in resting-state connectivity of the brain. These changes in the resting brain are robust and task-independent as they were found in the absence of sensory stimulation and without a region-related a priori hypothesis. Therefore they may indicate a fundamental disease-related change in the resting brain. They may account for the patients' persistent deficits in visuo-spatial attention, spatial orientation and unsteadiness. The relation of increasing connectivity in the inferior parietal lobe, specifically SMG, to improvement of VOR during active head movements reflects cortical plasticity in BVF and may play a clinical role in vestibular rehabilitation.

  18. Different Resting-State Functional Connectivity Alterations in Smokers and Nonsmokers with Internet Gaming Addiction

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    Xue Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated changes in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC of posterior cingulate cortex (PCC in smokers and nonsmokers with Internet gaming addiction (IGA. Twenty-nine smokers with IGA, 22 nonsmokers with IGA, and 30 healthy controls (HC group underwent a resting-state fMRI scan. PCC connectivity was determined in all subjects by investigating synchronized low-frequency fMRI signal fluctuations using a temporal correlation method. Compared with the nonsmokers with IGA, the smokers with IGA exhibited decreased rsFC with PCC in the right rectus gyrus. Left middle frontal gyrus exhibited increased rsFC. The PCC connectivity with the right rectus gyrus was found to be negatively correlated with the CIAS scores in the smokers with IGA before correction. Our results suggested that smokers with IGA had functional changes in brain areas related to motivation and executive function compared with the nonsmokers with IGA.

  19. Somatosensory integration controlled by dynamic thalamocortical feed-forward inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabernet, Laetitia; Jadhav, Shantanu P; Feldman, Daniel E; Carandini, Matteo; Scanziani, Massimo

    2005-10-20

    The temporal features of tactile stimuli are faithfully represented by the activity of neurons in the somatosensory cortex. However, the cellular mechanisms that enable cortical neurons to report accurate temporal information are not known. Here, we show that in the rodent barrel cortex, the temporal window for integration of thalamic inputs is under the control of thalamocortical feed-forward inhibition and can vary from 1 to 10 ms. A single thalamic fiber can trigger feed-forward inhibition and contacts both excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons. The dynamics of feed-forward inhibition exceed those of each individual synapse in the circuit and are captured by a simple disynaptic model of the thalamocortical projection. The variations in the integration window produce changes in the temporal precision of cortical responses to whisker stimulation. Hence, feed-forward inhibitory circuits, classically known to sharpen spatial contrast of tactile inputs, also increase the temporal resolution in the somatosensory cortex.

  20. Thalamocortical mechanisms for integrating musical tone and rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Large, Edward W; Schroeder, Charles E

    2014-02-01

    Studies over several decades have identified many of the neuronal substrates of music perception by pursuing pitch and rhythm perception separately. Here, we address the question of how these mechanisms interact, starting with the observation that the peripheral pathways of the so-called "Core" and "Matrix" thalamocortical system provide the anatomical bases for tone and rhythm channels. We then examine the hypothesis that these specialized inputs integrate acoustic content within rhythm context in auditory cortex using classical types of "driving" and "modulatory" mechanisms. This hypothesis provides a framework for deriving testable predictions about the early stages of music processing. Furthermore, because thalamocortical circuits are shared by speech and music processing, such a model provides concrete implications for how music experience contributes to the development of robust speech encoding mechanisms.

  1. Mind-wandering and alterations to default mode network connectivity when listening to naturalistic versus artificial sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould van Praag, Cassandra D.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.; Sparasci, Oliver; Mees, Alex; Philippides, Andrew O.; Ware, Mark; Ottaviani, Cristina; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2017-01-01

    Naturalistic environments have been demonstrated to promote relaxation and wellbeing. We assess opposing theoretical accounts for these effects through investigation of autonomic arousal and alterations of activation and functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) of the brain while participants listened to sounds from artificial and natural environments. We found no evidence for increased DMN activity in the naturalistic compared to artificial or control condition, however, seed based functional connectivity showed a shift from anterior to posterior midline functional coupling in the naturalistic condition. These changes were accompanied by an increase in peak high frequency heart rate variability, indicating an increase in parasympathetic activity in the naturalistic condition in line with the Stress Recovery Theory of nature exposure. Changes in heart rate and the peak high frequency were correlated with baseline functional connectivity within the DMN and baseline parasympathetic tone respectively, highlighting the importance of individual neural and autonomic differences in the response to nature exposure. Our findings may help explain reported health benefits of exposure to natural environments, through identification of alterations to autonomic activity and functional coupling within the DMN when listening to naturalistic sounds. PMID:28345604

  2. Altered Connectivity and Synapse Maturation of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway in a Mouse Model of the Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharkowski, F; Frotscher, Michael; Lutz, David; Korte, Martin; Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin

    2017-01-10

    The Fragile X syndrome (FXS) as the most common monogenetic cause of cognitive impairment and autism indicates how tightly the dysregulation of synapse development is linked to cognitive deficits. Symptoms of FXS include excessive adherence to patterns that point to compromised hippocampal network formation. Surprisingly, one of the most complex hippocampal synapses connecting the dentate gyrus (DG) to CA3 pyramidal neurons has not been analyzed in FXS yet. Intriguingly, we found altered synaptic function between DG and CA3 in a mouse model of FXS (fmr1 knockout [KO]) demonstrated by increased mossy fiber-dependent miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency at CA3 pyramidal neurons together with increased connectivity between granule cells and CA3 neurons. This phenotype is accompanied by increased activity of fmr1 KO animals in the marble burying task, detecting repetitive and obsessive compulsive behavior. Spine apparatus development and insertion of AMPA receptors is enhanced at postsynaptic thorny excrescences (TEs) in fmr1 KO mice. We report age-dependent alterations in TE morphology and in the underlying actin dynamics possibly linked to a dysregulation in profilin1 expression. TEs form detonator synapses guiding CA3 network activity. Thus, alterations described here are likely to contribute substantially to the impairment in hippocampal function and therefore to the pathogenesis of FXS.

  3. A comprehensive thalamocortical projection map at the mesoscopic level

    OpenAIRE

    Hunnicutt, Barbara J.; Long, Brian R.; Kusefoglu, Deniz; Gertz, Katrina J; Zhong, Haining; Mao, Tianyi

    2014-01-01

    The thalamus relays sensori-motor information to the cortex and is an integral part of cortical executive functions. The precise distribution of thalamic projections to the cortex is poorly characterized, particularly in mouse. We employed a systematic, high-throughput viral approach to visualize thalamocortical axons with high sensitivity. We then developed algorithms to directly compare injection and projection information across animals. By tiling the mouse thalamus with 254 overlapping in...

  4. Altered Resting-State Connectivity within Executive Networks after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

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    Monica Maher

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH is associated with significant mortality rates, and most survivors experience significant cognitive deficits across multiple domains, including executive function. It is critical to determine the neural basis for executive deficits in aSAH, in order to better understand and improve patient outcomes. This study is the first examination of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a group of aSAH patients, used to characterize changes in functional connectivity of the frontoparietal network. We scanned 14 aSAH patients and 14 healthy controls, and divided patients into "impaired" and "unimpaired" groups based on a composite executive function score. Impaired patients exhibited significantly lower quality of life and neuropsychological impairment relative to controls, across multiple domains. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that unimpaired patients were not significantly different from controls, but impaired patients had increased frontoparietal connectivity. Patients evidenced increased frontoparietal connectivity as a function of decreased executive function and decreased mood (i.e. quality of life. In addition, T1 morphometric analysis demonstrated that these changes are not attributable to local cortical atrophy among aSAH patients. These results establish significant, reliable changes in the endogenous brain dynamics of aSAH patients, that are related to cognitive and mood outcomes.

  5. Altered resting-state functional connectivity of the insula in young adults with Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Tao; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Zang, Yu-Feng; Shen, Zi-Jiao; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The insula has been implicated in salience processing, craving, and interoception, all of which are critical to the clinical manifestations of drug and behavioral addiction. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we examined resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the insula and its association with Internet gaming characteristics in 74 young adults with Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and 41 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects (HCs). In comparison with HCs, IGD subjects (IGDs) exhibited enhanced rsFC between the anterior insula and a network of regions including anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), putamen, angular gyrus, and precuneous, which are involved in salience, craving, self-monitoring, and attention. IGDs also demonstrated significantly stronger rsFC between the posterior insula and postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplemental motor area, and superior temporal gyrus (STG), which are involved in interoception, movement control, and auditory processing. Furthermore, IGD severity was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and angular gyrus, and STG, and with connectivity between the posterior insula and STG. Duration of Internet gaming was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and ACC. These findings highlight a key role of the insula in manifestation of the core symptoms of IGD and the importance to examine functional abnormalities of the anterior and posterior insula separately in IGDs.

  6. Altered resting-state network connectivity in stroke patients with and without apraxia of speech

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    Anneliese B. New

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor speech disorders, including apraxia of speech (AOS, account for over 50% of the communication disorders following stroke. Given its prevalence and impact, and the need to understand its neural mechanisms, we used resting state functional MRI to examine functional connectivity within a network of regions previously hypothesized as being associated with AOS (bilateral anterior insula (aINS, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, and ventral premotor cortex (PM in a group of 32 left hemisphere stroke patients and 18 healthy, age-matched controls. Two expert clinicians rated severity of AOS, dysarthria and nonverbal oral apraxia of the patients. Fifteen individuals were categorized as AOS and 17 were AOS-absent. Comparison of connectivity in patients with and without AOS demonstrated that AOS patients had reduced connectivity between bilateral PM, and this reduction correlated with the severity of AOS impairment. In addition, AOS patients had negative connectivity between the left PM and right aINS and this effect decreased with increasing severity of non-verbal oral apraxia. These results highlight left PM involvement in AOS, begin to differentiate its neural mechanisms from those of other motor impairments following stroke, and help inform us of the neural mechanisms driving differences in speech motor planning and programming impairment following stroke.

  7. Altered resting-state network connectivity in stroke patients with and without apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Anneliese B; Robin, Donald A; Parkinson, Amy L; Duffy, Joseph R; McNeil, Malcom R; Piguet, Olivier; Hornberger, Michael; Price, Cathy J; Eickhoff, Simon B; Ballard, Kirrie J

    2015-01-01

    Motor speech disorders, including apraxia of speech (AOS), account for over 50% of the communication disorders following stroke. Given its prevalence and impact, and the need to understand its neural mechanisms, we used resting state functional MRI to examine functional connectivity within a network of regions previously hypothesized as being associated with AOS (bilateral anterior insula (aINS), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and ventral premotor cortex (PM)) in a group of 32 left hemisphere stroke patients and 18 healthy, age-matched controls. Two expert clinicians rated severity of AOS, dysarthria and nonverbal oral apraxia of the patients. Fifteen individuals were categorized as AOS and 17 were AOS-absent. Comparison of connectivity in patients with and without AOS demonstrated that AOS patients had reduced connectivity between bilateral PM, and this reduction correlated with the severity of AOS impairment. In addition, AOS patients had negative connectivity between the left PM and right aINS and this effect decreased with increasing severity of non-verbal oral apraxia. These results highlight left PM involvement in AOS, begin to differentiate its neural mechanisms from those of other motor impairments following stroke, and help inform us of the neural mechanisms driving differences in speech motor planning and programming impairment following stroke.

  8. Effective connectivity of hippocampal neural network and its alteration in Mg2+-free epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xin-Wei; Li, Jing-Bo; Lu, Qin-Chi; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the connectivity of the brain neural network and its evolution in epileptiform discharges is meaningful in the epilepsy researches and treatments. In the present study, epileptiform discharges were induced in rat hippocampal slices perfused with Mg2+-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The effective connectivity of the hippocampal neural network was studied by comparing the normal and epileptiform discharges recorded by a microelectrode array. The neural network connectivity was constructed by using partial directed coherence and analyzed by graph theory. The transition of the hippocampal network topology from control to epileptiform discharges was demonstrated. Firstly, differences existed in both the averaged in- and out-degree between nodes in the pyramidal cell layer and the granule cell layer, which indicated an information flow from the pyramidal cell layer to the granule cell layer during epileptiform discharges, whereas no consistent information flow was observed in control. Secondly, the neural network showed different small-worldness in the early, middle and late stages of the epileptiform discharges, whereas the control network did not show the small-world property. Thirdly, the network connectivity began to change earlier than the appearance of epileptiform discharges and lasted several seconds after the epileptiform discharges disappeared. These results revealed the important network bases underlying the transition from normal to epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slices. Additionally, this work indicated that the network analysis might provide a useful tool to evaluate the neural network and help to improve the prediction of seizures.

  9. Altered Resting-State EEG Source Functional Connectivity In Schizophrenia: The Effect Of Illness Duration

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    Giorgio eDi Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis of schizophrenia as a disconnection syndrome, studies of resting-state EEG Source Functional Connectivity (EEG-SFC in people affected by schizophrenia are sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate resting-state EEG-SFC in 77 stable, medicated patients with schizophrenia (SCZ compared to 78 healthy volunteers (HV. In order to study the effect of illness duration, SCZ were divided in those with a short duration of disease (SDD; n = 25 and those with a long duration of disease (LDD; n = 52. Resting-state EEG recordings in eyes closed condition were analyzed and lagged phase synchronization (LPS indices were calculated for each ROI pair in the source-space EEG data. In delta and theta bands, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC than HV; a higher theta band connectivity in frontal regions was observed in LDD compared with SDD. In the alpha band, SCZ showed lower frontal EEG-SFC compared with HV whereas no differences were found between LDD and SDD. In the beta1 band, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC compared with HVs and in the beta2 band, LDD presented lower frontal and parieto-temporal EEG-SFC compared with HV. In the gamma band, SDD had greater connectivity values compared with LDD and HV. This study suggests that resting state brain network connectivity is abnormally organized in schizophrenia, with different patterns for the different EEG frequency components and that EEG can be a powerful tool to further elucidate the complexity of such disordered connectivity.

  10. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sophia; Keeser, Daniel; Samson, Andrea C; Kirsch, Valerie; Blautzik, Janusch; Grothe, Michel; Erat, Okan; Hegenloh, Michael; Coates, Ute; Reiser, Maximilian F; Hennig-Fast, Kristina; Meindl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA). We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male) and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male). Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  11. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

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    Sophia Mueller

    Full Text Available Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA. We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, voxel-based morphometry (VBM and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male. Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  12. Alteration of functional connectivity in autism spectrum disorder: effect of age and anatomical distance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiliang Long; Xujun Duan; Dante Mantini; Huafu Chen

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with disruption of local- and long-range functional connectivity (FC). The direction of those changes in FC (increase or decrease), however, is inconsistent across studies. Further, age-dependent changes of distance-specific FC in ASD remain unclear. In this study, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from sixty-four typical controls (TC) and sixty-four patients with ASD, whom we further classified into child (18 years)....

  13. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity and Connectivity in Depressed Parkinson's Disease.

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    Xiao Hu

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease (PD, but the neurophysiological mechanisms of depression in PD are poorly understood. The current study attempted to examine disrupted spontaneous local brain activities and functional connectivities that underlie the depression in PD. We recruited a total of 20 depressed PD patients (DPD, 40 non-depressed PD patients (NDPD and 43 matched healthy controls (HC. All the subjects underwent neuropsychological tests and resting-state fMRI scanning. The between-group differences in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF of BOLD signals were examined using post-hoc tests after the analysis of covariance. Compared with the NDPD and HC, the DPD group showed significantly increased ALFF in the left median cingulated cortex (MCC. The functional connectivity (FC between left MCC and all the other voxels in the brain were then calculated. Compared with the HC and NDPD group, the DPD patients showed stronger FC between the left MCC and some of the major nodes of the default mode network (DMN, including the post cingulated cortex/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and cerebellum. Correlation analysis revealed that both the ALFF values in the left MCC and the FC between the left MCC and the nodes of DMN were significantly correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. Moreover, higher local activities in the left MCC were associated with increased functional connections between the MCC and the nodes of DMN in PD. These abnormal activities and connectivities of the limbic-cortical circuit may indicate impaired high-order cortical control or uncontrol of negative mood in DPD, which suggested a possible neural mechanism of the depression in PD.

  14. How music alters a kiss: superior temporal gyrus controls fusiform-amygdalar effective connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrs, Corinna; Deserno, Lorenz; Bakels, Jan-Hendrik; Schlochtermeier, Lorna H; Kappelhoff, Hermann; Jacobs, Arthur M; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Koelsch, Stefan; Kuchinke, Lars

    2014-11-01

    While watching movies, the brain integrates the visual information and the musical soundtrack into a coherent percept. Multisensory integration can lead to emotion elicitation on which soundtrack valences may have a modulatory impact. Here, dynamic kissing scenes from romantic comedies were presented to 22 participants (13 females) during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The kissing scenes were either accompanied by happy music, sad music or no music. Evidence from cross-modal studies motivated a predefined three-region network for multisensory integration of emotion, consisting of fusiform gyrus (FG), amygdala (AMY) and anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG). The interactions in this network were investigated using dynamic causal models of effective connectivity. This revealed bilinear modulations by happy and sad music with suppression effects on the connectivity from FG and AMY to aSTG. Non-linear dynamic causal modeling showed a suppressive gating effect of aSTG on fusiform-amygdalar connectivity. In conclusion, fusiform to amygdala coupling strength is modulated via feedback through aSTG as region for multisensory integration of emotional material. This mechanism was emotion-specific and more pronounced for sad music. Therefore, soundtrack valences may modulate emotion elicitation in movies by differentially changing preprocessed visual information to the amygdala.

  15. Sevoflurane Alters Spatiotemporal Functional Connectivity Motifs That Link Resting-State Networks during Wakefulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung; Palanca, Ben J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spatiotemporal patterns of correlated neural activity during the transition from wakefulness to general anesthesia have not been fully characterized. Correlation analysis of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows segmentation of the brain into resting-state networks (RSNs), with functional connectivity referring to the covarying activity that suggests shared functional specialization. We quantified the persistence of these correlations following the induction of general anesthesia in healthy volunteers and assessed for a dynamic nature over time. Methods: We analyzed human fMRI data acquired at 0 and 1.2% vol sevoflurane. The covariance in the correlated activity among different brain regions was calculated over time using bounded Kalman filtering. These time series were then clustered into eight orthogonal motifs using a K-means algorithm, where the structure of correlated activity throughout the brain at any time is the weighted sum of all motifs. Results: Across time scales and under anesthesia, the reorganization of interactions between RSNs is related to the strength of dynamic connections between member pairs. The covariance of correlated activity between RSNs persists compared to that linking individual member pairs of different RSNs. Conclusions: Accounting for the spatiotemporal structure of correlated BOLD signals, anesthetic-induced loss of consciousness is mainly associated with the disruption of motifs with intermediate strength within and between members of different RSNs. In contrast, motifs with higher strength of connections, predominantly with regions-pairs from within-RSN interactions, are conserved among states of wakefulness and sevoflurane general anesthesia. PMID:28082871

  16. Intermediate Progenitors Facilitate Intracortical Progression of Thalamocortical Axons and Interneurons through CXCL12 Chemokine Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Philipp; Molnár, Zoltán; Tzeng, Yi-Shiuan; Lai, Dar-Ming; Arnold, Sebastian J; Stumm, Ralf

    2015-09-23

    via the cognate receptor CXCR4. This paracrine signal may ensure thalamocortical connectivity and dispersion of inhibitory neurons in the rapidly growing cortex.

  17. Cross-modal plasticity in sensory deprived animal models: From the thalamocortical development point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzera, Cecilia; López-Bendito, Guillermina

    2016-09-01

    Over recent decades, our understanding of the plasticity of the central nervous system has expanded enormously. Accordingly, it is now widely accepted that the brain can adapt to changes by reorganizing its circuitry, both in response to external stimuli and experience, as well as through intrinsic mechanisms. A clear example of this is the activation of a deprived sensory area and the expansion of spared sensory cortical regions in individuals who suffered peripheral sensory loss. Despite the efforts to understand these neuroplastic changes, the mechanisms underlying such adaptive remodeling remains poorly understood. Progress in understanding these events may be hindered by the highly varied data obtained from the distinct experimental paradigms analyzed, which include different animal models and neuronal systems, as well as studies into the onset of sensory loss. Here, we will establish the current state-of-the-art describing the principal observations made according to the time of sensory deprivation with respect to the development of the thalamocortical connectivity. We will review the experimental data obtained from animal models where sensory deprivation has been induced either before or after thalamocortical axons reach and invade their target cortical areas. The anatomical and functional effects of sensory loss on the primary sensory areas of the cortex will be presented. Indeed, we consider that the comparative approach of this review is a necessary step in order to help deciphering the processes that underlie sensory neuroplasticity, for which studies in animal models have been indispensable. Understanding these mechanisms will then help to develop restorative strategies and prostheses that will overcome the functional loss.

  18. Basal ganglia modulation of thalamocortical relay in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia

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    Yixin eGuo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia dysfunction has being implied in both Parkinson's disease and dystonia. While these disorders probably involve different cellular and circuit pathologies within and beyond basal ganglia, there may be some shared neurophysiological pathways. For example, pallidotomy and pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS are used in symptomatic treatment of both disorders. Both conditions are marked by alterations of rhythmicity of neural activity throughout basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. Increased synchronized oscillatory activity in beta band is characteristic of Parkinson’s disease, while different frequency bands, theta and alpha, are involved in dystonia. We compare the effect of the activity of GPi, the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, on the information processing in the downstream neural circuits of thalamus in Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. We use a data-driven computational approach, a computational model of the thalamocortical (TC cell modulated by experimentally recorded data, to study the differences and similarities of thalamic dynamics in dystonia and Parkinson's disease. Our analysis shows no substantial differences in TC relay between the two conditions. Our results suggest that, similar to Parkinson’s disease, a disruption of thalamic processing could also be involved in dystonia. Moreover, the degree to which TC relay fidelity is impaired is approximately the same in both conditions. While Parkinson’s disease and dystonia may have different pathologies and differ in the oscillatory content of neural discharge, our results suggest that the effect of patterning of pallidal discharge is similar in both conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that the mechanisms of GPi DBS in dystonia maybe involve improvement of TC relay fidelity.

  19. Basal ganglia modulation of thalamocortical relay in Parkinson's disease and dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yixin; Park, Choongseok; Worth, Robert M; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2013-01-01

    Basal ganglia dysfunction has being implied in both Parkinson's disease and dystonia. While these disorders probably involve different cellular and circuit pathologies within and beyond basal ganglia, there may be some shared neurophysiological pathways. For example, pallidotomy and pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are used in symptomatic treatment of both disorders. Both conditions are marked by alterations of rhythmicity of neural activity throughout basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. Increased synchronized oscillatory activity in beta band is characteristic of Parkinson's disease, while different frequency bands, theta and alpha, are involved in dystonia. We compare the effect of the activity of GPi, the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, on information processing in the downstream neural circuits of thalamus in Parkinson's disease and dystonia. We use a data-driven computational approach, a computational model of the thalamocortical (TC) cell modulated by experimentally recorded data, to study the differences and similarities of thalamic dynamics in dystonia and Parkinson's disease. Our analysis shows no substantial differences in TC relay between the two conditions. Our results suggest that, similar to Parkinson's disease, a disruption of thalamic processing could also be involved in dystonia. Moreover, the degree to which TC relay fidelity is impaired is approximately the same in both conditions. While Parkinson's disease and dystonia may have different pathologies and differ in the oscillatory content of neural discharge, our results suggest that the effect of patterning of pallidal discharge is similar in both conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that the mechanisms of GPi DBS in dystonia may involve improvement of TC relay fidelity.

  20. Neural dynamics in a model of the thalamocortical system. I. Layers, loops and the emergence of fast synchronous rhythms.

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    Lumer, E D; Edelman, G M; Tononi, G

    1997-01-01

    A large-scale computer model was constructed to gain insight into the structural basis for the generation of fast synchronous rhythms (20-60 Hz) in the thalamocortical system. The model consisted of 65,000 spiking neurons organized topographically to represent sectors of a primary and secondary area of mammalian visual cortex, and two associated regions of the dorsal thalamus and the thalamic reticular nucleus. Cortical neurons, both excitatory and inhibitory, were organized in supragranular layers, infraganular layers and layer IV. Reciprocal intra- and interlaminar, interareal, thalamocortical, corticothalamic and thalamoreticular connections were set up based on known anatomical constraints. Simulations of neuronal responses to visual input revealed sporadic epochs of synchronous oscillations involving all levels of the model, similar to the fast rhythms recorded in vivo. By systematically modifying physiological and structural parameters in the model, specific network properties were found to play a major role in the generation of this rhythmic activity. For example, fast synchronous rhythms could be sustained autonomously by lateral and interlaminar interactions within and among local cortical circuits. In addition, these oscillations were propagated to the thalamus and amplified by corticothalamocortical loops, including the thalamic reticular complex. Finally, synchronous oscillations were differentially affected by lesioning forward and backward interareal connections.

  1. Antidepressant Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy Unrelated to the Brain's Functional Network Connectivity alterations at an Individual Level

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    Chen, Guang-Dong; Ji, Feng; Li, Gong-Ying; Lyu, Bo-Xuan; Hu, Wei; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can alleviate the symptoms of treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Functional network connectivity (FNC) is a newly developed method to investigate the brain's functional connectivity patterns. The first aim of this study was to investigate FNC alterations between TRD patients and healthy controls. The second aim was to explore the relationship between the ECT treatment response and pre-ECT treatment FNC alterations in individual TRD patients. Methods: This study included 82 TRD patients and 41 controls. Patients were screened at baseline and after 2 weeks of treatment with a combination of ECT and antidepressants. Group information guided-independent component analysis (GIG-ICA) was used to compute subject-specific functional networks (FNs). Grassmann manifold and step-wise forward component selection using support vector machines were adopted to perform the FNC measure and extract the functional networks' connectivity patterns (FCP). Pearson's correlation analysis was used to calculate the correlations between the FCP and ECT response. Results: A total of 82 TRD patients in the ECT group were successfully treated. On an average, 8.50 ± 2.00 ECT sessions were conducted. After ECT treatment, only 42 TRD patients had an improved response to ECT (the Hamilton scores reduction rate was more than 50%), response rate 51%. 8 FNs (anterior and posterior default mode network, bilateral frontoparietal network, audio network, visual network, dorsal attention network, and sensorimotor network) were obtained using GIG-ICA. We did not found that FCPs were significantly different between TRD patients and healthy controls. Moreover, the baseline FCP was unrelated to the ECT treatment response. Conclusions: The FNC was not significantly different between the TRD patients and healthy controls, and the baseline FCP was unrelated to the ECT treatment response. These findings will necessitate that we modify the experimental scheme to

  2. Alterations of EEG functional connectivity in resting state obese and overweight patients with binge eating disorder: A preliminary report.

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    Imperatori, Claudio; Fabbricatore, Mariantonietta; Farina, Benedetto; Innamorati, Marco; Quintiliani, Maria Isabella; Lamis, Dorian A; Contardi, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo; Speranza, Anna Maria

    2015-10-21

    Alterations in brain functional connectivity have been detected in patients with eating disorders, but have not been studied in binge eating disorder (BED). We have investigated electroencephalographic (EEG) functional connectivity in thirteen overweight and obese patients with BED and thirteen overweight and obese patients without BED during RS condition. EEG analyzes were conducted by means of the exact Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (eLORETA). Compared to patients without BED, patients with BED demonstrated an increase of lagged phase synchronization in the beta frequency band among the cortical areas explored by FC1-T3 (left superior frontal gyrus-left middle temporal gyrus), T5-O1 (left inferior temporal gyrus-left middle occipital gyrus), and C4-O1 (right postcentral gyrus-left middle occipital gyrus) electrodes (T=4.861, p<0.05). EEG connectivity values were also significantly related to binge eating symptomatology after controlling for depressive symptoms. Our results may reflect the impairment of frontal control network and visual processing networks, which lead patients with BED to be more vulnerable to food cues and lack of control with regards to over eating.

  3. Altered regional connectivity reflecting effects of different anaesthesia protocols in the mouse brain.

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    Wu, Tong; Grandjean, Joanes; Bosshard, Simone C; Rudin, Markus; Reutens, David; Jiang, Tianzi

    2017-02-01

    Studies in mice using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) have provided opportunities to investigate the effects of pharmacological manipulations on brain function and map the phenotypes of mouse models of human brain disorders. Mouse rs-fMRI is typically performed under anaesthesia, which induces both regional suppression of brain activity and disruption of large-scale neural networks. Previous comparative studies using rodents investigating various drug effects on long-distance functional connectivity (FC) have reported agent-specific FC patterns, however, effects of regional suppression are sparsely explored. Here we examined changes in regional connectivity under six different anaesthesia conditions using mouse rs-fMRI with the goal of refining the framework of understanding the brain activation under anaesthesia at a local level. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to map local synchronization in the brain, followed by analysis of several brain areas based on ReHo maps. The results revealed high local coherence in most brain areas. The primary somatosensory cortex and caudate-putamen showed agent-specific properties. Lower local coherence in the cingulate cortex was observed under medetomidine, particularly when compared to the combination of medetomidine and isoflurane. The thalamus was associated with retained local coherence across anaesthetic levels and multiple nuclei. These results show that anaesthesia induced by the investigated anaesthetics through different molecular targets promote agent-specific regional connectivity. In addition, ReHo is a data-driven method with minimum user interaction, easy to use and fast to compute. Given that examination of the brain at a local level is widely applied in human rs-fMRI studies, our results show its sensitivity to extract information on varied neuronal activity under six different regimens relevant to mouse functional imaging. These results, therefore, will inform future rs

  4. Altered topological properties of functional network connectivity in schizophrenia during resting state: a small-world brain network study.

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    Yu, Qingbao; Sui, Jing; Rachakonda, Srinivas; He, Hao; Gruner, William; Pearlson, Godfrey; Kiehl, Kent A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant topological properties of small-world human brain networks in patients with schizophrenia (SZ) have been documented in previous neuroimaging studies. Aberrant functional network connectivity (FNC, temporal relationships among independent component time courses) has also been found in SZ by a previous resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. However, no study has yet determined if topological properties of FNC are also altered in SZ. In this study, small-world network metrics of FNC during the resting state were examined in both healthy controls (HCs) and SZ subjects. FMRI data were obtained from 19 HCs and 19 SZ. Brain images were decomposed into independent components (ICs) by group independent component analysis (ICA). FNC maps were constructed via a partial correlation analysis of ICA time courses. A set of undirected graphs were built by thresholding the FNC maps and the small-world network metrics of these maps were evaluated. Our results demonstrated significantly altered topological properties of FNC in SZ relative to controls. In addition, topological measures of many ICs involving frontal, parietal, occipital and cerebellar areas were altered in SZ relative to controls. Specifically, topological measures of whole network and specific components in SZ were correlated with scores on the negative symptom scale of the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS). These findings suggest that aberrant architecture of small-world brain topology in SZ consists of ICA temporally coherent brain networks.

  5. Novel neuronal and astrocytic mechanisms in thalamocortical loop dynamics.

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    Crunelli, Vincenzo; Blethyn, Kate L; Cope, David W; Hughes, Stuart W; Parri, H Rheinallt; Turner, Jonathan P; Tòth, Tibor I; Williams, Stephen R

    2002-12-29

    In this review, we summarize three sets of findings that have recently been observed in thalamic astrocytes and neurons, and discuss their significance for thalamocortical loop dynamics. (i) A physiologically relevant 'window' component of the low-voltage-activated, T-type Ca(2+) current (I(Twindow)) plays an essential part in the slow (less than 1 Hz) sleep oscillation in adult thalamocortical (TC) neurons, indicating that the expression of this fundamental sleep rhythm in these neurons is not a simple reflection of cortical network activity. It is also likely that I(Twindow) underlies one of the cellular mechanisms enabling TC neurons to produce burst firing in response to novel sensory stimuli. (ii) Both electrophysiological and dye-injection experiments support the existence of gap junction-mediated coupling among young and adult TC neurons. This finding indicates that electrical coupling-mediated synchronization might be implicated in the high and low frequency oscillatory activities expressed by this type of thalamic neuron. (iii) Spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) waves propagating among thalamic astrocytes are able to elicit large and long-lasting N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated currents in TC neurons. The peculiar developmental profile within the first two postnatal weeks of these astrocytic [Ca(2+)](i) transients and the selective activation of these glutamate receptors point to a role for this astrocyte-to-neuron signalling mechanism in the topographic wiring of the thalamocortical loop. As some of these novel cellular and intracellular properties are not restricted to thalamic astrocytes and neurons, their significance may well apply to (patho)physiological functions of glial and neuronal elements in other brain areas.

  6. Food-associated cues alter forebrain functional connectivity as assessed with immediate early gene and proenkephalin expression

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    Landry Charles F

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cues predictive of food availability are powerful modulators of appetite as well as food-seeking and ingestive behaviors. The neurobiological underpinnings of these conditioned responses are not well understood. Monitoring regional immediate early gene expression is a method used to assess alterations in neuronal metabolism resulting from upstream intracellular and extracellular signaling. Furthermore, assessing the expression of multiple immediate early genes offers a window onto the possible sequelae of exposure to food cues, since the function of each gene differs. We used immediate early gene and proenkephalin expression as a means of assessing food cue-elicited regional activation and alterations in functional connectivity within the forebrain. Results Contextual cues associated with palatable food elicited conditioned motor activation and corticosterone release in rats. This motivational state was associated with increased transcription of the activity-regulated genes homer1a, arc, zif268, ngfi-b and c-fos in corticolimbic, thalamic and hypothalamic areas and of proenkephalin within striatal regions. Furthermore, the functional connectivity elicited by food cues, as assessed by an inter-regional multigene-expression correlation method, differed substantially from that elicited by neutral cues. Specifically, food cues increased cortical engagement of the striatum, and within the nucleus accumbens, shifted correlations away from the shell towards the core. Exposure to the food-associated context also induced correlated gene expression between corticostriatal networks and the basolateral amygdala, an area critical for learning and responding to the incentive value of sensory stimuli. This increased corticostriatal-amygdalar functional connectivity was absent in the control group exposed to innocuous cues. Conclusion The results implicate correlated activity between the cortex and the striatum, especially the nucleus

  7. Traffic pollution exposure is associated with altered brain connectivity in school children.

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    Pujol, Jesus; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Macià, Dídac; Fenoll, Raquel; Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Rivas, Ioar; Forns, Joan; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Capellades, Jaume; Querol, Xavier; Deus, Joan; Sunyer, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Children are more vulnerable to the effects of environmental elements due to their active developmental processes. Exposure to urban air pollution has been associated with poorer cognitive performance, which is thought to be a result of direct interference with brain maturation. We aimed to assess the extent of such potential effects of urban pollution on child brain maturation using general indicators of vehicle exhaust measured in the school environment and a comprehensive imaging evaluation. A group of 263 children, aged 8 to 12 years, underwent MRI to quantify regional brain volumes, tissue composition, myelination, cortical thickness, neural tract architecture, membrane metabolites, functional connectivity in major neural networks and activation/deactivation dynamics during a sensory task. A combined measurement of elemental carbon and NO2 was used as a putative marker of vehicle exhaust. Air pollution exposure was associated with brain changes of a functional nature, with no evident effect on brain anatomy, structure or membrane metabolites. Specifically, a higher content of pollutants was associated with lower functional integration and segregation in key brain networks relevant to both inner mental processes (the default mode network) and stimulus-driven mental operations. Age and performance (motor response speed) both showed the opposite effect to that of pollution, thus indicating that higher exposure is associated with slower brain maturation. In conclusion, urban air pollution appears to adversely affect brain maturation in a critical age with changes specifically concerning the functional domain.

  8. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters the structure, connectivity and plasticity of cortical interneurons.

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    Guirado, Ramon; Perez-Rando, Marta; Sanchez-Matarredona, David; Castrén, Eero; Nacher, Juan

    2014-10-01

    Novel hypotheses suggest that antidepressants, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, induce neuronal structural plasticity, resembling that of the juvenile brain, although the underlying mechanisms of this reopening of the critical periods still remain unclear. However, recent studies suggest that inhibitory networks play an important role in this structural plasticity induced by fluoxetine. For this reason we have analysed the effects of a chronic fluoxetine treatment in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of transgenic mice displaying eGFP labelled interneurons. We have found an increase in the expression of molecules related to critical period plasticity, such as the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), GAD67/65 and synaptophysin, as well as a reduction in the number of parvalbumin expressing interneurons surrounded by perineuronal nets. We have also described a trend towards decrease in the perisomatic inhibitory puncta on pyramidal neurons in the mPFC and an increase in the density of inhibitory puncta on eGFP interneurons. Finally, we have found that chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the structure of interneurons in the mPFC, increasing their dendritic spine density. The present study provides evidence indicating that fluoxetine promotes structural changes in the inhibitory neurons of the adult cerebral cortex, probably through alterations in plasticity-related molecules of neurons or the extracellular matrix surrounding them, which are present in interneurons and are known to be crucial for the development of the critical periods of plasticity in the juvenile brain.

  9. A forward genetic screen with a thalamocortical axon reporter mouse yields novel neurodevelopment mutants and a distinct emx2 mutant phenotype

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    Vock Vita M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dorsal thalamus acts as a gateway and modulator for information going to and from the cerebral cortex. This activity requires the formation of reciprocal topographic axon connections between thalamus and cortex. The axons grow along a complex multistep pathway, making sharp turns, crossing expression boundaries, and encountering intermediate targets. However, the cellular and molecular components mediating these steps remain poorly understood. Results To further elucidate the development of the thalamocortical system, we first created a thalamocortical axon reporter line to use as a genetic tool for sensitive analysis of mutant mouse phenotypes. The TCA-tau-lacZ reporter mouse shows specific, robust, and reproducible labeling of thalamocortical axons (TCAs, but not the overlapping corticothalamic axons, during development. Moreover, it readily reveals TCA pathfinding abnormalities in known cortical mutants such as reeler. Next, we performed an unbiased screen for genes involved in thalamocortical development using random mutagenesis with the TCA reporter. Six independent mutant lines show aberrant TCA phenotypes at different steps of the pathway. These include ventral misrouting, overfasciculation, stalling at the corticostriatal boundary, and invasion of ectopic cortical cell clusters. An outcross breeding strategy coupled with a genomic panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms facilitated genetic mapping with small numbers of mutant mice. We mapped a ventral misrouting mutant to the Emx2 gene, and discovered that some TCAs extend to the olfactory bulbs in this mutant. Mapping data suggest that other lines carry mutations in genes not previously known for roles in thalamocortical development. Conclusions These data demonstrate the feasibility of a forward genetic approach to understanding mammalian brain morphogenesis and wiring. A robust axonal reporter enabled sensitive analysis of a specific axon tract inside the

  10. LSD alters eyes-closed functional connectivity within the early visual cortex in a retinotopic fashion.

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    Roseman, Leor; Sereno, Martin I; Leech, Robert; Kaelen, Mendel; Orban, Csaba; McGonigle, John; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J; Carhart-Harris, Robin L

    2016-08-01

    The question of how spatially organized activity in the visual cortex behaves during eyes-closed, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)-induced "psychedelic imagery" (e.g., visions of geometric patterns and more complex phenomena) has never been empirically addressed, although it has been proposed that under psychedelics, with eyes-closed, the brain may function "as if" there is visual input when there is none. In this work, resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) data was analyzed from 10 healthy subjects under the influence of LSD and, separately, placebo. It was suspected that eyes-closed psychedelic imagery might involve transient local retinotopic activation, of the sort typically associated with visual stimulation. To test this, it was hypothesized that, under LSD, patches of the visual cortex with congruent retinotopic representations would show greater RSFC than incongruent patches. Using a retinotopic localizer performed during a nondrug baseline condition, nonadjacent patches of V1 and V3 that represent the vertical or the horizontal meridians of the visual field were identified. Subsequently, RSFC between V1 and V3 was measured with respect to these a priori identified patches. Consistent with our prior hypothesis, the difference between RSFC of patches with congruent retinotopic specificity (horizontal-horizontal and vertical-vertical) and those with incongruent specificity (horizontal-vertical and vertical-horizontal) increased significantly under LSD relative to placebo, suggesting that activity within the visual cortex becomes more dependent on its intrinsic retinotopic organization in the drug condition. This result may indicate that under LSD, with eyes-closed, the early visual system behaves as if it were seeing spatially localized visual inputs. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3031-3040, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Altered resting-state connectivity in subjects at ultra-high risk for psychosis: an fMRI study

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    Choi Jung-Seok

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR for psychosis have self-disturbances and deficits in social cognition and functioning. Midline default network areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, are implicated in self-referential and social cognitive tasks. Thus, the neural substrates within the default mode network (DMN have the potential to mediate self-referential and social cognitive information processing in UHR subjects. Methods This study utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate resting-state DMN and task-related network (TRN functional connectivity in 19 UHR subjects and 20 matched healthy controls. The bilateral posterior cingulate cortex was selected as a seed region, and the intrinsic organization for all subjects was reconstructed on the basis of fMRI time series correlation. Results Default mode areas included the posterior/anterior cingulate cortices, the medial prefrontal cortex, the lateral parietal cortex, and the inferior temporal region. Task-related network areas included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, the inferior parietal lobule, and middle temporal cortex. Compared to healthy controls, UHR subjects exhibit hyperconnectivity within the default network regions and reduced anti-correlations (or negative correlations nearer to zero between the posterior cingulate cortex and task-related areas. Conclusions These findings suggest that abnormal resting-state network activity may be related with the clinical features of UHR subjects. Neurodevelopmental and anatomical alterations of cortical midline structure might underlie altered intrinsic networks in UHR subjects.

  12. Alterations in Cortical Sensorimotor Connectivity following Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective Resting-State fMRI Study.

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    Akinwunmi Oni-Orisan

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have demonstrated alterations during task-induced brain activation in spinal cord injury (SCI patients. The interruption to structural integrity of the spinal cord and the resultant disrupted flow of bidirectional communication between the brain and the spinal cord might contribute to the observed dynamic reorganization (neural plasticity. However, the effect of SCI on brain resting-state connectivity patterns remains unclear. We undertook a prospective resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI study to explore changes to cortical activation patterns following SCI. With institutional review board approval, rs-fMRI data was obtained in eleven patients with complete cervical SCI (>2 years post injury and nine age-matched controls. The data was processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimages software. Region of interest (ROI based analysis was performed to study changes in the sensorimotor network using pre- and post-central gyri as seed regions. Two-sampled t-test was carried out to check for significant differences between the two groups. SCI patients showed decreased functional connectivity in motor and sensory cortical regions when compared to controls. The decrease was noted in ipsilateral, contralateral, and interhemispheric regions for left and right precentral ROIs. Additionally, the left postcentral ROI demonstrated increased connectivity with the thalamus bilaterally in SCI patients. Our results suggest that cortical activation patterns in the sensorimotor network undergo dynamic reorganization following SCI. The presence of these changes in chronic spinal cord injury patients is suggestive of the inherent neural plasticity within the central nervous system.

  13. Altered Functional Connectivity in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment--A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

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    Weina Ding

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that people with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (sVCI have structural and functional abnormalities in the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites. In this study, we used seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC analysis and voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC techniques to investigate the alteration of rsFC in patients with sVCI. rsFC and structural magnetic resonance images were acquired for 51 patients with subcortical cerebrovascular disease. All patients were subdivided based on cognitive status into 29 with sVCI and 22 controls; patient characteristics were matched. rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and VMHC were calculated separately, and rsFC of the PCC and VMHC between the two groups were compared. The regions showing abnormal rsFC of the PCC or VMHC in sVCI patients were adopted as regions of interest for correlation analyses. Our results are as follows: The patients with sVCI exhibited increases in rsFC in the left middle temporal lobe, right inferior temporal lobe and left superior frontal gyrus, and significant decreases in rsFC of the left thalamus with the PCC. sVCI patients showed a significant deficit in VMHC between the bilateral lingual gyrus, putamen, and precentral gyrus. Additionally, the z-memory score was significantly positively associated with connectivity between the left thalamus and the PCC (r = 0.41, p = 0.03, uncorrected in the sVCI group. Our findings suggest that the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites play an important role in the pathogenesis of sVCI. Furthermore, rsFC between the left thalamus and the PCC might indicate the severity of sVCI.

  14. Role of inhibitory feedback for information processing in thalamocortical circuits

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    Mayer, Jörg; Schuster, Heinz Georg; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2006-03-01

    The information transfer in the thalamus is blocked dynamically during sleep, in conjunction with the occurrence of spindle waves. In order to describe the dynamic mechanisms which control the sensory transfer of information, it is necessary to have a qualitative model for the response properties of thalamic neurons. As the theoretical understanding of the mechanism remains incomplete, we analyze two modeling approaches for a recent experiment by Le Masson [Nature (London) 417, 854 (2002)] on the thalamocortical loop. We use a conductance based model in order to motivate an extension of the Hindmarsh-Rose model, which mimics experimental observations of Le Masson Typically, thalamic neurons posses two different firing modes, depending on their membrane potential. At depolarized potentials, the cells fire in a single spike mode and relay synaptic inputs in a one-to-one manner to the cortex. If the cell gets hyperpolarized, T -type calcium currents generate burst-mode firing which leads to a decrease in the spike transfer. In thalamocortical circuits, the cell membrane gets hyperpolarized by recurrent inhibitory feedback loops. In the case of reciprocally coupled excitatory and inhibitory neurons, inhibitory feedback leads to metastable self-sustained oscillations, which mask the incoming input, and thereby reduce the information transfer significantly.

  15. Short-term dynamics of thalamocortical and intracortical synapses onto layer 6 neurons in neocortex.

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    Beierlein, Michael; Connors, Barry W

    2002-10-01

    Layer 6 is the main source of neocortical connections back to specific thalamic nuclei. Corticothalamic (CT) systems play an important role in shaping sensory input, but little is known about the functional circuitry that generates CT activity. We recorded from the two main types of neurons in layer 6, regular-spiking (RS; pyramidal neurons) and fast-spiking (FS; inhibitory interneurons) cells and compared the physiological properties of different excitatory inputs. Thalamic stimulation evoked two monosynaptic inputs with distinct properties: suspected thalamocortical (TC) synaptic events had short latencies, short-term synaptic depression, and paired-pulse responses that suggested subnormal axonal conduction. A second group of synaptic responses likely originated from intracortical collaterals of CT cells that were antidromically activated from the thalamus. These intracortical responses had longer latencies, short-term synaptic facilitation, and were transmitted by axons with supernormal conduction. Suspected TC inputs to FS cells had significantly larger amplitudes than those onto RS cells. Dual recordings from neighboring neurons in layer 6 revealed both facilitating and depressing synaptic connections; the depressing synapses were probably formed by layer 6 cells that do not project to the thalamus, and thus were not sampled by thalamic stimulation. We conclude that layer 6 neurons integrate a variety of inputs with distinct temporal dynamics that are determined by the presynaptic cell type.

  16. Self-sustained asynchronous irregular states and Up-Down states in thalamic, cortical and thalamocortical networks of nonlinear integrate-and-fire neurons.

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    Destexhe, Alain

    2009-12-01

    Randomly-connected networks of integrate-and-fire (IF) neurons are known to display asynchronous irregular (AI) activity states, which resemble the discharge activity recorded in the cerebral cortex of awake animals. However, it is not clear whether such activity states are specific to simple IF models, or if they also exist in networks where neurons are endowed with complex intrinsic properties similar to electrophysiological measurements. Here, we investigate the occurrence of AI states in networks of nonlinear IF neurons, such as the adaptive exponential IF (Brette-Gerstner-Izhikevich) model. This model can display intrinsic properties such as low-threshold spike (LTS), regular spiking (RS) or fast-spiking (FS). We successively investigate the oscillatory and AI dynamics of thalamic, cortical and thalamocortical networks using such models. AI states can be found in each case, sometimes with surprisingly small network size of the order of a few tens of neurons. We show that the presence of LTS neurons in cortex or in thalamus, explains the robust emergence of AI states for relatively small network sizes. Finally, we investigate the role of spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). In cortical networks with strong SFA in RS cells, the AI state is transient, but when SFA is reduced, AI states can be self-sustained for long times. In thalamocortical networks, AI states are found when the cortex is itself in an AI state, but with strong SFA, the thalamocortical network displays Up and Down state transitions, similar to intracellular recordings during slow-wave sleep or anesthesia. Self-sustained Up and Down states could also be generated by two-layer cortical networks with LTS cells. These models suggest that intrinsic properties such as adaptation and low-threshold bursting activity are crucial for the genesis and control of AI states in thalamocortical networks.

  17. Alterations in visual cortical activation and connectivity with prefrontal cortex during working memory updating in major depressive disorder.

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    Le, Thang M; Borghi, John A; Kujawa, Autumn J; Klein, Daniel N; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2017-01-01

    alterations in activity patterns of the visual association areas, their connectivity with the prefrontal cortex, and their relationship with core clinical characteristics. These results highlight the role of information updating deficits in the cognitive control and symptomatology of depression.

  18. Mediodorsal and Visual Thalamic Connectivity Differ in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder With and Without Psychosis History

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    Anticevic, Alan; Yang, Genevieve; Savic, Aleksandar; Murray, John D.; Cole, Michael W.; Repovs, Grega; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Glahn, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical and theoretical studies implicate thalamocortical circuits in schizophrenia, supported by emerging resting-state functional connectivity studies (rs-fcMRI). Similar but attenuated alterations were found in bipolar disorder (BD). However, it remains unknown if segregated loops within thalamocortical systems show distinct rs-fcMRI alterations in schizophrenia. For instance, the mediodorsal (MD) nucleus, known to project to prefrontal networks, may be differently altered than the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), known to project to the occipital cortex. Also, it remains unknown if these circuits show different patterns of alterations in BD as a function of psychosis history, which may be associated with a more severe clinical course. We addressed these questions in 90 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 73 remitted BD patients (33 with psychosis history) matched to 146 healthy comparison subjects. We hypothesized that the MD vs LGN would show dissociations across diagnostic groups. We found that MD and LGN show more qualitative similarities than differences in their patterns of dysconnectivity in schizophrenia. In BD, patterns qualitatively diverged between thalamic nuclei although these effects were modest statistically. BD with psychosis history was associated with more severe dysconnectivity, particularly for the MD nucleus. Also, the MD nucleus showed connectivity reductions with the cerebellum in schizophrenia but not in BD. Results suggest dissociations for thalamic nuclei across diagnoses, albeit carefully controlling for medication is warranted in future studies. Collectively, these findings have implications for designing more precise neuroimaging-driven biomarkers that can identify common and divergent large-scale network perturbations across psychiatric diagnoses with shared symptoms. PMID:25031221

  19. The Fault Lies on the Other Side: Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Psychiatric Disorders is Mainly Caused by Counterpart Regions in the Opposite Hemisphere.

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    Zhang, Jie; Kendrick, Keith M; Lu, Guangming; Feng, Jianfeng

    2015-10-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are associated with abnormal resting-state functional connectivity between pairs of brain regions, although it remains unclear whether the fault resides within the pair of regions themselves or other regions connected to them. Identifying the source of dysfunction is crucial for understanding the etiology of different disorders. Using pathway- and network-based techniques to analyze resting-state functional magnetic imaging data from a large population of patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (239 patients, 251 controls), major depression (39 patients, 37 controls), and schizophrenia (69 patients, 62 controls), we show for the first time that only network-based cross-correlation identifies significant functional connectivity changes in all 3 disorders which survive correction. This demonstrates that the primary source of dysfunction resides not in the regional pairs themselves but in their external connections. Combining pathway and network-based functional-connectivity analysis, we established that, in all 3 disorders, the counterparts of pairs of regions in the opposite hemisphere contribute 60-76% to altered functional connectivity, compared with only 17-21% from the regions themselves. Thus, a transdiagnostic feature is of abnormal functional connectivity between brain regions produced via their contralateral counterparts. Our results demonstrate an important role for contralateral counterpart regions in contributing to altered regional connectivity in psychiatric disorders.

  20. Multimodal neuroimaging investigations of alterations to consciousness: the relationship between absence epilepsy and sleep.

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    Bagshaw, Andrew P; Rollings, David T; Khalsa, Sakh; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The link between epilepsy and sleep is well established on many levels. The focus of the current review is on recent neuroimaging investigations into the alterations of consciousness that are observed during absence seizures and the descent into sleep. Functional neuroimaging provides simultaneous cortical and subcortical recording of activity throughout the brain, allowing a detailed definition and characterization of large-scale brain networks and the interactions between them. This has led to the identification of a set of regions which collectively form the consciousness system, which includes contributions from the default mode network (DMN), ascending arousal systems, and the thalamus. Electrophysiological and neuroimaging investigations have also clearly demonstrated the importance of thalamocortical and corticothalamic networks in the evolution of sleep and absence epilepsy, two phenomena in which the subject experiences an alteration to the conscious state and a disconnection from external input. However, the precise relationship between the consciousness system, thalamocortical networks, and consciousness itself remains to be clarified. One of the fundamental challenges is to understand how distributed brain networks coordinate their activity in order to maintain and implement complex behaviors such as consciousness and how modifications to this network activity lead to alterations in consciousness. By taking into account not only the level of activation of individual brain regions but also their connectivity within specific networks and the activity and connectivity of other relevant networks, a more specific quantification of brain states can be achieved. This, in turn, may provide a more fundamental understanding of the alterations to consciousness experienced in sleep and epilepsy.

  1. Neuronal plasticity and thalamocortical sleep and waking oscillations

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    Timofeev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Throughout life, thalamocortical (TC) network alternates between activated states (wake or rapid eye movement sleep) and slow oscillatory state dominating slow-wave sleep. The patterns of neuronal firing are different during these distinct states. I propose that due to relatively regular firing, the activated states preset some steady state synaptic plasticity and that the silent periods of slow-wave sleep contribute to a release from this steady state synaptic plasticity. In this respect, I discuss how states of vigilance affect short-, mid-, and long-term synaptic plasticity, intrinsic neuronal plasticity, as well as homeostatic plasticity. Finally, I suggest that slow oscillation is intrinsic property of cortical network and brain homeostatic mechanisms are tuned to use all forms of plasticity to bring cortical network to the state of slow oscillation. However, prolonged and profound shift from this homeostatic balance could lead to development of paroxysmal hyperexcitability and seizures as in the case of brain trauma. PMID:21854960

  2. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity: Associated with structural network topology alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy.

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    Ceschin, Rafael; Lee, Vince K; Schmithorst, Vince; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    alteration in eigenvector centrality, clustering coefficient (inter-regional) and participation co-efficient (inter-modular) alterations of frontal-striatal and fronto-limbic nodes suggesting re-organization of these pathways. Both along tract and structural topology network measurements correlated strongly with motor and visual clinical outcome scores. This study shows the value of combining along-tract analysis and structural network topology in depicting not only selective parietal occipital regional vulnerability but also reorganization of frontal-striatal and frontal-limbic pathways in preterm children with cerebral palsy. These finding also support the concept that widespread, but selective posterior-anterior neural network connectivity alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy likely contribute to the pathogenesis of neurosensory and cognitive impairment in this group.

  3. Resting state networks and consciousness.Alterations of multiple resting state network connectivity in physiological, pharmacological and pathological consciousness states.

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    Lizette eHeine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in fMRI functional connectivity under physiological (sleep, pharmacological (anesthesia and pathological altered states of consciousness, such as brain death, coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state. The reviewed RSNs were the DMN, left and right executive control, salience, sensorimotor, auditory and visual networks. We highlight some methodological issues concerning resting state analyses in severely injured brains mainly in terms of hypothesis-driven seed-based correlation analysis and data-driven independent components analysis approaches. Finally, we attempt to contextualize our discussion within theoretical frameworks of conscious processes. We think that this lesion approach allows us to better determine the necessary conditions under which normal conscious cognition takes place. At the clinical level, we acknowledge the technical merits of the resting state paradigm. Indeed, fast and easy acquisitions are preferable to activation paradigms in clinical populations. Finally, we emphasize the need to validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of fMRI resting state measurements in non-communicating brain damaged patients.

  4. Resting state networks and consciousness: alterations of multiple resting state network connectivity in physiological, pharmacological, and pathological consciousness States.

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    Heine, Lizette; Soddu, Andrea; Gómez, Francisco; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Tshibanda, Luaba; Thonnard, Marie; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Kirsch, Murielle; Laureys, Steven; Demertzi, Athena

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) functional connectivity under physiological (sleep), pharmacological (anesthesia), and pathological altered states of consciousness, such as brain death, coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state. The reviewed resting state networks were the DMN, left and right executive control, salience, sensorimotor, auditory, and visual networks. We highlight some methodological issues concerning resting state analyses in severely injured brains mainly in terms of hypothesis-driven seed-based correlation analysis and data-driven independent components analysis approaches. Finally, we attempt to contextualize our discussion within theoretical frameworks of conscious processes. We think that this "lesion" approach allows us to better determine the necessary conditions under which normal conscious cognition takes place. At the clinical level, we acknowledge the technical merits of the resting state paradigm. Indeed, fast and easy acquisitions are preferable to activation paradigms in clinical populations. Finally, we emphasize the need to validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of fMRI resting state measurements in non-communicating brain damaged patients.

  5. The somatosensory link: S1 functional connectivity is altered by sustained pain and associated with clinical/autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia

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    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L.; Cahalan, Christine M.; Harris, Richard E.; Beissner, Florian; Garcia, Ronald G.; Kim, Hyungjun; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic functional pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain, significant pain catastrophizing, sympathovagal dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation for evoked pain. While several studies have found altered resting brain connectivity in FM, studies have not specifically probed the somatosensory system, and its role in both somatic and non-somatic FM symptomatology. Our objective was to evaluate resting primary somatosensory cortex (S1) connectivity, and explore how sustained, evoked deep-tissue pain modulates this connectivity. Methods We acquired fMRI and electrocardiography data from FM patients and healthy controls (HC) during rest (REST) and sustained mechanical pressure pain (PAIN) over the lower leg. Functional connectivity associated with different S1 subregions was calculated, while S1leg (leg representation) connectivity was contrast between REST and PAIN, and correlated with clinically-relevant measures in FM. Results At REST, FM showed decreased connectivity between multiple ipsilateral and cross-hemispheric S1 subregions, which was correlated with clinical pain severity. PAIN, compared to REST, produced increased S1legconnectivity to bilateral anterior insula in FM, but not in HC. Moreover, in FM, sustained pain-altered S1legconnectivity to anterior insula was correlated with clinical/behavioral pain measures and autonomic responses. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that both somatic and non-somatic dysfunction in FM, including clinical pain, pain catastrophizing, autonomic dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation, are all closely linked with the degree to which evoked deep-tissue pain alters S1 connectivity to salience/affective pain processing regions. Additionally, diminished connectivity between S1 subregions at REST in FM may result from ongoing widespread clinical pain. PMID:25622796

  6. NMDAR-regulated dynamics of layer 4 neuronal dendrites during thalamocortical reorganization in neonates.

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    Mizuno, Hidenobu; Luo, Wenshu; Tarusawa, Etsuko; Saito, Yoshikazu M; Sato, Takuya; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2014-04-16

    Thalamocortical (TC) connectivity is reorganized by thalamic inputs during postnatal development; however, the dynamic characteristics of TC reorganization and the underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. We addressed this question using dendritic refinement of layer 4 (L4) stellate neurons in mouse barrel cortex (barrel cells) as a model; dendritic refinement of L4 neurons is a critical component of TC reorganization through which postsynaptic L4 neurons acquire their dendritic orientation toward presynaptic TC axon termini. Simultaneous labeling of TC axons and individual barrel cell dendrites allowed in vivo time-lapse imaging of dendritic refinement in the neonatal cortex. The barrel cells reinforced the dendritic orientation toward TC axons by dynamically moving their branches. In N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-deficient barrel cells, this dendritic motility was enhanced, and the orientation bias was not reinforced. Our data suggest that L4 neurons have "fluctuating" dendrites during TC reorganization and that NMDARs cell autonomously regulate these dynamics to establish fine-tuned circuits.

  7. Mean field model of acetylcholine mediated dynamics in the thalamocortical system.

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    Clearwater, J M; Rennie, C J; Robinson, P A

    2008-12-01

    A recent continuum model of the large scale electrical activity of the thalamocortical system is generalized to include cholinergic modulation. The model is examined analytically and numerically to determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh) on its steady states, linear stability, spectrum, and temporal responses. Changing the ACh concentration moves the system between zones of one, three, and five steady states, showing that neuromodulation of synaptic strength is a possible mechanism by which multiple steady states emerge in the brain. The lowest firing rate steady state is always stable, and subsequent fixed points alternate between stable and unstable. Increasing ACh concentration changes the form of the spectrum. Increasing the tonic level of ACh concentration increases the magnitudes of the N100 and P200 in the evoked response potential (ERP), without changing the timing of these peaks. Driving the system with a pulse of cholinergic activity results in a transient increase in the firing rate of cortical neurons that lasts over 10s. Step-like increases in cortical ACh concentration cause increases in the firing rate of cortical neurons, with rapid responses due to fast acting nicotinic receptors and slower responses due to muscarinic receptor suppression of intracortical connections.

  8. Thalamocortical input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons measured using quantitative large-scale array tomography

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    Jong-Cheol eRah

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The subcellular locations of synapses on pyramidal neurons strongly influences dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity. Despite this, there is little quantitative data on spatial distributions of specific types of synaptic input. Here we use array tomography (AT, a high-resolution optical microscopy method, to examine thalamocortical (TC input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We first verified the ability of AT to identify synapses using parallel electron microscopic analysis of TC synapses in layer 4. We then use large-scale AT to measure TC synapse distribution on L5 pyramdial neurons in a 1.00 x 0.83 x 0.21 mm^3 volume of mouse somatosensory cortex. We found that TC synapses primarily target basal dendrites in layer 5, but also make a considerable input to proximal apical dendrites in L4, consistent with previous work. Our analysis further suggests that TC inputs are biased towards certain branches and, within branches, synapses show significant clustering with an excess of TC synapse nearest neighbors within 5-15 μm compared to a random distribution. Thus, we show that AT is a sensitive and quantitative method to map specific types of synaptic input on the dendrites of entire neurons. We anticipate that this technique will be of wide utility for mapping functionally-relevant anatomical connectivity in neural circuits.

  9. Intrinsic and synaptic dynamics interact to generate emergent patterns of rhythmic bursting in thalamocortical neurons.

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    Sohal, Vikaas S; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Rudolph, Uwe; Huguenard, John R

    2006-04-19

    Rhythmic inhibition entrains the firing of excitatory neurons during oscillations throughout the brain. Previous work has suggested that the strength and duration of inhibitory input determines the synchrony and period, respectively, of these oscillations. In particular, sleep spindles result from a cycle of events including rhythmic inhibition and rebound bursts in thalamocortical (TC) neurons, and slowing and strengthening this inhibitory input may transform spindles into spike-wave discharges characteristic of absence epilepsy. Here, we used dynamic clamp to inject TC neurons with spindle-like trains of IPSCs and studied how modest changes in the amplitude and/or duration of these IPSCs affected the responses of the TC neurons. Contrary to our expectations, we found that prolonging IPSCs accelerates postinhibitory rebound (PIR) in TC neurons, and that increasing either the amplitude or duration of IPSCs desynchronizes PIR activity in a population of TC cells. Tonic injection of hyperpolarizing or depolarizing current dramatically alters the timing and synchrony of PIR. These results demonstrate that rhythmic PIR activity is an emergent property of interactions between intrinsic and synaptic currents, not just a passive reflection of incoming synaptic inhibition.

  10. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway.

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    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In "driver" thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  11. Presynaptic adenosine receptor-mediated regulation of diverse thalamocortical short-term plasticity in the mouse whisker pathway

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    Giovanni eFerrati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In driver thalamocortical (TC synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors, modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  12. Spike timing and synaptic dynamics at the awake thalamocortical synapse.

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    Swadlow, Harvey A; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Gusev, Alexander G

    2005-01-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) neurons form only a small percentage of the synapses onto neurons of cortical layer 4, but the response properties of these cortical neurons are arguably dominated by thalamic input. This discrepancy is explained, in part, by studies showing that TC synapses are of high efficacy. However, TC synapses display activity-dependent depression. Because of this, in vitro measures of synaptic efficacy will not reflect the situation in vivo, where different neuronal populations have widely varying levels of "spontaneous" activity. Indeed, TC neurons of awake subjects generate high rates of spontaneous activity that would be expected, in a depressing synapse, to result in a chronic state of synaptic depression. Here, we review recent work in the somatosensory thalamocortical system of awake rabbits in which the relationship between TC spike timing and TC synaptic efficacy was examined during both thalamic "relay mode" (alert state) and "burst mode" (drowsy state). Two largely independent methodological approaches were used. First, we employed cross-correlation methods to examine the synaptic impact of single TC "barreloid" neurons on a single neuronal subtype in the topographically aligned layer 4 "barrel" - putative fast-spike inhibitory interneurons. We found that the initial spike of a TC burst, as well as isolated TC spikes with long preceding interspike intervals (ISIs) elicited postsynaptic action potentials far more effectively than did TC impulses with short ISIs. Our second approach took a broader view of the postsynaptic impact of TC impulses. In these experiments we examined spike-triggered extracellular field potentials and synaptic currents (using current source-density analysis) generated through the depths of a cortical barrel column by the impulses of single topographically aligned TC neurons. We found that (a) closely neighboring TC neurons may elicit very different patterns of monosynaptic activation within layers 4 and 6 of the aligned

  13. Altered functional connectivity links in neuroleptic-naïve and neuroleptic-treated patients with schizophrenia, and their relation to symptoms including volition

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    Weidan Pu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze functional connectivity in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia, resting-state fMRI data were obtained for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis from 22 first-episode neuroleptic-naïve schizophrenia (NNS, 61 first-episode neuroleptic-treated schizophrenia (NTS patients, and 60 healthy controls (HC. Reductions were found in untreated and treated patients in the functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus, and this was correlated with the reduction in volition from the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS, that is in the willful initiation, sustenance, and control of thoughts, behavior, movements, and speech, and with the general and negative symptoms. In addition in both patient groups interhemispheric functional connectivity was weaker between the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and temporal pole. These functional connectivity changes and the related symptoms were not treated by the neuroleptics. Differences between the patient groups were that there were more strong functional connectivity links in the NNS patients (including in hippocampal, frontal, and striatal circuits than in the NTS patients. These findings with a whole brain analysis in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia provide evidence on some of the brain regions implicated in the volitional, other general, and negative symptoms, of schizophrenia that are not treated by neuroleptics so have implications for the development of other treatments; and provide evidence on some brain systems in which neuroleptics do alter the functional connectivity.

  14. Global intracellular slow-wave dynamics of the thalamocortical system.

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    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-06-25

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like "modulator" EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs ("drivers") were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing "driver"- and "modulator"-like EPSPs, others showing "modulator"-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display "hub dynamics" and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves.

  15. Frequency Transformation in the Auditory Lemniscal Thalamocortical System.

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    Kazuo eImaizumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The auditory lemniscal thalamocortical (TC pathway conveys information from the ventral division of the medial geniculate body to the primary auditory cortex (A1. Although their general topographic organization has been well characterized, functional transformations at the lemniscal TC synapse still remain incompletely codified, largely due to the need for integration of functional anatomical results with the variability observed with various animal models and experimental techniques. In this review, we discuss these issues with classical approaches, such as in vivo extracellular recordings and tracer injections to physiologically identified areas in A1, and then compare these studies with modern approaches, such as in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, in vivo whole-cell recordings, optogenetic methods, and in vitro methods using slice preparations. A surprising finding from a comparison of classical and modern approaches is the similar degree of convergence from thalamic neurons to single A1 neurons and clusters of A1 neurons, although, thalamic convergence to single A1 neurons is more restricted areas within putative thalamic frequency lamina. These comparisons suggest that frequency convergence from thalamic input to A1 is functionally limited. Finally, we consider synaptic organization of TC projections and future directions for research.

  16. Altered structural and effective connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa in circuits that regulate energy and reward homeostasis.

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    Frank, G K W; Shott, M E; Riederer, J; Pryor, T L

    2016-11-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders that share many behaviors. Structural and functional brain circuits could provide biological links that those disorders have in common. We recruited 77 young adult women, 26 healthy controls, 26 women with anorexia and 25 women with bulimia nervosa. Probabilistic tractography was used to map white matter connectivity strength across taste and food intake regulating brain circuits. An independent multisample greedy equivalence search algorithm tested effective connectivity between those regions during sucrose tasting. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa had greater structural connectivity in pathways between insula, orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but lower connectivity from orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala to the hypothalamus (Panorexia and bulimia nervosa effective connectivity was directed from anterior cingulate via ventral striatum to the hypothalamus. Across all groups, sweetness perception was predicted by connectivity strength in pathways connecting to the middle orbitofrontal cortex. This study provides evidence that white matter structural as well as effective connectivity within the energy-homeostasis and food reward-regulating circuitry is fundamentally different in anorexia and bulimia nervosa compared with that in controls. In eating disorders, anterior cingulate cognitive-emotional top down control could affect food reward and eating drive, override hypothalamic inputs to the ventral striatum and enable prolonged food restriction.

  17. Sensory and motor deficits in children with cerebral palsy born preterm correlate with diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in thalamocortical pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOON, ALEXANDER H; STASHINKO, ELAINE E; NAGAE, LIDIA M; LIN, DORIS DM; KELLER, JENNIFER; BASTIAN, AMY; CAMPBELL, MICHELLE L; LEVEY, ERIC; MORI, SUSUMU; JOHNSTON, MICHAEL V

    2010-01-01

    AIM Cerebral palsy (CP) is frequently linked to white matter injury in children born preterm. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful technique providing precise identification of white matter microstructure. We investigated the relationship between DTI-observed thalamocortical (posterior thalamic radiation) injury, motor (corticospinal tract) injury, and sensorimotor function. METHOD Twenty-eight children born preterm(16 males, 12 females; mean age 5y 10mo, SD 2y 6mo, range 16mo–13y; mean gestational age at birth 28wks, SD 2.7wks, range 23–34wks) were included in this case–control study. Twenty-one children had spastic diplegia, four had spastic quadriplegia, two had hemiplegia, and one had ataxic hypotonic CP; 15 of the participants walked independently. Normative comparison data were obtained from 35 healthy age-matched children born at term(19 males, 16 females; mean age 5y 9mo, SD 4y 4mo, range 15mo–15y). Two-dimensional DTI color maps were created to evaluate 26 central white matter tracts, which were graded by a neuroradiologist masked to clinical status. Quantitative measures of touch, proprioception, strength (dynamometer), and spasticity (modified Ashworth scale) were obtained from a subset of participants. RESULTS All 28 participants with CP had periventricular white-matter injury on magnetic resonance imaging. Using DTI color maps, there was more severe injury in the posterior thalamic radiation pathways than in the descending corticospinal tracts. Posterior thalamic radiation injury correlated with reduced contralateral touch threshold, proprioception, and motor severity, whereas corticospinal tract injury did not correlate with motor or sensory outcome measures. INTERPRETATION These findings extend previous research demonstrating that CP in preterm children reflects disruption of thalamocortical connections as well as descending corticospinal pathways. PMID:19416315

  18. Dynamics of Circadian Thalamocortical Flow of Information during a Peripheral Neuropathic Pain Condition.

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    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Sameshima, Koichi; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory-discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep-wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) - both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep (SWS) state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence - analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and SWS episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus.

  19. Dynamics of circadian thalamocortical flow of information during a peripheral neuropathic pain condition

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    Helder eCardoso-Cruz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory-discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep-wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials – LFPs – both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence – PDC – analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and slow-wave-sleep episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus.

  20. Dynamics of Circadian Thalamocortical Flow of Information during a Peripheral Neuropathic Pain Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Sameshima, Koichi; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory–discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep–wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) – both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep (SWS) state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence – analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and SWS episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus. PMID:22007162

  1. White matter damage and brain network alterations in concussed patients: a review of recent diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional connectivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Catherine D; Schwedt, Todd J

    2015-05-01

    Over 2 million people are diagnosed with concussion each year in the USA, resulting in substantial individual and societal burdens. Although 'routine' clinical neuroimaging is useful for the diagnosis of more severe forms of traumatic brain injury, it is insensitive for detecting pathology associated with concussion. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) are techniques that allow for investigation of brain structural and functional connectivity patterns. DTI and rs-fMRI may be more sensitive than routine neuroimaging for detecting brain sequelae of concussion. This review summarizes recent DTI and rs-fMRI findings of altered structural and functional connectivity patterns in concussed patients.

  2. Rhythmic and dysrhythmic thalamocortical dynamics: GABA systems and the edge effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinás, Rodolfo; Urbano, Francisco J; Leznik, Elena; Ramírez, Rey R; van Marle, Hein J F

    2005-06-01

    Brain function is fundamentally related in the most general sense to the richness of thalamocortical interconnectivity, and in particular to the rhythmic oscillatory properties of thalamocortical loops. Such rhythmicity is involved in the genesis of cognition, in the sleep-wake cycle, and in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. The role of GABA-mediated transmission in regulating these functional states is addressed here. At the cortical level, inhibition determines the spread of cortical activation by sculpting the precise activity patterns that underlie the details of cognition and motor control. At the thalamic level, GABA-mediated inhibition modulates and resets distribution of the ongoing thalamocortical rhythmic oscillations that bind multisensory inputs into a single cognitive experience and regulate arousal levels.

  3. Altered patterns of directed connectivity within the reading network of dyslexic children and their relation to reading dysfluency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gojko Žarić

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reading is a complex cognitive skill subserved by a distributed network of visual and language-related regions. Disruptions of connectivity within this network have been associated with developmental dyslexia but their relation to individual differences in the severity of reading problems remains unclear. Here we investigate whether dysfunctional connectivity scales with the level of reading dysfluency by examining EEG recordings during visual word and false font processing in 9-year-old typically reading children (TR and two groups of dyslexic children: severely dysfluent (SDD and moderately dysfluent (MDD dyslexics. Results indicated weaker occipital to inferior-temporal connectivity for words in both dyslexic groups relative to TRs. Furthermore, SDDs exhibited stronger connectivity from left central to right inferior-temporal and occipital sites for words relative to TRs, and for false fonts relative to both MDDs and TRs. Importantly, reading fluency was positively related with forward and negatively with backward connectivity. Our results suggest disrupted visual processing of words in both dyslexic groups, together with a compensatory recruitment of right posterior brain regions especially in the SDDs during word and false font processing. Functional connectivity in the brain’s reading network may thus depend on the level of reading dysfluency beyond group differences between dyslexic and typical readers.

  4. Stability of thalamocortical synaptic transmission across awake brain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelzel, Carl R; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A

    2009-05-27

    Sensory cortical neurons are highly sensitive to brain state, with many neurons showing changes in spatial and/or temporal response properties and some neurons becoming virtually unresponsive when subjects are not alert. Although some of these changes are undoubtedly attributable to state-related filtering at the thalamic level, another likely source of such effects is the thalamocortical (TC) synapse, where activation of nicotinic receptors on TC terminals have been shown to enhance synaptic transmission in vitro. However, monosynaptic TC synaptic transmission has not been directly examined during different states of alertness. Here, in awake rabbits that shifted between alert and non-alert EEG states, we examined the monosynaptic TC responses and short-term synaptic dynamics generated by spontaneous impulses of single visual and somatosensory TC neurons. We did this using spike-triggered current source-density analysis, an approach that enables assessment of monosynaptic extracellular currents generated in different cortical layers by impulses of single TC afferents. Spontaneous firing rates of TC neurons were higher, and burst rates were much lower in the alert state. However, we found no state-related changes in the amplitude of monosynaptic TC responses when TC spikes with similar preceding interspike interval were compared. Moreover, the relationship between the preceding interspike interval of the TC spike and postsynaptic response amplitude was not influenced by state. These data indicate that TC synaptic transmission and dynamics are highly conserved across different states of alertness and that observed state-related changes in receptive field properties that occur at the cortical level result from other mechanisms.

  5. Clinical, cognitive, and functional connectivity correlations of resting-state intrinsic brain activity alterations in unmedicated depression

    OpenAIRE

    Tadayonnejad, Reza; Yang, Shaolin; Kumar, Anand; Ajilore, Olusola

    2014-01-01

    The pervasive and persistent nature of depressive symptoms has made resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) an appropriate approach for understanding the underlying mechanisms of major depressive disorder. The majority of rs-fMRI research has focused on depression-related alterations in the interregional coordination of brain baseline low frequency oscillations (LFOs). However, alteration of the regional amplitude of LFOs in depression, particularly its clinical, cogniti...

  6. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  7. Short-term plasticity in thalamocortical pathways: cellular mechanisms and functional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alamancos, M A

    1997-01-01

    Information reaches the neocortex through different types of thalamocortical pathways. These differ in many morphological and physiological properties. One interesting aspect in which thalamocortical pathways differ is in their temporal dynamics, such as their short-term plasticity. Primary pathways display frequency-dependent depression, while secondary pathways display frequency-dependent enhancement. The cellular mechanisms underlying these dynamic responses involve pre- and post-synaptic and circuit properties. They may serve to synchronize, amplify and/or filter neural activity in neocortex depending on behavioral demands, and thus to adapt each pathway to its specific function.

  8. Sevoflurane anesthesia induces neither contextual fear memory impairment nor alterations in local population connectivity of medial prefrontal cortex local field potentials networks in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyu; Zhang, Qian; Tian, Xin; Wang, Guolin

    2016-08-01

    Sevoflurane has been found to increase apoptosis and pathologic markers associated with Alzheimer disease, provoking concern over their potential contribution to postoperative cognitive dysfunction. This study aimed to determine the effects of sevoflurane on contextual fear memory of aged rats and to characterize local population connectivity of local field potentials (LFPs) in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of aged rats during contextual fear memory. Eighteen-month-old male SD rats were implanted with one multichannel electrode array in mPFC. The aged rats were divided into control group, sevoflurane group (1 MAC sevoflurane for 2 h) and surgical group with 1.0 MAC sevoflurane for 2 h. We then assessed the effect of the anesthesia on contextual fear memory, and alterations in the local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks by partial directed coherence (PDC). Surgery impaired contextual fear memory and reduced local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks in aged rats at day 1 after the surgery and anesthesia. 1 MAC Sevoflurane anesthesia induced neither contextual fear memory impairment nor alterations in local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks in aged rats when tested 1, 7, 15 and 30 days after exposure (P > 0.05). PDC values of theta band mPFC LFPs became strongly increased during contextual fear memory at 1, 7, 15, and 30 days after anesthesia. Our results suggest that 1 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia does not induce contextual fear memory impairment in aged rats and suggest that the increased local population connectivity in theta bands LFPs of mPFC plays a role in contextual fear memory.

  9. Altered Long- and Short-Range Functional Connectivity in Patients with Betel Quid Dependence: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

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    Tao Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease. Brain structural abnormalities may constitute an abnormal neural network that underlies the risk of drug dependence. We hypothesized that individuals with Betel Quid Dependence (BQD have functional connectivity alterations that can be described by long- and short-range functional connectivity density(FCD maps. Methods: We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from subjects of the Han ethnic group in Hainan, China. Here, we examined BQD individuals (n = 33 and age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs (n = 32 in a rs-fMRI study to observe FCD alterations associated with the severity of BQD. Results: Compared with HCs, long-range FCD was decreased in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and increased in the left cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL and bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL in the BQD group. Short-range FCD was reduced in the right ACC and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, and increased in the left CPL. The short-range FCD alteration in the right ACC displayed a negative correlation with the Betel Quid Dependence Scale (BQDS (r=-0.432, P=0.012, and the long-range FCD alteration of left IPL showed a positive correlation with the duration of BQD(r=0.519, P=0.002 in BQD individuals. Conclusions: fMRI revealed differences in long- and short- range FCD in BQD individuals, and these alterations might be due to BQ chewing, BQ dependency, or risk factors for developing BQD.

  10. Altered activity and functional connectivity of superior temporal gyri in anxiety disorders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaohu; Xi, Qian; Wang, Peijun; Li, Chunbo [Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai (China); He, Hongjian [Bio-X lab, Dept. of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-08-15

    The prior functional MRI studies have demonstrated significantly abnormal activity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) of anxiety patients. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether the abnormal activity in these regions was related to a loss of functional connectivity between these regions. Ten healthy controls and 10 anxiety patients underwent noninvasive fMRI while actively listening to emotionally neutral words alternated by silence (Task 1) or threat-related words (Task 2). The participants were instructed to silently make a judgment of each word's valence (i.e., unpleasant, pleasant, or neutral). A coherence analysis was applied to the functional MRI data to examine the functional connectivity between the left and the right STG, which was selected as the primary region of interest on the basis of our prior results. The data demonstrated that the anxiety patients exhibited significantly increased activation in the bilateral STG than the normal controls. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that the patient group showed significantly decreased degree of connectivity between the bilateral STG during processing Task 2 compared to Task 1 (t = 2.588, p = 0.029). In addition, a significantly decreased connectivity was also observed in the patient group compared to the control group during processing Task 2 (t = 2.810, p = 0.012). Anxiety patients may exhibit increased activity of the STG but decreased functional connectivity between the left and right STG, which may reflect the underlying neural abnormality of anxiety disorder, and this will provide new insights into this disease.

  11. Adults with high social anhedonia have altered neural connectivity with ventral lateral prefrontal cortex when processing positive social signals

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    Hong eYin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Social anhedonia (SA is a debilitating characteristic of schizophrenia and a vulnerability for developing schizophrenia among people at risk. Prior work (Hooker et al, 2014 has revealed neural deficits in ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC during processing of positive emotion in a community sample of people with high social anhedonia. Deficits in VLPFC neural activity are related to worse self-reported schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms and worse mood and behavior after social stress. In the current study, psychophysiological interaction (PPI analysis was applied to investigate the neural mechanisms mediated by VLPFC during emotion processing. PPI analysis revealed that, compared to low SA controls, participants with high SA displayed reduced VLPFC integration, specifically reduced connectivity between VLPFC and premotor cortex, inferior parietal and posterior temporal regions when viewing positive relative to neutral emotion. Across all participants, connectivity between VLPFC and inferior parietal region when viewing positive (versus neutral emotion was significantly correlated with measures of emotion management and attentional control. Additionally connectivity between VLPFC and superior temporal sulcus was related to reward and pleasure anticipation, and connectivity between VLPFC and inferior temporal sulcus correlated with attentional control measure. Our results suggest that impairments to VLPFC mediated neural circuitry underlie the cognitive and emotional deficits.

  12. Altered effective connectivity network of the amygdala in social anxiety disorder: a resting-state FMRI study.

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    Wei Liao

    Full Text Available The amygdala is often found to be abnormally recruited in social anxiety disorder (SAD patients. The question whether amygdala activation is primarily abnormal and affects other brain systems or whether it responds "normally" to an abnormal pattern of information conveyed by other brain structures remained unanswered. To address this question, we investigated a network of effective connectivity associated with the amygdala using Granger causality analysis on resting-state functional MRI data of 22 SAD patients and 21 healthy controls (HC. Implications of abnormal effective connectivity and clinical severity were investigated using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS. Decreased influence from inferior temporal gyrus (ITG to amygdala was found in SAD, while bidirectional influences between amygdala and visual cortices were increased compared to HCs. Clinical relevance of decreased effective connectivity from ITG to amygdala was suggested by a negative correlation of LSAS avoidance scores and the value of Granger causality. Our study is the first to reveal a network of abnormal effective connectivity of core structures in SAD. This is in support of a disregulation in predescribed modules involved in affect control. The amygdala is placed in a central position of dysfunction characterized both by decreased regulatory influence of orbitofrontal cortex and increased crosstalk with visual cortex. The model which is proposed based on our results lends neurobiological support towards cognitive models considering disinhibition and an attentional bias towards negative stimuli as a core feature of the disorder.

  13. Altered effects of perspective-taking on functional connectivity during self- and other-referential processing in adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ryu-Ichiro; Itahashi, Takashi; Ohta, Haruhisa; Yamada, Takashi; Kanai, Chieko; Nakamura, Motoaki; Watanabe, Hiromi; Kato, Nobumasa

    2016-08-30

    In interactive social situations, it is often crucial to be able to take another person's perspective when evaluating one's own or another person's specific trait; individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) critically lack this social skill. To examine how perspective-dependent self- and other-evaluation processes modulate functional connectivity in ASD, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in which 26 high-functioning adults with ASD and 24 typically developed (TD) controls were asked to decide whether an adjective describing a personality trait correctly described the participant himself/herself ("self") or the participant's mother ("other") by taking either the first (1P) or third person (3P) perspective. We observed that functional connectivity between the left sensorimotor cortex and the left middle cingulate cortex was enhanced in TD control individuals taking the 3P perspective, this enhancement was significantly reduced in ASD, and the degree of reduction was significantly correlated with the severity of autistic traits. Furthermore, the self-reference effect on functional connectivity between the left inferior frontal cortex and frontopolar cortices was significantly enhanced in TD control individuals taking the 3P perspective, whereas such effect was reversed in ASD. These findings indicate altered effects of perspective on the functional connectivity, which may underlie the deficits in social interaction and communication observed in individuals with ASD.

  14. Ablation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 potassium channels disrupts thalamocortical oscillations in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Felipe; Torres-Vega, Miguel A; Marks, Gerald A; Joho, Rolf H

    2008-05-21

    The genes Kcnc1 and Kcnc3 encode the subunits for the fast-activating/fast-deactivating, voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3, which are expressed in several brain regions known to be involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. When these genes are genetically eliminated, Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice display severe sleep loss as a result of unstable slow-wave sleep. Within the thalamocortical circuitry, Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits are highly expressed in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), which is thought to act as a pacemaker at sleep onset and to be involved in slow oscillatory activity (spindle waves) during slow-wave sleep. We showed that in cortical electroencephalographic recordings of freely moving Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice, spectral power is reduced up to 70% at frequencies Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient TRN neurons studied in vitro show approximately 60% increase in action potential duration and a reduction in high-frequency firing after depolarizing current injections and during rebound burst firing. The results support the hypothesis that altered electrophysiological properties of TRN neurons contribute to the reduced EEG power at slow frequencies in the thalamocortical network of Kv3-deficient mice.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in the thalamocortical network: strategic targets for the treatment of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngomba, R.T.; Santolini, I.; Salt, T.E.; Ferraguti, F.; Battaglia, G.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are positioned at synapses of the thalamocortical network that underlie the development of spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) associated with absence epilepsy. The modulatory role of individual mGlu receptor subtypes on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmi

  16. The effects of hemorrhagic parenchymal infarction on the establishment of sensori-motor structural and functional connectivity in early infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arichi, T.; Edwards, A.D. [Kings College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Perinatal Imaging and Health, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Counsell, S.J.; Mondi, V.; Tusor, N.; Merchant, N. [Kings College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Perinatal Imaging and Health, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Allievi, A.G.; Burdet, E. [Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Chew, A.T. [Kings College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Perinatal Imaging and Health, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom); Martinez-Biarge, M.; Cowan, F.M. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The objective of the study was to characterize alterations of structural and functional connectivity within the developing sensori-motor system in infants with focal perinatal brain injury and at high risk of cerebral palsy. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were used to study the developing functional and structural connectivity framework in six infants born prematurely at term equivalent age. This was first characterised in three infants without focal pathology, which was then compared to that derived from three infants with unilateral haemorrhagic parenchymal infarction and a subsequent focal periventricular white matter lesion who developed later haemiparesis. Functional responses to passive hand movement were in the contralateral perirolandic cortex, regardless of focal pathology. In infants with unilateral periventricular injury, afferent thalamo-cortical tracts appeared to have developed compensatory trajectories which circumvented areas of damage. In contrast, efferent corticospinal tracts showed marked asymmetry at term equivalent age following focal brain injury. Sensori-motor network analysis suggested that inter-hemispheric functional connectivity is largely preserved despite pathology and that impairment may be associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Following focal perinatal brain injury, altered structural and functional connectivity is already present and can be characterized with MRI at term equivalent age. The results of this small case series suggest that these techniques may provide valuable new information about prognosis and the pathophysiology underlying cerebral palsy. (orig.)

  17. Altered Structural and Functional Connectivity in Late Preterm Preadolescence: An Anatomic Seed-Based Study of Resting State Networks Related to the Posteromedial and Lateral Parietal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Andrew J.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Choi, SoYoung; Ceschin, Rafael; Bhushan, Chitresh; Leahy, Richard M.; Corby, Patricia; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Late preterm birth confers increased risk of developmental delay, academic difficulties and social deficits. The late third trimester may represent a critical period of development of neural networks including the default mode network (DMN), which is essential to normal cognition. Our objective is to identify functional and structural connectivity differences in the posteromedial cortex related to late preterm birth. Methods Thirty-eight preadolescents (ages 9–13; 19 born in the late preterm period (≥32 weeks gestational age) and 19 at term) without access to advanced neonatal care were recruited from a low socioeconomic status community in Brazil. Participants underwent neurocognitive testing, 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI). Seed-based probabilistic diffusion tractography and RS-fMRI analyses were performed using unilateral seeds within the posterior DMN (posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus) and lateral parietal DMN (superior marginal and angular gyri). Results Late preterm children demonstrated increased functional connectivity within the posterior default mode networks and increased anti-correlation with the central-executive network when seeded from the posteromedial cortex (PMC). Key differences were demonstrated between PMC components with increased anti-correlation with the salience network seen only with posterior cingulate cortex seeding but not with precuneus seeding. Probabilistic tractography showed increased streamlines within the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus within late preterm children while decreased intrahemispheric streamlines were also observed. No significant differences in neurocognitive testing were demonstrated between groups. Conclusion Late preterm preadolescence is associated with altered functional connectivity from the PMC and lateral parietal cortex to known distributed functional cortical networks

  18. Altered Structural and Functional Connectivity in Late Preterm Preadolescence: An Anatomic Seed-Based Study of Resting State Networks Related to the Posteromedial and Lateral Parietal Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Degnan

    Full Text Available Late preterm birth confers increased risk of developmental delay, academic difficulties and social deficits. The late third trimester may represent a critical period of development of neural networks including the default mode network (DMN, which is essential to normal cognition. Our objective is to identify functional and structural connectivity differences in the posteromedial cortex related to late preterm birth.Thirty-eight preadolescents (ages 9-13; 19 born in the late preterm period (≥32 weeks gestational age and 19 at term without access to advanced neonatal care were recruited from a low socioeconomic status community in Brazil. Participants underwent neurocognitive testing, 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI. Seed-based probabilistic diffusion tractography and RS-fMRI analyses were performed using unilateral seeds within the posterior DMN (posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus and lateral parietal DMN (superior marginal and angular gyri.Late preterm children demonstrated increased functional connectivity within the posterior default mode networks and increased anti-correlation with the central-executive network when seeded from the posteromedial cortex (PMC. Key differences were demonstrated between PMC components with increased anti-correlation with the salience network seen only with posterior cingulate cortex seeding but not with precuneus seeding. Probabilistic tractography showed increased streamlines within the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus within late preterm children while decreased intrahemispheric streamlines were also observed. No significant differences in neurocognitive testing were demonstrated between groups.Late preterm preadolescence is associated with altered functional connectivity from the PMC and lateral parietal cortex to known distributed functional cortical networks despite no significant

  19. Memory signals from the thalamus: early thalamocortical phase synchronization entrains gamma oscillations during long-term memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigl, Tobias; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Hanslmayr, Simon; Esslinger, Christine; Hinrichs, Hermann; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2012-12-01

    The thalamus is believed to be a key node in human memory networks, however, very little is known about its real-time functional role. Here we examined the dynamics of thalamocortical communication during long-term episodic memory retrieval in two experiments. In experiment 1, intrathalamic and surface EEG was recorded in an epileptic patient implanted with depth electrodes for brain stimulation therapy. In a recognition memory test, early (300-500 ms) stimulus-linked oscillatory synchrony between mediodorsal thalamic and frontal surface electrodes at beta frequency (20 Hz) was enhanced for correctly remembered old compared to correctly rejected new items. Directionality measures (Granger causality) indicated that the thalamus was the sender, and the neocortex the receiver, of this beta signal, which also modulated the power of neocortical gamma (55-80 Hz) oscillations (cross-frequency coupling). Experiment 2 validated the cross-frequency coupling effects in a healthy participant sample. Confirming the findings from experiment 1, significantly increased cross-frequency coupling was found over frontal scalp electrodes during successful recognition. Extending anatomical knowledge on thalamic connectivity with frontal neocortex, these results suggest that the thalamus sends an early memory signal to frontal regions, triggering further memory search processes.

  20. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  1. Impairments of thalamic resting-state functional connectivity in patients with chronic tinnitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Chen, Yu-Chen [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Feng, Xu [Department of Otolaryngology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Yang, Ming; Liu, Bin; Qian, Cheng [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Wang, Jian [Department of Physiology, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Salvi, Richard [Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Teng, Gao-Jun, E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Tinnitus patients have aberrant thalamic connectivity to many brain regions. • Decreased thalamic connectivity is linked with tinnitus characteristics. • Thalamocortical connectivity disturbances can reflect tinnitus-related networks. - Abstract: Purpose: The phantom sound of tinnitus is believed to arise from abnormal functional coupling between the thalamus and cerebral cortex. To explore this hypothesis, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the degree of thalamocortical functional connectivity in chronic tinnitus patients and controls. Materials and methods: Resting-state fMRI scans were obtained from 31 chronic tinnitus patients and 33 well-matched healthy controls. Thalamocortical functional connectivity was characterized using a seed-based whole-brain correlation method. The resulting thalamic functional connectivity measures were correlated with other clinical data. Results: We found decreased functional connectivity between the seed region in left thalamus and right middle temporal gyrus (MTG), right middle orbitofrontal cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, and bilateral calcarine cortex. Decreased functional connectivity was detected between the seed in the right thalamus and the left superior temporal gyrus (STG), left amygdala, right superior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, and left middle occipital gyrus. Tinnitus distress correlated negatively with thalamic functional connectivity in right MTG; tinnitus duration correlated negatively with thalamic functional connectivity in left STG. Increased functional connectivity between the bilateral thalamus and a set of regions were also observed. Conclusions: Chronic tinnitus patients have disrupted thalamocortical functional connectivity to selected brain regions which is associated with specific tinnitus characteristics. Resting-state thalamic functional connectivity disturbances may play an important role in

  2. Early-life stress exposure associated with altered prefrontal resting-state fMRI connectivity in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Ece Demir-Lira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stress (ELS exposure is associated with adverse outcomes across the lifespan. We examined the relation of ELS exposure to resting-state fMRI in children ages 4–7 years. ELS in the first years of life, but not concurrent, was associated with higher regional homogeneity of resting-state fMRI in the left lateral frontal cortex. Resting-state fMRI functional connectivity analyses showed that the region of left lateral frontal cortex demonstrating heightened regional homogeneity associated with ELS was negatively correlated with right temporal/parahippocampal areas. Moreover, higher regional homogeneity in the left lateral frontal cortex and its negative coupling with the right middle temporal/parahippocampal areas were associated with poorer performance on a reversal-learning task performed outside the scanner. Association of ELS exposure with regional homogeneity was independent of other early adversities. These findings suggest that ELS may influence the development of cognitive control in the lateral prefrontal cortex and its interactions with temporal cortex.

  3. Modafinil alters intrinsic functional connectivity of the right posterior insula: a pharmacological resting state fMRI study.

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    Nicoletta Cera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modafinil is employed for the treatment of narcolepsy and has also been, off-label, used to treat cognitive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders. In a previous study, we have reported that single dose administration of modafinil in healthy young subjects enhances fluid reasoning and affects resting state activity in the Fronto Parietal Control (FPC and Dorsal Attention (DAN networks. No changes were found in the Salience Network (SN, a surprising result as the network is involved in the modulation of emotional and fluid reasoning. The insula is crucial hub of the SN and functionally divided in anterior and posterior subregions. METHODOLOGY: Using a seed-based approach, we have now analyzed effects of modafinil on the functional connectivity (FC of insular subregions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of FC with resting state fMRI (rs-FMRI revealed increased FC between the right posterior insula and the putamen, the superior frontal gyrus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the modafinil-treated group. CONCLUSIONS: Modafinil is considered a putative cognitive enhancer. The rs-fMRI modifications that we have found are consistent with the drug cognitive enhancing properties and indicate subregional targets of action. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306.

  4. Dynamic functional connectivity analysis reveals transient states of dysconnectivity in schizophrenia

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    E. Damaraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder characterized by functional dysconnectivity or abnormal integration between distant brain regions. Recent functional imaging studies have implicated large-scale thalamo-cortical connectivity as being disrupted in patients. However, observed connectivity differences in schizophrenia have been inconsistent between studies, with reports of hyperconnectivity and hypoconnectivity between the same brain regions. Using resting state eyes-closed functional imaging and independent component analysis on a multi-site data that included 151 schizophrenia patients and 163 age- and gender matched healthy controls, we decomposed the functional brain data into 100 components and identified 47 as functionally relevant intrinsic connectivity networks. We subsequently evaluated group differences in functional network connectivity, both in a static sense, computed as the pairwise Pearson correlations between the full network time courses (5.4 minutes in length, and a dynamic sense, computed using sliding windows (44 s in length and k-means clustering to characterize five discrete functional connectivity states. Static connectivity analysis revealed that compared to healthy controls, patients show significantly stronger connectivity, i.e., hyperconnectivity, between the thalamus and sensory networks (auditory, motor and visual, as well as reduced connectivity (hypoconnectivity between sensory networks from all modalities. Dynamic analysis suggests that (1, on average, schizophrenia patients spend much less time than healthy controls in states typified by strong, large-scale connectivity, and (2, that abnormal connectivity patterns are more pronounced during these connectivity states. In particular, states exhibiting cortical–subcortical antagonism (anti-correlations and strong positive connectivity between sensory networks are those that show the group differences of thalamic hyperconnectivity and sensory hypoconnectivity

  5. Brain connectivity in pathological and pharmacological coma

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    Quentin Noirhomme

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC tend to support the view that awareness is not related to activity in a single brain region but to thalamo-cortical connectivity in the frontoparietal network. Functional neuroimaging studies have shown preserved albeit disconnected low level cortical activation in response to external stimulation in patients in a vegetative state or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. While activation of these primary sensory cortices does not necessarily reflect conscious awareness, activation in higher order associative cortices in minimally conscious state patients seems to herald some residual perceptual awareness. PET studies have identified a metabolic dysfunction in a widespread fronto-parietal global neuronal workspace in DOC patients including the midline default mode network, ‘intrinsic’ system, and the lateral frontoparietal cortices or ‘extrinsic system’. Recent studies have investigated the relation of awareness to the functional connectivity within intrinsic and extrinsic networks, and with the thalami in both pathological and pharmacological coma. In brain damaged patients, connectivity in all default network areas was found to be non-linearly correlated with the degree of clinical consciousness impairment, ranging from healthy controls and locked-in syndrome to minimally conscious, vegetative, coma and brain dead patients. Anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness was also shown to correlate with a global decrease in cortico-cortical and thalamo-cortical connectivity in both intrinsic and extrinsic networks, but not in auditory or visual networks. In anesthesia, unconsciousness was also associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between networks. These results suggest that conscious awareness critically depends on the functional integrity of thalamo-cortical and cortico-cortical frontoparietal connectivity within and between intrinsic and extrinsic brain networks.

  6. Effect of hypothermia on the thalamocortical function in the rat model.

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    Maybhate, Anil; Chen, Cheng; Thakor, Nitish V; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprotective effects of hypothermia are well documented in many injuries of the central nervous system in animal models as well as clinical studies. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. An important yet unexplored background issue is the effect of hypothermic cooling on the regional functionality of the healthy CNS. In a pilot study with the rat model, we seek to characterize the effect of moderate bodily cooling on the thalamo-cortical (T-C) function. Multiunit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the thalamus (VPL nucleus) and the somatosensory cortex (S1) for normothermic, mild hypothermic and mild hyperthermic conditions in healthy rats and the thalamo-cortical dynamics was characterized with Granger Causal Interaction (GCI). The GCI indicated that the thalamic driving of the cortical activity significantly increases in strength with bodily cooling and weakens with mild heating. These results could have important implications towards understanding of hypothermia.

  7. PCB 136 atropselectively alters morphometric and functional parameters of neuronal connectivity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via ryanodine receptor-dependent mechanisms.

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    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D; Pessah, Isaac N; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J

    2014-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca²⁺-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (-)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (-)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca²⁺-sensitive dye demonstrates that (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ oscillations. Similarly, (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure.

  8. Environmental enrichment potentiates thalamocortical transmission and plasticity in the adult rat visual cortex.

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    Mainardi, Marco; Landi, Silvia; Gianfranceschi, Laura; Baldini, Sara; De Pasquale, Roberto; Berardi, Nicoletta; Maffei, Lamberto; Caleo, Matteo

    2010-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that the complex sensorimotor and social stimulation achieved by rearing animals in an enriched environment (EE) can reinstate juvenile-like plasticity in the adult cortex. However, it is not known whether EE can affect thalamocortical transmission. Here, we recorded in vivo field potentials from the visual cortex evoked by electrical stimulation of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) in anesthetized rats. We found that a period of EE during adulthood shifted the input-output curves and increased paired-pulse depression, suggesting an enhanced synaptic strength at thalamocortical terminals. Accordingly, EE animals showed an increased expression of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT-2) in geniculocortical afferents to layer IV. Rats reared in EE also showed an enhancement of thalamocortical long-term potentiation (LTP) triggered by theta-burst stimulation (TBS) of the dLGN. To monitor the functional consequences of increased LTP in EE rats, we recorded visual evoked potentials (VEPs) before and after application of TBS to the geniculocortical pathway. We found that responses to visual stimulation were enhanced across a range of contrasts in EE animals. This was accompanied by an up-regulation of the intracortical excitatory synaptic marker vGluT-1 and a decrease in the expression of the vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT), indicating a shift in the excitation/inhibition ratio. Thus, in the adult rat, EE enhances synaptic strength and plasticity of the thalamocortical pathway associated with specific changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. These data provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which EE shapes the adult brain.

  9. Structural and connectomic neuroimaging for the personalized study of longitudinal alterations in cortical shape, thickness and connectivity after traumatic brain injury.

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    Irimia, A; Goh, S Y; Torgerson, C M; Vespa, P; Van Horn, J D

    2014-09-01

    The integration of longitudinal brain structure analysis with neurointensive care strategies continues to be a substantial difficulty facing the traumatic brain injury (TBI) research community. For patient-tailored case analysis, it remains challenging to establish how lesion profile modulates longitudinal changes in cortical structure and connectivity, as well as how these changes lead to behavioral, cognitive and neural dysfunction. Additionally, despite the clinical potential of morphometric and connectomic studies, few analytic tools are available for their study in TBI. Here we review the state of the art in structural and connectomic neuroimaging for the study of TBI and illustrate a set of recently-developed, patient-tailored approaches for the study of TBI-related brain atrophy and alterations in morphometry as well as inter-regional connectivity. The ability of such techniques to quantify how injury modulates longitudinal changes in cortical shape, structure and circuitry is highlighted. Quantitative approaches such as these can be used to assess and monitor the clinical condition and evolution of TBI victims, and can have substantial translational impact, especially when used in conjunction with measures of neuropsychological function.

  10. Clinical and biochemical profiles suggest fibromuscular dysplasia is a systemic disease with altered TGF-β expression and connective tissue features.

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    Ganesh, Santhi K; Morissette, Rachel; Xu, Zhi; Schoenhoff, Florian; Griswold, Benjamin F; Yang, Jiandong; Tong, Lan; Yang, Min-Lee; Hunker, Kristina; Sloper, Leslie; Kuo, Shinie; Raza, Rafi; Milewicz, Dianna M; Francomano, Clair A; Dietz, Harry C; Van Eyk, Jennifer; McDonnell, Nazli B

    2014-08-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a rare, nonatherosclerotic arterial disease for which the molecular basis is unknown. We comprehensively studied 47 subjects with FMD, including physical examination, spine magnetic resonance imaging, bone densitometry, and brain magnetic resonance angiography. Inflammatory biomarkers in plasma and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) cytokines in patient-derived dermal fibroblasts were measured by ELISA. Arterial pathology other than medial fibrodysplasia with multifocal stenosis included cerebral aneurysm, found in 12.8% of subjects. Extra-arterial pathology included low bone density (P<0.001); early onset degenerative spine disease (95.7%); increased incidence of Chiari I malformation (6.4%) and dural ectasia (42.6%); and physical examination findings of a mild connective tissue dysplasia (95.7%). Screening for mutations causing known genetically mediated arteriopathies was unrevealing. We found elevated plasma TGF-β1 (P=0.009), TGF-β2 (P=0.004) and additional inflammatory markers, and increased TGF-β1 (P=0.0009) and TGF-β2 (P=0.0001) secretion in dermal fibroblast cell lines from subjects with FMD compared to age- and gender-matched controls. Detailed phenotyping of patients with FMD allowed us to demonstrate that FMD is a systemic disease with alterations in common with the spectrum of genetic syndromes that involve altered TGF-β signaling and offers TGF-β as a marker of FMD.

  11. Cigarette smoking leads to persistent and dose-dependent alterations of brain activity and connectivity in anterior insula and anterior cingulate.

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    Zanchi, Davide; Brody, Arthur L; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Kopel, Rotem; Emmert, Kirsten; Preti, Maria Giulia; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Haller, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Although many smokers try to quit smoking, only about 20-25 percent will achieve abstinence despite 6 months or more of gold-standard treatment. This low success rate suggests long-term changes in the brain related to smoking, which remain poorly understood. We compared ex-smokers to both active smokers and non-smokers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore persistent modifications in brain activity and network organization. This prospective and consecutive study includes 18 non-smokers (29.5 ± 6.7 years of age, 11 women), 14 smokers (≥10 cigarettes a day >2 years of smoking, 29.3 ± 6.0 years of age, 10 women) and 14 ex-smokers (>1 year of quitting 30.5 ± 5.7 years of age, 10 women). Participants underwent a block-design fMRI study contrasting smoking cue with control (neutral cue) videos. Data analyses included task-related general linear model, seed-based functional connectivity, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of gray matter and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) of white matter. Smoking cue videos versus control videos activated the right anterior insula in ex-smokers compared with smokers, an effect correlating with cumulative nicotine intake (pack-years). Moreover, ex-smokers had a persistent decrease in functional connectivity between right anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) compared with control participants, but similar to active smokers. Potentially confounding alterations in gray or white matter were excluded in VBM and TBSS analyses. In summary, ex-smokers with long-term nicotine abstinence have persistent and dose-dependent brain network changes notably in the right anterior insula and its connection to the ACC.

  12. Characterization of early cortical population response to thalamocortical input in vitro

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    Michael Raymond Heliodor Hill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro thalamocortical slice preparation of mouse barrel cortex allows for stimulation of the cortex through its natural afferent thalamocortical pathway. This preparation was used here to investigate the first stage of cortical processing in the large postsynaptic dendritic networks as revealed by voltage sensitive dye imaging. We identified the precise location and dimensions of two clearly distinguishable dendritic networks, one in the granular layer IV and one in the infragranular layer V and VI and showed that they have different physiological properties. DiI fluorescent staining further revealed that thalamocortical axons project on to these two networks in the typical barrel like form, not only in the granular but also in the infragranular layer. Finally we investigated the short term dynamics of both the voltage sensitive dye imaging signal and the local field potential in response to a train of eight-pulses at various frequencies in both these layers. We found evidence of differences in the plasticity between the first two response peaks compared to the remaining six peaks as well as differences in short term plasticity between the voltage sensitive dye imaging response and the local field potential. Our findings suggest, that at least early cortical processing takes place in two separate dendritic networks that may stand at the beginning of further parallel computation. The detailed characterization of the parameters of these networks may provide tools for further research into the complex dynamics of large dendritic networks and their role in cortical computation.

  13. Characterization of early cortical population response to thalamocortical input in vitro.

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    Hill, Michael R H; Greenfield, Susan A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro thalamocortical slice preparation of mouse barrel cortex allows for stimulation of the cortex through its natural afferent thalamocortical pathway. This preparation was used here to investigate the first stage of cortical processing in the large postsynaptic dendritic networks as revealed by voltage sensitive dye imaging (VSDI). We identified the precise location and dimensions of two clearly distinguishable dendritic networks, one in the granular layer (GL) IV and one in the infragranular layer (IGL) V and VI and showed that they have different physiological properties. DiI fluorescent staining further revealed that thalamocortical axons project on to these two networks in the typical barrel like form, not only in the granular but also in the IGL. Finally we investigated the short-term dynamics of both the VSDI signal and the local field potential (LFP) in response to a train of eight-pulses at various frequencies in both these layers. We found evidence of differences in the plasticity between the first two response peaks compared to the remaining six peaks as well as differences in short-term plasticity between the VSDI response and the LFP. Our findings suggest, that at least early cortical processing takes place in two separate dendritic networks that may stand at the beginning of further parallel computation. The detailed characterization of the parameters of these networks may provide tools for further research into the complex dynamics of large dendritic networks and their role in cortical computation.

  14. State-dependent firing determines intrinsic dendritic Ca2+ signaling in thalamocortical neurons.

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    Errington, Adam C; Renger, John J; Uebele, Victor N; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    Activity-dependent dendritic Ca(2+) signals play a critical role in multiple forms of nonlinear cellular output and plasticity. In thalamocortical neurons, despite the well established spatial separation of sensory and cortical inputs onto proximal and distal dendrites, respectively, little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling during the different state-dependent firing patterns that are characteristic of these neurons. Here we demonstrate that T-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed throughout the entire dendritic tree of rat thalamocortical neurons and that they mediate regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes, typical of, but not exclusive to, sleep states, resulting in global dendritic Ca(2+) influx. In contrast, actively backpropagating action potentials, typical of wakefulness, result in smaller Ca(2+) influxes that can temporally summate to produce dendritic Ca(2+) accumulations that are linearly related to firing frequency but spatially confined to proximal dendritic regions. Furthermore, dendritic Ca(2+) transients evoked by both action potentials and low-threshold spikes are shaped by Ca(2+) uptake by sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases but do not rely on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Our data demonstrate that thalamocortical neurons are endowed with intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling properties that are spatially and temporally modified in a behavioral state-dependent manner and suggest that backpropagating action potentials faithfully inform proximal sensory but not distal corticothalamic synapses of neuronal output, whereas corticothalamic synapses only "detect" Ca(2+) signals associated with low-threshold spikes.

  15. Modeling absence seizure dynamics: implications for basic mechanisms and measurement of thalamocortical and corticothalamic latencies.

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    Roberts, James A; Robinson, Peter A

    2008-07-01

    A successful physiologically based continuum model of the corticothalamic system is applied to determine the relative contributions of axonal and intrinsic cellular delays to the waveforms of absence seizures. The predicted period of the absence seizure depends linearly on model parameters describing thalamocortical, corticothalamic, intracortical, and synaptodendritic delays, and these dependences are linked to the seizure mechanism by showing how time intervals between peaks in the waveforms depend on the parameters. Counterintuitively, it is found that a peak in the local field potential recorded in the thalamic relay nuclei can precede the peak in the cortical field that drove it, without violating causality, but rendering naive interpretation of time intervals between peaks invalid. We argue that a thalamocortical loop mechanism for absence seizures is consistent with intrathalamic cellular properties being the leading determinant of the frequency of spike-wave discharges in rat genetic models, with the combination of network and cellular properties providing a natural explanation for the lower frequency of human absence seizures. Finally, our results imply that the seizure frequency is not determined by the fastest thalamocortical and corticothalamic fibers, but rather depends on an effective weighted conduction velocity of all pathways present.

  16. Efficient implementation of a real-time estimation system for thalamocortical hidden Parkinsonian properties

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    Yang, Shuangming; Deng, Bin; Wang, Jiang; Li, Huiyan; Liu, Chen; Fietkiewicz, Chris; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Real-time estimation of dynamical characteristics of thalamocortical cells, such as dynamics of ion channels and membrane potentials, is useful and essential in the study of the thalamus in Parkinsonian state. However, measuring the dynamical properties of ion channels is extremely challenging experimentally and even impossible in clinical applications. This paper presents and evaluates a real-time estimation system for thalamocortical hidden properties. For the sake of efficiency, we use a field programmable gate array for strictly hardware-based computation and algorithm optimization. In the proposed system, the FPGA-based unscented Kalman filter is implemented into a conductance-based TC neuron model. Since the complexity of TC neuron model restrains its hardware implementation in parallel structure, a cost efficient model is proposed to reduce the resource cost while retaining the relevant ionic dynamics. Experimental results demonstrate the real-time capability to estimate thalamocortical hidden properties with high precision under both normal and Parkinsonian states. While it is applied to estimate the hidden properties of the thalamus and explore the mechanism of the Parkinsonian state, the proposed method can be useful in the dynamic clamp technique of the electrophysiological experiments, the neural control engineering and brain-machine interface studies.

  17. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

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    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood.

  18. Altered brain activation and functional connectivity in working memory related networks in patients with type 2 diabetes: An ICA-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Lu, Shan; Liu, Chunlei; Zhang, Huimei; Zhou, Xuanhe; Ni, Changlin; Qin, Wen; Zhang, Quan

    2016-03-29

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can cause multidimensional cognitive deficits, among which working memory (WM) is usually involved at an early stage. However, the neural substrates underlying impaired WM in T2DM patients are still unclear. To clarify this issue, we utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and independent component analysis to evaluate T2DM patients for alterations in brain activation and functional connectivity (FC) in WM networks and to determine their associations with cognitive and clinical variables. Twenty complication-free T2DM patients and 19 matched healthy controls (HCs) were enrolled, and fMRI data were acquired during a block-designed 1-back WM task. The WM metrics of the T2DM patients showed no differences compared with those of the HCs, except for a slightly lower accuracy rate in the T2DM patients. Compared with the HCs, the T2DM patients demonstrated increased activation within their WM fronto-parietal networks, and activation strength was significantly correlated with WM performance. The T2DM patients also showed decreased FC within and between their WM networks. Our results indicate that the functional integration of WM sub-networks was disrupted in the complication-free T2DM patients and that strengthened regional activity in fronto-parietal networks may compensate for the WM impairment caused by T2DM.

  19. Relating Alpha Power and Phase to Population Firing and Hemodynamic Activity Using a Thalamo-cortical Neural Mass Model.

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    Robert Becker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations are ubiquitous phenomena in the animal and human brain. Among them, the alpha rhythm in human EEG is one of the most prominent examples. However, its precise mechanisms of generation are still poorly understood. It was mainly this lack of knowledge that motivated a number of simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG - functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies. This approach revealed how oscillatory neuronal signatures such as the alpha rhythm are paralleled by changes of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal. Several such studies revealed a negative correlation between the alpha rhythm and the hemodynamic BOLD signal in visual cortex and a positive correlation in the thalamus. In this study we explore the potential generative mechanisms that lead to those observations. We use a bursting capable Stefanescu-Jirsa 3D (SJ3D neural-mass model that reproduces a wide repertoire of prominent features of local neuronal-population dynamics. We construct a thalamo-cortical network of coupled SJ3D nodes considering excitatory and inhibitory directed connections. The model suggests that an inverse correlation between cortical multi-unit activity, i.e. the firing of neuronal populations, and narrow band local field potential oscillations in the alpha band underlies the empirically observed negative correlation between alpha-rhythm power and fMRI signal in visual cortex. Furthermore the model suggests that the interplay between tonic and bursting mode in thalamus and cortex is critical for this relation. This demonstrates how biophysically meaningful modelling can generate precise and testable hypotheses about the underpinnings of large-scale neuroimaging signals.

  20. High field fMRI reveals thalamocortical integration of segregated cognitive and emotional processing in mediodorsal and intralaminar thalamic nuclei

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    Coraline Danielle Metzger

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Thalamocortical loops, connecting functionally segregated, higher order cortical regions and basal ganglia, have been proposed not only for well described motor and sensory regions, but also for limbic and prefrontal areas relevant for affective and cognitive processes. These functions are, however, more specific to humans, rendering most invasive neuroanatomical approaches impossible and interspecies translations difficult. In contrast, non invasive imaging of functional neuroanatomy using fMRI allows for the development of elaborate task paradigms capable of testing the specific functionalities proposed for these circuits. Until recently, spatial resolution largely limited the anatomical definition of functional clusters at the level of distinct thalamic nuclei. Since their anatomical distinction seems crucial not only for the segregation of cognitive and limbic loops but also for the detection of their functional interaction during cognitive-emotional integration, we applied high resolution fMRI on 7 Tesla.Using an event related design, we could isolate thalamic effects for preceding attention as well as experience of erotic stimuli. We could demonstrate specific thalamic effects of general emotional arousal in mediodorsal nucleus and effects specific to preceding attention and expectancy in intralaminar centromedian/parafascicular complex (CM/PF. These thalamic effects were paralleled by specific coactivations in the head of caudate nucleus as well as segregated portions of rostral or caudal cingulate cortex and anterior insula supporting distinct thalamo-striato-cortical loops. In addition to predescribed effects of sexual arousal in hypothalamus and ventral striatum, high resolution fMRI could extent this network to paraventricular thalamus encompassing laterodorsal and parataenial nuclei. We could lend evidence to segregated subcortical loops which integrate cognitive and emotional aspects of basic human behaviour such as sexual

  1. Short-Term Plasticity of a Thalamocortical Pathway Dynamically Modulated by Behavioral State

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    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A.; Connors, Barry W.

    1996-04-01

    The neocortex receives information about the environment and the rest of the brain through pathways from the thalamus. These pathways have frequency-dependent properties that can strongly influence their effect on the neocortex. In 1943 Morison and Dempsey described "augmenting responses," a form of short-term plasticity in some thalamocortical pathways that is triggered by 8- to 15-hertz activation. Results from anesthetized rats showed that the augmenting response is initiated by pyramidal cells in layer V. The augmenting response was also observed in awake, unrestrained animals and was found to be dynamically modulated by their behavioral state.

  2. A Thalamocortical Neural Mass Model of the EEG during NREM Sleep and Its Response to Auditory Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hong-Viet V.; Marshall, Lisa; Born, Jan; Martinetz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Few models exist that accurately reproduce the complex rhythms of the thalamocortical system that are apparent in measured scalp EEG and at the same time, are suitable for large-scale simulations of brain activity. Here, we present a neural mass model of the thalamocortical system during natural non-REM sleep, which is able to generate fast sleep spindles (12–15 Hz), slow oscillations (sleep study in humans, where closed-loop auditory stimulation was applied. The model output relates directly to the EEG, which makes it a useful basis to develop new stimulation protocols. PMID:27584827

  3. A model of functional brain connectivity and background noise as a biomarker for cognitive phenotypes: application to autism.

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    Luis García Domínguez

    Full Text Available We present an efficient approach to discriminate between typical and atypical brains from macroscopic neural dynamics recorded as magnetoencephalograms (MEG. Our approach is based on the fact that spontaneous brain activity can be accurately described with stochastic dynamics, as a multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (mOUP. By fitting the data to a mOUP we obtain: 1 the functional connectivity matrix, corresponding to the drift operator, and 2 the traces of background stochastic activity (noise driving the brain. We applied this method to investigate functional connectivity and background noise in juvenile patients (n = 9 with Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, and compared them to age-matched juvenile control subjects (n = 10. Our analysis reveals significant alterations in both functional brain connectivity and background noise in ASD patients. The dominant connectivity change in ASD relative to control shows enhanced functional excitation from occipital to frontal areas along a parasagittal axis. Background noise in ASD patients is spatially correlated over wide areas, as opposed to control, where areas driven by correlated noise form smaller patches. An analysis of the spatial complexity reveals that it is significantly lower in ASD subjects. Although the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying these alterations cannot be determined from macroscopic brain recordings, we speculate that enhanced occipital-frontal excitation may result from changes in white matter density in ASD, as suggested in previous studies. We also venture that long-range spatial correlations in the background noise may result from less specificity (or more promiscuity of thalamo-cortical projections. All the calculations involved in our analysis are highly efficient and outperform other algorithms to discriminate typical and atypical brains with a comparable level of accuracy. Altogether our results demonstrate a promising potential of

  4. White matter alterations related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and COMT val158met polymorphism: children with valine homozygote attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder have altered white matter connectivity in the right cingulum (cingulate gyrus

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    Kabukcu Basay B

    2016-04-01

    -posterior thalamic radiation (include optic radiation than the val homozygotes, independent of ADHD diagnosis. Third, children with ADHD had lower FA in the L-CGC and R-retrolenticular part of the internal capsule than the controls, independent of the COMT polymorphism.Conclusion: Significant differences reported here may be evidence that the COMT gene val158met polymorphism variants, as well as ADHD, could affect brain development. ADHD and the COMT polymorphism might be interactively affecting WM development in the R-CGC to alter the WM connectivity in children with val homozygote ADHD.Keywords: neuroimaging, attention deficit, hyperactivity, catechol-O-methyltransferase

  5. Increased synchronization and decreased neural complexity underlie thalamocortical oscillatory dynamics in mild cognitive impairment.

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    Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes; Cruz-Vadell, Abel; Suarez-Gonzalez, Aida; Gil-Neciga, Eulogio

    2009-07-15

    Abnormal patterns of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha oscillations in preclinical stages of dementia reveal a selective vulnerability of thalamocortical circuits to the cascade of neurodegenerative events heralding Alzheimer's disease (AD). EEG-alpha slowing characterizes both mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy aging, but it remains ambiguous whether different neural mechanisms underlie this oscillatory behavior in normal and pathological senescence. In this study, we show that the strength of phase coupling and the level of phase predictability between thalamocortical and cortico-cortical EEG sources of low alpha frequency are abnormally facilitated in MCI patients when compared to healthy elderly subjects. Additionally, we found a loss of neural complexity intrinsic to both thalamic and cortical generators of lower alpha in MCI patients, which likely influenced the aberrant phase synchronization behavior between EEG-alpha sources in this high risk group of AD. Taken together, these results suggest that different neural mechanisms account for the well known slowing of alpha rhythm present in normal aging and MCI patients. Whether these anomalous neural coding mechanisms of lower alpha generation in MCI patients represent a potential electrophysiological marker of mild AD is a topic for future research.

  6. Embryonic and postnatal development of the layer I-directed ("matrix") thalamocortical system in the rat.

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    Galazo, Maria J; Martinez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Porrero, César; Clascá, Francisco

    2008-02-01

    Inputs to the layer I apical dendritic tufts of pyramidal cells are crucial in "top-down" interactions in the cerebral cortex. A large population of thalamocortical cells, the "matrix" (M-type) cells, provides a direct robust input to layer I that is anatomically and functionally different from the thalamocortical input to layer VI. The developmental timecourse of M-type axons is examined here in rats aged E (embryonic day) 16 to P (postnatal day) 30. Anterograde techniques were used to label axons arising from 2 thalamic nuclei mainly made up of M-type cells, the Posterior and the Ventromedial. The primary growth cones of M-type axons rapidly reached the subplate of dorsally situated cortical areas. After this, interstitial branches would sprout from these axons under more lateral cortical regions to invade the overlying cortical plate forming secondary arbors. Moreover, retrograde labeling of M-type cell somata in the thalamus after tracer deposits confined to layer I revealed that large numbers of axons from multiple thalamic nuclei had already converged in a given spot of layer I by P3. Because of early ingrowth in such large numbers, interactions of M-type axons may significantly influence the early development of cortical circuits.

  7. Generation of spike latency tuning by thalamocortical circuits in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Mesik, Lukas; Sun, Yujiao J; Liang, Feixue; Xiao, Zhongju; Tao, Huizhong W; Zhang, Li I

    2012-07-18

    In many sensory systems, the latency of spike responses of individual neurons is found to be tuned for stimulus features and proposed to be used as a coding strategy. Whether the spike latency tuning is simply relayed along sensory ascending pathways or generated by local circuits remains unclear. Here, in vivo whole-cell recordings from rat auditory cortical neurons in layer 4 revealed that the onset latency of their aggregate thalamic input exhibited nearly flat tuning for sound frequency, whereas their spike latency tuning was much sharper with a broadly expanded dynamic range. This suggests that the spike latency tuning is not simply inherited from the thalamus, but can be largely reconstructed by local circuits in the cortex. Dissecting of thalamocortical circuits and neural modeling further revealed that broadly tuned intracortical inhibition prolongs the integration time for spike generation preferentially at off-optimal frequencies, while sharply tuned intracortical excitation shortens it selectively at the optimal frequency. Such push and pull mechanisms mediated likely by feedforward excitatory and inhibitory inputs respectively greatly sharpen the spike latency tuning and expand its dynamic range. The modulation of integration time by thalamocortical-like circuits may represent an efficient strategy for converting information spatially coded in synaptic strength to temporal representation.

  8. Frequency-selectivity of a thalamocortical relay neuron during Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation: a computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cagnan, H.; Meijer, H.G.E.; van Gils, S.A.; Krupa, M.; Heida, T.; Rudolph, M.; Wadman, W.J.; Martens, H.C.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this computational study, we investigated (i) the functional importance of correlated basal ganglia (BG) activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms by analysing the effects of globus pallidus internum (GPi) bursting frequency and synchrony on a thalamocortical (TC) relay neu

  9. Experiment K-6-02. Biomedical, biochemical and morphological alterations of muscle and dense, fibrous connective tissues during 14 days of spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailas, A.; Zernicke, R.; Grindeland, R.; Kaplanski, A.

    1990-01-01

    Findings on the connective tissue response to short-term space flight (12 days) are discussed. Specifically, data regarding the biochemical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of selected connective tissues (humerus, vertebral body, tendon and skeletal muscle) of growing rats is given. Results are given concerning the humerus cortical bone, the vertebral bone, nutritional effects on bone biomechanical properties, and soft tense fiber connective tissue response.

  10. Functional connectivity measures after psilocybin inform a novel hypothesis of early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Leech, Robert; Erritzoe, David; Williams, Tim M; Stone, James M; Evans, John; Sharp, David J; Feilding, Amanda; Wise, Richard G; Nutt, David J

    2013-11-01

    Psilocybin is a classic psychedelic and a candidate drug model of psychosis. This study measured the effects of psilocybin on resting-state network and thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Fifteen healthy volunteers received intravenous infusions of psilocybin and placebo in 2 task-free resting-state scans. Primary analyses focused on changes in FC between the default-mode- (DMN) and task-positive network (TPN). Spontaneous activity in the DMN is orthogonal to spontaneous activity in the TPN, and it is well known that these networks support very different functions (ie, the DMN supports introspection, whereas the TPN supports externally focused attention). Here, independent components and seed-based FC analyses revealed increased DMN-TPN FC and so decreased DMN-TPN orthogonality after psilocybin. Increased DMN-TPN FC has been found in psychosis and meditatory states, which share some phenomenological similarities with the psychedelic state. Increased DMN-TPN FC has also been observed in sedation, as has decreased thalamocortical FC, but here we found preserved thalamocortical FC after psilocybin. Thus, we propose that thalamocortical FC may be related to arousal, whereas DMN-TPN FC is related to the separateness of internally and externally focused states. We suggest that this orthogonality is compromised in early psychosis, explaining similarities between its phenomenology and that of the psychedelic state and supporting the utility of psilocybin as a model of early psychosis.

  11. Magnetic Field Tomography of Coherent Thalamocortical 40-Hz Oscillations in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribary, U.; Ioannides, A. A.; Singh, K. D.; Hasson, R.; Bolton, J. P. R.; Lado, F.; Mogilner, A.; Llinas, R.

    1991-12-01

    This paper introduces the use of magnetic field tomography (MFT), a noninvasive technique based on distributed source analysis of magnetoencephalography data, which makes possible the three-dimensional reconstruction of dynamic brain activity in humans. MFT has a temporal resolution better than 1 msec and a spatial accuracy of 2-5 mm at the cortical level, which deteriorates to 1-3 cm at depths of 6 cm or more. MFT is used here to visualize the origin of a spatiotemporally organized pattern of coherent 40-Hz electrical activity. This coherence, initially observed during auditory input, was proposed to be generated by recurrent corticothalamic oscillation. In support of this hypothesis, we illustrate well-defined 40-Hz coherence between cortical-subcortical sites with a time shift that is consistent with thalamocortical conduction times. Studies on Alzheimer patients indicate that, while a similar activity pattern is present, the cortical component is reduced in these subjects.

  12. Cellular and neurochemical basis of sleep stages in the thalamocortical network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Giri P; Chauvette, Sylvain; Shamie, Isaac; Soltani, Sara; Timofeev, Igor; Cash, Sydney S; Halgren, Eric; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-11-16

    The link between the combined action of neuromodulators in the brain and global brain states remains a mystery. In this study, using biophysically realistic models of the thalamocortical network, we identified the critical intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms, associated with the putative action of acetylcholine (ACh), GABA and monoamines, which lead to transitions between primary brain vigilance states (waking, non-rapid eye movement sleep [NREM] and REM sleep) within an ultradian cycle. Using ECoG recordings from humans and LFP recordings from cats and mice, we found that during NREM sleep the power of spindle and delta oscillations is negatively correlated in humans and positively correlated in animal recordings. We explained this discrepancy by the differences in the relative level of ACh. Overall, our study revealed the critical intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms through which different neuromodulators acting in combination result in characteristic brain EEG rhythms and transitions between sleep stages.

  13. Altered intrinsic organisation of brain networks implicated in attentional processes in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a resting-state study of attention, default mode and salience network connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidlauskaite, Justina; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Roeyers, Herbert; Wiersema, Jan R

    2016-06-01

    Deficits in task-related attentional engagement in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been hypothesised to be due to altered interrelationships between attention, default mode and salience networks. We examined the intrinsic connectivity during rest within and between these networks. Six-minute resting-state scans were obtained. Using a network-based approach, connectivity within and between the dorsal and ventral attention, the default mode and the salience networks was compared between the ADHD and control group. The ADHD group displayed hyperconnectivity between the two attention networks and within the default mode and ventral attention network. The salience network was hypoconnected to the dorsal attention network. There were trends towards hyperconnectivity within the dorsal attention network and between the salience and ventral attention network in ADHD. Connectivity within and between other networks was unrelated to ADHD. Our findings highlight the altered connectivity within and between attention networks, and between them and the salience network in ADHD. One hypothesis to be tested in future studies is that individuals with ADHD are affected by an imbalance between ventral and dorsal attention systems with the former playing a dominant role during task engagement, making individuals with ADHD highly susceptible to distraction by salient task-irrelevant stimuli.

  14. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Liu, Chen; Wei, Xile; Tsang, K. M.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-03-01

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  15. The thalamic low-threshold Ca²⁺ potential: a key determinant of the local and global dynamics of the slow (thalamocortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crunelli, Vincenzo; Errington, Adam C; Hughes, Stuart W; Tóth, Tibor I

    2011-10-13

    During non-rapid eye movement sleep and certain types of anaesthesia, neurons in the neocortex and thalamus exhibit a distinctive slow (thalamocortical (TC) network requires the balanced interaction of oscillator systems in both the neocortex and thalamus. Within such a scenario, we have previously argued that the powerful low-threshold Ca(2+) potential (LTCP)-mediated burst of action potentials that initiates the UP states in individual TC neurons may be a vital signal for instigating UP states in related cortical areas. To investigate these issues we constructed a computational model of the TC network which encompasses the important known aspects of the slow oscillation that have been garnered from earlier in vivo and in vitro experiments. Using this model we confirm that the overall expression of the slow oscillation is intricately reliant on intact connections between the thalamus and the cortex. In particular, we demonstrate that UP state-related LTCP-mediated bursts in TC neurons are proficient in triggering synchronous UP states in cortical networks, thereby bringing about a synchronous slow oscillation in the whole network. The importance of LTCP-mediated action potential bursts in the slow oscillation is also underlined by the observation that their associated dendritic Ca(2+) signals are the only ones that inform corticothalamic synapses of the TC neuron output, since they, but not those elicited by tonic action potential firing, reach the distal dendritic sites where these synapses are located.

  16. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin, E-mail: dengbin@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Chen; Wei, Xile [Department of Electrical and Automation Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Tsang, K. M.; Chan, W. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-03-15

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  17. Alteration of consciousness in focal epilepsy: the global workspace alteration theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Fabrice; McGonigal, Aileen; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of consciousness (AOC) is an important clinical manifestation of partial seizures that greatly impacts the quality of life of patients with epilepsy. Several theories have been proposed in the last fifty years. An emerging concept in neurology is the global workspace (GW) theory that postulates that access to consciousness (from several sensorial modalities) requires transient coordinated activity from associative cortices, in particular the prefrontal cortex and the posterior parietal associative cortex. Several lines of evidence support the view that partial seizures alter consciousness through disturbance of the GW. In particular, a nonlinear relation has been shown between excess of synchronization in the GW regions and the degree of AOC. Changes in thalamocortical synchrony occurring during the spreading of the ictal activity seem particularly involved in the mechanism of altered consciousness. This link between abnormal synchrony and AOC offers new perspectives in the treatment of the AOC since means of decreasing consciousness alteration in seizures could improve patients' quality of life.

  18. Altered effective connectivity network of the basal ganglia in low-grade hepatic encephalopathy: a resting-state fMRI study with Granger causality analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The basal ganglia often show abnormal metabolism and intracranial hemodynamics in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE. Little is known about how the basal ganglia affect other brain system and is affected by other brain regions in HE. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effective connectivity network associated with the basal ganglia is disturbed in HE patients by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty five low-grade HE patients and thirty five age- and gender- matched healthy controls participated in the rs-fMRI scans. The effective connectivity networks associated with the globus pallidus, the primarily affected region within basal ganglia in HE, were characterized by using the Granger causality analysis and compared between HE patients and healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed between the abnormal effective connectivity and venous blood ammonia levels and neuropsychological performances of all HE patients. Compared with the healthy controls, patients with low-grade HE demonstrated mutually decreased influence between the globus pallidus and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, cuneus, bi-directionally increased influence between the globus pallidus and the precuneus, and either decreased or increased influence from and to the globus pallidus in many other frontal, temporal, parietal gyri, and cerebellum. Pearson correlation analyses revealed that the blood ammonia levels in HE patients negatively correlated with effective connectivity from the globus pallidus to ACC, and positively correlated with that from the globus pallidus to precuneus; and the number connectivity test scores in patients negatively correlated with the effective connectivity from the globus pallidus to ACC, and from superior frontal gyrus to globus pallidus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low-grade HE patients had disrupted effective

  19. Altered functional connectivity in posttraumatic stress disorder with versus without comorbid major depressive disorder: a resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennis, Mitzy; Rademaker, Arthur R; van Rooij, Sanne J H; Kahn, René S; Geuze, Elbert

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that is often diagnosed with comorbid depressive disorder. Therefore, neuroimaging studies investigating PTSD typically include both patients with and without comorbid depression. Differences in activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insula have been shown to differentiate PTSD patients with and without major depressive disorder (MDD). Whether or not comorbid MDD affects resting state functional connectivity of PTSD patients has not been investigated to our knowledge. Here, resting state functional connectivity of PTSD patients with (PTSD+MDD; n=27) and without (PTSD-MDD; n=23) comorbid MDD was investigated. The subgenual ACC and insula were investigated as seed regions. Connectivity between the subgenual ACC and perigenual parts of the ACC was increased in PTSD+MDD versus PTSD-MDD, which may reflect the presence of depressive specific symptoms such as rumination. Functional connectivity of the subgenual ACC with the thalamus was reduced, potentially related to more severe deficits in executive functioning in the PTSD+MDD group versus the PTSD-MDD group. In addition, the PTSD+MDD group showed reduced functional connectivity of the insula with the hippocampus compared to the PTSD-MDD group. However, this cluster was no longer significantly different when PTSD patients that were using medication were excluded from analyses. Thus, resting state functional connectivity of the subgenual ACC can distinguish PTSD+MDD from PTSD-MDD, and this may therefore be used as a neurobiological marker for comorbid MDD in the presence of PTSD. As PTSD+MDD are more treatment resistant, these findings can also guide treatment development, for example by targeting the subgenual ACC network with treatment.

  20. Altered functional connectivity during self- and close other-reflection in patients with bipolar disorder with past psychosis and patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Liwen; Meer, van der Lisette; Opmeer, Esther M.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Aleman, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in implicit self-processing have been reported both in psychotic patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia. It remains unclear whether these two psychotic disorders show disturbed functional connectivity during explicit self-reflection, which is associated with social functi

  1. Presence of a Chaotic Region at the Sleep-Wake Transition in a Simplified Thalamocortical Circuit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kush Paul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and wakefulness are characterized by distinct states of thalamocortical network oscillations. The complex interplay of ionic conductances within the thalamo-reticular-cortical network give rise to these multiple modes of activity and a rapid transition exists between these modes. To better understand this transition, we constructed a simplified computational model based on physiological recordings and physiologically realistic parameters of a three-neuron network containing a thalamocortical cell, a thalamic reticular neuron and a corticothalamic cell. The network can assume multiple states of oscillatory activity, resembling sleep, wakefulness and the transition between these two. We found that during the transition period, but not during other states, thalamic and cortical neurons displayed chaotic dynamics, based on the presence of strange attractors, estimation of positive Lyapunov exponents and the presence of a fractal dimension in the spike trains. These dynamics were quantitatively dependent on certain features of the network, such as the presence of corticothalamic feedback and the strength of inhibition between the thalamic reticular nucleus and thalamocortical neurons. These data suggest that chaotic dynamics facilitate a rapid transition between sleep and wakefulness and produce a series of experimentally testable predictions to further investigate the events occurring during the sleep-wake transition period.

  2. Presence of a Chaotic Region at the Sleep-Wake Transition in a Simplified Thalamocortical Circuit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Kush; Cauller, Lawrence J; Llano, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are characterized by distinct states of thalamocortical network oscillations. The complex interplay of ionic conductances within the thalamo-reticular-cortical network give rise to these multiple modes of activity and a rapid transition exists between these modes. To better understand this transition, we constructed a simplified computational model based on physiological recordings and physiologically realistic parameters of a three-neuron network containing a thalamocortical cell, a thalamic reticular neuron, and a corticothalamic cell. The network can assume multiple states of oscillatory activity, resembling sleep, wakefulness, and the transition between these two. We found that during the transition period, but not during other states, thalamic and cortical neurons displayed chaotic dynamics, based on the presence of strange attractors, estimation of positive Lyapunov exponents and the presence of a fractal dimension in the spike trains. These dynamics were quantitatively dependent on certain features of the network, such as the presence of corticothalamic feedback and the strength of inhibition between the thalamic reticular nucleus and thalamocortical neurons. These data suggest that chaotic dynamics facilitate a rapid transition between sleep and wakefulness and produce a series of experimentally testable predictions to further investigate the events occurring during the sleep-wake transition period.

  3. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeowool eHuh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in-vivo for its advantages such as reduced noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Of the anesthetics, urethane had been widely used in some thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested whether this assumption stands by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during ‘the awake state’ or under ‘urethane anesthesia’ utilizing the extracellular single unit recording technique. First we have tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over the 4 hour recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane.

  4. Cellular and neurochemical basis of sleep stages in the thalamocortical network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Giri P; Chauvette, Sylvain; Shamie, Isaac; Soltani, Sara; Timofeev, Igor; Cash, Sydney S; Halgren, Eric; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    The link between the combined action of neuromodulators in the brain and global brain states remains a mystery. In this study, using biophysically realistic models of the thalamocortical network, we identified the critical intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms, associated with the putative action of acetylcholine (ACh), GABA and monoamines, which lead to transitions between primary brain vigilance states (waking, non-rapid eye movement sleep [NREM] and REM sleep) within an ultradian cycle. Using ECoG recordings from humans and LFP recordings from cats and mice, we found that during NREM sleep the power of spindle and delta oscillations is negatively correlated in humans and positively correlated in animal recordings. We explained this discrepancy by the differences in the relative level of ACh. Overall, our study revealed the critical intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms through which different neuromodulators acting in combination result in characteristic brain EEG rhythms and transitions between sleep stages. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18607.001 PMID:27849520

  5. Thalamocortical dynamics of the McCollough effect: boundary-surface alignment through perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen; Hwang, Seungwoo; Mingolla, Ennio

    2002-05-01

    This article further develops the FACADE neural model of 3-D vision and figure-ground perception to quantitatively explain properties of the McCollough effect (ME). The model proposes that many ME data result from visual system mechanisms whose primary function is to adaptively align, through learning, boundary and surface representations that are positionally shifted due to the process of binocular fusion. For example, binocular boundary representations are shifted by binocular fusion relative to monocular surface representations, yet the boundaries must become positionally aligned with the surfaces to control binocular surface capture and filling-in. The model also includes perceptual reset mechanisms that use habituative transmitters in opponent processing circuits. Thus the model shows how ME data may arise from a combination of mechanisms that have a clear functional role in biological vision. Simulation results with a single set of parameters quantitatively fit data from 13 experiments that probe the nature of achromatic/chromatic and monocular/binocular interactions during induction of the ME. The model proposes how perceptual learning, opponent processing, and habituation at both monocular and binocular surface representations are involved, including early thalamocortical sites. In particular, it explains the anomalous ME utilizing these multiple processing sites. Alternative models of the ME are also summarized and compared with the present model.

  6. Modeling thalamocortical cell: impact of Ca2+ channel distribution and cell geometry on firing pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Zomorrodi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of calcium channel distribution and geometry of the thalamocortical cell upon its tonic firing and the low threshold spike (LTS generation was studied in a 3-compartment model, which represents soma, proximal and distal dendrites as well as in multi-compartment model using the morphology of a real reconstructed neuron. Using an uniform distribution of Ca2+ channels, we determined the minimal number of low threshold voltage-activated calcium channels and their permeability required for the onset of LTS in response to a hyperpolarizing current pulse. In the 3-compartment model, we found that the channel distribution influences the firing pattern only in the range of 3% below the threshold value of total T-channel density. In the multi-compartmental model, the LTS could be generated by only 64% of unequally distributed T-channels compared to the minimal number of equally distributed T-channels. For a given channel density and injected current, the tonic firing frequency was found to be inversely proportional to the size of the cell. However, when the Ca2+ channel density was elevated in soma or proximal dendrites, then the amplitude of LTS response and burst spike frequencies were determined by the ratio of total to threshold number of T-channels in the cell for a specific geometry.

  7. Modeling Thalamocortical Cell: Impact of Ca2+ Channel Distribution and Cell Geometry on Firing Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorrodi, Reza; Kröger, Helmut; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    The influence of calcium channel distribution and geometry of the thalamocortical cell upon its tonic firing and the low threshold spike (LTS) generation was studied in a 3-compartment model, which represents soma, proximal and distal dendrites as well as in multi-compartment model using the morphology of a real reconstructed neuron. Using an uniform distribution of Ca2+ channels, we determined the minimal number of low threshold voltage-activated calcium channels and their permeability required for the onset of LTS in response to a hyperpolarizing current pulse. In the 3-compartment model, we found that the channel distribution influences the firing pattern only in the range of 3% below the threshold value of total T-channel density. In the multi-compartmental model, the LTS could be generated by only 64% of unequally distributed T-channels compared to the minimal number of equally distributed T-channels. For a given channel density and injected current, the tonic firing frequency was found to be inversely proportional to the size of the cell. However, when the Ca2+ channel density was elevated in soma or proximal dendrites, then the amplitude of LTS response and burst spike frequencies were determined by the ratio of total to threshold number of T-channels in the cell for a specific geometry. PMID:19129908

  8. Abnormal thalamocortical activity in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, K D; Dubois, M; Llinás, R R

    2010-07-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic disease that presents a continuing challenge in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Recent studies of neuropathic pain, in both animals and patients, have established a direct relationship between abnormal thalamic rhythmicity related to Thalamo-cortical Dysrhythmia (TCD) and the occurrence of central pain. Here, this relationship has been examined using magneto-encephalographic (MEG) imaging in CRPS Type I, characterized by the absence of nerve lesions. The study addresses spontaneous MEG activity from 13 awake, adult patients (2 men, 11 women; age 15-62), with CRPS Type I of one extremity (duration range: 3months to 10years) and from 13 control subjects. All CRPS I patients demonstrated peaks in power spectrum in the delta (orbitofrontal-temporal cortices related to the affective pain perception. Indeed, CRPS Type I patients presented abnormal brain activity typical of TCD, which has both diagnostic value indicating a central origin for this ailment and a potential treatment interest involving pharmacological and electrical stimulation therapies.

  9. Phasic and tonic mGlu7 receptor activity modulates the thalamocortical network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valériane eTassin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 7 (mGlu7 induces absence-like epileptic seizures, but its precise role in the somatosensory thalamocortical network remains unknown. By combining electrophysiological recordings, optogenetics and pharmacology we dissected the contribution of the mGlu7 receptor at mouse thalamic synapses. We found that mGlu7 is functionally expressed at both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses, where it can inhibit neurotransmission and regulate short-term plasticity. These effects depend on the PDZ-ligand of the receptor, as they are lost in mutant mice. Interestingly, the very low affinity of mGlu7 receptors for glutamate raises the question of how it can be activated, namely at GABAergic synapses and in basal conditions. Inactivation of the receptor activity with the mGlu7 negative allosteric modulator (NAM, ADX71743, enhances thalamic synaptic transmission. In vivo administration of the NAM induces a lethargic state with spindle and/or spike-and-wave discharges accompanied by a behavioral arrest typical of absence epileptic seizures. This provides evidence for mGlu7 receptor-mediated tonic modulation of a physiological function in vivo preventing synchronous and potentially pathological oscillations.

  10. 岛叶在尼古丁成瘾中有效链接的变化%Altered effective connectivity of insula in nicotine addiction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武; 王峰; 张震; 任翔; 张志远; 李杨; 孙涛

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究岛叶在尼古丁成瘾状态下有效链接的改变,以了解岛叶在成瘾中的作用及其功能。方法2012年6月至2013年6月宁夏医科大学20例尼古丁成瘾者,自愿进行吸烟戒断和吸烟满足状态下的静息态磁共振扫描。应用GICA分析获得成瘾脑区独立成分图,对独立成图进行配对t检验得到感兴趣区:岛叶、海马旁回、楔前叶、前扣带回背侧区、前扣带回喙侧区、运动辅助区和前额叶腹内侧/背外侧区,应用GCA计算岛叶与各脑区之间的有效链接。结果尼古丁戒断状态下,从岛叶到前额叶背外侧区、前额叶腹内侧区、前扣带回背侧区、前扣带回喙侧区和楔前叶的有效链接增强,而在满足状态下岛叶没有明显的有效链接改变。图论分析显示岛叶在戒断时是一个因果信号输出源。结论岛叶是尼古丁戒断时的信号输出节点,以其内感受功能监测戒断时的机体稳态变化,对各脑区活动进行功能整合产生主观意识对成瘾起作用。%Objective To explore the changes of effective connectivity associated with insula in different nicotine addiction sessions so as to understand its role and function.Methods A total of 20 smokers received the scans of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in two sessions of different conditions:smoking abstinence followed by smoking satiety.Group ICA was initially adopted to obtain the independent component patterns.And paired t-test of ICA spatial patterns revealed such regions of interest as insula, parahippocampus, precuneus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex , rostral anterior cingulate cortex , supplementary motor area and ventromedial /dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and effective connectivity from insula to other regions was examined subsequently with GCA.Results In smoking abstinence , insula showed increased effective connectivity with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex , ventromedial prefrontal

  11. Frequent loss and alteration of the MOXD2 gene in catarrhines and whales: a possible connection with the evolution of olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Seon; Wang, Yao; Oh, Hye Ji; Lee, Kangseok; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2014-01-01

    The MOXD2 gene encodes a membrane-bound monooxygenase similar to dopamine-β-hydroxylase, and has been proposed to be associated with olfaction. In this study, we analyzed MOXD2 genes from 64 mammalian species, and identified loss-of-function mutations in apes (humans, Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, and five gibbon species from the four major gibbon genera), toothed whales (killer whales, bottlenose dolphins, finless porpoises, baijis, and sperm whales), and baleen whales (minke whales and fin whales). We also identified a shared 13-nt deletion in the last exon of Old World cercopithecine monkeys that results in conversion of a membrane-bound protein to a soluble form. We hypothesize that the frequent inactivation and alteration of MOXD2 genes in catarrhines and whales may be associated with the evolution of olfaction in these clades.

  12. Orexin-dependent activation of layer VIb enhances cortical network activity and integration of non-specific thalamocortical inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Y Audrey; Andjelic, Sofija; Badr, Sammy; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Neocortical layer VI is critically involved in thalamocortical activity changes during the sleep/wake cycle. It receives dense projections from thalamic nuclei sensitive to the wake-promoting neuropeptides orexins, and its deepest part, layer VIb, is the only cortical lamina reactive to orexins. This convergence of wake-promoting inputs prompted us to investigate how layer VIb can modulate cortical arousal, using patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics in rat brain slices. We found that the majority of layer VIb neurons were excited by nicotinic agonists and orexin through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing α4-α5-β2 subunits and OX2 receptor, respectively. Specific effects of orexin on layer VIb neurons were potentiated by low nicotine concentrations and we used this paradigm to explore their intracortical projections. Co-application of nicotine and orexin increased the frequency of excitatory post-synaptic currents in the ipsilateral cortex, with maximal effect in infragranular layers and minimal effect in layer IV, as well as in the contralateral cortex. The ability of layer VIb to relay thalamocortical inputs was tested using photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing fibers from the orexin-sensitive rhomboid nucleus in the parietal cortex. Photostimulation induced robust excitatory currents in layer VIa neurons that were not pre-synaptically modulated by orexin, but exhibited a delayed, orexin-dependent, component. Activation of layer VIb by orexin enhanced the reliability and spike-timing precision of layer VIa responses to rhomboid inputs. These results indicate that layer VIb acts as an orexin-gated excitatory feedforward loop that potentiates thalamocortical arousal.

  13. Regulation of AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSPs in dendritic trees of thalamocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajeunesse, Francis; Kröger, Helmut; Timofeev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Two main excitatory synapses are formed at the dendritic arbor of first-order nuclei thalamocortical (TC) neurons. Ascending sensory axons primarily establish contacts at large proximal dendrites, whereas descending corticothalamic fibers form synapses on thin distal dendrites. With the use of a multicomparment computational model based on fully reconstructed TC neurons from the ventroposterolateral nucleus of the cat, we compared local responses at the site of stimulation as well as somatic responses induced by both α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated currents. We found that AMPAR-mediated responses, when synapses were located at proximal dendrites, induced a larger depolarization at the level of soma, whereas NMDAR-mediated responses were more efficient for synapses located at distal dendrites. The voltage transfer and transfer impedance were higher for NMDAR than for AMPAR activation at any location. For both types of synaptic current and for both input locations at the dendritic arbor, somatic responses were characterized by a low variability despite the large variability found in local responses in dendrites. The large neurons had overall smaller somatic responses than small neurons, but this relation was not found in local dendritic responses. We conclude that in TC cells, the dendritic location of small synaptic inputs does not play a major role in the amplitude of a somatic response, but the size of the neuron does. The variability of response amplitude between cells was much larger than the variability within cells. This suggests possible functional segregation of TC neurons of different size.

  14. Dynamic analysis of the conditional oscillator underlying slow waves in thalamocortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois eDavid

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During non-REM sleep the EEG shows characteristics waves that are generated by the dynamic interactions between cortical and thalamic oscillators. In thalamic neurons, low-threshold T-type Ca2+ channels play a pivotal role in almost every type of neuronal oscillations, including slow (<1 Hz waves, sleep spindles and delta waves. The transient opening of T channels gives rise to the low threshold spikes (LTSs, and associated high frequency bursts of action potentials, that are characteristically present during sleep spindles and delta waves, whereas the persistent opening of a small fraction of T channels, (i.e. ITwindow is responsible for the membrane potential bistability underlying sleep slow oscillations. Surprisingly thalamocortical (TC neurons express a very high density of T channels that largely exceed the amount required to generate LTSs and therefore, to support certain, if not all, sleep oscillations. Here, to clarify the relationship between T current density and sleep oscillations, we systematically investigated the impact of the T conductance level on the intrinsic rhythmic activities generated in TC neurons, combining in vitro experiments and TC neuron simulation. Using bifurcation analysis, we provide insights into the dynamical processes taking place at the transition between slow and delta oscillations. Our results show that although stable delta oscillations can be evoked with minimal T conductance, the full range of slow oscillation patterns, including groups of delta oscillations separated by Up states (grouped-delta slow waves requires a high density of T channels. Moreover, high levels of T conductance ensure the robustness of different types of slow oscillations.

  15. Targeted deletion of Kcne2 impairs HCN channel function in mouse thalamocortical circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Wang Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels generate the pacemaking current, I(h, which regulates neuronal excitability, burst firing activity, rhythmogenesis, and synaptic integration. The physiological consequence of HCN activation depends on regulation of channel gating by endogenous modulators and stabilization of the channel complex formed by principal and ancillary subunits. KCNE2 is a voltage-gated potassium channel ancillary subunit that also regulates heterologously expressed HCN channels; whether KCNE2 regulates neuronal HCN channel function is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of Kcne2 gene deletion on I(h properties and excitability in ventrobasal (VB and cortical layer 6 pyramidal neurons using brain slices prepared from Kcne2(+/+ and Kcne2(-/- mice. Kcne2 deletion shifted the voltage-dependence of I(h activation to more hyperpolarized potentials, slowed gating kinetics, and decreased I(h density. Kcne2 deletion was associated with a reduction in whole-brain expression of both HCN1 and HCN2 (but not HCN4, although co-immunoprecipitation from whole-brain lysates failed to detect interaction of KCNE2 with HCN1 or 2. Kcne2 deletion also increased input resistance and temporal summation of subthreshold voltage responses; this increased intrinsic excitability enhanced burst firing in response to 4-aminopyridine. Burst duration increased in corticothalamic, but not thalamocortical, neurons, suggesting enhanced cortical excitatory input to the thalamus; such augmented excitability did not result from changes in glutamate release machinery since miniature EPSC frequency was unaltered in Kcne2(-/- neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Loss of KCNE2 leads to downregulation of HCN channel function associated with increased excitability in neurons in the cortico-thalamo-cortical loop. Such findings further our understanding of the normal physiology of brain circuitry critically

  16. [Diversity in thalamic relay neurons: evidence for "bottom-up" and "top-down" information flow in thalamocortical pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clascá, Francisco; Rubio-Garrido, Pablo; Galazo, María J; Porrero, César

    2009-01-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) pathways are still mainly understood as the gateway for ascending sensory-motor information into the cortex. However, it is now clear that a great many TC cells are involved in interactions between cortical areas via the thalamus. We review recent data, including our own, which demonstrate the generalized presence in rodent thalamus of two major TC cell types characterized, among other features, by their axon development, arborization and laminar targeting in the cortex. Such duality may allow inputs from thalamus to access cortical circuits via "bottom-up"-wired axon arbors or via "top-down"-wired axon arbors.

  17. Altered Th17 cells and Th17/regulatory T-cell ratios indicate the subsequent conversion from undifferentiated connective tissue disease to definitive systemic autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szodoray, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Barath, Sandor; Csipo, Istvan; Nagy, Gabor; El-Hage, Fadi; Osnes, Liv T; Szegedi, Gyula; Bodolay, Edit

    2013-12-01

    A shift in the balance between Th17-cells and regulatory T-cells (Treg) is an important feature of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), and may also contribute to their development. Hereby, we assessed the distribution of peripheral Th17 and Treg-cells in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD), the forerunner of SAIDs and followed these parameters during the development towards definitive SAIDs. Fifty-one UCTD patients were investigated and followed-up for 3 years. Flow cytometry was used to identify and follow three cell-populations: Th17-cells (CD4+IL-17+ T-cells), natural regulatory T-cells (CD4(+)CD25(bright)FoxP3(+); nTregs) and IL-10 producing Type-1 regulatory T-cells (CD4+IL-10+ T-cells; Tr1). Altogether 37.3% of these patients progressed into SAIDs. Th17-cells were increased in UCTD vs. controls, which further increased in those, whom developed SAIDs eventually. The Th17/nTreg ratio gradually increased from controls through UCTD patients, reaching the highest values in SAID-progressed patients. Regarding the Th17/Tr1 ratios, a similar tendency was observed moreover Th17/Tr1 could distinguish between UCTD patients with, or without subsequent SAID progression in a very early UCTD stage. Various immunoserological markers showed association with Th17 and Th17/nTreg at baseline, indicating the consecutive development of a distinct SAID. The derailed Th17/Treg balance may contribute to disease progression therefore could function as a prognostic marker.

  18. Analysis of the role of the low threshold currents IT and Ih in intrinsic delta oscillations of thalamocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarillo, Yimy; Mato, Germán; Nadal, Marcela S

    2015-01-01

    Thalamocortical neurons are involved in the generation and maintenance of brain rhythms associated with global functional states. The repetitive burst firing of TC neurons at delta frequencies (1-4 Hz) has been linked to the oscillations recorded during deep sleep and during episodes of absence seizures. To get insight into the biophysical properties that are the basis for intrinsic delta oscillations in these neurons, we performed a bifurcation analysis of a minimal conductance-based thalamocortical neuron model including only the IT channel and the sodium and potassium leak channels. This analysis unveils the dynamics of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons, and describes how the interplay between the amplifying variable mT and the recovering variable hT of the calcium channel IT is sufficient to generate low threshold oscillations in the delta band. We also explored the role of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current Ih in this reduced model and determine that, albeit not required, Ih amplifies and stabilizes the oscillation.

  19. Analysis of the role of the low threshold currents IT and Ih in intrinsic delta oscillations of thalamocortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimy eAmarillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thalamocortical neurons are involved in the generation and maintenance of brain rhythms associated with global functional states. The repetitive burst firing of TC neurons at delta frequencies (1-4 Hz has been linked to the oscillations recorded during deep sleep and during episodes of absence seizures. To get insight into the biophysical properties that are the basis for intrinsic delta oscillations in these neurons, we performed a bifurcation analysis of a minimal conductance-based thalamocortical neuron model including only the IT channel and the sodium and potassium leak channels. This analysis unveils the dynamics of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons, and describes how the interplay between the amplifying variable mT and the recovering variable hT of the calcium channel IT is sufficient to generate low threshold oscillations in the delta band. We also explored the role of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current Ih in this reduced model and determine that, albeit not required, Ih amplifies and stabilizes the oscillation.

  20. Enduring Effects of Early Life Stress on Firing Patterns of Hippocampal and Thalamocortical Neurons in Rats: Implications for Limbic Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrish Ali

    Full Text Available Early life stress results in an enduring vulnerability to kindling-induced epileptogenesis in rats, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Recent studies indicate the involvement of thalamocortical neuronal circuits in the progression of kindling epileptogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine in vivo the effects of early life stress and amygdala kindling on the firing pattern of hippocampus as well as thalamic and cortical neurons. Eight week old male Wistar rats, previously exposed to maternal separation (MS early life stress or early handling (EH, underwent amygdala kindling (or sham kindling. Once fully kindled, in vivo juxtacellular recordings in hippocampal, thalamic and cortical regions were performed under neuroleptic analgesia. In the thalamic reticular nucleus cells both kindling and MS independently lowered firing frequency and enhanced burst firing. Further, burst firing in the thalamic reticular nucleus was significantly increased in kindled MS rats compared to kindled EH rats (p<0.05. In addition, MS enhanced burst firing of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Following a stimulation-induced seizure, somatosensory cortical neurons exhibited a more pronounced increase in burst firing in MS rats than in EH rats. These data demonstrate changes in firing patterns in thalamocortical and hippocampal regions resulting from both MS and amygdala kindling, which may reflect cellular changes underlying the enhanced vulnerability to kindling in rats that have been exposed to early life stress.

  1. A chronometric functional sub-network in the thalamo-cortical system regulates the flow of neural information necessary for conscious cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Domínguez, Umberto; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Froufé-Torres, Manuel; León-Carrión, Jose

    2013-06-01

    The thalamo-cortical system has been defined as a neural network associated with consciousness. While there seems to be wide agreement that the thalamo-cortical system directly intervenes in vigilance and arousal, a divergence of opinion persists regarding its intervention in the control of other cognitive processes necessary for consciousness. In the present manuscript, we provide a review of recent scientific findings on the thalamo-cortical system and its role in the control and regulation of the flow of neural information necessary for conscious cognitive processes. We suggest that the axis formed by the medial prefrontal cortex and different thalamic nuclei (reticular nucleus, intralaminar nucleus, and midline nucleus), represents a core component for consciousness. This axis regulates different cerebral structures which allow basic cognitive processes like attention, arousal and memory to emerge. In order to produce a synchronized coherent response, neural communication between cerebral structures must have exact timing (chronometry). Thus, a chronometric functional sub-network within the thalamo-cortical system keeps us in an optimal and continuous functional state, allowing high-order cognitive processes, essential to awareness and qualia, to take place.

  2. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  3. [A layer-by-layer analysis of the components of the thalamocortical responses of the rabbit sensorimotor cortex in ontogeny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimko, I A

    1991-01-01

    The data obtained in the paper showed that complex dynamics of changes of spatial-temporary situation of heterocomponent thalamocortical responses (TCR) at passing the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) was conditioned by the properties of electrogenesis of each TCR component, age and frequency of stimulation of ventroposterolateral (VPL) thalamus nucleus transformation of electric profile of the second positive component (PC-2) of the TCR at passing SMC might testify to algebraic summation in this component of bioelectric processes of several generation sources (invertible and non-invertible PC-2). The revealed properties of ontogenetic dynamics of the bioelectric fields profiles of the third negative component (NC-3) of the TCR might be the consequence of the age stages of the development and change of embryonal mechanisms of electrogenesis of the definitive ones in extremely similar negativities.

  4. Implementing the cellular mechanisms of synaptic transmission in a neural mass model of the thalamo-cortical circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen Bhattacharya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel direction to existing neural mass modelling technique is proposed where the commonly used `alpha function' for representing synaptic transmission is replaced by a kinetic framework of neurotransmitter and receptor dynamics. The aim is to underpin neuro-transmission dynamics associated with abnormal brain rhythms commonly observed in neurological and psychiatric disorders. An existing thalamocortical neural mass model is modified by using the kinetic framework for modelling synaptic transmission mediated by glutamatergic and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric-acid-ergic receptors. The model output is compared qualitatively with existing literature on in-vitro experimental studies of ferret thalamic slices, as well as on single-neuron-level model based studies of neuro-receptor and transmitter dynamics in the thalamocortical tissue. The results are consistent with these studies: the activation of ligand-gated GABA receptors is essential for generation of spindle waves in the model, while blocking this pathway leads to low-frequency synchronised oscillations such as observed in slow-wave sleep; the frequency of spindle oscillations increase with increased levels of post-synaptic membrane conductance for AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic-acid receptors, and blocking this pathway effects a quiescent model output. In terms of computational efficiency, the simulation time is improved by a factor of ten compared to a similar neural mass model based on alpha functions. This implies a dramatic improvement in computational resources for large-scale network simulation using this model. Thus, the model provides a platform for correlating high-level brain oscillatory activity with low-level synaptic attributes, and makes a significant contribution towards advancements in current neural mass modelling paradigm as a potential computational tool to better the understanding of brain oscillations in sickness and in health.

  5. Implementing the cellular mechanisms of synaptic transmission in a neural mass model of the thalamo-cortical circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Basabdatta S

    2013-01-01

    A novel direction to existing neural mass modeling technique is proposed where the commonly used "alpha function" for representing synaptic transmission is replaced by a kinetic framework of neurotransmitter and receptor dynamics. The aim is to underpin neuro-transmission dynamics associated with abnormal brain rhythms commonly observed in neurological and psychiatric disorders. An existing thalamocortical neural mass model is modified by using the kinetic framework for modeling synaptic transmission mediated by glutamatergic and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric-acid)-ergic receptors. The model output is compared qualitatively with existing literature on in vitro experimental studies of ferret thalamic slices, as well as on single-neuron-level model based studies of neuro-receptor and transmitter dynamics in the thalamocortical tissue. The results are consistent with these studies: the activation of ligand-gated GABA receptors is essential for generation of spindle waves in the model, while blocking this pathway leads to low-frequency synchronized oscillations such as observed in slow-wave sleep; the frequency of spindle oscillations increase with increased levels of post-synaptic membrane conductance for AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic-acid) receptors, and blocking this pathway effects a quiescent model output. In terms of computational efficiency, the simulation time is improved by a factor of 10 compared to a similar neural mass model based on alpha functions. This implies a dramatic improvement in computational resources for large-scale network simulation using this model. Thus, the model provides a platform for correlating high-level brain oscillatory activity with low-level synaptic attributes, and makes a significant contribution toward advancements in current neural mass modeling paradigm as a potential computational tool to better the understanding of brain oscillations in sickness and in health.

  6. A population-based model of the nonlinear dynamics of the thalamocortical feedback network displays intrinsic oscillations in the spindling (7-14 Hz) range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Nada A B; Denham, Michael

    2005-12-01

    The thalamocortical network is modelled using the Wilson-Cowan equations for neuronal population activity. We show that this population model with biologically derived parameters possesses intrinsic nonlinear oscillatory dynamics, and that the frequency of oscillation lies within the spindle range. Spindle oscillations are an early sleep oscillation characterized by high-frequency bursts of action potentials followed by a period of quiescence, at a frequency of 7-14 Hz. Spindles are generally regarded as being generated by intrathalamic circuitry, as decorticated thalamic slices and the isolated thalamic reticular nucleus exhibit spindles. However, the role of cortical feedback has been shown to regulate and synchronize the oscillation. Previous modelling studies have mainly used conductance-based models and hence the mechanism relied upon the inclusion of ionic currents, particularly the T-type calcium current. Here we demonstrate that spindle-frequency oscillatory activity can also arise from the nonlinear dynamics of the thalamocortical circuit, and we use bifurcation analysis to examine the robustness of this oscillation in terms of the functional range of the parameters used in the model. The results suggest that the thalamocortical circuit has intrinsic nonlinear population dynamics which are capable of providing robust support for oscillatory activity within the frequency range of spindle oscillations.

  7. Sleep EEG Fingerprints Reveal Accelerated Thalamocortical Oscillatory Dynamics in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodizs, Robert; Gombos, Ferenc; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Sleep EEG alterations are emerging features of several developmental disabilities, but detailed quantitative EEG data on the sleep phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome (WS, 7q11.23 microdeletion) is still lacking. Based on laboratory (Study I) and home sleep records (Study II) here we report WS-related features of the patterns of…

  8. 轻微肝性脑病全脑功能连接的静息态功能MRI研究%Altered whole brain functional connectivity in patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚荣丰; 张龙江; 许强; 梁雪; 罗松; 张志强; 卢光明

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the alteration of the whole brain functional connectivity in patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy(MHE) by using resting-state functional MRI,and to explore its role in distinguishing the MHE from cirrhotic patients without MHE by using the receiver operator characteristic(ROC) curve.Methods Thirty cirrhotic patients with MHE,32 cirrhotic patients without MHE (non-MHE),and 49 healthy controls underwent standard resting-state functional MRI scan.Whole brain functional connectivities were compared with analysis of variance test to observe the difference among three groups,and then compared with Post-hoc test to investigate the changes between MHE and non-MHE groups.Results There were widespreadly different functional connectivities among three groups.All 115 functional conenctivities showed significant difference among three groups(all P<0.05).Compared with non-MHE patients,MHE patients showed 6 decreased functional connectivity in the following brain regions (P<0.05):between left supper temporal gyrus-right orbitofrontal cortex,left Heschl's gyrus-left Rolandic operculum,left Heschl's gyrus-right olfactory cortex,left hippocampus-right amygdala,left putamen-right putamen,and left temporal pole of supper temporal gyrus-right temporal pole of middle temporal gyrus (t=-4.41-3.82,P<0.01).ROC analysis demonstrated that the left hippocampus-right amygdala had the highest value for differentiating MHE from non-MHE group(AUC=0.78,95%CI 0.66-0.90) with a cutoff value=0.56,sensitivity=73% and specificity=81%).Conclusion Functional connectivity analysis can be used to observe the functional changes in MHE patient,and has a potential for the early diagnosis of MHE.%目的 利用静息态fMRI观察轻微肝性脑病(MHE)患者全脑功能连接的改变,并通过ROC曲线分析差异脑区连接在鉴别MHE和无MHE的肝硬化患者中的价值.方法 收集30例MHE患者(MHE组)、32例无MHE的肝硬化患者(无MHE组)和49名健

  9. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  10. Strengthening connections: functional connectivity and brain plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The ascendancy of functional neuroimaging has facilitated the addition of network-based approaches to the neuropsychologist’s toolbox for evaluating the sequelae of brain insult. In particular, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) mapping of resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) data constitutes an ideal approach to measuring macro-scale networks in the human brain. Beyond the value of iFC mapping for charting how the functional topography of the brain is altered by insult and injury, iFC analyses c...

  11. About Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen S Rockland

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the attention attracted by connectomics, one can lose sight of the very real questions concerning What are connections? In the neuroimaging community, structural connectivity is ground truth and underlying constraint on functional or effective connectivity. It is referenced to underlying anatomy; but, as increasingly remarked, there is a large gap between the wealth of human brain mapping and the relatively scant data on actual anatomical connectivity. Moreover, connections have typically been discussed as pairwise, point x projecting to point y (or: to points y and z, or more recently, in graph theoretical terms, as nodes or regions and the interconnecting edges. This is a convenient shorthand, but tends not to capture the richness and nuance of basic anatomical properties as identified in the classic tradition of tracer studies. The present short review accordingly revisits connectional weights, heterogeneity, reciprocity, topography, and hierarchical organization, drawing on concrete examples. The emphasis is on presynaptic long-distance connections, motivated by the intention to probe current assumptions and promote discussions about further progress and synthesis.

  12. Gendered Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Bo

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the gendered nature of urban politics in Cape Town by focusing on a group of female, township politicians. Employing the Deleuzian concept of `wild connectivity', it argues that these politically entrepreneurial women were able to negotiate a highly volatile urban landscape...... space also drew on quite traditional notions of female respectability. Furthermore, the article argues, the form of wild connectivity to an extent was a function of the political transition, which destabilized formal structures of gendered authority. It remains a question whether this form...... of connectivity might endure, as Capetonian politics assumes a post-apartheid structure....

  13. System identification of the nonlinear dynamics in the thalamocortical circuit in response to patterned thalamic microstimulation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Daniel C.; Wang, Qi; Gollnick, Clare A.; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Nonlinear system identification approaches were used to develop a dynamical model of the network level response to patterns of microstimulation in vivo. Approach. The thalamocortical circuit of the rodent vibrissa pathway was the model system, with voltage sensitive dye imaging capturing the cortical response to patterns of stimulation delivered from a single electrode in the ventral posteromedial thalamus. The results of simple paired stimulus experiments formed the basis for the development of a phenomenological model explicitly containing nonlinear elements observed experimentally. The phenomenological model was fit using datasets obtained with impulse train inputs, Poisson-distributed in time and uniformly varying in amplitude. Main results. The phenomenological model explained 58% of the variance in the cortical response to out of sample patterns of thalamic microstimulation. Furthermore, while fit on trial-averaged data, the phenomenological model reproduced single trial response properties when simulated with noise added into the system during stimulus presentation. The simulations indicate that the single trial response properties were dependent on the relative sensitivity of the static nonlinearities in the two stages of the model, and ultimately suggest that electrical stimulation activates local circuitry through linear recruitment, but that this activity propagates in a highly nonlinear fashion to downstream targets. Significance. The development of nonlinear dynamical models of neural circuitry will guide information delivery for sensory prosthesis applications, and more generally reveal properties of population coding within neural circuits.

  14. Dynamic changes in single unit activity and γ oscillations in a thalamocortical circuit during rapid instrumental learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunxiu; Fan, David; Lopez, Alberto; Yin, Henry H

    2012-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and mediodorsal thalamus (MD) together form a thalamocortical circuit that has been implicated in the learning and production of goal-directed actions. In this study we measured neural activity in both regions simultaneously, as rats learned to press a lever to earn food rewards. In both MD and mPFC, instrumental learning was accompanied by dramatic changes in the firing patterns of the neurons, in particular the rapid emergence of single-unit neural activity reflecting the completion of the action and reward delivery. In addition, we observed distinct patterns of changes in the oscillatory LFP response in MD and mPFC. With learning, there was a significant increase in theta band oscillations (6-10 Hz) in the MD, but not in the mPFC. By contrast, gamma band oscillations (40-55 Hz) increased in the mPFC, but not in the MD. Coherence between these two regions also changed with learning: gamma coherence in relation to reward delivery increased, whereas theta coherence did not. Together these results suggest that, as rats learned the instrumental contingency between action and outcome, the emergence of task related neural activity is accompanied by enhanced functional interaction between MD and mPFC in response to the reward feedback.

  15. Layer-by-layer analysis of the components of thalamocortical responses of the sensorimotor cortex in the rabbit during ontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimko, I A

    1992-01-01

    The complex dynamics of the changes in the spatial-temporal disposition of the heterocomponent thalamocortical responses (TCR) when traversing the sensorimotor cortex (SMC), are governed by the characteristics of the electrogenesis of each of the components of the TCR, the age of the animal, and the frequency of stimulation of the ventroposterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus. At the same time, the transformation of the electrical profile of the second positive component (PC-2) of the TCR during traversal of the SMC may suggest the algebraic summation in this component of the bioelectrical processes of several sources of generation (of the inverted and noninverted PC-2). The characteristics of the ontogenetic dynamics of the profiles of the biological fields of the third negative component (NC-3) of the TCR which were found may be the result of age-related stages of development and of a change in the embryonal mechanisms of electrogenesis to the definitive mechanisms in the presence of outwardly similar negativities.

  16. Effects of Patterned Sound Deprivation on Short- and Long-Term Plasticity in the Rat Thalamocortical Auditory System In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe N. Soutar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal sensory experience plays a significant role in the maturation and synaptic stabilization of sensory cortices, such as the primary auditory cortex (A1. Here, we examined the effects of patterned sound deprivation (by rearing in continuous white noise, WN during early postnatal life on short- and long-term plasticity of adult male rats using an in vivo preparation (urethane anesthesia. Relative to age-matched control animals reared under unaltered sound conditions, rats raised in WN (from postnatal day 5 to 50–60 showed greater levels of long-term potentiation (LTP of field potentials in A1 induced by theta-burst stimulation (TBS of the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN. In contrast, analyses of short-term plasticity using paired-pulse stimulation (interstimulus intervals of 25–1000 ms did not reveal any significant effects of WN rearing. However, LTP induction resulted in a significant enhancement of paired-pulse depression (PPD for both rearing conditions. We conclude that patterned sound deprivation during early postnatal life results in the maintenance of heightened, juvenile-like long-term plasticity (LTP into adulthood. Further, the enhanced PPD following LTP induction provides novel evidence that presynaptic mechanisms contribute to thalamocortical LTP in A1 under in vivo conditions.

  17. System identification of the nonlinear dynamics in the thalamocortical circuit in response to patterned thalamic microstimulation in-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Daniel C; Wang, Qi; Gollnick, Clare A; Stanley, Garrett B

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nonlinear system identification approaches were used to develop a dynamical model of the network level response to patterns of microstimulation in-vivo. Approach The thalamocortical circuit of the rodent vibrissa pathway was the model system, with voltage sensitive dye imaging capturing the cortical response to patterns of stimulation delivered from a single electrode in the ventral posteromedial thalamus. The results of simple paired stimulus experiments formed the basis for the development of a phenomenological model explicitly containing nonlinear elements observed experimentally. The phenomenological model was fit using datasets obtained with impulse train inputs, Poisson-distributed in time and uniformly varying in amplitude. Main Results The phenomenological model explained 58% of the variance in the cortical response to out of sample patterns of thalamic microstimulation. Furthermore, while fit on trial averaged data, the phenomenological model reproduced single trial response properties when simulated with noise added into the system during stimulus presentation. The simulations indicate that the single trial response properties were dependent on the relative sensitivity of the static nonlinearities in the two stages of the model, and ultimately suggest that electrical stimulation activates local circuitry through linear recruitment, but that this activity propagates in a highly nonlinear fashion to downstream targets. Significance The development of nonlinear dynamical models of neural circuitry will guide information delivery for sensory prosthesis applications, and more generally reveal properties of population coding within neural circuits. PMID:24162186

  18. HR Connect

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HR Connect is the USAID HR personnel system which allows HR professionals to process HR actions related to employee's personal and position information. This system...

  19. [Gastroenterologic aspects of connective tissue diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomonte, L; Zoli, A; Alessi, F; Ghirlanda, G; Greco, A V; Magarò, M

    1985-07-14

    The connective tissue disorders are a protean group of acquired diseases which have in common widespread immunologic and inflammatory alterations of connective tissue. The acquired connective tissue diseases generally include the following clinical entities: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis, polyarteritis nodosa, scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, Sjögren's and Behcet's sindromes. These entities have certain features in common which include sinovitis, pleuritis, myocarditis, endocarditis, pericarditis, peritonitis, vasculitis, myositis, changes in skin, alteration of connective tissue and nephritis. Gastrointestinal and hepatic involvement in connective tissue disorders are not the most important features, nevertheless appear almost regularly. Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, malabsorption may affect patients suffering by rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and other collagenophaties. In some cases mesenteric vasculitis may cause intestinal ischemia which may result in bowel infarction, mucosal ulceration, hemorrhage, perforation. After an extensive review of the existing literature the Authors make an accurate evaluation of gastrointestinal and hepatic alterations in connective tissue diseases.

  20. Mean-field thalamocortical modeling of longitudinal EEG acquired during intensive meditation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Manish; Zanesco, Anthony P; King, Brandon G; Bridwell, David A; MacLean, Katherine A; Aichele, Stephen R; Jacobs, Tonya L; Wallace, B Alan; Saron, Clifford D; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-07-01

    Meditation training has been shown to enhance attention and improve emotion regulation. However, the brain processes associated with such training are poorly understood and a computational modeling framework is lacking. Modeling approaches that can realistically simulate neurophysiological data while conforming to basic anatomical and physiological constraints can provide a unique opportunity to generate concrete and testable hypotheses about the mechanisms supporting complex cognitive tasks such as meditation. Here we applied the mean-field computational modeling approach using the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) collected at three assessment points from meditating participants during two separate 3-month-long shamatha meditation retreats. We modeled cortical, corticothalamic, and intrathalamic interactions to generate a simulation of EEG signals recorded across the scalp. We also present two novel extensions to the mean-field approach that allow for: (a) non-parametric analysis of changes in model parameter values across all channels and assessments; and (b) examination of variation in modeled thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) connectivity over the retreat period. After successfully fitting whole-brain EEG data across three assessment points within each retreat, two model parameters were found to replicably change across both meditation retreats. First, after training, we observed an increased temporal delay between modeled cortical and thalamic cells. This increase provides a putative neural mechanism for a previously observed reduction in individual alpha frequency in these same participants. Second, we found decreased inhibitory connection strength between the TRN and secondary relay nuclei (SRN) of the modeled thalamus after training. This reduction in inhibitory strength was found to be associated with increased dynamical stability of the model. Altogether, this paper presents the first computational approach, taking core aspects of physiology and

  1. Causal hierarchy within the thalamo-cortical network in spike and wave discharges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Vaudano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Generalised spike wave (GSW discharges are the electroencephalographic (EEG hallmark of absence seizures, clinically characterised by a transitory interruption of ongoing activities and impaired consciousness, occurring during states of reduced awareness. Several theories have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of GSW discharges and the role of thalamus and cortex as generators. In this work we extend the existing theories by hypothesizing a role for the precuneus, a brain region neglected in previous works on GSW generation but already known to be linked to consciousness and awareness. We analysed fMRI data using dynamic causal modelling (DCM to investigate the effective connectivity between precuneus, thalamus and prefrontal cortex in patients with GSW discharges. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed fMRI data from seven patients affected by Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy (IGE with frequent GSW discharges and significant GSW-correlated haemodynamic signal changes in the thalamus, the prefrontal cortex and the precuneus. Using DCM we assessed their effective connectivity, i.e. which region drives another region. Three dynamic causal models were constructed: GSW was modelled as autonomous input to the thalamus (model A, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (model B, and precuneus (model C. Bayesian model comparison revealed Model C (GSW as autonomous input to precuneus, to be the best in 5 patients while model A prevailed in two cases. At the group level model C dominated and at the population-level the p value of model C was approximately 1. CONCLUSION: Our results provide strong evidence that activity in the precuneus gates GSW discharges in the thalamo-(fronto cortical network. This study is the first demonstration of a causal link between haemodynamic changes in the precuneus -- an index of awareness -- and the occurrence of pathological discharges in epilepsy.

  2. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  3. Resting state functional MRI in Parkinson's disease: the impact of deep brain stimulation on 'effective' connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Joshua; Urner, Maren; Moran, Rosalyn; Flandin, Guillaume; Marreiros, Andre; Mancini, Laura; White, Mark; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia; Friston, Karl; Foltynie, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Depleted of dopamine, the dynamics of the parkinsonian brain impact on both 'action' and 'resting' motor behaviour. Deep brain stimulation has become an established means of managing these symptoms, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Non-invasive characterizations of induced brain responses, and the effective connectivity underlying them, generally appeals to dynamic causal modelling of neuroimaging data. When the brain is at rest, however, this sort of characterization has been limited to correlations (functional connectivity). In this work, we model the 'effective' connectivity underlying low frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting Parkinsonian motor network-disclosing the distributed effects of deep brain stimulation on cortico-subcortical connections. Specifically, we show that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation modulates all the major components of the motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop, including the cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical, direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways, and the hyperdirect subthalamic nucleus projections. The strength of effective subthalamic nucleus afferents and efferents were reduced by stimulation, whereas cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical and direct pathways were strengthened. Remarkably, regression analysis revealed that the hyperdirect, direct, and basal ganglia afferents to the subthalamic nucleus predicted clinical status and therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation; however, suppression of the sensitivity of the subthalamic nucleus to its hyperdirect afferents by deep brain stimulation may subvert the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation. Our findings highlight the distributed effects of stimulation on the resting motor network and provide a framework for analysing effective connectivity in resting state functional MRI with strong a priori hypotheses.

  4. Rhythmic dendritic Ca2+ oscillations in thalamocortical neurons during slow non-REM sleep-related activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Adam C; Hughes, Stuart W; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2012-08-15

    The distribution of T-type Ca2+ channels along the entire somatodendritic axis of sensory thalamocortical (TC) neurons permits regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes (LTS) accompanied by global dendritic Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, T-type Ca2+ channels play an integral role in low frequency oscillatory activity (dynamics of T-type Ca2+ channel-dependent dendritic Ca2+ signalling during slow sleep-associated oscillations remains unknown. Here we demonstrate using patch clamp recording and two-photon Ca2+ imaging of dendrites from cat TC neurons undergoing spontaneous slow oscillatory activity that somatically recorded δ (1–4 Hz) and slow (<1 Hz) oscillations are associated with rhythmic and sustained global oscillations in dendritic Ca2+. In addition, our data reveal the presence of LTS-dependent Ca2+ transients (Δ[Ca2+]) in dendritic spine-like structures on proximal TC neuron dendrites during slow (<1 Hz) oscillations whose amplitudes are similar to those observed in the dendritic shaft. We find that the amplitude of oscillation associated Δ[Ca2+] do not vary significantly with distance from the soma whereas the decay time constant (τdecay) of Δ[Ca2+] decreases significantly in more distal dendrites. Furthermore, τdecay of dendritic Δ[Ca2+] increases significantly as oscillation frequency decreases from δ to slow frequencies where pronounced depolarised UP states are observed. Such rhythmic dendritic Ca2+ entry in TC neurons during sleep-related firing patterns could be an important factor in maintaining the oscillatory activity and associated biochemical signalling processes, such as synaptic downscaling, that occur in non-REM sleep.

  5. T-type calcium channels promote predictive homeostasis of input-output relations in thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Su Z; Kim, Haram R; Fiorillo, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    A general theory views the function of all neurons as prediction, and one component of this theory is that of "predictive homeostasis" or "prediction error." It is well established that sensory systems adapt so that neuronal output maintains sensitivity to sensory input, in accord with information theory. Predictive homeostasis applies the same principle at the cellular level, where the challenge is to maintain membrane excitability at the optimal homeostatic level so that spike generation is maximally sensitive to small gradations in synaptic drive. Negative feedback is a hallmark of homeostatic mechanisms, as exemplified by depolarization-activated potassium channels. In contrast, T-type calcium channels exhibit positive feedback that appears at odds with the theory. In thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), T-type channels are capable of causing bursts of spikes with an all-or-none character in response to excitation from a hyperpolarized potential. This "burst mode" would partially uncouple visual input from spike output and reduce the information spikes convey about gradations in visual input. However, past observations of T-type-driven bursts may have resulted from unnaturally high membrane excitability. Here we have mimicked within rat brain slices the patterns of synaptic conductance that occur naturally during vision. In support of the theory of predictive homeostasis, we found that T-type channels restored excitability toward its homeostatic level during periods of hyperpolarization. Thus, activation of T-type channels allowed two retinal input spikes to cause one output spike on average, and we observed almost no instances in which output count exceeded input count (a "burst"). T-type calcium channels therefore help to maintain a single optimal mode of transmission rather than creating a second mode. More fundamentally our results support the general theory, which seeks to predict the properties of a neuron's ion channels and

  6. A novel role of dendritic gap junction and mechanisms underlying its interaction with thalamocortical conductance in fast spiking inhibitory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qian-Quan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the roles of dendritic gap junctions (GJs of inhibitory interneurons in modulating temporal properties of sensory induced responses in sensory cortices. Electrophysiological dual patch-clamp recording and computational simulation methods were used in combination to examine a novel role of GJs in sensory mediated feed-forward inhibitory responses in barrel cortex layer IV and its underlying mechanisms. Results Under physiological conditions, excitatory post-junctional potentials (EPJPs interact with thalamocortical (TC inputs within an unprecedented few milliseconds (i.e. over 200 Hz to enhance the firing probability and synchrony of coupled fast-spiking (FS cells. Dendritic GJ coupling allows fourfold increase in synchrony and a significant enhancement in spike transmission efficacy in excitatory spiny stellate cells. The model revealed the following novel mechanisms: 1 rapid capacitive current (Icap underlies the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels; 2 there was less than 2 milliseconds in which the Icap underlying TC input and EPJP was coupled effectively; 3 cells with dendritic GJs had larger input conductance and smaller membrane response to weaker inputs; 4 synchrony in inhibitory networks by GJ coupling leads to reduced sporadic lateral inhibition and increased TC transmission efficacy. Conclusion Dendritic GJs of neocortical inhibitory networks can have very powerful effects in modulating the strength and the temporal properties of sensory induced feed-forward inhibitory and excitatory responses at a very high frequency band (>200 Hz. Rapid capacitive currents are identified as main mechanisms underlying interaction between two transient synaptic conductances.

  7. Learning Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Regina D.; Richards, Patricia O.

    2005-01-01

    In this edition of Learning Connections, the authors show how technology can enhance study of weather patterns, reading comprehension, real-world training, critical thinking, health education, and art criticism. The following sections are included: (1) Social Studies; (2) Language Arts; (3) Computer Science and ICT; (4) Art; and (5) Health.…

  8. Getting Connected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    That the world outside schools is changing faster than ever is old news. Unfortunately, that the world "inside" schools is changing at a glacial pace is even older news. As school leaders, principals have an important choice to make as they move into the second decade of the 21st century. School leaders have a moral obligation to connect and…

  9. Spatial dynamics of receptive fields in cat primary visual cortex related to the temporal structure of thalamocortical feedforward activity. Experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suder, Katrin; Funke, Klaus; Zhao, Yongqiang; Kerscher, Nicolas; Wennekers, Thomas; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2002-06-01

    We investigated how changes in the temporal firing rate of thalamocortical activity affect the spatiotemporal structure of receptive field (RF) subunits in cat primary visual cortex. Spike activity of 67 neurons (48 simple, 19 complex cells) was extracellulary recorded from area 17/18 of anesthetized and paralyzed cats. A total of 107 subfields (on/off) were mapped by applying a reverse correlation technique to the activity elicited by bright and dark rectangles flashed for 300 ms in a 20x10 grid. We found that the width of the (suprathreshold) discharge fields shrank on average by 22% during this 300-ms-long stimulus presentation time. Fifty-eight subfields (54%) shrank by more than 20% of peak width and only ten (less than 10%) showed a slight increase over time. The main size reduction took place 40-60 ms after response onset, which corresponded to the transition from transient peak firing to tonic visual activity in thalamocortical relay cells (TC). The experimentally obtained RFs were then fitted with the aid of a neural field model of the primary visual pathway. Assuming a Gaussian-shaped spatial sensitivity profile across the RF subfield width, the model allowed us to estimate the subthreshold RF (depolarization field, D-field) from the minimal discharge field (MDF). The model allowed us to test to what degree the temporal dynamics of thalamocortical activity contributes to the spatiotemporal changes of cortical RFs. To this end, we performed the fitting procedure either with a pure feedforward model or with a field model that also included intracortical feedback. Spatial and temporal parameters obtained from fits of the experimental RFs matched closely to those achieved by simulating a pure feedforward system with the field model but were not compatible with additional intracortical feedback. Thus, our results show that dot stimulation, which optimally excites thalamocortical cells, leads to a shrinkage with respect to the size of the RF subfield at the

  10. Ablation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 Potassium Channels Disrupts Thalamocortical Oscillations In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, Felipe; Torres-Vega, Miguel A.; Marks, Gerald. A.; Joho, Rolf H.

    2008-01-01

    The genes Kcnc1 and Kcnc3 encode the subunits for the fast-activating/fast-deactivating, voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3, which are expressed in several brain regions known to be involved in the regulation of the sleep–wake cycle. When these genes are genetically eliminated, Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice display severe sleep loss as a result of unstable slow-wave sleep. Within the thalamocortical circuitry, Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits are highly expressed in the thalamic reticular ...

  11. Order-theoretical connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Richmond

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Order-theoretically connected posets are introduced and applied to create the notion of T-connectivity in ordered topological spaces. As special cases T-connectivity contains classical connectivity, order-connectivity, and link-connectivity.

  12. On-off intermittency of thalamo-cortical neuronal network oscillations in the electroencephalogram of rodents with genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Yu.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Runnova, Anastasija E.; Shurugina, Sveltlana A.; Ivanov, Alexey V.

    2013-02-01

    Spike-wave discharges are electroencephalographic hallmarks of absence epilepsy. Spike-wave discharges are known to originate from thalamo-cortical neuronal network that normally produces sleep spindle oscillations. Although both sleep spindles and spike-wave discharges are considered as thalamo-cortical oscillations, functional relationship between them is still uncertain. The present study describes temporal dynamics of spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles as determined in long-time electroencephalograms (EEG) recorded in WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy. We have proposed the wavelet-based method for the automatic detection of spike-wave discharges, sleep spindles (10-15Hz) and 5-9Hz oscillations in EEG. It was found that non-linear dynamics of spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles fits well to the law of 'on-off intermittency'. Intermittency in sleep spindles and spike-wave discharges implies that (1) temporal dynamics of these oscillations are deterministic in nature, and (2) it might be controlled by a system-level mechanism responsible for circadian modulation of neuronal network activity.

  13. A potential biomarker in sports-related concussion: brain functional connectivity alteration of the default-mode network measured with longitudinal resting-state fMRI over thirty days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, David C; Covassin, Tracey; Nogle, Sally; Doyle, Scarlett; Russell, Doozie; Pearson, Randolph L; Monroe, Jeffrey; Liszewski, Christine M; DeMarco, J Kevin; Kaufman, David I

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnosis and monitoring of sports-related concussion rely on clinical signs and symptoms, and balance, vestibular, and neuropsychological examinations. Conventional brain imaging often does not reveal abnormalities. We sought to assess if the longitudinal change of functional and structural connectivity of the default-mode network (DMN) can serve as a potential biomarker. Eight concussed Division I collegiate football student-athletes in season (one participated twice) and 11 control subjects participated in this study. ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) was administered over the course of recovery. High-resolution three dimensional T1-weighted, T2*-weighted diffusion-tensor images and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scans were collected from each subject within 24 h, 7±1 d and 30±1 d after concussion. Both network based and whole-brain based functional correlation analyses on DMN were performed. ImPACT findings demonstrated significant cognitive impairment across multiple categories and a significant increase of symptom severity on Day 1 following a concussion but full recovery by 6.0±2.4 d. While the structural connectivity within DMN and gross anatomy appeared unchanged, a significantly reduced functional connectivity within DMN from Day 1 to Day 7 was found in the concussed group in this small pilot study. This reduction was seen in eight of our nine concussion cases. Compared with the control group, there appears a general trend of increased DMN functional connectivity on Day 1, a significant drop on Day 7, and partial recovery on Day 30. The results of this pilot study suggest that the functional connectivity of DMN measured with longitudinal rs-fMRI can serve as a potential biomarker to monitor the dynamically changing brain function after sports-related concussion, even in patients who have shown clinical improvement.

  14. Connecting dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Kyoko; Jacobs, Rachel L.

    2017-01-01

    of connecting the dots of recalled moments of individual family members lives and is geared towards building a family’s shared future for posterity. Lastly, we consider a wider implication of family reminiscence in terms of human development. http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Memory-Practices-and-Learning...... and Middleton, 1995). A reminiscence conversation is a dynamic talk-in-interaction, which can produce valuable learning experience for the participants involved. Reminiscence talk contains rich, personal, historic data that can reveal and inform family members of an unknown past. In this seminar/chapter, we...... shall present a discursive approach, a methodology that captures the dynamics of reminiscence. We analyse collected conversational data of British family members reminiscing on their past as a joint family activity. Through such talk-in-interaction, the family members develop continuity within...

  15. The impact of corticothalamic feedback on the output dynamics of a thalamocortical neurone model: the role of synapse location and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emri, Z; Antal, K; Crunelli, V

    2003-01-01

    The spatio-temporal integration of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials was investigated in a multi-compartment model of a thalamocortical neurone. Consistent with experimental data, cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials contained a metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated component and were generated by synapses located on distal dendrites. Within this framework, three synaptic distributions (each with equal maximal synaptic conductances) were compared: symmetric, with synapses distributed equally between all dendritic trees, single-dendrite, where synapses were allocated on all distal segments of one dendrite, and single-segment, which comprised one synapse on a single dendritic compartment. We addressed three main issues: (1) the propagation of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials to the soma, (2) the interaction of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials with proximally generated retinal excitatory postsynaptic potentials, and (3) the effectiveness of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials in entraining and perturbing the delta oscillation. The somatic and dendritic amplitudes of the cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials depended on the distribution of the synapses, being largest and smallest, respectively, for the symmetric distribution, and smallest and largest, respectively, for the single-segment distribution. When a retinal excitatory postsynaptic potential followed a subthreshold cortical excitatory postsynaptic potential with a short (2-200 ms) delay, its ability to evoke action potentials was increased, with single-segment cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials having the longest-lasting facilitatory effect. When a retinal excitatory postsynaptic potential arrived with a longer delay (210-400 ms), the effect of the cortical excitatory postsynaptic potential was to decrease the number of retinally evoked action potentials. These facilitatory and depressant effects of the cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials

  16. The Altered Functional Connectivity of Prefrontal Cortex in Heroin Dependent Individuals:fMRI Study%慢性海洛因依赖患者前额叶皮质功能连接变化的fMRI研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨伟川; 王亚蓉; 李强; 李玮; 朱佳; 黄玉芳; 王玮

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过分析慢性海洛因成瘾者认知抑制性控制环路的关键脑区-前额叶功能连接的变化,探讨其在成瘾中的作用.方法 慢性海洛因依赖男性患者12例,与之年龄、受教育程度和尼古丁依赖水平匹配的健康被试12例参加本研究.采用3.0 T磁共振扫描仪,8通道头线圈,对被试分别进行头颅结构和静息态功能磁共振扫描,后利用SPM8软件以双侧前额叶为感兴趣区,分别进行组内和组间前额叶静息态功能网络分析.结果 与对照组比较,慢性海洛因依赖组前额叶与额眶回、角回、颞中回、双侧苍白球功能连接度显著上升,与前扣带回的功能连接显著下降(t=3.5,P5).结论慢性海洛因依赖者认知抑制性控制功能的神经环路受损,而奖赏以及动机驱动环路功能出现异常强化.%Objective To investigate whether the functional connectivity of the brain region, prefrontal cortex (PFC), which implicated in cognition and inhibitory control, changed in chronic heroin dependent individuals. Methods Twelve male chronic heroin users and 12 age- , gender- and nicotine dependence- matched healthy subjects participated in the present study. The participants received a resting state fMRI scan with a General Electric 3.0 Tesla scanner and a 8-channel birdcage head coil. Functional connectivity was analyzed based on resting state fMRI data in order to determine the temporal correlation between PFC and the other regions on the whole brain scale. Finally, one-sample t-test and two-sample t-test were applied to observe the change of functional connectivity of PFC between the two groups. Results The PFC of heroin group showed higher strength of functional connectivity between PFC and orbitofrontal cortex ( OFC), pallium, but lower between PFC and anterior cingulate cortex ( ACC) in chronic heroin users than that in healthy subjects (t= 3.52 P<0. 001). Conclusion Dysfunctional connectivity of PFC-OFC, PFC- lentiform

  17. Neural network connectivity differences in children who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soo-Eun; Zhu, David C

    2013-12-01

    Affecting 1% of the general population, stuttering impairs the normally effortless process of speech production, which requires precise coordination of sequential movement occurring among the articulatory, respiratory, and resonance systems, all within millisecond time scales. Those afflicted experience frequent disfluencies during ongoing speech, often leading to negative psychosocial consequences. The aetiology of stuttering remains unclear; compared to other neurodevelopmental disorders, few studies to date have examined the neural bases of childhood stuttering. Here we report, for the first time, results from functional (resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging) and structural connectivity analyses (probabilistic tractography) of multimodal neuroimaging data examining neural networks in children who stutter. We examined how synchronized brain activity occurring among brain areas associated with speech production, and white matter tracts that interconnect them, differ in young children who stutter (aged 3-9 years) compared with age-matched peers. Results showed that children who stutter have attenuated connectivity in neural networks that support timing of self-paced movement control. The results suggest that auditory-motor and basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks develop differently in stuttering children, which may in turn affect speech planning and execution processes needed to achieve fluent speech motor control. These results provide important initial evidence of neurological differences in the early phases of symptom onset in children who stutter.

  18. Strengthening connections: functional connectivity and brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Clare; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2014-03-01

    The ascendancy of functional neuroimaging has facilitated the addition of network-based approaches to the neuropsychologist's toolbox for evaluating the sequelae of brain insult. In particular, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) mapping of resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) data constitutes an ideal approach to measuring macro-scale networks in the human brain. Beyond the value of iFC mapping for charting how the functional topography of the brain is altered by insult and injury, iFC analyses can provide insights into experience-dependent plasticity at the macro level of large-scale functional networks. Such insights are foundational to the design of training and remediation interventions that will best facilitate recovery of function. In this review, we consider what is currently known about the origin and function of iFC in the brain, and how this knowledge is informative in neuropsychological settings. We then summarize studies that have examined experience-driven plasticity of iFC in healthy control participants, and frame these findings in terms of a schema that may aid in the interpretation of results and the generation of hypotheses for rehabilitative studies. Finally, we outline some caveats to the R-fMRI approach, as well as some current developments that are likely to bolster the utility of the iFC paradigm for neuropsychology.

  19. Connectivity of communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Guoqiang

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces a number of recent developments on connectivity of communication networks, ranging from connectivity of large static networks and connectivity of highly dynamic networks to connectivity of small to medium sized networks. This book also introduces some applications of connectivity studies in network optimization, in network localization, and in estimating distances between nodes. The book starts with an overview of the fundamental concepts, models, tools, and methodologies used for connectivity studies. The rest of the chapters are divided into four parts: connectivity of large static networks, connectivity of highly dynamic networks, connectivity of small to medium sized networks, and applications of connectivity studies.

  20. Relation between functional connectivity and rhythm discrimination in children who do and do not stutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Eun Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to perceive and produce rhythmic patterns in the environment supports fundamental human capacities ranging from music and language processing to the coordination of action. This article considers whether spontaneous correlated brain activity within a basal ganglia-thalamocortical (rhythm network is associated with individual differences in auditory rhythm discrimination. Moreover, do children who stutter with demonstrated deficits in rhythm perception have weaker links between rhythm network functional connectivity and rhythm discrimination? All children in the study underwent a resting-state fMRI session, from which functional connectivity measures within the rhythm network were extracted from spontaneous brain activity. In a separate session, the same children completed an auditory rhythm-discrimination task, where behavioral performance was assessed using signal detection analysis. We hypothesized that in typically developing children, rhythm network functional connectivity would be associated with behavioral performance on the rhythm discrimination task, but that this relationship would be attenuated in children who stutter. Results supported our hypotheses, lending strong support for the view that (1 children who stutter have weaker rhythm network connectivity and (2 the lack of a relation between rhythm network connectivity and rhythm discrimination in children who stutter may be an important contributing factor to the etiology of stuttering.

  1. Study on Altered Resting State Functional Connectivity of Cerebellum in Alzheimer's Disease Pa-tients%阿尔茨海默病患者静息态下磁共振成像对小脑功能评估价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚秀婷; 陈博宇; 毕思伟; 祝清勇; 范国光; 商秀丽

    2016-01-01

    Objective]To detect the patterns of functional connectivity of cerebellum in Alzheimei's disease (AD)patients,mild cognition impairment subjects (MCI),and normal healthy controls using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).[Methods]Images were acquired from 1 9 AD patients,1 6 MCI subjects,and 1 9 healthy controls.The bilateral dentate nucleus (DN)was defined as regions of interest (ROI) in a voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis.The altered functional connectivity pattern between AD sub-jects and controls were evaluated by two-sample t-tests.Then,the MCI subjects were included to evaluate how different stages of the disease affect the functional connectivity of the cerebellum.[Results]Some regions of the cerebellum such as the left supramarginal gyrus,left inferior parietal lobule,and right lentiform nucleus (P<0.05,corrected by AlphaSim)in AD subjects showed decreased functional connectivity with the bilateral DN.We also found increased functional connectivity of DN with the right cerebellum anterior lobe,right inferi-or temporal gyrus,left and right inferior occipital gyrus,right middle temporal gyrus,right precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P <0.05,corrected by AlphaSim)in AD patients.[Conclusion]Findings of altered functional connectivity of the cerebellum suggest its important role in AD and MCI.More studies are needed to improve our understanding of them.%【目的】应用静息态功能磁共振成像技术(fMRI)观察阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)患者,轻度认知功能障碍(mild cognition impairment,MCI)和正常人静息态下小脑齿状核功能连接改变的差异。【方法】对19例 AD 患者,16例 MCI 患者及19例正常对照者在静息态下行 fMRI 检查。以双侧齿状核为感兴趣区,对功能连接的相关系数进行双样本 t 检验,比较不同组别小脑功能连接改变的差异。【结果】AD 组小脑齿状核与左缘上回/顶下小叶、右豆状核、左顶下

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-deficient Fibroblasts Exhibit an Alteration in the Fibrotic Response to Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 because of an Increase in the Levels of Endogenous Fibronectin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droppelmann, Cristian A.; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Vial, Cecilia; Brandan, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an important extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme, and it has been involved in different fibrotic disorders. The connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), which is increased in these pathologies, induces the production of extracellular matrix proteins. To understand the fibrotic process observed in diverse pathologies, we analyzed the fibroblast response to CTGF when MMP-2 activity is inhibited. CTGF increased fibronectin (FN) amount, MMP-2 mRNA expression, and gelatinase activity in 3T3 cells. When MMP-2 activity was inhibited either by the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM-6001 or in MMP-2-deficient fibroblasts, an increase in the basal amount of FN together with a decrease of its levels in response to CTGF was observed. This paradoxical effect could be explained by the fact that the excess of FN could block the access to other ligands, such as CTGF, to integrins. This effect was emulated in fibroblasts by adding exogenous FN or RGDS peptides or using anti-integrin αV subunit-blocking antibodies. Additionally, in MMP-2-deficient cells CTGF did not induce the formation of stress fibers, focal adhesion sites, and ERK phosphorylation. Anti-integrin αV subunit-blocking antibodies inhibited ERK phosphorylation in control cells. Finally, in MMP-2-deficient cells, FN mRNA expression was not affected by CTGF, but degradation of 125I-FN was increased. These results suggest that expression, regulation, and activity of MMP-2 can play an important role in the initial steps of fibrosis and shows that FN levels can regulate the cellular response to CTGF. PMID:19276073

  3. Connection Strings Property on ADO Connection Object

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Girigi Deogratias; Wu Min; Cao Weihua

    2002-01-01

    The connection string property on ADO connection object contains the information used to establish a connection to the data source. The syntax, the keyword of that information must be in specific format. Depending on the type of data you are connecting to, you need either specify an OLEDB provider or use on ODBC driver. The biggest problem, the industries face is the proliferation of data access interfaces, and the complexity of creating,maintaining and programming against them, and the network problem when communicating over the Intranet or the Internet. This paper first provides an in-depth look of the standard arguments supported by ADO connection string; then gives the easier way for understanding the meaning, the utility and the syntax of the connection strings property on ADO connection object, and finally proposes solution to work around the problems due to the connection strings errors.

  4. Attribute-space connectivity and connected filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper connected operators from mathematical morphology are extended to a wider class of operators, which are based on connectivities in higher dimensional spaces, similar to scale spaces, which will be called attribute-spaces. Though some properties of connected filters are lost, granulometr

  5. Network community structure alterations in adult schizophrenia: identification and localization of alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman-Sinkoff, Dov B; Barch, Deanna M

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests functional connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. While findings have been mixed, evidence points towards a complex pattern of hyper-connectivity and hypo-connectivity. This altered connectivity can be represented and analyzed using the mathematical frameworks provided by graph and information theory to represent functional connectivity data as graphs comprised of nodes and edges linking the nodes. One analytic technique in this framework is the determination and analysis of network community structure, which is the grouping of nodes into linked communities or modules. This data-driven technique finds a best-fit structure such that nodes in a given community have greater connectivity with nodes in their community than with nodes in other communities. These community structure representations have been found to recapitulate known neural-systems in healthy individuals, have been used to identify novel functional systems, and have identified and localized community structure alterations in a childhood onset schizophrenia cohort. In the present study, we sought to determine whether community structure alterations were present in an adult onset schizophrenia cohort while stringently controlling for sources of imaging artifacts. Group level average graphs in healthy controls and individuals with schizophrenia exhibited visually similar network community structures and high amounts of normalized mutual information (NMI). However, testing of individual subject community structures identified small but significant alterations in community structure with alterations being driven by changes in node community membership in the somatosensory, auditory, default mode, salience, and subcortical networks.

  6. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  7. Connective Tissue Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connective tissue is the material inside your body that supports many of its parts. It is the "cellular ... their work. Cartilage and fat are examples of connective tissue. There are over 200 disorders that impact connective ...

  8. Minimum cost connection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    . We use three axioms to characterize allocation rules that truthfully implement cost minimizing networks satisfying all connection demands in a game where: (1) a central planner announces an allocation rule and a cost estimation rule; (2) every agent reports her own connection demand as well as all...... connection costs; and, (3) the central planner selects a cost minimizing network satisfying reported connection demands based on estimated connection costs and allocates true connection costs of the selected network....

  9. [Dose-dependent tazepam modulation of amplitude-temporal characteristics of thalamocortical responses and the constant potential of the sensorimotor cortex in rabbits at eye opening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimko, I A; Fokin, V F

    2000-01-01

    The pronounced benzodiazepine (antiphobic) modulation of the amplitude-temporal parameters of different components of the thalamocortical responses (TCR) of the sensorimotor cortex is observed in rabbits in their early postnatal ontogeny. This modulation is of a dose-dependent character and is registered not after the injection of tazepam in a concentration of the "therapeutic tranquilizing window" but also in the psychotoxic plasma range. A gradual increase in blood tazepam concentration in a young rabbit pup is accompanied by the wave-like and differential decrease in the amplitude of the second and third positive (P2 and P3) and third negative (N3) TCR components, while the second negative (N2) and fourth positive (P4) components tend to a wave-like increase. The dose-dependent dynamics of tazepam modulation of the P2, P3, and N3 latencies is characterized by a wave-like and differential increase. The latency of P4 decreases slightly and that of the N2 increases with a low degree of significance. The selective dynamics of benzodiazepine modulation appears to be related with peculiarities of the electrogenesis of each of the components. The dose-dependent modulation of the level of cortical DC potential is of the same character as the respective amplitude changes in P2, P3, and N3, but its fluctiatuons are more pronounced.

  10. Altered Onset Response Dynamics in Somatosensory Processing in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sheraz; Hashmi, Javeria A; Mamashli, Fahimeh; Bharadwaj, Hari M; Ganesan, Santosh; Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Kitzbichler, Manfred G; Zetino, Manuel; Garel, Keri-Lee A; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Kenet, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in cortical connectivity and evoked responses have been extensively documented in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, specific signatures of these cortical abnormalities remain elusive, with data pointing toward abnormal patterns of both increased and reduced response amplitudes and functional connectivity. We have previously proposed, using magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, that apparent inconsistencies in prior studies could be reconciled if functional connectivity in ASD was reduced in the feedback (top-down) direction, but increased in the feedforward (bottom-up) direction. Here, we continue this line of investigation by assessing abnormalities restricted to the onset, feedforward inputs driven, component of the response to vibrotactile stimuli in somatosensory cortex in ASD. Using a novel method that measures the spatio-temporal divergence of cortical activation, we found that relative to typically developing participants, the ASD group was characterized by an increase in the initial onset component of the cortical response, and a faster spread of local activity. Given the early time window, the results could be interpreted as increased thalamocortical feedforward connectivity in ASD, and offer a plausible mechanism for the previously observed increased response variability in ASD, as well as for the commonly observed behaviorally measured tactile processing abnormalities associated with the disorder.

  11. Cerebro-cerebellar connectivity is increased in primary lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Meoded

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased functional connectivity in resting state networks was found in several studies of patients with motor neuron disorders, although diffusion tensor imaging studies consistently show loss of white matter integrity. To understand the relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity, we examined the structural connections between regions with altered functional connectivity in patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS, a long-lived motor neuron disease. Connectivity matrices were constructed from resting state fMRI in 16 PLS patients to identify areas of differing connectivity between patients and healthy controls. Probabilistic fiber tracking was used to examine structural connections between regions of differing connectivity. PLS patients had 12 regions with increased functional connectivity compared to controls, with a predominance of cerebro-cerebellar connections. Increased functional connectivity was strongest between the cerebellum and cortical motor areas and between the cerebellum and frontal and temporal cortex. Fiber tracking detected no difference in connections between regions with increased functional connectivity. We conclude that functional connectivity changes are not strongly based in structural connectivity. Increased functional connectivity may be caused by common inputs, or by reduced selectivity of cortical activation, which could result from loss of intracortical inhibition when cortical afferents are intact.

  12. Cerebro-cerebellar connectivity is increased in primary lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meoded, Avner; Morrissette, Arthur E; Katipally, Rohan; Schanz, Olivia; Gotts, Stephen J; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Increased functional connectivity in resting state networks was found in several studies of patients with motor neuron disorders, although diffusion tensor imaging studies consistently show loss of white matter integrity. To understand the relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity, we examined the structural connections between regions with altered functional connectivity in patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), a long-lived motor neuron disease. Connectivity matrices were constructed from resting state fMRI in 16 PLS patients to identify areas of differing connectivity between patients and healthy controls. Probabilistic fiber tracking was used to examine structural connections between regions of differing connectivity. PLS patients had 12 regions with increased functional connectivity compared to controls, with a predominance of cerebro-cerebellar connections. Increased functional connectivity was strongest between the cerebellum and cortical motor areas and between the cerebellum and frontal and temporal cortex. Fiber tracking detected no difference in connections between regions with increased functional connectivity. We conclude that functional connectivity changes are not strongly based in structural connectivity. Increased functional connectivity may be caused by common inputs, or by reduced selectivity of cortical activation, which could result from loss of intracortical inhibition when cortical afferents are intact.

  13. Modelagem neurocomputacional do circuito tálamo-cortical: implicações para compreensão do transtorno de défi cit de atenção e hiperatividade A neurocomputational model for the thalamocortical loop: towards a better understanding of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Q.M. Madureira

    2007-12-01

    in ADHD. PURPOSE: Elaborating a neurocomputational model from biochemical knowledge of mesocortical and mesotalamic dopamine systems, to investigate how different levels of mesothalamic dopamine influence the thalamocortical loop, leading to some attention deficits observed in ADHD. METHOD: First, we model physiological properties of thalamic neurons with a set of mathematical equations. Next, we simulate computationally the modeled thalamocortical loop under different levels of mesothalamic dopamine, and also the mesocortical dopaminergic decrease. RESULTS: Low levels of mesothalamic dopamine hinders the attentional shift and, high levels of such neuromodulator lead to distraction. When such alterations occur together with a decrease in the mesocortical dopamine level, the attention deficit turns into incapacity of perceiving environmental stimuli, due to a no winner competition between low activated thalamic areas. Inattention in ADHD also has its origins in dopaminergic disturbs throughout the mesothalamic pathway, which enhance a high focusing or do not allow the attention focus consolidation. CONCLUSION: In ADHD, the inattention is related to dopaminergic alterations that are not restricted to the mesocortical system.

  14. Altered interhemispheric connectivity in individuals with Tourette's disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hugdahl, Kenneth;

    2004-01-01

    size, yielding a prominent interaction of diagnosis with age. Corpus callosum size correlated positively with tic severity. Corpus callosum size also correlated inversely with dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortical volumes in both the subjects with Tourette's disorder and the comparison...... subjects, but the magnitudes of the correlations were significantly greater in the group with Tourette's disorder. The effects of medication and comorbid illnesses had no appreciable influence on the findings. CONCLUSIONS: Given prior evidence for the role of prefrontal hypertrophy in the regulation of tic....... Reduced inhibitory input may in turn enhance prefrontal excitation, thus helping to control tics and possibly contributing to the cortical hyperexcitatibility reported previously in patients with Tourette's disorder....

  15. Alterations in Functional Connectivity for Language in Prematurely Born Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Robin J.; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty; Kesler, Shelli R.; Katz, Karol H.; Schneider, Karen C.; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Makuch, Robert W.; Reiss, Allan L.; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent data suggest recovery of language systems but persistent structural abnormalities in the prematurely born. We tested the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative networks for processing language. Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 22; 600-1250 g birth weight), without neonatal brain injury on neonatal…

  16. Effect of cocaine dependence on brain connections: Clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liangsuo; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Johns, Sade E.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence (CD) is associated with several cognitive deficits. Accumulating evidence, based on human and animal studies, has led to models for interpreting the neural basis of cognitive functions as interactions between functionally related brain regions. In this review, we focus on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies using brain connectivity techniques as related to CD. The majority of these brain connectivity studies indicated that cocaine use is associated with altered brain connectivity between different structures, including cortical-striatal regions and default mode network. In cocaine users, some of the altered brain connectivity measures are associated with behavioral performance, history of drug use, and treatment outcome. The implications of these brain connectivity findings to the treatment of CD and the pros and cons of the major brain connectivity techniques are discussed. Finally potential future directions in cocaine use disorder research using brain connectivity techniques are briefly described. PMID:26512421

  17. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppl, Timm B; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Laird, Angela R; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-06-01

    Despite its 0.5-1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multimodal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia.

  18. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppl, Timm B.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fox, Peter T.; Laird, Angela R.; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Despite its 0.5–1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multi-modal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia. PMID:25733379

  19. Microgravity Stress: Bone and Connective Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Susan A; Martinez, Daniel A; Boudreaux, Ramon D; Mantri, Anita V

    2016-03-15

    The major alterations in bone and the dense connective tissues in humans and animals exposed to microgravity illustrate the dependency of these tissues' function on normal gravitational loading. Whether these alterations depend solely on the reduced mechanical loading of zero g or are compounded by fluid shifts, altered tissue blood flow, radiation exposure, and altered nutritional status is not yet well defined. Changes in the dense connective tissues and intervertebral disks are generally smaller in magnitude but occur more rapidly than those in mineralized bone with transitions to 0 g and during recovery once back to the loading provided by 1 g conditions. However, joint injuries are projected to occur much more often than the more catastrophic bone fracture during exploration class missions, so protecting the integrity of both tissues is important. This review focuses on the research performed over the last 20 years in humans and animals exposed to actual spaceflight, as well as on knowledge gained from pertinent ground-based models such as bed rest in humans and hindlimb unloading in rodents. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms for alterations in bone and connective tissues with exposure to microgravity, but intriguing questions remain to be solved, particularly with reference to biomedical risks associated with prolonged exploration missions.

  20. Painful connections: densification versus fibrosis of fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Piero G; Stecco, Antonio; Stern, Robert; Stecco, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Deep fascia has long been considered a source of pain, secondary to nerve pain receptors becoming enmeshed within the pathological changes to which fascia are subject. Densification and fibrosis are among such changes. They can modify the mechanical properties of deep fasciae and damage the function of underlying muscles or organs. Distinguishing between these two different changes in fascia, and understanding the connective tissue matrix within fascia, together with the mechanical forces involved, will make it possible to assign more specific treatment modalities to relieve chronic pain syndromes. This review provides an overall description of deep fasciae and the mechanical properties in order to identify the various alterations that can lead to pain. Diet, exercise, and overuse syndromes are able to modify the viscosity of loose connective tissue within fascia, causing densification, an alteration that is easily reversible. Trauma, surgery, diabetes, and aging alter the fibrous layers of fasciae, leading to fascial fibrosis.

  1. Cognitive control network connectivity in adolescent women with and without a parental history of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Clasen

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Depressed parents may transmit depression vulnerability to their adolescent daughters via alterations in functional connectivity within neural circuits that underlie cognitive control of emotional information.

  2. Differential Effects of Brain Disorders on Structural and Functional Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Pons, Sandro; Olivetti, Emanuele; Avesani, Paolo; Dodero, Luca; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Different measures of brain connectivity can be defined based on neuroimaging read-outs, including structural and functional connectivity. Neurological and psychiatric conditions are often associated with abnormal connectivity, but comparing the effects of the disease on different types of connectivity remains a challenge. In this paper, we address the problem of quantifying the relative effects of brain disease on structural and functional connectivity at a group level. Within the framework of a graph representation of connectivity, we introduce a kernel two-sample test as an effective method to assess the difference between the patients and control group. Moreover, we propose a common representation space for structural and functional connectivity networks, and a novel test statistics to quantitatively assess differential effects of the disease on different types of connectivity. We apply this approach to a dataset from BTBR mice, a murine model of Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum (ACC), a congenital disorder characterized by the absence of the main bundle of fibers connecting the two hemispheres. We used normo-callosal mice (B6) as a comparator. The application of the proposed methods to this data-set shows that the two types of connectivity can be successfully used to discriminate between BTBR and B6, meaning that both types of connectivity are affected by ACC. However, our novel test statistics shows that structural connectivity is significantly more affected than functional connectivity, consistent with the idea that functional connectivity has a robust topology that can tolerate substantial alterations in its structural connectivity substrate. PMID:28119556

  3. Asymptotically hyperbolic connections

    CERN Document Server

    Fine, Joel; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    General Relativity in 4 dimensions can be equivalently described as a dynamical theory of SO(3)-connections rather than metrics. We introduce the notion of asymptotically hyperbolic connections, and work out an analog of the Fefferman-Graham expansion in the language of connections. As in the metric setup, one can solve the arising "evolution" equations order by order in the expansion in powers of the radial coordinate. The solution in the connection setting is arguably simpler, and very straightforward algebraic manipulations allow one to see how the obstruction appears at third order in the expansion. Another interesting feature of the connection formulation is that the "counter terms" required in the computation of the renormalised volume all combine into the Chern-Simons functional of the restriction of the connection to the boundary. As the Chern-Simons invariant is only defined modulo large gauge transformations, the requirement that the path integral over asymptotically hyperbolic connections is well-d...

  4. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits.

  5. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical–Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13–30 Hz) and gamma (30–90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30–90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits. PMID:25987642

  6. Eccentric connectivity index

    CERN Document Server

    Ilić, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    The eccentric connectivity index $\\xi^c$ is a novel distance--based molecular structure descriptor that was recently used for mathematical modeling of biological activities of diverse nature. It is defined as $\\xi^c (G) = \\sum_{v \\in V (G)} deg (v) \\cdot \\epsilon (v)$\\,, where $deg (v)$ and $\\epsilon (v)$ denote the vertex degree and eccentricity of $v$\\,, respectively. We survey some mathematical properties of this index and furthermore support the use of eccentric connectivity index as topological structure descriptor. We present the extremal trees and unicyclic graphs with maximum and minimum eccentric connectivity index subject to the certain graph constraints. Sharp lower and asymptotic upper bound for all graphs are given and various connections with other important graph invariants are established. In addition, we present explicit formulae for the values of eccentric connectivity index for several families of composite graphs and designed a linear algorithm for calculating the eccentric connectivity in...

  7. On eccentric connectivity index

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bo

    2010-01-01

    The eccentric connectivity index, proposed by Sharma, Goswami and Madan, has been employed successfully for the development of numerous mathematical models for the prediction of biological activities of diverse nature. We now report mathematical properties of the eccentric connectivity index. We establish various lower and upper bounds for the eccentric connectivity index in terms of other graph invariants including the number of vertices, the number of edges, the degree distance and the first Zagreb index. We determine the n-vertex trees of diameter with the minimum eccentric connectivity index, and the n-vertex trees of pendent vertices, with the maximum eccentric connectivity index. We also determine the n-vertex trees with respectively the minimum, second-minimum and third-minimum, and the maximum, second-maximum and third-maximum eccentric connectivity indices for

  8. Institutions for Asian Connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharyay, Biswa

    2010-01-01

    To make Asia more economically sustainable and resilient against external shocks, regional economies need to be rebalanced toward regional demand- and trade-driven growth through increased regional connectivity. The effectiveness of connectivity depends on the quality of hard and soft infrastructure. Of particular importance in terms of soft infrastructure which makes hard infrastructure work are the facilitating institutions that support connectivity through appropriate policies, reforms, sy...

  9. Handbook of networking & connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    McClain, Gary R

    1994-01-01

    Handbook of Networking & Connectivity focuses on connectivity standards in use, including hardware and software options. The book serves as a guide for solving specific problems that arise in designing and maintaining organizational networks.The selection first tackles open systems interconnection, guide to digital communications, and implementing TCP/IP in an SNA environment. Discussions focus on elimination of the SNA backbone, routing SNA over internets, connectionless versus connection-oriented networks, internet concepts, application program interfaces, basic principles of layering, proto

  10. 78 FR 55684 - ConnectED Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... content into the curriculum; and as classroom management software tools move everything from homework... consider promising strategies for achieving the President's goal of connecting virtually all K-12 students... policies and consider the most promising strategies for equipping K-12 schools for digital learning....

  11. Inverse Degree and Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-ling; TIAN Ying-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a connected graph with vertex set V(G),order n =丨V(G)丨,minimum degree δ(G) and connectivity κ(G).The graph G is called maximally connected if κ(G) =δ(G).Define the inverse degree of G with no isolated vertices as R(G) =Σv∈V(G)1/d(v),where d(v) denotes the degree of the vertex v.We show that G is maximally connected if R(G) < 1 + 2/δ + n-2δ+1/(n-1)(n-3).

  12. Asymptotically hyperbolic connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Joel; Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    General relativity in four-dimensions can be equivalently described as a dynamical theory of {SO}(3)˜ {SU}(2)-connections rather than metrics. We introduce the notion of asymptotically hyperbolic connections, and work out an analogue of the Fefferman-Graham expansion in the language of connections. As in the metric setup, one can solve the arising ‘evolution’ equations order by order in the expansion in powers of the radial coordinate. The solution in the connection setting is arguably simpler, and very straightforward algebraic manipulations allow one to see how the unconstrained by Einstein equations ‘stress-energy tensor’ appears at third order in the expansion. Another interesting feature of the connection formulation is that the ‘counter terms’ required in the computation of the renormalised volume all combine into the Chern-Simons functional of the restriction of the connection to the boundary. As the Chern-Simons invariant is only defined modulo large gauge transformations, the requirement that the path integral over asymptotically hyperbolic connections is well-defined requires the cosmological constant to be quantised. Finally, in the connection setting one can deform the 4D Einstein condition in an interesting way, and we show that asymptotically hyperbolic connection expansion is universal and valid for any of the deformed theories.

  13. Minimum cost connection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2015-01-01

    demands. We use a few axioms to characterize allocation rules that truthfully implement cost minimizing networks satisfying all connection demands in a game where: (1) a central planner announces an allocation rule and a cost estimation rule; (2) every agent reports her own connection demand as well...... as all connection costs; (3) the central planner selects a cost minimizing network satisfying reported connection demands based on the estimated costs; and, (4) the planner allocates the true costs of the selected network. It turns out that an allocation rule satisfies the axioms if and only if relative...

  14. Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darley, Joy W.; Leapard, Barbara B.

    2010-01-01

    Algebraic thinking is a top priority in mathematics classrooms today. Because elementary school teachers lay the groundwork to develop students' capacity to think algebraically, it is crucial for teachers to have a conceptual understanding of the connections between arithmetic and algebra and be confident in communicating these connections. Many…

  15. Tokens of Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    When teachers make the effort to build a solid relationship with each student, built on trust, they often engender a life-long connection, one that's life-changing for the student. But how can teachers grow such long-lasting relationships with all students, especially disenfranchised learners and those who make it hard to connect? Crowley, a…

  16. Making Connections with Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Joanne E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes four methods to structure estimation activities that enable students to make connections between their understanding of numbers and extensions of those concepts to estimating. Presents activities that connect estimation with other curricular areas, other mathematical topics, and real-world applications. (MDH)

  17. Connectivity in Autism: A review of MRI connectivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Pallavi; Cochran, David; Hodge, Steven M.; Haselgrove, Christian; Kennedy, David; Frazier, Jean A.

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affects 1 in 50 children between the ages of 6–17 years as per a 2012 CDC survey of parents. The etiology of ASD is not precisely known. ASD is an umbrella term, which includes low (IQ70) individuals. A better understanding of the disorder, and how it manifests in an individual subject can lead to more effective intervention plans to fulfill the individual’s treatment needs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive investigational tool that can help study the ways in which the brain develops and/or deviates from the typical developmental trajectory. MRI offers insights into the structure, function, and metabolism of the brain. In this article, we review published studies on brain connectivity changes in ASD using either resting state functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging. The general findings of decreases in white matter integrity and long-range neural coherence are prevalent in ASD literature. However, there is somewhat less of a consensus in the detailed localization of these findings. There are even fewer studies linking these connectivity alterations with the behavioral phenotype of the disorder. Nevertheless, with the help of data sharing and large-scale analytic efforts, the field is advancing towards several convergent themes. These include reduced functional coherence of long-range intra-hemispheric cortico-cortical default mode circuitry, impaired inter-hemispheric regulation, and an associated, perhaps compensatory, increase in local and short-range cortico-subcortical coherence. PMID:26146755

  18. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  19. Generalized connectivity of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xueliang

    2016-01-01

    Noteworthy results, proof techniques, open problems and conjectures in generalized (edge-) connectivity are discussed in this book. Both theoretical and practical analyses for generalized (edge-) connectivity of graphs are provided. Topics covered in this book include: generalized (edge-) connectivity of graph classes, algorithms, computational complexity, sharp bounds, Nordhaus-Gaddum-type results, maximum generalized local connectivity, extremal problems, random graphs, multigraphs, relations with the Steiner tree packing problem and generalizations of connectivity. This book enables graduate students to understand and master a segment of graph theory and combinatorial optimization. Researchers in graph theory, combinatorics, combinatorial optimization, probability, computer science, discrete algorithms, complexity analysis, network design, and the information transferring models will find this book useful in their studies.

  20. Handbook of Brain Connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jirsa, Viktor K

    2007-01-01

    Our contemporary understanding of brain function is deeply rooted in the ideas of the nonlinear dynamics of distributed networks. Cognition and motor coordination seem to arise from the interactions of local neuronal networks, which themselves are connected in large scales across the entire brain. The spatial architectures between various scales inevitably influence the dynamics of the brain and thereby its function. But how can we integrate brain connectivity amongst these structural and functional domains? Our Handbook provides an account of the current knowledge on the measurement, analysis and theory of the anatomical and functional connectivity of the brain. All contributors are leading experts in various fields concerning structural and functional brain connectivity. In the first part of the Handbook, the chapters focus on an introduction and discussion of the principles underlying connected neural systems. The second part introduces the currently available non-invasive technologies for measuring struct...

  1. [Altered states of consciousness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  2. Small vessel disease and cognitive impairment : The relevance of central network connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, Yael D.; Fotiadis, Panagiotis; Piantoni, Giovanni; Boulouis, Gregoire; Kelly, Kathleen E.; Gurol, Mahmut E.; Leemans, Alexander; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Central brain network connections greatly contribute to overall network efficiency. Here we examined whether small vessel disease (SVD) related white matter alterations in central brain network connections have a greater impact on executive functioning than alterations in non-central brain network c

  3. Visual cortex plasticity evokes excitatory alterations in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Tsanov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The integration of episodic sequences in the hippocampus is believed to occur during theta rhythm episodes, when cortico-hippocampal dialog results in reconfiguration of neuronal assemblies. As the visual cortex (VC is a major source of sensory information to the hippocampus, information processing in the cortex may affect hippocampal network oscillations, facilitating the induction of synaptic modifications. We investigated to what degree the field activity in the primary VC, elicited by sensory or electrical stimulation, correlates with hippocampal oscillatory and synaptic responsiveness, in freely behaving adult rats. We found that the spectral power of theta rhythm (4-10Hz in the dentate gyrus (DG, increases in parallel with high-frequency oscillations in layer 2/3 of the VC and that this correlation depends on the degree of exploratory activity. When we mimic robust thalamocortical activity by theta-burst application to dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, a hippocampal theta increase occurs, followed by a persistent potentiation of the DG granule field population spike. Furthermore, the potentiation of DG neuronal excitability tightly correlates with the concurrently occurring VC plasticity. The concurrent enhancement of VC and DG activity is also combined with a highly negative synchronization between hippocampal and cortical low frequency oscillations. Exploration of familiar environment decreases the degree of this synchrony. Our data propose that novel visual information can induce high-power fluctuations in intrinsic excitability for both VC and hippocampus, potent enough to induce experience-dependent modulation of cortico-hippocampal connections. This interaction may comprise one of the endogenous triggers for long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  4. Quantifying bicycle network connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Loh, Tracy Hadden

    2017-02-01

    The intent of this study was to compare bicycle network connectivity for different types of bicyclists and different neighborhoods. Connectivity was defined as the ability to reach important destinations, such as grocery stores, banks, and elementary schools, via pathways or roads with low vehicle volumes and low speed limits. The analysis was conducted for 28 neighborhoods in Seattle, Washington under existing conditions and for a proposed bicycle master plan, which when complete will provide over 700 new bicycle facilities, including protected bike lanes, neighborhood greenways, and multi-use trails. The results showed different levels of connectivity across neighborhoods and for different types of bicyclists. Certain projects were shown to improve connectivity differently for confident and non-confident bicyclists. The analysis showed a positive correlation between connectivity and observed utilitarian bicycle trips. To improve connectivity for the majority of bicyclists, planners and policy-makers should provide bicycle facilities that allow immediate, low-stress access to the street network, such as neighborhood greenways. The analysis also suggests that policies and programs that build confidence for bicycling could greatly increase connectivity.

  5. Covariant Magnetic Connection Hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pegoraro, F

    2016-01-01

    In the single fluid, nonrelativistic, ideal-Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma description magnetic field lines play a fundamental role by defining dynamically preserved "magnetic connections" between plasma elements. Here we show how the concept of magnetic connection needs to be generalized in the case of a relativistic MHD description where we require covariance under arbitrary Lorentz transformations. This is performed by defining 2-D {\\it magnetic connection hypersurfaces} in the 4-D Minkowski space. This generalization accounts for the loss of simultaneity between spatially separated events in different frames and is expected to provide a powerful insight into the 4-D geometry of electromagnetic fields when ${\\bf E} \\cdot {\\bf B} = 0$.

  6. Singularities of invariant connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amores, A.M. (Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)); Gutierrez, M. (Universidad Politecnica, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-12-01

    A reductive homogeneous space M = P/G is considered, endowed with an invariant connection, i.e., such that all left translations of M induced by members of P preserve it. The authors study the set of singularities of such connections giving sufficient conditions for it to be empty, or, in other cases, familities of b-incomplete curves converging to singularities. A full description of the b-completion of a connection with M = R[sup m] (or a quotient of it) is given with information on its topology. 5 refs.

  7. Nucleus accumbens functional connectivity discriminates medication-overuse headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Torta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication-overuse headache (MOH is a secondary form of headache related to the overuse of triptans, analgesics and other acute headache medications. It is believed that MOH and substance addiction share some similar pathophysiological mechanisms. In this study we examined the whole brain resting state functional connectivity of the dorsal and ventral striatum in 30 patients (15 MOH and 15 non-MOH patients to investigate if classification algorithms can successfully discriminate between MOH and non-MOH patients on the basis of the spatial pattern of resting state functional connectivity of the dorsal and ventral striatal region of interest. Our results indicated that both nucleus accumbens and dorsal rostral putamen functional connectivity could discriminate between MOH and non-MOH patients, thereby providing possible support to two interpretations. First, that MOH patients show altered reward functionality in line with drug abusers (alterations in functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens. Second, that MOH patients show inability to break habitual behavior (alterations in functional connectivity of the dorsal striatum. In conclusion, our data showed that MOH patients were characterized by an altered functional connectivity of motivational circuits at rest. These differences could permit the blind discrimination between the two conditions using classification algorithms. Considered overall, our findings might contribute to the development of novel diagnostic measures.

  8. Connective Tissue Naevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat Ramesh M

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A young adult female patient of connective tissue naevus presented with papules and indurated plaques on both les and left arm. Histopathology showed increased amount of collagen in the dermis. Osteopoikilosis was absent.

  9. Using computational models to relate structural and functional brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    Modern imaging methods allow a non-invasive assessment of both structural and functional brain connectivity. This has lead to the identification of disease-related alterations affecting functional connectivity. The mechanism of how such alterations in functional connectivity arise in a structured network of interacting neural populations is as yet poorly understood. Here we use a modeling approach to explore the way in which this can arise and to highlight the important role that local population dynamics can have in shaping emergent spatial functional connectivity patterns. The local dynamics for a neural population is taken to be of the Wilson-Cowan type, whilst the structural connectivity patterns used, describing long-range anatomical connections, cover both realistic scenarios (from the CoComac database) and idealized ones that allow for more detailed theoretical study. We have calculated graph-theoretic measures of functional network topology from numerical simulations of model networks. The effect of the form of local dynamics on the observed network state is quantified by examining the correlation between structural and functional connectivity. We document a profound and systematic dependence of the simulated functional connectivity patterns on the parameters controlling the dynamics. Importantly, we show that a weakly coupled oscillator theory explaining these correlations and their variation across parameter space can be developed. This theoretical development provides a novel way to characterize the mechanisms for the breakdown of functional connectivity in diseases through changes in local dynamics.

  10. Connective Tissue Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008349 A clinical analysis of 32 patients with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in diffuse connective tissue diseases. CHEN Guangxing(陈光星), et al. Dept Rheumatol, PUMC & CAMS Beijing 100730. Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(5):362-365.Objective To provide clues to diagnosis and treatment for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage(DAH)in patients with diffuse connective tissue diseases(CTD).Method To analyze restropectively the data of clinical features,

  11. Reliability of power connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BRAUNOVIC Milenko

    2007-01-01

    Despite the use of various preventive maintenance measures, there are still a number of problem areas that can adversely affect system reliability. Also, economical constraints have pushed the designs of power connections closer to the limits allowed by the existing standards. The major parameters influencing the reliability and life of Al-Al and Al-Cu connections are identified. The effectiveness of various palliative measures is determined and the misconceptions about their effectiveness are dealt in detail.

  12. NEACP Onboard Connectivity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-30

    Methodology Framework .............................. 6-3 6.2.2 Sources of ME Cost Savings with NOCH ............... 6-5 6.2.3 Additional Benefits of 1OCU...processing system (MPS) installation connects all record and data communications equipment to a common MIL -STD-1553B bus and automates many of the manual...Local Area Network Concepts A NOCH developed around a generic bus would provide connectivity throughout the aircraft, thereby reducing or eliminating

  13. Connections between Frontier Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza-Olivia Lungu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The global financial system presents a high degree of connectivity and the network theory provides the natural framework for visualizing the structure of it connections. I analyse the financial links established between the frontier markets and how these links evolve over a 10 years period (2001 - 2011. I identify patterns in the network looking both at the node specific statistics (degree, strength and clustering coefficient and at the aggregated network statistics (network density and network asymmetry index.

  14. [Connective tissue and inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Lajos

    2014-03-23

    The author summarizes the structure of the connective tissues, the increasing motion of the constituents, which determine the role in establishing the structure and function of that. The structure and function of the connective tissue are related to each other in the resting as well as inflammatory states. It is emphasized that cellular events in the connective tissue are part of the defence of the organism, the localisation of the damage and, if possible, the maintenance of restitutio ad integrum. The organism responds to damage with inflammation, the non specific immune response, as well as specific, adaptive immunity. These processes are located in the connective tissue. Sterile and pathogenic inflammation are relatively similar processes, but inevitable differences are present, too. Sialic acids and glycoproteins containing sialic acids have important roles, and the role of Siglecs is also highlighted. Also, similarities and differences in damages caused by pathogens and sterile agents are briefly summarized. In addition, the roles of adhesion molecules linked to each other, and the whole event of inflammatory processes are presented. When considering practical consequences it is stressed that the structure (building up) of the organism and the defending function of inflammation both have fundamental importance. Inflammation has a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and the unimpaired somato-psychological state of the organism. Thus, inflammation serves as a tool of organism identical with the natural immune response, inseparably connected with the specific, adaptive immune response. The main events of the inflammatory processes take place in the connective tissue.

  15. Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connective Tissue Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Connective Tissue August 2016 Questions and Answers about Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue This publication contains general information about heritable (genetic) ...

  16. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T. (University of New Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  17. Linear connections on matrix geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Madore, J; Mourad, J; Madore, John; Masson, Thierry; Mourad, Jihad

    1994-01-01

    A general definition of a linear connection in noncommutative geometry has been recently proposed. Two examples are given of linear connections in noncommutative geometries which are based on matrix algebras. They both possess a unique metric connection.

  18. Connectable solar air collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestergaard Jensen, S.; Bosanac, M.

    2002-02-01

    The project has proved that it is possible to manufacture solar air collector panels, which in an easy way can be connected into large collector arrays with integrated ducting without loss of efficiency. The developed connectable solar air collectors are based on the use of matrix absorbers in the form of perforated metal sheets. Three interconnected solar air collectors of the above type - each with an transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} - was tested and compared with parallel tests on two single solar air collectors also with a transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} One of the single solar air collectors has an identical absorber as the connectable solar air collectors while the absorber of the other single solar air collector was a fibre cloth. The efficiency of the three solar air collectors proved to be almost identical in the investigated range of mass flow rates and temperature differences. The solar air collectors further proved to be very efficient - as efficient as the second most efficient solar air collectors tested in the IEA task 19 project Solar Air Systems. Some problems remain although to be solved: the pressure drop across especially the connectable solar air collectors is too high - mainly across the inlets of the solar air collectors. It should, however, be possible to considerably reduce the pressure losses with a more aerodynamic design of the inlet and outlet of the solar air collectors; The connectable solar air collectors are easy connectable but the air tightness of the connections in the present form is not good enough. As leakage leads to lower efficiencies focus should be put on making the connections more air tight without loosing the easiness in connecting the solar air collectors. As a spin off of the project a simple and easy way to determine the efficiency of solar, air collectors for pre-heating of fresh air has been validated. The simple method of determining the efficiency has with success been compared with an advance method

  19. Cortico–Cortical Connections of Primary Sensory Areas and Associated Symptoms in Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veggeberg, Rosanna; Wilcox, Sophie L.; Scrivani, Steven J.; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine is a recurring, episodic neurological disorder characterized by headache, nausea, vomiting, and sensory disturbances. These events are thought to arise from the activation and sensitization of neurons along the trigemino–vascular pathway. From animal studies, it is known that thalamocortical projections play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signals from the meninges to the cortex. However, little is currently known about the potential involvement of cortico–cortical feedback projections from higher-order multisensory areas and/or feedforward projections from principle primary sensory areas or subcortical structures. In a large cohort of human migraine patients (N = 40) and matched healthy control subjects (N = 40), we used resting-state intrinsic functional connectivity to examine the cortical networks associated with the three main sensory perceptual modalities of vision, audition, and somatosensation. Specifically, we sought to explore the complexity of the sensory networks as they converge and become functionally coupled in multimodal systems. We also compared self-reported retrospective migraine symptoms in the same patients, examining the prevalence of sensory symptoms across the different phases of the migraine cycle. Our results show widespread and persistent disturbances in the perceptions of multiple sensory modalities. Consistent with this observation, we discovered that primary sensory areas maintain local functional connectivity but express impaired long-range connections to higher-order association areas (including regions of the default mode and salience network). We speculate that cortico–cortical interactions are necessary for the integration of information within and across the sensory modalities and, thus, could play an important role in the initiation of migraine and/or the development of its associated symptoms. PMID:28101529

  20. The CONNECT project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, Yaniv; Alexander, Daniel C; Jones, Derek K

    2013-01-01

    diameter and axonal density). This unique insight into both tissue microstructure and connectivity has enormous potential value in understanding the structure and organization of the brain as well as providing unique insights to abnormalities that underpin disease states. The CONNECT (Consortium......In recent years, diffusion MRI has become an extremely important tool for studying the morphology of living brain tissue, as it provides unique insights into both its macrostructure and microstructure. Recent applications of diffusion MRI aimed to characterize the structural connectome using...... tractography to infer connectivity between brain regions. In parallel to the development of tractography, additional diffusion MRI based frameworks (CHARMED, AxCaliber, ActiveAx) were developed enabling the extraction of a multitude of micro-structural parameters (axon diameter distribution, mean axonal...

  1. Skeletal muscle connective tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline

      The connective tissue content of skeletal muscle is believed to be the major factor responsible for defining the eating quality of different meat cuts, although attempts to correlate quantifications based on traditional histological methods have not as yet been able to prove this relation....... Collagen, being the major protein in connective tissue, has been extensively investigated with regard to its relation to meat tenderness, but the results have been rather conflicting. Meat from older animals is tougher than that from younger animals, and changes in the properties of the collagen due...... that collagen plays a significant role in determining the tenderness of meat. What are we missing? Therefore, fundamental aspects of connective tissue research have been the centre of attention throughout this thesis. A holistic view has been applied, glancing at this complex tissue which has many facets...

  2. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  3. Best connected rectangular arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendra Shekhawat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It can be found quite often in the literature that many well-known architects have employed either the golden rectangle or the Fibonacci rectangle in their works. On contrary, it is rare to find any specific reason for using them so often. Recently, Shekhawat (2015 proved that the golden rectangle and the Fibonacci rectangle are one of the best connected rectangular arrangements and this may be one of the reasons for their high presence in architectural designs. In this work we present an algorithm that generates n-4 best connected rectangular arrangements so that the proposed solutions can be further used by architects for their designs.

  4. Altered global brain signal in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Genevieve J.; Murray, John D.; Repovs, Grega; Cole, Michael W.; Savic, Aleksandar; Glasser, Matthew F.; Pittenger, Christopher; Krystal, John H.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Glahn, David C.; Anticevic, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia display a complex neurobiology, which has long been associated with distributed brain dysfunction. However, no investigation has tested whether schizophrenia shows alterations in global brain signal (GS), a signal derived from functional MRI and often discarded as a meaningless baseline in many studies. To evaluate GS alterations associated with schizophrenia, we studied two large chronic patient samples (n = 90, n = 71), comparing them to healthy subjects (n = 220) and patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (n = 73). We identified and replicated increased cortical power and variance in schizophrenia, an effect predictive of symptoms yet obscured by GS removal. Voxel-wise signal variance was also increased in schizophrenia, independent of GS effects. Both findings were absent in bipolar patients, confirming diagnostic specificity. Biologically informed computational modeling of shared and nonshared signal propagation through the brain suggests that these findings may be explained by altered net strength of overall brain connectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:24799682

  5. 18.CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930734 Measurement of serum soluble interleukin—2 receptor in connective tissue diseases.CAI Houronget al.Dept Intern Med,Affili Gulou Hosp,Med School,Nanjing Univ,Nanjing,210008,ShanghaiJ Immunol 1993;13(4):216—218December 1993 Vol 10 No 4

  6. Connecting Competing Memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarse, van der R.; Saloul, I.A.M.

    Research Expert Meeting: Connecting Competing Memories of War in Contemporary Europe5 March 2014NIAS hosts, 6 - 7 March, the expert meeting of the Consortium for 'The Cultural Heritage of War in Contemporary Europe'. The aim is to draft main themes and discuss financial and research structures regar

  7. The Anansi Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carger, Chris Liska

    1998-01-01

    Describes a teacher educator's efforts to connect children's literature, sponsored by a partnership between Northern Illinois University and Chicago Public Schools. In one project, student teachers used award-winning picture books to inspire African-American eighth graders to create pastels on black paper. In another, regional folk tales inspired…

  8. Technology and Internet Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Denise; Lindroth, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that teachers can use computer software and Internet connections to enhance curriculum and capitalize student's natural interest in sports and sports figures. Provides a list of activities that students can do in relation to the Olympic games and gives information on how technology can assist in such activities. Appropriate Internet…

  9. Wireless Connectivity and Capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Halldorsson, Magnus M

    2011-01-01

    Given $n$ wireless transceivers located in a plane, a fundamental problem in wireless communications is to construct a strongly connected digraph on them such that the constituent links can be scheduled in fewest possible time slots, assuming the SINR model of interference. In this paper, we provide an algorithm that connects an arbitrary point set in $O(\\log n)$ slots, improving on the previous best bound of $O(\\log^2 n)$ due to Moscibroda. This is complemented with a super-constant lower bound on our approach to connectivity. An important feature is that the algorithms allow for bi-directional (half-duplex) communication. One implication of this result is an improved bound of $\\Omega(1/\\log n)$ on the worst-case capacity of wireless networks, matching the best bound known for the extensively studied average-case. We explore the utility of oblivious power assignments, and show that essentially all such assignments result in a worst case bound of $\\Omega(n)$ slots for connectivity. This rules out a recent cla...

  10. Connecting with Your Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamchur, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    A workshop model on presentation skills for teachers in the classroom is presented. The goals and techniques would apply to many teaching situations in the college classroom, as well as lectures and symposium presentations. Making a personal connection, focusing on audience, and empowering the audience are discussed. (MLW)

  11. Clip, connect, clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fujima, Jun; Lunzer, Aran; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    using three mechanisms: clipping of input and result elements from existing applications to form cells on a spreadsheet; connecting these cells using formulas, thus enabling result transfer between applications; and cloning cells so that multiple requests can be handled side by side. We demonstrate...

  12. The connected brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The connected brain Martijn van den Heuvel, 2009 Our brain is a network. It is a network of different brain regions that are all functionally and structurally linked to each other. In the past decades, neuroimaging studies have provided a lot of information about the specific functions of each separ

  13. Preschool Connected Speech Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJohnson, Albert; And Others

    This speech inventory developed for a study of aurally handicapped preschool children (see TM 001 129) provides information on intonation patterns in connected speech. The inventory consists of a list of phrases and simple sentences accompanied by pictorial clues. The test is individually administered by a teacher-examiner who presents the spoken…

  14. Revisiting city connectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, U.

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new perspective on city connectivity in order to analyze non-hub cities and their position in the world economy. The author revisits the different approaches discussed in the Global Commodity Chains (GCC), Global Production Networks (GPN) and World City Network (WCN) discou

  15. Natural connections given by general linear and classical connections

    OpenAIRE

    Janyška, Josef

    2004-01-01

    We assume a vector bundle $p: E\\to M$ with a general linear connection $K$ and a classical linear connection $\\Lam$ on $M$. We prove that all classical linear connections on the total space $E$ naturally given by $(\\Lam, K)$ form a 15-parameter family. Further we prove that all connections on $J^1 E$ naturally given by $(\\Lam, K)$ form a 14-parameter family. Both families of connections are described geometrically.

  16. On contravariant product conjugate connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Blaga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Invariance properties for the covariant and contravariant connections on a Riemannian manifold with respect to an almost product structure are stated. Restricting to a distribution of the contravariant connections is also discussed. The particular case of the conjugate connection is investigated and properties of the extended structural and virtual tensors for the contravariant connections are given.

  17. An improved molecular connectivity index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新华; 俞庆森; 朱龙观

    2000-01-01

    Through modification of the delta values of the molecular connectivity indexes, and connecting the quantum chemistry with topology method effectively, the molecular connectivity indexes are converted into quantum-topology indexes. The modified indexes not only keep all information obtained from the original molecular connectivity method but also have their own virtue in application, and at the same time make up some disadvantages of the quantum and molecular connectivity methods.

  18. Functional connectivity of emotional processing in depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carballedo, Angela

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study is to map a neural network of emotion processing and to identify differences in major depression compared to healthy controls. It is hypothesized that intentional perception of emotional faces activates connections between amygdala (Demir et al.), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and that frontal-amygdala connections are altered in major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: Fifteen medication-free patients with MDD and fifteen healthy controls were enrolled. All subjects were assessed using the same face-matching functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) task, known to involve those areas. Brain activations were obtained using Statistical Parametric Mapping version 5 (SPM5) for data analysis and MARSBAR for extracting of fMRI time series. Then data was analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). RESULTS: A valid model was established for the left and the right hemispheres showing a circuit involving ACC, OFC, PFC and AMY. The left hemisphere shows significant lower connectivity strengths in patients than controls, for the pathway that goes from AMY to the OF11, and a trend of higher connectivity in patients for the path that goes from the PF9 to the OF11. In the right hemisphere, patients show lower connectivity coefficients in the paths from the AMY to OF11, from the AMY to ACC, and from the ACC to PF9. By the contrary, controls show lower connectivity strengths for the path that goes from ACC to AMY. CONCLUSIONS: Functional disconnection between limbic and frontal brain regions could be demonstrated using structural equation modeling. The interpretation of these findings could be that there is an emotional processing bias with disconnection bilaterally between amygdala to orbitofrontal cortices and in addition a right disconnection between amygdala and ACC as well as between ACC and prefrontal cortex possibly in line with a more prominent role for the right hemisphere

  19. Connecting to Everyday Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Smith, Rachel Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    construction and reproduction of cultural heritage creating novel connections between self and others and between past, present and future. We present experiences from a current research project, the Digital Natives exhibition, in which social media was designed as an integral part of the exhibition to connect...... issues of digital heritage with audiences’ everyday practices in a museum. We point to the fact the use of social media in museums not only challenge us to rethink the design of technology for museum experiences. Social media also challenge us to rethink conceptions of museums and cultural heritage......We suggest that social media can contribute to reconnecting audiences’ everyday practices to issues of cultural heritage in museum institutions. Social media can support the creation of dialogical spaces in the museum, both playful and reflective, that allow audiences to engage in the ongoing...

  20. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating......CRIS2010, the 10th conference in the bi-annual series organized by euroCRIS, focuses on the connecting role of Current Research Information Systems (CRIS). Aalborg, Denmark where CRIS2010 is held, is located near the intersection of the Northern Sea and Kattegat, a place were not only the waters...... of two seas are exchanged, but also goods and culture. In a similar way, Current Research Information Systems are at the intersection between (publicly funded) research and society. They do not only connect actors, activities and results within the research domain but also play a crucial role in raising...

  1. Climate change and coral reef connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, P. L.; Leis, J. M.; Lough, J. M.; Paris, C. B.; Kingsford, M. J.; Berumen, M. L.; Lambrechts, J.

    2009-06-01

    This review assesses and predicts the impacts that rapid climate change will have on population connectivity in coral reef ecosystems, using fishes as a model group. Increased ocean temperatures are expected to accelerate larval development, potentially leading to reduced pelagic durations and earlier reef-seeking behaviour. Depending on the spatial arrangement of reefs, the expectation would be a reduction in dispersal distances and the spatial scale of connectivity. Small increase in temperature might enhance the number of larvae surviving the pelagic phase, but larger increases are likely to reduce reproductive output and increase larval mortality. Changes to ocean currents could alter the dynamics of larval supply and changes to planktonic productivity could affect how many larvae survive the pelagic stage and their condition at settlement; however, these patterns are likely to vary greatly from place-to-place and projections of how oceanographic features will change in the future lack sufficient certainty and resolution to make robust predictions. Connectivity could also be compromised by the increased fragmentation of reef habitat due to the effects of coral bleaching and ocean acidification. Changes to the spatial and temporal scales of connectivity have implications for the management of coral reef ecosystems, especially the design and placement of marine-protected areas. The size and spacing of protected areas may need to be strategically adjusted if reserve networks are to retain their efficacy in the future.

  2. Disturbed Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity Rather than Structural Connectivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Qi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS—a relapsing functional bowel disorder—presents with disrupted brain connections. However, little is known about the alterations of interhemispheric functional connectivity and underlying structural connectivity in IBS. This study combined resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to investigate changes in interhemispheric coordination in IBS patients. Resting-state functional and structural magnetic resonance images were acquired from 65 IBS patients and 67 healthy controls (matched for age, sex and educational level. Interhemispheric voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC was calculated and compared between groups. Homotopic regions showing abnormal VMHC in patients were targeted as regions of interest for analysis of DTI tractography. The fractional anisotropy, fiber number, and fiber length were compared between groups. Statistical analysis was also performed by including anxiety and depression as covariates to evaluate their effect. A Pearson correlation analysis between abnormal interhemispheric connectivity and clinical indices of IBS patients was performed. Compared to healthy controls, IBS patients had higher interhemispheric functional connectivity between bilateral thalami, cuneus, posterior cingulate cortices, lingual gyri and inferior occipital/cerebellum lobes, as well as lower interhemispheric functional connectivity between bilateral ventral anterior cingulate cortices (vACC and inferior parietal lobules (IPL. The inclusion of anxiety and depression as covariates abolished VMHC difference in vACC. Microstructural features of white matter tracts connecting functionally abnormal regions did not reveal any differences between the groups. VMHC values in vACC negatively correlated with the quality of life scores of patients. In conclusion, this study provides preliminary evidence of the disrupted

  3. Pectus excavatum and heritable disorders of the connective tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Tocchioni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum, the most frequent congenital chest wall deformity, may be rarely observed as a sole deformity or as a sign of an underlying connective tissue disorder. To date, only few studies have described correlations between this deformity and heritable connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Poland, MASS (Mitral valve prolapse, not progressive Aortic enlargement, Skeletal and Skin alterations phenotype among others. When concurring with connective tissue disorder, cardiopulmonary and vascular involvement may be associated to the thoracic defect. Ruling out the concomitance of pectus excavatum and connective tissue disorders, therefore, may have a direct implication both on surgical outcome and long term prognosis. In this review we focused on biological bases of connective tissue disorders which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of pectus excavatum, portraying surgical and clinical implication of their concurrence.

  4. Pectus excavatum and heritable disorders of the connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Messineo, Antonio; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2013-09-24

    Pectus excavatum, the most frequent congenital chest wall deformity, may be rarely observed as a sole deformity or as a sign of an underlying connective tissue disorder. To date, only few studies have described correlations between this deformity and heritable connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Poland, MASS (Mitral valve prolapse, not progressive Aortic enlargement, Skeletal and Skin alterations) phenotype among others. When concurring with connective tissue disorder, cardiopulmonary and vascular involvement may be associated to the thoracic defect. Ruling out the concomitance of pectus excavatum and connective tissue disorders, therefore, may have a direct implication both on surgical outcome and long term prognosis. In this review we focused on biological bases of connective tissue disorders which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of pectus excavatum, portraying surgical and clinical implication of their concurrence.

  5. Weldless Flange Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Mattias; Jonsson, Henrik; Löfqvist, Stefan; Maigne, Remi; Bravo, Unai

    2004-01-01

    This development project is a bachelor’s degree thesis work that will conclude the education program ”Development Technology” at Blekinge Institute of Technology. The development project has been done in cooperation with Faurecia Exhaust Systems AB in Torsås that constructs and manufactures manifolds, catalytic converters, mufflers and whole exhaust systems. The task with this project was to find a new solution concept for the connection of pipes into flanges in manifolds. The concept that Fa...

  6. Connecting with Citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Poul Erik Flyvholm; Isaksson, Maria

    2017-01-01

    /2007. If Norway, like Denmark, significantly reduces its number of municipalities, the majority of municipalities will undergo significant change and experience loss of identity. Each new municipality will need to create meaningful new identities attractive to publics fearful of alienation inside a community...... they have no relationship to. The study examines how municipalities reach out to connect with their publics, and whether they employ emotional and engaging discourse. Our data consists of 20 Norwegian and 20 Danish municipal websites....

  7. Functional connectivity in cortico-subcortical brain networks underlying reward processing in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Oldehinkel

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study does not corroborate previous childhood evidence for functional connectivity alterations between key reward processing regions in adolescents and young adults with ADHD. Our findings could point to developmental normalization or indicate that reward-processing deficits result from functional connectivity alterations in general task-related networks.

  8. Energy storage connection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  9. Connective tissue ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren's syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers.

  10. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  11. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another.

  12. Connecting the Production Multiple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichen, Alex Yu; Mouritsen, Jan

    was implementing sales and operations planning (S&OP) process to foster integration on its demand chain. Although actors wanted to see what it is to produce, that is to say, the object Production, as a singular object that could be diffused across time and space, Production became more multiple because the S...... in opposite directions. They are all part of the fluid object. There is no single chain of circulating references that makes the object a matter of fact. Accounting fluidity means that references drift back and forth and enact new realities also connected to the chain. In this setting future research may...

  13. Transcultural Tectonic Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an understanding of Jørn Utzon, as one of the most profound exponents of a transcultural and tectonic approach to modern architecture in the late twentieth century. The paper will examine the sources of inspiration, intersections and connections in Utzon’s architecture; which...... ruins in Mexico. The Sydney Opera House’s signature sail-like roof shells derive from knowledge of boat building in his youth and ancient Chinese and Japanese temple roofs floating above a stone base. With the choice of ceramic tiles to accentuate the sculptural character of the shells, owing its...

  14. Naturally Connecting the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ During China International Trade Fair for Home Textiles and Accessories held in Shanghai 2010(on Aug.25th the second day of the fair),Cotton Council International(CCI)hosted an exchange meeting targeted the COTTON USATM home textile licenses,taking"Naturally Connecting the World-Opportunities for Sourcing and Collaboration with Cotton-Made Home Textiles"as the theme of the meeting.CCI's representative institution in China invited the domestic famous home textile brands,enterprises and their customers to participate in the exchange which aims to introduce the current development trend of the global cotton textile industry through CCI,the powerful platform of communication.

  15. Practicing (Dis)connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    day-to-day character of the work practices entailed, tracing their at once embedded, yet, distributed and disparate – (dis)connected – configurations. In the course of an MRI exam, from the screening of the patient to the scanning itself, and onto the subsequent processing and analysis of the images...... and redistribution of knowledge-practices in and through sociotechnical change, particularly in the light of the advent of film-less radiology, and how MRI comes to be particularly implicated in the transition/development in radiology toward practices entailing picture archive and communication systems (PACS...

  16. Connectivity from a different perspective: comparing seed dispersal kernels in connected vs. unfragmented landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, John D; Carlo, Tomas A; Brudvig, Lars A; Damschen, Ellen I; Haddad, Nick M; Levey, Douglas J; Orrock, John L; Tewksbury, Joshua J

    2016-05-01

    Habitat fragmentation can create significant impediments to dispersal. A technique to increase dispersal between otherwise isolated fragments is the use of corridors. Although previous studies have compared dispersal between connected fragments to dispersal between unconnected fragments, it remains unknown how dispersal between fragments connected by a corridor compares to dispersal in unfragmented landscapes. To assess the extent to which corridors can restore dispersal in fragmented landscapes to levels observed in unfragmented landscapes, we employed a stable-isotope marking technique to track seeds within four unfragmented landscapes and eight experimental landscapes with fragments connected by corridors. We studied two wind- and two bird-dispersed plant species, because previous community-based research showed that dispersal mode explains how connectivity effects vary among species. We constructed dispersal kernels for these species in unfragmented landscapes and connected fragments by marking seeds in the center of each landscape with 'IN and then recovering marked seeds in seed traps at distances up to 200 m. For the two wind-dispersed plants, seed dispersal kernels were similar in unfragmented landscapes and connected fragments. In contrast, dispersal kernels of bird-dispersed seeds were both affected by fragmentation and differed in the direction of the impact: Morella cerifera experienced more and Rhus copallina experienced less long-distance dispersal in unfragmented than in connected landscapes. These results show that corridors can facilitate dispersal probabilities comparable to those observed in unfragmented landscapes. Although dispersal mode may provide useful broad predictions, we acknowledge that similar species may respond uniquely due to factors such as seasonality and disperser behavior. Our results further indicate that prior work has likely underestimated dispersal distances of wind-dispersed plants and that factors altering long

  17. LHCb connects its pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Two weeks ago the first beryllium section of the LHCb beam vacuum chamber was installed. This three-day operation, after requiring lengthy preparation work, demanded patience and precision as the first of four sections of the beampipe was connected to the vertex locator (VeLo) vacuum vessel. The AT-VAC Group with the collaboration of PH/LBD, including Gloria Corti, Tatsuya Nakada, Patrice Mermet, Delios Ramos, Frans Mul, Bruno Versollato, Bernard Corajod, and Raymond Veness. (Not pictured: Adriana Rossi and Laurent Bouvet) This first installed section is composed of a nearly two-metre long conical tube of one-millimetre thick beryllium and of a thin spherical-shaped window, 800 millimeter diameter, made of an aluminum alloy, and has the appearance of a mushroom lying on its side. The window is connected to the conical part of the beampipe through an aluminum alloy bellow, which is needed to allow for mechanical alignment once the assembly is installed. Beryllium was chosen as the material for 12 m of the 19...

  18. Can mouse imaging studies bring order to autism connectivity chaos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Liska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI has consistently highlighted impaired or aberrant functional connectivity across brain regions of autism spectrum disorder (ASD patients. However, the manifestation and neural substrates of these alterations are highly heterogeneous and often conflicting. Moreover, their neurobiological underpinnings and etiopathological significance remain largely unknown. A deeper understanding of the complex pathophysiological cascade leading to aberrant connectivity in ASD can greatly benefit from the use of model organisms where individual pathophysiological or phenotypic components of ASD can be recreated and investigated via approaches that are either off limits or confounded by clinical heterogeneity. Despite some obvious limitations in reliably modelling the full phenotypic spectrum of a complex developmental disorder like ASD, mouse models have played a central role in advancing our basic mechanistic and molecular understanding of this syndrome. Recent progress in mouse brain connectivity mapping via resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI offers the opportunity to generate and test mechanistic hypotheses about the elusive origin and significance of connectional aberrations observed in autism. Here we discuss recent progress towards this goal, and illustrate initial examples of how the approach can be employed to establish causal links between ASD-related mutations, developmental processes, and brain connectional architecture. As the spectrum of genetic and pathophysiological components of ASD modelled in the mouse is rapidly expanding, the use of rsfMRI can advance our mechanistic understanding of the origin and significance of the connectional alterations associated with autism, and their heterogeneous expression across patient cohorts.

  19. Transnational Connections and Multiple Belongings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galal, Lise Paulsen; Sparre, Sara Cathrine Lei

    With the purpose of presenting DIMECCE key findings, we in this paper present different aspects, potentials and challenges related to the Middle Eastern Christians transnational connections and multiple belonging. We distinguish between individual transnational connections and practices, such as ......, such as family relations, churches as transnational – or global – institutions, and other organisations and associations established to support politically, socially or culturally connections and development in the country or region of origin.......With the purpose of presenting DIMECCE key findings, we in this paper present different aspects, potentials and challenges related to the Middle Eastern Christians transnational connections and multiple belonging. We distinguish between individual transnational connections and practices...

  20. Connect the future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李柯翰

    2015-01-01

    <正>China has been developed so rapidly that it economic strength grows fast like a rocket.It leads China to become the World’s second-largest economy.Because the change of our life conditions,more and more people are wiling to go abroad,in order to feel the fresh air,civilized language,advanced science,and harmony atmosphere,all of these things like baptism which shocked people’s heart.The pursuit of better life quality requires more and more important elements such as beautiful landscape,clean lake,elegant buildings,rigorous law and kind people,since the beauty of landscape depends on it’s quality,the prosperity of a country rely on it’s power.I’ve been dreaming to become a messenger who can establish connect between different countries and various people.

  1. Connectomics and neuroticism : an altered functional network organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servaas, Michelle N; Geerligs, Linda; Renken, Remco J; Marsman, Jan-Bernard; Ormel, Johan; Riese, Harriëtte; Aleman, André

    2015-01-01

    The personality trait neuroticism is a potent risk marker for psychopathology. Although the neurobiological basis remains unclear, studies have suggested that alterations in connectivity may underlie it. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to shed more light on the functional network organiz

  2. Alterations in orbitofrontal cortex functional connectivity and decision making deficits in heroin-dependent individuals%海洛因成瘾患者眶额叶皮层功能连接异常与决策能力缺失的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱迎伟; 江桂华; 苏欢欢; 马晓芬; 李黎明; 田军章; 张雪林

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) functional connectivity and its association with decision-making deficits in chronic heroin-dependent individuals (HDIs) and explore the neural mechanisms of heroin addiction and relapse.Methods Fourteen male chronic HDIs and 14 healthy subjects matched for age,education,and nicotine consumption participated in this study.Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed using a 1.5 T MR scanner.Functional connectivity of the OFC and the rest of the brain were calculated using REST software.Voxel-based analysis of the functional connectivity maps between the control and HDI groups was performed with two-sample t test.The Iowa gambling task (IGT) was used to assess the participants' decision making during uncertainty.Results Compared with the control group,the HDIs showed significantly decreased functional connectivity of the OFC and the right inferior parietal lobule (rIPL) (t=3.5,P<0.05).A significant negative correlation was noted between the functional connectivity of the OFC-rIPL and performance level at the IGT.Conclusion The OFC-rIPL functional connectivity is significantly disrupted in HDIs,which may be the neural basis for decision-making deficits.%目的 探讨慢性海洛因成瘾者眶额叶皮层(OFC)功能连接的变化及其与慢性海洛因成瘾者冲动性决策行为的关系.方法 慢性海洛因成瘾男性患者14例,与之年龄、受教育程度和尼古丁依赖水平匹配的健康被试14例参加本研究.采用1.5 T磁共振扫描仪,16通道神经血管线圈,对被试分别进行头颅结构和静息态功能磁共振扫描,后利用SPM8软件以双侧眶额叶皮层为感兴趣区,分别进行组内和组间眶额叶皮层静息态功能网络分析.采用爱荷华赌博任务(IGT)对两组被试进行决策能力评估.结果 与对照组比较,慢性海洛因成瘾组眶额叶皮层与右侧顶下小叶(rIPL)之

  3. Hydrological connectivity for riverine fish: measurement challenges and research opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, A.H.; Burnett, K.M.; Steel, E.A.; Flitcroft, R.L.; Pess, G.R.; Feist, B.E.; Torgersen, C.E.; Miller, D.J.; Sanderson, B.L.

    2010-01-01

    possible in the following arenas: (i) incorporating network structure and river discharge into analyses; (ii) increasing explicit consideration of temporal complexity and fish behaviour in the scope of analyses; and (iii) parsing degrees of human and natural influences on connectivity and defining acceptable alterations. Multiscale analyses are most likely to identify dominant patterns of connections and disconnections, and the appropriate scale at which to focus conservation activities.

  4. Dynamic adaptation of tendon and muscle connective tissue to mechanical loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Koskinen, Satu Osmi Anneli

    2008-01-01

    The connective tissue of tendon and skeletal muscle is a crucial structure for force transmission. A dynamic adaptive capacity of these tissues in healthy individuals is evident from reports of altered gene expression and protein levels of the fibrillar and network-forming collagens, when subjected...... in this article provide strong evidence for the highly adaptable nature of connective tissue in muscle and tendon....

  5. Stories becoming sticky : how civic initiatives strive for connection to governmental spatial planning agendas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoep, van der H.

    2014-01-01

      This thesis aims to understand the phenomenon of self-organizing civic initiatives, how they engage in and connect to planning practices aimed at the improvement of the quality of places and why these connections lead to alteration or transformation of governmental plannin

  6. Subcortical connections of normotopic and heterotopic neurons in sensory and motor cortices of the tish mutant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottler, F; Couture, D; Rao, A; Kahn, H; Lee, K S

    1998-05-25

    Orthograde and retrograde tracers were used to examine subcortical connections of neurons in the neurological mutant tish rat. This animal exhibits bilateral heterotopia similar to those observed in epileptic humans with subcortical band heterotopia. Terminal varicosities were labeled in the striatum, thalamus, brainstem, and spinal cord following injections of the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the heterotopic cortex. The general topography of corticothalamic projections was evaluated by injecting the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG) into ventral thalamic nuclei. Retrograde labeling of small-to-medium sized neurons was observed in layer VI of topographically restricted portions of the normotopic cortex. Similar appearing cells were labeled in the neighboring portions of the underlying heterotopia; however, these neurons did not display characteristic lamination or radial orientation. Thalamocortical terminals labeled by injecting BDA into the ventroposterolateral nucleus (VPL) were observed primarily in layer IV of the medial aspect of the normotopic somatosensory cortex. In contrast, a radial column of terminals was present in the underlying heterotopia. Typical barrel labeling was found in the lateral aspect of the normotopic somatosensory cortex after injecting the ventroposteromedial nucleus (VPM), whereas more diffuse patches of labeling were observed in the underlying heterotopia. Heterotopic neurons in the tish cortex, thus, exhibit characteristic features of subcortical connectivity. Both normotopic and heterotopic neurons in the tish brain project to appropriate subcortical sites and establish bidirectional topographic connections with the thalamus. These results suggest that primary sensory-motor information is represented in a parallel manner in the normotopic and heterotopic cortices of the tish rat.

  7. [CT imaging features of pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillet, P Y; Mama, N; Nunes, H; Uzunhan, Y; Abbad, S; Brauner, M W

    2009-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders correspond to a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases characterized by abnormal immune system activity leading to connective tissue alterations in multiple parts of the body. In adults, connective tissue disorders include rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, and mixed connective tissue disease. Broncho-pulmonary involvement may be variable with involvement of all anatomical components of the lung. Involvement of other intrathoracic structures (pleura, respiratory muscles, heart, rib cage) is frequent. The most specific manifestations include interstitial lung diseases and pulmonary hypertension. During follow-up, progressive respiratory diseases may occur due to the treatment, infections, pulmonary embolism or neoplasms.

  8. Ressourcenorientierte Diagnostik im Alter

    OpenAIRE

    Forstmeier, Simon; Maercker, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Trotz der im Alter zunehmenden körperlichen, kognitiven und sozialen Verlusten bleibt das subjektive Wohlbefinden relativ stabil. Dies weist auf die vielen Ressourcen älterer Menschen hin. Dieser Artikel stellt für die klinische Ressourcendiagnostik relevante Verfahren vor und erläutert die zugrunde liegenden Konzepte. Berücksichtigt werden Aktivitäten und Erlebnisse als Ressourcen, emotionale Ressourcen (positiver Affekt, Lebenszufriedenheit, Selbstwerterleben, Lebensqualität), motivationale...

  9. The Connectivity Analysis of Intermittent Connected Wireless Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yun; Zhou Yahui; Liu Qilie; Wang Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    The connectivity is a basic and important characteristic to the network, it expresses the situation of link connectivity directly, and provides important reference for the entire network plan. Using statistics and probability Theory, this article emphasizes the probability between any two nodes in the network which nodes are equally distributed and the connectivity of whole network. At last, this article has made verification through simulation and has made out a conclusion, the simulation result agrees with theoretical analysis.

  10. Connections between the thalamus and the somatosensory areas of the anterior ectosylvian gyrus in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, H; Kopf, E M

    1984-04-01

    The thalamocortical and corticothalamic connections of the second somatic sensory area (SII) and adjacent cortical areas in the cat were studied with anterograde and retrograde tracers. Injections consisted of horseradish peroxidase conjugated to wheat germ agglutinin (HRP-WGA) or a mixture of equal parts of tritiated leucine and proline. The cortical regions to be injected were electrophysiologically studied with microelectrodes to determine the localization of the selected components of the body representation in SII. The distribution of recording points was correlated in each case with the extent of the injection mass in the cortex. Distributions of retrograde and anterograde labeling in the thalamus were reconstructed from serial coronal sections. The results from cases with injections of tracers exclusively confined to separate parts of the body map in SII indicated a fairly precise topographical organization of projections from the ventrobasal complex (VB) to SII. The labeled cells and fibers were located within a series of lamella-like rods that curved throughout the dorsoventral and rostrocaudal axis of VB. The position and extent of these lamellae shifted from medial and ventral, in the medial subdivision of ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPLm) for radial forelimb digit zones of SII, to dorsal, posterior, and lateral, in the lateral subdivision of ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL1) for proximal leg and trunk regions in SII. For every injected area in SII the densest clustering of labeled cells and fibers was usually more posteriorly represented in VB. The distribution in these dense zones of labeling often extended through the central core of VB. SII projecting neurons were also consistently noted in the extreme rostral portion of the medial subdivision of the posterior nuclei (Pom) that lies dorsal to VB. Corticothalamic and thalamocortical connections for SII were entirely reciprocal. Injections of tracers into cortical areas surrounding SII

  11. The Chitin Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, David L.; Vicencio, Alfin G.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is an essential component of the fungal cell wall. Chitosan, a deacetylated form of chitin, is also important in maintaining cell wall integrity and is essential for Cryptococcus neoformans virulence. In their article, Gilbert et al. [N. M. Gilbert, L. G. Baker, C. A. Specht, and J. K. Lodge, mBio 3(1):e00007-12, 2012] demonstrate that the enzyme responsible for chitosan synthesis, chitin deacetylase (CDA), is differentially attached to the cell membrane and wall. Bioactivity is localized to the cell membrane, where it is covalently linked via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Findings from this study significantly enhance our understanding of cryptococcal cell wall biology. Besides the role of chitin in supporting structural stability, chitin and host enzymes with chitinase activity have an important role in host defense and modifying the inflammatory response. Thus, chitin appears to provide a link between the fungus and host that involves both innate and adaptive immune responses. Recently, there has been increased attention to the role of chitinases in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, especially asthma. We review these findings and explore the possible connection between fungal infections, the induction of chitinases, and asthma. PMID:22448043

  12. Formal connections in deformation quantization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masulli, Paolo

    attention on symplectic manifolds equipped with a family of star products, indexed by a parameter space. In this situation we can define a connection in the trivial bundle over the parameter space with fibres the formal smooth functions on the manifold, which relates the star products in the family...... and is called a formal connection. We study the question of classifying such formal connections. To each star product we can associate a certain cohomology class called the characteristic class. It turns out that a formal connection exists if and only if all the star products in the family have the same...... characteristic class, and that formal connections form an affine space over the derivations of the star products. Moreover, if the parameter space for the family of star products is contractible, we obtain that any two flat formal connections are gauge equivalent via a self-equivalence of the family of star...

  13. Age-related changes in task related functional network connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Steffener

    Full Text Available Aging has a multi-faceted impact on brain structure, brain function and cognitive task performance, but the interaction of these different age-related changes is largely unexplored. We hypothesize that age-related structural changes alter the functional connectivity within the brain, resulting in altered task performance during cognitive challenges. In this neuroimaging study, we used independent components analysis to identify spatial patterns of coordinated functional activity involved in the performance of a verbal delayed item recognition task from 75 healthy young and 37 healthy old adults. Strength of functional connectivity between spatial components was assessed for age group differences and related to speeded task performance. We then assessed whether age-related differences in global brain volume were associated with age-related differences in functional network connectivity. Both age groups used a series of spatial components during the verbal working memory task and the strength and distribution of functional network connectivity between these components differed across the age groups. Poorer task performance, i.e. slower speed with increasing memory load, in the old adults was associated with decreases in functional network connectivity between components comprised of the supplementary motor area and the middle cingulate and between the precuneus and the middle/superior frontal cortex. Advancing age also led to decreased brain volume; however, there was no evidence to support the hypothesis that age-related alterations in functional network connectivity were the result of global brain volume changes. These results suggest that age-related differences in the coordination of neural activity between brain regions partially underlie differences in cognitive performance.

  14. Hitchin's connection in metaplectic quantization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Gammelgaard, Niels Leth; Lauridsen, Magnus Roed

    2012-01-01

    We give a differential geometric construction of a connection, which we call the Hitchin connection, in the bundle of quantum Hilbert spaces arising from metaplectically corrected geometric quantization of a prequantizable, symplectic manifold, endowed with a rigid family of Kähler structures, all...... manifold in question. Furthermore, when we are in a setting similar to the moduli space, we give an explicit formula and show that this connection agrees with previous constructions....

  15. Altered resting state brain networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Göttlich

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra leading to dysfunctional cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical loops. In addition to the characteristic motor symptoms, PD patients often show cognitive impairments, affective changes and other non-motor symptoms, suggesting system-wide effects on brain function. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph-theory based analysis methods to investigate altered whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity in PD patients (n = 37 compared to healthy controls (n = 20. Global network properties indicated less efficient processing in PD. Analysis of brain network modules pointed to increased connectivity within the sensorimotor network, but decreased interaction of the visual network with other brain modules. We found lower connectivity mainly between the cuneus and the ventral caudate, medial orbitofrontal cortex and the temporal lobe. To identify regions of altered connectivity, we mapped the degree of intrinsic functional connectivity both on ROI- and on voxel-level across the brain. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients showed lower connectedness in the medial and middle orbitofrontal cortex. The degree of connectivity was also decreased in the occipital lobe (cuneus and calcarine, but increased in the superior parietal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, supramarginal gyrus and supplementary motor area. Our results on global network and module properties indicated that PD manifests as a disconnection syndrome. This was most apparent in the visual network module. The higher connectedness within the sensorimotor module in PD patients may be related to compensation mechanism in order to overcome the functional deficit of the striato-cortical motor loops or to loss of mutual inhibition between brain networks. Abnormal connectivity in the visual network may be related to adaptation and compensation processes as a consequence

  16. Disrupted white matter connectivity underlying developmental dyslexia: A machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zaixu; Xia, Zhichao; Su, Mengmeng; Shu, Hua; Gong, Gaolang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental dyslexia has been hypothesized to result from multiple causes and exhibit multiple manifestations, implying a distributed multidimensional effect on human brain. The disruption of specific white-matter (WM) tracts/regions has been observed in dyslexic children. However, it remains unknown if developmental dyslexia affects the human brain WM in a multidimensional manner. Being a natural tool for evaluating this hypothesis, the multivariate machine learning approach was applied in this study to compare 28 school-aged dyslexic children with 33 age-matched controls. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging were acquired to extract five multitype WM features at a regional level: white matter volume, fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. A linear support vector machine (LSVM) classifier achieved an accuracy of 83.61% using these MRI features to distinguish dyslexic children from controls. Notably, the most discriminative features that contributed to the classification were primarily associated with WM regions within the putative reading network/system (e.g., the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, thalamocortical projections, and corpus callosum), the limbic system (e.g., the cingulum and fornix), and the motor system (e.g., the cerebellar peduncle, corona radiata, and corticospinal tract). These results were well replicated using a logistic regression classifier. These findings provided direct evidence supporting a multidimensional effect of developmental dyslexia on WM connectivity of human brain, and highlighted the involvement of WM tracts/regions beyond the well-recognized reading system in dyslexia. Finally, the discriminating results demonstrated a potential of WM neuroimaging features as imaging markers for identifying dyslexic individuals.

  17. Interstate Connections - CEHC [ds619

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) commissioned the California Essential Habitat Connectivity...

  18. Brain Mechanisms of Altered Consciousness in Generalised Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Seri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the inherent difficulties in achieving a biologically meaningful definition of consciousness, recent neurophysiological studies are starting to provide some insight in fundamental mechanisms associated with impaired consciousness in neurological disorders. Generalised seizures are associated with disruption of the default state network, a functional network of discrete brain areas, which include the fronto-parietal cortices. Subcortical contribution through activation of thalamocortical structures, as well as striate nuclei are also crucial to produce impaired consciousness in generalised seizures.

  19. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  20. Cocaine exposure reorganizes cell type- and input-specific connectivity in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, Andrew F; Cassel, John M; Carter, Adam G

    2014-09-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine alters the structural and functional properties of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These changes suggest a rewiring of the NAc circuit, with an enhancement of excitatory synaptic connections onto MSNs. However, it is unknown how drug exposure alters the balance of long-range afferents onto different cell types in the NAc. Here we used whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, optogenetics and pharmacogenetics to show how repeated cocaine exposure alters connectivity in the mouse NAc medial shell. Cocaine selectively enhanced amygdala innervation of MSNs expressing D1 dopamine receptors (D1-MSNs) relative to D2-MSNs. We also found that amygdala activity was required for cocaine-induced changes to behavior and connectivity. Finally, we established how heightened amygdala innervation can explain the structural and functional changes evoked by cocaine. Our findings reveal how exposure to drugs of abuse fundamentally reorganizes cell type- and input-specific connectivity in the NAc.

  1. Identification of neural connectivity signatures of autism using machine learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopikrishna eDeshpande

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in neural connectivity have been suggested as a signature of the pathobiology of autism. Although disrupted correlation between cortical regions observed from functional MRI is considered to be an explanatory model for autism, the directional causal influence between brain regions is a vital link missing in these studies. The current study focuses on addressing this in an fMRI study of Theory-of-Mind in 15 high-functioning adolescents and adults with autism (ASD and 15 typically developing (TD controls. Participants viewed a series of comic strip vignettes in the MRI scanner and were asked to choose the most logical end to the story from three alternatives, separately for trials involving physical and intentional causality. Causal brain connectivity obtained from a multivariate autoregressive model, along with assessment scores, functional connectivity values, and fractional anisotropy obtained from DTI data for each participant, were submitted to a recursive cluster elimination based support vector machine classifier to determine the accuracy with which the classifier can predict a novel participant’s group membership (ASD or TD. We found a maximum classification accuracy of 95.9 % with 19 features which had the highest discriminative ability between the groups. All of the 19 features were effective connectivity paths, indicating that causal information may be critical in discriminating between ASD and TD groups. These effective connectivity paths were also found to be significantly greater in controls as compared to ASD participants and consisted predominantly of outputs from the fusiform face area and middle temporal gyrus indicating impaired connectivity in ASD participants, particularly in the social brain areas. These findings collectively point towards the fact that alterations in causal brain connectivity in individuals with ASD could serve as a potential non-invasive neuroimaging signature for autism

  2. Financial Connections and Systemic Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, F.; Babus, A.; Carletti, E.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model where institutions form connections through swaps of projects in order to diversify their individual risk. These connections lead to two different network structures. In a clustered network groups of financial institutions hold identical portfolios and default together. In an uncl

  3. [Muscles and connective tissue: histology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage, J-P

    2012-10-01

    Here, we give some comments about the DVD movies "Muscle Attitudes" from Endovivo productions, the movies up lighting some loss in the attention given to studies on the connective tissue, and especially them into muscles. The main characteristics of the different components in the intra-muscular connective tissue (perimysium, endomysium, epimysium) are shown here with special references to their ordered architecture and special references to their spatial distributions. This connective tissue is abundant into the muscles and is in continuity with the muscles in vicinity, with their tendons and their sheath, sticking the whole on skin. This connective tissue has also very abundant connections on the muscles fibres. It is then assumed that the connective tissue sticks every organs or cells of the locomotion system. Considering the elastic properties of the collagen fibres which are the most abundant component of connective tissue, it is possible to up light a panel of connective tissue associated functions such as the transmission of muscle contractions or the regulation of protein and energetic muscles metabolism.

  4. FIBROBLAST INVOLVEMENT IN SOFT CONNECTIVE TISSUE CALCIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne eRonchetti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of PXE patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibres and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization.

  5. Hierarchies of Predominantly Connected Communities

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Michael; Wagner, Dorothea

    2013-01-01

    We consider communities whose vertices are predominantly connected, i.e., the vertices in each community are stronger connected to other community members of the same community than to vertices outside the community. Flake et al. introduced a hierarchical clustering algorithm that finds such predominantly connected communities of different coarseness depending on an input parameter. We present a simple and efficient method for constructing a clustering hierarchy according to Flake et al. that supersedes the necessity of choosing feasible parameter values and guarantees the completeness of the resulting hierarchy, i.e., the hierarchy contains all clusterings that can be constructed by the original algorithm for any parameter value. However, predominantly connected communities are not organized in a single hierarchy. Thus, we develop a framework that, after precomputing at most $2(n-1)$ maximum flows, admits a linear time construction of a clustering $\\C(S)$ of predominantly connected communities that contains ...

  6. Control System interaction in the VSC-HVDC Grid Connected Offshore Wind Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Jakob Bærholm; Kocewiak, Łukasz Hubert; Hjerrild, Jesper;

    2015-01-01

    or converter interaction studies have therefore become an important part of the system design studies of a high voltage alternating current (HVAC) grid connected OWPP. The voltage sourced converter high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC) has become a preferred choice for grid connection of remotely located...... OWPPs. As for the HVAC grid connected OWPPs, there is a need to conduct harmonic stability studies in the design phase of an HVDC grid connected OWPP. As the offshore electrical environment is significantly altered compared to the offshore network in an HVAC connected OWPP, there is a need to define...... the procedure of the stability study and its application for the HVDC grid connected OWPPs. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the harmonic instability phenomena in HVDC grid connected OWPPs using both frequency and time domain simulations. A good correlation at lower frequencies between the two...

  7. Adaptive decoupled power control method for inverter connected DG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Tian, Yanjun; Chen, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The integration of renewable energy technology is making the power distribution system more flexible, but also introducing challenges for traditional technology. With the nature of intermittent and less inertial, renewable energy-based generations need effective control methods to cooperate...... an adaptive droop control method based on online evaluation of power decouple matrix for inverter connected distributed generations in distribution system. Traditional decoupled power control is simply based on line impedance parameter, but the load characteristics also cause the power coupling, and alter...

  8. Nocebo context modulates long-term habituation to heat pain and influences functional connectivity of the operculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Isabel; Wiehler, Antonius; Arndt, Manuela; May, Arne

    2015-11-01

    In the past, nocebo manipulations have been found to modulate pain perception and influence long-term habituation to pain. Recently, neural correlates accompanying this finding have been identified: habituation over days is mirrored by decreased activity in pain-processing brain areas, whereas nocebo-specific modulation specifically involves the opercular cortex. Focusing on duration and central network characteristics of nocebo information in a longitudinal heat pain paradigm, we investigated 40 healthy participants over a period of 21 consecutive days, whereof sessions on days 1, 8, 14, and 21 were performed during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Negative context information was given to half of the participants, inducing a nocebo manipulation through verbal suggestions. The analysis was focused on brain areas associated with habituation and nocebo effects and identified coupled brain regions using functional connectivity analysis. Decreased pain perception over days was reflected in reduced blood oxygenation level dependent signal in pain-processing areas, such as the insula and somatosensory cortices, whereas increased rostral anterior cingulate cortex activation reflected the central correlate for habituation over time. Habituation was significantly less pronounced in the nocebo group. Consistent with previous results, the nocebo manipulation not only modulated pain perception but also was accompanied by the activation of the operculum over an extended period of time. Importantly, the operculum exhibited changes in coupling during nociceptive input over time, as demonstrated by decreased connectivity with the basal ganglia and pinpoints differences, depending on whether a nocebo context was given. These data suggest that negative verbal suggestions prognosticating increasing pain may prevail by modulating basal ganglia-thalamocortical loops.

  9. Abnormal Connectional Fingerprint in Schizophrenia: A Novel Network Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin Thanarajah, Sharmili; Han, Cheol E; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Singer, Wolf; Deichmann, Ralf; Maurer, Konrad; Kaiser, Marcus; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The graph theoretical analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has received a great deal of interest in recent years to characterize the organizational principles of brain networks and their alterations in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. However, the characterization of networks in clinical populations can be challenging, since the comparison of connectivity between groups is influenced by several factors, such as the overall number of connections and the structural abnormalities of the seed regions. To overcome these limitations, the current study employed the whole-brain analysis of connectional fingerprints in diffusion tensor imaging data obtained at 3 T of chronic schizophrenia patients (n = 16) and healthy, age-matched control participants (n = 17). Probabilistic tractography was performed to quantify the connectivity of 110 brain areas. The connectional fingerprint of a brain area represents the set of relative connection probabilities to all its target areas and is, hence, less affected by overall white and gray matter changes than absolute connectivity measures. After detecting brain regions with abnormal connectional fingerprints through similarity measures, we tested each of its relative connection probability between groups. We found altered connectional fingerprints in schizophrenia patients consistent with a dysconnectivity syndrome. While the medial frontal gyrus showed only reduced connectivity, the connectional fingerprints of the inferior frontal gyrus and the putamen mainly contained relatively increased connection probabilities to areas in the frontal, limbic, and subcortical areas. These findings are in line with previous studies that reported abnormalities in striatal-frontal circuits in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, highlighting the potential utility of connectional fingerprints for the analysis of anatomical networks in the disorder.

  10. Spatial remapping of cortico-striatal connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; Derikx, Loes C; Bakker, Maaike; Scheeringa, René; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2010-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by striatal dopamine depletion, especially in the posterior putamen. The dense connectivity profile of the striatum suggests that these local impairments may propagate throughout the whole cortico-striatal network. Here we test the effect of striatal dopamine depletion on cortico-striatal network properties by comparing the functional connectivity profile of the posterior putamen, the anterior putamen, and the caudate nucleus between 41 PD patients and 36 matched controls. We used multiple regression analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to quantify functional connectivity across different networks. Each region had a distinct connectivity profile that was similarly expressed in patients and controls: the posterior putamen was uniquely coupled to cortical motor areas, the anterior putamen to the pre-supplementary motor area and anterior cingulate cortex, and the caudate nucleus to the dorsal prefrontal cortex. Differences between groups were specific to the putamen: although PD patients showed decreased coupling between the posterior putamen and the inferior parietal cortex, this region showed increased functional connectivity with the anterior putamen. We conclude that dopamine depletion in PD leads to a remapping of cerebral connectivity that reduces the spatial segregation between different cortico-striatal loops. These alterations of network properties may underlie abnormal sensorimotor integration in PD.

  11. Practical lessons in remote connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouroubali, A.; Starren, J.; Barrows, R. C.; Clayton, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Community Health Information Networks (CHINs) require the ability to provide computer network connections to many remote sites. During the implementation of the Washington Heights and Inwood Community Health Management Information System (WHICHIS) at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (CPMC), a number of remote connectivity issues have been encountered. Both technical and non-technical issues were significant during the installation. We developed a work-flow model for this process which may be helpful to any health care institution attempting to provide seamless remote connectivity. This model is presented and implementation lessons are discussed. PMID:9357643

  12. Framework for Connections on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    There is a substantial amount of current information systems and marketing research focused on social networking sites, most frequently on Facebook. Often, these studies utilize available metadata on user on-line behavior, such as what links the users clicked on. In order to better understand...... behavior of Facebook users, it makes sense to investigate also whom the users connect to. It is possible to hypothesize that behavior of people, who connect only to relatives on Facebook, differs from behavior of people, who are connected only to their classmates. The paper offers a framework of Facebook...

  13. Characteristics of implant-CAD/CAM abutment connections of two different internal connection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, T; Braian, M; Shimada, A; Shibata, N; Takeshita, K; Vandeweghe, S; Coelho, P G; Wennerberg, A; Jimbo, R

    2012-05-01

    Titanium or zirconium computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing abutments are now widely used for aesthetic implant treatments; however, information regarding microscopic structural differences that may influence the biological and mechanical outcomes of different implant systems is limited. Therefore, the characteristics of different connection systems were investigated. Optical microscopic observation and scanning electron microscopy showed different characteristics of two internal systems, namely the Astra Tech and the Replace Select system, and for different materials. The scanning electron microscopic observation showed for the Astra Tech that the implant-abutment interface seemed to be completely sealed for both titanium and zirconium abutments, both horizontally and sagittally; however, the first implant-abutment contact was below the fixture top, creating a microgap, and fixtures connected with titanium abutments showed significantly larger values (23·56μm±5·44 in width, and 168·78μm±30·39 in depth, P0·70), creating an inverted microgap. Thus, microscopy evaluation of two commonly used internal systems connected to titanium or zirconium abutments showed that the implant-abutment interface was perfectly sealed under no-loading conditions. However, an inverted microgap was seen in both systems, which may result in bacterial accumulation as well as alteration of stress distribution at the implant-abutment interface.

  14. Geographical imagination and technological connectivity in East Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Mark; Andersen, Casper; Mann, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses and compares two transformative moments of technologically-mediated change in East Africa, the construction of the Uganda railway between Mombasa and Lake Victoria (1896-1903) and the introduction of fibre-optic cables that landed into the ports of Dar Es Salaam and Mombasa...... in 2009. It uses discourse analysis to examine how technologically-mediated connectivity has been represented by political and economic actors during these transformative moments. In both cases, we explore the origins of the expectations of connectivity and the hope and fear associated with them. Building...... on Massey’s notion of power-geometry and Sheppard’s concept of positionality the paper focuses on power relationships in discussions of connectivity and asks how people understand the abilities of transformative technologies to modify positionalities and alter relational distance and proximity. Ultimately...

  15. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in motor and association networks in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann K. Shinn

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating illness characterized by disturbances in multiple domains. The cerebellum is involved in both motor and non-motor functions, and the cognitive dysmetria and dysmetria of thought models propose that abnormalities of the cerebellum may contribute to schizophrenia signs and symptoms. The cerebellum and cerebral cortex are reciprocally connected via a modular, closed-loop network architecture, but few schizophrenia neuroimaging studies have taken into account the topographical and functional heterogeneity of the cerebellum. In this study, using a previously defined 17-network cerebral cortical parcellation system as the basis for our functional connectivity seeds, we systematically investigated connectivity abnormalities within the cerebellum of 44 schizophrenia patients and 28 healthy control participants. We found selective alterations in cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity. Specifically, schizophrenia patients showed decreased cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in higher level association networks (ventral attention, salience, control, and default mode networks relative to healthy control participants. Schizophrenia patients also showed increased cerebro-cerebellar connectivity in somatomotor and default mode networks, with the latter showing no overlap with the regions found to be hypoconnected within the same default mode network. Finally, we found evidence to suggest that somatomotor and default mode networks may be inappropriately linked in schizophrenia. The relationship of these dysconnectivities to schizophrenia symptoms, such as neurological soft signs and altered sense of agency, is discussed. We conclude that the cerebellum ought to be considered for analysis in all future studies of network abnormalities in SZ, and further suggest the cerebellum as a potential target for further elucidation, and possibly treatment, of the underlying mechanisms and network abnormalities producing symptoms of

  16. Mundtlig eksamen via Adobe Connect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    I løbet af de sidste tre år har der på Syddansk Universitet (SDU) været afholdt mere end 20 mundtlige kandidatforsvar samt andre mundtlige eksaminationer via webkonferencesystemet Adobe Connect. Formålet med denne artikel er at videregive de praktiske erfaringer fra gennemførelsen af disse...... eksaminationer samt at opstille nogle hensigtsmæssige retningslinjer for dem, der ønsker at give sig i kast med mundtlig eksamination via Adobe Connect. Der indledes derfor med en generel præsentation af Adobe Connect samt de elementer ved systemet, som oftest anvendes i forbindelse med mundtlig eksamination...... mundtlige eksaminationer via Adobe Connect....

  17. THE EXISTENCE OF CONNECTING ORBITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,using the notion of an isolating block and Conley's attractor theory,an existence criterion of trajectories connecting a pair of invariant sets of ordinary differential equations is given.

  18. Connectivity threshold for Bluetooth graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Broutin, Nicolas; Fraiman, Nicolas; Lugosi, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    We study the connectivity properties of random Bluetooth graphs that model certain "ad hoc" wireless networks. The graphs are obtained as "irrigation subgraphs" of the well-known random geometric graph model. There are two parameters that control the model: the radius $r$ that determines the "visible neighbors" of each node and the number of edges $c$ that each node is allowed to send to these. The randomness comes from the underlying distribution of data points in space and from the choices of each vertex. We prove that no connectivity can take place with high probability for a range of parameters $r, c$ and completely characterize the connectivity threshold (in $c$) for values of $r$ close the critical value for connectivity in the underlying random geometric graph.

  19. Small vessel disease and cognitive impairment: The relevance of central network connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijmer, Yael D; Fotiadis, Panagiotis; Piantoni, Giovanni; Boulouis, Gregoire; Kelly, Kathleen E; Gurol, Mahmut E; Leemans, Alexander; O'Sullivan, Michael J; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-07-01

    Central brain network connections greatly contribute to overall network efficiency. Here we examined whether small vessel disease (SVD) related white matter alterations in central brain network connections have a greater impact on executive functioning than alterations in non-central brain network connections. Brain networks were reconstructed from diffusion-weighted MRI scans in 72 individuals (75 ± 8 years) with cognitive impairment and SVD on MRI. The centrality of white matter connections in the network was defined using graph theory. The association between the fractional anisotropy (FA) of central versus non-central connections, executive functioning, and markers of SVD was evaluated with linear regression and mediation analysis. Lower FA in central network connections was more strongly associated with impairment in executive functioning than FA in non-central network connections (r = 0.41 vs. r = 0.27; P 50%-10% connections). Higher SVD burden was associated with lower FA in central as well as non-central network connections. However, only central network FA mediated the relationship between white matter hyperintensity volume and executive functioning [change in regression coefficient after mediation (95% CI): -0.15 (-0.35 to -0.02)]. The mediation effect was not observed for FA alterations in non-central network connections [-0.03 (-0.19 to 0.04)]. These findings suggest that the centrality of network connections, and thus their contribution to global network efficiency, appears to be relevant for understanding the relationship between SVD and cognitive impairment. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2446-2454, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Connective tissue diseases in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, J; Tantcheva-Poór, I

    2016-04-01

    In this article we provide a brief review of systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, and mixed connective tissue disease in adolescents. As skin manifestations often belong to the presenting symptoms and may have a significant impact on the quality of life, dermatologists play an important role in the management of patients with connective tissue diseases. Early diagnosis and therapy onset are crucial for the patients' long-term outcome.

  1. Symmetries in Connection Preserving Deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Ormerod

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available e wish to show that the root lattice of Bäcklund transformations of the q-analogue of the third and fourth Painlevé equations, which is of type (A_2+A_1^{(1}, may be expressed as a quotient of the lattice of connection preserving deformations. Furthermore, we will show various directions in the lattice of connection preserving deformations present equivalent evolution equations under suitable transformations. These transformations correspond to the Dynkin diagram automorphisms.

  2. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  3. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bralten, Linda B. C.; French, Pim J., E-mail: p.french@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Neurology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Dr Molewaterplein 50, 3000 CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-07

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes.

  4. Strongly 2-connected orientations of graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    We prove that a graph admits a strongly 2-connected orientation if and only if it is 4-edge-connected, and every vertex-deleted subgraph is 2-edge-connected. In particular, every 4-connected graph has such an orientation while no cubic 3-connected graph has such an orientation....

  5. Mapping cortico-striatal connectivity onto the cortical surface: a new tractography-based approach to study Huntington disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Marrakchi-Kacem

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is associated with early and severe damage to the basal ganglia and particularly the striatum. We investigated cortico-striatal connectivity modifications occurring in HD patients using a novel approach which focuses on the projection of the connectivity profile of the basal ganglia onto the cortex. This approach consists in computing, for each subcortical structure, surface connectivity measures representing its strength of connections to the cortex and comparing these measures across groups. In this study, we focused on Huntington disease as an application of this new approach. First, surface cortico-striatal connectivity measures of a group of healthy subjects were averaged in order to infer the "normal" connectivity profile of the striatum to the cortex. Second, a statistical analysis was performed from the surface connectivity measures of healthy subjects and HD patients in order to detect the cortical gyri presenting altered cortico-striatal connectivity in HD. Lastly, percentage differences of connectivity between healthy subjects and patients were inferred, for each nucleus of the striatum, from the connectivity measures of the cortical gyri presenting a significant connectivity difference between the two groups. These percentage differences characterize the axonal disruptions between the striatum and the cortex occurring in HD. We found selective region-specific degeneration of cortical connections predominating for associative and primary sensorimotor connections and with relative preservation of limbic connections. Our method can be used to infer novel connectivity-based markers of HD pathological process.

  6. Muscle and tendon connective tissue adaptation to unloading, exercise and NSAID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Kasper

    2014-04-01

    The extracellular matrix network of skeletal muscle and tendon connective tissue is primarily composed of collagen and connects the muscle contractile protein to the bones in the human body. The mechanical properties of the connective tissue are important for the effectiveness of which the muscle force is transformed into movement. Periods of unloading and exercise affect the synthesis rate of connective tissue collagen protein, whereas only sparse information exits regarding collagen protein degradation. It is likely, though, that changes in both collagen protein synthesis and degradation are required for remodeling of the connective tissue internal structure that ultimately results in altered mechanical properties of the connective tissue. Both unloading and exercise lead to increased production of growth factors and inflammatory mediators that are involved in connective tissue remodeling. Despite the fact that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seem to inhibit the healing process of connective tissue and the stimulating effect of exercise on connective tissue protein synthesis, these drugs are often consumed in relation to connective tissue injury and soreness. However, the potential effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on connective tissue needs further investigation.

  7. Visualizing neuronal network connectivity with connectivity pattern tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilen Nordlie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex ideas are best conveyed through well-designed illustrations. Up to now, computational neuroscientists have mostly relied on box-and-arrow diagrams of even complex neuronal networks, often using ad hoc notations with conflicting use of symbols from paper to paper. This significantly impedes the communication of ideas in neuronal network modeling. We present here Connectivity Pattern Tables (CPTs as a clutter-free visualization of connectivity in large neuronal networks containing two-dimensional populations of neurons. CPTs can be generated automatically from the same script code used to create the actual network in the NEST simulator. Through aggregation, CPTs can be viewed at different levels, providing either full detail or summary information. We also provide the open source ConnPlotter tool as a means to create connectivity pattern tables.

  8. Monosynaptic functional connectivity in cerebral cortex during wakefulness and under graded levels of anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette A Vizuete

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The balance between excitation and inhibition is considered to be of significant importance for neural computation and cognitive function. Excitatory and inhibitory functional connectivity in intact cortical neuronal networks in wakefulness and graded levels of anesthesia has not been systematically investigated. We compared monosynaptic excitatory and inhibitory spike transmission probabilities using pairwise cross-correlogram analysis. Spikes were measured at 64 sites in the visual cortex of rats with chronically implanted microelectrode arrays during wakefulness and three levels of anesthesia produced by desflurane. Anesthesia decreased the number of active units, the number of functional connections, and the strength of excitatory connections. Connection probability (number of connections per number of active unit pairs was unaffected until the deepest anesthesia level, at which a significant increase in the excitatory to inhibitory ratio of connection probabilities was observed. The results suggest that the excitatory-inhibitory balance is altered at an anesthetic depth associated with unconsciousness.

  9. MedlinePlus Connect: Technical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Are Here: Home → MedlinePlus Connect → Technical Information URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/technical. ... on the How it Works page . Queries are URL-based. Connect uses the GET method not POST. ...

  10. Simulation of Local Blood Flow in Human Brain under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    In addition to the altered gravitational forces, specific shapes and connections of arteries in the brain vary in the human population (Cebral et al., 2000; Ferrandez et al., 2002). Considering the geometric variations, pulsatile unsteadiness, and moving walls, computational approach in analyzing altered blood circulation will offer an economical alternative to experiments. This paper presents a computational approach for modeling the local blood flow through the human brain under altered gravity. This computational approach has been verified through steady and unsteady experimental measurements and then applied to the unsteady blood flows through a carotid bifurcation model and an idealized Circle of Willis (COW) configuration under altered gravity conditions.

  11. Adolescent nicotine induces persisting changes in development of neural connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert F; McDonald, Craig G; Bergstrom, Hadley C; Ehlinger, Daniel G; Brielmaier, Jennifer M

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent nicotine induces persisting changes in development of neural connectivity. A large number of brain changes occur during adolescence as the CNS matures. These changes suggest that the adolescent brain may still be susceptible to developmental alterations by substances which impact its growth. Here we review recent studies on adolescent nicotine which show that the adolescent brain is differentially sensitive to nicotine-induced alterations in dendritic elaboration, in several brain areas associated with processing reinforcement and emotion, specifically including nucleus accumbens, medial prefrontal cortex, basolateral amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and dentate gyrus. Both sensitivity to nicotine, and specific areas responding to nicotine, differ between adolescent and adult rats, and dendritic changes in response to adolescent nicotine persist into adulthood. Areas sensitive to, and not sensitive to, structural remodeling induced by adolescent nicotine suggest that the remodeling generally corresponds to the extended amygdala. Evidence suggests that dendritic remodeling is accompanied by persisting changes in synaptic connectivity. Modeling, electrophysiological, neurochemical, and behavioral data are consistent with the implication of our anatomical studies showing that adolescent nicotine induces persisting changes in neural connectivity. Emerging data thus suggest that early adolescence is a period when nicotine consumption, presumably mediated by nicotine-elicited changes in patterns of synaptic activity, can sculpt late brain development, with consequent effects on synaptic interconnection patterns and behavior regulation. Adolescent nicotine may induce a more addiction-prone phenotype, and the structures altered by nicotine also subserve some emotional and cognitive functions, which may also be altered. We suggest that dendritic elaboration and associated changes are mediated by activity-dependent synaptogenesis, acting in part

  12. Functional connectivity during rested wakefulness predicts vulnerability to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, B T Thomas; Tandi, Jesisca; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-05-01

    Significant inter-individual differences in vigilance decline following sleep deprivation exist. We characterized functional connectivity in 68 healthy young adult participants in rested wakefulness and following a night of total sleep deprivation. After whole brain signal regression, functionally connected cortical networks during the well-rested state exhibited reduced correlation following sleep deprivation, suggesting that highly integrated brain regions become less integrated during sleep deprivation. In contrast, anti-correlations in the well-rested state became less so following sleep deprivation, suggesting that highly segregated networks become less segregated during sleep deprivation. Subjects more resilient to vigilance decline following sleep deprivation showed stronger anti-correlations among several networks. The weaker anti-correlations overlapped with connectivity alterations following sleep deprivation. Resilient individuals thus evidence clearer separation of highly segregated cortical networks in the well-rested state. In contrast to corticocortical connectivity, subcortical-cortical connectivity was comparable across resilient and vulnerable groups despite prominent state-related changes in both groups. Because sleep deprivation results in a significant elevation of whole brain signal amplitude, the aforesaid signal changes and group contrasts may be masked in analyses omitting their regression, suggesting possible value in regressing whole brain signal in certain experimental contexts.

  13. Continuously Connected With Mobile IP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems developed Cisco Mobile Networks, making IP devices mobile. With this innovation, a Cisco router and its connected IP devices can roam across network boundaries and connection types. Because a mobile user is able to keep the same IP address while roaming, a live IP connection can be maintained without interruption. Glenn Research Center jointly tested the technology with Cisco, and is working to use it on low-earth-orbiting research craft. With Cisco's Mobile Networks functionality now available in Cisco IOS Software release 12.2(4)T, the commercial advantages and benefits are numerous. The technology can be applied to public safety, military/homeland security, emergency management services, railroad and shipping systems, and the automotive industry. It will allow ambulances, police, firemen, and the U.S. Coast Guard to stay connected to their networks while on the move. In the wireless battlefield, the technology will provide rapid infrastructure deployment for U.S. national defense. Airline, train, and cruise passengers utilizing Cisco Mobile Networks can fly all around the world with a continuous Internet connection. Cisco IOS(R) Software is a registered trademark of Cisco Systems.

  14. Identifying diagnostically-relevant resting state brain functional connectivity in the ventral posterior complex via genetic data mining in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Philip R; Curtis, Kaylah N; Patriquin, Michelle A; Wolf, Varina; Viswanath, Humsini; Shaw, Chad; Sakai, Yasunari; Salas, Ramiro

    2016-05-01

    Exome sequencing and copy number variation analyses continue to provide novel insight to the biological bases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The growing speed at which massive genetic data are produced causes serious lags in analysis and interpretation of the data. Thus, there is a need to develop systematic genetic data mining processes that facilitate efficient analysis of large datasets. We report a new genetic data mining system, ProcessGeneLists and integrated a list of ASD-related genes with currently available resources in gene expression and functional connectivity of the human brain. Our data-mining program successfully identified three primary regions of interest (ROIs) in the mouse brain: inferior colliculus, ventral posterior complex of the thalamus (VPC), and parafascicular nucleus (PFn). To understand its pathogenic relevance in ASD, we examined the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the homologous ROIs in human brain with other brain regions that were previously implicated in the neuro-psychiatric features of ASD. Among them, the RSFC of the VPC with the medial frontal gyrus (MFG) was significantly more anticorrelated, whereas the RSFC of the PN with the globus pallidus was significantly increased in children with ASD compared with healthy children. Moreover, greater values of RSFC between VPC and MFG were correlated with severity index and repetitive behaviors in children with ASD. No significant RSFC differences were detected in adults with ASD. Together, these data demonstrate the utility of our data-mining program through identifying the aberrant connectivity of thalamo-cortical circuits in children with ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 553-562. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The solar-stellar connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark S.

    2016-07-01

    A review of some principal results achieved in the area of stellar astrophysics with its origins in solar physics - the Solar-Stellar Connection - is presented from the perspective of an observational astronomer. The historical origins of the Solar-Stellar Connection are discussed followed by a review of key results from observations of stellar cycles analogous to the solar cycle in terms of parameters relevant to dynamo theory. A review of facets of angular momentum evolution and irradiance variations, each of which is determined by emergent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields, is given. Recent considerations of the impacts of stellar magnetic activity on the ambient radiative and energetic particle environment of the habitable zone of exoplanet systems are summarized. Some anticipated directions of the Solar-Stellar Connection in the new era of astronomy as defined by the advent of transformative facilities are presented.